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Artists offer frank ‘conversations’ 15 / Push for artificial turf 33

the richmond

Bunny ‘dumper’ caught in the act 3

REVIEW

richmondreview.com Friday, september 14, 2012

48 PAGEs

Richmond RCMP Const. Jimmy Ng (right) died Sept. 15, 2002 when the police cruiser he was driving was T-boned by then-19-year-old Stuart Chan’s 2003 Honda Civic Si-R.

‘It seems like it was yesterday’ Saturday marks grim anniversary of crash that claimed Richmond RCMP Const. Jimmy Ng

by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter Stuart Chan’s Alberta Road apartment looks out onto Garden City Park, where children can often be seen laughing and playing with their families. Whether the 29-year-old self-described businessman ever becomes a father remains to be seen, but his night of foolishness a decade ago robbed another man of ever experiencing such joy. And left one couple childless and with a wound that will never fully heal. Saturday is the 10th anniversary of the night Yau Chun Chan became a killer. While he wasn’t holding a gun, and never fired a bullet, what Chan did do behind the wheel of a sparkling new high-performance 2003 Honda Civic SiR was every bit as deadly. It was around 2:30 a.m. on Sept. 15, 2002

that Richmond RCMP Const. Jimmy Ng died when Chan’s Honda roared through a red light at the intersection of No. 3 Road and Williams, and smashed into the side of Ng’s police cruiser. Chan, just weeks removed from his 19th birthday, had been street racing in his new car that night, according to witnesses, a criminal offence he was eventually punished for, though he never did quite pay his entire debt to society. Richmond RCMP officers will mark the anniversary Saturday with a moment of silence and more than a few tears. RCMP Sgt. Peter Thiessen said it’s hard to believe that it’s been 10 years since that tragic night. “It seems like it was yesterday,” said Thiessen, who served as the spokesperson for the Richmond detachment back in 2002. “I clearly

Richmond’s Yau Chun Stuart Chan, seen in this image from 2009, spent eight months of a twoyear sentence behind bars.

remember that evening and clearly remember the days and weeks that followed like it was yesterday.”

Recalling the events of that night remain painful for Thiessen, whose emotional pleas to street racers played out repeatedly over the TV and radio news. Thiessen was sound asleep when he got the call from a distraught dispatcher who advised him that a fellow Mountie had been involved in a crash. En route to the devastating crash scene, where Ng’s cruiser was nearly split down the middle, Thiessen was supplied more details about what happened. “So I became aware...” he said, pausing to regain his composure. “It still has that affect. It just does and I can’t do anything about it. It comes back very easily.” It was just a couple of days earlier when he and other RCMP members were playing golf with Jimmy Ng at an internal police event. See Page 21

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Page 2 路 Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012


Richmond Review · Page 3

Friday, September 14, 2012

Animal dumping a ‘cruel’ reality Illegal under provincial law, but no local enforcement; pet dumpers undeterred by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter Under a cloak of darkness late Saturday, a man parked his vehicle next to the chapel in Minoru Park and exited carrying a cardboard box. From the box he pulled two small black rabbits, then tried shooing them into the trees. Watching was Cindy Howard. “I yelled out that he was not allowed to dump the rabbits, that it was illegal and that he should take them to the shelter,” said Howard, co-founder of the Bandaids for Bunnies animal rescue group. The man scooped up the rabbits—which hadn’t budged—and drove off. “My guess is that he either drove to another location and dumped them there or he took them home and killed them,” said Howard. It’s a familiar scene on Lulu Island, where abandoned pet rabbits run wild in parks, fields and the green spaces of Richmond Auto Mall. Dumping of unwanted pets isn’t exclusive to rabbits. Richmond Animal Shelter is full of a variety of domestic animals abandoned by owners in places where they fight to survive against wild animals, vehicles and starvation. Dumping pets is illegal under provincial law, but in the absence of a local bylaw, swift justice of perpetrators is unlikely.

Gruesome discovery It was about six weeks ago when berry-pickers made a disturbing discovery. Two pet carriers were found dumped in the area of the Richmond Nature Park, off Shell Road, and it appeared animals were still inside. Richmond Animal Protection Society staff, who operate the local animal shelter, were dispatched. Inside one of the carriers they found a white Persian cat they’ve since named Coconut. Inside the second carrier was just hair, and a hunt for the animal it belonged to turned up nothing. Meanwhile, Coconut was dehydrated, starving, soaked in urine and covered in its own feces. It’s unclear how long it had been locked up and left for dead. “It was just in horrible condition. It’s amazing it lived,” said Carol Reichert, executive director of the society. “It’s such a shame people do stuff like that.” Coconut has now endured three surgeries and hundreds of stitches, and continues to fight for its life. Its medical bills are nearing $1,000. “People are doing ridiculous things,” said Reichert. “Why not dump those two carriers in our driveway? Stick them at the end of the driveway, not in the bush.” Inside the No. 5 Road animal shelter, staff have seemingly endless stories of unwanted animals that have been unceremoniously abandoned in Richmond. There’s Mouse, a teacup Yorkie left in a box in a hotel lobby. It’s leg had been broken months before and in the absence of medical

Matthew Hoekstra photos ABOVE: Jessica Franco holds Coconut at Richmond Animal Shelter on Wednesday. The white Persian cat is recovering from three surgeries after being abandoned in the bushes, locked in an animal carrier. RIGHT: Rabbits run freely in Minoru Park.

care, bones had fused incorrectly. Shelter staff sought treatment for the animal, which had to have it’s leg broken again for it to heal properly. And on Wednesday, an animal control officer found an eightweek-old kitten inside a tied-up plastic grocery bag, left on the side of Ferndale Road. “People are just really ignorant about what to do with their animals,” said Reichert. “We need more education in this community.”

Bylaw ‘most effective way’ Dumping, or abandoning a pet is illegal under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, according to the B.C. SPCA’s general manager of cruelty investigations. Leaving a domestic animal in a park or on the side of the road is leaving it in distress—a violation under the provincial law. Marcie Moriarty said it’s also cruel, suggesting some pet owners might assume that leaving a pet in a public park is a promise of a good life. “It’s downright cruel to abandon your rabbit, your cat—those are domestic animals, and what you are doing is promising them a slow, and sometimes fast, painful death.” Animal experts say a newly dumped rabbit can easily be spotted, because other rabbits—or larger wild animals—will start attacking the passive foreigner.

Moriarty said there have been a few successful prosecutions of people who have dumped their pets, but conviction is a long and difficult process. Richmond council took a step toward controlling the population of abandoned rabbits by banning the retail sale of bunnies. But Moriarty suggested the city has the opportunity to do more. A local bylaw banning animal dumping would give bylaw officers enforcement powers. Signs, a camera and legislative language that resulted in fines for dumping could lead to immediate results in curbing a burgeoning bunny population. “That’s the most effective way I would think with respect to rabbits to prevent that versus the odd animal cruelty case that would go forward.” For pet owners who find themselves with an animal they no longer want, Moriarty said dumping is not the answer. She said pet owners have a responsibility to attempt to find a new, safe home for the animal, and if all that fails, there are rescue facilities and shelters that will accept the animal. “They made the decision to get an animal…they should make an equal effort to try and place them.” City spokesperson Ted Townsend said staff are mulling additional violations for the animal control reg-

ulation bylaw. Releasing pets into the wild could be among the recommendations city council would consider, along with feeding wild animals or animals in city parks. “In the interim we certainly discourage the release of domestic animals as it is inhumane to the animals, upsets the ecology of the city’s parks and can create health issues, damage to public and private property and other problems,” said Townsend. People who dump animals may not make it on the city’s radar, but those who dump garbage do. Peo-

ple tipping trash on city land face a $1,000 fine plus the cost of removing the waste. And residents who report illegal dumping that leads to a bylaw conviction net a $200 reward from the city. For rabbit rescuer Cindy Howard, it’s about time the city addresses the issue of abandoned rabbits head-on. Witnessing an attempted animal release last Saturday made her wonder how often the activity occurs. Said Howard: “What are the odds of me seeing this? That just tells you…how often this happens.”


