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EAGLE VALLEY

NEWS

Students take on social issues in community Page 6

Eagles continue to disappoint opposition Page 7

Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012 PM40008236

Vol. 53 No. 41 Sicamous, B.C., • 1.25 (HST included) • www.eaglevalleynews.com

A moo-ving experience: Parkview Elementary Principal Joan Chafe plants one on Katie, a jersey cow brought into the school gym Wednesday so that Chafe could live up to her end of a challenge she put out to students (and they met) to raise $400 for the Terry Fox Foundation. Be sure to check out the video at www.eaglevalleynews.com, or on the EVN Facebook page. Photo by James Murray

Arts Council receives good news on disaster assistance Appeal: Province upholds appeal against decision denying flood repair funding for Red Barn. By Lachlan Labere Eagle Valley News

Being a squeaky wheel may soon pay off for Carla Krens and the Eagle Valley Arts Council, who have been trying to secure disaster financial assistance for flood damaged caused to the Red Barn Art Centre. Last week, Krens and the arts council received a lengthy letter from Rebecca Denlinger, the province’s fire and emergency management commissioner and Provincial Emergency Program director, explaining why they are now considered eligible to receive disaster financial assistance. Denlinger’s letter is in response to an appeal by the arts council, which had applied for, and was subsequently denied, financial aid through Emergency Management BC’s Disaster Financial Assistance (DFA) pro-

gram. The funding was sought to help with the cost of repairing damage caused by this summer’s flooding. According to an Aug. 17 letter from Emergency Management BC, the arts council was denied funding on the grounds that it doesn’t qualify as a “charitable,” volunteer organization. “My dispute is with the fact that since we have income of any kind through the rental of the Red Barn, we’re disqualified,” Krens, the arts council’s treasurer, explained to the News. “I don’t see why income equates to non-charitable, because the Red Cross is definitely a charitable organization and they raise funds. And we raise funds through rental, so I don’t see the reason for us being disqualified.” Work in progress: Eagle Valley Arts Council treasurer Carla Krens takes Krens raised the point that the regulation in the work being done by volunteers to repair the damaged caused to the Red See George Abbott on page 3 Barn Arts Centre during summer’s flooding. File photo


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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Eagle Valley News

Councils see results from UBCM effort Need Help? By Lachlan Labere Eagle Valley News

Ask and sometimes you will receive. This is a lesson Salmon Arm and Sicamous took away from the recent Union of B.C. Municipalities convention. Representatives of both municipal councils were among the 1,500 or so local government delegates to vote on 203 resolutions, ranging from the highprofile vote to lobby Ottawa for the decriminalization of marijuana (passed), to backing the consumption of booze at music festivals and special events (passed), to redistributing the $82 million a year casino host cities get to communities without gambling facilities (failed). None of the resolutions, however, were submitted by the District of Sicamous or City of Salmon Arm’s councils. Instead, both of these delegations attended this year’s convention with something of a hit list to raise with specific provincial ministers. The biggest issue for Sicamous was water. In particular, getting the B.C. government’s support, and funding, for a new water treatment plant. After stressing this need with the appropriate ministers, Sicamous council and Mayor Darrell Trouton were overjoyed to hear Premier Christy Clark, in her speech to UBCM delegates, commit the province to helping the district fix its water

CALENDAR OF EVENTS This is a FREE listing of community events for not-for-profit organizations and paid advertisers. DEADLINE: 2pm, Fridays

problem. Salmon Arm council also received an unexpectedly quick and positive response after meeting with B.C. Attorney General Shirley Bond. The purpose of this meeting, led by Coun. Alan Harrison, was to discuss the need for an intersection camera in Salmon Arm on the Trans-Canada Highway. Mayor Nancy Cooper said Bond was well informed of the situation, and was made aware of the rigamarole Salmon Arm has been going through. “When we talked with the attorney general, Shirley Bond, her deputy minister said, ‘well you know there’s 204 intersection camera requests ahead of Salmon Arm,’” explained Mayor Nancy Cooper. “And (Bond) said, ‘well, how many of those have we sent letters to saying we would do it and not done it?’ And he said, ‘well, none.’ And she said, ‘how many municipalities have said they would put up $100,000,’ which is what it costs to get that camera? ‘How many of them have put up that money themselves?’ And he said none. So she said, ‘then I think Salmon Arm moves to the top of the list.’ Cooper says the morning after that meeting with Bond she received a call from ICBC wanting to discuss the intersection camera further. “They were wanting to talk to me and I said

I would talk more when I got home,” said Cooper. “But that was quite nice – the very next morning.” Another instance of gratification for Cooper and Trouton came in Clark’s announcement that the province will be investing $650 million over the next 10 years into four-lane improvements of the Trans-Canada Highway between Kam-

also included lobbying Fortis to bring natural gas to the community. Trouton said the meeting went very well, and that Fortis will continue surveying the district over the next couple of months to see if connecting the community is viable. Trouton was also pleased with the response from the province to the notion of establishing a gateway tourism centre

It’s nice to have that connection with other council’s in our area so you can have these conversations about how we can help each other. Nancy Cooper Mayor, City of Salmon Arm

oops and the Alberta loops border. This came as a bit of a surprise for Cooper, Trouton, and Revelstoke and Golden mayors David Raven and Christina Benty. Prior to the announcement, the four had met to discuss shared concerns about the highway before meeting with BC Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Mary Polak. “(Polak) was saying well, we understand but you know, the economy, right now it’s not a great time and there’s not a lot of money to put towards it and this kind of thing,” said Cooper. “So when we heard (Clark) on Friday, we were like, ‘yes!’ We were all pretty happy to hear that in the premier’s speech.” Sicamous’ hit list

October 14 - Uniformed Appreciation Service for Police, Fire, Ambulance, etc. @ Sicamous Bible Church. 326 Kappel Street, Sicamous. November 17 - Shuswap Ladies Striders Membership Drive to Renew or become a new member at Piccadilly Mall from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Cost is $10.00 yearly. Shuswap Lady Striders meet throughout the year to partake in seasonal athletic activities and have social time together. Every 1st & 3rd Tuesday- Sicamous Lions Club meets at the Sicamous Seniors Activity Centre, 1090 Shuswap Ave, Sicamous. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Meeting starts at 7:00 pm. Everyone Welcome. For info contact Joan at 250-836-4876 or Kathy at 250836-3267 Every 1st & 3rd Wed.- Parkinsons Support Group at First united Church. 20 - 4th Street SE, Salmon Arm at 10 am. Contact Doreen at 250-836-2509. Every 1st & 3rd Wed. Eagle Valley Photography Club starts on Oct 17. Everyone welcome. 7 pm at the Red Barn. Every 4th Mon.- Royal Canadian Legion Br. #99 general meeting, 7 p.m. Third Sunday of the month -Regular meeting of the Eagle Valley Artisans Guild. 3:30 pm - Red Barn, Sicamous. Guests welcome. For info contact Terry

Sicamous in Sicamous. “The (tourism) minister’s staff will be taking the lead on it, getting back to us and collaborating with Parks Canada as well,” said Trouton. “So they’ll come to Sicamous and assess the idea.” There were additional positives for Salmon Arm council as well. They met with both the Minister of Education, Shuswap MLA George Abbott, as well as Advanced Education Minister John Yap to lobby for support for the downtown campus proposal. Coun. Debbie Cannon took the lead on this presentation, and Abbott accompanied council for their presentation to Yap. “Then, after we finished meeting with the

Sinton: 250-836-4613. Every Monday and Thursday -Chairbiotics (low impact exercise) Seniors activity Centre 10:00 am. Join us. $2 each. Every Mon. & Fri. - Bridge, Seniors Activity Centre, 1 p.m. Every Tues. Stopping the Violence Program in Sicamous - counselling for women who have experienced abuse during childhood or adult relationships. No charge. Call Kathy at 250-832-9700. Every Tues. - Sicamous Amateur Drama Club rehearsals, 7:00 p.m., Red Barn Arts Centre. 836-4705. Tues. & Thurs. - Carpet Bowling at the Seniors’ Activity Centre at 1 p.m. Every Tues. & Thurs. - Seniors Meals provided, 12 noon in Common Room at the Haven. Every Wed. Wednesday Arts for Everyone. 10 am - 3 pm starting September 5. For info contact Juanita at 250-836-3019 or Gail- at 250-836-5472 Every Wed. Girl Guides of Canada. Sparks - 3:00 pm. Brownies - 4:00 pm. Girl Guides - 5:30 pm. New members welcome Every Wed. Lunch by a donation at the Seniors Activity Centre, 1091-Shuswap Avenue at 12 noon.

minister of advanced education, we’d heard it had been endorsed by the (Okanagan College) board of governors, so that was really exciting,” said Cooper. Coun. Chad Eliason took the lead in explaining Salmon Arm’s need to Community, Sport, and Cultural Development Minister Bill Bennett for future funding to replace aging sewer lines. Bennett responded by saying the city would need a good plan, and that there’s $10,000 in funding available to put together such a plan. “They realize probably every community in the province needs sewer upgrades, right, and there would possibly be some federal money down the road,” said Cooper. Both Trouton and Cooper commended their respective councils for the long hours and good work they put in at the convention. And Cooper acknowledged the importance of working together with neighbouring councils like Sicamous’. “I noticed we were leaving one meeting just as they were going in, and we said, ‘it’s okay, we didn’t take any money, it’s all yours,” laughed Cooper. “It’s nice to have that connection with other councils in our area so you can have these kinds of conversations about how we can help each other, and the kidding around too.”

