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COMMUNITY: Drop Zone raises $140K /A3 The Greater Victoria hockey scene ARTS: Victoria Choir charts new waters /A18 is highlighted in a 12-page section Inside SPORTS: Royals get Russian sniper /A25

SAANICHNEWS Wednesday, September 19, 2012

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Third try for vilified UVic parkade Kyle Slavin News staff

The University of Victoria, for the third time in 14 months, attempted Monday to garner Saanich council’s support to build a parkade on campus. Councillors tabled the plans twice before, in August and October of last year, because they felt the community wasn’t properly consulted. Both meetings lasted several hours and drew streams of angered residents voicing concerns about the parkade’s height, location and expected traffic impacts. “It’s been a good lesson for helping UVic understand that with such a substantial development, it effects the greater community,” said Coun. Paul Gerrard. A third meeting was held Monday night, after the News’ press deadline. “I think UVic should’ve heard the first time (council tabled the project) that the consultation process was not seen to be transparent. My impression is that they were rushing the process, and there’s never a good resolution when that happens.” A more thorough consultation process that spanned this winter and spring, conducted by H.B. Lanarc, resulted in UVic submitting a parkade design to Saanich that looks drastically different than anything council’s seen before. While the initial parking garage was planned to be 503 stalls over seven levels, the new plan proposes 332 stalls over five levels, one of which will be buried. The estimated $13.4-million parkade is part of a larger project, a new athletics centre slated for the corner of McKenzie Avenue and Gabriola Road. PLEASE SEE: Neighbours, Page A4

Natalie North/News staff

Maisie Riddle, centre, reads from her life story, as compiled by Braeden and Abbey Timms, who sit on either side of 95-yearold resident of Abbeyfield St. Peter’s House. The teens have been volunteering with the residents since late last year.

Volunteering a family affair Seniors, teens connect at Abbeyfield house Natalie North News staff

Maisie Riddle holds a flowercovered folder bearing her name on her lap. Inside the front cover: a photo of the 95-year-old woman’s smiling face and a series of her personal stories as compiled by Abbey and Braeden

Timms, two Reynolds secondary school students who began volunteering at Abbeyfield St. Peter’s House last March. “I found it so easy to talk to you. I didn’t know when to shut up,” says Riddle, a resident of Abbeyfield, a non-profit facility aimed at low-income seniors. Across from Riddle sits Abbey, 15, and Braeden, 17, along with their 10-year-old sister Katie, who began volunteering at the house this winter after their mother Tammy Timms read a story in the

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Saanich News about the society’s need for more volunteers. While the teens created life histories, Katie worked in the garden alongside Tammy, a nurse. “In North America in general, we don’t value elderly people, as opposed to other cultures who have a bit more reverence or respect for the elderly,” Tammy says. “There’s just so much to learn from them. In my lifetime, I won’t see the changes they’ve seen: automobiles, planes, man on the moon, Internet, world wars

– they’ve lived in such diverse times and they have so much to share.” Tammy was surprised by the insight her kids put into their interviews, despite having gained far more than they’ve given to residents, she says. “How cool is it to be reading about World War Two and then meet someone who was in the trenches?” Tammy says. “It’s almost hard for them to absorb.” PLEASE SEE: Teens, Page A17

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A2 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

Campy but fun, a filmmaker lives the dream Natalie North News staff

John Varszegi sits in front of his computer screen grinning. “This is not for bragging,â€? he says through his thick Hungarian accent. “James Cameron ‌ David Cronenberg‌â€? Varszegi scrolls through the List of Canadian directors Wikipedia page with a finger pointed to the screen. He pauses. â€œâ€Ś John Varszegi.â€? The Hillside/Quadra neighbourhood bachelor suite-turned bluescreen studio represents all that Varszegi could not access as a boy driven to make films in communist Hungary. Since founding the not-forprofit organization HTVBC seven years ago, the 56-year-old single dad and home care worker has directed and edited more than 100 short films and continues to funnel all of his extra income into his cinematic endeavours. The organization, initially known as Hungarian Television of B.C., began as a source of Hungarian community programming for online and TV platforms, but Varszegi has since broadened his scope to include any aspect of B.C. or Canadian culture. He is now driven by a desire to screen at international film festivals and support emerging local actors and writers.

“All of the actors are mostly local because we want to support them with references,â€? Varszegi said. “We’d like to somehow support and push the local, non-professional film community.â€? Last year’s big project was Unsound Innocence, a campy feature-length action flick laden with gunfire and fake blood and shot entirely in Spectrum Community School. It was recently accepted into Mexico’s Oaxaca FilmFest. Anyone visiting the Observatory Hill or Beaver Lake recently may have seen equally offbeat and adrenaline-charged shoots from his current project The Ten Dimension Theory, a sciencefiction action film, based on Rob Bryanton’s book Imagining the Tenth Dimension. Stretching the limits of lowbudget, independent filmmaking, Varszegi shot a boat chase scene in Victoria’s Inner Harbour and used Craigdarroch Castle to stand in for the Vatican for his latest epic. “It’s a bit tongue in cheek,â€? said Randy Parker, a 53-year-old actor who has enjoyed playing the lead role in Varszegi’s last two features. “When you work with what you can on a shoestring budget, sometimes it goes off your intended focus and you just work with it. ‌ If it goes a little off at a certain point and it’s a little campy and people are laughing, but they’re happy and enter-

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Filmmaker John Varszegi, right, founder of the HTVBC Film Studio, with actor Randy Parker. Varszegi, originally from Hungary, shoots low-budget independent films around Victoria. tained in the end, that’s OK.� Varszegi is still in need of more actors to fill in all of the roles in The Ten Dimension Theory. “That’s the beautiful part of it. (Actors and crews) are all adults with families and they’ve spent their time for free. They spend the whole summer from morning until evening time just for enthusiasm, just because they think we do something good and useful.� Parker commends Varszegi on

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his openness and ability to collaborate. “When he first approached me he said: ‘We make films. It’s a hobby. Some people golf; some people fish, but we make films.’ First and foremost you just want to have fun and create something. Maybe something will come of it later.� As Varszegi scans through highlights from his demo reel the smile returns to his face. He has

put in a lot of hours since he first shot a Three Musketeers tribute as a 14-year-old in Hungary. “Nobody has ever thought about ‘Oh we can make money with this,’â€? Varszegi says. “Well we can or we can not, who cares? The point is that we do something useful. ‌ The point is the fun.â€? To see Varszegi’s films, see htvbc.com. nnorth@saanichnews.com

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www.saanichnews.com • A3

SAANICH NEWS -Wednesday, September 19, 2012

COMMUNITY NEWS IN BRIEF

Woman mugged on Vernon Avenue A man on a mountain bike mugged a woman for her cellphone last Friday morning at a bus stop a few blocks from the Saanich police station. Saanich police say a woman was waiting at the bus stop of the northbound lane of Vernon Avenue in the 800-block and a male approached her at 6:13 a.m. He produced an undisclosed weapon and demanded the woman’s wallet. She told the man she didn’t have a wallet and pushed him away, police say. She then ran away but fell, dropping her cellphone. He threatened her again, took the cellphone and rode away on his bike. The suspect was last seen entering the parking lot at 880 Vernon Ave. Police say the woman tried to flag down passing drivers, but nobody stopped. She called police from a restaurant at the Saanich Plaza across the road. The suspect couldn’t be found. He is described as white, about 35 years old, average build, small dark eyes, stubble and a broad nose. The suspect wore a tan coloured trench coat, dark cargo pants, dark shoes and was riding a dark coloured mountain bike. Police are seeking assistance from anyone living in the Uptown or Saanich Plaza area or commuting, between 6 and 6:30 a.m. Friday. Anyone with information can call the Saanich Police tip line at 250-475-4356.

Fundraiser garage sale for Lifetime Lifetime Networks, a Saanich-based charity devoted to creating friendship and support networks for people with disabilities, is hosting a garage sale on Sunday. All funds raised will go towards supporting the charity. The sale runs from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m., at 102-4090 Shelbourne St. Call 250-4774112 or email carlene@lnv.ca for more information. Check out Lifetime Networks at lifetimenetworks.org.

Don’t think, don’t look down Annual Drop Zone raises $140,000 for Easter Seals Natalie North News staff

On a beautiful September afternoon the late summer sun warmed my face. I’d scored an hour out of the office and the conditions couldn’t have been better, except for the fact that I was balancing on the ledge of the CIBC Building 13 storeys above View Street, not sure if I should laugh or cry or vomit. I couldn’t choose and froze up instead. Why does someone uncomfortable with heights decide to rappel down the side of an office building dressed as a gingerbread cookie? Because when you’re a reporter, beautiful opportunities are handed to you on a regular basis and even when all of your instincts suggest these opportunities will shave decades from your life, you agree to them. Not because you want to overcome fears or prove anything, but because you love a good story. The penchant toward wearing a costume fit for a tyke is tougher to explain. With a harness cinched tightly around my core clad in a brown felt jumper with the feet hacked off, I pretended I knew how to navigate the side of building like a pro, and questioned just when my life got so weird. I was scared, sure, but witnesses have given the most petrified of the drop award to Jason Lamb, radio morning show host from the Zone@91.3. Lamb, who suggested he was merely the most vocal about his nerves, agreed to participate in the rappel when he was put on the spot live on the air by colleague Pol Plastino. The agreement evoked random pangs of panic for Lamb in the quiet moments leading up to Thursday’s event. “I was coming up with excuses until I was strapped in the harness,” Lamb said. “I would be going about my day and then it would hit me: this shivery feeling – a cold feeling of doom.”

Sharon Tiffin photos/News staff

Fearless reporter Natalie North, above, looks remarkably at ease in a gingerbread man outfit as she rappels downs the CIBC Building. Saanich Mayor Frank Leonard, right, concentrates as he starts his speedy walk down 13 storeys. About 60 people braved the Drop Zone to raise $140,000 for Easter Seals. “I decided as soon as it was my turn to walk the plank of death, just to do it and get it done and out of the way as soon as possible,” Lamb said. Speeding toward the street without so much as looking down was the same approach taken by Saanich Mayor Frank Leonard, who shares Lamb’s aversion to heights. While I was systematically inching my running shoes down the concrete and peeking into the office space of kindly executives along the way – who can resist extending a warm smile and wave at a woman dressed as a cookie? – I felt the fast approaching shadow of a stealthy gentleman darting to the ground at what appeared to be breakneck speed. For Leonard, who was enticed to join the drop just 10 days prior to the event, the rappel was a mission of sheer duty, rather than personal pleasure. Leonard’s drop was completed with $4,800 in donations raised, landing him the honour of top fundraiser. After the event, the perpetually composed veteran of public events admitted to an overwhelming feeling of relief. “It’s a thing to strike off the

bucket list,” said Craig Heinz, manager of special events for B.C. Lions Society Victoria. “How often do you get to do something like that?” “There were a lot of people who didn’t think they could do it, who were considering backing out and then they just stepped up to the plate and actually did it,” added Heinz, who also did the rappel. “When they got to the bottom they thought it was fantastic.” Fantastic is a word I would apply to the situation, despite appearing as a happy, yet terrified Christmas blob in front of my colleagues and friends. Easter Seals Drop Zone volunteers, sponsors and characters with all kinds of far superior costumes – Bat girls, Super girls, Rainbow Brite, the Star Trek crew, a giant kidney, Daisy the cow – combined their super powers to make this year’s Drop Zone the most successful yet.

Some 60 droppers raised more than $140,000 to benefit Easter Seals on Vancouver Island including Easter Seals House, a home away from home for children and their families who are traveling for medical treatment, and Easter Seals Camp Shawnigan, a fully subsidized and accessible camp for children with disabilities. nnorth@saanichnews.com


A4 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

‘Free baby’ ad likely posted from outside Victoria Kyle Slavin

good home.” “We still are hoping that it was a hoax,” said Const. Mike Russell, though investigators haven’t yet been able to confirm the post’s validity. The ad was originally posted

News staff

Victoria police are still attempting to track down the person who posted a classified ad, offering a baby “free to a

to UsedVictoria, a Black Pressowned website, on Sept. 10 at 9:03 a.m. It was removed 25 minutes later by UsedVictoria moderators. “Our terms of use outlines that we reserve the right to delete

C O R D OV A B AY

content deemed obscene, illegal, immoral, sexually explicit, or anything deemed not family friendly,” said Erin Richards, marketing co-ordinator for UsedVictoria. “First and foremost, our concern is for the welfare of the child.” Victoria police got involved an hour later. “We’re still working on tracking down the IP address. We’re

still confident (the ad was posted) well outside our jurisdiction, but we haven’t been able to narrow it down any further than that,” Russell said. He added that if the post was not a hoax, he wants to remind the parent that there are resources in the community that can provide assistance to new parents. kslavin@saanichnews.com

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Continued from Page A1

Kristi Simpson, associate vicepresident responsible for campus planning, says the university is “looking forward to showing council what we’ve done and how the project has changed. “We did a much better job about communicating with the community about what the project is, why we think it’s important to the campus and community, and soliciting feedback on what the impacts might be and making adjustments based on that feedback,” she said. “I think we’ve accomplished that, and that’s demonstrated through the support we’ve gotten from our community associations.” This will be Coun. Nichola Wade’s first opportunity to weigh in on the parkade project, as she was the only new face elected to council in last November’s municipal election. “The plan for me is to review what’s gone (to council) before to get as much background on the project as I can,” she said. Despite not having been on coun-

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cil, Wade was well aware of the reasons council took issue with the parkade twice before. “With a project of this nature you’re never going to have everybody thrilled with the actual outcome. But the process by which we reach it is critical,” she said. While the process was more thorough this time around, opposition to the project still exists. Council’s agenda package included a number of letters from area residents concerned about the project’s size, location and traffic impacts. “I have lived in (the Cadboro Bay) neighbourhood most of my life and it is only in the last few years that UVic seems to be a poor neighbour having little regard for their neighbours,” wrote Karen Lightbody in a letter to Saanich. Saanich council was expected to discuss the development variance permit at Monday night’s committee of the whole meeting. Check out Friday’s edition of the News to read about their decision or check out saanichnews.com. kslavin@saanichnews.com

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www.saanichnews.com • A5

SAANICH NEWS -Wednesday, September 19, 2012



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conventions around this are if you’re going back to the bargaining table, unless you’re involved in a full-blown strike, then you suspend significant job action activity. We’re not seeing that,� Kilpatrick said. Sprenger stressed that the objective of the job action was to keep pressure on the university without impacting students too much. He added, however, that the unions “thought it was important not to impact classes and labs. It’s a relatively minor inconvenience to students that the bookstore’s closed.� While the strike kept the coffee shop closed, and management had to clean weekend messes inside on-campus housing on Monday, managers reopened the bookstore just after noon in a limited capacity. It was closed an hour later after “heated verbal exchanges� erupted between picketers and students, according to UVic.

