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Chasing spirits Looking for ghosts at the Victoria Golf Club Page A3

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NEWS: Province to overhaul liquor licence rule /A4 ARTS: Celebrity art sale to help fix synagogue /A12 SPORTS: Glenylon runner sets course record /A22

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Ferries charts a new course The News embarks upon an investigation into corporation Dan Palmer News staff

When B.C. Ferries was made an independent company in 2003, the minister in charge heralded the move as a cost-saving measure. “(The province) wants B.C. Ferries to meet its potential, to sail on time, to have clean facilities, a good selection of food choices and friendly services and, of course, to remain affordable,” said then-transportation minister Judith Reid. But fares have remained anything but affordable, increasing by an average of 80 per cent in the past eight years. At the same time, the corporation is still losing money – $16 million last year alone. Facing an order from B.C. Ferry Commissioner Gord Macatee to Inside find $30 million from service cuts, the province will be gathering pub■ A sea of change lic input from communities that Page A8-A9 depend on ferry service as a lifeline, navigating the stormy waters of increasingly cash-strapped residents and frustrated commuters. It’s a crisis Macatee acknowledged in his January 2012 report on the Coastal Ferry Act. “Current ferry fares and the proposed increases have reached the tipping point of affordability and are imposing significant hardship on ferry dependent communities,” he said. As the provincial government launches its formal public consultation at coastalferriesengagement.ca, The News is taking a comprehensive look at B.C. Ferries in a four-part series. We’ll give an overview of the challenges that lie ahead in the wake of lower ridership, higher fares and year-over-year red ink on the company’s books. First, we’ll tell you how we got here and where your money goes. Next, we’ll explore the impact of increasing fares on the major routes between Vancouver Island and the mainland. Part three will look at the southern Gulf Islands and the potential impact of a looming reduction in sailings that will save an estimated $21 million. In our final piece, we’ll look to the future of B.C. Ferries and find out what it can do to stay afloat. dpalmer@vicnews.com

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Pumpkin carving 101 Dressed as Lalaloopsy dolls, Rylieh Legault, 7, struggles to make the first cut on a pumpkin with sister, Bella, 5, at the Vic West Halloween Fun Fest at the Vic West Community Centre on Sunday. The event also featured a costume parade, Halloween craft-making, safety tips and face painting, among other activities.

Medical street team work pays off Five years since its inception, VICOT boasts significant results in the city Roszan Holmen News staff

Four months in hospital. That’s the average total length of time some of Victoria’s most vulnerable people spend in an acute-care bed

over the course of one year. The estimated cost to the health care system of that care: $97,000 per person. This is only one of the costs associated with the standard approach to the homeless, mentally ill and addicted. A newer approach, however, is showing it can bring these numbers down significantly. Five years since it launched, the Victoria Integrated Community Outreach Team has published its first set of data showing results over three years.

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“It’s been so successful,” said Joe Power, manager of mental health and addictions with the Vancouver Island Health Authority, one of the team’s funders. VICOT is an interdisciplinary team providing intensive, collaborative support to the region’s most street-entrenched population. Last week its 2011 annual report was made public. PLEASE SEE: Street community, Page A6

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VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

www.vicnews.com • A3

Delving into

DARKNESS V

ictoria Golf Club wears Perhaps the best-known guest its history in a mantle of of the club, however, was never weathered brick, leaded famous in life. Doris Gravlin was carriage lights and elegant 30 years old when she went for woodwork. It’s quiet, dignified and quite a walk on the course with her exclusive. The club, after all, used the estranged husband, Victor, on the traditional black ball system to vet new night of Sept. 22, 1936. Her beaten members for more than 100 years and its body was discovered on the ocean660 golfing members are still a fairly elite side seventh fairway five days later. group. Four weeks later, Victor’s drowned Still, it’s not the living golfers that corpse was found floating in an offconcern me. I’ve come to determine if shore kelp bed. the club has some The apparent murder-suicide might with chills. uninvited, less have been forgotten had Doris not reputIn a most disturbcorporeal guests. edly returned to haunt the golf course in ing occurrence, I feel as It all began as a bit a series of well-documented sightings that though I walk through a of a lark. I was asked continue to this day. spider’s web. Investigator to set up a feature A cynic by nature, I still feel an inexpli- Ed Sum sees me repeatstory, wherein a cable sense of apprehension as the team edly running my hands famous haunting sets up its equipment. They’re bright, over my head and asks spot is checked enthusiastic and perfectly normal folks: if I have “that cobwebby out just before well-educated and not at all flighty. Still, feeling.” Halloween. Do the they believe in the paranormal and claim I wonder how he knows. investigation and to have had real experiences of spiri- “People get that feeling Tim Collins write up a fun feature tual contact. What if my cynicism is mis- when there’s paranormal Reporting for the holiday. placed, I worry. energy in the room,” Sum But things took an As the evening progresses into night, says. “This place has a lot. Tim Collins/News staff unexpected turn as I did the background I follow behind the investigators as they Don’t worry, you get used for the story. I talked to staff at the club slowly walk the halls. The lights have been to it.” I opt to leave the Above and inset: is it a ghostly apparition, or merely and while some were dismissive, others extinguished and the stately clubhouse basement for a while, but a reflection? (Below) Susanne Gilby, left, and Yvonne grew very sombre, recounting their own has taken on a decidedly eerie feel. The the feeling persists for the Fried set up equipment in the Victoria Golf Club’s dining room. strange experiences inside the building. two-storey downstairs locker rooms turn rest of the night. Then I talked to John Adams, Victoria’s out to be a warren of well appointed hallAs dawn nears, the resident expert on ghostly legends. “It’s ways and alcoves leading to even more group wraps up and we make our way in very haunted there,” he warned me. “You cubbyholes and dead ends. One of the the cold and moonless night across the may not believe . . . I didn’t at first, but investigators, medium Karen Bellas-de wet grass to the seventh fairway in search over the years . . . I don’t know. There’s Zwart, stops suddenly. “I don't like this of Doris’ disembodied spirit, but she fails something there.” room,” she whispers. “There’s a lot of sad- to appear. We say our goodbyes and I Footfalls at night in an empty building? It’s dark, and a misty rain hangs in ness here. And I can feel movement.” start the drive home only to find myself Objects moved in the dead of night? the night air as I wait for checking the rearview The foyer piano playing notes with no Susanne Gilby and her mirror to ensure that I’ve one around? Some of these stories crew to arrive at the elegot no unwanted passenhave become a part of the folklore of gant front entrance to the gers in the back seat. I the staff at the club. golf club, on the Oak Bay notice the feeling of cobHere’s a few more: waterfront. webs across my face is Gilby is head of the gone. ■ As the last two staff members left ParanormalVictoriaInvesPARAVI’s report on the for the night, the mantle clock near the tigations and Research night lists a series of submain entrance began to chime. The Society (PARAVI), whose jective occurrences. Jac chimes had never before functioned. A members kindly agreed Andre reports hearing a subsequent inspection by a clockmaker to conduct the ghost hunt whispered voice and the found that the sounding mechanism – in fact they were thrilled discovery of an inexpliwas fused, rendering the clock with the opportunity. cable sprinkling of ice incapable of chiming. When they roll up with on a downstairs carpet suitcases of cameras, dighours after the building ■ A food worker was last in the ital recorders and maghad been closed and kitchen, cleaning after an event. netic field meters, it’s vacated. Bellas-de Zwort The building was locked. Suddenly a apparent that they're takreports feeling somesingle cherry tomato rolled out of the ing things very seriously. thing touch her hair and darkness to stop at the man’s feet. We enter the silent buildthe clear presence of an The worker left the building and never ing and immediately I feel entity with “much sadreturned. Sharon Tiffin/News staff ness.” All the investigaa chill. It’s probably the Victoria historian and ghost-tour guide John Adams, sitting in the tor’s reports recount rain, I tell myself. ■ The last staffer in the building went We’re in an old build- apparently haunted Minstrel’s Gallery in the Fireside Grill restaurant strange sounds and feelto the locker areas to ensure that ing, yet not as old as the in Saanich, acknowledges spirits visit Victoria Golf Club in Oak Bay. ings but the final analyall doors and windows were locked club that was founded in sis of the film and sound and the lights turned off. He returned 1893. The clubhouse was built in 1928 Several times team members stop at so- recordings is still underway. upstairs, but a moment later heard a and soon after burned to the ground, but called psychic hot spots to invite contact One strange anomaly has surfaced, sound from the lower levels. Returning was rebuilt on the site later that year. An from whatever entity might be lurking though. A series of photos, all taken downstairs, he found that every light ominous beginning. about. I actually find myself listening for within seconds of each other, has one was back on and all windows and The building has hosted its share of responses. Increasingly spooked by the shot in which a bulletin board appears doors were open. luminaries: Rudyard Kipling, Bob Hope, experience, I feel the hair at the back of to have a framed picture mounted in its Bing Crosby, the Prince of Wales (later to my neck rise. I round a corner and come centre. The picture appears in only one of be King Edward VIII), Ben Hogan and a face-to-face with a horrid visage that looks the series of photos. All the others show that ice come from? host of others. They all played the course as shocked as I feel, my heart thumps as I the same board empty of any postings. Then I remember what John Adams and relaxed in this very building. In the realize it’s a floor to ceiling mirror. Strange, indeed. said about how “we don’t want to believe, gloom, I can almost see their shadows Do I believe in ghosts? No . . . but then but there’s something there.” Later, I clearly hear footsteps down the moving through the front doors and into hall, but discover that no one is there. I there was that cobwebby feeling, and the Perhaps there is. the darkened foyer. put it off to imagination, but it leaves me question of those photos. And where did reporter@vicnews.com

Haunted tales from the Victoria Golf Club


A4 • www.vicnews.com FUTURE SHOP – Correction Notice We would like to clarify the Fido LG Optimus L7 (WebCode: 10206957) found on page 11 of the October 26 flyer. Please be advised that this phone is offered on a 2-year voice and data activation plan and IS NOT offered without a data plan, as previously advertised. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

Liquor branch says ‘minor’ changes led to denial of permit for Belfry Daniel Palmer

Applications/Nominations for Membership Water Advisory Committee

The minister responsible for liquor in B.C. has promised to take a “common sense” approach and repeal a law that shut down a local arts fundraiser. The Belfry Theatre was forced to cancel its annual Crush wine auction, scheduled for Oct. 28, after being denied a special occasion licence 10 days previous. At the time, the theatre was told provincial regulations prohibit the auctioning of alcohol unless it is first purchased directly from a government branch or agent. On Friday, Energy and Mines Minister Rich Coleman announced charities can still auction gift baskets containing alcohol.

News staff

Meetings are held at 9 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month at CRD Integrated Water Services office, 479 Island Highway, Victoria, BC. Appointments will be for a two (2) year term commencing January 2013. Send us a one-page summary telling about yourself, your area of expertise, which interest group you represent and why you would like to serve on the committee. Deadline for receipt of applications is November 2, 2012. For a copy of the Terms of Reference contact CRD at the address below or visit our website: www.crd.bc.ca/water/administration/ advisorycommittee.htm. Mail, fax or email your application to: Water Advisory Committee CRD Integrated Water Services Phone: 250.474.9606 479 Island Highway Fax: 250.474.4012 Victoria, BC V9B 1H7 Email: water@crd.bc.ca

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But they will have to wait until the government repeals a key section of the law that was only recently applied to wine-only auctions. “Our goal is to get rid of these outdated liquor laws that unnecessarily restrict British Columbians and to regulate alcohol responsibly in the process,” Coleman said in a statement. Ivan Habel, general manager of the Belfry, said the announcement comes too late for his fundraiser, but he is happy the province is tackling the issue. “While placing wine in gift baskets may be the government’s temporary fix, it is certainly not a long-term solution for the sector,” Habel said in a statement. “We anxiously await further clarity on the auctioning of

wine as a fundraising activity, which is still prohibited.” Questions remain on why the policy governing charity wine auctions was revised nearly four months ago without charity consultation. A spokesperson for the Liquor Control and Licensing Board said a policy directive was not issued at the time “because the law and policy remained the same.” But a May 2012 version of the special occasion licence policy manual reveals significant revisions were made to the sections governing charitable donations and wine auctions in June. In the older manual, section 4.6 stated: “Liquor, including donated liquor, may be auctioned at a licensed special occasion to raise funds for charity.”

The revised manual states: “Only liquor which has been purchased by the SOL holder or liquor which has been donated by a manufacturer or agent, may be auctioned at a licensed special occasion to raise funds for a registered charity.” An additional revision (section 4.4) states that only a liquor manufacturer or agent can donate alcohol for charity events. The word “only” does not appear in the earlier version. A ministry spokesperson responded to requests for comment on the policy change by saying the changes were “minor.” “We had some queries and we wanted to make sure the policy was clear.” the spokesperson said. dpalmer@vicnews.com

Sleeping it off fails to work for morning-after driver A routine speed trap in the 3000-block of Blanshard St. resulted in a Delta man’s arrest for drunk driving on Thursday. A 2002 Ford Explorer was pulled over for travelling 75

km/h around 10 a.m.. Victoria police officers at the roadblock noticed the smell of alcohol on the driver’s breath. The 55-year-old man said he had been drinking the previ-

ous evening, but assumed he was sober after sleeping it off. The suspect driver blew in the warning range on two screening devices and he was issued a three-day driving suspension.