Page 4 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

Workshops on grant-writing offered to artists Richmond Cultural Centre will host two workshops next week offering local artists guidance on writing grants. The workshops will take participants through the basics of articulating a compelling case for projects, creating a realistic budget and assembling support materials. The City of

Richmond’s arts and culture operating assistance and project assistance programs will be used as a model. Participants are encouraged to bring along a grant application they’re currently working on. The first session is Monday, Sept. 17 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in

the cultural centre boardroom, facilitated by arts co-ordinator Camyar Chaichian. A second workshop will be offered Wednesday, Sept. 19 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in the cultural centre atrium. Participants are asked to register by e-mailing community services@richmond.ca.

South Arm United’s 53rd annual Country Fair is Saturday South Arm United Church will be hosting the 53rd annual Country Fair this Saturday at the corner of No. 3 Road and Steveston Highway. The fun-filled event will feature a hayride, carnival games, face painting, food, cake walk, quilting display, crafts, home baking including strawberry shortcake, a

silent auction and entertainment. Admission is free and there's plenty of parking available. The fair, which runs from 9:30 a.m to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 15, will feature the "biggest garage sale ever" with records, books, clothing, junque, toys, plants, linens.

CITY OF RICHMOND NOTICE OF TAX SALE

In accordance with the provisions of Section 403 of the Local Government Act, being Chapter 323 R.S. 1996 as amended, the following properties, upon which the taxes are delinquent, will be offered for sale by public auction at the Council Chambers of the City of Richmond, 6911 No 3 Road, at the hour of 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon on the 24th day of September 2012 unless the delinquent taxes, together with interest, are sooner paid. Take notice that the purchase of a tax sale property is subject to tax under the “Property Purchase Tax Act” on the fair market value of the property, following the expiration of the redemption period. The City makes no representation express or implied as to the condition or quality of the properties being offered for sale. Prospective purchasers are urged to research the properties and make all necessary inquires to municipal, and other government departments, and in the case of strata lots to the strata corporation, to determine the existence of any bylaws, restrictions, charges or other conditions which may affect the value or suitability of the properties. Please note that the successful bidder is required to provide full payment (cash or certified cheque) by 4:00 p.m. on September 24, 2012; otherwise, the property will be offered for sale again at 10:00 a.m., September 25, 2012. Folio 000-399-014 000-634-032 000-736-003 000-825-033 004-689-093 005-282-004 033-518-000 040-538-010 040-860-077 040-861-023 040-865-114 044-528-013 052-186-309 054-445-103 056-675-005 056-808-201 056-863-120 057-202-237 057-205-161 057-556-126 057-588-011 057-601-271 057-602-103 057-602-176 057-602-257 059-910-121 059-995-004 060-020-121

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Richmond Review · Page 5

Friday, September 14, 2012

College still investigating local massage therapist Gordon Hall accused of sexually assaulting clients by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter While the College of Massage Therapists of B.C. won’t say how many complaints have been made against a Richmond massage therapist charged this week with two counts of sexual assault, college registrar Susan Addario said the investigation into him is ongoing. Addario said any complaints received by the college and disposed of by its inquiry committee or discipline committee are posted on the college’s website ADVERTISING FEATURE (www.cmtbc.bc.ca). Gordon Hall is charged with a Jan. 1, 2008 sexual assault, and another onthe Nov. 1, 2008. The With June, graducharges not been ation have month just proven in aaround court ofthe law, corner, and Hall is scheduled to make his firsttoappearance our thoughts turn

outlined in the Health Profession Act, can a public statement or press release be issued by the college. And that didn’t happen in 2008, when Hall admitted to professional misconduct, was fined $5,000 and suspended from practising for six months for failing to “respect patient/therapist boundaries in his verbal and physical conduct, with the result that his patient perceived that he made contact with her person for sexual rather than therapeutic purposes.” It also didn’t happen in Februgordon hall ary of last year, when Hall was in Richmond provincial court on banned by the college from seeing female patients following a Oct. 25. But the college can’t disclose complaint. Richmond RCMP Sgt. Cam Kowthe number of complaints or how many different complainants alski said there’s no active investithere are accusing Hall because gation involving Hall. But if others have been victimof the Health Profession Act, the Freedom of Information and Pri- ized by him, they should contact vacy Act, and the college’s own the Richmond RCMP at 604-2781212, and speak to Cpl. Dustine bylaws. “The college, like any other Rodier. “If there’s more victims out health regulator, can’t provide crete utility pole just details about matters in the pro- there, we need to know,” Kowalski before 4said. a.m. All four cess of investigation,” she said. were thrown from the Only in extraordinary situations,

CHANGES TO GRADUATED LICENSING

City Board City Appointments 2013 Richmond City Council wishes to fill vacancies on the following Advisory Committees/Boards: • Advisory Committee on the Environment • Agricultural Advisory Committee • Aquatic Services Board • Athletic Commission • Board of Variance • Child Care Development Advisory Committee • Community Services Advisory Committee • Economic Advisory Committee • Family and Youth Court Committee • Gateway Theatre Society Board

• • • • • • • • •

Heritage Commission Intercultural Advisory Committee Museum Society Board Parking Advisory Committee Public Art Advisory Committee Public Library Board Seniors Advisory Committee Sister City Committee Vancouver (YVR) Aeronautical Noise Management Committee • YVR Environmental Advisory Committee

Persons interested in serving the community, in a voluntary capacity, on any of the above advisory bodies are invited to submit an application, along with a resume, to the attention of: Gail Johnson, Manager, Legislative Services, City Clerk’s Office, no later than Friday, October 5, 2012. Please refer to the webpage noted below for the staff contact and information on the purpose or mandate of these committees. Application forms can be obtained at the Information Desk, Main Floor, Richmond City Hall, 6911 No. 3 Road, or on the City website at www.richmond.ca (City Hall > City Council > Boards & Committees > Advisory Committees). City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca

THE ROAD Don’t Sing and Drive RULES

car. Two of the four new drivers, especialdied from their injuries. advertising feature ly new teenage drivPrompted by these ers. Last week we tragic events and described British results in other GLP Columbia’s original jurisdictions, the BC Graduated Licensing government made with decrements in drivingto the program Humorists[GLP]. can have lots Program The changes of funof with the performance.that This came study into effect on goal theesoterica original Cedric Hughes Barrister & Solicitor that is the ‘stuff’ of many aimed to investigate the effects program, introduced October 7, 2003. These academic conferences and we of both activities on driving inshould August 1998, was to tackle the awful changes are more than fine-tuning. They thank them for it. The performance. Twenty-one statistics: 35% of all deaths in the 13 to extend theparticipants basic completed two-year term of the laugh often helps translate three 21expensive year incomprehensible s age group caused by car acci- GLP to three a drive 12-month Learner trials ofyears: a simulated dents; and‘mere 20% of all new drivers involve term (reducible bywith 3 months studies into common concurrently a peripheral for certified sense,’ which isn’twithin an easy job. d in crashes their first two years of driving training) a 24 consecutive, detection task.plus The trials Indeed, we sing the praises included a baseline (no music) term. A driving. prohibition-free month Novice Cedric hughes Barrister & solicitor of all who attempt making condition, be a condition in Learner must accompanied by a www.roadrules.ca Initially the results were positive. During complex theorizing and proof which participants listened supervisor 25 years of age or older with a thecomprehensible first twoto years, theandnew driver the layperson, especially when crash to music,valid and a condition inI-5 whichdriver’s participants license sang Class and may rate down But most of the thesewent efforts concern road26%. safety study. along to music. Singing to music was associated with have only one passenger in addition to improvement Learners A recent examplewas is anby article we have seenrather than slower and more variable speeds than driving with supervisor. following the 5th International Conference Traffic likely Novices who remained 45%onmore no music;the however, listening to musicAwasNovice associated is limited to one passenger only, excluding and Transport Psychologydrivers which tookto place the than experienced beininvolved in the slowest speeds overall. Unexpectedly, singing immediate with family unless he or she is last three days of August 2012 in Groningen, The and listening to musicmembers, were associated with better lane crashes. Netherlands. Attended by traffic psychology researchers st bymusic a supervising driver 25 keeping accompanied performance than the no condition. The continued. March 21 , years or older. Immediate family memfromcarnage around the world, the program On was jam-packed Nonetheless, participants reported higher subjective 2002, four Deltaandteens were with over 200 speakers presenters. This killed high level when mental workload and feelings of distraction when they bers are defined as father, mother, broththeof participation teen driver failedof to a of stop sign is indicative this stop growingatarea were singing music while driving than when they and grandparer, tosister, spouse, children, conference backgrounder “in at study, thethe intersection of noting 57Bthat, Street and were either to music or driving in silence. entlistening including the same step or foster relaEurope aloneWay there areand over 200 Ph.D.s involved in full- by aMs. Rudin-Brown was quoted as saying the better Deltaport was broadsided tions. Novices who receive a driving protime research in traffic and transport psychology.” semi-trailer. The teen driver, licensed for lane-keeping performance associated with singing hibition must go back to the beginning of article by journalist Mistythe Harris, Postmedia and listening to music may result from “cognitive onlyThe two weeks, was only survivor. the novice stage, that is, they lose all News, appearedstin Canadian newspapers focusing, tunneling” whereby the extra mental processing On May 31 , 2003, a 19-year-old driver accumulated driving experience time and not surprisingly, on a Canadian researcher’s narrows attentional focus to the immediate area in and his three friends,a after watching a must start again at Month 1. For a comcontribution to the conference: study co-authored front car. She said her findings suggest, “that hockey game and drinking, attempted to of the by Christina Rudin-Brown, a human factors pletetry tooutline the drivers should avoid singingof whileall driving, and Learner and drive home together. TheRoad driver wove even in listening specialist with Transport Canada’s Safety and to musicrules, when driving—especially Novice visit the ICBC website and out of Regulation traffic atDirectorate high speed and colMotor Vehicle and G. Hughes when thewww.icbc.com. driving demand is high …[because of, for and Dr.with KristieaYoung, researchers Monash lided truck on theat the other side ofexample] a bad weather and unfamiliar surroundings.” immediate reaction to these changes University Research Centre, Australia blind hillAccident on Cedar Hill Road in Victoria.MistyThe Harris summed up the study results as was predictably mixed. called, Sing, sing a song…” Is singing while driving In this case, the three friends and the suggesting “drivers’ karaoke performances aren’tWith fingersmore dangerous than listeningwhile to music? crossed, lookearsforward just a menace to their we passengers’ but also to to positive truck driver survived the teen drivThe published abstract outlines the aims, research everyoneresults else on thefrom road.” these changes to the proermethod was and killed. On July 18th, 2003, four results as follows: gram. friends wereactivities involved single-car…by Cedric Hughes, Barrister & Solicitor Two common performedin whileadriving high-speed the include listening tocrash music andon singing alongOld to music.Island with regular weekly contributions from Cedric Hughes L.L.B. Highway. into a conIt is not knownTheir whether car either crashed activity is associated Leslie McGuffin, LL.B. Leslie McGuffin L.L.B.

the road rules

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Page 6 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

Our own frozen ies blueberr

Last Weekend for Fresh Blueberries! Come by this weekend while they last!

Tonnes of Okanagan produce in now! CORNER OF BLUNDELL AND SIDAWAY (look for the red barn) RICHMOND, BC

City unveils new geothermal system City officials cut the ribbon last week on Richmond’s first district energy utility, which will harness geothermal energy to heat and cool more than 500 homes in its first phase. The new $4.8-million utility is powering apartments in the city’s redeveloping West Cambie neighbourhood of Alexandra. “Richmond is committed to being a sustainable community and that requires finding new ways to meet our energy needs, while also reducing our greenhouse gas emissions,” Mayor Malcolm Brodie

City of Richmond photo Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie and other city officials tour the inside of a new district energy facility in West Cambie Thursday.

said in a news release.

The 2012 Richmond Street Banner Contest is calling for entries in the following visual art categories: photography • digital art • painting mixed media collage • illustration printmaking

Banner Contest Themes Banner designs must reflect the following themes: Parks and Nature • Transportation Active Living • City Centre Arts, Culture and Heritage

A $300 honorarium will be awarded for each of the selected designs. For complete contest rules and guidelines visit www.richmond.ca/banners or call 604-244-1250

Contest closes September 28, 2012

The city owns and operates the Odlin Road facility, which is set to offer energy to three major new housing developments in the area. The utility is already supplying the energy that will be needed to heat and cool the new Remy and Mayfair developments, which, when occupied, will include more than 500 new homes and a major new daycare. Construction is expected to begin soon on the new Omega development, which will also be a client of the new utility. The utility is designed to be expanded as needed to service other clients in the neighbourhood. The facility costs $80,000 to operate annually at full capacity. According to the city, this cost—along with the construction cost— will be recovered over time through user rates, making the utility self-

financing. This utility uses technology to extract heat from the ground through an underground network of vertical pipe loops and more than 350 wells. Water is pumped though this network where it’s naturally heated by the earth. The water is then re-circulated into the utility, where pumps distribute it to heat exchangers inside the residential buildings. At full capacity, the utility will avoid the production of 200 to 600 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions, according to the city. Officials are now looking at developing more district energy utilities for redeveloping areas of City Centre. Such projects aim to make a dent in city council’s goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 33 per cent by 2020, and by 80 per cent by 2050 from 2007 levels.

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Richmond Review · Page 7

Friday, September 14, 2012

Martin van den Hemel photo This camper van was destroyed by a fire Wednesday afternoon at Super Save Gas, at No. 5 Road and Westminster Highway.

Camperized van burns at gas station by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter A camperized van was destroyed by fire late Wednesday afternoon at the Super Save Gas, 6600 No. 5 Rd. The fire forced the closure of Westminster Highway to eastbound traffic, creating commuter chaos at the

height of the rush hour, as Richmond Fire-Rescue dealt with the blaze. There was no visible damage to the gas station, but the van’s windows were blown out, and firefighters were flooding the older American-made van with water. No word yet as to the cause of the fire.

More than 50 free activities happening in Richmond!