After two weeks of rotating strikes at the University of Victoria, pickets are down through the remainder of this week as union reps returned to the bargaining table to negotiate with the employer. The job action culminated Monday with workers walking off the job at the bookstore and Finnerty Express coffee shop, along with residence housekeeping services. “Today we turned it up a notch, as far as putting pressure up on the employer,� CUPE 951 president Doug Sprenger said Monday. “If we are able to make significant progress this week (in negotiations) there won’t be any picketing action for a while.� CUPE 951 and 917 represent some 1,500 non-teaching jobs such as tradespeople, food service staff, childcare workers, and office and library staff, and have both been without contracts since March 31, 2010. Bruce Kilpatrick, with holistic pet foods fro from the university’s director of communicaMiss Daisy’s tions, said the union’s Pet Foods tactic of continuing to strike despite solidified & Supplies plans to return to the 3838 Cadboro Bay Road bargaining table was missdaisyspetfoods.ca “unusual.� “It’s hard to fig250-590-5182 ure out because the

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“There was concern about deescalation. We wanted to make sure we weren’t putting our students or staff in a position that compromised their safety,â€? Kilpatrick said. Sprenger rebutted the claim that there were heated conversations, but said CUPE members told UVic they were upset that management appeared as bookstore staff by wearing employee T-shirts. “We said, ‘We’d really like to bring the temperature down (at the bookstore), maybe we should walk (employees) to a different building, like the library. ‌ I guess (UVic) took that as a threat,â€? Sprenger said. “We just wanted to diffuse the situation.â€? Negotiations between the two unions and UVic were expected to take place Tuesday through Thursday this week. At issue for the unions is job security and inflation protection. kslavin@saanichnews.com

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The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal

Ida Chong, MLA is seeking nominations for individual residents of Oak Bay – Gordon Head to receive one of four Queen’s Diamond Jubilee medals. Nominees should be: ¡ A Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada

¡ Have made a significant contribution to a particular province, territory, region or community within Canada, or an achievement abroad that brings credit to Canada; and ¡

Be alive on February 6th, 2012

Nomination forms and further information can be obtained at www.gg.ca/diamondjubilee or at Oak Bay – Gordon Head constituency offices. Nominations must be received at #219, 3930 Shelbourne Street by 4 p.m. September 21, 2012

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A6 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

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Saanich canine unit earns best in country at police championships Kyle Slavin News staff

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A Saanich police canine officer is the top dog in the country after earning an overall first place at the Canadian Police Canine Championships in Regina, Sask., earlier this month. Const. Jon Zielinski and his fouryear-old German shepherd, Zeke, participated in a gamut of trials, which show off the dog and handler’s skills when working together as a team. “He’s special to me because of his loyalty. He’s easygoing. I know that he has all the gears that I need and he knows when to switch it on, so to speak,” Zielinksi said, while Zeke gnawed on a toy beside him. “When we were in Regina, he showed that he has all the gears and he performed really well. But at the end of the day I can take him home and he’s part of the family.” Some 30 canine units from across Canada participated in building search, evidence search and open compound search scenarios, along

with a criminal apprehension test. The dogs were also tested on their obedience and agility. Zielinski, who has competed previously at the canine championships (placing third overall in 2008 with police dog Bauer), says the winning formula takes time to prove successful at the competitions. “First of all you need a bit of luck, then you need the (right) dog, and then you need the hard work,” he said. All the tests Zeke went through at the Sept. 6 to 9 championships were scenarios of situations he could face any time while on duty in Saanich. “We’re very proud to have this No. 1 team in Canada here serving our community and the citizens of our community and region,” said Sgt. Dean Jantzen. Saanich police canine units have a history of successes at the Canadian championships, including overall first place wins in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2005 and 2006. kslavin@saanichnews.com

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SAANICH NEWS -Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Bus union Scientists lash out at federal cutbacks approves strike vote Edward Hill News staff

Daniel Palmer News staff

About three-quarters of Greater Victoria’s 650 transit operators and workers voted 98 per cent in favour of taking a strike vote, should talks with B.C. Transit break down in the coming weeks. “We have no intentions of having a strike vote right now,” said Ben Williams, Canadian Auto Workers Local 333 president. “We understand the dependence on B.C. Transit and the hassle that would cause the riders, and it’s definitely a last resort,” he said. Union representatives returned to the bargaining table with B.C. Transit last week. Negotiations previously broke off after union and B.C. Transit reps failed to agree on reasonable wage increases, contracting out and contract language, Williams said. Additional bargaining dates are scheduled into October. The union has been without a collective agreement since March 31.

Women’s show returns to Pearkes The 18th annual Victoria Women’s Show returns to Pearkes fieldhouse Sept. 22 and 23, with this year the addition of a wellness expo. Visitors will have the opportunity to sample products and services, while they take in a sneak peek at fall fashions and live entertainment. Festivities include: a Gluten Free Zone hosted by the Victoria chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association, drop in Zumba classes, circuit training and a main stage show with acclaimed clairvoyant, Christine Hurley daily at noon. The first 100 people through the door at George Pearkes Arena, 3100 Tillicum Rd., receive goody bags. The show runs from 10 a.m to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $5 and available at the door only. Free admission for children 12 and under. See atrshows.com. nnorth@saanichnews.com GUTTER CLEANING • WINDOW CLEANING • POWER WASHING

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A leading Canadian climate scientist slammed the search for the long-lost 1845 Franklin Expedition as a veiled front for future oil and gas extraction in the high Arctic. Andrew Weaver, a professor in the University of Victoria school of earth and ocean sciences, called the search for the HMS Erebus and HMS Terror a “joke” during an off-the-cuff speech at a noontime rally on Friday in Victoria. “The Franklin Expedition is using tax dollars to seismically survey the ocean bottom for future oil and gas exploration. That has nothing to do with science,” Weaver said. “It’s all about oil and gas exploration. They are mapping out the floor.” Researchers in white lab jackets, Raffi Cavoukian, a.k.a Raffi the children’s entertainer, Saanich-Gulf Islands MP Elizabeth May and Saanich South MLA Lana Popham, joined Weaver in denouncing cutbacks in environmental research spending, and the fear cultivated among federal scientists about speaking publicly about research that might undermine the Conservative government’s economic goals. “Morale at federal government science labs is at an all-time low,” Weaver said to several hundred people gathered at Yates and Government streets, outside a federal building. “What’s happening in Canada is science is happening behind closed doors ... and is only made public if it fits with the government’s agenda.”

Weaver, among other “The country has terspeakers, also noted that minated the eyes and federal scientists often ears on the ocean polaren’t authorized to speak lution front,” he said, with the media, and that referring to himself jokinstead, journalists receive ingly as Dr X. “Dr. X” scripted “media lines” on told the News that he research from federal comremains an employee of munications officers. the Department of Fish“We used to laugh about eries and Oceans, and what was happening to scicould be subject to legal ence in the George W. Bush repercussions for speakera. It pales in comparison ing publicly. to what is going on now (in As for the 2012 FrankCanada),” Weaver said. Don Denton/News staff lin Expedition, the govCritics of the Conserva- UVic climate scientist ernment said in August tive government argue that Andrew Weaver speaks that it is indeed mapfederal economic policy during a rally highlighting ping the Arctic ocean trumps science and envi- cutbacks to scientific floor as part of ongoing ronmental monitoring. Pol- programs, institutions surveys conducted in iticians at the rally pointed and research. 2008, 2010 and 2011 by to cuts in long-running ArcParks Canada’s undertic program to monitor the ozone layer, water archaeology service. cuts in staff to monitor the health of A press release from the Prime Minmarine ecosystems and sea life, and ister’s Office in August said the 2012 cuts across the board to federal agen- Franklin expedition will collect data for cies which monitor natural resources the production of navigational charts and environmental compliance. and topographical maps in the Arctic. “Canadians are being put at risk by this Weaver’s fellow scientists from the shortsighted, reckless Stephen Harper UVic Ocean Technology Lab are operatgovernment,” May told the crowd. ing an autonomous underwater vehicle A speaker who donned a fake mous- to gather three-dimensional data of the tache and beard, and who was confirmed ocean floor for the Franklin survey areas, to be a research scientist out of the Insti- for the Parks Canada-led expedition. tute of Ocean Sciences in Sidney, told the “The use of cutting-edge technology crowd the Conservative government cut by the team to map the Arctic waters and funding for a $12-million national pro- locate the Franklin vessels is also a tribgram that monitored pollutants in the ute to Canadian expertise,” Prime Minisocean that accumulate in marine food ter Stephen Harper said in a release. chain and ecosystem. editor@saanichnews.com

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

Candidates come out of woodwork for byelection Past and present UVic professors, former provincial cabinet minister seek NDP, Green nominations Daniel Palmer News staff

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Two of the four major parties running in the upcoming Victoria byelection are seeing a slew of potential candidates vying for the job. Elizabeth Cull, a former provincial NDP cabinet minister, and Charley Beresford, a former school trustee, have added their names to the growing list of people seeking the NDP nomination. Cull served as Oak Bay-Gordon Head MLA from 1989 to 1996, becoming finance minister and deputy premier. “I was part of the (Mike) Harcourt NDP administration here in British Columbia, I know that economic health relies on the health of our citizens, our environment and our communities,” Cull said in a news release. Cull owns businesses in Victoria and Oak Bay, is a supporter of the urban farming movement and a member of several Victo-

ria area business associations. Beresford is a former Greater Victoria school trustee and is executive director of the Columbia Institute, a research and public policy organization focused on leadership for sustainable communities. “We don’t need pipelines and oil tankers, we need the Canadian government to be a leader in fighting climate change not a leader in creating pollution,” Beresford said in a statement. Murray Rankin, an environmental lawyer and former University of Victoria law professor, announced on Sept. 9 his interest in the NDP candidacy. Local NDP members will choose between its candidates Oct. 14. Meanwhile, the Green Party of Canada released its initial list of three nominees on Saturday, although more are expected. They include Donald Galloway, a UVic law professor and refugee rights advocate; Trevor Moat, an electrical engineer and

board member of the James Bay Neighbourhood Association; and Mark Loria, development director at both the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria and the Victoria Conservatory of Music. Green party members will choose their candidate Sept. 29 at the Metro Theatre, in conjunction with their annual general meeting. Paul Summerville, a former RBC chief economist and UVic economics professor, was the sole Liberal nominee at the News’ deadline. The local area association for the ruling Conservative Party hadn’t announced any candidate as of Monday. A byelection was called after New Democrat MP Denise Savoie stepped down Aug. 31 for health reasons. The byelection date has not yet been set by the federal government, but must be called within six months of Savoie’s resignation. The Victoria federal riding encompasses the City of Victoria, Oak Bay and the portion of Saanich east of Shelbourne Street and south of McKenzie Avenue. dpalmer@vicnews.com

FOR BREAKING NEWS

9/7/12 6:32 PM

www.saanichnews.com THE CORPORATION OF THE DISTRICT OF SAANICH

NOTICE OF TAX SALE Pursuant to Section 403 of the Local Government Act, the following properties will be offered for sale by public auction to be held at the Council Chambers, Saanich Municipal Hall, 770 Vernon Avenue, Victoria BC on Monday September 24, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. unless the delinquent taxes plus interest are sooner paid. FOLIO NUMBER