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Sunshine award to Gordon Mackie, Arnie Veideman, Sicamous Museum, Leif David, Eiko Uehara, Astrida Knox, Ivy Munro, Sierra Leonhardt, Tim Hortons, A&W, Shell, Subway, D Dutchman Dairy, and Grandma & Grandpa’s Restaurant. The Summer Reading Club 2012 was a great success! 95 members read 982 books! ~ Eileen & Belinda, Sicamous Library **** Bright sunshine to my traveling partners, Don & Agatha, Terry & Sharon, Darrell & Jeanette, Charlotte, Heidi and Fred for the great company and learning experience at UBCM. Special thanks goes out to Fred for driving Charlotte and I home from the airport. Much appreciated. ~ Councillor Joan Thomson **** Bags full of sunshine to everyone who frequented the new Sicamous Market this year. Thanks too to the Sicamous Legion for hosting us every week. Special hugs for Cyril for dedicating your Saturday mornings to making it possible for us to have a market and to Judy for everything she does and especially the awesome music! ~ The Bag Lady Sunshine Awards are FREE of charge. 20 words per award, due to limited space. Please do not submit more than two awards per week. Recognize your friend, neighbour or loved one with a sunshine award for doing that extra special good deed!

Every Wed. - Seniors Crib, 7:30 p.m., Haven seniors building. Everyone welcome - you don’t have to be a senior. Socializing and coffee served after crib. Info: Esther 836-4373. Every Wed. - T.O.P.S. (Take off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Wednesday morning at the Sicamous Rec. Centre (arena). Weigh in at 9:00 am and meeting at 9:30. Everyone Welcome. Ph: 250-836-4041 for info Every Wed until July 25 - Sicamous Mixed Softball League games, 6:30 pm at Finlayson Park Every Wed.-Sat. United Church Thrift Store 10:00 am to 3 p.m. Every Thurs. - Malakwa Thrift Store 10:00 am - 4:00 pm. $2 a bag (clothes sale) Located between the two churches. Every Thurs. - Sicamous Crokinole Group meets at 7pm at the Sicamous & District Recreation Centre upstairs for more info and to join call Dave Reed @ 250-836-3652 Every Thurs.-Ladies shuffleboard at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #99 in Sicamous. 1pm-3pm. All ladies welcome. Every Thurs.- Crib and darts 7 pm at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #99. Everyone welcome. Every 1st, 3rd, 4th Thurs. - Keepsake Kwilters

meet at the Haven Common room 1095 Shuswap Avenue at 7:00 p.m. For info call 250-836-2695. Every 2nd and 4th Thurs. Options For Sexual health from 7 to 9 p.m., Sicamous Health Unit. Every 3rd Thursday monthly meeting of the Malakwa Community Association at 7:30 in the Malakwa Hall. Every Fri. - Parents & Tots, 10-12 noon at Catholic Church. 836-3440. Every Fri. - Eagle Valley Brush & Palette Club, Red Barn, 10am-3pm, Everyone welcome! Every Sat. - Outdoor market – back parking lot of Sicamous Legion $10/space. No booking required. No required start or end times. Every 1st & 3rd Fri. - Pool Tournament at the Royal Canadian Legion #99 at 7:00 pm. Every 4th Sun. - OAPO Birthday Tea for members & friends, Seniors Activity Centre, 2 p.m. Last Saturday of every month -Sicamous Royal Canadian Legion #99 Ladies Auxilliary dinner 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Fax your events to: 250-836-2661 or visit us at Parkland Mall, Sicamous


Eagle Valley News Wednesday, October 10, 2012

www.eaglevalleynews.com A3

Community Foundation funds growing By Barb Brouwer Eagle Valley News

This year, a mission of the Shuswap Community Foundation is to create a smart and caring community. In a spirit of community-building generosity, the foundation last week disbursed discretionary grants totalling $65,025 and $106,695 in agency and donor-directed grants for a grand total of $171,720. In her president’s report, Karen Angove, called this a significant milestone and a major accomplishment. Other highlights Angove noted were the McGuire Lake Memorial Walkway, created in partnership with the City of Salmon Arm

and seven new family funds. The walkway will become the designated community location to celebrate life’s milestones, such as significant birthdays and anniversaries to fondly remember a loved one. Each 12”X”24” brick purchased for placement in the walkway includes a donation to the foundation’s walkway fund, which will fund communitybased charitable programs, projects and services within the Shuswap area in perpetuity. “Our permanent capital fund has grown to almost $5 million,” she reported, noting the foundation also boasts a new website and, “in

a difficult economic climate, sustainable, better than average returns on investments.” Groups benefitting from Shuswap Community Foundation grants this year include: Adams River Nature Society, Caravan Farm Theatre, Cedar Heights Community Association, Eagle Valley Community Support Society, Shuswap District Arts Council, Friends of 1922 Notch Hill Society, Kamloops Symphony Society, Literacy Alliance of the Shuswap Society, Salmon Arm Children’s Festival Society, Malakwa Community Centre Association, North Canoe Parent Advisory Council, Northern Lights Cham-

ber Choir, Salmon Arm and Shuswap Lake Agricultural Association, Salmon Arm Bay Nature Enhancement Society, Salmon Arm Museum and Heritage Association, Shuswap Association for Community Living, Shuswap Family Resource and Referral Society, Shuswap Trail Alliance Society, Shuswap Association of Writers, Sicamous and District Senior Centre Society, Sorrento Memorial Hall Association, Switzmalph Cultural Society, RCAC 222 Shuswap Squadron Sponsoring Committee. Angove offered sincere thanks to retiring board members Alice Duck from Sicamous

and Doug Adams from Salmon Arm for their significant contributions over the past several years. Welcomed onboard as new foundation directors were Colleen Johns, representing the Sicamous area and John White representing the Salmon Arm area. Looking ahead, Angove says the foundation has embraced the Gov. Gen. David Johnston’s mission to make Canada a smarter and more caring nation by joining a “Smart and Caring” initiative created by Community Foundations Canada. For more information on the foundation, call their office at 250-832-5428.

George Abbott and district backed arts council’s appeal Continued from front

upon which Emergency Management BC based their decision fails to define charitable, and that its wording is ambiguous. Denlinger concurs in her letter that a definition of ‘charitable’ is not given, and that “it is therefore hard to interpret what organization qualifies or not.” She goes on to explain that most DFA applicants that do qualify as charitable, are registered as charitable organizations under the Income Tax Act. Because the arts council is not a registered charity, Denlinger then referred

to Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) policy and guidelines to determine if the arts council qualifies. Ultimately, she decided in favour of the arts council’s appeal. “Based on the CRA criteria for charitable organizations and the information you provide about the Eagle Valley Arts Council, I am satisfied that your organization is a charitable organization and am therefore overturning the original determination and direct that you be considered to be eligible to receive disaster financial assistance,” writes Denlinger.

Along with submitting the appeal, Krens was able to secure letters of support from both the District of Sicamous and Shuswap MLA George Abbott, whose letter went directly to BC Justice Minister and Attorney General Shirley Bond. “I know the Eagle Valley Arts Council of Sicamous very well as it has been in operation for 32 years. I can attest to it being a “charitable” and “not-forprofit” organization,” writes Abbott. “Their members work very hard to keep their programs going, programs that benefit the old, the young and the broader

community. It is an excellent organization that greatly enriches the community.” Krens is grateful to both the district and Abbott. Though she is a little disappointed things have had to go as far as they have as a result of what she feels was a hasty decision on the part of Emergency Management BC. “They come to this conclusion now, why wouldn’t have they come to that conclusion then if they had looked at it in more depth?” says Krens. There is still, however, some paperwork required for the arts council. Denlinger asks

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(250) 836-3070 • 217 Finlayson St., Sicamous, BC

2012 Flood Victims Trust Account Fund Announcement – October 3, 2012 Limited funds are available through donations to the 2012 Sicamous Flood Victims Trust Fund. These funds are available to property owners that have received physical damage to household fixtures regardless of full time resident status. Application forms are available at the District of Sicamous office at 446 Main Street or the Chamber of Commerce office at 314A Finlayson Street. Completed applications will be received at the District of Sicamous office at 446 Main Street, Sicamous, BC until 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 31st, 2012. For anyone still wishing to donate to the fund, donations can be made at the Sicamous Branch of the Salmon Arm Savings and Credit Union to Account number 1549914, Branch 2, Sicamous 2012 Flood Victims. Donations will be accepted until 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, October 31st, 2012.

District of Sicamous Ph: 250-836-2477 Fax: 250-836-4314 www.sicamous.ca 446 Main Street. Box 219 Sicamous B.C. V0E 2V0

that they provide a letter from their insurance company confirming that flood insurance was not available for the Red Barn. Krens says she has confirmation that the lowest available flood deductible is $10,000, and that the arts council’s policy will not cover that. “But I have to go back and see if that’s acceptable or not, but I’m pretty sure it will be,” says Krens.

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Eagle Valley News

OPINION Mayes needs to step up for his constituents

O

bviously no one wants politicians interfering with independent agencies simply to benefit themselves or their

party. But Okanagan-Shuswap MP Colin Mayes is taking things a little too far. When asked if he would make a presentation to the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission over Falkland possibly being removed from the riding, his response was, “It’s a public process, not a political process.” No one was expecting Mayes or the Conservative government to issue marching orders to the commission, but there is a role for him to play in this “public process.” He was elected to represent the interests of his constituents and a number of his constituents are saying they would not be served by being shifted from Okanagan-Shuswap to a new riding that includes Kelowna, Summerland, Merritt, Logan Lake and Princeton. Falkland residents insist that all of their economic and social connections are with Vernon, Salmon Arm and the other communities of the Okanagan-Shuswap. In a new riding, their interests would likely be forgotten and they would have to travel great distances — likely to Kelowna — to meet their federal representative. Beyond the residents themselves, who better to present their case than Mayes? He has been MP for a number of years and should be familiar with the community of Falkland and the close relationship it has with the other communities of Okanagan-Shuswap. He must understand the challenges they would experience if the boundary was redrawn. Political interference in a legislated process is wrong, but that doesn’t prevent elected officials from doing their job and representing those they serve. It’s unfortunate Mayes hasn’t added his voice to Falkland’s fight. -Vernon Morning Star

