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PENINSULA

NEWS

Established 1912

Fire Safety Week Oct. 7 to 12

A safe path in Central Saanich

Getting to know the Peninsula’s fire and police services and staying safe, page A15

A group of Central Saanich citizens is petitioning the district to create a path into Brentwood Bay, page A3

Friday, October 5, 2012

Watch for breaking news at www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Delay denied North Saanich council majority holds off challenge to development process Steven Heywood News staff

A majority of councillors in the District of North Saanich are fed up with roadblocks being thrown up against residential development proposals and said as much in a vote at the most recent council meeting. Mayor Alice Finall raised a motion on Monday, Oct. 1 to halt any action on density issues — including hearing development proposals — in order for council to complete its public consultation process. It was an attempt, said some councillors, to put the brakes on the municipality’s approvals process and in the end did not pass. “The mayor is trying to stall what we are trying to do,” said councillor Ted Daly, recalling his previous cries for a review of the official community plan, which failed at the time, but would have addressed the current issue of housing density. “We’ve had this discussion before,” added coun. Dunstan Browne, saying by statute, the district has enough meetings to hear from the public on these issues. “The problem with this motion … is that it’s wording … means nothing gets done.” Finall’s motion, “that council complete the public consultation process prior to considering or taking any further steps with increases in density,” is about public input, she said. PLEASE SEE: Dramatic density change, page A4

Steven Heywood/News staff

Sidney North Saanich RCMP cordon off a portion of Tulista Park Wednesday morning after a body was discovered in a parking area near the Anacortes Ferry terminal.

Foul play ruled out in death B.C. Coroner’s Service discovered cause of death of man found in Sidney park Steven Heywood News staff

A man’s body was found Wednesday morning, Oct. 3 in a parking area at Sidney’s Tulista Park. A large portion of the north end of the park, near the Anacortes Ferry terminal, was cordoned off by police for about four hours that morning, to allow their forensics section and B.C. Coroner’s Service to investigate the scene. Police at the scene reported that the Sidney North Saanich RCMP had received calls in the early morning about the possibility of a deceased person in the park.

Sgt. Wayne Conley said the body was discovered next to a parked motor home. He added police were looking into whether the person and the vehicle were connected, and said later that they were. The man had apparently parked the motor home in the lot in the early morning hours of Wednesday, Oct. 3. The body was not that of 54-year-old Gordon Henderson, who had been reported missing Oct. 1 and has since been found (see page 2 of today’s paper). Conley said the investigation revealed that there was no foul play involved in what was termed a sudden death. The man was not from the area and his next-of-kin, who live in another province, have been notified. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com


A2 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Missing man is found safe North Saanich’s Gordon Henderson had been missing since Monday

      



Steven Heywood News staff

          

A 54-year-old North Saanich man has been found alive and safe after being reported missing by his family on Monday, Oct. 1. Police earlier in the week had enlisted the public’s help to try to find Gordon Henderson. By Wednesday afternoon, Sidney North Saanich RCMP had reported that Henderson has been found alive and his family was on their way to

 

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meet with him. Further details about the disappearance were not given. Henderson went missing Monday and was believed to have been in the area of the Saanich Peninsula at the time. Cpl. Kevin Day of the RCMP stated in a media release Tuesday that the disappearance was out of character for Henderson. Sgt. Wayne Conley of the RCMP said Wednesday that they appreciate the work of area media and the public in getting the word out.

RCMP/file

Gordon Henderson of North Saanich has been found.

Pacific Coach Lines bus shelter sought along Pat Bay Highway

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Devon MacKenzie News staff

Central Saanich district council and staff will be sending a letter to Pacific Coach Lines requesting that the company consider erecting a shelter at their stop on the Pat Bay Highway in front of the Waddling Dog pub. Council moved to have staff send the letter

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after communication was received from users of the bus who noted that there is nowhere for riders to sit and wait, nor is there shelter if they are waiting in poor weather. Council also discussed the possibility of asking PCL to consider moving the stop to a location with an existing covered shelter if erecting a shelter isn’t an option. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

UBCM rejects casino reform VICTORIA — A proposal to redistribute some of the $82 million a year casino host cities get to cities without gambling facilities was rejected by delegates at the recent Union of B.C. Municipalities conference, amid concerns over how it would work. — Black Press

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A3

Friday, October 5, 2012

Devon MacKenzie/News staff

Traffic travels along a busy stretch of West Saanich Road just before the intersection at Keating X Road. Residents in the area are calling for a separated pedestrian pathway along the road.

Residents call for pedestrian walkway Concerned citizens in Central Saanich want safe access to bus stops, amenities Devon MacKenzie News staff

A group of Central Saanich residents are banding together to call for a pedestrian walkway to be put in along a section of West Saanich Road. Barb Whittington, who lives on West Saanich Road near the intersection of Old West Saanich Road, started a petition with several neighbors asking the municipality to consider the feasibility of installing a separated (from the roadway) pedestrian pathway that would run from the northern end of Old West Saanich Road into Brentwood Bay. “What we’re looking for is something similar to what Saanich

installed in front of the Red Barn Market,” explained Whittington. “We want a pathway that’s separate from the roadway and would give pedestrians and cyclists a safe option to travel into Brentwood or to the nearby bus stops.” Whittington has lived at the same address for about 35 years, and although she said she isn’t against growth and change in the area, she does acknowledge that traffic has increased significantly along the stretch of road in the last three decades. “(This section of) road, I would say, has become about 10 times busier since we’ve lived here,” she said. “There isn’t really another way to get into Brentwood or to the

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bus stops and the volume of traffic is really discouraging to pedestrians, especially for families who have young kids who walk down to get the school bus.” Whittington attended Monday night’s council meeting with a few of her neighbours who signed the petition and spoke to council about their concerns. “We want this path primarily for safety and accessibility,” Whittington said. “According to a freedom of information request we got from the municipality, when this stretch of road was monitored from the fall of 2011 to the early spring of 2012, 100 per cent of the vehicles traveling down it were speeding, even after the speed limit was changed from 50 to 40 kilometers

an hour. It really discourages people from walking when we should be encouraging people to get up and be active. “We’re never going to get rid of cars, nor do we have to, we just need a solution to make these two things work together.” During the meeting, council voted to send the idea of the walkway to staff and have them look at the feasibility and cost of such a project, but it wasn’t without discussion. “I don’t think the speed limit should have even been changed to 40 in the first place,” said councillor John Garrison during the meeting. “(West Saanich) is a major arterial road and the speed limit should be at least 50.”

Coun. Carl Jensen indicated the desire to have walkways in other places around the municipality is an ongoing issue, and that all requests should be looked at longterm. “I think we need to look at this in terms of the five year plan,” he said. Chief Administrative Officer Patrick Robins said staff would have something back to council on the rough costs for such a project — both curb and gutter and separate gravel walkway — in the coming weeks, adding that the fate of the project would ultimately rest on approval from the province depending on if the land is part of the provincial right of way or not. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

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A4 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Dramatic density change force housing. “This is an attempt to put the brakes on what “My concern is consultation with the people in the majority of council has already approved,� he this community,� she said, adding none has been said. done at all on the two recent development applica“We still have nothing in any of those propostions — on John Road and East Saanich Road. als that (does) anything for workforce housing,� “These have gone through council quite quickly,� countered Finall, suggesting council needs to hold Finall said, adding this is the case because they large public meetings — not just public hearings at have convinced some councillors that they will council chambers — to get the public’s opinion on offer workforce — or affordable — housing. the district’s housing and growth strategies. Yet, said the mayor, neither projCoun. Celia Stock, also on the ect addresses workforce housing at mayor’s side, said she’s not sure if “There will all. these development proposals meet “We are looking at dramatic den- never be a guarantee the standard for workforce housing sity changes,� Finall said, “without that the district needs. that those will be any understanding that they are of As well, she said she’s concerned affordable.� benefit to this community.� public input will fall on deaf ears. Coun. Elsie McMurphy added “You can’t go to people with a – Elsie McMurphy the homes proposed in two current prior mindset,� she said, “where development applications will be everybody in the community selling for market value. knows you’ve already made up “There will never be a guarantee (by a devel- your mind.� oper) that those will be affordable,� she said. Coun. Craig Mearns added he wants the two McMurphy added she supports the mayor’s project proposals — which he termed quite small position, saying it’s important council shows peo- — to proceed and “to see how they do.� ple consultation means something. Coun. Conny McBride said the term ‘affordable’ “Council may not do what each (person) says, is up to individuals and what they can afford. Yet, but at least we hear them.� with workforce housing needed to keep industry Daly responded by saying the two developments in the area, “it’s needed here. It’s why people voted calling for increased density do benefit the com- for us.� munity and will provide more family and workIn a 4-3 vote, the mayor’s motion failed. Continued from page A1

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A5

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Traffic ground to a halt on the Pat Bay Highway at the Island View intersection recently, as Saanich and Victoria police practised their procedures to escort important people from the airport and ferry terminal into Victoria.

Taking the region’s pulse Vital Signs report looks at social housing, health and more Daniel Palmer News staff

The Victoria Foundation released its annual report card on Tuesday, highlighting a greater need for social housing and daycare in the Capital Region, as well as inflated wait times for children needing surgery. The Vital Signs report provides a sweeping overview of the Capital Region’s economy, environmental health, arts, safety, transportation and seven other indicators. It combines a range of provincial and national statistics with citizen perception to highlight community successes and shortcomings. “There are tremendous drives being made in homelessness (and) there’s an increase in daycare spaces,” said foundation executive director Sandra Richardson. Although 300 more daycare spots were added in Greater Victoria last year, it’s still not nearly enough to meet demand, Rich-

ardson said. “With 19,000 children needing daycare and just over 5,000 daycare spaces ... it’s still perceived as not enough,” she said. Another red flag is the province’s social housing waitlist. The number of people in Greater Victoria in line for subsidized housing increased by 15 per cent in the past year to 1,681. “It’s a reflection of the increase in rent. We still have very high rents for a community with our income level,” said Andrew Wynn-Williams, executive director of the Victoria Coalition to End Homelessness. But there has been success tackling both homelessness and low-income housing in recent years, he said. Last year, 152 new units were completed and another five projects are planned throughout the Capital Region. “Right now, the objective is to just get more built.” Richardson hopes the report will create public awareness of the need to support nonprofit services accessed by the

region’s most vulnerable citizens. “If the public is aware of that, it perhaps causes them to be more mindful of places like the food bank and what they can do to give back,” she said. “Not everybody has the same opportunities.” The Capital Region bodes better than the average Canadian city in both median family income ($77,000) and unemployment (5.3 per cent). Other indicators include the Canadian Creativity Index, which ranks cities based on technology, talent and tolerance for creative industries. Victoria ranks second, alongside Vancouver, as one of the best places in the country for creative industries. Toronto ranks seventh while Ottawa takes top spot. Greater Victoria still lags in entrepreneurs, however, sitting 71st out of 100 Canadian cities on an index that measures the presence, growth and policy environment for small business ownership. To view the report, visit victoriafoundation.com.

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A6 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

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Town of Sidney NOTICE OF PERMISSIVE TAX EXEMPTION Notice is given under Sections 94 and 227 of the Community Charter that the Council of the Town of Sidney intends to consider, at the meeting of October 9, 2012, a bylaw exempting from property taxation the lands and improvements held by the Society of Saanich Peninsula Museums, and legally described as: Lot 19, Section 11, Range 4 East, North Saanich District, Strata Plan VIS4994 PID: 025-877-488; Folio 120368.019; Civic Address: #1 - 2423 Beacon Avenue Section 224 of the Community Charter provides that a Council may, by bylaw, exempt land or improvements or both that are owned or held by a charitable, philanthropic or other not for profit corporation and that council considers are used for a purpose that is directly related to the purposes of the corporation. The permissive exemption will be for the years 2013 and 2014. The estimated municipal property taxes that would be imposed on the property if it was not exempt are: 2013: $850; 2014: $876. Inquiries concerning the proposed bylaw may be directed to: Director of Corporate Services, Sidney Town Hall, 2440 Sidney Avenue, Telephone 250-656-1184.

NEWS REVIEW

Submitted photo

A VicPD officer holds some of the $50,000 worth of crack cocaine and methamphetamine seized Wednesday afternoon at Swartz Bay ferry terminal.