His vehicle was also impounded. “Just because you’ve slept, doesn’t mean you’ve slept it off,” VicPD Const. Andy Dunstan said. dpalmer@vicnews.com

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Province promises to change liquor policy

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The Capital Regional District (CRD) invites applications/ nominations from residents interested in sitting on the Water Advisory Committee to provide advice on water supply, water quality, the stewardship of the lands held by the CRD for water supply purposes and water conservation measures. There are vacancies for members representing Fish Habitat, Resident/ Ratepayers Associations, and Other organizations.

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www.vicnews.com • A5

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

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Harbour authority aiming for another record season Speeding in neighbourhood was reduced Daniel Palmer News staff

The departure of the last cruise ship at Ogden Point last week capped a record-breaking year. But the increase in traffic continues to be watched closely by area residents. In total, 503,675 passengers on 224 vessels arrived in Victoria between April and October, according to the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority. “The significant growth in cruise (business) over the past 10 years has brought many benefits for the community,” said Sonterra Ross, the authority’s chief operating officer. The 2013 season will see the visit of the first Solstice-class vessel, a massive 315-metre ship that carries 2,850 passengers. The largest ship this season was 296 metres in length. GVHA’s speeding reduction program, which temporarily suspends Ogden Point licences for lead-footed taxi drivers, has also shown early

signs of success. Ross said 15 drivers had their licences pulled for three days after being caught exceeding the speed limit by commissionaires. “Early analysis shows that speeding was reduced,” said Marg Gardiner, James Bay Neighbourhood Association president, adding the numbers apply to all traffic on Montreal Street, not just taxis. She plans to release a full seasonal traffic analysis at the association’s Nov. 14 meeting. Gardiner said an average of 350 taxis and 40 tour buses make their way through James Bay with every cruise ship arrival. “On three or five cruise-ship days, that’s a lot more traffic,” she said. Ross said the GVHA has just concluded a market assessment of future business and early signs point to growth in the cruise industry. “We’re looking at the 10-, 20-, 25-year outlook,” she said, adding any potential berth expansion would take place over a similar time frame. dpalmer@vicnews.com

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Fraudster Thow granted parole Convicted financial criminal Ian Thow is out of prison, but must abide by several conditions. In 2010, the former financial advisor was convicted of defrauding 21 clients, including eight in Greater Victoria. His victims lost a total of $8 million. He was sentenced to nine years, minus two years for time served. Last week, the National Parole Board granted Thow full parole. Thow must now provide financial

information to his parole supervisor; he must inform his supervisor before residing with another person in an intimate relationship; he must be employed, upgrading his credentials or searching for employment; and he must get psychological counselling. In January 2012, the board denied Thow’s application for parole after finding he lacked remorse and displayed a sense of entitlement. rholmen@vicnews.com

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A6 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

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think about police calls as being a negative encounter,” she said. “The The numbers show that before one thing that has changed … is that being referred to VICOT, an average some of the clients are seeing posiclient spent a total of 121 days in an tive encounters with police – perhaps acute care bed over 12 months. they’re calling in to report crimes.” In the first year of support, that Despite its successes, VICOT faces number dropped to some ongoing chalan average of 35 days. lenges. In the second year, it Finding housing for dropped even further, clients is a constant VICOT clients’ average to 11 days. struggle, Chyzowski use of services in the Multiplied over 65 said. 12 months before and clients – VICOT’s aver“Any change in indiafter being referred to age caseload – the savvidual’s lives is not the support program: ings to the health-care going to be significant ■ From 95 to 31 – system equals roughly unless somebody has number of calls logged $6 million per year. a roof over their head to police “What this doesn’t first and can create ■ From 121 to 35: capture is emergency some stability in their number of days spent room visits and ambulives,” she said. “Tryin acute care lance rides – so (there ing to change a drug are) significant savings, addiction problem … hence the justification when somebody is livfor these teams,” Power said. ing on the street is near impossible.” VICOT comprises a team of 12 Another challenge is tracking. people, including nurses, outreach To date there has been no comworkers, social workers, a probation prehensive analysis of the costs and officer, a police officer and a Minis- benefits of the program over time. try of Social Development assistance “We’re in the process of gatherworker. ing the longitudinal, the evaluational They share an office and meet daily data,” Power said. “Information and to share information about clients. data gathering is always a challenge In the first year, clients’ lives stabi- (with limited staff resources).” lize as they build a relationship with For instance, the total cost of the their team. In year two, they begin 12-member team isn’t known, but the rehabilitation process, Power elsewhere, similar teams have a budsaid. get of $1.4 million. The annual report also presents Also not tracked is client progress data about police intervention. after graduating from VICOT’s supPolice calls related to VICOT cli- port program. ents dropped from 95 in the year “What we hope to find, and we before their acceptance into the pro- expect to find, is that a certain subset gram to 31 the following year. of the clients will no longer need the The types of police calls also services of the team at some point changed, said Trudy Chyzowski, and will become productive memVICOT team leader. bers of society,” Power said. “I think sometimes we always rholmen@vicnews.com Continued from Page A1

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Randall Garrison, MP ESQUIMALT–JUAN DE FUCA ADDRESS:

A2–100 Aldersmith Pl, Victoria, BC V9A 7M8 250-405-6550 FAX: 250-405-6554 EMAIL: Randall.Garrison@parl.gc.ca WEB: www.randallgarrison.ndp.ca PHONE:


VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

www.vicnews.com • A7


A8 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

SPECIAL REPORT: ROUGH SEAS A four-part series on B.C. Ferries

Don Denton/News staff

A passenger walks up the passageway to Berth No. 5 at B.C. Ferries’ Tsawwassen terminal to wait for the arrival of the ferry from Swartz Bay on Vancouver Island. In the background a ferry heads out on the Tsawwassen-Duke Point run.

A sea of change B.C. Ferries at ‘tipping point’ of affordability: commissioner Part 1 Daniel Palmer News staff

I

f there is one collective cry from the three major stakeholders in B.C. Ferries, it is this: Things need to change. The independent B.C. Ferry Commission, the two-man office tasked with providing oversight and regulation to North America’s largest ferry service, has declared a “tipping point” in affordability, recognizing that the $2.5 billion needed for ferry replacement over the next decade needs to be accompanied by a longer-term vision than business as usual. In the meantime, fares will continue to rise – capped at 12 per cent over the next three years – to help meet the bottom line in the wake of a 13-year low in vehicle traffic and a 21-year low in ridership. Many of the residents who depend on the 25 coastal routes believe it’s an issue of simple mathematics: lower the fares and

ridership will increase. Tempting as this theory seems, it doesn’t tell the entire story. B.C. Ferry Commissioner Gord Macatee spent most of last year consulting with more than 30 coastal communities before setting the maximum fare increases and instructing the ferry corporation to find $54 million in efficiencies. While he sympathizes with the added financial burden to taxpayers, he agrees that there is a “huge risk” with cutting fares to stimulate higher ridership. Macatee said the drop in marine ferry traffic is roughly equivalent to that seen on free-of-charge B.C. inland ferries, those that connect the highway system throughout the Interior. And the much-publicized CoastSaver program, where weekend fares on the major routes were reduced in May and June, failed to produce any increase in ridership from the previous year. “It’s hard to refute the fact that a 30-per-cent price reduction didn’t result in any lift in ridership,” he said. “And if ridership doesn’t rise, the company is in trouble.”

Timeline: A short history of B.C. Ferries

1960 B.C. Ferries’ first route is created, running between Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen and using just two vessels.

1960-1970 B.C. Ferries takes over operations of the Black Ball Line and other major private companies providing vehicle ferry service between Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland.

Late 1950s A strike by employees of the Black Ball Line causes the provincial government to decide that the coastal ferry service in B.C. needs to be government-owned.

Mid-1980s B.C. Ferries takes control of operations of the saltwater branch of the B.C. Ministry of Transportation and Highways, which runs ferry services to small coastal communities.

Mid-1960s The ferry system expands and begins servicing other small coastal communities. B.C. Ferries builds more vessels, many of them in the first five years of its operations, to keep up with the demand.

1998-2000 The “fast cat” program is launched in 1998, with three catamaran ferries built for the major routes. The program is mired in political scandal.


www.vicnews.com • A9

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Since 2003, provincial legislation binds the publicly owned but privately run corporation to deliver a minimum number of sailings on each route. Hours of operation, minimum capacity and frequency and number of trips are all dictated by a core service agreement between B.C. Ferries and the province. It prevents the corporation from easily reacting to lower ridership, but it’s meant to ensure the corporation stays anchored in its founding notion. “People still need to have the ability to get to work, get to school, buy their groceries, get their supplies,” Macatee said. Transportation Minister Mary Polak announced on Monday that a formal public consultation on the future of coastal ferry service will run until Dec. 21. It will result in $30 million in service cuts over the next three years. “We intend to make (the consultation) as broad as possible,” she said. Town hall meetings are being held in 30 communities across B.C., and feedback forms can also be submitted online at coast ferriesengagement.ca. Polak’s office has already identified $9 million in sailing cutbacks on the major routes between Vancouver Island and the mainland. That means another $21 million must be trimmed from among the money-losing minor routes of the Gulf Islands and the North. “It’s very difficult to take a look at specific sailings and try to surgically make changes to ones that are not reaching their capacity, because you have issues like labour agreements and fuel costs. You can’t simply flip a switch and have a ferry turn on and off,” Polak said. Eighty per cent of B.C. Ferries’ expenses are comprised of fuel and labour costs. The price of marine diesel has risen nearly 150 per cent since 2004 and ate up $121 million of the 2012 budget. The volatility of the “dirty” fuel compelled Macatee to push B.C. Ferries on alternative energy sources. “Liquified natural gas (LNG) is abundant in B.C.; it’s very low-cost and environmentally superior,” he said. The company estimates it would reduce its fuel costs by 60 per cent with a switch to LNG.

Did you know? The Sidney-Anacortes ferry, operated by Washington State Ferries, costs $47.90 US each way for a driver and vehicle, the equivalent of about $16 less than the Swartz Bay-Tsawwassen run on B.C. Ferries. The Washington ferry takes about three hours and adds about 100 kilometres of drive time, depending on where you’re travelling to on the mainland. It also requires two border crossings, which can be unpredictable for wait times. In the fall and winter seasons, only one ferry leaves the Island via Sidney, at noon, and return trips take place once a day at 8:30 a.m. A bonus for SmartCar drivers: The SidneyAnacortes ferry is even cheaper at only $38.35 US for a driver and vehicle. B.C. Ferries does not have reduced rates for SmartCar drivers, who have to pay the standard $64.10 one-way rate. – Daniel Palmer Don Denton/News staff

The B.C. Ferries vessel Spirit of British Columbia arrives in Tsawwassen. But the expense and time commitment of retrofitting mid-life ships means that only the 11 vessels slated for replacement in the coming decade will be considered. Macatee said fuel savings can still be found with careful scrutiny. B.C. Ferries saved 700,000 more litres of fuel last year by making simple changes like reducing idling time and reducing the speed of ships. “When you pay attention to things, you find a way to save.” Efficiencies in labour costs could prove more difficult in the coming years. Public outcry over ex-CEO David Hahn’s salary, bonuses and pension prompted a legislative change that means new executives will receive compensation

more in line with senior public sector managers. B.C. Ferries’ executive team was trimmed from 17 to nine positions in 2008, but unionized labour positions aren’t likely to change, with only a 0.5-per-cent reduction in employee numbers since 2003. Transport Canada regulations require a set number of employees on each vessel based on maximum passenger capacity, which is a big factor in the $257 million spent each year on labour. “A lot of people acknowledge that there’s a lot of overtime ... and that’s one area that needs to be looked at, along with management,” said Gary Coons, NDP ferry critic. While management positions have ballooned from 261 to 594 in the past nine years, it doesn’t tell the entire story.

OUR TEAM

“These are positions such as senior chief engineers, chief engineers and senior chief stewards, so they are not new positions to the company,” said B.C. Ferries spokesperson Deborah Marshall. The management jobs were converted from union to exempt positions, she said. Polak said she has been impressed with the ideas coming forward from coastal communities in the early stages of consultation, particularly with developing a long-term vision for B.C. Ferries. “Many of them have already been giving a lot of thought to potential solutions, ideas like the use of water taxis or the use of passenger-only ferries,” she said. But a new plan is a long way from completion. dpalmer@vicnews.com

Kevin Laird Project editor

Don Descoteau Copy editor

Don Denton Photo editor

Daniel Palmer Reporter

UP NEXT: The concerns of southern Gulf Islands communities

2003 The province announces that B.C. Ferries, which had been in debt, will be reorganized into a private corporation, with the government the sole shareholder.

2011 B.C. Ferries reports a loss of $16.5 million due to falling ridership, with vehicle traffic dropping 3.5 per cent and passenger traffic 2.8 per cent. Critics point to increased fares as causing the reductions.

2004 Controversy hits in July when B.C. Ferries announces it has disqualified all Canadian bids to build three new Coastal-class ships, and that only proposals from European shipyards are being considered. The contract is estimated at $542 million for the three ships. The first ship, Coastal Renaissance, enters service in March 2008.

AUGUST 2012 B.C. Ferries announces it will cut 98 round trips on its major routes starting in the fall as part of a four-year plan to save $1 million on these routes.