EAGLE VALLEY

NEWS

NDP makes skills training their mission By Tom Fletcher News Columnist

VICTORIA – My column on skills training a couple of weeks ago gave short shrift to the NDP position: tax the banks and hand out grants for women’s studies, sociology and other worthless pursuits, while skilled jobs go begging. That’s a pretty crude caricature, so I sat down with NDP leader Adrian Dix in his legislature office last week to get a better sense of his thinking on the subject. Dix has been devoting a lot of time lately to skills training, in trades particularly. He meets frequently with business people now, and his recent speeches emphasize that every one of them talks about the growing shortage of skilled employees. Dix credits Premier Christy Clark and jobs minister Pat Bell with making some good moves recently, announcing equipment upgrades for vocational programs around the province. He says it’s because the NDP have been “pounding away at them for eight months” about freezing advanced education spending in their March budget. Dix calls that a crucial mistake and predicts the government will reverse it soon. “So I think, if we’re going to have

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a mission for four years as a government, if we’re elected, this is the mission: to start to address the skills shortage,” he told me. In his speech to the recent municipal convention, and again at an NDP provincial council meeting, Dix zeroed in on B.C.’s apprenticeship system. Since the B.C. Liberals took it from trade unions and set up a Crown corporation called the Industry Training Authority in 2004, the completion rate for apprentices has fallen to 37 per cent, he said. Dix assured me he isn’t proposing to “blow up” the ITA, or hand control back to unions. They will have “a voice,” along with business. Speaking to the NDP executive, Dix referred to Phil Hochstein, president of the non-union Independent Contractors and Businesses’ Association, as the symbol of trades training decline. Not surprisingly, Hochstein has a different take. The 37 per cent figure is misleading, Hochstein said, because under the ITA there are currently 32,000 apprentices in the system, twice as many as when it was union controlled. Many drop out in the first year, and Alberta claims a better completion rate because they don’t start counting until the second year. And when Dix touts

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Alberta’s “mandatory” trade system, Hochstein said he means returning to a system where all work is restricted to journeymen or registered apprentices of that trade. “What it does is impose union jurisdiction on the training system of the entire construction industry,” Hochstein said. “So multi-skilling, multitasking, organizing the work in the most efficient way is blown out of the water, and it’s stuck in the old craft system of training.” Hochstein said the NDP talks a great game about getting more young people into trades. But when unions have the upper hand, they will always favour seniority. A quota of two apprentices per journeyman means another one can’t be hired. Dix agreed with me that the public school system has over-emphasized university, to the detriment of not just industrial trades but lab techs, chefs and other skilled workers that are in short supply. As B.C. Federation of Labour president Jim Sinclair recently noted, tradesmen themselves often don’t encourage their kids, because they’ve been told all their lives that they are “tool monkeys” in a dead-end job. And would NDP student grants be targeted to need? Dix’s answer was a definite maybe.

BC PRESS COUNCIL-This Eagle Valley News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council.Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2.For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org

Published every Wednesday covering Sicamous, Malakwa, Mara, Seymour Arm and serving Anstey Arm, Cambie, Cinnemousin Narrows, Craigellachie and Solsqua. All material contained in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is expressly prohibited by the rights holder. We do not guarantee placement on specific pages. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) for our publishing activities. ADVERTISING DEADLINE: FRIDAY, 2 PM


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Eagle Valley News Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Snow Bird League

Recall makes veggies look mighty good With the expansion of the recent recall of beef coming out of Alberta, I can’t help but feel a bit relieved for being a vegetarian. Er, except for that bacon, lettuce tomato bagel I had the other week. Okay, so I’m not really vegetarian – anymore. But neither me nor my family is keen on red meat. Therefore, we’re not personally concerned for our wellbeing in relation to the beef products from the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alta. that have been found to be contaminated with a particularly nasty strain of E. coli. If you do have any beef sitting in your freezer, make sure it’s not on the very long list on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) website at www.inspection.gc.ca/ English/corpaffr/recarapp/ 2012/20121003e. shtml. If you do have one of these products,

IN PLAIN VIEW LACHLAN LABERE

it’s best to get rid of it. E.coli 0157, the strain in the recalled beef, is said to be one of the worst, capable of causing kidney failure and even death. About that vegetarian thing, I managed to live without meat for almost two decades. Only in the past couple of years have I begun to re-introduce product sourced from creatures that once walked on two or four legs. I gave up meat for a couple of reasons. One, I simply grew tired of it. As a wee lad, the meatless meal was an alien concept at my parent’s dinner

table. And throughout my youth, I must have eaten a cow’s worth of ground beef and a coop full of chickens. Another reason: I fell for a vegetarian and, well, to quote Jules Winnfield (Samuel L. Jackson’s character from the movie Pulp Fiction), “…my girlfriend is a vegetarian, which pretty much makes me a vegetarian too.” For some, vegetarianism is a socio-political decision. If you’re talking the politics of sustainability, there is an abundance of information out there supporting meatless and animal-product free diets as good for the planet. This is typically contrasted with largescale meat production and the resources it requires, related issues of animal cruelty and the impact they have on land, water, etc. The XL Foods recalls have opened up a different can of politi-

cal worms. The federal government is expected to take action, with critics reminding them of the cutbacks suffered by the CFIA under the Conservative’s recent omnibus bill, while questioning why CFIA alerted Canadians about the contaminated XL product three days after banning exports to the U.S. Meanwhile, our cattle industry (big and small players alike) is already beginning to suffer from the fallout. Earlier this year, when boxes of massed produced, contaminated meat products were being yanked off the shelves in another recall, a retired farmer told me this is part of the reason why we must protect our existing agricultural lands and support our local, small-scale producers/ processors. Problems tend to arise when you put all your eggs into so few baskets, so to speak.

By this time, my family had been eating meat in small portions, once, maybe twice a week – a shift driven by the eating habits of my fussy toddler. But I saw the sense of this argument, and try to base my meat purchases on it. Regarding the XL situation, it also makes sense not to place all one’s eggs in so few baskets, so to speak. I sometimes consider going cold turkey on meat again, especially when these massive recalls come up. It’s not easy though. I mean, let’s face it, bacon (quoting Pulp Fiction again) “tastes gooood.”

Wednesday, OCTOBER 10th, 2012 7:00 p.m. At the Curling Club

All current and new members welcome! Reduced registration fee if you attend the AGM!

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end us your sports results & stories!

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The S Sicamous & District Chamber of Commerce wants to hear from you! Who do you think deserves to be a star in Sicamous Chamber’s

Business Excellence Awards!

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Annual Dinner, Dance and Auction!

Dance the Night Away!

Saturday November 3rd , 2012 at 5:30 pm Featuring “LEAD PAINTED TOYS”

HATS OFF TO

EXCELLENCE

Oscar theme night so dress in your best “Red Carpet “ attire! Gala Event and Business Excellence Awards to be held upstairs at the Sicamous Recreation Centre. Tickets available at the Visitor Information office in the District Civic Centre, Main Street. TICKETS: $40 per person (tax not included)

Select a category and submit your nomination today! Nominators will be entered into a draw for a fabulous gift basket! Nomination Criteria: Must be a Sicamous & District Chamber Member in good standing. If you wish to have your business included please contact the Chamber Office Today 250-836-0002

Nominations must be received at the Chamber office by Oct 26th, 2012, 4 pm Send by fax 250-836-4368, mail or Nominate Online www.sicamouschamber.bc.ca Office drop off – Chamber Office • 314A Finlayson Street, PO Box 346 Sicamous, BC V0E 2V0

To view the list of eligible Sicamous & District Chamber Members & nomination criteria, stop by the office or nominate online. Visit www.sicamouschamber.bc.ca “I am pleased to nominate the business named below, in the category I have indicated, Below are my reasons for believing this business should be honoured with a 2012 Business Excellence Award.” (Attach a separate sheet with your comments or a letter of support, articles or a list of accomplishments.) Nominate as often as you like using a separate sheet or nominate online at www.sicamouschamber.bc.ca

Business Name: _______________________________

Email: ________________________________________

Category: ____________________________________

Nominator Name: _____________________________

Contact Name: ________________________________

Phone: _____________ Fax: _____________________

Phone: _____________ Fax: _____________________

Email: ________________________________________


A6 www.eaglevalleynews.com

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Eagle Valley News

ERS students tackle social concerns By Lachlan Labere Eagle Valley News

A new program at Eagle River Secondary is empowering students to make a difference. The high school’s social justice program began in September, and already the students involved have accomplished plenty. “We’ve done two community clean-up days… over 18 bags of garbage from Sicamous. We’ve put in over 56 hours of volunteer service at thrift stores and whatnot. We’ve raised, I think 33 pairs of glasses that are going to be going to Peru. We’ve got stamps, we’ve got shoes, we’ve got blankets for the women’s shelter, we’ve got baby blankets that we’re making for the health centre. The kids have been absolutely amazing with this project,” explains teacher Desiree Marshall-Peer. And as of Friday, Sept. 28, the program’s 16 students had raised more than $1,000 for yet another project held that evening, their Walk and Roll fundraiser for ALS B.C. (For more information, or to donate, visit http://www.alsbc. ca/events/third-partyevents/146-walk-androll-eagle-secondarysocial.) Marshall-Peer says the social justice course was developed at Eagle River, and is something that other schools, and the province, are watching to see how successful it

Letters Welcome

Eagle Valley News welcomes letters but reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and legality. Letters must be signed and include writer’s address or phone number for verification purposes only. No thank yous to specific businesses please.

Husky House Restaurant 6 am-10 pm

Sled/Boat Fuel Gas Bar Open 24-7

is. As Marshall-Peer describes it, her students are essentially allowed to choose their own projects, while they are guided by studies that look at issues at a local, national and international level. Humanitarian efforts and advocacy are a big part of the program. The next big project for ERS’ social justice students is the Hungry for Halloween food drive. Students will also be doing volunteer work at the local food bank, as well as a food bank kitchen in Salmon Arm. “The kids, a lot of time, they get the reputation of being, you know, the trouble makers or whatever. But they’re not; they’re wonderful kids,” says Marshall-Peer. This is something the school’s aboriginal support worker, Cathy Barrazza, would agree with wholeheartedly. The idea to do a fundraiser for ALS BC was actually Barrazza’s.