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LEGAL NUMBER

PID

CIVIC ADDRESS

UPSET PRICE

50-1360-190

LOT 19 SECTION 20 LAKE LAND DISTRICT PLAN 29502

001-388-177

365 HECTOR RD

25,098.86

51-6667-000

LOT 11 SECTION 13 LAKE LAND DISTRICT PLAN 11030

005-121-370

4125 BOUSFIELD PL

5,706.41

51-6668-000

LOT 12 SECTION 13 LAKE LAND DISTRICT PLAN 11030

005-121-396

4129 GILLIE RD

9,511.64

51-6792-010

LOT 11 BLOCK 1 SECTION 1 LAKE LAND DISTRICT PLAN 1719

007-070-861

4153 GILLIE RD

782.87

51-6792-020

LOT 12 BLOCK 1 SECTION 1 LAKE LAND DISTRICT PLAN 1719

007-070-870

4151 GILLIE RD

785.02

51-7044-020

LOT B SECTION 5 LAKE LAND DISTRICT PLAN 40779

000-304-298

4149 WILKINSON RD

5,600.59

53-4573-000

LOT 11 SECTION 50 VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT PLAN 12367

005-013-062

556 TAIT ST

10,307.59

65-1546-000

LOT 4 BLOCK 3 SECTION 9 VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT PLAN 1707

007-077-360

969 TATTERSALL DR

8,436.02

65-1630-000

LOT 14 BLOCK B SECTION 9 VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT PLAN 1270

000-666-165

3579 SAVANNAH AVE

11,286.06

65-5365-000

LOT 6 BLOCK 14 SECTION 14 VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT PLAN 877

004-202-520

132 SIMS AVE

6,391.68

66-0228-110

LOT 11 SECTION 11 VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT PLAN VIS3483 TOGETHER WITH AN INTEREST IN THE COMMON PROPERTY IN PROPORTION TO THE UNIT ENTITLEMENT OF THE STRATA LOT AS SHOWN ON FORM 1 OR V, AS APPROPRIATE

019-004-010

204 - 7 GORGE RD W

4,192.32

LOT 21 SECTION 7/63 VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT PLAN VIS1229 TOGETHER WITH AN INTEREST IN THE COMMON PROPERTY IN PROPORTION TO THE UNIT ENTITLEMENT OF THE STRATA LOT AS SHOWN ON FORM 1 OR V, AS APPROPRIATE

000-027-391

68-0578-031

70-3737-000

LOT 10 SECTION 36 VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT PLAN 15262

004-204-093

3345 CEDAR HILL RD

8,172.00

74-1693-000

LOT 5 SECTION 44 VICTORIA LAND DISTRICT PLAN 4316

006-096-573

2680 SEA VIEW RD

11,439.57

4717.24 108 - 949 CLOVERDALE AVE

Any person upon being declared the successful bidder must immediately pay by cash or certified cheque a minimum of not less than the upset price. Failure to pay this amount will result in the property being offered for sale again. Any balance must be paid by cash or certified cheque by 3:00 p.m. the same day. Failure to pay the balance will result in the property being offered for sale again at 10:00 a.m. on the following day. The District of Saanich makes no representation express or implied as to the condition or quality of the properties being for sale. Prospective purchasers are urged to inspect the properties and make all necessary inquires to municipal and other government departments, and in the case of strata lots to the strata corporation, to determine the existence of any bylaws, restrictions, charges or other conditions which may affect the value or suitability of the property. The purchase of a tax sale property is subject to tax under the Property Transfer Tax Act on the fair market value of the property. Anne Tetley, CGA Manager of Revenue Services


www.saanichnews.com • A9

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Hard road ahead for Land Conservancy Faced with a crippling debt, TLC looks at ‘bold and innovative’ ways to fix financial problems

Daniel Palmer Reporting Daniel Palmer News staff

Supporters of The Land Conservancy are holding their breath to see how the B.C. nonprofit will weather the worst financial crisis it has faced in its 15-year history. TLC, which owns and manages 300 protected properties worth $32 million across the province – including Christmas Hill Nature Sanctuary, Craigflower historic sites and Madrona Farm in

Saanich – is currently undergoing massive restructuring after its bank accounts were frozen by Canada Revenue Agency last month for unpaid taxes. The federal agency has since released TLC’s accounts, allowing staff to be paid and freeing up $23,000 for an immediate tax payment. It now faces the difficult task of rebuilding trust with its 8,000 members while trying to woo more, and must navigate its way through a short-term debt repayment plan with minimal revenue options. “We have faced difficult financial situations before, but the current economic situation demands we take an innovative and bold look at the way we do everything,” said Al Craighead, TLC board chair, and Kathleen Sheppard, acting executive director, in a joint statement. Sheppard took over when founder Bill Turner retired in June.

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The organization’s financial problems were apparent as far back as 2009, when internal disagreements boiled into the public sphere. Internal critics at the time said Turner had been too focused on acquiring properties without due concern for stretching TLC finances too thin. Proponents of Turner cited the necessity to respond quickly to new opportunities, while Craighead and Sheppard said TLC’s acquisitions have saved “properties of natural, cultural and agricultural significance when others said it was impossible.” Board member Briony Penn said in a letter to members that TLC’s board of directors is working on a sustainability plan that is expected to be revealed at the non-profit’s annual general meeting Nov. 3. Immediate measures include reducing of staff from 60 to 12, moving to donated office space and paying down capped shortterm debt. TLC’s Long-term initiatives will build on core membership to generate steady revenue, and look at alternative management options for its properties.

Vision Matters Dr. Victor J. Chin

“The current economic situation demands we take an innovative and bold look at the way we do everything,” –Al Craighead TLC board chair An action plan will be agreed upon in November and finalized before the 2013 annual meeting, said Craighead and Sheppard. TLC’s own bylaws, standards of practices and charity legislation prevent it from selling its conservation properties to generate revenue, although in a worst-case scenario,

properties could be transferred to other charitable organizations with a similar mandate, Penn said. TLC is expecting two significant government grants before the end of the calendar year as well, she said. Across the province, TLC is involved with 300 projects totaling about 48,500 hectares. Created in 1997, TLC is a non-profit charitable land trust that works throughout the province protecting habitat for plants, animals and natural communities as well as properties with historical, cultural, scientific or recreational values. See blog.conservancy.bc.ca. – with files from Nanaimo News Bulletin dpalmer@vicnews.com

THE CORPORATION OF THE DISTRICT OF SAANICH

NOTICE OF INFORMATION SESSION Rithet Reservoir Replacement The District of Saanich is having a public open house for the Rithet Reservoir Replacement project September 20, 2012 between the hours of 6:00 pm and 8:30 pm at Saanich Commonwealth Place in the Arbutus Room located at 4636 Elk Lake Drive. We wish to present this project, explain the impacts of the construction to the neighbourhood, answer questions and obtain any concerns that residents might have. For further information please contact Nina Sutic-Bata at 250.475.5575, local 3468, or by email at nina.sutic-bata@saanich.ca.

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A10 • www.saanichnews.com

SAANICHNEWS

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Edward Hill Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Saanich News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-920-2090 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.saanichnews.com

OUR VIEW

Wages need to match inflation With B.C. government workers, University of Victoria non-teaching staff and ICBC staff on rotating picket lines, and now with bus drivers threatening to do the same, labour unrest looks to be hitting a tipping point, if not across the province, at least in the capital city. It’s hard to blame union negotiators for rolling out pickets, After years of ‘net or the threat of after years of zero’ real incomes pickets, austerity and limited or zero wage and are shrinking benefit increases, imposed in the face of a struggling economy. B.C. Government and Services Employees Union, for one, isn’t happy with a proposed three per cent wage hike over two years. Increases that don’t keep up with inflation consign workers in the public and private sector to rollbacks in spending power. At the same time as people are seeing their real incomes drop, household goods, power, water, housing and fuel certainly aren’t getting cheaper, especially in the Capital Region, with its historically high cost of living. Now the B.C. government is freezing hiring and cutting management salaries with the expectation of $389 million less in natural gas revenues. More belt-tightening is likely, and as new Finance Minister Mike de Jong noted, the government will review its bargaining mandate with public sector unions. After years of living under “net zero” something has to give. Having tens of thousands of workers with ever-shrinking buying power only exacerbates the cycle of a declining economy. It’s simple economics to know that the overall economy improves when consumers are secure in their work, and inflation isn’t outpacing salaries. But under four or five years of stagnating wages, people will always spend less on consumer goods, or will assume more debt. There’s no clear answer to bringing the economy back to buoyancy, but having wage hikes that match inflation is a start. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@saanichnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Saanich News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Stakes go up in B.C. gas gamble Mike de Jong’s debut as B.C. health care, universities and Crown finance minister was a grim one. corporations, as well as governThe first financial update for this ment operations. He hinted at an election year projects a even harder line with $1.4 billion decline in natuunions, as the governral resource revenues from ment’s largest employee Kevin Falcon’s one and group continued selective only budget in February. strike action. Most of that is from This, and the famildeclining natural gas reviar vow to rein in travel enues in the next three and other discretionary years. And it’s not just the spending, won’t come price of gas that’s lower close to replacing the lost than the finance ministry’s gas revenues. Asset sales, array of private sector which Falcon came up Tom Fletcher with in a desperate effort experts had forecast. B.C. Views The volume of B.C. gas to dig the government sold is down as well, as out of its huge sales tax abundant new sources of shale gas hole, won’t show up on the books come on-stream in the U.S. As with until next year, if they go ahead at oil, that’s currently the only market all. Raising taxes or fees? Forget Canada has. it. It’s either cut programs or run And it wasn’t long ago that the another deficit. energy ministry was trumpeting The one glimmer of hope in what its monthly totals for “bonus bids” de Jong called the “ugly” resource paid by gas companies for drilling revenue picture is that natural gas rights in northeastern B.C. That revenues don’t have much farther gold rush has wound down as shale to fall. And then there is the light at deposits are staked and the price the far end of the tunnel, exports to falls. Asia where the price remains much De Jong’s response shows how higher. serious this problem is for any B.C. That project took two important government. He inherits Falcon’s steps forward last week. Spectra political commitment to present a Energy and British multinational balanced budget next spring. How BG Group unveiled plans for a third he will do that, and be believed in a major pipeline to bring northeast heated post-HST election campaign, gas to the coast, this one to a site remains a mystery. near Prince Rupert proposed for a De Jong announced a hiring liquefied natural gas facility. freeze for government staff, and a And on Friday, the Haisla management salary freeze across Nation and the B.C. government

announced a land use agreement to develop another LNG export facility on the Douglas Channel near Kitimat. Two proposals in that area have already received federal export permits and financing from global energy players, including Chinese, Japanese and Korean companies. One of the bills jammed through by the B.C. Liberals in the hectic legislative session this spring was to do away with another of those federal-provincial overlaps that make industrial development so slow and difficult. Ottawa has sole authority to regulate reserve lands, but agreed to delegate that to B.C. and the Haisla, allowing them to pioneer the latest agreement. This is a major breakthrough, not just in the industrial development of northern B.C. but in dismantling the century-old logjam of aboriginal resource claims. At the centre of Premier Christy Clark’s much-promoted jobs plan is the target of having three LNG export terminals and associated pipelines in production by 2020. That now looks like a more realistic target. But the jobs and revenues won’t arrive in time to save the B.C. Liberals from their current predicament. – Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Jobs and revenues won’t arrive in time to save the B.C. Liberals ...’


www.saanichnews.com • A11

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

LETTERS Deer complainants should finance control measures

On an island in the sun University of Victoria grad students Roger Angus and Natasha Wood bask in the sunshine at Cadboro Bay Beach taking a study break while enjoying their own tunes. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Readers respond: to gender-neutral washrooms, bike licences Science editorial skates on thin ice

Nothing embarrassing about Celine Dion

Your editorial Friday (Walking on thin ice, Sept. 14) plumbed new depths of global warming hysteria. The Arctic is back in 1920s and 30s territory. The Antarctic, where most of the world’s sea ice is located, has its 13th highest ice area ever measured. And the rest of your editorial is just as inaccurate. Take a look at actual sea level rise – it’s virtually nonexistent. The drought in the U.S. this year was less severe than droughts in the 1980s, much less the 1930s, and largely offset by a wet, cold summer in Northern Europe. CO2 is certainly a greenhouse gas and increased concentrations are likely to raise global temperature, but not by much. The models which suggest otherwise are filled with uncertainty, data issues and the absence of actual observation; they cannot form a sound basis for anything but a wait-and-see attitude. To formulate policy based on science as immature and uncertain as “climate science” is a recipe for getting it wrong. Jay Currie Oak Bay

Re: Looking toward greener grass (Offside and Offbeat, Sept. 7) Daniel Palmer writes about a number of celebrities including Celine Dion and repeats the tired old mantra that she is an “embarrassing cultural export.” What exactly is embarrassing about a world renowned entertainer who fills theatres night after night, who lives an exemplary life, has been honoured by countless church and government dignitaries and who possesses an incredible capacity to delight and inspire millions of fans? Having witnessed first hand her absolute magnetism as a performer I utterly refute his derogatory remarks. She’s a world-class act in every way and the cheap shots don’t diminish her accomplishments in the least. Alixe Wallis Victoria