OCTOBER 2012 B.C. Ferries plans to raise ferry fares by 4.1 percent in 2013 and expects to have similar increases in each of the next three years.

Source: B.C. government, B.C. Ferries, Black Press


A10 • www.vicnews.com

VICTORIANEWS

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Victoria News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-381-3484 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Latest quake a wake-up call The 7.7-magnitude earthquake and resulting aftershocks, based below and around Haida Gwaii, left many residents of coastal B.C. wondering what would happen next. While the end result saw little to no damage done, even in the areas most at risk for a tsunami, we hope the province learned some lessons from this latest close call. One of the biggest was that people need to know where to turn for the best information in the event of a potential or real disaster. Twitter and Facebook – both prone to the spread of unsubstantiated rumours – may not be the best source for accurate details, especially early on in an emergency. The province’s emergency information website, a logical place to turn for up-to-date information, besides local radio, appeared to be overwhelmed with the high volume of traffic. That left residents of Tofino and other coastal communities on Vancouver Island, including those in Greater Victoria, worried about the potential risk and looking for instructions. Justice Minister Shirley Bond defended the province’s response and said the southwest coast of Vancouver Island wasn’t under immediate threat from a tsunami. Nonetheless, people were left wondering what they should do. Part of the problem stems from a lack of understanding around the terminology used. The meaning of such terms as warning, alert and advisory could be made more clear to the average person. The City of Victoria issued a tsunami “advisory” late Saturday, asking people to avoid entering the ocean and move away from beaches or docks. By comparison, residents in Haida Gwaii and the North Coast were given tsunami “warnings” Sunday following aftershocks from the big quake. When it comes to emergency information, confusion in the minds of the public leads to panic, which doesn’t help facilitate an orderly response. We don’t need to get paranoid about the potential for disaster to strike. But this latest scenario offered yet another wake-up call to at least have a plan in place before it’s too late. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Victoria News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2009 WINNER

Little new in B.C. Liberal renewal B.C. Liberal delegates gathered the taxes of private sector workers for their convention on the who in many cases have no pension weekend at the Chateau Whistler, plan at all. the same luxury hotel There was talk of where Gordon Campbell passing a law that all new fired up the troops in 2008. public sector hires be Back then the restricted to a “defined advertising slogan contribution” plan was “Keep BC Strong.” where the employee and Unveiled at Premier employer contribute Christy Clark’s pre-election equally and the pension pep rally: “Together. is based on what those Building BC.” contributions yield. This slight change hints This would provoke at the big difference. Tom Fletcher the mother of all Campbell led a frontconfrontations with B.C. Views running party to a third the B.C. Federation of straight majority, while Labour, but there was Clark is a struggling underdog no evidence yet that this is going pleading for unity to turn back an beyond the talking stage. NDP tsunami. The resolutions continued the Hence “Free Enterprise Friday,” theme of confronting the labour a discussion open to non-party movement, ritual combat that members. Clark began with an seems to be an inescapable part of upbeat speech urging party B.C. elections. members to “reach out our arms, Delegates passed two motions, open the tent and be as big as we one calling for public sector unions can possibly be.” to disclose what they spend on So did they? Dashing between salaries, political activities and three concurrent sessions, I missed lobbying, and another advocating a fair amount of it, but there were a ban on unions spending some provocative suggestions to compulsory dues on political appeal to those inclined to support campaigns. the resurgent B.C. Conservatives. This is a pet project of Nechako An accountant spoke to a packed Lakes MLA John Rustad, whose room about the growing unfunded constituency sponsored both liability of public sector pensions, motions. Rustad presented a most of which are still of the private member’s bill last year to “defined benefit” variety. Based require detailed disclosure, but it on bond interest rates that have was left to die on the order paper. since sunk to all-time lows, these Like all the policy resolutions government-guaranteed pensions debated at the convention, these are now a free ride for those lucky ideas are not binding on the enough to have them, funded by government. Again, there is no

actual change on the horizon. Delegates rejected another motion that would have made membership in the B.C. Teachers’ Federation optional. This would have been a declaration of war on B.C.’s most militant union, just as Clark and Education Minister Don McRae embark on a long-shot bid to end the decades of confrontation that have defined that relationship since teachers were relegated to the industrial union model of labour relations. There was a brief debate on a motion to scrap the carbon tax, sponsored by northern members who see it as unfairly punitive on those who endure cold weather and long highway drives for themselves and the goods they need to have trucked in. This was rejected too, after delegates were reminded that the tax now takes in more than $1 billion annually that is used to reduce business and personal income taxes. Scrapping it would amount to announcing acrossthe-board income tax hikes, contradicting 12 years of B.C. Liberal policy just before an election. The good news for Clark is that the 2012 convention was a highenergy, well-attended event that contradicts the notion of a party in disarray. The bad news is nothing has really changed. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘The resolutions continued the theme of confronting the labour movement.’


www.vicnews.com • A11

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

OPINION

Ca rv

Region backpedaling headlong to tax ruin A story about the future of taxpayer is more than a cycling on the $220-million little nervous about current needed to complete cycling and proposed projects and paths in the Capital Region ballooning costs, and lack of is generating plenty of fiscal restraint and oversight. debate, especially among the On March 15, Victoria struggling working poor, the councillors approved a staff unemployed and one-parent recommendation to increase families. the budget for Stan Bartlett the new Johnson The struggling Guest column business community Street Bridge to is concerned about $92.8 million, the impact on taxes. Here’s up $15.8 million from the another viewpoint on some $77 million calculated in of the current mega-projects June 2010. While costs are from a beleaguered taxpayer shared amongst three levels and a senior on fixed income. of government, the City of While I enjoy an occasional Victoria taxpayer pays for any spin, the idea of a lengthy cost overruns. commute to work or On top of this, Greater elsewhere is foreign to me. Victoria homeowners are Like the vast majority of the bracing to find out what the public, I have no inclination major increases will be to to dress in spandex, develop their annual property tax a skinny butt, race through bills, now that the federal and stop signs, or pound my provincial governments have testosterone-laced chest. recently committed their That said, I recognize share of the $782-million cost cycling is generally of building sewage treatment associated with improved infrastructure. health and well-being. Residents in the seven Mind you, reports on invested municipalities of overuse injuries to back Victoria, Saanich, Oak Bay, and neck, sexual impotence, Esquimalt, Langford, View exposure to air pollution, Royal and Colwood will have weather limitations, long, to absorb the tax hikes until impractical commutes or car the project is completed in collisions causing serious 2018. Of more concern is that injury or death suggest there local taxpayers will again get are downsides to covering to pick up any cost overruns. the entire region in bike At an estimated cost of paths at great cost for a few $950-million, a Light Rail thousand cyclists. Transit (LRT) system from At this point, the embattled downtown to Uptown and

then to West Shore has been recommended by the Victoria Regional Rapid Transit Project (VRRTP) and endorsed by the B.C. Transit and Capital Regional District boards and councils in the affected municipalities. The estimated cost and the business case has been submitted for funding under the Provincial Transit Plan. An alternative LRT view comes from the Capital Regional District Business and Residential Taxpayers Association (www.crdtaxpayers.com). They chronicle in detail the inflated ridership numbers, inaccurate cost projections and the ability of a small region of 360,000 people to pay for this. It’s unclear which taxpayer would pick up the cost overruns that seem to invariably accompany big projects. These mega-projects are planned during the most turbulent economic period in several generations. The downturn has resulted in thousands of job losses, including hundreds in Greater Victoria. During this period of restraint, the game plan should be to address only essential infrastructure and to make prudent decisions in a prioritized, disciplined fashion. More importantly, let some

of these projects play out and find out the real costs and tax implications. Although city hall doesn’t want to release an itemized list to the public, in Victoria alone, there’s an estimated $500-million infrastructure deficit that should be the priority. Capital city residents are already coping with significant power, water and other utility increases, something that seems to escape empire-building politicians and Capital Bike and Walk Society and Greater Victoria Cycling Coalition lobbyists. It’s time for taxpayers in the Capital to tell its several hundred politicians their limit has been reached. In the meantime a costshared and user-pay system is worth looking at for the spandex crowd: an annual lottery, some corporate private fundraising, or the introduction of mandatory licensing to include a skills course. Backpedal on this $220million dream – based on inflated bike path usage numbers – and stretch it over 50 years. Stan Bartlett is a retired journalist and a member of the Capital Regional District Business and Residential Taxpayers Association. He lives in Fairfield.

Readers respond: Ferry fares, city council control Ferry fares change islands’ demographic Re: Fantasies won’t keep ferries afloat (B.C. Views, Oct. 17) Tom Fletcher calls ferry subsidies “a welfare program for the reclusive and the rich.” Actually, it is high ferry fares that are turning our islands into summer homes for rich Albertans and Americans. Fifteen years ago, I lived on one of the small islands. The people I knew there were not reclusive and certainly weren’t rich. Like me, they were drawn by the community’s warmth, and strong sense of participation and responsibility. Residents enjoyed living closer to nature, in a place where community change moved at a digestible pace. Especially during the off-season, you knew your children were safe without having to shepherd them everywhere by car. Most families would have enjoyed a materially better standard of living in a city, but placed more value on living

in peaceful surroundings in a small, active community. The islands used to be an affordable and enjoyable destination for those who lived nearby. Another group that has lost out, though Fletcher never mentions them, are the many Vancouver Islanders and mainlanders who used to enjoy day or weekend trips to the nearby small islands. Remember those days? Now, a day trip from Victoria to Salt Spring can cost $75 for a family of four. Visiting Hornby Island could cost up to $116 (depending on children’s ages). The ferry service is indeed a part of the highway system. Or does Fletcher know of any other viable way to transport children to high schools, sick people to hospitals, to bring in police, to transport food and other necessities? It is Tom Fletcher’s fantasy that it’s a “financially illiterate cliché.” It is sad indeed that B.C.’s policies have contributed to re-creating the islands as vacation havens for the

wealthy from elsewhere. Grace Wyatt Victoria

Council’s weakness a head-scratcher Re: Council requests more oversight in bridge building (News, Sept. 28) This story about the Johnson Street bridge project tells a bizarre tale, suggesting that council has little authority over the bridge team. I thought that the bridge is in Victoria, on a street for which Victoria is responsible. I thought that the bridge replacement was initiated and authorized by council. Doesn’t council employ the team? Something’s missing. This appears to go with a recent article saying that Victoria council had to pass a motion requiring staff to advise council of every report they’ve received. Then backtracking somewhat due to volume. Isn’t reality that staff, including the bridge team, work for council, thus council

has full authority to direct their work and get reports from them? Yes, council could try to micro-manage and engage in other bad practices, but I think they have the legal right to do so. What’s going on? Keith Sketchley Saanich

Letters The News welcomes opinions and comments. Letters should discuss issues and stories covered in the News and be 300 words or less. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity. Mail: Letters to the Editor, Victoria News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 Fax: 250-386-2624 Email: editor@vicnews. com

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Vision Matters Dr. Stephen Taylor

Healthy Eyes. Doctor Delivered.

What is 20/20 vision? You may be pleased to hear that you have 20/20 vision and think you have perfect vision. But do you? Not necessarily. 20/20 only indicates how sharp or clear your vision is at a distance. Overall vision also includes peripheral awareness or side vision, eye coordination, depth perception, focussing ability and colour vision. 20/20 is the average visual clarity obtainable by normal healthy eyes. Since it is an average, it means that there are those that see better or worse than 20/20 and yet still have healthy eyes. 20/20 describes normal visual clarity or sharpness measured at a distance of 20 feet from an object. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. If you have 20/100 vision, it means that you must be as close as 20 feet to see what a person with normal vision can see at 100 feet. In the metric system, 6/6 is the equivalent of 20/20. The ability to see objects clearly is affected by many factors. Eye conditions like nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism or eye disease influence visual acuity. Most people with vision slightly below 20/20 function very well, whereas some people who have better than 20/20 feel their vision is not satisfactory. Everybody’s visual expectations are different and satisfactory vision is far more complex than just being able to see 20/20. If you feel your vision is not up to standard a comprehensive eye examination will identify causes that may affect your ability to see well. Optometrists may be able to prescribe glasses, contact lenses or other vision aids that will help improve your vision. If the reduced vision is due to an eye disease, the use of ocular medication or other treatment may be needed. If necessary, a referral to a specialist will be made if an eye disease is found which warrants further investigation.

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A12 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Area students raise $200K for Tour de Rock Esquimalt High’s campaign hits an all-time high Through bake sales, concerts, car washes, raffles and infamous head shaves, Greater Victoria students raised nearly $200,000 toward supporting kids with

cancer for the 2012 Canadian Cancer Society Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock campaign. Students at Reynolds secondary in Saanich topped the list of highest fundraisers, gathering $109,253 in just 12 days.