Arrests made in drug bust at Swartz Bay Daniel Palmer News staff

Victoria police stopped nearly $50,000 worth of crack cocaine and methamphetamine from hitting the city’s streets Wednesday, Sept. 26. VicPD worked with RCMP and B.C. Ferries staff to arrest two people as they returned with a suitcase full of drugs from Vancouver on the 1 p.m. sailing from Tsawwassen to Swartz

Bay terminal. Police said 24 ounces of crack cocaine and 12 ounces of meth were seized, a result of a month-long investigation by VicPD’s Strikeforce and Street Crime units. A 23-year-old Victoria man will be in court today on charges of possession for the purposes of trafficking, while a 26-year-old Sooke woman was released on a promise to appear Nov. 7.

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A7

Ferry fares are going up Fares given go-ahead to jump 12 per cent over three years

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VICTORIA — B.C. Ferries has the green light to raise fares by up to 12 per cent over three years and passengers should expect less frequent sailings on some major runs. Increases in the fare cap of roughly four per cent a year were approved Monday by B.C. Ferry Commissioner Gord Macatee. The ferries regulator also directed B.C. Ferries to come up with more than $54 million in savings over four years, including $30 million through service cuts. B.C. Ferries will trim some sailings starting Oct. 9, particularly when vessels are running with light passenger loads on major routes between the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island. Regular odd-hour sailings won’t be affected, but nearly 100 even-hour sailings are to be scrapped between those terminals this fall and winter to help save an estimated $1 million. Tsawwassen-Duke Point sailings that have been running less

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threat of considerably higher fare increases as well as deeper service cuts. One option Macatee expects the corporation to explore is the possible conversion of some ferries to natural gas, reducing the impact of high fuel costs. The corporation is to file an alternate fuel use plan within 30 days, as well as a separate plan to cut fuel consumption. editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

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B.C. Ferries plans to trim some sailings as of Oct. 9 as it tries to come up with $54 million in savings. than 25 per cent full account for nearly half the planned cuts. Potential cuts to Gulf Islands routes are to go to public hearings in advance of any decision. B.C. Ferries reported declining fare revenue in 2011, recording the lowest number of passengers in 21 years. Vehicle traffic is at a 13-year low. The province injected an extra $80 million into the ferry service this year to avert the

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Crime mapping online Central Saanich police introduce a new app on website SAANICHTON — Central Saanich Police Service has launched a new online Crime Mapping system that is available to the whole community. With the new app, police incidents are mapped and uploaded every 24 hours to the online program.

The events are carefully screened to protect privacy, however, mapping them will provide the community with relevant neighbourhood crime data, said Chief Constable Paul Hames. “Providing reliable, timely information to our citizens is one

of our top priorities, because an informed public is a safer public,” he said. Visit the Crime Mapping program at www.cspolice.ca or download the free Crime Reports app from the iTunes store.

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COMMUNITY SOCIAL SERVICES WORKERS ... THE HEART AND SOUL OF OUR COMMUNITIES.

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Meet Sheryl. She’s been working in B.C.’s community social services sector for 21 years. She loves her job as a counselor and crisis line worker, and she’s dedicated to the women, youth, and families that she serves every day. But Sheryl, and other community social services workers like her, have witnessed the impacts of BC Liberal

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The Art of Aging Wednesday, October 10, 7:30 p.m. University Centre Farquhar Auditorium Book signing to follow government cuts on the lives of the people they support. Now, after more than a decade of ZLY]PJLJ\[ZJSVZ\YLZHUKUVZPNUPÄJHU[^HNLVY ILULÄ[PUJYLHZLZ[OLZL^VYRLYZHYL[OLTZLS]LZ falling behind and struggling to make ends meet. Working people like Sheryl are the heart and soul of our communities.

Contact your MLA, or Premier Clark by visiting www.cssfairdeal.ca/action

It’s time to treat workers like Sheryl with fairness and respect.

Whether we like it or not, we are all getting older. As a surgeon, ethicist and teacher, Dr. Nuland draws on scientific facts to explain the changes that occur in the last stage of life’s journey. Melding a scientist’s passion for truth with a humanist’s understanding of the heart and soul, he shares the essential steps that middle-aged or younger men and women should be taking in preparation for their sixties, seventies and beyond. Yale University’s Dr. Nuland is best known for his honest take on death in the New York Times Best Seller How We Die. Growing old, Nuland teaches us, is not a disease but an art – and for those who practice it well, it can bring extraordinary rewards. This free public lecture has reserved seating. Tickets can be booked in advance at 250-721-8480 or www.auditorium.uvic.ca. A $2 evening parking fee will be in effect for all UVic parking lots.


A8 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

EDITORIAL

NEWS REVIEW

Jim Parker Publisher Steven Heywood Editor Janice Marshall Production Manager Bruce Hogarth Circulation Manager

The Peninsula News Review is published by Black Press Ltd. | #6 - 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7 | Phone: 250-656-1151 • Fax: 250-656-5526 • Web: www.peninsulanewsreview.com

OUR VIEW

Running for the money T

his Thanksgiving weekend is a special one, as we reflect on the many ways our community has come together recently. One could not help but be touched by the support of hundreds of folks who came out for the annual Terry Fox Run last month. Their enthusiasm and giving spirit is contagious. The Terry Fox Run for cancer research begins a wave of fundraising that rolls through the fall and into the Christmas season. Last weekend’s CIBC Run for the Cure saw more than 4,000 runners and walkers make their way around Ring Road at the University of Victoria. The event is fun and exciting for participants, who are in equal part sombre and thoughtful. They sang, chanted and wore all manner of pink attire, from boas and tiaras to T-shirts and tutus, emblazoned with names honouring loved ones who are battling or have been taken by breast cancer. More than $30 million was raised across the country by this event for breast cancer research, education and advocacy. Today (Oct. 5) is the finale of the Canadian Cancer Society’s Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock fundraising ride. The 17 riders trained six months – averaging 4,000 kilometres each – in preparation for the twoweek, 1,000-kilometre ride down Vancouver Island. As well, those who support them spend many months planning and fundraising to make that ride worthwhile. The riders themselves will tell you, it’s not about the cycling, but about the communities, both large and small, that support the tour along the way. And this weekend the 33rd GoodLife Fitness Victoria Marathon hits the streets of the city. Competitive runners have trained hard for the event, pounding out an estimated 400 kilometres before they hit the ground running this Sunday on Menzies Street near the legislature. Along with thousands of runners come thousands of dollars in donations for more than 20 charities supported by the marathon. The fundraising aspect of the marathon is relatively new, yet has shown great potential as it becomes more culturally intertwined with the race itself. We applaud the physical and fundraising efforts of all these riders, runners and walkers. They help lift all of our spirits, by giving us the opportunity to share their good feelings and help those around us through our charitable donations. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@peninsulanewsreview.com or fax 250-656-5526. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Peninsula News Review is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2010

It’s OK not to be a tough mudder A

slew of friends and friendsmarathon. For an event that of-friends signed up for the swarms walkers, runners and Tough Mudder in Whistler, wheelers over a good chunk of a hardcore 10- to 12-kilometre the city for a day, I was stunned obstacle course, earlier this year. with how little I knew about the It seemed you couldn’t go a day GoodLife Fitness Victoria Marathon. without hearing about More than 12,000 another connection to participants are expected someone who planned to to fill the streets on leap small buildings and marathon morning slime through obstacles – with road closures to achieve the glory of throughout Victoria and completion. Oak Bay along the route. I take pride in knowing The races range from a these friends who one-kilometre kids’ run intentionally ran through to the full 42-kilometre electrically charged wires marathon, starting and in the Mudder, or guys and finishing not far from the girls who climb mountains Christine van legislative buildings. or snowshoe ridiculous There are four official Reeuwyk hills and vales in Mind charities benefiting from Island Girl Over Mountain Adventure race proceeds and 20 Racing. charities that are raising I’ve never contemplated anything funds through a pledge process in remotely similar, not even a simple the event. trek up the West Coast Trail. I’m walking with the Hepatitis C They’re generally strong of body Education and Prevention Society’s and mind. I’m not. Liver Warriors, also known as Team I know these things about Daisy, for my pal. myself and tend to lean away Non-profit HepCBC provides from activities where I’ll likely be support for those living with the maimed or injured. I know my blood-borne virus which attacks limitations and am not shamed by the liver. them. The society has high hopes of So me, myself and I were stunned raising $25,000 – enough to reopen when my rubber arm twisted to its office, hire a part-time executive support a friend and walk the half director for a year and return to marathon this weekend. This heart helping people living with the over mind thing could get a person heavy stigma of Hep C. killed. I figure the least I can do is take Sunday marks the 33rd a few hours to walk this beautiful anniversary of the Victoria city as a way of raising awareness

of this group. One coworker (OK, he’s the boss) and his wife are doing the half marathon as a training run for the New York Marathon next month. I’d call it insane, but he’s the boss. Another coworker is partaking in her fourth Victoria Marathon, doing the half again to raise funds for Lifetime Networks, a non-profit to support people with disabilities in Victoria. It’s not the lure of adrenaline that pulls her, but the emotional high. “It’s uplifting and powerful,” she says. It’s a high to witness the sense of accomplishment on the faces of folks as they cross the finish line, particularly those participants with obvious physical impairments who overcome a lot to make the trek. The online map identifies cheer zones along the way. From what I hear, there are people in costume, those who offer inspirational quotes on posterboard and even entertainers keeping everyone – walkers and athletic specimens alike – in good spirits on the 21-kilometre route. Fortunately, the GoodLife Fitness Victoria Marathon welcomes walkers who can finish the half marathon course in fewer than six hours. I can do that. I’m pretty sure. Probably. I’m no Tough Mudder and have no desire to win or anything… Christine van Reeuwyk is a reporter with the Oak Bay News. cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

‘I know my limitations and am not shamed by them.’


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A9

LETTERS Readers respond: Policing costs, rezoning land Commuter resents mayors’ implications Re: Victoria and Esquimalt mayors call for regional cost-sharing for policing (Sept. 28, page A2), As a resident of Saanich who is employed in Victoria, I guess I am one of the freeloaders Mayor Fortin is perturbed about. Though when I am loitering around I am spending money at coffee shops, restaurants, book stores and many other retailers at least five days a week. If the property taxes of surrounding municipalities are hit when they don’t get to see the economic benefit of hosting “two-thirds of the population of Greater Victoria on any given day,” (that was a complaint, really?) then I will simply have to take as much of my business as possible elsewhere. What’s next? Are mayors Fortin and Desjardins going to start handing out invoices at Ogden Point to greet all the tourists coming off the cruise ships? “Spend money in our city? How dare they!” Paul Rokeby-Thomas Saanich

Calm down a little, please I’m not sure what is more ridiculous, the reaction of police over some boys with a BB gun, or the News Review dedicating a quarter of the front page to the story. I would however appreciate some further explanation of “the dangers and risks of possessing a BB gun”, unless of course they were referring to the risk of harm coming from an over zealous police officer with a gun responding to such a call? I use BBs guns all the time, I have never thought of it as a risk, or caused anyone any harm. I’d wager that more people hurt themselves with chopsticks than with BB guns. The police officer quoted in the story also assures us that calls to police of a gun being seen will always “prompt the same tactical response from police”, the absurdity of that comment is surpassed only by the terrifying nature of it. Am I to expect a tactical take down every time I go to the local shooting range or out hunting? Will I be put in cuffs and have my property seized every time I try to keep a crow from killing the song birds at the feeder in my backyard or shoot a can with my son? When did simply possessing a gun, real or fake, become a crime? I think it’s time for the police, and this newspaper, to calm down a little when it comes to guns. Mike Shoesmith Central Saanich

In favour of rezoning Re: Quality and peace in the south east quadrant of North Saanich. I am a half-acre property owner in the south east quadrant of North Saanich. I am in favour of

PENINSULA NEWS

rezoning properties of two-thirds-plus acres from R2 to R1. In my opinion this would not change the quality and peace of this friendly neighbourhood, in fact it might help lower our current residential sewer change. Darlene Melnyk North Saanich

REVIEW Connect with us

BEST PRICE | BEST QUALITY BEST SERVICE

Fiscal restraint forgotten As a taxpayer of Central Saanich I would like to see some fiscal restraint by this city council.There seems to be no end to the big expensive projects they are going to commit the city to. First a fire hall that was not needed and they are going to keep the old one for a satellite, not retire it and sell it to cover costs of the new one. Central Saanich has a very low fire rating and very slow growth rate — two fire halls are not needed. Now I get in the mail that this council wants a new city hall for a projected cost of $16 million. This makes no sense. The existing one is more than adequate, again the low growth rate of this district doesn’t justify such a major expense. Central Saanich only has a population of 16 thousand, give or take, and does not have the tax base for these expensive projects. These two projects, $7 million for the fire hall and $16 million for the city hall, add $23 million to the debt. The argument put forth is the need to earthquake proof everything. An event may happen, and if a big enough event happens, nothing will withstand it. This used to be a pay as you go district, now no project is too big to put on the taxpayers’ back. I tried in the last election to select and talk to people that were for fiscal restraint. It seems that once elected, this was quickly forgotten. Andy Caldwell Central Saanich

Letters to the Editor The PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW welcomes your opinions and comments. Letters to the editor should discuss issues and stories that have been covered in the pages of the REVIEW. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to less than 300 words. The REVIEW reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The REVIEW will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity or to discuss using your letter as a guest column. Phone numbers are not printed. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, #6 - 9843 Second St., Sidney, B.C. V8L 3C7 ■ Fax: 250-656-5526 ■ E-mail: editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

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A10 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

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Rancher named B.C. Lt-Gov. Tom Fletcher Black Press

VICTORIA — Nicola Valley rancher Judith Guichon has been named B.C. Lieutenant Governor, as Stó:lo Grand Chief Steven Point’s five-year term comes to an end. Guichon runs the family cattle ranch in the Nicola Valley. She has served as president of the B.C. Cattlemen’s Association, a director of the Grassland Conservation Council of B.C., and on provincial government task forces on ranching and species at risk.