Genderless washrooms still discriminate Re: Students create washrooms for all (News, Sept. 7) These new washrooms are being hailed as a progressive act. However, it isn’t progressive if you happen

to be one of the males who had exclusive use of these two washroom prior to the change. The two washrooms that have been converted are formerly men’s washrooms that have had partitions installed to separate the urinals from the three toilet stalls. Consequently, men at UVic are being subjected to greater competition for access to toilets while women are being granted less competition. This is absolutely unfair, and it must be reversed. Install gender-neutral washrooms in new buildings. Do not retrofit gender-neutral washrooms into already constructed buildings. To do so detrimentally affects the people who had sole use of the washrooms before the change. Denis Oliver, Victoria

Canada needs more immigration Immigration not helping the economy (Letters, Sept. 12) I do not agree with Sean Murray’s assessment of immigrants. With baby boomers beginning to retire and younger Canadians having fewer children, our tax base has flat lined, and the

number of tax-paying citizens per retiree will fall from 4 to 2.5 in the next decade. Unless we start having five children per family, immigration of young, preferably educated men and women is the only way we’ll balance the age differential. The number of Canadians under the age of 30 needs to increase by at least 1.5 per cent minimum a year for the next 15 years – 750,000 a year. Bring ’em on. Steve Campbell Victoria

Licensing bicyclists makes sense Re: Cyclist licensing would enhance safety (Letters, Sept. 7) Where do cyclists get off using highways, byways, alleyways, sidewalks without paying a penny? Licensed drivers pay a hefty fee to use the roads and so they should. Cyclists should write a test on road rules, then they know the ones they break. This includes riding two or three abreast, which they do all too often. Cyclists should pay a minimum of $100 per year licence fee and be held accountable, just like licensed drivers. Richard Carstens Victoria

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Are we the only taxpayers exasperated by the sense of entitlement exhibited by those who believe our local municipality should control the deer population on their behalf? Yet another new government program to be funded, of course, by the increasingly burdened Saanich homeowner. In the past few years, there have been a growing number of letters to the editor complaining about the ever-rising property taxes in the district. Well, guess what? This is why property taxes increase relentlessly year after year. We believe that programs such as roads, garbage, and parks are supported by a vast majority of citizens, who are willing to pay for these valuable services provided by our local government. We believe, however, that many residents (including us) simply won’t want to contribute towards a deer control program. In fact, in the district’s latest “Citizens Survey 2012,” an amazing 71 per cent of residents indicated that they would prefer less municipal services to increased property taxes. We believe, therefore, that any deer control program must be a user-pay system. One suggestion is for the CRD to contract with Groupon to set up an online, coupon-style system of collecting funds. Those residents who wish to control the deer can volunteer funds towards the cost of the program. Those who don’t want to participate simply don’t contribute. If sufficient funds are volunteered to fund the entire cost, then the new program proceeds. If adequate funds are not received, then the program is cancelled; let residents vote with their own wallet. Dave and Shari Poje Saanich

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes your opinions and comments. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Saanich News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 250-386-2624 ■ E-mail: editor@saanichnews.com


A12 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

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Guaranteed Lowest Prices *Applies only to our major supermarket competitors’ print advertisements (i.e. yer, newspaper). We will match the competitor’s advertised price only during the effective date of the competitor’s print advertisement. Our major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us and are based on a number of factors which can change from time to time. Identical items are deďŹ ned as same brand, item type (in the case of produce, meat and bakery), size and attributes and carried at this store location. We will not match competitors’ “multi-buysâ€? (eg. 2 for $4), “spend x get xâ€?, “Freeâ€?, “clearanceâ€?, discounts obtained through loyalty programs, or offers related to our third party operations (post ofďŹ ce, gas bars, dry cleaners etc.). We reserve the right to cancel or change the terms of this promise at any time.

We Match Prices! *Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks, quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors’ yers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match identical items (deďŹ ned as same brand, size, and attributes) and for fresh produce, meat and bakers, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us).


www.saanichnews.com • A13

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

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A14 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

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www.saanichnews.com • A15

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Longtime office coffee supplier proud to go green program out of its Government Street campus. The next TESL course gets underway Oct. 1. Visit inlinguavictoria.com or call 250-590-4805.

Tutoring agency enters second decade Don Descoteau Biz Beat Oughtred Coffee and Tea has been operating carbon-neutral since 2009, an achievement that earned it a 2012 Capital Regional District Ecostar award for climate action. The company, which owner John Oughtred began as EzeBrew Coffee Services in Victoria 39 years ago and grew across the province, has taken its total estimated emissions from 517 tonnes in 2009 down to 387 tonnes. At the same time, its landfill waste dropped 75 per cent while energy costs were reduced by more than eight per cent. Oughtred’s carbon footprint was reduced through expanding its recycling programs, eliminating paper transactions, streamlining delivery routes, reducing air travel and installing a heat redistribution system. To find out more about how the company greened its operation, visit oughtred.com.

Dahlia Miller and her staff of teaching professionals at Smart Tutor Referrals are celebrating 10 years of providing academic support for students in Greater Victoria. The Sidney-based company has cultivated confidence in its learners through the use of oneon-one home tutoring sessions and the provision of study skill and homework resources and workshops. For more information, visit smarttutorreferrals.com or call 250-544-1588.

Bridal boutique opens in Old Town Located in the city’s design district at 1816 Government

Prayers for the universe

St., The White Peony, the brainchild of owner Trish Mussico, is offering brides-to-be a collection of hand-selected dresses and accessories straight from the New York bridal market. The 1,700-square-foot retail space is open by appointment (250-590-8044), but prospective clients can view merchandise at thewhitepeony.com.

Dawn Faris ties her prayer to the prayer tree outside of St. Aidan’s United Church after a Sunday sermon. Church members write prayers on cloth that are tied to a cherry tree where the winds carry their wishes out into the universe, a ritual similar to the Tibetan prayer cloths.

Weight loss clinic up and running The fledgling U Weight Loss Clinic is enjoying its first months of business at 2401 Millstream Rd. across from Home Depot. The franchised operation creates doctor-formulated, personalized lifestyle change plans for clients that help them reach and maintain their ideal weight. For more information, call 778-432-2080 or visit uweightloss.com/ulangford. To submit your business news, email editor@vicnews.com.

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A16 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

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Natural gas makes your summers seem endless A natural gas barbecue never runs out of fuel. If you have a natural gas patio heater or fire pit, you can stay outside long after summer‘s over. And when that blustery storm hits, you can stay warm and well fed with a natural gas fireplace and range. Both will continue working during a power outage. For comfort, convenience and value balance your home’s energy mix with natural gas. Visit fortisbc.com/gasisgood to watch our video on how natural gas fits into your everyday life.

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www.saanichnews.com • A17

SAANICH NEWS -Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Teens compile life stories of residents They’re very polite friendly, well-spoken, very bright – all of those qualities came through to the seniors.” While this year’s addition of new members to the board has eased volunteer responsibilities for board members, the society would welcomes any additional help. Anyone interested in volunteering at Abbeyfield, which is supported by resident rents and a small grant from B.C. Housing, may contact Dodd by phone at 250-595-5281 or by emailing arlenadodd@telus. net. nnorth@saanichnews.com

Continued from Page A1

Abbey and Braeden have nearly completed their work interviewing each of the house’s 12 residents and compiling their stories. The duo filmed and transcribed each interview and offered a digital copy to each family. “We all had a good look at our lives when we looked back,” Riddle adds. “It’s good to look back. … I didn’t always look like this.” Riddle attributes an greater sense of family at the house with the presence of the Timms family, from their work on the life stories, to the artwork created by Katie. Last Easter the youngster spearheaded a plan to decorate a planter for each of the residents. Her personal touch didn’t go unnoBIKE ticed. “It’s encouraging to see what a good family looks like,” Riddle says. 148 98¢ “You get so much bad 2 00 6 99 news and they’re good 299 news.” “We walked in not knowing what to ffor our new expect,” Braeden says. “It’s nice to see how different things are – how much has changed.” in today’s paper! “All of the residents have been just thrilled to have them at the house,” says Arlena Dodd, director on the board. “The elders always love to interact with young people.

Shave and a haircut Saanich municipal arborist Dan Gallagher trims a tree of dead wood to keep park-goers safe at Hampton Park. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

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A18 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

HOT TICKET

THE ARTS

NEWS

Pacific Opera Victoria presents a magnificent distillation of Shakespeare’s epic drama of tyranny and dark magic. Conducted by Timothy Vernon with Gregory Dahl as Macbeth and Lyne Fortin as Lady Macbeth, every moment of Verdi’s Macbeth pulls the audience into the heart of evil. Begins Oct. 4 at the Royal Theatre. Tickets available at rmts.bc.ca.

Macbeth

Victoria choir charts new waters Christine van Reeuwyk

tors. “His energy, dedica- guest conductor Michelle Mourre. tion, and passion for choral The season will conclude in May 2013 music is infectious.” with Wismath’s debut leading the choir, feaWith a new musical leader, turing a program of standard choral mastercome new ideas. works and unique contemporary composi“One of my tasks and tions. Haydn’s Nelson Mass as well as works responsibilities has been by American-Swedish composer Steve finding a way to connect my Dobrogosz and Latvian composer Peteris musical ideas for the orga- Vasks will be performed with soloists and nization,” Wismath said. He orchestra. and the VCS background “We’re performing one piece of music team filtered through ideas that is very much a known work … but to create “a menu of perfor- we’re also combining it with three fairly mances” for this season. modern works,” Wismath said. “Next season is a unique “I believe in the importance of educating season for us because we our audience on music,” he explained. “If we do two very large concerts only listen to (one type of music) we tend to with the Victoria Sym- grow to only accept the sounds that we’re phony,” he said. used to … it’s required to expose ourselves Submitted photo Continuing the long tra- as musicians and our audience base to a Brian Wismath, music director for the Victoria Choral dition of collaboration with variety of music. It keeps them interested in Society. the Victoria Symphony, the what we’re doing and what comes next.” Victoria Choral Society will The choir is always on the search for new Chorus Niagara, and Ontario Youth Choir; start the seavoices and auditions for this and as assistant conductor of Opera in Con- son with two performances season are underway. cert Chorus (Ontario). In 2006, Wismath as guests of the Symphony. In Contact membership@ conducted the Vancouver Chamber Choir November, the choir will pervictoriachoralsociety.ca for Brian Wismath is as a participant in the Choral Conductors’ form Mozart’s Requiem under details. Complete informaalso music director Symposium concert broadcast on CBC the baton of Maestra Tania tion about the auditions can of the Vox Humana Radio. Miller. VCS will join the Symbe found at victoriachoralsoChamber Choir and the “The choir is looking forward to working phony again in December to ciety.ca. Victoria Conservatory with Brian,” said Tricia Johnson, president present the perennial favoucvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews. of Music Chorale. of Victoria Choral Society’s board of direc- rite, Handel’s Messiah, under com

News staff

A new face at the helm plus a changed rehearsal venue could culminate in a collaborative and inspiring season for the Victoria Choral Society. Music director Brian Wismath started with the organization in May and spent the summer planning the 2012-13 season. “It’s a large organization. The choir has about 130 to 145 people,” he said, likening it to the Titanic. “Manoeuvring can be a challenge at times. … It takes a big background crew to make sure things move smoothly.” A change in policy meant a change in practice space for the Victoria Choral Society this season. The audition choir moves from Holy Cross Church to the Oak Bay United Church on Mitchell Street. “Oak Bay gives us the opportunity to connect with the community which is part of our mandate,” said Wismath. “It’s been a lot of work finding a new location. There’s only so many spaces in the city that can hold as many people as we have. … It’s all very much appropriate and in line with our upcoming season which is full of newness.” The new leader has a rich choral background. He has served as director of the University of Victoria Chamber Singers and Tucson Masterworks Chorale; as associate conductor of Orpheus Choir of Toronto,

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www.saanichnews.com • A19

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Local book awards finalists announced The short list of local authors has been unveiled for the City of Victoria’s Butler Book Prize and Bolen Books’ Children’s Book Prize. The winners of both prizes receive $5,000 each in recognition of the best literary work in fiction, non-fiction and poetry, and in children’s literature respectively. A gala event to announce the winners will take place Oct. 10 at the Union Club of B.C. at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 and are available at Bolen Books in Hillside Mall, Ivy’s Bookshop at 2188 Oak Bay Ave., Munro’s Books at 1108 Government St. and from the Victoria Book Prize Society by calling 250-589-8430. City of Victoria Butler Book Prize finalists include: William Deverell, I’ll See You in My Dreams (fiction), published by McClelland & Stewart; Esi Edugyan, Half-Blood Blues (fiction), published by Thomas Allen Publishers; Rachel Fisher, Heather Stretch and Robin Tunnicliffe, All the Dirt: Reflections on Organic Farming (nonfiction), published by TouchWood Editions; Madeline Sonik, Afflictions and Departures (nonfiction), published by Anvil Press and Mark Zuehlke, Breakout from Juno: Canadian Army and the Normandy Campaign, July 4-August 21, 1944 (non-fiction), published by Douglas & McIntyre. Bolen Books Children’s Book Prize finalists include: Kit Pearson, The Whole Truth (fiction), published by Harper Collins; Pamela Porter, I’ll Be Watching (fiction), published by Groundwood Books and Caitlyn Vernon, Nowhere Else on Earth: Standing Tall for the Great Bear Rainforest (nonfiction), published by Orca Book Publishers. dpalmer@vicnews.com

Two shows in one See Douglas Fisher – Michael O’Toole: A Two Man Show at Peninsula Gallery, 100-2506 Beacon Ave. in Sidney from Sept. 23 to 29. Fisher and O’Toole are two top calibre B.C. artists; Fisher is a sculptor and O'Toole is a painter. “Together, their work will make for an exceptional show,� says gallery co-owner Gillian Hanlon. Douglas Fisher’s Dancing on an Ocean of Time, left, and Michael OToole’s Lake Louise Study.