SICAMOUS EAGLES JUNIOR B HOCKEY CLUB

Double Header WEEKEND! vs. North Okanagan Knights

Away Game Friday, October 12

Home Game Saturday, October 13 Puck Action starts at 7 pm! Good Luck to all the lads! Sicamous & District Recreation Centre

She had wanted to organize some sort of fundraiser. Her brother Dave suffers from the disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Marshall-Peer’s students grabbed hold of the cause and made it their own – in part to make Barrazza happy. “I was very touched with their enthusiasm, wanting to do something for me,” says Barrazza. “I felt kind of selfish, that it was not right. But when I started to think about it, I thought, how lucky

I am that these kids want to do something that’s important to me and my family, a very personal issue.” For a future project, Marshall-Peer is looking at the possibility of having her students work in a soup kitchen in Vancouver’s notorious East Side, something she says a class from the Kootenays currently does. In the meantime, she says her students recognize there are issues close to home they can focus on.

IT’S AMAZING WHAT A COOKIE CAN DO! Your purchase supports

Big Fun! Big Adventure! Lots of Friends! girlguides.ca 1-800-565-8111

Sunday Breakfast Buffet

8 am - 11 am Husky 99 adults House $ Restaurant $ 99 seniors & kids

11 8

ALS walk: Eagle River Secondary’s Walk and Roll participants get ready to head off on the fundraiser for ALS, organized by students in the school’s Social Justice program. Photo by Lachlan Labere

Diesel Cardlock

10 & under

1340 TRANS CANADA HWY., SICAMOUS • 250-836-4675

Community Notice Beginning October 9, FortisBC contractors will be in the area collecting information to determine if a natural gas pipeline is feasible for the District of Sicamous. There will be no disruption or inconvenience to residences or businesses throughout the anticipated two week period. If you have any questions, please call 250-868-4502.

FortisBC uses the FortisBC Energy name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (12-274 12/2012)

Sicamous and District Rec Centre

(250) 836-2283 • arena@cablelan.net • Box 665 Sicamous

SICAMOUS & DISTRICT RECREATION CENTRE SCHEDULE ICE SURFACE - WEEK OF 1 OCTOBER 2012 MONDAY OCT 8 Public Skating: 10:30 am - 11:30 am Pre Novice: 5 pm - 6 pm Atom: 6 pm - 7 pm Pee Wee: 7:15 pm - 8:15 pm Old Times: 8:30 pm - 10 pm TUESDAY OCT 9 Public Skating: 10:30 am - 11:30 am Lunch Bunch: 12 pm - 2 pm Public Skating: 2 pm - 4 pm Figure Skating: 5 pm - 8 pm Eagles: 8:15 pm - 9:45 pm WEDNESDAY OCT 10 Public Skating: 10:30 am - 11:30 am Lunch Bunch: 12 pm - 2 pm Public Skating: 2:30 pm - 3 pm Pre Novice: 5 pm to 6 pm Atom: 6 pm to 7 pm Midget: 7:15 pm - 8:15 pm Eagles: 8:30 pm - 10 pm

Joel Kipp

THURSDAY OCT 11 Public Skating: 10:30 am - 11:30 am Lunch Bunch: 12 pm - 2 pm Public Skating: 2 pm - 4 pm Salmon Arm: 5 pm - 6 pm Pee Wee: 6 pm - 7 pm Midget: 7:15 pm - 8:15 pm Eagles: 8:30 pm - 9:30 pm FRIDAY OCT 12 SATURDAY OCT 13 Pre Novice: 9 am - 10:30 am Atom: 11 am - 12:30 pm Salmon Arm: 2 pm - 4 pm Salmon Arm: 4:15 pm - 6:15 pm Eagles vs N. Okanagan: 7 pm - 9 pm SUNDAY, OCT 14 Pee Wee: 9:30 am - 11:30 am Midget: 11 am - 1 pm Eagles vs Revelstoke: 2 pm

Rec Centre Gym open 8:00 am to close. Full Membership: $20.

SICAMOUS EAGLES PLAYER PROFILE Position: Defenseman Home Town: Salmon Arm Age: 19 Height: 6’ 0” Weight: 165 Prev Team: Salmon Arm SilverBacks Hobbies / Interests: Rihanna, Katy Perry, Carrie Underwood Personal Hero: My Brother Goals / Objectives: To win and get a scholarship Favorite NHL Team: Vancouver Canucks Favorite Player: Niklas Lidstrom Favorite Music: Country Favorite Food: Tacos What do you like best about playing hockey in Sicamous: Great team mates


Eagle Valley News Wednesday, October 10, 2012

www.eaglevalleynews.com A7

SPORTS

CONTESTS CONTES TS PR PRODU ODUCTS CTS STORE STORES S FLY FLYERS ERS DEALS DEALS COUPO COUPONS NS BROCHU BRO CHURES RES CATAL CATALOGU OGUES ES CON CONTES TESTS TS PR PRODU ODUCTS CTS ST STORE ORES S FLYERS FLY ERS DE DEALS ALS CO COUPO UPONS NS BRO BROCHU CHURES RES CA CATAL TALOGU OGUES ES

Eagles continue to disappoint opponents By Lachlan Labere Eagle Valley News

The Sicamous Eagles appear to be doing something right. Last weekend the team chalked up two more wins, making it five in total, preceded by two overtime losses. Eagle Brendan Devries was named first star in Sicamous’ Friday, Oct. 5 home game, contributing three goals to the team’s 8-4 tally vs the Kamloops Storm. Teammate Corbin Marcotte was first on the board, however, with a power play goal at 13:23 in the first frame, assisted by Jameson Stoski and Cam Olson. In the final third of the period, Sicamous kept the Storm on the defensive while potting four back-to back goals. The first came from Matt Reed, aided by Cameron Berry and Jamie

Breakaway: Connor Buick gets stopped on a breakaway by Aaron Brandoli during the Sicamous Eagles 2-1 win over the Revelstoke Grizzlies on Saturday. Photo by Alex Cooper/Revelstoke Times Review Gallo. Devries put in the Storm was able to able to bring the action goal number three, as- put in an early mark- back to Sicamous’ end, sisted by Kelyn Opel. er, but Connor Buick but was only able to Aiden Nisse put in goal (Reed) was able to secure two more goals number four (Brett Tro- bring Sicamous’ lead before the clock ran fanenko, Marcotte), up to 6-1 before the pe- out. while Jordan Harder riod’s end. Marcotte and Reed potted the fifth at the Devries scored his were named the game’s :31 mark (Marcotte, second and third goals Trofanenko). early in the final frame. In the second frame The Storm was then

Sicamous Adult Flu Public Health Unit Phone: 250-836-4835 Tuesday, October 30 9am – 11:30am Tuesday, November 6 Tuesday, November 20 Tuesday, November 27 9am-10:30am By appointment only

Sicamous Seniors Activity Centre Thursday, October 18 9am – 3:30pm Wednesday, October 24 9am – 11:30am No appointment necessary Malakwa Community Learning Centre Thursday, October 25 2pm – 4pm No appointment necessary

Flu shots are safe, effective, and free for the following: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Visit flyerland.ca to view this week’s flyer Valid Friday through Thursday

Visit our facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/SafewayCanada

SAVE TIME. SAVE MONEY.

your source for FREE coupons

Packing material for moving Once you have finished reading the newspaper don’t throw it away. Find another use for it. Newspaper makes great filler for packing household goods when moving. As soon as everything is unpacked, take the used newspaper to a recycling center near you.

Read Reuse Recycle

&

Free residential metal & organic waste FREE FLU SICAMOUS DISPOSAL EVENT CLINICS

Get your free Àu shot at: Sicamous Family Flu Public Health Unit Phone: 250-836-4835 Wednesday, October 24 1pm – 5pm Wednesday, November 28 2pm – 4pm By appointment only

second and third star. Sicamous had to work harder to earn their 2-1 win Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Revelstoke Forum vs rivals the Grizzlies. The Grizzlies were first on the board with a goal in the second half of the first period. Eagle Nicholas Astasiewicz was able to tie things up at :58 before the period’s end. The score remained 1-1 throughout the second frame, finally broken by Devries halfway through the third period, with assists going to Devon Quartly and Stoski. Reed was named first star for this game, while Sicamous netminder Jack Surgenor was named second star, stopping 46 out of 47 shots.

Creating better lives, vibrant neighbourhoods, and a healthier planet.

People 65 years and older and their caregivers/household contacts Children and adults with chronic health conditions and their household contacts Health-care workers Emergency responders All children age 6 to 59 months of age Household contacts and caregivers of children age 0-59 months Pregnant women who will be in their third trimester during inÀuenza season and their household contacts Residents of nursing homes and other chronic care facilities People who work with live poultry and/or swine Aboriginal people Adults who are very obese And more …to view a full list of those who can get their Àu shot for free visit www.interiorhealth.ca/FluClinics

The Àu (inÀuenza) is highly contagious. Getting your Àu shot protects you and those around you – at home, school and work. For more information contact your local public health of¿ce, or visit www. interiorhealth.ca

October 1st to November 10th for Sicamous Residents During regular land¿ll hours of operation ONLY

SICAMOUS LANDFILL NOW OPEN ORGANIC WASTE

Grass Clippings • Leaves • Prunings • Brush & Weeds • Tree Limbs up to 8” in diameter

WHITE GOODS

Fridges • Air Conditioners • Freezers • Hot Water Tanks • Bath Tubs • Stoves • Clothes Washers and Dryers

Fridges, freezers, water coolers, air conditioners, etc, that contain FREON will be subject to a $15/unit Freon removal fee

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

Barbeques • Lawn Mowers • Angle Iron • Bed Springs • Propane Tanks • Metal Doors • Metal Window Frames • Plate Steel (small pieces) • Metal Roo¿ng • Metal Siding • Old Plumbing • Bicycles • Metal Toys (wagons, etc.) • Swing Sets • Metal Yard Tools NO wood attached. NO auto parts. NO auto bodies. NO commercial wastes and NO prohibited wastes. All other refuse delivered to the refuse disposal site on these days will be assessed the applicable refuse disposal fee. All commercial loads are subject to disposal fees. For more information contact:

Columbia Shuswap Regional District 781 Marine Park Drive NE, Salmon Arm BC V1E 4P1 250-833-5950 Toll free at 1-888-248-2773 www.csrd.bc.ca


A8 www.eaglevalleynews.com

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Eagle Valley News

Eagle Valley News Wednesday, October 10, 2012

www.eaglevalleynews.com A9

Fire Prevention Week

Fire Prevention Week

Prevention

1122 RIVERSIDE AVENUE 250-836-3603

Repl Replace plac acee or pprofessionally ac roffe ro fess fess ssiio ionall iona lly rep repair any appliances that spark, smell unusual, or overheat.