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“Mrs. Guichon has and congratulated dedicated herself Guichon. to her community, “She has a deep province and counappreciation for try,� Prime Minister the history and Stephen Harper said traditions of Britin a statement Monish Columbia and day. “She is a leader has spent a lifetime in keeping British ensuring that we all Columbia’s agriculstay connected to ture and cattle indusour roots – partictries environmentally ularly through her sound and she has Judith Guichon work with the B.C. worked hard to proCattlemen’s Assomote and protect the ranch- ciation,� Clark said. ers of British Columbia.� Lieutenant Governors are Premier Christy Clark appointed by the Governor thanked Point for his work General on the recommenda-

tion of prime ministers. They serve five-year terms as the Queen’s representative in each province, declaring new legislation and performing ceremonial duties around the province. Point is a former provincial court judge. Before being named to chief commissioner of the B.C. Treaty Commission, Point served as an elected chief of the Skowkale First Nation for 15 years. He also served as the tribal chair of the Stó:lo Nation Government, and Grand Chief of the Stó:lo Tribal Council.

UBCM report due; meetings list okayed COUNCIL NEWS

Steven Heywood News staff

IN BRIEF - North Saanich Oct. 1

Mayor Alice Finall attended the recent Union of B.C. Municipalities conference in Victoria. She said she will report on it more fully at the next council meeting. Councillor Elsie McMurphy asked Finall what the steps are to report on the UBCM. Finall said it’s up to each councillor to summarize their experiences from the event. She said more than one councillor reporting on the UBCM offers different perspectives and is helpful.

• Council briefly discussed the Sidney North Saanich RCMP quarterly report. Mayor Finall noted that Staff Sergeant Dennis O’Gorman reported that as of April 1, 2013, funding from Transport Canada will end for two auxiliary constable posted at the Victoria International Airport. • Council passed its 2013 meeting schedule. There will generally be two regular meetings per month, except in the

event of holidays that fall on the Monday session days. Councillor Ted Daly noted there will only be one regular meeting in August and September, 2013, due to the UBCM conference in September. Mayor Final said that issues can be dealt with at a later date. • Council passed its annual list of properties exempt from taxation. It includes churches, notfor-profit societies, museums, youth groups, Capital Regional District land (which gets the biggest exemption at around $17,000) and Town of Sidney property (McTavish Road site of the North Saanich fire hall).

District Of North Saanich

Public Notice 2013 Permissive Property Taxation Exemption Bylaw In accordance with Section 227 of the Community Charter, notice is hereby provided regarding the adoption of the “North Saanich Exemption from Taxation Bylaw No. 1311 (2012). The intent of this bylaw is to grant property taxation exemptions to the following categories of land/or improvements: Length of Exemption is 1 year Roll Property Description Number 00529.050 02472.000 03030.000 19036.000 19077.000 19200.300 20007.000 21400.003 21413.000 23011.000 23013.000 23017.000 23017.010 23018.000 23024.000 Total

St. John’s United Church Sidney Pentecostal Church

Address

10990 West Saanich Rd. 10364 McDonald Park Rd. The Kiwanis Elderly Citizens Village 10585 McDonald Park Rd. 676 Kittyhawk Sponsoring Committee Society 1979 DeHavilland Way B.C. Aviation Museum 1910 Norseman Rd. Navy League of Canada (Saanich Peninsula 9565 Hurricane Rd. Branch) Memorial Park Society (area behind Parkland McDonald Park Rd School) Saanich Peninsula Chamber of Commerce 10382 Pat Bay Highway Memorial Park Society 10714 McDonald Park Rd. Seventh Day Adventist Church 9300 Willingdon Rd. Capital Regional District 1717 McTavish Rd. Holy Trinity Anglican Church Hall 1325 Mills Rd. Holy Trinity Anglican Church 1319 Mills Rd. Town of Sidney 1665 McTavish Rd. Saanich Peninsula Presbyterian Church 9296 East Saanich Rd.

Tax Estimate 2013 3,329.00 5,115.00 8,501.00 1,542.00 12,478.00 1,273.00 2,841.00 2,081.00 7,339.00 9,699.00 17,027.00 2,862.00 2,809.00 8,800.00 8,954.00 94,650.00

Please direct any inquiries respecting this notice to the Finance Department at the District of North Saanich at 250-655-5495.


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW -Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A11

Giving thanks, giving back Brentwood Bay mom and son raise finds for Cops for Cancer Devon MacKenzie News staff

A Brentwood Bay woman who relied on support from her friends and community last year is intent on giving back. Liza Glynn, who was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 1998, received chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency treatment, known as liberation treatment, in the spring of 2011. The treatment isn’t offered in Canada because it’s considered experimental. Glynn relied on her friends and members of the community to help cover the costs of travel to the U.S. and the cost of the treatment. Glynn is now able to move more freely since the treatment and has set a goal with her son, Tenney, to help raise funds for Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock. “I was very grateful for the kindness and support I received from the community before my surgery,” she said. “Now Tenney and I want to give back to the community who helped us and give to the people who need it.” After raising funds, Glynn cut her hair on Saturday, Sept. 22 and will continue to accept donations for the cause until Thanksgiving (Oct. 8). To donate to Liza and Tenny’s Tour de Rock fund, contact them at 250-652-4123 or arpiseta03@ yahoo.ca.

Submitted photo

Liza Glynn and her son Tenney pause for a photo after Liza cut her hair short for the cause.

Tour de Rock in Sidney The Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock rode its way into Sidney on Thursday, Oct. 4, after the Peninsula News Review’s deadline. There was a planned parade with the 18 riders, a barbecue and other events in Beacon Park, all designed to raise funds for the effort to support children with cancer and their families. Watch for coverage in next Wednesday’s News Review.

NORTH SAANICH — North Saanich council will invite Graham Debling, president of the Sidney Museum and Archives to an upcoming committee of the whole meeting to talk about the museum expansion. Debling made a brief appearance at their Oct. 1 regular meeting in regards to their fundraising campaign. “We want to more comprehensively tell the story of Sidney, North Saanich and area,” Debling said.

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YOUR TOWN HALL >> District of Central Saanich | Town Hall Project

Community Meeting saturday, october 13, 2012 open house 10 am to 2 pm presentation 11 am and 1 pm

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A12 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

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Cadets from the 676 Kittthawk Air Cadet Squadron sell Lugaro Diamond Balloons at the third annual Rotary Monte Carlo night.

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Monte Carlo night nets big bucks Rotary brings in $20,000 Devon MacKenzie

18,500 THAT’S A

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The Sidney by the Sea Rotary club held their third annual Monte Carlo night on Sept. 28 at the Viscount Aerocentre and raised more than $20,000 to give back to the community. “Over 400 people turned out for an evening of dancing with the Timebenders, casino tables and great silent and live auction items,” said Clint Flood, Sidney by the Sea Rotary public relations officer. “All the money raised from the event is going back into our community in various projects that will help youth, family and seniors.” Apart from raising a hefty chunk of cash, the organization handed out over $2,700 that night to the local Sea and Air Cadets and the Sidney Lions food bank. reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A13

Central Saanich council recognizes small business Devon MacKenzie News staff

• Council voted to make a proclamation that recognizes Oct. 20 of this year as Small Business Saturday in Central Saanich. The motion was made by Coun. Carl Jensen and was unanimously agreed upon by council. “Small business is classified as anything under 50 employees and that’s a lot of our businesses here in the community,” said Jensen during the meeting. “By making this motion, I hope to recognize the contribution our small businesses make in the community.” October is recognized nationally as Small Business Month in Canada.

does not pose any issues with the municipality’s official community plan nor does it require Agricultural Land Commission

approval, said Planning Director Hope Burns. • Coun. Carl Jensen attended the Capital Regional District meet-

COUNCIL NEWS IN BRIEF - Central Saanich Oct. 1 ing and reported back

on the recreation commission’s report that Panorama Recreation Centre experienced its busiest pool season ever this past summer.

Jensen noted that the closure of Commonwealth pool over the summer months for renovations had a significant impact

on heightened attendance numbers at Panorama and other pools throughout the CRD. reporter@peninsula newsreview.com

Our exclusive offer is causing waves. $50 for you & $50 to charity.

• Woodwynn Farms is in the process of preparing a new application for temporary housing to bring to Central Saanich council. According to Coun. Adam Olsen, the farm already sent an application to the Agricultural Land Commission on a previous date, so the new application will only have to go to the municipality rather than both governing bodies. • Vantreight Farms put forward a proposal during Monday night’s meeting to install a 50m tower with a 30m by 30m compound for the installation of various telecommunication companies’ equipment. The farm has housed telecommunications antennas on some of their existing buildings for more than 20 years, but is seeking to formalize the way the process is done, by installing an appropriate tower. Because of the land’s zoning and the size of the tower and compound, the proposal

Correction Event date and time left out In the Oct. 3 edition of the Peninsula News Review, the story Inclusive First Nations art show is coming neglected to mention the date and location of the show. The show began Sept. 28 and runs until Oct. 21 at the Community Arts Council Gallery at Tulista Park (9565 Fifth St.)

from september to december, we’ll give you $50 as well as donate $50 to a charity of your choice when you open a new chequing account. We want to partner with you to benefit our community by spreading what we call “Waves of Kindness.”

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#WavesOfKindness *This offer is available to individuals 18 years of age or older who open a new Island Savings membership with $5.00 shares and a new demand account (chequing or savings) and set up direct deposit or minimum deposit of $500. Bonus paid after first direct deposit or after minimum deposit has been in account for 90 days. Selected charity must be a registered charity and donation will be made by Island Savings. Limit of one cash bonus per customer and per joint account. Offer valid until December 31, 2012.


A14 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

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NEWS REVIEW

THE ARTS

PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW

File photo

Fine Art Show goers stand with artist Craig Benson and his Six Swimming Seals last year.

Fine Art Show in Sidney Devon MacKenzie News staff

Smell gas? Get out, then call: FortisBC’s 24-hour Emergency Line at 1-800-663-9911, or 911. Natural gas is used safely in homes across B.C. everyday. FortisBC adds an odourant that smells like rotten eggs or sulphur. If there’s a leak, you’ll smell it.