Esquimalt High collected more than $10,000, an alltime high for the school, according to teacher-sponsor Jonathan Schneider. Since its inception in 1998, the twoweek bicycle journey in which police officers ride the length of

Vancouver Island has raised $16.6 million for pediatric cancer research. This year’s grand total has yet to be announced, but is estimated at $1.1 million. Donations can still be made at tourderock.ca. editor@vicnews.com Sharon Tiffin/News staff

CORPORATION OF THE TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT 1229 Esquimalt Road Esquimalt, B.C. V9A 3P1 250-414-7100

NOTICE OF MEETINGS Monday, November 5th Regular Council 7 pm Council Chambers Wednesday, November 7th Arts, Culture and Special Events Advisory Committee 7 pm Council Chambers For further information, please call 250-414-7135 or our website @ www.esquimalt.ca/council

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Oct. 30th – Nov. 25th Café Gallery Arts Centre at Cedar Hill Cedar Hill Recreation Centre 3220 Cedar Hill Rd. The Community Arts Council of Greater Victoria presents an exhibit and sale of paintings by the Oak Bay Art Club. Original works in various mediums will be presented by a group of artists.

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Parish of St. Peter & St. Paul

Rev. Lon Towstego

Esquimalt High student Sarah Smith looks for support from fellow teens as she has her head shaved during a Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock fundraiser at the school earlier this month. The students’ campaign brought in more than $10,000, a record since the school began raising money for Tour de Rock.

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www.vicnews.com • A13

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

City seeks advice from some ‘real’ playground experts

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Fill ’er up Paul Mullen gets a push from friend Barry Dale as he enjoys one of the stainless-steel sculptures in Holland Park on Dallas Road near Harrison Pond. The playful public art, created by Tyler Hodgins, represents a glass of water and is entitled Glass Half Full.

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Are you part of the community?

Victoria parks staff are looking to the experts to help plan upgrades to playground equipment at two city parks. Not playground engineers – children. Kids know what’s fun and what’s boring on the playground, and next week they’re invited with their parents to a pair of public open houses to tell city staff all about it. Parks staff will use this expert advice to upgrade equipment at Fern Street Park (in the Jubilee neighbourhood) and Wark Street Park (near the Blanshard Community Centre). Open house dates are as follows: • Fern Street Park – Tuesday, Nov. 6, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Sundance elementary,1625 Bank St. • Wark Street Park – Wednesday, Nov. 7 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Blanshard Community Centre, 901 Kings Rd. Information panels and the survey will be available on the City of Victoria website and at the parks office in Beacon Hill Park from Nov. 8 to Nov. 30. To arrange an appointment, call 250-3610600. rholmen@vicnews.com

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All roads lead to McLoughlin Point. Analysis of a distributed system found that 11 treatment plants would cost more than $2 billion to build, making a central plant the most cost-effective choice for existing developments. In the future, to serve growth areas new treatment plants will take advantage of technologies not yet available today. Check out the facts online at www.wastewatermadeclear.ca/facts or watch for our insert in your local paper on November 14, 2012. www.wastewatermadeclear.ca

your source for FREE coupons


A14 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

THE ARTS

HOT TICKET Red Hot Flamenco

NEWS

Be whisked away to a sultry night in Spain with the multi-talented group Companía Azul. Beautiful song, high-spirited dance and passionate music combine for an incredible concert showcasing the art of Flamenco. Nov. 1, 2 p.m., Nov. 2 and 3, 8 p.m. at the Royal Theatre. Go to rmts.bc.ca for more information.

Auction to help save Canada’s oldest synagogue Items from celebrities such as Leonard Cohen, Margaret Atwood up for bid Kyle Wells News staff

Works by famous local and nationally renowned artists will be on the auction block, along with many other items, as Canada’s oldest synagogue raises money for much-needed repairs. Congregation Emanu-El, 1461 Blanshard St., is a designated National Heritage Site and, as it approaches 150 years old, is the oldest synagogue in Canada in continuous use. There is a history of community involvement with the synagogue that stretches back to its beginnings. When it was built in 1863, people came together from throughout Victoria to help raise funds for the small community of Jewish residents who were committed to establishing

the synagogue. “There were more than 200 people who made contributions towards the synagogue,” board vice president Jean Dragufhan said. “That’s quite impressive given that there were only about 35 members of the synagogue at that time. So it just shows you the level of community support.” The congregation hopes to once again rally support from the wider community for its Nov. 22 auction to raise money to go towards repairs, namely for the roof. The building is showing its age and a large crack has formed in the centre of an arch toward the back of the synagogue. The roof, which is the original, is shifting and the whole structure needs to be stabilized “If we can’t do that, the building itself is in great danger,” Dragufhan said. “It’s alarming if you look inside because the crack is getting so large, chunks of plaster are now falling off. We’re still OK, but I don’t know for how long.” The synagogue reached out to celebrities both local and from afar, along with local businesses, for items to auction. They answered generously and

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Margaret receives a Birthday Cake from Save on Foods

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Rabbi Harry Brechner and Jean Dragufhan, synagogue vice president, show off a print by Leonard Cohen that will be auctioned off at the Congregation Emanu-El Benefit Auction Nov. 22. The proceeds will go towards rebuilding the synagogue’s roof. the synagogue now has more than 100 items for its auction. Among them are a number of works of art from some big names in the art world. One is a signed print donated by Leonard Cohen, which comes with a certificate of authenticity. The work is the first in a series of 50 prints by the legendary JewishCanadian songwriter, poet and artist. “We wrote him and asked him and he responded,” Dragufhan said. Prints were also donated by local artists Robert Bateman and Phyllis Serota. Other celebrities who contributed items are Margaret Atwood, Marc Garneau and Morley Safer. Also available are holiday packages to the Wickaninnish Inn and Pacific Sands Beach Resort in Tofino, tickets to events in Victoria, gift certificates for dinners in various restaurants, spa days, cooking classes and items from a variety of business. “We got some wonderful

responses,” Dragufhan said. “There’s a whole range of items that will be up for auction so people can have something small, they can bid on something large.” The goal is to raise $25,000 through the evening. In total the synagogue is trying to raise $900,000 to complete all needed repairs, including restoring stained glass windows, replacing the front porch and improving the seismic stability of the building. Synagogue organizers are also planning events for 2013 to celebrate the 150th anniversary. Tickets for the live auction are $50 and include hors d’oeuvres, care of The London Chef, and drinks. Legendary Victoria auctioneer Eric Charman will be leading the live auction. Tickets are available online at congregationemanu-el.ca or by mail at Congregation Emanu-El, 1461 Blanshard St., Victoria, V8W 2J3. kwells@goldstreamgazette.com

Exactly how much is an inch of water? And how do you measure it?

An inch of water a week – from rainfall & watering – is all the water your lawn needs to stay healthy. More than one inch of water, and you risk weak, shallow roots, and damage by fungus, weeds, diseases and pests. Get a watering gauge FREE! If you have a water bill account number in the Greater Victoria area call 250.474.9684 for a free watering gauge. Watering gauges make it easy to see how much water your lawn is getting. For more information visit www.crd.bc.ca/water or call 250.474.9684 for a Waterfacts sheet on how to measure how much water your lawn is getting. www.crd.bc.ca/water


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The music that flows out of Vancouver artist Steve Dawson is so natural and unforced that it’s possible to forget all of the work that went into producing it. Behind the organic, flowing guitar, the crisp arrangements and the laconic singing voice, resides one of the brightest, hardest working musicians Canada has ever produced. Dawson’s recent solo album Nightshade expands on the language of his guitar work and offers more complex songs than ever before. When questioned about the lyrical content, Dawson said, “I read dark stuff, watch dark movies and am drawn to that kind of subject matter. As far as musical influences, I count Joe Henry and Elliot Smith as a direct influence on my writing. Their music is dark, but for myself, I don’t feel that dark as a person. Maybe writing music like this is a way to get it out of my system.” Whatever therapeutic function creating the songs on Nightshade may have had for Dawson, it’s his audience that benefits, and local audiences will have the chance to hear for them-

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For its first concert of the 2012-13 season, Saanich Peninsula’s Via Choralis chamber choir presents music for Remembrance Day, featuring Gabriel Fauré’s well-loved Requiem. The program will also include Fauré’s Cantique de Jean Racine and other music by Canadian composers Paul Halley, Pete Seeger, Larry Nickel and Linda Fletcher. Pie Jesu from the Requiem will be sung by young Victoria soprano Gwendolyn Jamieson, who has sung for five years with Viva Youth Choir and recently was invited to join the adult women’s choir Ensemble Laude, one of the youngest members of that choir. She has performed as a soloist with the early music ensemble, A Great Noyse, on several occasions, and recently attended as the youngest participant at the Historically Informed Summer School in York, England. Accompanist Braden Young studied piano performance focusing on collaborative piano at the Victoria Conservatory of Music and the University of British Columbia. He has also pursued studies in voice and in composition, and has been the recipient of numerous scholarships and awards for academic excellence as well as performance. The performance, directed by Nicholas Fairbank, is on Sunday, Nov. 11 at 3 p.m. at St. Elizabeth’s Church, 10030 Third St., in Sidney. Tickets are $15 for adults, $8 for students. For more information go to viachoralis.com.

Lap steel guru plays Hermann’s LOOK INSIDE! AL

Via Choralis performs Requiem for Remembrance

www.vicnews.com • A15

L OC

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

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Steve Dawson brings his steel guitar to Victoria this Friday. selves as Dawson performs Nov 2, at 8 p.m. at Hermann’s Jazz Club, 753 View St. Go to hightideconcerts.net for more information. llavin@vicnews.com

We are CLOSED FRIDAY MORNING to mark down merchandise and open our doors at

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General Board Meeting & Open House Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2012 The Vancouver Island Health Authority Board of Directors is holding its regular General Board meeting: Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2012 at 11:00 am Sheraton Victoria Gateway Hotel 829 McCallum Road, Victoria, BC In addition to conducting its regular business, there will be a limited amount of time set-aside during the meeting for scheduled presentations from the public and to respond to questions from the floor, separate from the process of written questions described below. There will also be an opportunity to have questions addressed on an individual basis during the Open House. Presentation Guidelines: A written request is required to make a presentation to the Board. Requests should include the general nature and viewpoint of the presentation and groups/organizations must identify one individual as the spokesperson. Presentations will be limited to a maximum of 10 minutes. Note: Should the number of applications exceed the time available at the meeting it may not be possible to schedule all presentations. You will be contacted to confirm whether or not you have been selected to make a presentation. Presentations will not be accepted without prior arrangement. Written Questions for the Board: Questions must be submitted in advance of the meeting to allow for a formal response, which will be distributed in writing at the meeting and posted to our website following the meeting Written questions or requests for presentations to the VIHA Board must be submitted before 4:00 pm on Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012 by email to janet.shute@viha.ca or by fax to (250) 370-8750 or by mail to: Vancouver Island Health Authority, Executive Office, 1952 Bay Street, Victoria, BC V8R 1J8 Open House Immediately Following the General Board Meeting Following the General Board meeting there will be an Open House to allow for a general exchange of thoughts, suggestions and concerns between the VIHA Board and senior management staff and the general public.

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A16 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

CHOOSE 1 OF 2 FREE OFFERS! 

spend $250 and receive a

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spend $175 and receive a

winter skin care gift set $19.99 value

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†Spend $250 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location (excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, †Sp pre prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products wh which are provincially regulated) and we will give you a $25 President’s Choice® gift card. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cas cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. $25 President’s Choice® gift card will be cancelled if product is retu returned at a later date and the total value of product(s) returned reduces the purchase amount below the $25 threshold (before applicable taxes). Valid from Friday, October 26th, until closing Thursday, $250 Nov November 1st, 2012. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. 307451 10003 07451 7 4

ÕSpend $175 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive free a winter skin care gift set. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of $19.99 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, October 26th until closing Thursday, November 1st, 2012. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 652489 10000 02501 4

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Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2012 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

Guaranteed Lowest Prices *Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ print advertisements (i.e. flyer, newspaper). We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s print advertisement. Our major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us and are based on a number of factors which can change from time to time. Identical items are defined as same brand, item type (in the case of produce, meat and bakery), size and attributes and carried at this store location. We will not match competitors’ “multi-buys” (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get x”, “Free”, “clearance”, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this promise at any time.

We Match Prices! *Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors’ flyers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and for fresh produce, meat and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us).


www.vicnews.com • A17

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Pumpkin Art welcomed back to Oak Bay Tim Collins News staff

A decidedly spooky atmosphere has descended upon Oak Bay Village for Halloween, but it’s all in good fun. The spirit of the holiday has possessed the Oak Bay Business Improvement Association, which is hosting Canada’s largest exhibition of Pumpkin Art, a display that has received rave reviews in Toronto, New York and a host of locations across Vancouver Island. Pumpkin Art is the creation of local artist and events guru John Vickers. The man behind the Victoria Buskers Festival and the Chalk Art Festival, Vickers created the pumpkin art display as an event that would be consistent with his philosophy of providing free,

Oak Bay studio tour this weekend The 13th annual Oak Bay Artists Fall Studio Tour features 26 artists who will open their homes to the public. Janet Barclay, manager of Oak Bay recreation services, is behind the tour and is thrilled with the interest the program has generated, both among artists and the public. In the past, she said, the artists have each had more than 400 people attend their studios, and the number keeps growing. This year’s tour features artists whose work spans the full range of artistic endeavours including oil, acrylic and watercolour painting as well as ink drawings, china painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, collage and art crafted from wood. The tour takes place on Nov. 3 and 4 between noon and 4:30 p.m. A full map of the artists’ studios and details on the event can be found at oakbaybc.org/event/ oak-bay-artists-studiotour. reporter@vicnews.com

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Oak Bay Business Improvement Association project director Heather Leary is sandwiched between two of pumpkin carver John Vickers’ creations. family friendly, public festivals and events to the people of Greater Victoria. The pumpkin display has been a 12-year labour of love for Vickers, who has intricately carved upwards of 500 gourds (actually very authentic looking polyurethane pumpkin moulds). They represent themes ranging from

the humorous to the macabre. “I like to create themed groupings of the pumpkins,” he said. “It’s great when people recognize something nostalgic – something that takes them back to another time. They’ll point them out and it’ll evoke other memories and conversations.” Vickers adds new pumpkins to his display every year to

replace those which have been damaged or become dated. This year he’s added pumpkins that feature the faces of the mayor and municipal councillors of Oak Bay. “They’re pretty good likenesses,” he said. “And it’s all pretty lighthearted, anyway.” While the display first started on some front lawns in Victoria’s Fairfield neighbourhood in 1998, it soon outgrew that location and was hosted at Government House for several years. It has moved a few times since, but found a long-term home in Oak Bay in 2011. “We’re thrilled to have Pumpkin Art back in Oak Bay,” said Heather Leary, the project manager for the Oak Bay Business Improvement Association. She estimated

upwards of 2,000 people toured the display last year and she is confident the number will be much higher now that people are aware of the display’s new location.