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A20 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

Dance school, church a ‘blessed relationship’ Daniel Palmer News staff

David and Karen Beales are putting the final touches on their new home office in Vic West. The wood floors have been beautifully restored, chandeliers grace the high ceilings and a 13-metre mirror runs the length of the vast openconcept space. But what makes the Beales’ home unique isn’t just that it’s a 122-yearold heritage building, or even that it houses their self-run ballet school.

Perhaps the most curious aspect is that it’s also a church, which the Beales will soon share with a previously nomadic Anglican congregation. “We were looking around at houses and we stumbled across the Anglican Diocese list of churches, and we realized it would cost us the same amount to mortgage a house and lease a commercial space as it would to buy one of the church properties,” David said. In order to respect the history of the building, which was established

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in 1891 as an army garrison church, the Beales came to an agreement with St. Mark’s Traditional Anglican and Rev. Stanley Sinclair. Sinclair and his congregation have been without a permanent home since 2010, and had, until recently, been using the Orange Hall in Fernwood for their weekly services. “They’re traditional Anglicans and they follow all the things that used to be done here 120 years ago,” Karen said. The arrangement with the Beales will provide a muchneeded home base and the opportunity for growth, Sinclair said. “We’ve been building up to the point where we’re outgrowing the Orange Hall. The result is we have a very ideal situation short of owning the property,” he said. The church officially reopened last Sunday at 10:30 a.m. with a Prayer Book Holy Eucharist, commemorating the Battle of Britain. On Sept. 22 and 23, ordination of the deacon and rededication ceremonies will take place, followed by a family Sunday celebration Sept. 30. The Beales’ Maple Leaf School of Ballet opened Sept. 10 and runs beginner to advanced classes for children and adults.

Sharon Tiffin/news staff

Dancer David Beales, left, and Rev. Stanley Sinclair look forward to sharing space at a renovated church on the corner of Henry and Catherine Streets. Beales has opened a dance studio, Maple Leaf School of Ballet, while the reverend has moved his congregation into the church’s sanctuary from a temporary home in Fernwood. David’s professional training in “We are very happy to have Russian ballet creates a unique (St. Mark’s) here because the offering in the city, he said. building should be used as a The couple hopes to rent out place of worship as well,” Karen the space for weddings and said. other community events in the “It works well to have them future as well, pending a rezonhere, and it’s a very, very ing application with the City of blessed relationship.” Victoria. dpalmer@vicnews.com

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www.saanichnews.com • A21

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

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A22 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

Take our short survey and you could.

At the Saanich News we always put our readers first. We’d like to know you better so we can keep you informed and connected.

* 1. How do you generally read your local paper?

*7. Do you...?

 The printed newspaper  Online on my computer or laptop  On my tablet  On my smartphone

Research online prior to store purchase? Make online purchases? Use your smart phone for shopping?

*8. Do you ever...?

* 2. How many people in your household (including yourself) read the paper? Female 18-24 ............ 25-34 ............ 35-44 ............ 45-54 ............ 55-65 ............ 65+ Male.....18-24 ............ 25-34 ............ 35-44 ............ 45-54 ............ 55-64 ............ 65+

1            

2            

3            

Compromise on quality to save money? Forego a brand name to save money? Wait for the item to go on sale?

4 or more            

 Less than 10 minutes  10 - 20 minutes  21- 30 minutes  30 minutes +

* 4. Which advertising offers are you most interested in? Frequently

Occasionally

Never

           

           

           

 Jysk  Kin’s Farm Market  London Drugs  Lululemon  M&M Meats  Mark’s Work Wearhouse  Marketplace IGA  Nesters  Overwaitea  Pharmasave  PriceSmart  Real Canadian Superstore  Reitmans  Rexall  Rona

 Safeway  Save-on-Foods  Sears  Shoppers Drug Mart  Sport Chek or Sport Mart  Staples  Starbucks  T&T Supermarket  The Bay  The Brick  The Source  Tim Hortons  Walmart  Winners  XS Cargo

* 6. What most influences your decision when choosing a grocery store?    

Loyalty to the chain Closest to home Best deals/offers/coupons Rewards or credit card program

Never   

Occasionally   

Never   

 New

* 11. What type of vehicle are you considering and when do you plan to purchase? Car Minivan Pickup truck SUV

Next 3 months    

Next 6 months    

Next year    

 Your first home purchase?  Upsize?  Downsize?

* 17. What type of real estate are you looking at? Single detached Townhouse Condo Resort property

Newly built    

Previously owned    

* 18. Are you planning any financial transactions? Please check all that apply.  Consolidate your debt load  Pay off a loan  Pay off your mortgage  Remortgage your property  Renew your mortgage  Secure a loan  Seek financial planning advice  Set up a line of credit  Switch banks or credit union  None of the above

 Less than $35,000  $35,000 to less than $50,000  $50,000 to less than $75,000  $75,000 to less than $100,000  $100,000 to less than $150,000  $150,000 or more

 Economy  Midrange  Luxury  Hybrid

* 20. In which city/municipality do you currently live?

______________________________________________

* 13. Which ‘extra’ items are you likely to spend on in your household? Car detailing Fast food Fitness membership Further education or courses Gourmet foods or desserts Home improvement less than $500 Home improvement over $500 Live theatre or festivals Manicure, pedicure, hair styling Movie downloads, Pay per view, movie channels Movie theatre Restaurant dining Scratch and lottery tickets Trips to a casino

* 16. Will this be..?

* 19. In which category does your annual household income fall?

* 12. Is your next vehicle most likely to be...?

* 5. Please check the stores you shop at  Army & Navy  Bargain! Shop  Best Buy  Buy Low  Canadian Tire  Chapters  Choices Market  Coopers  Dollar Giant  Dollarama  Extra Foods  Future Shop  Home Depot  Home Hardware  Ikea

Frequently   

Occasionally   

* 10. Will it be a new or preowned vehicle?

* 3. How much time do you typically spend reading the newspaper, its stories, advertising and flyers?

Appliances Discount, bargain or dollar store Clothing, accessories and footwear Computers, tablets, phones, cameras Fast Food Furniture, rugs and beds Groceries Health, personal care and make-up Office supplies Tools, home & yard improvement Toys & games, arts & crafts TV, stereo, PVR, Satellite

Frequently   

 No

 Pre-owned

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OR... Go to https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Saanich to take this survey online …

* 9. Are you or someone in your household planning to purchase a new or pre-owned vehicle in the near future? (If no, jump to Q13)  Yes

NEWS

Frequently              

Occasionally              

Never              

* 14. Are you planning to travel in the near future? For business In Canada for less than 3 days by plane  Getaway of less than 3 days to the USA  Longer trip within Canada by car  Longer trip within Canada by plane  Longer trip to the USA by car  Longer trip to the USA by plane  Longer trip outside of North America 

For pleasure       

No plans to travel       

* 15. Does anyone in your household plan to sell or buy real estate in the near future? If no, jump to Q18)  Yes  No

* 21. How far will you drive from your home to use a business or service?  16-30 minutes  31-60 minutes  1 hours  2 hours  3 hours  More than 4 hours  I don’t shop outside of my own community

* 22. Thank you for taking the time to complete our survey. If you’d like to be entered into the prize draw, please leave us your first and last name and your email address. We will contact the winner via email or daytime phone number at the close of the study. First name _____________________________________________ Last Name _____________________________________________ Email address ___________________________________________ or daytime phone ________________________________________ Your COMPLETED entry is an automatic entry to win $250 cash. Winners will be contacted within two weeks after contest closing date. No purchase necessary. Odds of winning are dependant on the number of participants. The contest is open to all residents of British Columbia of the age of majority. One entry per person. Valid ID may be required. Winners may be required to answer a skill testing question. Prize will be awarded as one $250 cheque. Prizes must be accepted as awarded. Full contest details are available at the front desk of Black Press Victoria, p y open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p p.m. Employees of Black Press are not eligible to enter.

Tear out this page — mail or drop off your entry to 818 Broughton St., Victoria, V8W 1E4 Go to https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Saanich to take this survey online …

Complete survey by Oct. 21st for a chance to win!


www.saanichnews.com • A23

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Victoria mayor declares ‘Recovery Day’ for city Sept. 30 is officially Recovery Day in Victoria. Victoria Mayor Dean Fortin made the proclamation last Thursday, making Victoria the second city in Canada behind Vancouver to recognize the success of addictions treatment. “It really is about celebrating recovery,” said Susan Donaldson, an addictions counsellor and the driving force behind the declaration. Donaldson and her colleagues plan to promote the day in future years and raise awareness about options for addictions treatment. “There’s a lot of people in Victoria who have successfully recovered from addictions. We see a lot of active addictions around the city, but once people are in recovery, they just go about their lives,” she said. Fortin also declared Sept. 21 the International Day of Peace in the city, and created an environmental public health awareness week from Sept. 24 to 30.

Metchosin farmer Terry Sterling shot a problem bear that bolted through his property, chasing his free-range chickens. The bear came through his farm on several occasions and was suspected of killing two turkeys.

50

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Charla Huber/News staff

ALL FRAMES Including in-stock designers.

Bear killed for targeting farm

Charla Huber Reporting Pulling the trigger wasn’t easy for Terry Sterling when a fowl-eating bear returned to his Metchosin farm. “It was the last thing I wanted to do,” Sterling said. “It was either me or someone else.” The bear bolted through the farm repeatedly for two months. The farmer’s last resort was shooting it. Sterling raises free range fowl, including chickens, ducks and turkeys. In all his years farming it’s the first time he has had an issue with bears coming after the birds. “He was in good shape and he (appeared) well fed,” Sterling said of the bear. The tragic tale started in

July, after the bear began chasing the chickens and ducks. The first time Sterling pulled his rifle was Aug. 6 when the chickens alerted him. “I’ve had chickens since I was 12; they let me know with their tempo and tone,” said the 56-year-old. “I knew a predator was there, but I thought it was a raccoon, hawk or a mink.” When Sterling saw the bear he let out a warning shot. “I shot at the bear to protect my livestock. I shot just behind him. I just wanted to scare him,” he said. The bear’s reaction worried him. “I though he’d be out of there like ‘bam’,” Sterling said smacking his hands together. “But he didn’t gallop off – he just briskly ran off. I’ve scared bears before, this was not normal.” Sterling came home after a farmer’s market Aug. 11 to find the remains of two turkeys. On Aug. 26 he was up early harvesting vegetables when he heard his chickens alert him to a predator. When he saw it was the same bear, he shot it to pro-

tect the animals. “I just felt that there was no alternative,” Sterling said. Throughout the two months of bear trouble, Sterling was in contact with B.C. conservation officers. They unsuccessfully set up a bear trap on his property and nearby farms to capture the problem bear. A neighbour also took a shot at a bear July 8. Conservation officers told Sterling to put the chickens behind an electric fence to keep them safe. “Electric fencing is the least you can do,” said conservation officer Peter Pauwels. “If a bear gets at taste for (chickens) then it will keep coming back for the easy pickings.” Sterling opposes the idea but said if other bears attack his livestock he will consider either electric fencing, or not raising chickens altogether. Sterling knows he lives in bear country and has farmed there for 25 years. In the past five he started having incidents with bears, but mostly over fruit trees. It was the first time a bear has attacked his animals.

Since the bear was killed there have been no more incidents on his property.