The annual Sidney Fine Art Show, presented by the Community Arts Council of the Saanich Peninsula, opens next week at the Mary Winspear Centre. The show is celebrating a decade of featuring works from some of B.C.’s most highly regarded artists. “The Community Arts Council of the Saanich Peninsula is excited and encouraged by the fact that over the years, the Sidney Fine Art Show has

become one of the premiere juried fine art shows in Western Canada and a permanent fixture in the Peninsula’s annual fall arts schedule,” said Sandy Bligh, the chair of the Sidney Fine Art Show organizing committee. “It’s an event that’s eagerly anticipated by artists, the community, and by the many volunteers who so generously give their time.” Adjudication for the show closed in mid-September and saw 377 pieces selected by three jurors out of 1,200 submissions. “In this economy one of our

prime challenges remains to encourage artists working in all media to save and submit their best work for adjudication to the show,” Bligh said. The Sidney Fine Art Show opens Friday, Oct. 12 at 9 a.m. and continues through the weekend until Sunday, Oct. 14 at 5 p.m. A “Meet the Artists” evening is being held on the Saturday night during the show. Visit www.sidneyfineartshow. com for more information. — with files from the Community Arts Council of the Saanich Peninsula

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www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A15

PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, October 5, 2012

Only a working smoke alarm can save your life! Alarm campaign FIRE PREVENTION WEEK OCT. 7-14

Smoke alarms save lives “Fall backâ€? to smart home safety As most Canadians turn back the clocks on November 4, here are some timely smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) safety tips: s7HENYOU change your clocks, test your smoke arlam. s9OUHAVE less than three minutes to escape a ďŹ re. So when smoke alarms sound, everyone must know what to do and where to go. Having and practising an escape plan is essential. s)NSTALLONESMOKEALARM on every storey and outside BEDROOMS)NSTALLINSIDE bedrooms if you sleep with doors closed. s%NSUREALLSMOKEALARMS are fully powered. Never take out batteries or remove an alarm from ceiling due to a false alarm. s)FYOURHOMEHASANY fuel-burning devices such as a gas furnace, gas water heater, gas appliances, or an attached garage or carport, install at least one CSAapproved carbon monoxide outside all sleeping areas. One per storey is recommended.

s2EPLACESMOKEALARMSEVery 10 years, and CO alarms every 7-10 years (depending on manufacturer) whether battery operated or hardwired into your home’s electrical system. Carbon monoxide is colourless, odourless and tasteless. So without a CO alarm, humans cannot detect its presence. Despite the average home having several potential sources of the deadly gas, studies show that nearly 60 per cent of Canadians have not INSTALLEDA#/ALARM)NADdition to being impossible to detect, CO also has another nefarious trait. Symptoms of carbon monoxide exposure mimic the u, without the FEVER)TISROUTINELYRESPONsible for thousands of clinic and hospital visits each year, and is commonly misdiagnosed. Prolonged or extreme exposure causes nausea, dizziness, confusion, the loss of physical mobility, brain damage and ultimately, death. More home safety resources can be found on the www. safeathome.ca web site.

Analysis was undertaken on almost 50,000 ďŹ res that occurred in Alberta, British Columbia, and Ontario over a 5-year period involving 663 fatalities. The ďŹ ndings demonstrated that the death rate per 1,000 ďŹ res in the absence of a present, functioning smoke alarm was 74% greater than when a functioning smoke alarm was present.

Thanksgiving turkey ďŹ res cause for concern at 9-1-1 centre % #OMMSlREDISPATCHTEAMIS warning families to be mindful of their turkey cooking during Thanksgiving weekend. “A turkey isn’t something you typically see on a list of household ďŹ re hazards, but we get 9-1-1 calls about ovens going up in ames all the time,â€? says Corey +ELSO % #OMMlREDISPATCHER “The result can be devastating if you’re not careful every time you have something cooking for an extended period of time.â€?

% #OMMHASRECEIVEDSOMEODD calls to 9-1-1 before – including someone wanting to know how long to cook a turkey – but a turkey ďŹ re is no joke. )NFACT ITISALEADING cause of spikes in 9-1-1 calls over the holidays. “A ame in your oven can start easily and escalate quickly,â€? says Kelso. “Oil drippings through a thin tinfoil turkey pan or bits of leftover food residue inside your oven are extremely ammable in a high temperature setting.â€?

Many fatal ďŹ res start at night )NVESTIGATIONS into home ďŹ re deaths very often ďŹ nd that a smoke alarm did not sound. )TMAYHAVE been disconnected or not in working order. The batteries may have been dead, or someone may have taken them out. Smoke alone won’t necessarILYWAKEYOUUP)NFACT THE fumes could put you into an even deeper sleep. Often, victims never wake up. Se-

niors will often need assistance from family members to put safety measures into place. As well, family members are in the best position to reinforce the precautions necessary to help their loved ones prevent or respond to a ďŹ re. Focus on these six priorities to help aging family members protect themselves against ďŹ re in the home.

NINSTALL smoke alarms inside every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement. NLarger homes may need ADDITIONAL smoke alarms to provide enough protection. NFor the best protection, INTERCONNECT all smoke alarms so when one sounds they all sound. NAn IONIZATION smoke alarm is generally more responsive to aming ďŹ res and a PHOTOELECTRIC smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering ďŹ res. For the best protection, both types of alarms or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms (also known as dual sensor alarms) are recommended. N Smoke alarms should be INSTALLED away from the kitchen to prevent false alarms. Generally, they should be at least 10 feet (3 meters) from a cooking appliance. N REPLACE all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old.

Which smoke alarm is best for reducing false alarms? Smoke alarms are not all the same. By choosing the correct technology you can keep your family safe and reduce those annoying false alarms when you cook or shower. Photoelectric smoke alarms are a good choice near kitchens or in areas

adjacent to bathrooms, say fire safety experts. Their sensors are best at detecting slow smouldering fires — which means you will have fewer false alarms caused by burnt toast or shower steam. Ionization smoke alarms are good for general living areas, as their sensors are

best at detecting fast-flaming fires. Fire departments say having both types in your home, or a combination with both types of sensors, provides the best protection. More information as well as fire safety tips can be found online at www.safeathome.ca.

A smoke alarm campaign launched just two months ago aimed at ensuring every home in B.C. has working smoke alarms is quickly building momentum as supporters, notably Kidde Canada and Black Press, have come on board with contributions totalling $425,000. Kidde Canada is donating 5,000 smoke alarms, with a total Shirley retail value of $75,000, Minister to support the goal of Bond at a fire alarm the campaign - to have campaign stop. functioning smoke alarms in every household in B.C. These 5,000 smoke alarms will be distributed among vulnerable populations in the province, including to First Nations homes. Partners will work together on developing a distribution plan that will maximize the protection offered by smoke alarms to homes identified as most at risk. Black Press, based in Victoria, is adding more reach to the safety campaign with a $350,000 strategic, multimedia investment to raise awareness among its readers about the importance of having working smoke alarms in their homes. The Fire Chiefs’ Association of B.C. and the Office of the Fire Commissioner will lead a steering committee of stakeholders on the local, provincial and national level, with a focus on the Three E’s of Injury Prevention — education, environment and enforcement. A national injury reduction forum will be held Oct. 12, 2012, hosted by Surrey Fire Service with the Canadian Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. Oct. 12, 2012 has been proclaimed Smoke Alarm Awareness Day in B.C.

How to get out alive! • Always have an emergency plan in place with your family so you all know where to meet in case of a fire. Pick an easy place to remember, such as a neighbour’s yard that is a safe distance from your home. • Plan escape routes from your home. Remember, only rely on a window as an escape route if it is large enough and on the ground floor. • Always teach children to crawl as close to the floor as possible if there is smoke in your home. • If there is a fire or you smell smoke, before you open a door, test the temperature of the door with the back of your hand. If the door is hot, do not try to exit through it. Try a window instead. • Replace batteries in smoke alarms on a regular basis and check expiration dates on fire extinguishers to make sure they are still good.


A16 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

FIRE PREVENTION WEEK OCT. 7-14

Peninsula fire chiefs offer fire safety advice Central Saanich Volunteer Fire Department

annual Grade 5 Expo — a day of learning for local students at their fire hall. They are sent through eight different stations to learn about safety and the job that firefighters do in the community. “It’s the right age to get at them with the information,” French says. With the support from teachers, the stu-

Having children learn about fire safety early is key, says Central Saanich Fire Department Chief Ron French — not only for their own education, but for their parents as well. That’s why the local department hosts the

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dents take the information back home and share it with their parents. That’s good news, as fire safety is everyone’s business. To stay on top of that business, French says the department has a stable of 46 volunteer firefighters. Ninety per cent of those member, he says, are trained fully and ready for when the department can adopt its two-station model. That begins when Central Saanich’s new fire hall construction is complete. Even with information in the households and a dedicated fire department, French says prevention is still the key to fire safety. He urges residents to keep an uncluttered house to avoid fire and asks people to make sure their electrical appliances are working. “A lot of our fires are attributed to electrical wires an appliances,”

“It all comes down to having a plan.” – Jim Tweedhope he explains. Then, he adds, make sure the home has a visible address — so that emergency personnel can find you when you need them, the most. In the meantime, French says the department will be conducting driveway surveys in the Mt. Newton Slope area of his jurisdiction. There, he explains, some driveways are too narrow for the fire trucks to fit. He says they may ask residents to do a little tree cutting or bush clearing to ensure the trucks can reach their homes if and when they are needed.

Town of Sidney Volunteer Fire Department Jim Tweedhope, fire Chief for the Town of Sidney’s volunteer department, is looking for a few good men and women. The local department

Before

is down to 33 members and he says they need more to ensure adequate community coverage, day and night. Sidney has a busy department, he says, with between 500 and 600 calls each year. While residents of Sidney are a top priority to be able to respond quickly to those calls, Tweedhope says he might be relaxing that stipulation in order to shore up his numbers. “It is a large commitment,” he cautions, noting that the job is rewarding but a member has to have their entire family on board to make it work. The training people get, Tweedhope says, is of high caliber. Recently, a pair of Sidney volunteer firefighters have become career members in big city departments — often a goal of young, ambitious firefighters. One, he says, has joined the Vancouver Fire Department full-time and is one of only a dozen women on the force. In between recruitment phases, Tweedhope says the department encourages people to make sure

they have working fire alarms in their homes and businesses. As well, people should have a plan to be able to get out of their houses safely, in case there’s a fire. That involves having two ways out — in case the main exit in your plan is cut off by fire or smoke. “It all comes down to having a plan,” he says. Tweedhope says the local department will be ready for the Great Canadian Shake Out — an annual earthquake drill. It happens at 10:18 a.m. on Oct. 18, and residents, schools and businesses are encouraged to use the time to practice their safety and survival drills. “People have to be aware of the potential for it,” he says. “We live in a very active earthquake zone.”

North Saanich Volunteer Fire Department At the North Saanich Volunteer Fire Department, Chief Gary Wilton says they have received 341 calls to date in 2012.

That’s on par with previous years, where they average some 550 calls. Those are for various emergencies, from fires and car accidents, to alarms of all types and other assistance requests. “It’s amazing how regular it is,” Wilton says about the calls. To meet that demand, North Saanich has 45 volunteers, a full compliment to fill their two fire halls. “We just graduated another seven firefighters,” he says. Yet, even with a full crew, two fire halls (and soon to have a third out on Wain Road), Wilton says there’s one concern he has about being able to reach people when they call for help. It’s people’s house address signs. Often they are covered up and in some cases, they don’t exist at all. Knowing where they are going is the first step to reaching people with help, he says. “It’s amazing how many people just don’t have (address signs). We will even supply and install them if we’re asked.”

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1620 Mills Road, North Saanich, B.C. V8L 5S9 Tel: 250-656-0781 • Fax: 250-656-3155 E-mail: admin@northsaanich.ca www.northsaanich.ca

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PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A17

CRIME AND SAFETY AWARENESS

FIRE PREVENTION WEEK OCT. 7-14

Pedestrian and driver safety in changing seasons C

Photo courtesy of Central Saanich Police Service

Central Saanich Police Sgt. Andy Duke (center) stands with two new recruits, Cst. Anil Apa (left) and Cst. Nigel Smallwood, at their swearing in ceremony.

New police officers sworn in Central Saanich Police Service welcomes two new recruits

T

wo new recruits have been added to the roster at the Central Saanich Police Service. Cst. Anil Apa and Cst. Nigel Smallwood join the force after being selected in a process coordinated by Sgt. Andy Duke over a year ago. Cst. Anil Apa is originally from Turkey

and holds a degree in economics. He also served as a sergeant in the Turkish army. Cst. Nigel Smallwood is originally from England where he worked as an investigator for Her Majesty’s Customs and Excise and the Serious Organized Crime Agency. Smallwood also holds a commercial pilots license and volunteers with

civil air search and rescue. The two new officers began training at the police academy in New Westminster in April and participated in patrol training with the Central Saanich police. They take on their new roles with the service in December. — Central Saanich Police Service

entral Saanich Police Service is reminding everyone on the Peninsula that fall has arrived, and with that comes shorter days and longer nights. The seasonal change can also result in increased chance of pedestrian accidents on roads because of darker or low-visibility weather. Cst. Paul Brailey, Central Saanich police traffic safety officer, offers a few tips to pedestrians and drivers as we move into fall: • Pedestrians should dress to be seen. Wear bright and reflective clothing when walking at night and especially in bad weather. • Drivers should be aware of pedestrians crossing at night or in low-visibility weather, and pedestrians should always make sure to have eye contact with a driver before stepping out into a roadway or intersection — even if you are in a crosswalk or crossing with lights. • For pedestrians, hearing is an important safety sense. Listen for approaching vehicles that you may not see but are potentially travelling in your path.