The pumpkins are displayed on the back lawn of the Oak Bay Municipal Hall, 2167 Oak Bay Ave., until tonight (Oct. 31). The display is free of charge, but donations

will be accepted for Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock. Between 2 and 5 p.m. today, children are invited to trick-or-treat at shops on Oak Bay Avenue. reporter@vicnews.com

Don’t forget to winterize. Winterizing protects your in-ground or micro/drip system against freezing and expansion, which can damage piping, fittings, valves and sprinkler heads. So bundle up now to keep your system safe and ready to use when the weather warms up. For more information about winterizing your in-ground or micro/drip system visit www.crd.bc.ca/water or call 250.474.9684.

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A18 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

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Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Friday, November 2, 2012 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slightly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Canada Safeway Limited. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

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www.vicnews.com • A19

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

City receives fixed-price bids on bridge

Smart meter installations almost finished

Construction costs must not exceed $66 million

Homeowners who refused upgrade have had install put on hold by Hydro

Roszan Holmen News staff Black Press files

Tom Fletcher Black Press

B.C. Hydro is getting close to the end of its installation of 1.7 million wireless electricity meters, but the “smart grid” won’t be functional until next spring. Until then, meters will still be read manually or consumption estimated for billing purposes. And for one more winter storm season, people will still have to call B.C. Hydro to report a power outage, before the grid begins automatic metering and reporting of electrical failures. Cindy Verschoor, Hydro’s communications manager for the smart meter program, said about four per cent of the meter installations remain to be done, mainly on the Gulf Islands. Some of the old meters remain in locations around the province, either because they

are inaccessible or because owners have refused new ones. Manual meter readings will be checked against automatic readings during the testing phase to verify accuracy. Verschoor said there have been six meters replaced due to inaccurate readings or other defects, but generally the new meters are more accurate, and they eliminate human errors in reading or entering data required for mechanical meters. “All of our meters have to be certified by Measurement Canada, which is a consumer protection agency, just like the pump at the gas station and the scale at the grocery store,” she said. While B.C. Hydro owns the meter, the base and connections are part of the owner’s electrical system and can be

Smart meters are tested at a B.C. Hydro laboratory. When the smart grid system becomes functional next year, customers will be able to see a graph on Hydro’s website that shows their hourly electricity consumption. placed anywhere. In some cases, garages or decks have been built over meters, and if they can’t be read, the bill is based on an estimate until a wireless meter is installed. Verschoor said only two customers out of more than one million have opted to have the meter located away from their home. Those who refuse for whatever reason have their installation placed “on hold” while their concerns are addressed by B.C. Hydro. After media reports of fires associated with the program, B.C. Hydro commissioned a study of residential fire reports by Surrey Fire Chief Len Garis and researcher Joseph Clare. It shows that electrical fires have

declined since the installation of new meters began. Damaged meter sockets are usually the owner’s responsibility, but B.C. Hydro inspects them at the time of installation and offers to fix them at no charge if they are damaged. So far, 1,200 meter bases have been replaced. A house fire in Mission last spring took place three days after a smart meter was installed. Verschoor said the fire is still under investigation by the B.C. Safety Authority, but the meter has been ruled out as a cause. Despite media reports to the contrary, there have been no fires attributed to smart meters, she said. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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Oct. 30 marked another landmark in the progression of the Johnson Street Bridge replacement project. On Tuesday afternoon, the deadline passed for three engineering companies, pre-selected by the city, to submit their fixed-price bids on the job. The deadline was twice extended to allow the companies more time to refine their bids. Each firm can submit multiple bids, offering different options. Next, Victoria’s bridge evaluation team will analyze the proposals and submit the one that best matches the city’s criteria to council for approval. The big question for council is whether the bids will fit within the project’s $92.8million budget. The construction contract must come in at or under $66 million. “The expectation is they will hit the mark we set for them,” said Coun. Chris Coleman. “If not, then we’ll have to have a discussion.” The City of Victoria has already passed a bylaw to borrow $49.2 million for the project. rholmen@vicnews.com

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oo L k Esquimalt Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

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The Memorial Walkway Project is taking shape in Esquimalt’s Memorial Park.

Centennial Walkway takes shape in Memorial Park Jennifer Blyth Black Press

A lasting tribute to Esquimalt’s residents and businesses is taking shape in Memorial Park. The initial brick work has been put in place for the Centennial Walkway Project, conceived as a way to honour Esquimalt’s past, present and future, explains Bruce Devitt, co-chair of the Esquimalt Centennial Committee. The project is replacing the existing asphalt path at Memorial Park with 17,000 bricks, many of which will be inscribed with the names of families and businesses that have helped shape the township’s heritage. “People have been really supportive,” Devitt says. “We wanted

to show the past, present and future fabric of Esquimalt and not just for the families but for the businesses as well.” While the committee had initially hoped to have the engraved bricks in place this fall, a flurry of purchases in recent months has meant the engraving is taking a little longer that expected; once the 620 bricks purchased to date are completed, installation will be dependent on the weather. Currently, the walkway grand opening is tentatively scheduled for this December, says Ritchie Morrison, the township’s communications co-ordinator. From single bricks, like that commemorating the region’s first baby of 2012 – who happened to be from Esquimalt – to multi-

generational groupings, the pathway is a true legacy project. “I’ve heard some really interesting stories,” Devitt says. “Some families have made a family tree, which might have six or eight bricks.” As an on-going memorial designed to evolve with the town, bricks will continue to be available for purchase, to be added over time. “That is the whole purpose of having a legacy project,” Devitt notes. Inscriptions cost $100 for a four-by-eight-inch brick or $200 for an eight-by-eight brick. To purchase a brick, visit www. esquimalt.ca or pick up an application form at the municipal hall or Esquimalt Rec Centre.

Proudly Representing Esquimalt Randall Garrison MP Esquimalt – Juan de Fuca 250-405-6550 www.randallgarrison.ndp.ca Randall.Garrison@parl.gc.ca A2 – 100 Aldersmith Place, View Royal

Maurine Karagianis MLA Esquimalt – Royal Roads 250-479-8326 www.maurinekaragianis.ca Maurine.Karagianis.MLA@leg.bc.ca A5 – 100 Aldersmith Place, View Royal

Head to the Archie Browning Sports Centre’s back parking lot tonight (Wednesday) for the alwaysfun Halloween Bonfire. One of Esquimalt’s favourite community events, enjoy the huge bonfire from 6 to 9 p.m., along with a costume contest with prizes from local merchants, hot chocolate and hot dogs.

Veterans’ Cemetery Tour Nov. 11 Local history buffs are invited to mark Remembrance Day with the Nov. 11 Veterans’ Cemetery Remembrance Tour, hosted by the Old Cemeteries Society. John Azar leads the annual tour, featuring fascinating stories from the Crimean War to present day. Meet at 2 p.m. at Esquimalt’s Veterans’ Cemetery, accessed off Colville Road, near the Base Hospital. Tours are $5/nonmembers; $2/members; no reservations needed. For details, visit www.oldcem. bc.ca/tour.htm


www.vicnews.com • A21

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

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CommunityCalendar Monday to Friday – Rainbow Kitchen serves a free hearty meal at noon for low-income and marginalized people at the United Church of Esquimalt, 500 Admirals Rd., in Wheeley Hall (enter from Lyall Street). Fridays – Esquimalt Walking Group hosts free social, community walks leaving from the rec centre foyer at 10 a.m. year-round, rain or shine. 1st & 3rd Tuesdays – Esquimalt Lions Club meets at 6 p.m., at Esquimalt Legion Hall, 620 Admirals Rd. FMI: President John Higgs, lionjohn@shaw.ca or 250-994-9288; Gerry Mullen, bcgian@shaw.ca or 250-480-7175 1st & 3rd Wednesdays – Kiwanis Club of Esquimalt meets, 7:30 a.m. at Gorge Vale Golf Club. 2nd & 4th Mondays – Esquimalt Photography Club meets, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in the church hall of Esquimalt United Church. New members welcome, incl. all levels of amateur photographers. FMI: www. esquimaltphotoclub.org Thursdays – Esquimalt Writers Group meets,

10 a.m. to noon at Esquimalt Rec Centre. No membership required. FMI: 250-4128532. Nov. 1 – Victoria Cougars host the Nanaimo Buccaneers, 7 p.m. at Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www. victoriacougars.com Nov. 5 – Esquimalt Council meets, 7 p.m. in Council Chambers. FMI: 250-414-7135 Nov. 8 – Victoria Cougars host the Kerry Park Islanders, 7 p.m. at Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www. victoriacougars.com Nov. 9 – A special Veterans’ Week edition of Wendy Morton’s Get Poemed program is at the Esquimalt Library, 2 to 4. Bring a personal picture, memento or story for inspiration, and Wendy will compose an original poem for you. All welcome. No registration required. Nov. 10 – Pacific Mobile Depots Community Recycling, 9 a.m. to noon at the Archie Browning Sports Centre rear parking lot – soft and hard plastics, styrofoam, milk/drink

cartons and electronics. Drop-off fees apply. FMI: 250-893-3851 or www. pacificmobiledepots.com Nov. 11 – Remembrance Day ceremonies at the cenotaph. Nov. 11 – Annual Veterans’ Cemetery Remembrance Tour with John Azar, 2 p.m., featuring stories of people and their times, from the Crimean War to the present day. Meet at Veterans’ Cemetery, off Colville Rd. near the Base Hospital. FMI: www. oldcem.bc.ca/tour.htm Nov. 15 – Victoria Cougars host the Campbell River Storm, 7 p.m. at Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www. victoriacougars.com Nov. 16 – The Esquimalt Library hosts Beryl Young, author of Follow the Elephant, 10:30 to

Send your Esquimalt event notices to jblyth@telus.net 11:30 a.m. Learn to use your own life experiences to write stories. For Grades 4 to 7. Info/ registration: www.gvpl.ca or 250-414-7198. Nov. 17 – National Children’s Day, with kindergym, facepainting, crafts, art displays at the Esquimalt Rec Centre from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and a Coast Capital Free Swim from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Bring the whole family for a free, fun-filled day. FMI: 250412-8500 Nov. 18 – Victoria Cougars host the Comox Valley Glacier Kings, 3:30 p.m. at Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www.victoriacougars.com Nov. 19 – Esquimalt Council meets, 7 p.m. in Council Chambers. FMI: 250-414-7135 Nov. 22 – Victoria Cougars host the Saanich Braves, 7 p.m. at Archie Browning Arena. FMI: www. victoriacougars.com Nov. 24 – Esquimalt Creative Crafters & Knitters Christmas Sale, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Esquimalt Rec Centre; help support seniors’ programming.

Nov. 26 – Paper Crafts for Kids: Origami, fun with stories and paper art activities, for ages 10 to 12, at the Esquimalt Library, 3 to 4 p.m. Info/ registration: www.gvpl.ca or 250-414-7198 Nov. 26 – Esquimalt Committee of the Whole meets, 7 p.m. in Council Chambers. FMI: 250414-7135.