Week

Fire Prevention Week The Anchor Riverfront Motel

1321 TCH Sicamous 250-836-2546 www.anchormotel.ca

October 7-14, 2012

A fire is no fun... but practicing fire safety can be. Plan two escape routes from every room and practice home fire drills.

Double check all curling irons and hair care appliances are unplugged before leaving your room

Fire Prevention Week AUTO s u o m a c i S R RECYCLERS

SWANSEA POINT FIRE DEPARTMENT (l to r) Back Row L-R: Don Herrmann, Janet McQuhae, Trisha Kennedy, Ron Hughes, Hank De Boer. Front Row L-R: Rick Martens, Mike Thoms, Gage Golling (Future Firefighter), Mike Melnichuk (Chief), Gus Fugmann, Gary Bandura. Missing: Ed Herrmann, Gord Parker, Kaulin Melnyk, Gerry Langan, Dave Schurek, Mark Klyn, Bob Babonau, Brian Magowan

Trans Canada Hwy, East of Sicamous

250-836-3939

Ensure there is a working smoke alarm on every floor of the home.

Fire Prevention Week 534 Main M i St., St Sicamous, Si BC

250-836-4781

Replace smoke detector batteries annually.

SICAMOUS FIRE DEPARTMENT : Ashley Allen, Vivian Ogino, Shane Mckellar, Brett Ogino, Chad Strohschien, Brianna Laroy, Nicole Kramer, Cherie Kramer, Peter Kramer The crew from left to right back row are: Clayton Allen, Christa Meyer, Gordon Elliott, Jordan Laroy, Dennis Barbe, Derrick Brown, Jarrod Laroy, Mike Ross, Jan Hedmark, Dale Wood, Chris Gagel, Dean Henderson Missing crew are: Barry Chafe, Bradford Backs, Dawn Backs, Chris Wilson, Jamie Walsh, Kevin Allen, Ron Dunlop

Smell gas?

(NC)—We replace all sorts of things in our homes on a regular basis. So why is it so hard to remember that smoke (and carbon monoxide) alarms need to be replaced too? They are working

24/7/365 so it makes sense that they don’t last forever. Fire safety officials remind us to replace all smoke alarms every 10 years. For CO alarms, they need to be replaced every 7-10 years depending

Fire Prevention Week

Get out, then call:

Fire Prevention Week

Feel all doors before opening them. If a door is hot, get out another way.

Fire Prevention Week

Sicamous 814 TC Highway Use appliances that have an automatic shut-off.

Fire Prevention Week PRODUCE • MEATS • DRY GOODS • GROCERIES • BAKERY • DELI

• 250-836-4899 • 436 Main St. Sicamous Open 7 days a week • 8am - 9pm

Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years.

Fire Prevention Week

www.twinanchors.com • 1.800.663.4026 Wear safety gear when welding & dealing with hot metals

Fire Prevention Week SICAMOUS EAGLES JUNIOR HOCKEY CLUB

www.sicamouseagles.com Never leave your cooking unattended.

Fire Prevention Week Eagle Valley Arts Council

Marine

Make sure all extinguishers are updated & checked regularly

e Prevention evention Wee Fire Week

Hair Affairs 444 Main Street Sicamous BC Ph: 250-836-2737

If your clothes catch fire, STOP, DROP & ROLL on the floor to smother the flames.

MALAKWA FIRE DEPARTMENT: Guest Yvon Lehoux from Rocky Mountian Phoneix Pump Tester, Kenn Mount CSRD Fire Coordinator, Joanne Held Malakwa Fire Chief, Travis Braun firefighter, Cam Salmond firefighter, Daryle Attig firefighter, Rick Re firefighter, Jim Jackson Safety Officer, Steven Simpson new recruit. Missing crew are: Mike Cosman, Ron Westbrook, Dan Roddick, Trevor Vandenberg, Kutis Attig, Kassi Attig, Nathan Koebel, Richard Ouillette, Monica Hunter, Steven Simpson, Ron Noel, Jess Pilgrim.

Fire Prevention Week Eagle River Automotive Specializing in light trucks and 4x4s General Auto Repairs Highway #1 East, Sicamous, BC

(250) 836-2333 Do not smoke, or leave matches or lighters in the garage or workshop.

FortisBC uses the FortisBC Energy name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (11-001.5A 10/2012)

on the manufacturer. This is true whether alarms are battery operated or hardwired. So the next time you’re in a hardware store, pick up another “decade of defense” for your family’s peace of mind.

Mayor, Councillors & staff

Supporting the growth of Arts & Culture in our community.

FortisBC’s 24-hour Emergency Line at 1-800-663-9911, or 911. Natural gas is used safely in homes across B.C. everyday. FortisBC adds an odourant that smells like rotten eggs or sulphur. If there’s a leak, you’ll smell it.

Smoke alarms need to be replaced regularly

DISTRICT OF SICAMOUS

1226 Riverside Ave.

517 Main Street 250-836-2525

If your clothes catch fire, STOP, DROP & ROLL on the floor to smother the flames.

Fire Prevention Week Sicamous and District Rec Centre • (250) 836-2283 • arena@cablelan.net • Box 665 Sicamous Keep a timer handy to remind you when the oven and burners should be switched off.

Fire Prevention Week INSURANCE BROKERS & CONSULTANTS Sicamous: 250-836-3600 Replace frayed electrical cords before they burn or cause a fire.

Fire Prevention Week

yard medics Bradford Backs: (250) 517-9393

Paul Backs: (250) 836-3277 517-8321

During power outages, exercise caution when using candles as a light source.

Fire Prevention Week LICENSED DINING Fantastic food Daily Specials 734 TRANS-CANADA HWY, Sicamous, BC

250-836-4906 www.joeschmucks.ca Do the light fixtures in your home use bulbs that are the correct wattage?


A8 www.eaglevalleynews.com

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Eagle Valley News

Eagle Valley News Wednesday, October 10, 2012

www.eaglevalleynews.com A9

Fire Prevention Week

Fire Prevention Week

Prevention

1122 RIVERSIDE AVENUE 250-836-3603

Repl Replace plac acee or pprofessionally ac roffe ro fess fess ssiio ionall iona lly rep repair any appliances that spark, smell unusual, or overheat.

Week

Fire Prevention Week The Anchor Riverfront Motel

1321 TCH Sicamous 250-836-2546 www.anchormotel.ca

October 7-14, 2012

A fire is no fun... but practicing fire safety can be. Plan two escape routes from every room and practice home fire drills.

Double check all curling irons and hair care appliances are unplugged before leaving your room

Fire Prevention Week AUTO s u o m a c i S R RECYCLERS

SWANSEA POINT FIRE DEPARTMENT (l to r) Back Row L-R: Don Herrmann, Janet McQuhae, Trisha Kennedy, Ron Hughes, Hank De Boer. Front Row L-R: Rick Martens, Mike Thoms, Gage Golling (Future Firefighter), Mike Melnichuk (Chief), Gus Fugmann, Gary Bandura. Missing: Ed Herrmann, Gord Parker, Kaulin Melnyk, Gerry Langan, Dave Schurek, Mark Klyn, Bob Babonau, Brian Magowan

Trans Canada Hwy, East of Sicamous

250-836-3939

Ensure there is a working smoke alarm on every floor of the home.

Fire Prevention Week 534 Main M i St., St Sicamous, Si BC

250-836-4781

Replace smoke detector batteries annually.

SICAMOUS FIRE DEPARTMENT : Ashley Allen, Vivian Ogino, Shane Mckellar, Brett Ogino, Chad Strohschien, Brianna Laroy, Nicole Kramer, Cherie Kramer, Peter Kramer The crew from left to right back row are: Clayton Allen, Christa Meyer, Gordon Elliott, Jordan Laroy, Dennis Barbe, Derrick Brown, Jarrod Laroy, Mike Ross, Jan Hedmark, Dale Wood, Chris Gagel, Dean Henderson Missing crew are: Barry Chafe, Bradford Backs, Dawn Backs, Chris Wilson, Jamie Walsh, Kevin Allen, Ron Dunlop

Smell gas?

(NC)—We replace all sorts of things in our homes on a regular basis. So why is it so hard to remember that smoke (and carbon monoxide) alarms need to be replaced too? They are working

24/7/365 so it makes sense that they don’t last forever. Fire safety officials remind us to replace all smoke alarms every 10 years. For CO alarms, they need to be replaced every 7-10 years depending

Fire Prevention Week

Get out, then call:

Fire Prevention Week

Feel all doors before opening them. If a door is hot, get out another way.

Fire Prevention Week

Sicamous 814 TC Highway Use appliances that have an automatic shut-off.

Fire Prevention Week PRODUCE • MEATS • DRY GOODS • GROCERIES • BAKERY • DELI

• 250-836-4899 • 436 Main St. Sicamous Open 7 days a week • 8am - 9pm

Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years.

Fire Prevention Week

www.twinanchors.com • 1.800.663.4026 Wear safety gear when welding & dealing with hot metals

Fire Prevention Week SICAMOUS EAGLES JUNIOR HOCKEY CLUB

www.sicamouseagles.com Never leave your cooking unattended.