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A18 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

CRIME AND SAFETY AWARENESS

FIRE PREVENTION WEEK OCT. 7-14

Carbon monoxide threat jumps with cold weather

T

hat extra nip in the fall air provides a reminder that increased vigilance is required to protect your family from carbon monoxide, known as the silent killer. For one Ontario man, it is an especially stark reminder. In late 2008 John Gignac, a retired firefighter, lost his niece, her husband and their two children to carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. A blocked chimney vent forced the deadly gas from their gas fireplace back into their home. And just one year ago, a Whitehorse family and a boarder were also killed by CO poisoning. After his family tragedy, Gignac established the Hawkins-Gignac Foundation for CO Education and spends his retirement imploring others to protect themselves from CO with one simple step: installing a CSA-approved carbon monoxide alarm. “My niece Laurie Hawkins and her family had no chance because they did not have a CO alarm,” Gignac says. “If they did, they would still be with us today.” Carbon monoxide is colourless, odourless and tasteless. So without a CO alarm,

humans cannot detect its presence. Despite the average home having several potential sources of the deadly gas, studies show that nearly 60 per cent of Canadians have not installed a CO alarm. “Over the past four years I have spoken to dozens of groups and hundreds of people and the comments are almost always the same,” Gignac says. “People tell me they don’t need a carbon monoxide alarm because they have electric heat. But when I ask them if they have a gas appliance or water heater, or a woodburning or gas fireplace, or a garage or carport attached to their house, they all get a horrified look on their face. Because any one of those can be a source of CO and their families have been at risk for years.” In addition to being impossible to detect, CO also has another nefarious trait. Symptoms of carbon monoxide exposure mimic the flu, without the fever. It is routinely responsible for thousands of clinic and hospital visits each year, and is commonly misdiagnosed. Prolonged or extreme exposure causes nausea, diz-

ziness, confusion, the loss of physical mobility, brain damage and ultimately, death. Gignac offers these four CO safety steps:

Halloween safety for all

• Have a licensed inspector check heating systems and other fuel-burning appliances, including fireplaces, every year.

Tips for trick or treaters and people celebrating

• Install one CSA-approved CO alarm on each storey of your home and outside all sleeping areas.

Halloween is fast approaching and with that comes reminders to all about safety this time of year, said Cpl. Pat Bryant of the Central Saanich Police Service. “This time of year is fun for people of all ages but it can also pose challenges for those who choose to celebrate it. Above all, it’s important that you and your children remain safe,” he said. Bryant’s tips for keeping kids safe include staying off the road and staying visible. “We expect trick-ortreaters to be out during normal evening hours, so they need to be aware of traffic and drivers need to use extra caution when driving through our community,” he said. “Trick-or-treaters should always use sidewalks and driveways, and avoid the street if

• Check outside to make sure all exhaust flues and vents are not obstructed. • Replace CO alarms every 7-10 years depending on the manufacturer, whether battery operated or hardwired. “Most CO alarms cost in the range of $30, just about 2 cents a day over their lifespan, a small price to pay for the safety of you and your family,” Gignac adds. More safety tips are available online at www.endthesilence.ca.

Sparky says: replace old smoke alarms and never tamper with them Sparky the Fire Dog teams up with firefighters and educators to encourage smart fire safety habits that save lives. Smoke alarm tampering is at the top of Sparky’s “nono” list. Taking batteries out of a smoke alarm, or removing it from the ceiling when it goes off because of cooking smoke or shower steam, puts a family at serious risk. Canadian research shows that more than 50 per cent of

people who tamper with their smoke alarms forget to later re-install the batteries or the alarm itself. This leaves them without early warning should a fire break out. “A smoke alarm doubles your chance of escaping a fire,” says Carol Heller, a home safety specialist at Kidde, Canada’s leading fire protection company. “If nuisance alarms are a problem, check to see that you have installed the

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correct type of smoke alarm in each location on every storey of your home. That way, false alarms can be reduced significantly. And remember to only buy smoke alarms that have a push-button or remote control ‘Hush’ feature. This allows you to easily silence a false alarm and still stay safe while the smoke clears.” Sparky’s other top fire safety tip is to replace old smoke alarms. Over time,

smoke alarms test the air in your home more than 3.5 million times. So sensors become coated in dust and other airborne particles and sensitivity may be lost. So whether they are battery operated or wired into your home’s electrical system, Sparky and the National Fire Protection Association say replace all smoke alarms after 10 years. More tips can be found at www.safeathome.ca.

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at all possible.” Bryant also added these tips for parents when sending out their children on the big night: • Children should use a flashlight while walking to help their visibility, especially in rural areas. • Parents can adhere reflective tape or stickers to children’s costumes or treat bags or have them wear a reflective bracelet to up their visibility to drivers. • Young trick or treaters should always be accompanied by an adult. • If allowing older youth to trick-or-treat without supervision, pre-plan a route with them in advance. • Be sure trick-ortreaters are wearing well-fitting shoes. • Avoid costumes that drag on the ground or impede your child’s vision. Any face masks should allow for full visibility and breathing. • Candy should not be eaten unless checked by an adult first. Bryant noted that Halloween is a time for adult celebrators as well, and that police will be on patrol that night making sure people are staying safe. “We will be out conducting routine patrols and counterattack roadblocks so make sure to plan a safe ride home,” he reminded. reporter@peninsula newsreview.com


HometownHeroes PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A19

PENINSULA’S VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTERS

2012

Central Saanich

Ron French, Fire Chief

Rob Nelson, Deputy Chief

Forrest Owens, Asst. Chief

John Robertson, Asst. Chief

Cent. Saanich Fire Dept.

District of Central Saanich, Public Works

Cent. Saanich Fire Dept.

Cent. Saanich Fire Dept.

Brian McAdam, Captain

Dan Little, Captain

Neal Widdifield, Captain

Darren Morson, Captain

Len Gillespie, Lieutenant

Rob Syverson, Lieutenant

Julian Dunford, Lieutenant

Jason Rumsby, Lieutenant

Mike Crocker, Firefighter

University of Victoria

City of Victoria, Public Works

Canada Border Services Agency

District of Saanich

BC Ambulance Service

Cent. Saanich Fire Dept.

Universal Sheet Metal

BC Ambulance Service

University of Victoria

Keith Yeo, Firefighter

Randy Munro, Firefighter

Rob Panter, Firefighter

Brian Bickford, Firefighter

Greg Johnson, Firefighter

Doug Smart, Firefighter

Stacy Lee, Firefighter

Chris Tetley, Firefighter

Pat Robbins, Firefighter

BC Transit

District of Central Saanich, Public Works

G4S

Bickford Excavating

District of Saanich

Service Canada

Victoria Airport Authority

Physician

Scotia Bank Commercial Banking

Jodi Hensel, Firefighter

Duncan Yeo, Firefighter

Brennan Gummer, Firefighter

Leigh Bissenden, Firefighter

Bruce Rosenthal, Firefighter

Glen Trites, Firefighter

Scott Henderson, Firefighter

Mike Simpson, Firefighter

Ryan Brain, Firefighter

Pacific Institure of Sports Excellence

Coastal Construction

Cent. Saanich Fire Dept.

Capital Regional District

Island Farms Dairy

Department of National Defence

Cairnview Mechanical

District of Central Saanich, Public Works

BC Ambulance Service

Brian Gill, Firefighter

Damon O’Brien, Firefighter

Tim Dutchak, Firefighter

Dean Bissenden, Firefighter

Shaun Sweenie, Firefighter

Paul Lacasse, Firefighter

Ian Banfield, Firefighter

Bobby Scott, Firefighter

Tristan Gentile, Firefighter

BC Ambulance Service

McKimm & Lott

BC Ambulance Service

District of Central Saanich, Public Works

AMJ Campbell Van Lines

Department of National Defence

Fortis BC Natural Gas

City of Victoria, Public Works

Self Employed

Michelle Warren, Firefighter

Brent McMillen, Firefighter

Daryl Hall, Firefighter

John Inoke, Firefighter

Phil Reaume, Firefighter

Emiliano Hernandez, Firefighter

BC Ferries

VIHA

Access Records

Access Records

Butchart Gardens

Siskin Cabinets Doors

The following businesses offer their thanks and appreciation for your hard work and dedication. Sidney Waterfront Inn & Suites

Adams Electronics

www.sidneywaterfrontinn.com 9775 First Street Sidney ................................ 250.656.1131

103-9838 Fourth Street Sidney ..................

Oceanside RV Resort

A Parkbridge Lifestyle Resort

www.oceansideresortrv.com 3000 Stautw Road Saanichton........................250.544.0508

Town of Sidney 2440 Sidney Avenue, Sidney .....................

(250) 656-1184

(250) 656-4351

Murray Coell, MLA Saanich North and the Islands www.murraycoellmla.bc.ca ....................... (866) 655-5711

District of Central Saanich 1903 Mt. Newton X Rd. Saanichton ..........

The Denture Clinic

(250) 652-4444

3-2227 James White Boulevard Sidney ..... (250) 655-7009

Panorama Recreation Centre www.panoramarecreation.ca 1885 Forest Park Drive North Saanich .......

(250) 656-7271

District of North Saanich 1620 Mills Road in North Saanich ..............

Victoria International Airport 201-1640 Electra Blvd Sidney.....................

(250) 656-0781 (250) 953-7500


A20 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Sidney Hank Michno, Assistant Chief Mike Harman, Assistant Chief

Jim Tweedhope, Fire Chief

Brett Mikkelson, Deputy Chief

Sidney Fire Department

Sidney Fire Department

Sidney Fire Department

Town of Sidney

Jeff Tomlin, Captain

Robert Tyler, Captain

Joe Geary, Captain

Sidney Fire Department

Mary Winspear Centre

Sidney Plumbing

Richard Ford, Lieutenant

Aaron Kary, Lieutenant

Ryan Michno, Lieutenant

Craig Pelton, Lieutenant

Nigel Adams, Firefighter

Matt Beasley, Firefighter

Steve Bennett, Firefighter

Darrin Blinko, Firefighter

Don Campbell, Firefighter

Kory Coward, Firefighter

Elk Lake Auto Centre

Pronautic Builders

BC Ambulance Service

City of Victoria

Shoppers Drug Mart

BC Corrections

Town of Sidney

JV Gasworks

Self Employed

Town of Sidney

Arthur van Deth, Firefighter

Greg Fiddick, Firefighter

Donald Galbraith, Firefighter

Carl Gardner, Firefighter

Jay Krieger, Firefighter

Kevin Mackenzie, Firefighter

Corey Makar, Firefighter

Jason Mockridge, Firefighter

Dave Nikula, Firefighter

Darren Proulx, Firefighter

Sidney Appliance

Home Renovations

Viking Air

Self Employed

Victoria Airport Fire

BC Ambulance Service

James Island Industries

BC Ambulance Service

LawnTech

Darren J. Proulx, CGA

Adam Pryer, Firefighter

Kirk Tamburino, Firefighter

Rick Toogood, Firefighter

Steven Tyler, Firefighter

Shawn Waters, Firefighter

Kelly Wilson, Firefighter

Peninsula Co-op

VIHA

University of Victoria

Mary Winspear Centre

BC Transit

Sidney Appliance

North Saanich Gary Wilton, Fire Chief

Pat Phillips, Deputy Chief John Trelford, Assistant Chief

District of North Saanich

Van Isle Windows

District of North Saanich

Steve Knapp, Fire Prevention Officer Jennifer Provan, Admn. Asst.