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Travis Paterson 250-480-3279 sports@vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

Gardening

SPORTS

Cross country locals stunned by Mill Bay middle schooler

Ragtag Reynolds win boys XC title GNS Ben Weir sets course record at cross country Islands Travis Paterson News staff

Every few years a surprise team shows up as a major contender in the Island high school cross country series. This year it was the Reynolds secondary boys team, taking the Island Cross Country Championship team title at Beaver Lake on Oct. 24. Reynolds beat out perennial powerhouses Oak Bay High, which came second, and Nanaimo’s Dover Bay secondary, in third. Oak Bay won the girls team title. “The (Reynolds) boys lost their minds a bit just because it was so unexpected,” said Reynolds coach Brad Cunningham. “We knew we had a deep team, but Oak Bay and Dover Bay are so strong, and (fourth-place) Mount Douglas too.” Ben Weir of Glenlyon Norfolk School set a course record as the top male, completing the 6.7-kilometre course in 20 minutes, 42 seconds, just three seconds ahead of Liam Kennel of Oak Bay High. Thomas Getty of Mount Doug took third, 30 seconds later, a sweep by the trio of teammates who train together at the city’s elite high school track and field program. Pacing the lead group of male runners at Beaver Lake was Reynolds’ Seamus Maguire, as usual. Maguire is the reigning B.C. high school 800-

metre champion and a “frontrunner” who likes to lead out. Close behind Maguire was Erik Evans, among the pack of Weir, Kennel and Getty. Evans overtook Maguire as they finished fourth and sixth, respectively. Key to the Reynolds’ win was getting five runners in the top 25, a feat that will prove challenging against the rest of the province this weekend. Taylor Lyman, a Grade 9 student, finished an impressive race at 16th overall, with teammates Thomas Thierbach in 19th and Jon McKay in 23rd. “We’ve been fifth the last few years so it’s great we finally get to go to provincials,” Cunningham said. The top four teams qualfiy for provincials in Prince George on Saturday (Nov. 3). Reynolds will be sending the maximum seven runners, same as with Oak Bay, Dover Bay and Mount Doug. Reynolds’ only cross country girl, Grade 11 Klara Hlavon, will also make the trip. She finished 21st overall. “We’re not a traditional cross country school, so this is a special year and it’s one that’s been four years in the making,” said Cunningham, a former competitive triathlete. “When Maguire and Evans came together four years ago I thought, ‘huh, we have something here.’” Reynolds is a “ragtag group” of exceptional athletes, Cunningham explained, as most of them have another sport that is their main focus. Evans is a triathlete who trains under local youth coach Kelly Guest. Maguire is a Saanich junior Braves hockey player hoping to crack the B.C. Hockey League.

Locals gunning for top spots at provincials Travis Paterson News staff

Photo by Rob Wille

Caleigh Bachop of Mount Doug, No. 461, and Madelyn Brunt, No. 664, are part of the lead pack of runners at the high school cross country championships at Beaver Lake on Oct. 24. Thierbach is a competitive curler and McKay spends most of his time in the pool as an aspiring swimmer. “In a way, they are good runners and had the races of their lives. They committed to this team even though they’re specialized in other disciplines.”

Middle school student Desirae Ridenour of Cowichan Valley won the girls race with Caleigh Bachop of Mount Doug in second, Miryam Basset of Nanaimo secondary in third and Madelyn Brunt of Oak Bay High in fourth. sports@vicnews.com

Vikes at nationals

UVic Vike Carly Krestanovich carries the ball against the UBC Thunderbirds at UVic earlier this season. The Vikes and T-Birds travel to Toronto for the CIS nationals this week. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

NEWS

The UVic Vikes women’s field hockey team is in Toronto for the CIS women’s field hockey championship, Nov. 1 to 4. A 12th championship banner isn’t out of the question for the Vikes, but with 12 first and second year players on the squad, this year is more about experience and the long term plan. Last week three Vikes were named Canada West All-Stars, local products Kyla Kirby and Annie Walters-Shumka, and Surrey’s Carly Krestanovich. The national championship begin with roundrobin play from Thursday to Saturday. The top two teams following pool play will advance to gold-medal final on Nov. 4. All 12 matches will be streamed on CIS-SIC.tv. The Vikes (3-4-1) qualified for nationals by finishing second in the three-team conference ahead of Calgary, and behind UBC (8-0). sports@vicnews.com

Even before the race started, running partners Caleigh Bachop, Madelyn Brunt, Brittany King and Megan Kinghorn found each other. With Miryam Bassett of Nanaimo, the crew formed a lead pack, as they usually do, and jumped out ahead of the 4.5-kilometre high school cross country championships course at Beaver Lake. No one noticed Desirae Ridenour, a Grade 9 student from Mill Bay’s George Bonner Middle School. “We took our group out pretty hard, we didn’t see (Ridenour) at the beginning of the race,” said Bachop, a Grade 12 student from Mount Douglas secondary. “We were running our usual race, but on the second hill (Ridenour) took off. We all thought ‘who is that?’ but I wasn’t feeling it for a push. We didn’t say anything, we just let her go.” Ridenour went on to win the race, 16 seconds ahead of Bachop (second) and 19 seconds ahead of Bassett (third), who is last year’s champion. Brunt, of the Oak Bay High champion girls team, finished fourth, while King and Kinghorn, of Spectrum Community school, slipped to seventh and eighth. Word on the street is that Ridenour is the “We didn’t say younger sister of Chrisanything, we just tine Ridenour, a former Canada Summer Games let her go.” triathlon champion and – Caleigh Bachop national team member who transfered from UVic to the University of Guelph this fall. “I had never seen (Ridenour) before, she ripped it up out there,” Bachop said. The Mount Doug girls team finished fifth and missed the cut for provincials, just a few points behind Campbell River high. Bachop will attend as the only girl from Mount Doug, a contender for top spot. “It’s too bad we can’t go to Prince George as a team, we were so close,” Bachop said. The middle distance specialist will return as a go-to member of Mount Doug’s track and field team this spring. She won the provincial 800-metre club championship in the summer and is weighing her post secondary options for 2013. That includes the possibility of joining the Vikes, which would follow in her dad Steve’s footsteps. Steve competed for Esquimalt High before setting the Vikes’ indoor 800m record, which he holds to this day. Bachop isn’t going it alone in Prince George. She joins the Mount Doug boys team, which finished fourth, and her elite high school track and field teammates. “Brunt, King and Kinghorn and I all go back and forth every race and they are highly fit right now,” Bachop said. “It will be a tough race.” Now that they know about Ridenour, the crew can keep an eye on her just as they’ll be hoping to keep Kayla Stone of Vancouver and Regan Yee of Hazelton (north of Smithers) within reach. sports@vicnews.com


www.vicnews.com • A23

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Braves hungry for Wolves

WHY WAIT? WE CAN HELP NOW! Happiness is a beautiful smile!

Pink in the rink returns to Pearkes Travis Paterson News staff

Friday is the annual pink in the rink game for the Saanich Braves, and it’s a night the Island’s second place junior B team does not take lightly. The Braves (12-3) host the Westshore Wolves (10-7) at Pearkes arena. There’ll be no problem finding motivation for the Braves. Not only is it breast cancer fundraiser night, it’s the first rematch since the Wolves shutout Braves 3-0 at Pearkes on Oct. 12. “Goalie Alec Dhillon stood on his head that night and changed the momentum of the game,” said Braves coach Brad Cook. “We started doing things out of character, which can happen on nights like that.” The Braves bounced back from that game, which was only their second loss of the season, with a win. The Braves lost their next game to the Victoria Cougars, but have since won three straight, two against the Kerry Park Islanders and one against the Peninsula Panthers. And now the Braves hope to make it four in a row with the expansion Wolves visiting. “It comes down to playing a more structured game and limiting the Wolves’ chances. It could very likely be a goaltending duel,” Cook said. Likely starting for the Braves is Tanner McGaw, who has 10 wins in 12 games. McGaw, a former Victoria Grizzlies tender, owns the league’s best save percentage of .928, and has the second best goals against average of 2.21 per game. Defensively the Braves are still in a fix. Forward Andrew White has done an admirable job since moving to into the defensive core against the Oceanside Generals on Oct. 13. Cook said White will stay on the blue line until injured D-men Liam Sproule and Garrett Kemmler are healthy. “Not having Sproule and Kemmler is a big blow to this club. We’ve used seven different affiliate players already and it’s still October.” No surprise to anyone is the play of captain Ty Jones, last year’s MVP. Jones centres the top line with returnee Shawn McBride on his left and Josh Gray on his right. Gray is new to the Braves this season, a displaced Kootenay junior B player who finished last year with the Texas Brahmas in the junior B Western States Hockey League. The 20-year-old scored

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Are your kids begging for new games? Photo by Christian Stewart Photography

Saanich Braves forward Josh Gray carries the puck against the Kerry Park Islanders in VIJHL action, Friday (Oct. 26) at Pearkes Arena. The Braves won 3-1. seven goals and 10 assists in 14 games with the Brahmas, and has 15 goals in 15 games this year. “He’s blessed with a rocket of a shot and he’s a big strong kid who can destroy people out there,” Cook said. Game time for pink in the rink is 6:30 p.m.

Cougars buck up The Nanaimo Buccaneers visit the Archie Browning Sports Centre for the first time ever tomorrow (Nov. 1). It’s the first of three games in three nights for Victoria Cougars, which visit the Panthers and Islanders on Friday and Saturday. Puck drop for the Cougars and Buccaneers is 7 p.m. sports@vicnews.com

Vikes into soccer playoffs The UVic Vikes men’s and women’s soccer teams are heading to the Canada West playoffs. The men bettered the Mount Royal Cougars 3-0 in the rain-soaked conditions of Centennial Stadium on Friday. The Vikes fell 2-0 to the Winnipeg Wesmen on Saturday, but are in the playoffs regardless. They’ll attend the Canada West Final Six in Edmonton this weekend, Nov. 3 and 4. The Vikes women’s team, which is hosting the CIS nationals later in November, is on pace to win its way in. Janelle Smith, Jana Yates and Emma Greig each scored once in the Vikes 3-0 win over the Fraser Valley Cascades at Centennial on Saturday. The Vikes women advance to the Canada West Final Four at Trinity Western University in Langley, Nov. 3 and 4. sports@vicnews.com

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PERSONALS MONEY MAKING SECRETS they don’t want you to know. For a FREE CD, call 855-373-3231 ADCODE 251. STEAMWORKS: A club for men to meet men. 582 Johnson St., Victoria. 250-3836623 steamworksvictoria.com

TRAVEL GETAWAYS ITALY- VILLAGE house in beautiful central Italy for rent. Call Anita 250-655-4030.

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!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE FURNITURE

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

HELP WANTED

TRADES, TECHNICAL

LEGAL SERVICES

EARN 100% plus on our new product. I will be selling our bulk new product below cost to interested buyers. Please forward your interests by email. rgtkachuk@shaw.ca.

MEAT MANAGER, Jasper Super A. Jasper Super A is looking for an experienced Retail Meat Manager. As Meat Manager you will be responsible for all aspects of the managing the department, including cutting meat. You must have working knowledge of gross margins, expense controls and human resources management. The successful candidate must have Grade 12 (or equivalent) and be able to provide a “clearâ€? security clearance. If you have the skills and abilities please forward your resume to our Head OfďŹ ce, The Grocery People Ltd. (TGP) in conďŹ dence to: Human Resources OfďŹ cer, The Grocery People Ltd., 14505 Yellowhead Trail, Edmonton, AB, T5L 3C4. Fax 780-447-5781. Email: humanresources@tgp.ca

LEEMAR EXCAVATOR Components Requires a Red Seal certiďŹ ed Heavy Duty Mechanic for in house and offsite repairs for a variety of West Coast Equipment. Successful applicants will have a minimum of 2 years work experience, be able to work independently as well as part of a team. Applicants must hold a valid driver’s license with an air endorsement ticket. Welding experience is an asset. Leemar is located in Parksville and services Vancouver Island. We offer a competitive beneďŹ ts package dependent on experience. Please fax resumes to 250-248-4404 Attn: Shop foreman or by email to danielle@leemar.ca

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certiďŹ cation, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

SIBOLA MOUNTAIN FALLING is looking for CertiďŹ ed Fallers for seismic work in BC & Alberta. For more info contact Jordan at 250-5969488 or jordan@sibolamountainfalling.com

IN TOWN cat sitter, my home. 250-588-6718.

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

NEED TO OutďŹ t An OfďŹ ce? Executive Chair, desk, bookcase, 2 client chairs. Call (250)652-0793.

PERSONAL SERVICES

BUILDING SUPPLIES

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

HEALTH PRODUCTS

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

2010 LEGEND 4 wheel scooter with jumbo basket, scooter cover, walking cane, ag holder and canopy. Like new, always kept in the house. Retail price $4,357, now asking $2050 obo. (250)656-7786.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS ARE YOU AN UNEMPLOYED YOUTH (age 18-29) with a business idea? Could you use $5,000 to develop your idea? If you live in the Capital Regional District, we may be able to help. For full details and to see if you are eligible, visit us online: http://www.ethoscmg. com/ymb.html or email us at ymb@ethoscmg.com LEARN FROM Home. Earn from home. Medical Transcriptionists are in demand. Lots of jobs! Enrol today for less than $95 a month. 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com LIVE & Work in the Tropics. Become a Professional Scuba Instructor. Government Accredited Student Financing Available. Professional Diver Training (PDT). Training Professional Divers Since 1987. www.professionaldivertraining.ca

R E M OT E S I T E S A F E T Y. C A Online safety courses from $29.95: WHMIS, H2S, TDG and more. 1 - 2 hours each. No classroom, books, CD/ DVDs. Canadian Standards Compliant. Industry recognized certiďŹ cates issued.