Province plugs loophole that handcuffed transit cops Officers couldn’t demand ID, arrest wanted criminals by Jeff Nagel Black Press A promised tough crackdown on TransLink fare evaders got off to a shaky start last week when some Transit Police officers refused to issue tickets because they hadn’t been empowered to demand identification from violators. The problem was an oversight in the legislation passed this spring that gave TransLink new ticket enforcement powers. The provincial government quickly moved to plug the loophole through a cabinet order Friday and all officers were expected to be issuing tickets as intended by Monday afternoon. Spokesperson Anne Drennan said most officers did continue to ticket fare evaders – provided they voluntarily identified themselves – but a minority weren’t comfortable with the process and were put on other duties, such as high-visibility fare checks at entrances to fare-paid zones. “It wasn’t a work-to-rule situation at all,” Drennan said. “They felt strongly about it. But they were out there working and doing everything they could through a different approach.” In the past, fare evaders who refused to identify themselves when caught could be arrested for obstruc-

tion, but the new rules initially failed to include the power to demand ID. To Transit Police, the issue was much bigger than just busting fare cheaters. Officers catch about 500 accused criminals each year who are wanted by other jurisdictions on arrest warrants—everything from breach of probation to armed robbery—by conducting fare checks and then running violators’ names through police databases. But without an ability to demand names and arrest those who don’t comply, a huge hole opened in what had been a useful anti-crime net. “It impaired our ability to do that almost completely,” Drennan said. Without the quick revision of the regulation, officers would have had to merely escort violators off TransLink property, knowing that some might be dangerous criminals they would normally bring to justice. The rule change required Transit Police officers use new procedures in demanding fare evaders identify themselves and training is being conducted at the start of each new shift. Fare evasion fines still start at $173 but they will now climb to $213 after six months and $273 if unpaid after a year. ICBC will now refuse to issue or renew licences or insurance for violators who don’t pay and TransLink will also have other options, such as sending unpaid fines to a collection agency. In past years, most fare evaders never paid their tickets because there was no enforcement mechanism with teeth.

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Page 6 · Richmond Review Page 8 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Friday, September 14, 2012

opinion opinion the richmond

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EDITORIAL: Embrace best EDITORIAL: Debt to society still unpaid part W of the new year ball, Chan was allowed to avoid hen Richmond’s making a street-racing related Yau Chun Stuart presentation to his high-school Chan was senpeers. tenced to two-years less a indicating to a late probation nights for little ones officially,While another few his week marks day in jail for the Sept. 15,weeks left officer that he was ready to give replaced with beds hitting in the season, the start of a theto presentation, suddenly 2002 driving-related death pillow while it is still according the tilt of theChanthe newConst. year. Jimmy Ng,Earth’sstopped answering phone, of RCMP outside. access relative to hislight Yes, Jan. 1 is the calendar and couldn’t be reached. Like the weeks following its revolutions around the the court made it clear what beginning of every year As soon as his sentence Newwas Year’s Day, we will debt hetruly owed to society. sun. completed, there was no but, life is governed legal

T

PUBLISHER MARY KEMMIS, 604-247-3702 publisher@richmondreview.com

EDITOR BHREANDÁIN CLUGSTON, 604-247-3730 editor@richmondreview.com STAFF REPORTERS MATTHEW HOEKSTRA, 604-247-3732 mhoekstra@richmondreview.com MARTIN VAN DEN HEMEL, 604-247-3733 martin@richmondreview.com SPORTS EDITOR DON FENNELL, 604-247-3731 sports@richmondreview.com

ASSISTANT ADVERTISING MANAGER ELANA GOLD, 604-247-3704 elanag@richmondreview.com SALES ROB AKIMOW, 604-247-3708 roba@richmondreview.com COLLIN NEAL, 604-247-3719 collinn@richmondreview.com LESLEY SMITH, 604-247-3705 lesley@richmondreview.com TORRIE WATTERS, 604-247-3707 torrie@richmondreview.com

CIRCULATION MANAGER RACHAEL FINKELSTEIN, 604-247-3710 circulation@richmondreview.com CIRCULATION JR TUAZON, ROYA SARWARY, 604-247-3710 circulation@richmondreview.com

CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER JAANA BJORK, 604-247-3716 jaana@richmondreview.com CREATIVE DEPARTMENT GABE MUNDSTOCK, 604-247-3718 gabe@richmondreview.com PETER PALMER, 604-247-3706 peter@richmondreview.com JAMES MARSHALL, 604-247-3701 james@richmondreview.com The Richmond Review is a member of the B.C. Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the council. Write (include documentation) within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org Published every Wednesday and Friday by Black Press Ltd.

of something new, be it another grade of learning or the time, finally, to quit a nasty habit and replace it with a healthy one. In addition, September is, traditionally, the best month of the year in weather-wise. While we were drenched in June and baked in July and August, September

blesses us with some heat before easing off into the perfect combination of warm days, crisp nights and that autumnal smell that can only be experienced, not described. So, embrace your new start this week. Start an exercise program. Take up a hobby. Join a club. Play some tennis. Resolve to do something for you. After all, the annual long bleak and cold stretch is not far away. Let’s enjoy the best part of the new year while we can. —Kamloops This Week (Black Press)

witness more bodies in Tuesday, Sept. 4, marks But a decade later, by a September start.Ng’s parents mechanism remaining to force gyms, more walkers and the beginning of a new are still grieving in a way only Labour Day (which came him to make that presentation. runners on the roads, more school year for thousands other parents who have lost a and went this week) marks It’s something par- being taken up as hobbies of local kids and adults that Ng’s child can relate to, and gnawthe real end of summer, ents, Dr. aChris and Therese Ng, like January, September, —and it can be jarring ing at them is the factare, that Chan despite the fact there wanted to witness but never is seen as the beginning every year, with didn’t fulfill one of his most changehappened. important committment to the But it’s not too late. community. If Chan has become a man, he Chan turned 29 last month, but can finally give some closure to it remains to be seen whether a couple who is now childless by he’s really matured. displaying some maturity and He’s certainly not the freshlyfulfilling that promise made so minted 19-year-old, who got long ago. behind the wheel of his newly As every day that passes, he’s purchased Honda Civic Si-R and again thumbing his nose at the drove at 130 kilometres per hour court system, the community, through a red light, killing Ng the memory of Jimmy Ng and of who was in a police cruiser while course his parents. out on community patrols. There’s a saying that a man is Today, Chan lives a relatively only as good as his word. anonymous existence in an Until that street-racing presenapartment overlooking Gartation happens, Chan’s debt to den City Park, just a block from society will remain unpaid. where his mom, dad and sister And some would argue, in live. their eyes, he’ll remain morally Jimmy Ng’s family deserves some closure from the man who killed their son. Somehow, through a justice bankrupt. Ng, a Richmond constable, was killed by a street racer 10 years ago. systemTom that Fletcher simply dropped the

Separating oil from manure

B.C. Views

IMarking a September to remember was as surprised as anyone to hear about the plan by this newspaper’s owner, David Black, to begin regulatory work on an oil refinery for Kitimat.