Ray Halsall, Captain

Paul Schwagly, Captain

Greg Smith, Captain

Scott Provan, Captain

Wayne Wooster, Lieutenant

Tieg Clark, Lieutenant

Pat Jordan, Lieutenant

Kurtis Barner, Lieutenant

CFB Esquimalt

Kone Elevators

Island Traffic

District of North Saanich

Municipality of Oak Bay

G & E Equipment

A. Slater Electric

A. Slater Electric

District of North Saanich

District of North Saanich

Les Hammond, Firefighter

John Latta, Firefighter

Bill Ehman, Firefighter

Chuck Hanan, Firefighter

Hammond Management

Latta Aviation

Air Canada

Victoria Shipyards

Dave Charters, Firefighter Sonny Watson, Firefighter Shaun McCumber, Firefighter

Jim Nelson, Firefighter

V.I. Propane

Neville Consulting Group

District of North Saanich

Angela Kind, Firefighter

Ben Harding, Firefighter

Ted Stelck, Firefighter

Mike Arychuk, Firefighter

Jo Ann Sjerven, Firefighter

Self - employed

District of North Saanich

Mortgage Architects

Games Workshop

Self Employed

Stelck Tile

Institute of Ocean Science

School District #63

Adam Elia, Firefighter

Jon Dodd, Firefighter

Darryl Bacheldor, Firefighter

James Bridge, Firefighter

Chandler Louie, Firefighter

James Dooley, Firefighter

Canpro Construction

Wales McLelland Construction

Radio Works

Holmes Realty

Lordco Auto Parts

Self Employed

D.C. Systems Services

Austin Dickson, Firefighter Nicholas Brethour, Firefighter Canadian Forces

Nicholson Manufacturing

Murray Goodsir, Firefighter Chase Mollberg, Firefighter Goodsir Painting

Nicholson Manufacturing

Anna-Marie Trelford, Firefighter Brian Thomas, Firefighter Victoria Airport Authority

Bobby Smart, Firefighter Nick Prozorovsky-Halsall, Firefighter Ruben Infante, Firefighter


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A21

Jesse Goldstream News carrier

CARRIERS SHOW THEIR SUPPORT FOR SPORT during Jersey Day, part of Sports Day in Canada Black Press community newspaper carriers showed their support for sport last Friday by donning a favourite team jersey while they delivered their paper routes, as part of national Jersey Day. Recognizing both the hard work of the dedicated carriers to deliver the local news every week and the importance of sport in the life of a vibrant community, Black Press asked its 1,100 carriers to submit photos of themselves “on the job” in their team colours, says Black Press Director of Circulation Bruce Hogarth.

A flood of photos arrived, showing carriers in action while delivering the Oak Bay News, Victoria News, Saanich News, Goldstream News Gazette, and Peninsula News Review. A sampling of the submissions is printed here for our readers to enjoy. Participating carriers were eligible to win prizes from the Victoria Royals, Thrifty Foods, Saanich Parks and Rec, Wildplay and the National Geographic IMAX. Thank you to all of our newspaper carriers from Black Press!

Cara Victoria News carrier

Oliver Oak Bay News carrier

Logan & Connor Goldstream News carriers

Matthias Saanich News carrier

Emily & Cooper Victoria News carriers

Kiara Victoria News carrier

Erik Saanich News carrier

Nik Goldstream News carrier

Brendan Peninsula News Review carrier

THANK YOU TO ALL OUR BLACK PRESS NEWSPAPER CARRIERS & DRIVERS


A22 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.388.3535 fax 250.388-0202 email classified@peninsulanewsreview.com

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SOOKENEWS

MIRROR

0ENINSULA .EWSĂĽ2EVIEW $EADLINES 7EDNESDAYĂĽ%DITIONĂĽ 8PSE"ET-ONDAYxxAM %JTQMBZ"ET&RIDAYxxAM &RIDAYĂĽ%DITION 8PSE"ET7EDNESDAYxxPM %JTQMBZ"ETx4UESDAYxxAM -!*/2ĂĽ#!4%'/2)%3ĂĽ).ĂĽ /2$%2ĂĽ/&ĂĽ!00%!2!.#% &!-),9x!../5.#%-%.43 #/--5.)49x!../5.#%-%.43 42!6%,x #(),$2%.x%-0,/9-%.4 0%23/.!,x3%26)#%3 "53).%33x3%26)#%3x 0%43xx,)6%34/#+ -%2#(!.$)3%x&/2x3!,% 2%!,x%34!4% 2%.4!,3 !54/-/4)6% -!2).%

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

COMING EVENTS INTRO TO CREATING EBOOKS

for Writers - Oct. 13th, Victoria. www.3pennypublishing.com

UKRAINIAN FOOD SALE

Sat, Oct 6, 10am-noon. 1110 Caledonia Ave, Victoria, BC. Homemade fresh frozen perogies, cabbage rolls, borscht, fresh sausage.

250-384-2255. PERSONALS STEAMWORKS: A club for men to meet men. 582 Johnson St., Victoria. 250-3836623 steamworksvictoria.com

LOST AND FOUND

FOUND: 4GB Panasonic camera chip, Sept. 25th near FairďŹ eld Plaza. Contains pics of child’s birth. Is this photo you? Or do you know her? Please call Sue at (250)4751258 or (250)363-8691.

TRAVEL GETAWAYS ITALY- VILLAGE house in beautiful central Italy for rent. Call Anita 250-655-4030.

$)3#2)-).!4/29 ,%')3,!4)/.

!DVERTISERSx AREx REMINDEDx THATx 0ROVINCIALx LEGISLATIONx FORBIDSx THEx PUBLICATIONxOFxANYxADVERTISEMENTx WHICHx DISCRIMINATESx AGAINSTx ANYx PERSONxBECAUSExOFxRACE xRELIGION x SEX x COLOUR x NATIONALITY x ANCESTRYx ORxPLACExOFxORIGIN xORxAGE xUNLESSx THEx CONDITIONx ISx JUSTIÙEDx BYx Ax BONAx ÙDEx REQUIREMENTx FORx THEx WORKxINVOLVED

#/092)'(4

#OPYRIGHTx ANDORx PROPERTIESx SUBSISTx INx ALLx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx INx ALLx OTHERx MATERIALx APPEARINGx INx THISx EDITIONx OFx BCCLASSIÙED COMx 0ERMISSIONx TOx REPRODUCEx WHOLLYxORxINxPARTxANDxINxANYxFORMx WHATSOEVER x PARTICULARLYx BYx Ax PHOTOGRAPHICx ORx OFFSETx PROCESSx INxAxPUBLICATIONxMUSTxBExOBTAINEDx INxWRITINGxFROMxTHExxPUBLISHERx!NYx UNAUTHORIZEDxREPRODUCTIONxWILLxBEx SUBJECTxTOxRECOURSExINxLAW

!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

EDUCATION/TUTORING

FREE ITEMS

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

TUTORING SERVICE in your home. CertiďŹ ed teachers, any grade, any subject. email: schooliseasyvic@gmail.com or call (250)483-5496. or go to www.schooliseasy.com/Victoria

FREE: LARGE overstuffed Sofa, dark green, full size. Call (250)656-1056.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ADVERTISE in the LARGEST OUTDOOR PUBLICATION IN BC THE 2013-2015 BC FRESHWATER FISHING REGULATIONS SYNOPSIS. The most effective way to reach an incredible number of BC Sportsmen & women. Two year edition- terriďŹ c presence for your business. Please call Annemarie 1.800.661.6335 email: ďŹ sh@ blackpress.ca MAKE A FORTUNE with $3000, we know how. Free info pack. Call (250)590-9634.

Looking for a NEW employee?

An Alberta Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilďŹ eld road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051. BANNISTER AUTO GROUP If you are energetic, creative and motivated and have the desire to join a “Customer First Familyâ€?, then we should invite you to come grow with us. We are one of Western Canada’s fasted growing automotive companies. We have an opening at our GM store in Vernon for a Sales Manager. Interested in joining our team? Contact Darryl Payeur @ 1-888-410-5761 or email your resume to darryl@bannisters.com. Bannister GM Vernon, Bannister GM Edson, Bannister Honda Vernon, Browns GM Dawson Creek, Champion GM Trail, HuberBannister Chevrolet Penticton, Salmon Arm GM Salmon Arm. FELLER BUNCHER- Duncan, BC. We are looking for a fulltime Feller Buncher operator. Our logging operations are with Timberwest in the Lake Cowichan area. Wage and beneďŹ t package as per the USW Coast Master Agreement. Please fax resume to 604-736-5320 or email to: kenfraser@telus.net. GM TECHNICIAN required at Jenner Chev in Victoria. Email: mgray@jennerchev.com

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper?

FRIENDLY FRANK 8 SPIDER plants in pots, $4/ea. 8 Geraniums plants in pots, $4/ea. 250-652-4199. ADJUSTABLE ELECTRIC single bed w/ Certa mattress, incls bedding, $75 obo. Call (250)475-6627. MAN’S 3 piece suit, pure virgin wool, never used, w 36� h 5’8�, $89 obo. (250)727-9425.

HELP WANTED

!'2%%-%.4

)Tx ISx AGREEDx BYx ANYx $ISPLAYx ORx #LASSIÙEDx !DVERTISERx REQUESTINGx SPACEx THATx THEx LIABILITYx OFx THEx PAPERx INx THEx EVENTx OFx FAILUREx TOx PUBLISHx ANx ADVERTISEMENTx SHALLx BExLIMITEDxTOxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxBYx THEx ADVERTISERx FORx THATx PORTIONx OFx THEx ADVERTISINGx OCCUPIEDx BYx THEx INCORRECTxITEMxONLYxANDxTHATxTHEREx SHALLx BEx NOx LIABILITYx INx ANYx EVENTx BEYONDxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxFORxSUCHx ADVERTISEMENTx 4HEx PUBLISHERx SHALLx NOTx BEx LIABLEx FORx SLIGHTx CHANGESx ORx TYPOGRAPHICALx ERRORSx THATxDOxNOTxLESSENxTHExVALUExOFxANx ADVERTISEMENT BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx CANNOTx BEx RESPONSIBLEx FORx ERRORSx AFTERx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx OFx PUBLICATIONx OFx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx.OTICExOFxERRORSxONx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx SHOULDx IMMEDIATELYx BEx CALLEDx TOx THEx ATTENTIONx OFx THEx #LASSIÙEDx $EPARTMENTx TOx BEx CORRECTEDx FORx THEx FOLLOWINGx EDITIONBCCLASSIÙEDCOMxRESERVESx THExRIGHTxTOxREVISE xEDIT xCLASSIFYxORx REJECTx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx TOx RETAINx ANYx ANSWERSx DIRECTEDx TOx THEx BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx "OXx 2EPLYx 3ERVICEx ANDx TOx REPAYx THEx CUSTOMERxFORxTHExSUMxPAIDxFORxTHEx ADVERTISEMENTxANDxBOXxRENTAL

DRIVERS WANTED: TerriďŹ c career opportunity outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects. No Rail Experience Needed!! Extensive Paid Travel, Meal Allowance, 4 wks. Vacation & BeneďŹ ts Package. Skills Needed - Ability to travel 3 months at a time Valid License with air brake endorsement. High School Diploma or GED. Apply at www.sperryrail.com under careers, keyword Driver DO NOT FILL IN CITY or STATE

PERSONAL SERVICES

FULL SIZE electric Scooter by Victory, excellent condition, 4 wheels, adjustable seat, headlight, horn and mirror. Asking $750 obo. Call (250)655-7404.

NEW AMEROCK 20� towel bar in box, antique bronze, $15. Call (250)383-5390.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

Need CA$H Today? Own A Vehicle? Borrow Up To $25,000

No Credit Checks! Cash same day, local ofďŹ ce.

www.PitStopLoans.com 1.800.514.9399

HOME CARE SUPPORT KIND, GENTLE, mature Registered B.C. Care Aide seeking Care worker/ light housekeeping position, P/T, in a friendly N/S home. References. $25./hour. (250)655-9239.

NUTRITION/DIET MOUTHWATERING CAPTAIN COOK’S, HOME BAKING Meat Pies, Chicken Pies 4� unbaked frozen $2.50/each Sausage rolls 9/$5 size 1/2� Croquette’s 6/$10 baked or frozen.

Info: 250-652-9755.

TRADES, TECHNICAL

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

RED SEAL Heat & Frost insulator. Steady work in the Victoria area, union wages & beneďŹ ts. $28.65/hr. + H&W and pension. 1-800-663-2738. Email: nmunro@insulators118.org

RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Portraiture-Baby+Family Maternity. Home Movies to DVD. Call 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

TENDER TOOTSIE slippers, size 8, $15. Call (250)5953070.

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, ďŹ r, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391. SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest ďŹ rewood producer offers ďŹ rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

HALF PRICE! Never used; Folding power lift shower commode with chair ($1600). Wheelchair mint cond. (best offer). Call (250)818-4000 or email mercedes500@shaw.ca

500 RECENT paperbacks, $.50; Altas Lathe, $900; 1200 hand crafted earrings/necklaces, $2-$7, large amounts 50% off. Call (250)655-3347.

HONDURAS MAHOGANY SIDEBOARD1930’s, 40�wx15�dx34�h, beautiful condition, $450. Call (250)656-3322.

DOWNSIZING/ SACRIFICE. Glass & white oak china hutch - wall mount or buffet. $200. White solid oak entertainment/ media storage centre $250. (250)656-9717.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

FURNITURE

SOLID AMERCIAN BLACK WALNUT. Gentlemen’s wardrobe (armoire type - original key) 44�wx24�dx54�h and chest of drawers, 54�wx25�dx30�h. Handcrafted in Quebec, 1930’s beautiful condition, $2800/pair. Call (250)656-3322.