Share the land with predators B.C. conservation officers are urging Highlands residents to stay conscious of the predators living in the district. There has been a rise in bear and cougar sightings in the area and residents are asked to keep livestock in barns overnight. “No livestock has been killed in Highlands for a few months now,” Pauwels said, but noted that livestock in Saanich bordering Highlands has recently been killed by cougars. Cougars hunt at night and Pauwels suggests people should take extra caution in the evening. “Children should not be out by themselves when it starts to get dark,” Pauwels said. “There have always been cougars in Highlands and there always will be. People should always be cautious.” charla@goldstreamgazette.com

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A24 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

Hiring, pay freeze as B.C. deficit climbs Natural gas price drop hits budget Tom Fletcher Black Press

Finance Minister Mike de Jong presents an update to the B.C. budget at the legislature last Thursday. The province faces an increased deficit due to lower natural gas prices. Tom Fletcher/Black Press

Look in select copies of today’s newspaper or online for:

E G A T N A V D A HOME ICE

GREATER HOCKEY IN A LOOK AT

The province is freezing management salaries in government, Crown corporations and agencies, and imposing a hiring freeze on direct government jobs to deal with a rising deficit forecast. Finance Minister Mike de Jong delivered his first quarterly financial update last Thursday, showing a deficit forecast up $173 million. That would bring the deficit to $1.14 billion by the end of the fiscal year next March, due mainly to lost revenues from falling natural gas prices. The hiring freeze doesn’t apply to health authorities, universities and other services beyond direct government staff, which is budgeted to shrink by 2,000 positions through attrition in the next three years. The pay freeze doesn’t apply to unionized positions, but de Jong said B.C.’s bargaining mandate for unions is also being reviewed. The current mandate calls for wage increases to be financed by savings in other parts of unionized operations. It has so far not produced a settlement with the biggest union representing direct provincial employees, the B.C. Government and Service

Employees’ Union, which has staged a series of one-day strikes since rejecting a 3.5 per cent wage increase over two years. De Jong said he intends to present a balanced budget in February for the 2013-14 fiscal year, when the government will face a May election. To do that, the government has to make up for an expected $389 million drop in natural gas revenue that year. The government uses gas price forecasts from five private sector agencies, but none fully accounted for the surge of shale gas production that has depressed North American prices. B.C. producers have ramped up despite the softening price, to prove reserves needed for liquefied natural gas export facilities proposed for the north coast. NDP finance critic Bruce Ralston said he predicted the gas price drop last spring, but former finance minister Kevin Falcon ignored him. And Ralston scoffed at de Jong’s claim that his ministry will find more savings in travel budgets and other discretionary spending. "Travel budgets? That’s an old movie," he said. De Jong said a fall legislative session is "unlikely" as he and other ministers appointed in Premier Christy Clark’s Sept. 5 cabinet shuffle learn their new jobs and work on balancing the budget. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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www.saanichnews.com • A25

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

How to reach us

Travis Paterson 250-480-3279 sports@vicnews.com

Gardening

SPORTS

Challenge series a tune-up for bowls’ biggest trophy Canada, U.S.A. bowlers meet at Juan de Fuca

ber of the JDF club, is the first vice-president of Bowls Canada, and is a rep for Bowls B.C. He’s helped assemble a Canadian squad that includes three Victoria produced players, the Battles sisters Heather and Shannon, and Steven Santana.

Travis Paterson News staff

Kyle Wells/News staff

David Mathie is the coach of the Canadian team hosting U.S.A. for the North American Challenge this week, Sept. 20 to 24, at the Juan de Fuca Lawn Bowling Club, where Mathie is a member.

The Juan de Fuca Lawn Bowling Club is hosting a world-championship warm-up this week. Tomorrow (Sept. 20) through Saturday, the Canadian lawn bowling team will host U.S.A. in the North American Challenge. “It’s a chance for Canada’s top bowlers to play the top bowlers of the U.S.A. in preparation for the upcoming world championships,” said David Mathie, head coach of the Canadian team. The 2012 World Championships take place Nov. 24 to Dec. 9 in Adelaide, Australia, and Mathie will lead Canada there too. “The NAC is a competition that cements the relations between us and the U.S.A., we’re great friends and like to get together.” Locally, Mathie is also a mem-

“Bowls has taken me to places all over Canada and the world.” – Heather Battles “I came from Oak Bay but Burnside (LBC) had the junior program that helped us achieve national and international levels,” said Heather. The former B.C. singles champion is taking time away from her doctorate studies at McMaster University in Hamilton this week. “Bowls has taken me to places all over Canada and the world, and I’ve met so many people because of it.” The NAC schedule is split into two divisions. Each country will field five-player men’s and wom-

en’s teams into the premier Folkins competition. There’s also fiveplayer men’s and women’s Jarvis teams. The difference between the teams is the Folkins players will go to the world championships, while the Jarvis division was created to develop future national team players. Heather and Shannon will play on Team Jarvis, and are in the mix to represent Canada at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Scotland. Shannon lives in Vancouver where she plays alongside Steven Santana, another Victoria raised player. Santana won the national singles championship in 2011 and was third in 2012. He’ll represent Canada on the men’s Folkins squad this week, and he’s also been named to throw the lead bowls on Canada’s triples and fours teams at the world championships. The NAC begins Thursday with pairs and triples matches and moves into fours, triples, and singles play for Friday and Saturday. sports@vicnews.com

Russian sniper will debut with Royals Victoria Royals open WHL season in Vancouver

“You never want to give up a younger guy who you haven’t seen his best yet, which is why the trade took a whole week,” Hope said. “But it was tough to get (Kisio) interested in someone else, he had his mind set on (Jones).” With Gogolev, the Royals are now at their cap for overage spots with three 20-year-olds, Jamie Crooks and Tyler Stahl being the other two. Goalie Patrik Polivka is the other import. Gogolev will be in the lineup for the Royals first game of the regular season in Vancouver on Friday (Sept. 21), and the first home game, Saturday night, 7:05 p.m. versus the Vancouver Giants. The Royals won the final preseason game, and the only one held in Victoria, 4-2 over the Giants on Saturday. Logan Nelson, Brandon Magee, Jamie Crooks and Ben Walker (empty net goal) scored for the Royals.

Travis Paterson News staff

Victoria Royals general manager Cam Hope is the first to admit he can’t count to 10 in Russian. Hope and Jeff Harris, the director of hockey ops and communications, picked up the Royals newest player, Russian import Alex Gogolev, from the airport on the weekend. “Alex tried to teach us to count to 10 in Russian, and even with a 30 minute drive we couldn’t get it, so it’s safe to say his English is much better than my Russian,” Hope said. Though his English is still improving, Gogolev can at least count to 57. That’s how many points the slick skating forward totalled as a 19-year-old rookie with the Calgary Hitmen last year, as he scored 25 goals and 32 assists. The 20-year-old was acquired by trade on Saturday in exchange for forward Zane Jones, 18, and a conditional sixth round pick in the 2013 WHL Bantam Draft. The Royals also got a fourth round pick in the 2013 draft. Gogolev became available because of the WHL numbers game. The Hitmen had five over age players, with just three spots, and three imports vying for two spots. “Gogolev is very skilled, but he was a two-spot player, a 20-year-old import,” Hope said. “We’re getting a player who is exceptionally smooth, a smart player with an excellent shot who can be a game breaker.” And to get, you have to give. Jones was one of the few promising 18-year-

Czech protector Rookie goalie Patrik Polivka’s save percentage of 0.963 and goals against average of 1.41 per game are the best among all WHL goalies with 120 minutes played in the preseason.

Stalled out Brad Watson/Calgary Hitmen

Russian import Alex Gogolev brings an elite skill set to the Royals this year. olds developed in the Royals/Bruins system. Last year as a 17-year-old he recorded 14 goals and 32 points, and was one of the Royals best players in all four playoff games. Discussions between Hope and Hitmen GM Kelly Kisio began during the WHL GMs meetings in Calgary last week and carried on until Saturday.

Defenceman Tyler Stahl won’t be available as he’s serving a six-game suspension for a checking to the head penalty against the Kelowna Rockets on Sept. 7.

See the Royals for $5 Every Monday prior to a home game, a limited number of $5 tickets will be available at the SaveOn-Foods Memorial Centre box office, starting at 9:30 a.m. sports@vicnews.com

Ex-Vike wins McNeill Half Former UVic Vikes runner Geoff Martinson won the Sept. 9 McNeill Bay Half Marathon, completing the 21-kilometre loop around Oak Bay in a time of one hour, 11 minutes and seven seconds. Last year’s women’s winner Claire Morgan defended her title and set a new personal best of 1:25:38. James Odgen (1:18:26) and Jane Campbell Arnold (1:32:26) were the top men’s and women’s masters runners. New this year was the Litespeed five-km race, which Laurence Coogan completed in 17:21. He was also the top men’s master. Sara Ellison was the top woman, doing the five-km in 23:08. Close behind was the top women’s master runner, Elaine Lowry, at 23:15. The top male junior was Rio Davison, 24:17, and the top female junior was Marin Davison, 29:13. Nearly 300 participants entered this year. sports@vicnews.com


A26 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

Vikes start with sweep It’s early, but the UVic Vikes women’s field hockey team took a big first step towards qualifying for the Torontohosted CIS National Championship later this fall. The Vikes defeated the Calgary Dinos, in Calgary, 1-0 on Sunday and 3-1 win on Saturday. It was the season opener for both teams. Annie Walters-Shumka (Claremont secondary) scored the Vikes’ only goal on Sunday. Kyla Kirby, Kayleen van der Ree and Rosie Beale scored in the Vikes win on Saturday. Because the Alberta Pandas withdrew its women’s field hockey program for 2012, the three-team Canada West schedule leaves one team with a bye

SPORTS STATS

Sweet start for Braves, Cougars

Photo by David Moll/Calgary Dinos

UVic Vikes field hockey player Alexis Veljacic chases for a loose ball against Calgary Dinos player Kendra Toth during the Vikes’ 3-1 win in Calgary on Saturday. The Vikes also won on Sunday, 1-0. each weekend. Instead the Vikes have a pair of exhibition matches against Vancouver Premier League teams. Tonight (Sept. 19) the Vikes will face the Kirby’s Island Wildcats at UVic tonight, 6:30 p.m., and on Saturday the Meralomas will visit for a 12:30 p.m.

start. The Vikes’ next Canada West games are against the UBC Thunderbirds, Sept. 29 and 30 at 11 a.m. All above games will be held at the UVic field hockey turf. The Vikes men’s field hockey team lost 4-1 to Burnaby on Saturday. Ryan Litnosky scored

the Vikes only goal. The Vikes are missing junior national players Sam Jones, James Kirkpatrick and Matthew Sarmento, who are at the Junior Pan American Games in Mexico. The Vikes are in Surrey against United Brothers on Saturday. sports@vicnews.com

The Saanich Braves and Victoria Cougars are each undefeated through the first stretch of the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League season. Saanich is 3-0, having defeated the Kerry Park Islanders 6-2, Peninsula Panthers 5-3 and Oceanside Generals 7-4. Captain Ty Jones leads the Braves with five goals, five assists in three games. Goalie Tanner McGaw has been in net for all three wins. The Braves host the Nanaimo Buccanneers, 6:30 p.m. Friday at George Pearkes arena. Meanwhile the Cougars picked up where they left off with four straight wins to start the season, first in the VIJHL. The Cougars latest win came against the Generals, 6-2 on Saturday. The Cougars visit the Westshore Wolves tonight, 7:30 p.m. at Bear Mountain Arena. Expansion has meant success so far in the VIJHL as the Buccaneers are 3-1 and the Wolves are 2-2. The two meet for the first time at at Bear Mountain on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. sports@vicnews.com

Correction The Sept. 12 issue of the News incorrectly identified the Saanich Braves home opener, which was a 6-2 win over the Kerry Park Islanders on Friday, Sept. 7 at George Pearkes arena. We regret the error.

Triathlon Xterra Victoria, Sept. 16 at Durrance Lake, 500m swim, 15-km mountain bike, 4-km trail run Place Age group Name 1 1/4 M3034 Brent McMahon 2 1/5 M4549 Dan Smith 3 2/4 M3034 Russell Anderson 4 1/7 M4044 Mike Palmer 5 1/5 F3034 Dawn Anderson 6 1/3 F2529 Katie Button 7 2/7 M4044 David Fishwick 8 2/5 F3034 Karen Trueman 9 3/7 M4044 Shay Averbuch 10 1/3 M3539 Tony Zarsadias 11 4/7 M4044 James Stone 12 2/3 M3539 Jeff Howard 13 1/3 M5559 Jack MacDougall 14 3/3 M3539 Drew Robertson 15 1/2 F4044 Stephanie Stone 16 1/3 M5054 Mark Overton 17 3/5 F3034 Alicia Bulmer 18 2/3 M5559 Paul Hooper 19 4/5 F3034 Sarah Mitchell 20 1/2 F5054 Linda Walsh 21 2/5 M4549 Mark Cunningham 22 3/5 M4549 Robert Thibodeau 23 3/4 M3034 Paul Chaytors 24 1/1 M2529 Corey Grobe 25 5/7 M4044 Dave Troughton 26 1/2 M60+ Dr. Gordon Levin 27 1/1 M2024 Nick Winters 28 4/5 M4549 Rob Bourguignon 29 2/3 M5054 Brian Strilesky 30 5/5 M4549 Kelly Sharman 31 2/3 F2529 Roanne English 32 4/4 M3034 Julien Menard 33 1/2 F4549 Elaine Lowry 34 1/2 F3539 Helen Johnston 35 3/3 M5559 Brian Fardoe 36 3/3 M5054 Ward R 37 2/2 M60+ Dan Dunaway 38 2/2 F4549 Heather Whittall 39 3/3 F2529 Alexa Shenstone 40 2/2 F3539 Sonterra Ross 41 6/7 M4044 Gordon Webster 42 5/5 F3034 Andrea Otto 43 7/7 M4044 Rick Prest 44 2/2 F5054 Janice Meek 45 2/2 F4044 Mable Elmore

Time 1:06:57 1:14:27 1:15:56 1:16:47 1:21:32 1:21:49 1:24:11 1:25:28 1:27:22 1:29:20 1:32:05 1:32:53 1:38:12 1:39:00 1:39:14 1:39:40 1:39:44 1:41:48 1:46:01 1:46:15 1:50:06 1:51:42 1:52:42 1:53:34 1:54:10 1:54:54 1:55:35 1:55:49 1:56:37 1:59:00 1:59:23 2:02:06 2:07:47 2:08:34 2:10:37 2:12:19 2:12:51 2:13:06 2:16:17 2:17:44 2:22:35 2:23:56 2:28:54 2:34:04 2:48:43

1 2 3 4

1:23:08 1:30:29 1:52:01 3:48:23

1/4 2/4 3/4 4/4

RELAY RELAY RELAY RELAY

Kim Hurley Trevor Millar Kirstin Pitre Maggie Koeberling

BC JOBS START HERE Find a job that’s right for you at a BC Jobs Fair. Trying to land your first full-time job? Looking to start over or move on with your career? Canada Starts Here: The BC Jobs Plan provides improved services to British Columbians looking for work, skills training and new career opportunities. At a BC Jobs Fair, you can meet people looking to hire, find information about job opportunities, and get helpful career advice, so that you can find a job that suits you. Find out what the future holds for you. Date: Location: Address: Time:

September 25, 2012 Harbour Towers Hotel & Suites, Victoria 345 Quebec Street Noon to 7:00 p.m.

www.bcjobsplan.ca/job-fairs

NEWS


www.saanichnews.com • A27

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

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A28 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

ART/MUSIC/DANCING

FREE ITEMS

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

FOR SALE BY OWNER

OTHER AREAS

SUITES, UPPER

CARS

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ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

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MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

FOR SALE BY OWNER. #30 Lekwammen Drive. 55+ complex. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, den, family room, dbl. garage. LP $319,900. Irma (250)477-4117

DOWNSIZING SALE. Rocker/Recliner, Sears Special, dark brown, $175, 9 cu ft Kenmore Freezer, $125, Charbroil BBQ, side burner-rotisserie, $150, electric body heater/vibrator, $50. Call 250-655-4185

LOWREY ORGAN Symphonic Holiday.4 channels, upper/lower keyboard, about 4’L x 2’W x 3.5’H, $600. obo. SCOOTER Rascal Continental,good working order $400. (250)544-2116 NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

CORDOVA BAY Character House. $599,900. (Bring Offers). 3 bdrm, 3 bath. Walk out private suite, view, on bike trail. Handicap features. Call 250-818-5397.