the third period and lost 5-4. home television from home. an. How could he say that? scoring the winner in the But then Henderson Well, Stan was far from bedying seconds of the 1972 I made a mad dash from the ing a traitor. He was worldly, scored the winning goals in Summit Series. second floor of the Annex to both the sixth and seventh though. As an RCMP officer That summer all the talk the band room at the other I’ll leave it to others to games. posted to the Canadian leading up to the eightend of the school grounds, comment on the practiThe country was abuzz. embassy in Rome, he was game series was about how cursing myself for not havcality of that plan, and With the series tied and one of the few Canadians it was going to be a walk in ing the guts to skip English whether it would make one game left Game 8 was who wasn’t so parochial as the park for Canada. It was and Math. When I got there the proposed Northern must-see TV. One problem, easy for a 16-year-old to buy to believe the only hockey it was standing room only, Gateway pipeline project it was to be played on a nation in the world was into the hype. Every time and Yvon Cournoyer was more acceptable to B.C.’s weekday morning durCanada. the Olympics rolled around, about to make it 5-5. government and populaEarlier this summer, Environment Terry the B.C. government’s requirements for the we’d province ing school hours. Being Despite the Game 1 Lake outlined Canadians were told Minister of Just as it appeared tion. Black Press news cov- Canada to consider the construction and operation of heavy oil pipelines. a goody-goody, naively thrashing, I believed was at a distinct have to settle for the disaperage, columns, letters to proud of my attendance Canada would prevail, disadvantage because propointment of a tie, Henderthe editor and other reader fessionals from mined oil sands understand. It’sthe notword tankamount of oil making its Trans-Mountain record, I couldn’t bring crude sonThe mostly because weren’t allowed came out of the corner comments are not affected to are slightly higher than ers and pipelines doing way into oceans this way: pipeline has been carrymyself to skip school. But was superstar defenceman participate. Those dasto bang the puck past by this project, and there extraction, which most of polluting. It’s Big tanker spills accounted ing crude from Alberta to I steam did violate school rules Orrthe would heal his tardly Soviets wouldn’t have Bobby Soviet goaltender Vladislav has been a range of views is slightly higher than you and me. for 37 million gallons a Burnaby and Washington by taking a transistor radio wobbly knees in time to a chance if Canada could Tretiak. expressed already. conventionally drilled Then thethinkpropayear, fiveHockey per cent of save Guest Shot state for more 60 with earphones to listenand to thethere day. Inismy ice theabout National Everyone leaptthan to their Whatever the merits of pumped crude. The most ganda about greenhouse the totalbest marine oil polluyears. It has periodically the game during my classes ing, there was no way the League’s players, we feet. Victory was ours. Grant Granger the refinery idea, it has gas-intensive gas emissions tiontoidentifi ed. carried for 40 Burnaby South. Soviets would befrom ablethe to oil atgreenhouse said ourselves. Barely. A heavy monthcrude previous, advanced the 1972. debate over crude sands Orr’s crude. Actor Robert farour theversion largestofsource years, and diluted ept. 28, By theused time in myNorth third handle wizardry. So ItBy was the our expectation wasbitumen domipipelines and the place of America is California heavy nation. Redford one“I’ll of the was War. oil runoff from land for 25 That years. period rolled around, Math when Stanissaid, bet highyou Cold If given a chance didn’t matter date I don’t oil in A our society. And that’s our crude, which is conventionest-profi le pitchmen for intopros drains, from oil Some of that crude 12, Canada was down 5-3. $5 the Soviets win” I took would demolish now. Our cheering wasis necessarily recall a good thing, because the up false that “tar changes, municipal and refined in Washington and Itally wasdrilled. difficult dealing with him onnotion it. their so-called amateurs. more beautiful to the ears offhand. However, it is as someone with a basic Burning coal produces sands” oil generates three industrial wastes and the gasoline and diesel algebraic equations as well As the series marched Then Game 1 in Montreal than any music produced of chemistry more greenhouse gases by timesCanada—a the greenhouse otheraround. sources: 363quick million across barged up to supply B.C. aknowledge day I do remember. asfarthe possible catastrophic 4-1 win rolled Two the band. and some experience in oil goals than oil, as University of gases as conventional oil. gallons. Bilge cleaning gas stations. And we of course Vividly. consequences to the counCanada in Toronto, a 4-4 for Canada and theand for A few weeks later were refi ning, I have noticed a Victoria climate scientist The facts are clear. The other routine ship mainteVancouver Island, Haida For most young Canadian try’s ego. tie in Winnipeg and a 5-3 party was on. Or so we out for dinner with Stan’s lot of ignorance about the Andrew Weaverthere has calcumost widely source nance added 137 million Gwaii He andopened all other hockey fans the seminal All of a sudden was Soviet triumphcited in Vancouthought. Our puffed-out family. hisB.C. wallet subject. lated. is a graph prepared by gallons, four times the islands onbeen marine moment in which they will hope when Phil Esposito ver—the tension mounted chests were promptly and said, depend “I’ve never Today I’dwhere like tothey address Two to U.S. environmental Cambridge tanker spill average. fuel shipments. remember were deflated scored make it 5-4. Math and my angstEnergy grew. Reas the much-fitter, more happy to pay somesome misgroups, including the one search Associates, which Airhighly pollution from veAnd forget the for the of restthe of main their lives class couldn’t get over As a teenager just starting and skilled (although one $5.”let’s I wasnot never more conceptions, which have fronted by Redford, have shows that 75 per cent of hicles and industry deposmost common heavy came on Feb. 28, 2010. I fast enough. I desperately Grade 12 making $1.25 an we were loathe to admit happy to take it either. oil been forget exploited some lately been promoting a greenhouse gases from all hydrocarbon particles used in B.C. It’s called won’t thatby one either. it)ited wanted to ditch the radio so hour delivering prescripSoviets took over and The Summit Series has The rstinone that suggests oil typesbyofbike crude when I study equal totoanother 97 million tions asphalt. I opponents. was fortunate tofibe the could watch it on televifor occur Royal Oak romped a 7-3 victory. been rightfully dubbed A is oil pollution in the general sands crudethe is lunch more corthe gasoline, jet fuel and gallons; building covering game sion. Finally, bell Drugs, I was worried about The nextnatural day weseeps went to September to Remember. and howPress it gets intoSidney the rosive to rung. pipelines. False, diesel$5, aretoburned by theof added 62place million gallons; Tom Fletcher legislafor Black when mercifully losing say nothing our aunt’s in Surrey Especially Sept.is28. environment. says industry, showing endpride. user.My concerns muloffshore discharges tive reporter and columnist Crosby scored the golden God the bless Mrs. Robinson. my for a familydrilling gathering. My A global by the analysis pipes Lynn that have Yes, during there are accounted fordeclared 15 million for Black Press newspagoal againststudy the United band of teacher, tiplied thevariations fifth game Our father’s cousin the Grant Granger is a Smithsonian Institution carried diluted bitumen emissions on Canada the regallons. pers. He canthe beBurnavy reached at States. But for my generaRobinson, had brought herfor reporter ininMoscow when Soviets were going to win. with in 1995 calculated the decades. maining quarter. Emissions So that’s the fi rst thing to tfl etcher@blackpress.ca. tion it was Paul Henderson blew a 3-0 lead heading into big, wooden-cased ElectroWhat! That’s anti-CanadiNewsLeader.

S


Richmond Review ¡ Page 9

Friday, September 14, 2012

letters

Reading

ties Corporation that a jet fuel pipeline to the refineries is the best and only option worth pursuing because it would safeguard the waterways and be a reliable source of fuel. The VAFFC is owned by a group of 30 airlines including Air Canada, West jet, Air China, Air New Zealand, Lufthansa, etc., who do not seem to be concerned with the objections of the City of Richmond and the people of the Lower Mainland who are adamantly opposed to this proposed project. The VAFFC’s own proposal includes Option #3, an upgraded pipeline to the Burnaby refinery and Option #8, a new pipeline to the Cherry Point refinery in Washington, but those were dismissed by the consortium. The Cherry Point refinery already supplies 40 per cent of their jet fuel via barges to the Westridge marine terminal in Burrard Inlet and 20 per cent in tanker trucks via the highways. The airlines would rather build an 80 million-litre tank farm less than 400 metres from a condominium complex and precariously close to the water’s edge in a hazardous earthquake

zone. They would rather ship Panamax tankers loaded with jet fuel down the South Arm of the Fraser River past the historic fishing village of Steveston and over the shallow Massey Tunnel. The energy stored in the tanks farm and Panamax tankers is equivalent to more than one million tons of TNT. An explosion, fire and spill would be deadly and horrific. The airport is critical to the B.C. economy and the need for jet fuel cannot be denied but the current pipeline is not being used to its full capacity. If the VAFFC builds more jet fuel holding tanks at the airport and increases the utilization of the Burnaby pipeline, they could increase their supply and no longer require a new source for jet fuel. This would also eliminate the need for tanker trucks from the Cherry Point refinery. Better fuel management would negate the need for a marine facility on the Fraser river. But this will not happen because of money. It is cheaper to buy the fuel from the United States than from a Canadian source. Profits are more important to the Air Canada, WestJet and the other airlines than protection of the water-