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

PET CARRIER, heavy fabric, zipper enclosure and shoulder strap, $25 obo. (250)598-0750 GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

LOWREY ORGAN Symphonic Holiday.4 channels, upper/lower keyboard, about 4’L x 2’W x 3.5’H, $600. obo. SCOOTER Rascal Continental,good working order $400. (250)544-2116

BERNINA 820 QE Sewing Computer - high end sewing & quilting machine w/ 40 cm long free arm, stitch regulator, dual feed. $4500. (250)882-5465. DOWNSIZING SALE. Rocker/Recliner, Sears Special, dark brown, $125, Charbroil BBQ, side burner-rotisserie, $100, electric body heater/vibrator, $35. Call 250-655-4185

10353 DEVLIN Plc, Sidney. Private Rancher. $499,000. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, lrg treed lot. Complete details at w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192295 www.realtor.ca mls #307481 CAYCUSE Very rare 5 acre treed park-like Property with well-maintained furnished home - 1500 sq.ft, 3-bdrm, 2 bath. Extremely close to Pristine Cowichan Lake. Perfect for recreational property or full time living. Reduced to sell $378,800. Exceptionally low yearly cost. Not leased land. Call 250-745-3387 or 250-478-2648

SOFA, LOVE seat, La-Z-Boy recliner, all in good condition, $300 obo (all). Email: robdi@shaw.ca

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

Garage Sales

PERSONAL SERVICES APPLIANCES MIND BODY & SPIRIT

âœŤâœŤâœŤâœŤâœŤ

WANTED: CLEAN fridge’s, upright freezers, 24� stoves, portable dishwashers, less than 15 yrs old. McFarland Industries, (250)885-4531.

CertiďŹ ed Aromatherapist “Simply the Best!â€? 14 yrs in Practice JANALEE

BUILDING SUPPLIES

MASSAGE

250-380-5190 ~Non-Sexual~

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

FREE ITEMS

.com

FREE: ELECTROHOME colour TV, works great. Call (250)598-0750.

#ALLĂ–  Ă–TOĂ–PLACEĂ–YOURĂ–GARAGEĂ–SALEĂ–ADĂ– ANDĂ–RECEIVEĂ–&2%%Ă–BALLOONS Ă–INVENTORYĂ–ANDĂ–TIPĂ–SHEETSĂ– ANDĂ–BRIGHTĂ–GARAGEĂ–SALEĂ–SIGNSĂ– GARAGE SALES

GARAGE SALES

ELECTRONIC SCOOTER Shop Rider Voyager 778S. Used indoors except for 3 trips outside. Exc. cond., $1200 obo. Call (250)472-1361.

GORDON HEAD- 4445 Tyndall Ave, Multi-family! Sat, Oct 6, 9am-2pm.

WE’RE ON THE WEB

BUYING OR SELLING?

KEATING AREA, 2219 Cooperidge Dr., Fri, Sat, Sun, Oct. 5, 6, & 7, 8am-3pm. Moving Sale. Furniture, twin beds, kitchenware, small appliances, older fridge, upright freezer, tools and garden tools, camping gear and lots of misc items.


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A23

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

FOR SALE BY OWNER

HOUSES FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

APARTMENT/CONDO

HOMES FOR RENT

AUTO FINANCING

CARS

1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250478-9231.

1-LEVEL WHEELCHAIR accessible 4 bdrm, 2.5 baths. Approx 2400 sq.ft. Pets, kids welcome. N/S. Avail immed. $1700/mo. (250)656-2242.

$399,000. Next to VGH, 2 bdrm + 3rd or office, 2 lvl, end unit, windows on 3 sides. Large family room, 2 fireplaces, pet allowed. 71-14 Erskine Ln., Tel: 250-478-0269. Open House, 2PM-4PM, Sat & Sun. www.Comfree.com/367097

Qualicum Beach: $295,000 1512 sq.ft. modular, 5yrs old, on own land in 45+ Coop Park. 2bdrm +den, 2baths. Close to beaches and golf courses. (250)738-0248

HOUSES FOR SALE

ARGYL MANOR 9861 Third St., 1 bdrm, F/S, common W/D N/S, N/P, HT & HW incl’d. $860/lease. Avail Oct 1st. Call 250-475-2005 ext 227. COLWOOD 2 bdrm condo, 4th floor, elevator, 5 appls, insuite laundry, F/P, prkg incld, N/P. $1100. Oct. 1. (250)474-6855.

SIDNEY Spectacular Rancher. Inside & Out! Very private, 12ft hedge ¾’s way around house. Beautiful exposure on a quiet, well maintained Cul-de-sac! Call 250-656-2222 or for more info: www.propertyguys.com ID#192329

GLANFORD AREA- Avail now 3 bdrms, 2 bath upper, $1400. 5 appls, 2 balconies, quiet str. Yard is shared. Sm pet ok. Call Equitex 250-386-6071.

HOMES WANTED

WESTHILLS: NEW 1 bdrm apt. $950+ util’s. Close all amens. W/D. NS/NP. Avail. Nov. 1st. Call 250-477-5610 or email scottman12@shaw.ca

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL SIDNEY: AIRPORT side of Beacon Ave. 650-700 sqft workshop/storage space. Rent incld’s heat and electricity with ample electric outlets. Shaw cable connection avail. Located on 2nd floor. Peninsula Mini Storage, 2072 Henry Ave. West. Call (250)655-6454. Also avail. 6500 sqft warehouse with large doors and high ceilings. Call to inquire.

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

CONNECTING BUYERS AND SELLERS www. bcclassified. com

COTTAGES DEEP COVE: cozy 1bdrm, wood floors, acreage, skylights $950 mo, N/S. 250-656-1312.

SAVE ON COMMISSION Sell your home for $6900 or 1% plus $900 fees FULL MLS SERVICE!

CALL: 250-727-8437

Jasmine Parsons www.jasmineparsons.com One Percent Realty V.I.

APARTMENTS FURNISHED LANDS END: large sunny water view, priv entry, parking, NS, www.sidneystudio.info. Adults, snow birds, refs. 250655-4175 SIDNEY EXECUTIVE suite. near ocean & town. $1295. Short/ long term.250-656-8080

CENTRAL PARK area, 3-4 bdrm home, full bsmt, W/D incl’d, $1450. 250-479-6569.

1985 CADILLAC Seville, 70,000 k. Mint condition. White leather upholstery. 1 owner. $3,500. Call (250)656-1560.

LOCHSIDE AREA, waterfront lrg 1 bdrm, close to James Island wharf, quiet, 4 appls, $800 incls heat. N/S, small pet neg. (250)544-0470. SIDNEY- 2 BDRM, garage, yard, deck, F/S, W/D. $1350. Avail Nov 1. (250)812-4154. Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

VICTORIA HOUSING. $475$575 all incl, suits working/students, disability. 778-977-8288

SUITES, LOWER

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

1-800-910-6402

SPORTS & IMPORTS

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557 Guaranteed

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BRIGHT, NEWLY renovated 1 bdrm suite in Deep Cove, grd level, separate entrance. F/S, W/D, D/W, appls all new, wood stove & flrs. N/S. $1100 inclusive. (250)656-6138.

1981 MERCEDES 300SD Turbo Diesel for sale. 281,000 KMS, (Champagne colour) in fair condition, asking $3000. Maintenance log available. Call 250-885-9010. RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

BRIGHT NEWLY renovated 1 bedroom above ground suite. 4 piece bath, storage, utilities and shared laundry. N/S, N/P. $800. Nov 1. 250-656-4319. C. SAANICH. 1-Bdrm. $850. inclds utils & laundry. NS/NP. Avail immed. 250-418-0780.

AUTO SERVICES

DEEP COVE lrg 1 bdrm, acreage, hot tub. W/D, cat ok, N/S. $850+ util. 250-656-1312

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

SAANICH- LARGE, 2000sq ft, 2 bdrm, lights & heat incld, N/S, N/P, ref’s, $1100 mo. Avail now. 250-652-0591. SIDNEY BACHELOR by Park & Ocean. No Drinking, NS/NP. Ref’s. 250-655-8826 (msgs).

SUITES, UPPER SIDNEY: QUIET cozy 1 bdrm. W/D, utils incld, NS/NP, completely furnished. Avail. Nov. 1st. $995/mo. (250)656-7184.

TOWNHOUSES SIDNEY- NEW 2 bdrm + den, W/D. NS/NP. $1700 mo. Avail immed. Call 250-217-4060.

www.bcclassified.com Call 250-388-3535

FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

22’ 5TH wheel, $4,900. Or sell with 2006 Chevy Silverado total package (asking $14,900). Incld’s Tonneau Lid. All excellent cond. Call (250)655-1147.

250-885-1427

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

CASH PAID

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

CARS

$50-$1000 CASH

“2004 RAV4 4WD”- $13,500 firm. 4 cyl, auto, silver, Michelins, 120,000 km,Victoria only vehicle. Complete maintenance history. Lady-driven, no accidents, excellent condition, keyless entry. Model Recommended In Top 10 by Consumer Reports. (250)479-5545.

MARINE

For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

BOATS

858-5865

$$$ BOATS Wanted. Any size. Cash buyer. Also trailers and outboards. 250-544-2628.

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

COMPUTER SERVICES

DRYWALL

GARDENING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Please call Des 250-656-9363, 250-727-5519.

DRYWALL PROFESSIONAL: Small additions, boarding, taping, repairs, texture spraying, consulting. Soundproof installation;bath/moisture resistance products. Call 250.384.5055. Petrucci’s Drywall.

21YRS EXP Garden clean-ups weeding, etc. All areas of city. $25/hr. No tax. 250-656-7045.

250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates.

ELECTRICAL

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

250-216-9476 ACCEPTING clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601

CARPENTRY McGREGOR HOME Repair & Renos. Decks to doors. Small jobs OK. WCB. (250)655-4518

COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites, etc. 250-886-8053, 778-351-4090. HAGENS COMPUTERS. New and used computers. Sales and service. 250-655-3566.

CONCRETE & PLACING

MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

ALL TYPES of Concrete & Carpentry work specializing in all types of retaining walls, large or small. IKON Construction since 1980. Call 250-4782898 or 250-880-0928.

CHIMNEY SERVICES

CONTRACTORS

JKG CHIMNEY. Clean, Repairs, Gutters, Roof Demoss, Torch On Flat. 250-588-3744.

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

CLEANING SERVICES

DRYWALL

MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estates, events, offices. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

PRIVATE HOUSEKEEPER. Has available openings. Exc ref’s. $25/hr. 778-433-4340.

MUD on the RUN. Small drywall repairs, textures & renovations. Ross, (250)812-4879.

CARPET INSTALLATION

250-361-6193 QUALITY Electric. New homes, renos. No job too sm. Seniors disc. #22779.

(250)208-8535 WOODCHUCK Yard a mess? Fall pruning & clean-up. Blackberry & ivy rmvl, weed control. 24yrs exp.

AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550.

ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualified, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com

KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

AURICLE BSC. 250-882-3129 Fall clean up, Lawn aeration & fertilize-soil-hedges & more.

FENCING

NO JOB too BIG or SMALL. SENIOR’S SPECIAL! Prompt, reliable service. Phone Mike (ANYTIME) at 250-216-7502.

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

HANDYPERSONS AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BIG BEAR Handyman. Decks, Stairs, Painting, General household repairs. Free estimate. Call Barry 250-896-6071

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

HANDYMAN SERVICES. Lawns, fences, pruning, flooring, painting, drywall, small renos. Mike/Chris 250-656-8961

FURNITURE REFINISHING U-NEEK SEATS. Hand cane, Danish weave, sea grass. UK Trained. Fran, 250-216-8997.

SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Call Fred, 250-888-5345.

GARDENING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

10% OFF. Mowing, Power Raking, Hedge/Shrub Trimming, Clean-up. 250-479-6495

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

www.bcclassified.com


A24 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

MOVING & STORAGE

PAINTING

PAINTING

PLUMBING

STUCCO/SIDING

WINDOW CLEANING

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

BIG BEAR Painting. Interior & Exterior. Quality work. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071

TOP NOTCH PAINTINGOver 25yrs exp. Interior/Exterior, Residential Reliable, Reasonable and Friendly Service. Call Brad 250-580-5542.