HELP WANTED 1598327 ALBERTA Ltd. o/a Vine-Vera cosmetics in Victoria, requires F/T experienced Cosmetic Sales People $11.50Hr. & 1+ year experienced Supervisor $15.50Hr. Email: vineveraca@gmail.com An Alberta Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilďŹ eld road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051. HEAVY DUTY TRUCK PARTSMAN, EXPERIENCE is required for permanent employment. Must have mechanical knowledge & be computer & keyboard literate. Attention: Norma, Bailey Western Star Trucks Inc, 1440 Redwood St, Campbell River, BC, V9W 5L2 250-286-1151. nhalliday@bailey westernstar.com

SAVE ON FOODS MEMORIAL CENTRE EVENING SUPERVISOR • Must be bondable & reliable. • Must have excellent communication skills

and be able to manage janitorial staff. • Work hours are event driven. Exciting opportunity to work in sports & entertainment. Fax resumes to: 250-220-7887 Attention: Deb Miller

ONLINE MEDIA Consultant Needed: Do you specialize in PPC, SEO, and Social Media? Apply to our job posting at http://tinyurl.com/93zreqk Required for an Alberta Trucking Company. One Class 1 Driver. Must have a minimum of 5 years experience pulling low boys and driving off road. Candidate must be able to pass a drug test and be willing to relocate to Edson, Alberta. Scheduled Days Off. Call Lloyd 780-723-5051

GET 50% OFF - Join Herbal Magic this week and get 50% Off. Lose weight quickly, safely and keep it off, proven results! Call Herbal Magic today! 1-800-854-5176.

EDUCATION/TUTORING HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD ATTENDANTS & SUPERVISORS Mac’s Convenience Store o/a Subway is hiring Food Counter Attendants ($10.25/hr), Food Service Supervisors ($12/hr). All 37.50hrs/wk. Mail CV: 1520 Admirals Road, Victoria, BC V9A 7B1 or vicsubway@yahoo.ca

MATH TUTOR. Former UVic math student. Many yrs exp. InďŹ nite patience 250-592-4166

FINANCIAL SERVICES

KITCHEN HELPER Frankie’s Burger Enterprises Inc. dba Fatburger hiring for their location in Victoria, BC. Kitchen Helper ($10.25/hr for all locations); both 40hrs/ week+ben. Apply by Fax: (604) 637-8874.

INCOME OPPORTUNITY EARN EXTRA Cash! - P/T, F/T immediate openings. Easy Computer work, other positions are available. Can be done from home. No experience needed. www.hwc-bc.com

TRADES, TECHNICAL JOURNEYMAN TECHNICIAN required immediately for Chrysler/ Dodge/ Jeep dealership in Salmon Arm, BC. Proven producer, good attitude, quality workmanship a must. Excellent wage and beneďŹ t package. Contact Pat 250832-8053, pat@brabymotors.com PLUMBER, JOURNEYMAN Prepare, fabricate, install plumbing and heating piping systems. Good oral and written communication skills. Ability to follow instruction. Hold a valid drivers license. Professional appearance at all times. Must have plumbing trades certiďŹ cations. Salary negotiable upon experience. Forward resume to quadramech@telus.net

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Portraiture-Baby+Family Maternity. Home Movies to DVD. Call 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

PETS PET CARE SERVICES

FRIENDLY FRANK 5 SPIDER plants in pots, $1.50/ea. 250-652-4199. 6-DRAWER DRESSER, solid wood, extremely clean, $35. (250)380-9596. FREE. 27� TV, good working order. Call 250-595-5734. LADY’S PANT Coat, 50% wool, exc. quality. Red, black trim, sz 12. $35. 250-383-5390 LARGE DOG house, comes apart, excellent condition, $35 obo. Call 250-595-5734. MIRROR, 28�x42�, $10. 2004 Heater (Kersone), $80. K-nex game, $9. 778-265-1615. QUEEN BED Frame & slats, solid pine, nice design, needs a little TLC. $55. James Bay 250-380-8733 TFAL DEEP-FRYER, $20 works great. Call (250)6566413.

BUFFET/ HUTCH, solid wood 18�Dx50�Wx79�H, red/brown tone, $265. Mikasa bone china ‘Minuet’ large serving dishes $10.ea. Melba Rose bone china gravy dish, 6 desert bowls w/plates $20. (250)380-8733.

$5000- POWER CHAIR, new cond, $1500 or Trade for (good cond) 4 wheeled Scooter. (250)896-7160 after 6pm.

FUEL/FIREWOOD DROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll Free 1 877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: it’s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161. M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660. NEED MONEY? No credit checks! No upfront fees! Immediate response! Electronic deposits and payments! 1 (866) 499-5629 www.mynextpay.com

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, ďŹ r, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391. SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest ďŹ rewood producer offers ďŹ rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

FURNITURE HONDURAS MAHOGANY SIDEBOARD1930’s, 40�wx15�dx34�h, beautiful condition, $450. Call (250)6563322. SOLID AMERCIAN BLACK WALNUT. Gentlemen’s wardrobe (armoire type - original key) 44�wx24�dx54�h and chest of drawers, 54�wx25�dx30�h. Handcrafted in Quebec, 1930’s beautiful condition, $2800/pair. Call (250)656-3322. DOWNSIZING/ SACRIFICE. Glass & white oak china hutch - wall mount or buffet. $200. White solid oak entertainment/ media storage centre $250. (250)656-9717.

HALF PRICE! Never used; Folding power lift shower commode with chair ($1600). Wheelchair mint cond. (best offer). Call (250)818-4000 or email mercedes500@shaw.ca

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 500 RECENT paperbacks, $.50; Altas Lathe, $900; 1200 hand crafted earrings/necklaces, $2-$7, large amounts 50% off. Call (250)655-3347.

BERNINA 820 QE Sewing Computer - high end sewing & quilting machine w/ 40 cm long free arm, stitch regulator, dual feed. $4500. (250)882-5465. FOR SALE 1-200 KW/250 KVA/300 amp 480 generator Cat engine 3406B c/w 1-1800 litre double wall Tidy Tank. $7000. Call 250-949-8133.


www.vicnews.com • A25

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

FOR SALE BY OWNER

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS

APARTMENT/CONDO

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

AUTO FINANCING

CARS

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

MODULAR HOMES and park model homes factory direct wholesale. New single wides $37,209 doubles $73,486 Special winter discounts! Call The Home Boys 877-976-3737 or www.hbmodular.ca

OAK BAY. Updated home on two levels. 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, sunroom + patio, new everything. 1766 sq ft & 956 unďŹ nished sq ft. $658,000. Call 250-598-6902.

URGENT SALE! Immaculate double-wide Lannon Creek $118,000 250-642-5707

Osteoporosis~MS~Fibromya lgia? Increase Performance? Commercial Vibration machine. Clinically proven. (250)287-2009. SHIMPO potters wheel, bats included, $600. Olympic klin model# 2327h, 23â€?wx27â€?d, new wiring, needs some new bricks, also included klin sitter dial, thermometer 1 full shelf, 8 1/2 shelves, posts and stilts, $700. Ohaus chipper beam scale, 2610 grams, $35. Open to reasonable offers. 1(250)247-8152. SKYWATCHER TELESCOPE and tri-pod. D-102MM F-1300MM. Only used once, asking $500. Please call (250)655-0051. STEEL BUILDINGS - Canadian made! - Reduced prices now! 20x22 $4,455. 25x26 $4,995. 30x38 $7,275. 32x50 $9,800. 40x54 $13,995. 47x80 $19,600. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-6685422. www.pioneersteel.ca STOREWIDE LIQUIDATION. Furniture, Mattresses; MicroďŹ bre or Leather Sofa, Loveseat & Chair w/5 Built-In Recliners, Choice of Colour $999.95; Tools, Hdwe. Everything Goes! Nothing Held Back! Vic & Toni Retired! Also save on Heaters, Axes, Tarps, Bookcases, BunkBeds; Recliners 1/2 Price! BUY & SAVE, 9818 4th St., Sidney. buyandsave.ca Visa, M/C

YAMAHA KAYAK roof racks, 2 locking bars, 1 side has 2 cradles, 2nd side has a Hullavator unit, drops to waste level. Seldom used, paid over $1200, asking $500 ďŹ rm. Please email: keebird@shaw.ca

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewelry. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER

408-3170 Irma St- $219,900. 2 bdrms, 1 bath, quiet, 45+. More info: (250)385-3547. wwwpropertyguys.com ID#192291

#,!33)&)%$Ă– !$3Ă–7/2+ 

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Gorge Apartments 215 Gorge Road East Victoria

$500 Move In Incentive Bachelor from $700/mo. 1 bdrm. from $790/mo. 2 bdrm. from $995/mo. • Indoor swimming pool (Redwood Park only) • Surface & carport parking • Upgraded balconies • Spectacular views • Storage lockers • Situated in Park Setting • 2 km from downtown • Crime Free MultI-Housing Program

Kamel Point Village Apartments 70 Dallas Road, Victoria

$500 Move In Incentive 2 bdrm. from $1,200/mo. OPEN HOUSE Sunday, November 4, 1pm-4pm. 10353 Devlin Place, Sidney, BC.Call 250-655-1499. $485,000 Details at: w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192295 www.realtor.ca mls #316102

HOUSES FOR SALE $399,000. Next to VGH, 2 bdrm + 3rd or ofďŹ ce, 2 lvl, end unit, windows on 3 sides. Large family room, 2 ďŹ replaces, pet allowed. 71-14 Erskine Ln., Tel: 250-478-0269. Open House, 2PM-4PM, Sat & Sun. w w w. C o m f r e e. c o m / 3 6 7 0 9 7 www.mls.ca x2486311

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO 1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, ďŹ rewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. Call 250-478-9231. CENTRAL SAANICH: 2 bdrm apt. Util’s incld’d. N/S. Avail. Nov. 1st. Call (250)477-2561.

CORDOVA BAY. REDUCED! (Bring Offers). 3 bdrm, 3 bath Character house, view. with 1bdrm suite. $575,000. (below appraisal) Call 250-818-5397.

Gorge Towers Apartments 200 Gorge Road West, Victoria

$500 Move In Incentive 1 bdrm. from $870/mo. 2 bdrm. from $1,140/mo. • Wheel-chair accessible • Outdoor, indoor and covered parking available • Lockers • Elevators • Laundry room • Balconies • Bicycle storage • Crime Free Multi-Housing Program

Fair Oaks Apartments 3501 Savannah Avenue, Saanich

FOR SALE BY OWNER. #30 Lekwammen Drive. 55+ complex. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, den, family room, dbl. garage. LP $319,900. Irma (250)477-4117 Incredible 5 acre treed PARK-LIKE PROPERTY with Well-Maintained Furnished Home 1500 sq.ft, 3-bdrm, 2 bath. Extremely close to Pristine Cowichan Lake, in the town of Caycuse. Perfect for recreational property or full time living. Motivated seller $378,800. Exceptionally low yearly cost. Not leased land. Call 250-745-3387 smartytwo@hotmail.com

• Water front low-rise • Outdoor parking available • Balconies • Bike storage • In suite storage • Dishwasher in some suites • Laundry room

$250 Move In Incentive 1 bdrm. from $840/mo. 2 bdrm. from $1,014/mo.

ESQUIMALT

Unique Building Must see

1 Bdrm & Bachelor Very quiet ocean views, Clean, well maintained. Laundry, Sauna, Elevator, Hot Water, Heat. (250) 388-9384

• Lush foliage & groomed landscaping • Well-maintained building •Amenities nearby • Wheel-chair accessible • Covered, indoor and outdoor parking • Laundry room • Balconies • Lockers • Elevator • Small ďŹ tness room

Call Now: 250.381.5084 www.caprent.com rentals@caprent.com

GRANT MANOR Newly renovated suites, Starting at $675 per mo

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

To view call 250-642-1900 SIDNEY CONDO, James White Blvd. 3 bdrms or 2-bdrm + den. 1200 sq.ft, N/S, N/P, 55+. $1400/mo (250)652-3606 THETIS LAKE ESTATES large 1 bdrm or can be 2 bdrm suite, all utils + cable/high speed internet, laundry, garbage, private parking, close to all amenities, quiet rural setting. Refs, small pet ok. $1050./$1250. 250-220-4718, 250-507-1440.

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

LOTS 4 RS3 SERVICED LOTS, in Langford, starting at $179,000 Great Happy Valley Location, at, ready for building. All services to lot lines. Excellent location, end of wooded lane. Email or call 250-661-2837 or 250-857-2481 for more info. mtd@shaw.ca

TILLICUM TOP r 2 BD 1 BA 55+ bldg incl. storage, in-suite or same r lndry. $950. 250858-2383. U pay hydro avail. now

DEEP COVE: cozy 1bdrm, wood oors, acreage, skylights $895/mo, N/S. 250-656-1312.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

COTTAGES

OAK BAY: Bright 2 bdrm suite duplex w/ garden. h/w oors, D/W, W/D. Close to all amens. Avail immed. NS/NP. $1350. To view call (250)217-2421.

APARTMENTS FURNISHED SIDNEY EXECUTIVE suite. near ocean & town. $1295. Short/long term. 250-656-8080

1997 TOYOTA Avalon XLS, white. $3,999. Automatic. Fully loaded, no accidents, new tires. 229k. Great running car. Call (250)656-5588.

HOMES FOR RENT SIDNEY: 1 lvl house 2br, dr, den. 1/2 blk to beach, NS/NP $1700 + util. (250)655-1304. Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

SOUTH OAK BAY furn’d character home, walk to golf club & beach, Jan 12 - Mar 16, all inclusive rent for 9 week period. $3500. Discounted in lieu of cat care. Call (250)598-4734. williamrobertson@shaw.ca

Guaranteed

Auto

Loans1-888

-229-0744

or

apply

at:

www.

greatcanadianautocredit.com

1998 PONTIAC Grand Prix GT US car - 193,000 miles, lady driven since 2003. $2800 obo. Alan, (778)426-3487. 2007 DODGE CALIBER SXTmint, loaded, 74,000 km. $10,000. (250)598-6605.