Fire Prevention Week Eagle Valley Arts Council

Marine

Make sure all extinguishers are updated & checked regularly

e Prevention evention Wee Fire Week

Hair Affairs 444 Main Street Sicamous BC Ph: 250-836-2737

If your clothes catch fire, STOP, DROP & ROLL on the floor to smother the flames.

MALAKWA FIRE DEPARTMENT: Guest Yvon Lehoux from Rocky Mountian Phoneix Pump Tester, Kenn Mount CSRD Fire Coordinator, Joanne Held Malakwa Fire Chief, Travis Braun firefighter, Cam Salmond firefighter, Daryle Attig firefighter, Rick Re firefighter, Jim Jackson Safety Officer, Steven Simpson new recruit. Missing crew are: Mike Cosman, Ron Westbrook, Dan Roddick, Trevor Vandenberg, Kutis Attig, Kassi Attig, Nathan Koebel, Richard Ouillette, Monica Hunter, Steven Simpson, Ron Noel, Jess Pilgrim.

Fire Prevention Week Eagle River Automotive Specializing in light trucks and 4x4s General Auto Repairs Highway #1 East, Sicamous, BC

(250) 836-2333 Do not smoke, or leave matches or lighters in the garage or workshop.

FortisBC uses the FortisBC Energy name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (11-001.5A 10/2012)

on the manufacturer. This is true whether alarms are battery operated or hardwired. So the next time you’re in a hardware store, pick up another “decade of defense” for your family’s peace of mind.

Mayor, Councillors & staff

Supporting the growth of Arts & Culture in our community.

FortisBC’s 24-hour Emergency Line at 1-800-663-9911, or 911. Natural gas is used safely in homes across B.C. everyday. FortisBC adds an odourant that smells like rotten eggs or sulphur. If there’s a leak, you’ll smell it.

Smoke alarms need to be replaced regularly

DISTRICT OF SICAMOUS

1226 Riverside Ave.

517 Main Street 250-836-2525

If your clothes catch fire, STOP, DROP & ROLL on the floor to smother the flames.

Fire Prevention Week Sicamous and District Rec Centre • (250) 836-2283 • arena@cablelan.net • Box 665 Sicamous Keep a timer handy to remind you when the oven and burners should be switched off.

Fire Prevention Week INSURANCE BROKERS & CONSULTANTS Sicamous: 250-836-3600 Replace frayed electrical cords before they burn or cause a fire.

Fire Prevention Week

yard medics Bradford Backs: (250) 517-9393

Paul Backs: (250) 836-3277 517-8321

During power outages, exercise caution when using candles as a light source.

Fire Prevention Week LICENSED DINING Fantastic food Daily Specials 734 TRANS-CANADA HWY, Sicamous, BC

250-836-4906 www.joeschmucks.ca Do the light fixtures in your home use bulbs that are the correct wattage?


A10 www.eaglevalleynews.com

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Eagle Valley News

Prevention WeekOctober 7-14 Statistics reveal that the most common causes of fire are: • Leaving candles unattended. • Falling asleep while a candle is lit.

FIRE PREVENTION WEEK OCT. 7-14

Smoke alarms save lives

• Using candles for light. • Candles located too close to burnable objects.

“Fall back� to smart home safety

Fire Prevention Week Main St., Sicamous 250-836-Beer

Pub & Liquor Store

STOP, DROP & ROLL

Fire Prevention Week SEA-D

Only a working smoke alarm can save your life!

G BOAT SALES & Service

www.seadogboatsales.com 525 Main St. Sicamous BC (250) 836-4567

Do not store propane indoors.

Fire Prevention Week 1314 Nordin Court Sicamous, BC

Your Outdoor Adventure Store!

250-836-2541

Where possible, plan two exits: a main route and an alternate route from each room.

As most Canadians turn back the clocks on November 4, here are some timely smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) safety tips: s7HENYOU change your clocks, test your smoke arlam. s9OUHAVE less than three minutes to escape a ďŹ re. So when smoke alarms sound, everyone must know what to do and where to go. Having and practising an escape plan is essential. s)NSTALLONESMOKEALARM on every storey and outside BEDROOMS)NSTALLINSIDE bedrooms if you sleep with doors closed. s%NSUREALLSMOKEALARMS are fully powered. Never take out batteries or remove an alarm from ceiling due to a false alarm. s)FYOURHOMEHASANY fuel-burning devices such as a gas furnace, gas water heater, gas appliances, or an attached garage or carport, install at least one CSAapproved carbon monoxide outside all sleeping areas. One per storey is recommended.

s2EPLACESMOKEALARMSEVery 10 years, and CO alarms every 7-10 years (depending on manufacturer) whether battery operated or hardwired into your home’s electrical system. Carbon monoxide is colourless, odourless and tasteless. So without a CO alarm, humans cannot detect its presence. Despite the average home having several potential sources of the deadly gas, studies show that nearly 60 per cent of Canadians have not INSTALLEDA#/ALARM)NADdition to being impossible to detect, CO also has another nefarious trait. Symptoms of carbon monoxide exposure mimic the u, without the FEVER)TISROUTINELYRESPONsible for thousands of clinic and hospital visits each year, and is commonly misdiagnosed. Prolonged or extreme exposure causes nausea, dizziness, confusion, the loss of physical mobility, brain damage and ultimately, death. More home safety resources can be found on the www. safeathome.ca web site.

Analysis was undertaken on almost 50,000 ďŹ res that occurred in Alberta, British Columbia, and Ontario over a 5-year period involving 663 fatalities. The ďŹ ndings demonstrated that the death rate per 1,000 ďŹ res in the absence of a present, functioning smoke alarm was 74% greater than when a functioning smoke alarm was present.

In case of ďŹ re - GET OUT AND STAY OUT – never go back into a burning building s#RAWLLOWNEARTHEmOORTO the nearest exit maintaining contact with the wall. s4ESTTHEDOORBYFEELINGIT WITHTHEBACKOFYOURHAND)F it is hot, do not open. Use an alternative route. s)FTHEDOORANDKNOBARE cool, stay low with your shoulder against the door while opening slowly. Be ready to close the door if smoke and heat rush in. s)FTRAPPED PUTASMANY

closed doors as possible between you and the ďŹ re, and seal all cracks in doors and windows with towels or bedding. s)FYOURCLOTHINGCATCHES ďŹ re, stop where you are, drop gently to the ground and cover your face with your hands while rolling back-and-forth to put out the ames. s#OOLMINORBURNSWITH cold water.

Many fatal ďŹ res start at night All schools practise regular ďŹ re drills & alarm inspections

North Okanagan Shuswap School District No. 83

)NVESTIGATIONS into home ďŹ re deaths very often ďŹ nd that a smoke alarm did not sound. )TMAYHAVE been disconnected or not in working order. The batteries may have been dead, or someone may have taken them out. Smoke alone won’t necessarILYWAKEYOUUP)NFACT THE fumes could put you into an even deeper sleep. Often, victims never wake up. Se-

niors will often need assistance from family members to put safety measures into place. As well, family members are in the best position to reinforce the precautions necessary to help their loved ones prevent or respond to a ďŹ re. Focus on these six priorities to help aging family members protect themselves against ďŹ re in the home.

NINSTALL smoke alarms inside every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement. NLarger homes may need ADDITIONAL smoke alarms to provide enough protection. NFor the best protection, INTERCONNECT all smoke alarms so when one sounds they all sound. NAn IONIZATION smoke alarm is generally more responsive to aming ďŹ res and a PHOTOELECTRIC smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering ďŹ res. For the best protection, both types of alarms or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms (also known as dual sensor alarms) are recommended. N Smoke alarms should be INSTALLED away from the kitchen to prevent false alarms. Generally, they should be at least 10 feet (3 meters) from a cooking appliance. N REPLACE all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old.


Eagle Valley News Wednesday, October 10, 2012

www.eaglevalleynews.com A11

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Many other sizes and prices are available! Contact Leah Bousfield 250-836-2570

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NEWS

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A12 www.eaglevalleynews.com

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Eagle Valley News

Rush the net: Sicamous Junior Eagles player Nathen Penn tries to push past the goaltender in hockey action Sunday during the Jr. Eagles’ weekend tournament at the Sicamous and District Recreation Centre.

Church service gives thanks to those in uniform Having served in the British military, Lawrence Hudson understands how people who serve in uniform may not always receive the appreciation they deserve. Hudson, the pastor at the Sicamous Bible Church, notes how fire, ambulance and rescue crews, as well as the RCMP, as an example, are regularly tasked with thankless work. “Night and day, they’re out on the highway, looking out for us, protecting us. And yet we sleep comfortably,” says Hudson. “There’s nobody out there to say thanks for what you did

last week, thanks for putting that fire out. To make up for this, Hudson and the Bible Church will be hosting its second Uniformed Services Appreciation service, Sunday, Oct. 14, 10:30 a.m. at 326 Kappel Street. “We’ve only been here three-and-a-half years – we’ve been in a ministry 35 years out on the Prairies…,” said Hudson. “This is what we’d always done on the Prairies and we started it here and it just takes off. People really like to come to it. We have bagpipes. It’s kind of a grand thing.”

Hudson says the service will include a number of keynote speakers, including Mayor Darrell Trouton, as well as service people who will share some of their personal experiences. The service is open to anyone, and is an opportunity to say thank

you to the men and women who serve the community and region. “It’s to let them know we pray for them… that we are praying for them when we hear the sirens go, we’re going to pray for your protection and that you get back safely,” says Hudson.