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

RE-STUCCO & HARDY Plank/Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

JOHN’S STONEWORK. Free estimates. Over 30 years experience. (250)595-6099. ROMAX MASONRY. Exp’d & Professional. Chimneys, Brick Veneer, Rockwork, Cultured Stone, Interlocking Paving. Fully insured. Estimates. Call 250-588-9471 - 250-882-5181

MOVING & STORAGE DIAMOND MOVING- 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734.

DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior and student discount. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler 250-418-1747. MALTA MOVING. Residential & Commercial - BBB Member. (250)388-0278.

PAINTING ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

DRYWALL REPAIRS & HOUSE PAINTING. Free estimates. If you, your family or friends need any of the above give Joseph Bronson a call 250-686-0663. Reasonable rates in a tight economy. I take pride in the end results.

High quality, Organized. Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Jeff, 250-472-6660 Cell 250-889-7715 Member BBB

PRESSURE WASHING

Peacock Painting

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127.

SAFEWAY PAINTING

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

250-652-2255 250-882-2254 WRITTEN GUARANTEE Budget Compliance

15% SENIORS DISCOUNT

DEMOSS Dr. $499 per/roof. 2 years warranty. We also install new roofs? Call 250-589-4998

TREE SERVICES

WINDOWS

LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

UPHOLSTERY UPHOLSTERER work. Your fabric 250-480-7937.

or

NEEDS mine.

WINDOW CLEANING RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

BLAINE’S WINDOW WASHING. Serving Sidney & Brentwood since 1983. Average house $35. 250-656-1475

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS FOR YOU! 250.388.3535

ww

SAANICHTON

Available

ROUTE 6221 - PANAVIEW HEIGHTS,VEYANESS RD, STELLY’S CROSS RD, EAST SAANICH RD ROUTE 6224 - EAST SAANICH RD, VEYANESS RD, HOVEY RD, (ODD) RIDGEDOWN CRES. DEAN PARK

Paper Routes Positions Open For FT/PT Carriers & Sub Carriers

ROUTE 6551 - PENDER PARK DR, ORCAS PARK TERRACE,SALISH DRIVE ROUTE 6553 - NASH PLACE, BEAUMARIS PLACE, DEAN PARK ROAD, PENDER PARK DRIVE, ROUTE 6561 - FOREST PARK DR, STUART PARK TERR, PORTLAND PL, FOREST PARK PL ROUTE 6562 - MAYNEVIEW TERRACE, STUART PARK PLACE, LANGARA PLACE ROUTE 6563 - MAYNVIEW TERRACE,GEORGIA VIEW,PARK PACIFIC TERRACE ROUTE 6564- FOREST PARK DRIVE ROUTE 6566- MORSEBY PARK, HARO PARK TANNER RIDGE

ROUTE 6105 - LOGANBERRY PLACE, WILCOX TERRACE ROUTE 6128 - SEABROOK RD, WHITE RD, VEYANESS RD, TANLEE CRES, CHATWELL DR, REID COURT SIDNEY

All Age Groups Welcome!

ROUTE 6359 - HARBOUR ROAD ROUTE 6439 - FIFTH STREET (ODD), FOURTH STREET, THIRD STREET, SECOND STREET (EVEN), BEVAN AVE ROUTE 6440 - OCEAN AVE, ORCHARD AVE, FIFTH STREET (ODD), FOURTH STREET, THIRD STREET, SECOND STREET (EVEN), OAKVILLE AVE

Call... Arlene 250-656-1151


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A25

THANK YOU!

SPORTS

For days like today!

Thanks to the following companies and organizations for supporting United Way’s 2012 Community Campaign through our Loaned Representative Program.

Glen Meadows ladies’ season wraps Awards handed out to members at windup Devon MacKenzie

club and Karen Smith from Glen Meadows golf and country club came first in the two best net tournament during the windup event. The Cedar Hill Ladies Club was also presented with the trophy for the Business Ladies most overall yearly inter-club points. With the season wrapped up, the final results from the year were tallied. Trophy recipients were as follows: Spring Trophy - Deb Henzie and Barb Hale Bernice Wilson Senior Trophy - Anni

News staff

The Glen Meadows Ladies Golf Division has wrapped up its season and the Glen Meadows Business Ladies hosted the yearly inter-club windup Saturday, Sept. 22. Golf clubs attended Glen Meadows from throughout the city and a great day of golf, dinner and prizes was had by all. The mixed team of Val Mieras and Yvonne Audette from Cedar Hill golf club, Cathy Savage from the Uplands golf

Jakubowski Super Senior Trophy - Marg Hurd Garland Trophy - Rita Seigo George Paulin Trophy - Rita Seigo Club Championship - Low Gross - Jo Ann Saville Club Championship Low Net - Molly Fediw Senior Club Championship - Marlene Hamilton Nash Trophy - Low Gross - Rita Seigo Nash Trophy - Low Net - Jo Ann Saville — With files from the Glen Meadows Ladies Golf Division

Pierre Campeau HP Advanced Solutions Inc

Darci Denis BC Pension Corporation

Anne Dickinson Natural Resources Canada

Tersia Fagan Camosun College

Michael Fisher Western Economic Diversification Canada

Caley Fox Vancouver Island Health Authority

Rosemary Harrison University of Victoria

Andrea Torres Royal Roads University

Parkland to host senior girls, boys volleyball SIDNEY — Parkland Secondary School plays host next week to two senior volleyball round robins. On Tuesday, Oct. 9, Parkland hosts Reynolds Senior Secondary, Spectrum Community School and Stelly’s Secondary School for a senior girls regular season round robin. On Wednesday, Oct. 10, Parkland

uwgv.ca

hosts Glenlyon Norflok School, Claremont Secondary School and Stelly’s for a regular season senior boys volleyball round robin. Games start at 6 p.m. both nights and are open to the public. Visit lowerislandschoolsports.ca for more information and schedules. — News staff

Amy Verge Department of National Defence

Shelley Wiebe Vancouver Island Health Authority

Invest in your community help us reach our 2012 goal of $6 million!

SPECIAL CANADA’S

AUTO SERVICE

STORE GORDON HEAD 3993 Cedar Hill Road 250.721.1125

LANGFORD West Shore Town Centre 250.474.2291

ROYAL OAK 801 Royal Oak Drive 250.727.6561

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Prices in effect from Friday October 5, 2012 to Thursday, October 11, 2012

Technician Tip A squealing sounds, may be your brakes’ first warning sign. Get them checked before they start grinding (they might be worn out by then).

Voted

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Industry-licensed technicians • Modern Equipment • Coast to Coast Warranty • Premium products you know & the Brands you can trust!

18th

9 % ! 2


A26 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Parkland Secondary School’s senior boys rowing team of Shawn Shortill, Sebastian Testart, Sam Lipscombe and Ethan Pennell dug deep for a second place finish in their heat against two Stelly’s Secondary boats on Elk Lake Sept. 30. Steven Heywood/News staff

Saanich Peninsula schools show well at Crabfest Regatta Steven Heywood News staff

High school rowing teams from Saanich and the Peninsula showed well at the Crabfest Regatta Sept. 30 on Elk Lake. Rowers at junior and senior levels from Stelly’s and Parkland secondary schools finished in the top three in a variety of events, demonstrating determination and talent to get throughout their respective heats to reach the day’s finals. Among junior A woman 8+, Stelly’s placed second with a time of 1:56.34, finishing

between two Claremont Secondary teams. In junior B women 4x, Stelly’s placed third (1:53.90). The Stinger’s junior A novice men’s 8+ team was first, beating Claremont by under a second. Parkland’s junior B novice men 4x rowers dominated Pacific Christian School in a time of 2:04.38 — more than seven seconds ahead. Parkland’s junior B novice women 4x took first and second in their final race of the day. A third local squad was only a second off of third place, which was taken by Glenlyon

Norfolk School. Stelly’s junior A novice women 8+ won their final race with a time of 2:20.34. In junior A men 4x, it was Stelly’s and Parkland in a one-two finish, respectively. The teams were separated by only a second. The Bayside Middle School rowers took second and third place in their junior C mixed 4x and in their women’s 4x final. Stelly’s would place third in junior A women 4x and second in junior B women’s 8+, just ahead of the Parkland entry. More results from Crabfest:

th Sandy’s 37 Anniversary Sale

Junior B novice men 4x - Stelly’s second. Junior B novice women 8+ - Parkland first. Junior A novice women 4x - Parkland second. Junior B men 4x - Stelly’s first. Junior A men 8+ - Parkland first, Stelly’s second. Full results from the race day can be found online at regattdata.com from Lower Vancouver Island School Sports (LVISSA), including results from Victoria’s Gorge Crabfest, featuring schools from the Victoria School District.

ON NOW

Storewide Savings of up to 50% off

Every September, Shoppers Drug Mart® stores across Canada set up a Tree of Life in support of women’s health, with 100% of all proceeds going directly to women’s health initiatives in your community. Over the years, you’ve contributed over $17 million and we’re hoping you’ll help us make a difference again this year. Visit your local Shoppers Drug Mart between September 29 and October 26 and buy a leaf ($1), a butterfly ($5), an acorn ($10) or a cardinal ($50) to help women’s health grow in your community. To find out which women’s charity your local Shoppers Drug Mart store supports, visit shoppersdrugmart.ca/treeoflife.

www.sandysfurniture.ca/contests/fall2012

Mon. – Wed. 10am-6pm Thurs. & Fri. 10am-9pm Sat. 10am-6pm Sun. 11am-5pm 250.391.6646 975Langford Parkway | Victoria

www.sandysfurniture.ca


PENINSULA NEWS REVIEW - Friday, October 5, 2012

www.peninsulanewsreview.com • A27

childrenshealthvi.org

Here’s a great children’s story. The Queen Alexandra Foundation for Children has been renamed Children’s Health Foundation of Vancouver Island. Please join us in welcoming our new name! We are excited about the change because the new name tells the story of what we do and where we do it. Our Foundation has a 90-year legacy of helping children thanks to you, our incredible donors and supporters. Our new name sets the stage for helping even more children in the years to come. Here for your children The newly-named Children’s Health Foundation of Vancouver Island will continue to promote the health and well-being of children, youth and families all over Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands. This includes funding for facilities, organizations, programs, and equipment for children in need.

The Queen Alexandra legacy lives on The Children’s Health Foundation of Vancouver Island continues to support the Queen Alexandra Centre for Children’s Health in Victoria. And the name “Queen Alexandra” will forever be part of our legacy.

How we help: Across the Islands We provide grants to organizations that support the health and well-being of children and youth through their programming. We also fund families experiencing urgent and unforeseen medical needs, including travel and accommodation and specialized medical equipment.

Jeneece Place With the support of our entire community, our Foundation funded, built and operates Jeneece Place. This 10-bedroom home provides a supportive and inexpensive environment for families who travel to Victoria for their child’s medical care.

West Shore and Sooke Child, Youth & Family Centres We own and operate these facilities in which child and youth related health and social service agencies use the facilities at cost – so that their resources can be directed to helping children.

HerWay Home HerWay Home is a program funded by our Foundation to reduce WKHORQJWHUPH΍HFWVRIVXEVWDQFHXVHGXULQJSUHJQDQF\RQEDELHV

Queen Alexandra Centre for Children’s Health We support programs at the Centre, such as physical therapy, wheelchair seating and bracing for children with special needs, and early childhood development.

If you would like more information mation or wish to donate, please visit childrrenshealthvi.org or call 250-519-6722. 250 519 6722


A28 • www.peninsulanewsreview.com

Friday, October 5, 2012 - PENINSULA

NEWS REVIEW

Wake Up For Deals This Saturday Only! Fletcher’s

Bacon

7am –11am only

Regular or Thick Sliced 500g Limit 2 Total

Compliments

On Sale

Bread

2

9Eac8h

Island Gold

White or Whole Wheat, 570g Limit 4 Total

On Sale

Large White Eggs Dozen Limit 2

On Sale

1

68

¢

Sun-Rype

Lactantia

Pure Apple Juice 1L Limit 4

Butter 454g Limit 4

On Sale

68

4Each8

¢

Each

On Sale

2

9Each8

Farms LAST Bergen Exclusive to Thrifty Foods! BC Blueberries On Sale or Raspberries OF THE SEASON

While quantities last.

Grown in BC Blueberries 11oz./312g Pack or Raspberries 1lb/454g Pack Weather Permitting.

Where this symbol appears, deposit & enviro levies are applicable.

3

9Eac8h

Specials in effect Saturday, October 6th, 2012, 7am–11am IN-STORE SHOPPING ONLY

Each


Peninsula News Review, October 05, 2012