ROOMS FOR RENT VICWEST: FURNISHED room, cable, phone, $450 & up. Call 1-250-748-1310.

$50-$1000 CASH

SUITES, LOWER BRENTWOODBACHELOR Lrg furn’d, grd level. Priv entrance, parking, close to bus. NS/NP. $700. (250)652-9454.

For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

858-5865

FLORENCE LAKE, 2 yr old 1 bdrm ground level suite, large mudroom, F/S, W/D, & micro. 2 private entrances w/ sunroom & patio on 1 acre prop. Utils incl. N/S, small pet ok, $950. Nov. 1. 250-391-1967. NEWLY RENO’D, bright, large 1 bedroom suite, $900 month! Includes heat, hydro, hot water, garbage pick-up, shared laundry, separate ground level entrance. Large shared fenced back yard, on main bus route, close to West Shore Mall. Located in Colwood on a quiet dead end street. Call 778-433-2056 for viewing. UPTOWN UPDATED 1-bdrm. 820 sq.ft, 3 storage rms, patio, yard, prkng, own entr., NS/NP. $860. incl. (250)361-3508. UVIC/CAMOSUN area, 2 bdrm, priv ent, N/P, N/S, $900. Avail immed. (250)477-6652.

TOWNHOUSES LAVENDER CO-OP is accepting applications for a quiet, 2 bdrm townhouse, W/D hookup, inside/outside storage, backyard. $876/mo. Share purchase $2500. Gross income $42,000 +. Applications available in the glass case outside the Community Hall at 10A-620 Judah St.

SPORTS & IMPORTS 1981 MERCEDES 300SD Turbo Diesel for sale. 281,000 KMS, (Champagne colour) in fair condition, asking $3000. Maintenance log available. Call 250-885-9010. RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

AUTO SERVICES $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

1982 HYBRID Westphalia. Can run on diesel or veggie oil. 1.9l 1996 Jetta engine. $12K. Serious enquiries only. Nanaimo (250)591-3711.

250-885-1427 Call us ďŹ rst & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

CARS

1999 FORD Econoline 350 Super duty Motorhome. V10. $22,000. 125km. Very well taken care of, clean and runs great. Please phone 250-6554840. Located in Sidney.

SIDNEY- NEW 2 bdrm + den, W/D. NS/NP. $1600 mo. Avail immed. Call 250-217-4060. TOWNHOUSE FOR Rent, Sooke Beautiful New Townhouse for rent in Sooke. 3 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 bath, 6 appliances. Garage & Driveway. 10 min walk to town core, on bus route. Private, cozy backyard. Small pets considered. $1350/mth, incl. garbage. Ph. 250-642-4952 or 250-8800110. Email: bulldog77@shaw.ca or visit www.drayeheights.com for photos.

1977 CADILAC Eldorado, beige metallic. Cruise control, automatic. Very good cond., only 80,000 km. $2000. obo. Please call (250)477-7076.

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES “2004 RAV4 4WDâ€?- $13,500 ďŹ rm. 4 cyl, auto, silver, Michelins, 120,000 km,Victoria only vehicle. Complete maintenance history. Lady-driven, no accidents, excellent condition, keyless entry. Model Recommended In Top 10 by Consumer Reports. (250)479-5545.

TRANSPORTATION AUTO FINANCING DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0� Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1985 CADILLAC Seville, 70,000 k. Mint condition. White leather upholstery. 1 owner. $3,500. Call (250)656-1560.

4&--:063 $"3'"45 XJUIBDMBTTJmFEBE

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 ďŹ rm. 250-755-5191.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

1-800-910-6402



Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other ďŹ nancing options available to qualiďŹ ed applicants.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


A26 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES HAULING AND SALVAGE

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

ELECTRICAL

GARDENING

HANDYPERSONS

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

FALL CLEAN ups, complete maintenance. Residential and commercial. 250-474-4373.

SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Call Fred, 250-888-5345.

250-477-4601

GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $40/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

CARPENTRY

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748.

BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Perimeter drains, driveway prep, Hardscapes, Lot clearing. Call 250-478-8858.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES 2 EXP’D reliable, thorough house cleaners. Excellent refs. 250-514-5105, 250-595-8760. GREAT RATES! Guar. cleaning since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. (250)385-5869 MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estates, events, offices. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

COMPUTER SERVICES COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites, etc. 250-886-8053, 778-351-4090.

CONTRACTORS CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

250-361-6193 QUALITY Electric. New homes, renos. No job too sm. Seniors disc. #22779. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. F.S.R. ELECTRICIAN. 20 yrs+ exp. Residential: New homes & Renos. Knob & tube replacement. $40./hr. Seniors Disc. Lic.#3003 (250)590-9653

PRO IRISH Gardeners; pruning, clean-ups, landscaping, lawn care, weekly gardening. Free est. Call (250)514-5942.

FENCING ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

GARDENING J&L GARDENING Specialty yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. John or Louise (250)891-8677. (250)208-8535 WOODCHUCK Yard a mess? Fall pruning & clean-up. Blackberry & ivy rmvl, weed control. 24yrs exp. 250-216-9476 ACCEPTING clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups.

COMM. & Residential Reno’s: Drywall, Carpentry & Painting. Call Les (250)858-0903.

ELECTRICAL

GARDEN OVERGROWN? Weeding, lawn cuts, cleanups, pruning. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca AURICLE BSC. 250-882-3129 Fall clean up, Lawn aeration & fertilize-soil-hedges & more. DPM SERVICES- lawn & garden, seasonal pruning, clean ups, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

.... THE GARDENING GAL .... Quality Affordable Gardening. Renovations Maintenance & Cleanups.... 250.217.7708.

250.388.3535 HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES INSULATION

PLASTERING

MALTA BLOWN Insulation. Attics - interior/exterior walls & sound silencer. (250)388-0278

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

PRESSURE WASHING

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

HAULING AND SALVAGE #1 JUNK Removal & Hauling. Small Renos. Free estimates. Cheapest in town. Same day emergency removal. Call 250818-4335. $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279. CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. EWING’S MOVING & Hauling. 1 men & truck. $60/hr. Call Dave at 250-857-2864. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

MOVING & STORAGE

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. DIAMOND MOVING- 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734. DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior Discount. Free Est’s. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler at 250-418-1747.

YARD ART

PAINTING

Tree, Hedge & Shrub Pruning Lawn Care. 250-888-3224

DO YOU ENJOY OUTDOOR VIEWS ALL YEAR ROUND? SUNROOM & SKYLIGHT REPAIR SPECIALISTS Custom Railings & Shower Enclosures Beat the Rain! ALLIED GLASS 250-388-5108

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS 250-889-5794. DIAMOND Dave Gutter & Window Cleaning at Fair Prices! 250-507-6543. AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, Guards, windows, powerwashing, roof demoss, repairs. Insured. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

HANDYPERSONS AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BIG BEAR Handyman. Decks, Stairs, Painting, General household repairs. Free estimate. Call Barry 250-896-6071

✭BUBBA’S HAULING✭ Honest, on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service. 250-478-8858. SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578. JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

GEOF’S RENO’S & Repairs. Decks, stairs, railings, gates & small additions. 250-818-7977.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS DEMOSS Dr. $499 per/roof. 2 years warranty. We also install new roofs? Call 250-589-4998

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

TREE SERVICES LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

WINDOW CLEANING

BIG BEAR Painting. Interior & Exterior. Quality work. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071

DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

PLUMBING

WINDOW & Gutter Cleaning, minor repairs. Comm/Res. Insured, free est. (250)881-3684

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

WE’RE ON THE WEB

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

Give them power. Give them confidence. Give them control.

GIVE THEM A PAPER ROUTE! A paper route is about so much more than money. These days kids want and need so many things. With a paper route they not only earn the money to buy those things, they also gain a new respect for themselves. They discover a new sense of confidence, power and control by having their very own job, making their own money and paying for their own games, phones and time with friends. All it takes is an hour or so after school Wednesday and Friday. And even better... there are no collections required.

It’s so easy to get started… call

250-360-0817 circulation@vicnews.com circulation@saanichnews.com circulation@goldstreamgazette.com www.vicnews.com www.saanichnews.com www.goldstreamgazette.com

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR


www.vicnews.com • A27

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, October 31, 2012

sceneandheard

P H O T O

F E A T U R E

Photos by Gunnar Freyr Steinsson To book events call 250-381-3484 or e-mail adminassist@vicnews.com

■ Women in Business Gala ■ Tuesday, Oct. 23 ■ Victoria Marriott Inner Harbour

Black Press Women in Business gala Women representing businesses from across the Capital Region came together Tuesday for the fall 2012 Black Press Women in Business gala at the Victoria Mariott Inner Harbour Hotel. A day for celebrating the successes of women throughout Greater Victoria, Black Press also took the opportunity to present its 2012 Women in Business Awards. Shawna Walker, from the Oak Bay Beach Hotel, received the Woman Business Owner of the Year Award, sponsored by the Women’s Enterprise Centre. Mandy Farmer, CEO of Accent Inns, received the Above and Beyond Award, sponsored by Staples Advantage. Stephanie Papik, owner of Fairfield’s Knotty By Nature fibre arts store was presented with the Ecoentrepreneur Award, sponsored by LalliCare Clinic, and Johanne Paquette, owner of Speakwell speakers bureau, received the Rising Star Award, sponsored by Nando’s Flamegrilled Chicken. Hosted by Penny Sakamoto, Black Press Group Publisher for Greater Victoria, with emcee Meribeth Burton, long-time Victoria journalist and now corporate spokesperson for BC Transit, the event also welcomed keynote speaker Alison Ross, the owner of Kilshaw’s Auctions who is lighting up the national stage as a “pawnmaster” on History Television’s hit, Pawnathon Canada. Other guests included the Victoria Foundation, presenting its Vital Signs community report on the Capital Region, Mayfair Mall fashion stylist Bonnie Pollard, showcasing the season’s must-have looks, and personal care experts from the Aveda Institute with the latest makeup trends. In addition to the Awards sponsors, Black Press gratefully acknowledges the support of Canadian Western Bank, Island Savings, Salt Spring Coffee and Home Outfitters for helping make the event a terrific success. Watch your local community newspapers for details about the next Women in Business event coming this spring.

Alison Ross, TV host and owner of Kilshaw’s Auctions, with Black Press Group Publisher, Penny Sakamoto.

Kate Coles, Brooklyn Greig, Shawna Walker (Business Owner of the Year), Kevin Walker and Beverly Booth.

Johanne Paquette, of Speakwell, accepts the Rising Star award from Ian Reinders and Arun Dodd, of Nando’s Flame Grilled Chicken.

Lindsay Wilson from the Westshore Chamber of Commerce, Dale Collins of Prosperity Planning and Patricia Wade of Patricia Wade Design.

Saira Waters of Dollar Divas and Alex Yates of Vision 2000 Travel Group.

Bonnie Pollard of Mayfair Shopping Centre introduces the latest fashion trends.

The Women’s Enterprise Centre’s Dawn McCooey with Christine Scott of Black Press.

Cindy Cairns of Murphy Wallbeds, and Karen Broughton of Five Star Cleaning

Alexandra Bristow gives Sandy Armitage a makeover.

Alison MacDougall, Roxana Da Costa and Anuschka Steigermann, of the Aveda Institue.

Mandy Farmer was named Above and Beyond business winner. Accepting on her behalf, at left, is Karen England with sponsor Shelley Rogers of Staples Advantage.

Eco-Entrepreneur award winner Stephanie Papik, of Knotty by Nature accepts the award from sponsor Melissa McLean, of LalliCare Clinic.


A28 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 - VICTORIA

You’ll feel like family! C Carrots O U N 2/ $300 T R Beef Top Sirloin Y Grilling Steaks V $297 A L Raisin U Bran E ISLAND GROWN

5 Lb Cello Bag

USDA SELECT

Lb 6.55 Kg Family Packs Limits in Effect

KELLOGG'S

$ FLYER EVERY FRIDAY Watch for our

in select Saanich News, Victoria News, Goldstream News Gazette & Peninsula News Review

97

5

1240 g

Limit 2

FROM CHINA

Country Grocer Mandarins

$ 97

3

5 LB BOX

HUNT'S

Thick & Rich Pasta Sauce

$ 00

4/ 5

680 mL

Limit 4 Total

CHEF BOYARDEE

Mini Ravioli Canned Pasta

$ 97

7

8-425 g Case

Limit 1

CAMPBELL'S

Soups • Tomato • Mushroom • Vegetable • Chicken Noodle

$ 00

2/ 1

284 mL

Limit 8 Total

IN THE BAKERY

Chocolate Chip Cookies

$ 97

4

24 Pack

Proud to be serving Victoria since 1986 Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Deposits and/or environmental fees extra where applicable. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday October 31st- Saturday November 3rd, 2012

4420 West Saanich Rd, Royal Oak • 1153 Esquimalt Rd, Victoria Open Daily 8am - 10pm

Offers valid at Royal Oak and Esquimalt Country Grocer locations only.

NEWS

Victoria News, October 31, 2012  

October 31, 2012 edition of the Victoria News

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