SICAMOUS

Wa s t e R e d u c t i o n RECYCLING FAIR October 20th, 2012 10am - 3pm Sicamous & District Recreation Centre Parking Lot This is a one day opportunity to recycle these items: Houshold paints and solvents* • Pesticides and Herbicides (with registration numbers and the skull and crossbones ONLY)* • Old gasoline* in ULC approved containers • Smoke Alarms • Residential Àuorescent tubes

ELECTRONIC WASTE

Batteries, computers, printers, monitors, fax machines, televisions, non cellular phones, laptops, vehicle audio and video systems, home audio and video systems, scanners, personal or portable audio and visual systems only NO automotive or industrial paints or diesel oil. NO tires For more information contact:

Columbia Shuswap Regional District 781 Marine Park Drive NE, Salmon Arm BC V1E 4P1 250-833-5950 Toll free at 1-888-248-2773 www.csrd.bc.ca

HOME PLAN OF THE WEEK

PLAN NUMBER 7-4-932

TOUCH OF VICTORIAN ELEGANCE A turret surrounded by an old-fashioned veranda with decorative stone-based pilasters lends the exterior of this generously proportioned four-bedroom home a touch of Victorian elegance. The elegance carries through the covered entry and beyond the double-height foyer. To the right, a charming study occupies the turret’s ground floor, with french doors to a veranda. Nearby is a powder room with a coat closet opposite. The great room, complete with a fireplace flanked by built-in entertainment units, flows seamlessly into the bayed-out nook, where a window seat overlooks the back garden. No cook will ever feel isolated in the kitchen, separated only by countertops and an eating bar from the great room and nook. The U-shaped counter configuration will save steps, and a capacious pantry provides always-needed storage space. Completing this welldesigned space is a convenient prep island. Also on the main floor is the laundry room, with a handy chute from upstairs and built-in boot shelves. Access from the double garage to the kitchen leads through a mud-room with a useful bench for changing damp or grubby footwear. The design shows regard for the streetscape — the garage’s double doors are hidden, with two partly mullioned street-side

windows giving passersby the illusion of lived-in space. On the second floor, the master bedroom features its own private balcony and a walk-in closet. The four-piece ensuite occupies the turret, giving this space the air of a spa retreat. The second and third bedrooms share a spacious fourpiece bathroom with a laundry chute. Over the garage, linked to the main house by a sloping walkway, is an unfinished bonus room. With slanting ceilings and a dormer window, this space would make an ideal play area or studio. This home measures 79 feet wide and 50 feet, seven inches deep, totalling 2,673 square feet, plus an unfinished basement. Plans for design 7-4-932 are available for $812 (set of 5), $914 (set of 8) and $977 for a super set of 10. Also add $30.00 for Priority charges within B.C. or $55.00 outside of B.C. Please add 12% H.S.T., 13% H.S.T. Or 5% G.S.T (where applicable) to both the plan price and Priority charges. Our 44TH Edition of the Home Plan Catalogue containing over 300 plans is available for $13.50 (includes taxes, postage and handling). Make all cheques and money orders payable to “Home Plan of the Week” and mail to: HOME PLAN OF THE WEEK c/o Eagle Valley News Unit 7, 15243 91 Avenue Surrey, B.C. V3R 8P8

SEE OUR WEB PAGE ORDER FORM ON: www.jenish.com AND E-MAIL YOUR ORDER TO:

homeplans @ jenish.com


Eagle Valley News Wednesday, October 10, 2012

www.eaglevalleynews.com A13

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Eagle Valley News

Your community. Your classifieds.

EAGLE VALLEY

NEWS

250.836.2570 fax 250.836.2570 email classiÀeds@eaglevalleynews.com

Office Hours: Mon. - Thurs. 12pm - 4pm Friday 10am-2pm Address: 1133 Parksville St. Parkland Mall, PO Box 113 Sicamous, BC V0E 2V0 Ph: (250) 836-2570 Fax: (250) 836-2661

Announcements

Employment

Information

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

SKYLINE ESSO Truck Stop, Food & Fuel 5501 TCH Craigellachie, ATM, Showers, Propane & Diesel fuel, driver’s room, tires & minor repairs. Licenced restaurant, Open 7 days a week 5am - 11pm 1-250-836-4949

Email: classifieds@ eaglevalleynews.com Web: www.eaglevalleynews.com

Lost & Found

DEADLINE: Display Classified Thursday 4:00pm* Word Classified Friday 12:00pm* *Changes on holidays

Word Classifieds: • First 3 lines $14.50 + HST • Bold Face Ad 24¢ per word Legal Notices: Display ad format only at $10.36 per column inch. Box replies: $1.50 pick up fee $2.00 mail fee Prices do not include HST. All ads must be prepaid. Word advertisements should be read at the first issue of publication. Eagle Valley News is not responsible for any errors appearing beyond the first insertion. AGREEMENT: It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such an advertisement. SUBSCRIPTION POLICY: Subscription Rates are: $44.50 per year $39.00 for seniors 65+ Subscriptions are not refundable but may be transferred to a third party. We do not guarantee ad placement on specific pages.

EAGLE VALLEY

NEWS

FOUND: A GARAGE door opener on Riverside Ave in Sicamous near Three Buoys Marina. Call 250-836-2403 to claim.

DRIVERS WANTED: Terrific career opportunity outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects. No Rail Experience Needed!! Extensive Paid Travel, Meal Allowance, 4 wks. Vacation & Benefits Package. Skills Needed - Ability to travel 3 months at a time Valid License with air brake endorsement. High School Diploma or GED. Apply at www.sperryrail.com under careers, keyword Driver DO NOT FILL IN CITY or STATE

SYSCO Kelowna is currently seeking both Owner/Operators and regular Delivery Drivers to service our customers. Enjoy free weekends, performance awards and local based delivery runs - home every night. Owner/Operator’s average net income after expenses: $90k+. To apply, email: frank.donald@kelowna.sysco.ca

Travel

Education/Trade Schools

Timeshare CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. NO Risk Program, STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248.

Travel VISITING ARIZONA for the Winter? Meridian RV Resort. Good Sam-Trailer Life Top 100 RV Resorts in America. Check us out at: www.meridianrvresort.com or call 866-770-0080.

Employment Business Opportunities ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC The 2013-2015 BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations Synopsis The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terrific presence for your business.

Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: fish@blackpress.ca EARN EXTRA cash! - P/T, F/T Immediate Openings For Men & Women. Easy Computer Work, Other Positions Are Available. Can Be Done From Home. No Experience Needed. www.HWC-BC.com NORTHERN ALBERTA clearing contractor seeks experienced Buncher and Skidder Operators for work in Northern Alberta. Subsistence and accommodations provided; Michelle@CommandEquipment. com. Fax 780-488-3002.

Career Opportunities LEARN FROM home. Earn from home. Medical Transcriptionists are in demand. Lots of jobs! Enroll today for less than $95 a month. 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com

Caretakers/ Residential Managers APARTMENT manager required for Burns Lake B.C. 27 units, live-in prefer, wages negotiable. Call 1250-570-2304 or send resume to reimerrd@live.com

21 WEEK HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM Prepare for a Career in Heavy Equipment Operation. Introducing our new Apprenticeship Program which includes: ITA Foundation ITA HEO Theory Multi Equipment Training (Apprenticeship hours logged) Certificates included are: • Ground Disturbance Level 2 • WHMIS • Traffic Control • First Aid Reserve your seat for October 22, 2012. Taylor Pro Training Ltd at 1-877-860-7627 www.taylorprotraining.com

Employment

Employment

Help Wanted

Trades, Technical

TWO FULL time position available immediately for Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep dealership in Salmon Arm, BC. “Dispatch /coordinator”-Applicant must possess automotive mechanical knowledge-strong work ethic, organizational skills and can multi task. “Journeyman Technician” -Applicant must have good attitude, quality workmanship. Both applicants must be able to produce in a fast paced environment. Excellent wage and benefit package. Please send resume: pat@brabymotors.com

Civil Engineering Technologist II District of Kitimat, full time permanent - wage range $36.11 - $43.69, over 2 years. Civil Technologist diploma required. Reporting to the Technical Services Manager, duties include a variety of infrastructure investigations, surveying, design, contract preparation, inspection and material testing on projects related to the municipality’s water, sewer, drainage and transportation systems. Candidates should be proficient in using electronic survey equipment, computer assisted design using AutoCad 3D, and MS Office. Valid BC driver’s licence required. Submit resumes by October 23, 4:30 pm, to Personnel, District of Kitimat, 270 City Centre, Kitimat, BC, V8C 2H7, Fax (250) 632-4995, or email dok@kitimat.ca

Services

Professional/ Management M’AKOLA Group of Societies Seeking Director of Operations for Victoria. Visit makola.bc.ca

Obituaries

Health Products GET 50% off - Join Herbal Magic this week and get 50% Off. Lose weight quickly, safely and keep it off, proven results! Call Herbal Magic today! 1-800-854-5176.

An Alberta Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilfield road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051. BANNISTER AUTO GROUP If you are energetic, creative and motivated and have the desire to join a “Customer First Family”, then we should invite you to come grow with us. We are one of Western Canada’s fasted growing automotive companies. We have an opening at our GM store in Vernon for Sales Manager. Interested in joining our team? Contact Darryl Payeur @ 1-888-410-5761 or email resume to darryl@bannisters.com Bannister GM Vernon, Bannister GM Edson, Bannister Honda Vernon, Browns GM Dawson Creek, Champion GM Trail, Huber-Bannister Chevrolet Penticton, Salmon Arm GM Salmon Arm. BUSY Lower Mainland tire shop is looking for an Experienced Service Truck Tire Technician. Your own Service Truck is preferable but not necessary. Top Wages Paid. Please send inquiries to tireshop1234@hotmail.com

Help Wanted

PLOW TRUCK OPERATORS

Argo Road Maintenance (North Okanagan) Inc., operating in the Armstrong/Enderby/ Vernon, Falkland, Lumby/Cherryville, Salmon Arm/Sicamous, Chase/Celista areas, is accepting resumes from drivers experienced in the operation of single and tandem axle trucks. Experience operating sanders and underbody or front plows would be an asset, but not essential. Applicants must hold a valid BC Driver’s License, minimum Class 3 with Air Brake Endorsement and must provide a current Driver’s Abstract with their resume. Please submit your resume and abstract to Mark Stahl, Programs Manager, by e-mail: argoroads13@yahoo.ca; by fax: 250-546-3791; by mail: Box 544, Armstrong, B.C., V0E 1B0; or in person: 2310 Kirton Avenue, in Armstrong.