FABULOUS SWEEPING OCEAN VIEWS Looking for an incredible low maintenance home with minimal yard work, amazing views & move-in ready? Beautiful 2bdrm + large den, two sunrooms, two decks, hardwood floors, gas F/P, skylights, 2.5 baths, garage + more. Built for view & privacy. 2200 sq ft. Dead-end, quiet street steps to beach. Saxe Point Park area. $575,000. 250-383-0206, 250-382-7890. Seasidevictoria@gmail.com

OPEN HOUSE: Sun, Sept. 16, 1-3pm, 10348 Devlin Pl., Sidney.

Spectacular Rancher. Inside & Out! Very private, 12ft hedge ¾’s way around house. Beautiful exposure on a quiet, well maintained Cul-de-sac! Call 250-656-2222 or for more info: w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192329

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Portraiture-Baby+Family Maternity. Home Movies to DVD. Call 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE ANTIQUES/VINTAGE 3-PIECE ANTIQUE Rattan furniture, Imperial Rattan Co. Sofa, chair, ottoman. Great condition. $150. Call (250)6564853 or (250)889-5248 (cell).

BUILDING SUPPLIES METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT COMPUTER. Compaq PC with Windows XP. Includes Microsoft Office, 17” flat-screen monitor, mouse, keyboard & speakers. $50. 250-380-8733.

FREE ITEMS FREE: BLACK Mondo grass, about 20 plants. Call (250)656-8720.

Osteoporosis~MS~Fibromya lgia? Increase Performance? Commercial Vibration machine. Clinically proven. (250)287-2009.

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, September 23 1:00-4:00. 10353 Devlin Place, Sidney 250-6551499. $499,000 Details at w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192295 www.realtor.ca mls #307481

SAWMILLS FROM only $3997. Make money and save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info and DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/ 400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT. SHOP-RIDER 4W SCOOTER new batteries, annual checkup. New Evolution 4 wheel walker w/basket+ additional Walker. Very fancy wine rack, w/lock & key. Fireplace tools. Call for more details, (250)380-4092. TRUCKLOAD MATTRESS Sale Direct from Factory - 39” Pocket Coil Sets $399., 54” & Queen $499., K/Size $699.; Cherry Bunk-Beds w/Mattresses $489.; Chests, N/Tables, Desks, Bookcases, Pantrys, Dinettes, Wardrobes & TV Stands. Sofas, Loveseats, Rockers, Recliners! All @ Liquidation Prices, Vic & Toni are Retiring! BUY & SAVE, 9818 4th St, Sidney.buyandsave.ca

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS

858-5865

COLWOOD: 3 or 4 bdrm + hot tub avail Sept. 1. Great family home located on quiet a cul de sac in the desirable Wishart area. $1900/mo inclds water, garbage pickup. You are responsible for 2/3 hydro (you have your own heat thermostat). Private laundry, D/W. Will consider pet (not a fenced yard). Pet deposit req’d, ref’s, Absolutely NO smoking. Call 250-478-4606.

RECREATIONAL PROPERTY Sun Peaks Duplex For Sale

SOOKE RANCHER Beautiful, immaculate, 1,649 sq ft executive rancher located in Whiffen Spit Estates, Sooke, BC. 10,000+ sq ft lot. Asking price $429,900. 250-686-5372

Each side: $449,000 5 bdrms. 3 bath, front & back decks. Exc. revenue opportunity We work with agents! 604-626-7100 www. northrockhomes.ca/peak-2-creek

FREE Tow away

1956 CONSUL MKI Estate Wagon, ONE OF APPROX 15 IN THE WORLD. Body, paint and motor all done. Lots of new parts. The car needs assembly. Will Trade for British and Cash. MUST SELL. No Time. Have all receipts. Call 250-490-4150 (Penticton, BC). ‘99 SUNFIRE, Painted & inspected, $2500. 778-425360250-532-0751

AUTO FINANCING

OFF-ROAD VEHICLES VOICE LESSONS. Juilliardtrained, 26 years experience, VCM, CCPA faculties. All ages, levels. voicemomsbk@gmail.com; 778678-0239

ROOMS FOR RENT

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

GREAT HOUSING. $425$625. Clean, quiet, comfortable. All incl. 778-977-8288

1999 ML 320 V6 Mercedes Benz SUV, good shape, low mileage. New tires, loaded, 4 wheel drive, $9000 obo. Call (250)478-5836 or cell (250)818-5754.

TIRED OF MAINTAINING A HOUSE & PROPERTY IN YOUR RETIREMENT YEARS? Here’s the answer … a delightful corner suite like new condition, independent living with services at the CAMELOT, James Bay. Steps to the Inner Harbour, shopping etc. The new sale price is $179,900 with some great extras! “A rental lease would also be considered”. This is an excellent buy! Move in now before winter sets in and enjoy life with friendly staff and residents in a home like atmosphere. Call owner now for details: 250-652-9725, cell 250-415-1001.

STORAGE SHIPPING CONTAINERS 20’ or 40’. Buy or Rent. Safe and secure. Easymove Container Services. Serving Vancouver Island. 1-(888)331-3279

SUITES, LOWER COLWOOD- 1 bdrm, own ent, patio, shared W/D, NS/NP. $850 incls utils, 250-391-7915

LANGFORD: SPACIOUS 1 bdrm, 1 bath, laundry, $850 mo all util’s incl. Avail Oct. 1st. NS/NP. (250)389-0983. By Owner, $47,900. 1260sqft, 3 bdrm mobile, exc. cond., 5 new stainless appl, W/D. Fully upgraded. New furnace, air tight stove. Family park. Call (250)478-8455.

$50-$1000 CASH

DEEP COVE: cozy 1bdrm, wood floors, acreage, skylights $950 mo, N/S. 250-656-1312.

DEEP COVE lrg 1 bdrm, acreage, hot tub. W/D, cat ok, N/S. $850+ util. 250-656-1312 Qualicum Beach: $295,000 1512 sq.ft. modular, 5yrs old, on own land in 45+ Coop Park. 2bdrm +den, 2baths. Close to beaches and golf courses. (250)738-0248

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

For scrap vehicle

APARTMENTS FURNISHED

HOUSES FOR SALE

1985 CADILLAC Seville, 70,000 k. Mint condition. White leather upholstery. 1 owner. $4,950. Call (250)656-1560.

COTTAGES

SIDNEY: FURN deluxe, newer, walk to town. All incl. Weekly/Monthly 250-656-8080

LAKEFRONT PROPERTYDesirable location in Sooke, $575,000. View by appt. (250)658-9133.

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

SIDNEY CONDO- 2 bdrm, NS/NP. $1375 + hydro, close to all amens. 250-656-4003.

HOMES FOR RENT

FURNITURE

HOME THEATER Audio system, boxed, never used, $300. Collector plates (endangered species), full set (10), $200. Call (250)474-2325.

CAYCUSE Very rare 5 acre treed park-like Property with well-maintained furnished home - 1500 sq.ft, 3-bdrm, 2 bath. Extremely close to Pristine Cowichan Lake. Perfect for recreational property or full time living. Reduced to sell $378,800. Exceptionally low yearly cost. Not leased land. Call 250-745-3387 or 250-478-2648

FOR SALE BY OWNER

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

DOWNSIZING/ SACRIFICE. Glass & white oak china hutch - wall mount or buffet. $200. White solid oak entertainment/ media storage centre $250. (250)656-9717.

MAYFAIR AREA 4 bdrms, 3 bath, 1 bdrm suite. $450,000. 3174 Yew St. Call 250-812-4910.

SIDNEY: SPACIOUS, 3 bdrm, all new reno, lrg yard, N/S $1375. 250-665-7324.

MNT DOUG area: Large 1 bdrm, reno’d. Inclusive, small dog welcome, N/S. $850. Call (250)721-0281, (250)858-0807

TRUCKS & VANS

Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557 Guaranteed

Auto

Loans1-888

-229-0744

or

apply

at:

www.

greatcanadianautocredit.com

2006 Dodge Caravan, 1 owner,

local, only 65,000 kms. Super clean inside & out. Exc cond. Well maintained. $9900 obo. Call 250-995-1378. WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in September $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-593-6095.

SIDNEY, WATERFRONT home, 1 bdrm, fully furn’d, all utils incl’d, F/S, W/D, small dog ok, N/S, avail now. $1000 mo. Ref’s. Call (250)665-6367. TILLICUM. 1 or 2 bdrm bsmnt. N/S, W/D. $900./ $1050. inclds hydro. Immed. (250)382-3855.

MARINE BOATS

AUTO SERVICES $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427 Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

CARS

SELL YOUR CAR... FAST!

MOUNT DOUG: 1 br+ office, fully furnished, spacious, NS/NP, $950 util’s incld’d. Avail. now. Call (250)721-4888 SAANICH- 3 bdrms, 1 bath, near schools, bus, mall. $1100 inclds utils. NS/NP. (250)3611569 or (250)920-6282.

1995 PLYMOUTH Voyager Van, 7 seater, 1 family owned, well maintained, woman driven, low mileage (164,000 KMS). Asking $2900. Call (250)477-4256.

1977 CADILAC Eldorado, beige metallic. Cruise control, automatic. Very good cond., only 80,000 km. $3000. obo. Please call (250)477-7076. 1984 380 SE Mercedes, 126. Daily driver, gold with sunroof. Leather interior, no rust. $1800. obo. (250)595-7573.

with a classified ad Call 310.3535


www.saanichnews.com • A29

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

DRYWALL

GARDENING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601

MUD on the RUN. Small drywall repairs, textures & renovations. Ross, (250)812-4879.

ELECTRICAL

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca

CARPENTRY

250-361-6193 QUALITY Electric. New homes, renos. No job too sm. Seniors disc. #22779.

BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748.

AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550.

ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualified, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com

COMPLETE HOME Renos. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting. Licenced insured. Call Darren 250-217-8131.

EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202.

AURICLE BSC. 250-882-3129 Fall clean up, Lawn aeration & fertilize-soil-hedges & more.

GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632.

DPM SERVICES, lawn & garden, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

GARDEN OVERGROWN? Weeding, lawn cuts, cleanups, pruning. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

DECKS, STAIRS, interesting projects. 30 years experience. Frank, (250)477-3315. McGREGOR HOME Repair & Renos. Decks to doors. Small jobs OK. WCB. (250)655-4518

CARPET INSTALLATION

NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $40/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

CHIMNEY SERVICES JKG CHIMNEY. Clean, Repairs, Gutters, Roof Demoss, Torch On Flat. 250-588-3744.

CLEANING SERVICES CLEAN ALL. Excellent cleaner. Honest & reliable. $20./hr. (250)477-9818, (250)580-7504 GREAT RATES! Guar. cleaning since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. (250)385-5869 MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estates, events, offices. BBB member. (250)388-0278. PRIVATE HOUSEKEEPER. Has available openings. Exc ref’s. $25/hr. 778-433-4340.

COMPUTER SERVICES COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites, etc. 250-886-8053, 778-351-4090.

CONCRETE & PLACING RBC CONCRETE Finishing. All types of concrete work. No job too small. Seniors discount. Call 250-386-7007.