Math

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When pipelines are good and when they are bad Editor: When are pipelines good and when are pipelines bad? In my opinion pipelines that keep toxic fuel out of our waterways are good and pipelines that bring toxic fuel to our waterways are bad. The Enbridge Northwest Gateway dual pipeline is bad because it would move massive amounts of Alberta crude oil, as diluted bitumen, to the pristine shores of British Columbia and potentially pollute the water. Hundreds more tankers would sail through the waterways increasing the risk to the environment . Premier Christy Clark should just say no instead of opening a debate that makes it appear as though the West Coast is for sale, if the price paid is high enough. An example of a good pipeline is a pipeline for delivery of jet fuel to the Vancouver airport from existing refineries. This is good because it would eliminate the need for tankers loaded with jet fuel in the Fraser river. VAPOR (Vancouver Airport Project Opposition for Richmond) has been working hard to convince the Vancouver Airport Fuel Facili-

Phonics

ways and the safety of the people living near the proposed marine facility and tank farm . We need to say no and convince the airlines and their VAFFC that it is time to abandon the current proposal and start looking at smart options such as safer and more dependable pipelines to existing refineries. Let’s protect our beautiful and fragile shoreline. Carol Day Chair Vancouver Airport Project Opposition for Richmond

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Page 10 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

letters

On moose antlers and shark fin soup

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Editor: Back in the ol’ days my Great Great Grandpa use to go out in the woods and shoot himself a moose. Why he’d shoot him right in the face and the cut their antlers off, take ’em home and hang ’ em on the wall. All he wanted was the antlers. He’d hang his coat and hat on ’em and anything else that was on the floor. Then one year Purvis Blenksphile from down there at city hall came out to ol’ Zeb’s (my great great) cabin and informed him he could no longer shoot moose in the face and just cut off their antlers. “I gulldurn done it legal,” Zeb hallered as he waved his hunting permit in the air. “Well” said Purvis, “down there at city hall we want you to harvest the whole moose. Use all the meat Zeb.” “Gulldurn government! All I use is the antlers! Use ’em to keep the firewood off the floor, hang up my delicates, I know where my hat is, and, I hang my hockey stick on ‘em. One day Purvis, that games gonna catch on! What

you’re doing is an infringement on my personal rights as a Canadian. I don’t shoot ’em illegal! I would never use antlers off an illegal moose. I does all my hunting in season!” Purvis sat down, unbuttoned his coat, and took off his hat. “Zeb there been talk in town from the new immigrants and they think what you do, and how you do it is wasteful. Mayor Barker, myself and the rest of the council do too.” “Hockey pucks!” Zeb yelled, slamming his fist on the table. ”Just because nearly all the antiantler activists are new to this here area and do not appreciate my cultural heritage of hanging antlers on a wall, does not give them the right to an outright ban of me enjoying my collection of moose antlers. As long as I’m shooting them legal you gotta respect my rights. What these activists, and you folk down at cit hall need to do is focus your efforts to stop the illegal harvest of moose out of season. Respect my right to enjoy my collection

of antlers.” “Well” said Purvis as he grabbed his hat to go “I don’t know how much longer you can keep this up. Moose herds are getting pretty scarce around here.” “Ya ya ya” mumbled Zeb as he shooed Purvis to the door. “Hey Purvis see that second row of antlers and how they shine? I rub red rice vinegar into them with a pinch of pepper and they almost glow when the sun comes round. Oh, and Purvis, have yourself one of them there ‘Bon Appetites.’ Saw that on  a French postcard down at the General Store.” With all respect Mr. Lawrence Lim, I took your letter (“Consuming shark fin soup is legal”) and changed the names and situation but kept the reasoning. It sounds silly in any language or situation. But you are right,  it is legal to have a bowl of shark fin soup. So you enjoy and remember every mouthful,  because memories are soon to be all you’ll have of it. Bob Niles Richmond

It’s wrong to kill an animal and not eat the meat Editor: I am a seven year old boy and I am reading a book about sharks. In it is a picture of a shark floating on the bottom of the ocean. He has no fins because fishermen cut them off for shark fin soup. He can’t swim or eat, so he is going to die. This makes me sad because it is

wrong to kill an animal and not eat the meat. In Richmond, some people are eating this soup and some sharks are almost extinct. Please stop people from eating it because it is sad to me. Hansen McDonnell Richmond

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Richmond Review · Page 11

Friday, September 14, 2012

letters

richmond’s newest

Time to find another delicacy Editor: “Just because nearly all the anti-shark fin activists are non-Chinese and do not appreciate the cultural heritage of the food does not give them the right to call for an outright ban.” (Letters, Richmond Review, Sept. 12). This is one of the negatives of multiculturalism, where people come to believe that their claims of cultural practices are sacrosanct and not to be questioned or banned. Canadian’s fabled politeness, tolerance and inclusivity can be taken as a weakness and we therefore can be bullied into accepting any claim, no matter how contrary to our cherished beliefs. We will try to accommodate all the varied practices of immigrants but not at the expense of what our forebears fought for and what made this country great. Lawrence Lim in his letter claims the problem is between legal and illegal finning of sharks when the call for a ban is on shark finning totally. It doesn’t

matter that he believes we are infringing on his personal rights as a Canadian; the good of the commonwealth takes priority over individual claims. This is what democracy is all about and animals have no defence against the greed and ignorance of us humans. Additionally Lim is also mistaken in his belief that the majority of those seeking a ban on finning are mostly non-Chinese. If he had been reading the letters to the local papers he would have seen many of them from Chinese Canadians, especially the young, which was particularly gratifying. The two Vancouver city councilors who are driving for a ban on finning are Kerry Jang and Raymond Louie plus Anthony Marr of the Vancouver Animal Defence League are all Chinese! Time for Lim to get with program and find another Chinese delicacy, of which the are many, to enjoy with family and friends. Alan Halliday Richmond

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Editor: I wish to take this opportuniy to thank the owner of the neat looking house on Steveston Highway for lopping-off the offending branch overhanging the sidewalk, and also another homeowner who has done likewise. I really appreciate it. This shows the caring nature of these homeowners. There are others who could oblige by doing the same. Glen Heredia Richmond

The Richmond Review welcomes letters on all topics. Your name and phone number must be included for verification. Email news@richmondreview.com

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Page 12 路 Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012


Richmond Review · Page 13

Friday, September 14, 2012

health

The pulse of Richmond Hospital

The Pulse of Richmond Hospital

Y

Natalie D. Meixner

ou never know when you’re going to need health care services, but you always want them to be there when you do. We’re fortunate to have those services right at our doorstep.