Columbia Shuswap Regional District

• • •

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

You can remember someone special with your gift to the Canadian Cancer Society To donate In Memory or In Honour: online: www.cancer.ca or mail to:

Salmon Arm Unit Office 111 Lakeshore Dr. N.E, PO Box 3451 Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4S2 Please include: Your name & address for tax receipt; Name of the person being remembered; Name & address to send card to. Let’s Make Cancer History

Honesty Makes a Difference

We accept all Memorial Society and Pre-Need Funeral Policies Making final arrangements for a loved one is not easy. That’s why compassion goes into everything we do. We are prepared to arrange any special request you may have. • Traditional Services • Cremation Services • Prearrangement Planning • All inquiries welcome 24 hrs.

Tammy & Vince Fischer

FUNERAL SERVICES & CREMATORIUM LTD. 4060-1st Ave. S.W. Salmon Arm, 833-1129 www.fischersfuneralservices.com Serving Kamloops to Golden Toll Free 1-888-816-1117

We’re on the net at www.bcclassified.com

Is seeking a highly motivated individual to fill the following position

(Casual/On-Call)

ADMINISTRATIVE CLERK The CSRD is seeking an energetic, outgoing and friendly person to play a front line role in the Administration Department. Applications are now being accepted for a Casual/On-call Administrative Clerk to provide relief work of a clerical nature on a call-in basis. As part of the Administration team, the Administrative Clerk provides reception, clerical support and centralized public information services to all departments with the primary function being reception. To find out more about this position you can visit our website at www.csrd.bc.ca. If you are interested in this position, submit a letter of interest supported by a resume outlining experience and education no later than 4:00 PM Friday, October 12, 2012 to: Colleen Goodey, Administrative/HR Assistant Columbia Shuswap Regional District 781 Marine Park Drive NE Box 978 SALMON ARM, BC, V1E 4P1 Telephone: (250) 833-5922 Fax: (250) 832-9774 E-mail: cgoodey@csrd.bc.ca The CSRD thanks all applicants for their interest in applying for this position; however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

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Register Online at www.bcdailydeals.com

BCDaily


www.eaglevalleynews.com A15 g y

Eagle Valley News Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Services

Real Estate

Transportation

Financial Services

Real Estate

Auto Financing

DROWNING IN debts? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500 GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161. M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

RIVERFRONT RESORT, Southern BC. Lots available as low as $61,900. Year round park, indoor pool & spa. Low maintenance fees. Inquiries: Jan 250-499-7887; Caroline 250-499-4233; www.riversidervparkresort.com

Need CA$H Today? Own A Vehicle? Borrow Up To $25,000

No Credit Checks! Cash same day, local office.

www.PitStopLoans.com 1.800.514.9399

Legal Services CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

Business/Office Service DENIED CANADA Pension plan disability benefits? The Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help. Call Allison Schmidt at 1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca

Small ads, BIG deals! Painting & Decorating nt iscou $D ting$$ $ ain P • Residential & Commercial • Interior/Exterior

• Wallpapering • Drywall Repair • Professional Workmanship • Seniors Discounts

Other Areas BUY LAND in Belize - English Commonwealth country in Central America. Caribbean Jungle lots - 3 miles from sea Starting at $11,000. All types available. For information call Patrick Snyder 778-403-1365.

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent 2 BDRM. $600/mo. N.S. N.P. 250-836-4509. LGE 1 & 2 BDRM. BRIGHT apts. In suite storage, green space, live-in manager. Cable incl. Sicamous, 250-836-4516 or 250-804-5364. SICAMOUS: 1 BDRM. $575/mo. 2 bdrm. $650/mo. plus hydro & D.D. 250-8363849. SICAMOUS. 2-bdrm luxury condo, 2 full baths + ensuite. Beautiful views of Shuswap Lake. New ss fridge, micro, d/w, w/d, built-in vac. $1000/mo. Avail. immed. (604)970-7745

Serving Sicamous & Area for 20+ Years

Merchandise for Sale

Heavy Duty Machinery A- STEEL SHIPPING STORAGE CONTAINERS / Bridges / Equipment Wheel loaders JD 644E & 544A / 63’ & 90’ Stiff boom 5th wheel crane trucks/Excavators EX200-5 & 892D-LC / Small forklifts / F350 C/C “Cabs”20’40’45’53’ New/ Used/ Damaged /Containers Semi Trailers for Hiway & StorageCall 24 Hrs 1-866-528-7108 Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557

Homes for Rent SICAMOUS: HOUSE FOR lease. NS, 3 bdrm. very close to school, fenced yd. 3 bay garage. Refs and D.D. req. $1200/mo. + util. 250-8043485.

Suites, Upper

Auto Services

SICAMOUS: 3BDRM 1100sq. ft., shared laundry, big yard 425 Main Street across from Askew Mall, avail now, $650/mo + util., also 5bdrm. whole house $880/mo. + util. (604)836-7888

BUY A car with Bad Credit! $0 Down, 24 Hour Approvals, Low Payments, No Credit OK. Approval Hotline Call 1-888222-0663 or Apply Online at www.CanadaDrives.ca

Townhouses 2BDRM townhome/condo Eagles Roost. Immed. occupancy, Downtown Sicamous, end unit/extra lg garage, New bldg, w/dryer in unit, former show home. $895/mo including Hydro. Leanne (250) 804-3485 SICAMOUS 2 bdrm townhouses, c/w washer & dryer. 250-836-4556

For Free Estimate call Lorraine

Cell 833-8009 Home 836-4154

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

Homes for Rent

Vehicle Wanted WE BUY All Cars! Not, we will Cars/Trucks/Vans. Car today with Phone call to: 8647.

Running or buy it! Sell Any One Free 1-800-551-

Trucks & Vans 2007 Sierra 1500 2wd,V-6 4 new tires, 67K. economical. Lady driven, excellent cond. $10,900. 250-503-2042

Homes for Rent

SLEDDER’S PARADISE Newly Renovated Family Home 2899 Sundance Road, Sicamous 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 4 appliances, nice yard, quiet area. $1100 per month & Hydro (1 year lease) with bi-monthly maintenances & inspections. Willing to sell or rent. For inquiries/photos: s_chambers@live.ca

403-823-7633 Interior South

Interior South

201 Mann Road, Sicamous

Misc. for Sale HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper?

Misc. Wanted Private Coin Collector Buying Collections, Accumulations, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins + Chad: 250-863-3082 in Town PURCHASING old Canadian & American coin collections & accumulations. 250-548-3670

PRICED TO SELL! BELOW ASSESSED VALUE! 2200+ sq. ft., 3 bdrms, 2 baths, full bsmt., single car garage, large deck with Mara lakeview! Summer kitchen, family rm, bath & large storage rm/workshop in bsmt with access to garage.

$189,000

MLS®10050805

Musical Instruments CORT acoustic steel string guitar with cutaway, grover tuners and Fishman Pickup. Beautiful wood and sound. Must be seen and played to appreciate. $650 Call 250-517-8087

Call Charlotte Hutchinson Personal Real Estate Corporation

TOLL FREE

1-800-582-8639 CELL 250-833-6545 OFFICE 250-836-2223 at Mara Lake INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

www.charlottehutchinson.com


A16 www.eaglevalleynews.com

Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Eagle Valley News

Thank You to all who participated in the Fourth Annual

Dave Stead Senior M e m o r i a l G o l f To u r n a m e n t

Held at Eagle River Golf Course

Sat., Sept. 15th 2012

Thanks to Lead Painted Toys for rocking out the tunes at the tourney!! Majority of the proceeds go back into the community, sponsor a local midget hockey player and a donation to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Canada. New this year is our “Scallywag Award” in loving memory of Devlin & Lealen Wagner. We wish wish to recognize all who donated this year and we appreciate your continuous support !

Twin Anchors Houseboats TA Structures and Twin Anchors Marine Nillerah’s Day Spa The Village Joe Schmuck’s Extreme Pita Brand Alliance Toliver Design Eagle River Automotive Shoppers Drug Mart - Brittany Kyllo Dave the Barber Remax Shuswap - Tammy C Jon Stead Daryl King Mike Yawney Sicamous Yoga George & Mary Watters Trican Cory & Nicole Davis Full Speed Rentals CM Rentals Synterra Technology Eagle River Golf Course - Rick, Marianne, Sonny Jager & staff Super 8 Motel Happy Corkers Wine & Gifts Nigel & Jeanne Lamb Maui Jim - Ali Watson Loanne Hidber Black Fox Energy Capri Insurance Bob White Dave Stead Jr. Colleen & Rod Dubois Askew’s Nixon Wenger Tim Horton’s Eagle Valley News Reds Rentals Royal Camps Dewalt Tools - Shawn Brayshaw D Dutchmen Dairy Best Western - Sicamous Inn Anchor Riverfront Motel Happy Trails T- Shirt Company BDO Dunwoody The Cover Spa Hair Affairs Sweet Freedom Yoga Gwyneth Stead Greg & Georgina Kyllo Todd & Jolayna Kyllo Sea Dog Boat Sales Naomi Low & Ben Lewis Inkxs Design & Printing Marianne and Knud Thomsen Moose Mulligans Brookstone Log Furniture Dakshina Yoga Buddy Rich Serenity Bookkeeping Lisa Stead and Taiya Stead

Special mention to the following individuals for their countless time and efforts in organizing this event!! Greg, Sarah, Brittany, Angela & Sammy Kyllo, Sarah Palmer, Tricia Jeffery, Gwyneth Stead and Mike Gallagher. To anyone we may have missed in the above list we sincerly aplologize and extend our heartfelt gratitude!

Photos; Tia Lemieux and Sarah Kyllo

Many thanks from the Stead and Kyllo families for your continued and generous support.


Eagle Valley News, October 10, 2012