CONTRACTORS CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

FENCING ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

FURNITURE REFINISHING U-NEEK SEATS. Hand cane, Danish weave, sea grass. UK Trained. Fran, 250-216-8997.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, Guards, windows, powerwashing, roof de-moss, repairs. Insured. Call (250)507-6543. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

HANDYPERSONS AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BEETLES RESIDENTIAL Renovations Ltd. Bathrooms, decks, painting, landscaping and handyman services. Fully insured and guaranteed. Free estimates. Call 250-889-4245. BIG BEAR Handyman. Decks, Stairs, Painting, General household repairs. Free estimate. Call Barry 250-896-6071 SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Small hauls. Call Fred, 250-888-5345.

HAULING AND SALVAGE

BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Perimeter drains, driveway prep, Hardscapes, Lot clearing. Call 250-478-8858.

LEVEL GROUND Landscaping

Complete Garden & Arborist Services. Lawns, hedges. Insured. Free est. 250-818-0587

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279. CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

J&L GARDENING Specialty yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. John or Louise (250)891-8677 (250)208-8535 WOODCHUCK No lawn we can’t fix. Cleanups, fall pruning, blackberry, ivy & weed removal, 24yrs.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774 SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578. SMART GUYS Hauling. Garden waste, junk removal, clean-ups, etc. Reliable, courteous service. 250-544-0611 or 250-889-1051.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

YARD ART

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

Tree, Hedge & Shrub Pruning Lawn Care. 250-888-3224

250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates.

✭BUBBA’S HAULING✭ Honest, on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service. 250-478-8858. JUNK REMOVAL 7 days / wk. Fast Service, Best Prices!! Free quotes. (250)857-JUNK.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

PLUMBING

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com ROMAX MASONRY. Exp’d & Professional. Chimneys, Brick Veneer, Rockwork, Cultured Stone, Interlocking Paving. Fully insured. Estimates. Call 250-588-9471 - 250-882-5181

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734. DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior and student discount. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler 250-418-1747. MALTA MOVING. Residential & Commercial - BBB Member. (250)388-0278.

PAINTING ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

GEOF’S RENO’S & Repairs. Decks, stairs, railings, gates & small additions. 250-818-7977. WEEDING, PRUNING, hedges, hauling, etc. $25/hr, free est. Senior Discounts. Call Steve (250)727-0481.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

MOVING & STORAGE

DO YOU ENJOY OUTDOOR VIEWS ALL YEAR ROUND? SUNROOM & SKYLIGHT REPAIR SPECIALISTS Custom Railings & Shower Enclosures Beat the Rain! ALLIED GLASS 250-388-5108

GARDENING

250-216-9476 ACCEPTING clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups.

250.388.3535

BIG BEAR Painting. Interior & Exterior. Quality work. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071 COLOURS & IDEAS. Exterior/ Interior Painting. All work waranteed. Call (250)208-8383. DRYWALL REPAIRS & HOUSE PAINTING. Free estimates. If you, your family or friends need any of the above give Joseph Bronson a call 250-686-0663. Reasonable rates in a tight economy. I take pride in the end results. LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

PLUMBING EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544. KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663. PROMINENT PLUMBING and Gas. Licenced, insured, dedicated to excellent workmanship and customer service. Work guaranteed. 250-5887645 prominentplumbingandgas.ca

PLASTERING PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS DEMOSS Dr. $499 per/roof. 2 years warranty. We also install new roofs? Call 250-589-4998

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

STEREO/TV/DVD WANTED: FLAT screen TV or PVR (inexpensive) for a single parent. Call 250-514-6688

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178. RE-STUCCO & HARDY Plank/Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

Roadtrip memories? Have H a ve y you ou cruised cruissed the California coast or toured the famed Route 66? Challenged the Grand Canyon or cycled the Rockies? Whatever your favourite roadtrip, if you have a story to tell send it along (with pictures if available), your name and contact number.

InMotion@blackpress.ca


A30 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

NDP lead narrows in new poll Tom Fletcher Black Press

UP TO

$6,000

CASH SAVINGS* 2012 Routan amount shown

2012 Golf MSRP from only

Cash Savings of

$21,340 Includes Freight & PDI

WITH

$2,500 off the MSRP

Life is paying you back. Volkswagen Victoria A new division of the German Auto Import Network

3329 Douglas Street | 250-475-2415 | vwvictoria.com *Limited time discount available on cash purchase only of the following select new and unregistered 2012 gas models remaining in dealership inventory: Golf / Routan with respective discounts of $2,500/$6,000. Discounts on cash purchase of other remaining new and unregistered 2012 models vary by model. Golf R excluded. MSRP of $21,340 is based on a new 2012 Golf 3-door. Freight and PDI of $1,365 included. Doc ($395), PPSA fee, license, insurance, registration, any dealer or other charges, options and applicable taxes are extra. Offers end November 30, 2012 and are subject to change or cancellation without notice. 2012 Golf Sportline 2.5L shown. Vehicles may not be exactly as shown. Visit vw.ca or your Volkswagen Victoria for details. “Volkswagen”, the Volkswagen logo, “Golf” and “Routan” are registered trademarks of Volkswagen AG. “Volksfest” is a trademark of Volkswagen AG. © 2012 Volkswagen Canada. DL 4991428.

The NDP and B.C. Liberals pitched what they hope are popular new policies Wednesday, as a new poll showed the governing party recovering a little of the ground it has lost to the opposition. The B.C. NDP still has a commanding lead in the latest of a series of Angus Reid Public Opinion polls, with 46 per cent intending to vote for them, down three per cent since January. That three per cent swung to the B.C. Liberals, bringing them back to 25 per cent support from historic lows.

The B.C. Conservatives held steady at 19 per cent, and the B.C. Green Party received eight per cent support, down one from January’s survey. Transportation Minister Mary Polak announced Wednesday that tolls on the new Port Mann bridge will begin at $1.50 when the bridge opens in December. Preliminary estimates had the toll at $3 per crossing, and the B.C. Liberal government signalled in August it would offer a reduction for the first year while the bridge functions with eight of 10 lanes. Also Wednesday, NDP leader Adrian Dix and agriculture critic Lana Popham (Saanich South)

called for new measures to assist the craft distillery industry in B.C. Dix called for the Liquor Distribution Branch markup to be reduced from 170 per cent to 129 per cent for “artisan” distilleries, defined as producing less than 50,000 litres a year using at least 50 per cent local agriculture products. B.C. Conservative leader John Cummins has been diverted from policy matters by preparations for the party’s AGM on Sept. 22 in Langley. He has rallied a group of party officials in an effort to vote down a leadership review as the party prepares for the May 2013 election.

RCMP seek help in forest fire investigations Kyle Wells News staff

Forest fires continue to plague the West Shore. A suspicious fire broke out in Highlands on Sept. 6 at about 11:30 p.m. near Millstream Lake and Munns roads. An RCMP officer arrived first and saw flames in the woods. He used his fire extinguisher on the blaze, which slowed it down until the Highlands Volunteer Fire Department arrived. Police came to the area

because a resident called West Shore RCMP to report a man who had come to their door asking for water to put out a fire. The man filled up a two-litre bottle with water and drove away. RCMP also attended a small brush fire in Metchosin on Wednesday, Sept. 5 at 8 p.m. in the 4400-block of Lindholm Rd. Police helped Metchosin fire department with traffic control as firefighters fought the blaze on the side of the road. RCMP are asking everyone to be careful in the dry conditions.

“Fires can make a significant impact in our community. They cause a lot of time and energy to fight and we would rather prevent them than to see them actually happen,” said Cpl. Kathy Rochlitz. “We want to remind people to be careful, discard cigarettes in the appropriate place, because it can endanger lives very, very quickly.” Anybody with information on recent forest fires is asked to call West Shore RCMP at 250474-2264 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

It’s new. And it’s phenomenal. Victoria has a new Bell store at 3500 Uptown Boulevard. Come in and check out Bell’s incredible lineup of superphones. We also sell Bell TV – a truly amazing TV service with absolutely stunning HD picture quality. We look forward to meeting you!

$

FREE HD PVR

a new superphone, until September 29 2012.1

No up-front or monthly fees, ever. Yours to keep at no charge. In a TV and Mobility bundle.

50 OFF

2

Offer valid September 17 - 29, 2012. Bell Mobility service available within network coverage areas available from Bell Mobility; see bell.ca/coverage. Satellite TV available to residential customers in Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan where technology and line of sight permit. E-billing is provided at no cost and paper bill is available for $2/month. One-time device activation ($35) applies. Upon early termination, price adjustments apply. Where applicable, TV monthly prices include a fee of 1.5% to fund Bell’s contribution to the CRTC’s Local Programming Improvement Fund (LPIF); see bell.ca/LPIF. LPIF will be itemized separately on your Bell invoice. Subject to change without notice; not combinable with other offers. Taxes, additional fees and restrictions apply. Other conditions apply. (1) With new activation on a 3-yr. term on a post-paid voice and data plan or a post-paid voice plan and a data feature with a min. value of $50/mo. Applies at the time of purchase on the price of the device or accessories in-store before taxes. Excludes iPhone and Samsung Galaxy S III. (2) Available to new Bell Satellite TV residential customers with continued subscription to a new or existing Bell Mobility Postpaid consumer account. Must subscribe to One Bill. $0 rental of HD PVR based on $13.86 monthly rental fee, less a $13.86 monthly credit. All charges will appear on your monthly Bell TV invoice. If you rent for 36 consecutive months, you may choose to take title to and own the receiver by notifying Bell TV within 30 days of receiving your final invoice. You may terminate your rental at any time without termination fees provided you return the receiver. Early termination fees may apply to the programming portion of your account if you also terminate your programming. Receivers may be new or refurbished at Bell’s choice. Receiver warranty of 39 months.


www.saanichnews.com • A31

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Historian unearths the roots of Oak Bay Tim Collins News staff

Ben Clinton-Baker is passionate about history. He is currently completing a masters thesis in history at the University of Victoria. In 2002 he travelled to the U.K. in search of his own family history, a quest that led him as far back as the 1800s and then to his family’s roots in the Norman settlements of Great Britain. “I didn’t quite find any royalty in my family tree, but it was close,” says Clinton-Baker with a smile. “I wanted to know where I came from, how my family came to the British colony on Vancouver Island from the U.K. It was a search for my own roots.” Roots are very important to Clinton-Baker. In fact that’s the name of his upcoming exhibit at the Oak Bay Municipal Hall. The Roots exhibit is comprised of a series of archival photos, explanatory text panels and representative artifacts of a bygone agricultural period in Oak Bay. While many of the photos are from the Oak Bay archives, some have come from private collections. “It’s amazing what people have out there. These records of the past are priceless. … They truly represent our heritage.” Clinton-Baker has worked tirelessly to help preserve that heritage in other ways as well. He is a member of both the Oak Bay Heritage Commission and the Heritage Foundation. “My interest in Oak Bay’s heritage was really sparked by conversations that I had with my grandfather about what the municipality was like when he was a boy,” says Clinton-Baker. “He was born and raised here and he remembers walking from Cadboro Bay Road to Willows Beach and crossing nothing but open fields of farmland.” Things have changed since then, but his grandfather’s stories had an impact. “My grandfather inspired me,” he says. “It’s not that he’s necessarily nostalgic for those times, but he gave me an appreciation of the value of knowing our history. He taught me that heritage is a fundamental pillar of the community – any community for that matter.” It’s a lesson that Clinton-Baker has taken to heart and one that he is trying to instill in others. “It’s important that we discover and appreciate the heritage sites that remain,” he says. “Sometimes we can have something right in front of us without having an appreciation of its significance.” An example of that lack of knowledge can be found in Uplands Park. Clinton-Baker discovered the foundation of the original Hudson’s Bay Com-

Tim Collins/News staff

Ben Clinton-Baker stands in Uplands Park where he discovered the foundation of the original Hudson’s Bay Company building. pany buildings, hidden and overgrown in an area near Dorset Avenue. “People walk within a hundred yards of this site and have no idea of what once stood here,” he says. “That’s why I put the Roots exhibit together. It’s important that people have that sense of where they came from.

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“Even the plants within Uplands Park have a history,” Clinton-Baker says. Each year the Friends of Uplands Park clear out invasive plant species brought here by European colonists. “Now we’re dealing with the actions of those original settlers ... trying to restore and maintain the original, natural beauty

of this area. Heritage preservation isn’t just about buildings.” While the Roots exhibit deals primarily with the European-style agriculture of Oak Bay’s past, Clinton-Baker is also keenly aware of the First Nation populations that inhabited the area prior to European settlement. “The original inhabitants here had cultivated and maintained a shrub-free grassland for centuries to enhance the growth of camas, a food crop for them,” he says. “But the European settlers just considered it to be an ideal place to start their farms. In a way, the camas meadows determined where the settlement would be. Now we have some people who maintain that the original aboriginal occupants of the land had no agriculture. The meadows tell you they’re wrong.” Clinton-Baker is giving an oral presentation of his work at the Windsor Park Pavilion on Sept. 19 at 7 p.m. The speech will augment the Roots exhibit and will provide more detail on the area’s agricultural history. “In the end, we build our future on the foundation of the past. Without strong roots in the past, we’ll never bear fruit in the future,” he says. For more on Oak Bay’s archives, see heritageoakbay.ca. reporter@vicnews.com

Heritage Acres


A32 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 - SAANICH

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Saanich News, September 19, 2012