Richmond Hospital is a place that everyone in our community will need to visit at some point in their lives. It’s a place filled with exceptional medical professionals and health care workers that consistently go above and beyond to provide quality care for patients. In addition though, it’s a place that relies on the gen-

erosity of our entire community to meet the growing health care needs of our city. As president and CEO of Richmond Hospital Foundation, I am honoured to represent an organization that for 25 years has raised more than $40-million in support of purchasing vital medical equipment, improving patient care programs, and upgrading facilities at Richmond Hospital. The truth is that government funding provides the basic framework for health care, but the support of our donors truly makes the difference in the quality of care that can be provided in Richmond. We are so grateful for the individuals, families, businesses, and organizations who have chosen to contribute to our Foundation. Knowing the support those gifts have provided, and the patients they’ve helped, I can tell you each has made a tremendous difference. Richmond Hospital is here for us on every step of life’s journey—from babies to greatgrandparents, our doctors, nurses, and professionals take pride in serving the needs of our community. They’re here to welcome the birth of your newborn. They’re here if you’ve broken a bone, need an MRI, or if you’re critically ill. They’re here for all of

life’s foreseen, and unforeseen, twists and turns. There’s no doubt a visit to the hospital can be an emotional journey. That’s why we feel the powerful experience of everyone who comes through our hospital tells the story of the hospital itself. We look forward to telling you these stories, of not only the patients that receive quality health care, but also those who work tirelessly to support our medical programs to make Richmond Hospital an exceptional place. The support of Richmond Hospital Foundation also allows our health professionals to expand their work into new areas of patient care. For example, one new initiative of the Foundation is a partnership with the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute to launch the first community hospital research program in British Columbia, right here at Richmond Hospital. A local family physician, Dr. Scott Garrison, is leading a team of doctors to research tangible issues that can be directly applied to patients. His current research focuses on whether reducing the number of medications that seniors take can actually result in healthier people and an improved quality of life. Research of this type has the

Dr. Scott Garrison, is leading a team of doctors to research tangible issues that can be directly applied to patients.

potential to impact thousands of lives, and it’s happening in Richmond thanks to Foundation supporters. As we approach the Fall, you’ll see our presence growing around town. From our 5th Annual Community Cares RadioTelethon on October 6th to our 14th Annual Starlight Gala on October 13th, we are already seeing overwhelming support from the community. I look forward in the months

ahead to taking you behind the scenes of Richmond Hospital and through the doors of our community and residential programs. I hope that through this column, you’ll feel the pulse of Richmond Hospital. Natalie D. Meixner is president and CEO of Richmond Hospital Foundation. Her column will appear monthly in The Richmond Review. www.richmondhospitalfoundation.com


Page 14 · Richmond Review

APPL TODA Y Y!

Friday, September 14, 2012

fitness

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reast movement when exercising can cause discomfort for women.

Sports bras support, control and protect a woman’s breasts from sagging and pain, if fitted professionally. As a fitness instructor and personal trainer I see women exercising everyday and what I observed in fitness classes is shocking: most participants wear an everyday bra! How do I know that? I see their breasts (AKA the girls) flopping around. Your breasts can bounce up to nine centimetres when unsupported during exercise! Many women are still unaware that unrestricted breast movement during exercise can permanently stretch the Coopers ligaments causing the breasts to sag, forever! See, we don’t have muscles to lift and keep them firm, we only have suspensory ligaments (Coopers ligaments). The breasts are linked to the chest via those ligaments, which help to give shape and form; with age, time and gravity these ligaments will stretch and the bust will sag. This life process is inevitable and irreversible, but you could be speeding up the process by not wearing adequate support during exercise. Let’s face it, you would not go cycling without proper head protection or running without proper training shoes, a good sports bra is a piece of sports kit designed to help to prevent injury and make you feel comfortable. Fortunately plenty of research has been done recently on sports bras and the conclusion is that wearing a well designed properly fitting

sports bra will help to prevent painful bounce and minimize damage to the ligaments. Sports bras also help to prevent women with larger breasts from suffering neck and shoulder discomfort caused by excessive bouncing. Whether you are running or jumping, a woman’s breasts will do a “figure of eight”: move up and down, side to side, up and down and in and out. By wearing a correctly fitting sports bra, breast movement can be reduced by as much as 50 per cent— thus delaying long-term sagging. Eighty-two per cent of doctors surveyed agreed that wearing a sport bra helps to prevent breast motion, reducing stress on breast’s outer skin and the Coopers suspensory ligaments which help to prevent long term sagging. Most importantly sports bras are more comfortable than most ordinary bras when playing sport or exercising.

How to choose the right bra for you? 1) The Style There are two types of sports bras: the “encapsulation version,” which has molded cups and provides firm support, and the “compression type,” which flattens the breasts against the body. The experts agree that larger-breasted women are usually better off with the moulded-cup models, especially those that feature minimal neck-to-navel stretch in the fabric. 2) The Fit A good fit is essential, firm and supportive but no so tight it restricts breathing. Although you can measure your bust to establish your size and cup size, it is worth remembering that sizes are not industry standard and each manufacturer’s sizes can vary from each other. Aim to find a bra that offers a two-hook back for an adjustable fit and don’t forget to give the bra “the jumping-jack test” to be sure it is doing what it is suppose to do. See Page 19


Friday, September 14, 2012

arts & entertainment

Richmond Review · Page 15

Liberty Lost (from the 2010 G20 summit in Toronto), 2010.

Artists offer frank ‘conversations’ Richmond Art Gallery hosts first Western Canada exhibition for Toronto photo-based artists

1985, the collapse of the cod fishery in 1994, and the financial crisis of 2008.”

by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter

T

hey’re quite unlike idyllic Steveston sunsets or peaceful park portraits.

Simply put, the photographs of Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge hardly illicit glances. With striking images chockablock with messages, the photography of the Toronto artists is more likely to attract full-on stares. The duo is set to unveil their works for the first time in Western Canada—right here at Richmond Art Gallery—in an exhibition called Open Conversations: The Art Practice of Carole Condé + Karl Beveridge. Their photo-based art practice is 35 years in the making, involving diverse communities and trade unions in such a way their subjects become participants in their work. The result— photographs that probe social, cultural and political issues that have formed the basis of 50 exhibitions at major museums and art spaces on four continents. Open Conversations features work that dates to 1975—when the artists began collaborating.

A portrait of photography artists Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge, who are presenting their work at an exhibition opening Saturday at Richmond Art Gallery.


And Condé and Beveridge added a uniquely Richmond twist to their exhibition. In June, the artists worked with Richmond Cultural Centre’s groups to create a new photonarrative piece focusing on cultural work. Subjects were also participants. The show’s public opening reception, Saturday, Sept. 15 from 3 to 5 p.m. will be attended by Carole Condé and curator Scott Marsden. What will viewers see in this exhibition? Condé: “With the exception of a series of drawings that portray the two of us in conversation about the art world in 1975, the works are photographic narratives that look at the experience and concerns of working people: from women organizing a union in 1980, to nuclear power workers in

Why the title, Open Conversations? Beveridge: “Our projects are based on conversations and workshops with the people that they are about. For example, the work Public Matters (at Richmond Cultural Centre), involved conversations with each of the participants, a workshop in which visual ideas were discussed and finally each of them played themselves in the final image along with actors who played the public characters. They are ‘open’ conversations because the process is one of collaboration…” Your work attempts to bridge working people and those in the arts. How has this divide changed since you began in the ‘80s? Condé: “At the beginning of the 1980’s the arts were seen as something outside most working people’s experience or interest. For the most part, art did not reflect their experience or beliefs; it had little to do with them. While this has not been overcome, there has been a significant shift in this position. For one, there is an understanding of cultural production as work—work that is underpaid and undervalued. There is an understanding that there are alternative forms of expression that do reflect people’s experience.” How much push-back have you received from subjects believing they don’t measure up to what art is? Beveridge: “I wouldn’t say there is push-back. Often there is a sense in which people don’t see

Open Conversations: The Art Practice of Carole Condé + Karl Beveridge
 •Sept. 15 to Nov. 10 at Richmond Art Gallery •Opening reception is Saturday, Sept. 15 from 3 to 5 p.m. Artist talk will be held prior to opening, at 2 p.m. Both events are free and open to the public •Gallery is open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (until 9 p.m. Thursdays) and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends what they do as deserving artistic attention. This comes from the idea that art is about genius and ‘worthy’ subjects. It also comes from the fact that what people do is not socially valued—that it’s just a job and not worthy of representation. On the other hand people have a strong sense of pride in what they do...but it is a pride that is seldom recognized.” You suggest it’s important to portray the lives and experiences of working people, so who is your work for? Condé: “We see what we do as addressed to two audiences: the arts and working people or the larger public. Both are a challenge. In the arts it’s to present a different model of working and relating to an audience or community. In terms of working people, it’s to suggest not only that their experiences are important… but that art and culture should engage the communities in which they are made.”


Page 16 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

arts & entertainment River Rock hosts Grease singalong aged and singing—to songs made famous by stars Olivia NewtonJohn and John Travolta—is mandatory. The singalong screening comes at a time when Grease fans are marking the 40th anniversary of

the stage musical, where songs such as “Summer Nights,”“You’re the One That I Want” and “Greased Lightnin” made their debut. The event takes place Sept. 21 at 8 p.m. Tickets, $19.50 to $29.50, available at ticketmaster.ca.

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kovsky. The musicians will also perform Ukrainian folk songs in costume, Slavic a cappella music and virtuoso instrumental music. This is the first time Richmond will host the Kiev Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, which includes 45 singers and 45 instrumentalists—all professionals, most having trained at the

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next week in preparation for the Monday show, which will be performed in Cantonese with Chinese and English subtitles. Sha Yexin’s play—banned in China by government—explores the life of Jiang Qing, Mao Zedong’s last wife. Once a movie star, Jiang Qing became a prominent member in the communist party before she was imprisoned. Tickets are $38 to $88, and available at gatewaytheatre.com or 604-2701812.

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By the time she was 23, she had already been married three times and had numerous affairs. Mao Zedong was the last man in her life—and she thought he was in the palm of her hand. The story of Jiang Qing is part of a play being presented by Springtime Stage at Gateway Theatre on Sept. 24. I Am Chairman Mao’s Bitch! is written by Shanghai playwright Sha Yexin. A crew of actors are scheduled to arrive in Richmond from Hong Kong early

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River Rock Show Theatre will host a singalong to the classic film and musical Grease next Friday. Promised is an interactive experience complete with on-screen lyrics. According to producer Ben Freedman, costumes are encour-

Play banned in China makes Richmond premiere


Richmond Review ¡ Page 17

Friday, September 14, 2012

arts & entertainment Artists ready for Steveston Grand Prix of Art Painters will take to the outdoors in Steveston next weekend for the 2012 Steveston Grand Prix of Art. Organized by the Phoenix Art Workshop, the third annual event welcomes artists from around the province to participate in a day of plein air painting in Steveston. Participants will receive a painting location, where they’ll have three hours to complete a work of art. The artists will then bring their masterpiece to Britannia Heritage Shipyard for display. Works will be judged, and visitors will also have a chance to vote for their favourite through a People’s Choice Award. The art race is Saturday, Sept. 22 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Paintings will be displayed at Britannia from 3 to 5 p.m. and on Sunday, Sept. 23, until 4 p.m. For more information and to register, visit grandprixofart.com.

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Page 18 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

fitness

The benefits of training with a dog

A Runner’s Mind Christine Blanchette

He is charming as he is athletic— a lean, mean running machine with muscular build, friendly disposition that makes him extremely popular with the ladies, some of whom ply him with food while others simply adore him. His name is Otis and he

is a proverbial chick magnet. Otis is also a dog. A real one! He is a five-yearold, 20 pound Jack Russell Terrier, bundle of energy with an insatiable desire to run – or hike – or run along side his bike-riding human sidekick, Brian Bjornson. Not just any Fido would

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do to work out with Brian, who has an impressive running pedigree of his own. He’s represented Canada internationally at the world marathon championships in Fukuoka, Japan, won the Royal Victoria Marathon, now in his 50’s keeping himself in shape through running, hiking and long bike rides. Throughout many of his forays into the woods or up mountainsides, Otis has been there with him, almost mocking him on occasions when Mr. Human couldn’t keep up on a particularly steep section of trail. It was obvious that Otis was an excellent training partner for Brian. In a recent interview, he commented, “I started running with Otis when he was five or six months old. I had to wait until he further developed his joints.” He continued, “We started running for 20 minutes at a time and built it up from there.” It made me think about times when a partner had to cancel out, leaving me to run by myself. I’d see

joggers with dogs but I never realized the benefits, including bonding with your pet and having a companion happy to share every step of your journey. I spoke recently with Dr. Kathy Kramer, a veterinarian at the Vancouver Wellness Animal Hospital, one of very few clinics in Canada to offer a combination of holistic and conventional pet health care. “There are many benefits in training with your dog,” she said, noting however, that it takes a commitment to Rover to make it work. “Running requires training since most dogs like to sniff along the way and get easily distracted,” she said. “Not every dog is cut out to be a marathoner. Common sense dictates that while you may try to run with your border collie, you would leave your bulldog or Chihuahua at home.” She continued, “Dogs also require conditioning like people do. A person would be crazy to start out by running 10 ki-

lometers so don’t expect your dog to do it! The same wear and tear that affects a person’s joints will affect a dog’s as well. Acute injuries, such as soft tissue sprains or ligament tears can happen quickly. As the dog ages, the percussive forces of running (especially on hard surfaces) can cause arthritis to start at an earlier age.” Dr. Kramer notes, “Depending on the length of the run and the ambient temperature, your dog should be offered water before, during and after the run.” She adds, “Shoes depend on the surface; gravel and ice can slice their pads easily and pad injuries are difficult to heal! I’ve seen many pad lacerations from shells along the beach as well. Soft dirt trails or grass is the best!” She continues, “An important thing to remember that each dog is an individual. I’m sure there are some smaller breeds who love to jog and some larger dogs who’d rather

be couch potatoes. It also depends on their personality, stamina and overall health.” Dr. Kramer advises, “Heat stroke is the biggest risk during the summer. Dogs only sweat through their footpads and can easily overheat even with normal temperatures. If you aren’t sure if your dog is having a problem, it’s best not to take the risk. Stop, offer some water.” Meanwhile, Otis is now easily capable of an eight hour hike, with Brian noting, “I’m tired by then but Otis isn’t.” The pair also mountain bike about 10-15 km at a competitive pace. When winter sets in Brian said that he’ll be taking Otis snow shoe running. “He is the only training partner I can rely on as he will never say no and he is available 24/7.” See you on the trails! Christine Blanchette is a Richmond runner and writer. Follow her on Twitter (@christineruns) and at www.christineruns.com

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Richmond Review · Page 19

Friday, September 14, 2012

fitness

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Straps, seams important in bra selection From Page 14 3) The Fabric In recent years sports bras have benefited from the advance in high performance fabrics that wick moisture away from the skin and keep you dryer and cooler. Fabrics such as Coolmax which has a unique fibre construction that helps to keep you cool and dry. X-static is a pure silver coated antimicrobial yarn that helps to eliminate bacterial build up and has excellent wickability and breathability properties. Supplex is a soft nylon yarn that handles like cotton, this enables quick drying, up to 40 per cent faster than cotton; it is abrasion resistant to minimize pilling and is easy to look after. Please ladies, be on the lookout for “dead bra”—the moment when the fabric loses its functionality. On average, a machinehandled sports bra will last about six months but if you hand wash and line dry it instead of machine handle, it will last about twice as long. 4) The Seams Here’s a manufacturing detail you probably wouldn’t concern yourself with when shopping for a bra, but would later lament if it proves painful to you. Although the quality of sports bras has in general improved in recent years, some still have poorly placed seams that can irritate or promote chafing. The solution: look for cups

that are seamless (or have covered seams) and insist on hooks or fasteners that are covered with fabric and cushioned for maximum protection. 5) The Straps Again, something you might not worry about in the store—but don’t overlook the fact that straps can interrupt your physical activity and prove a real nuisance when they slip. Choose wide nonstretch and adjustable straps for best results. In addition, a wide Y-back panel or cross straps can help increase support. 6) Recommendations Bra selection is a matter of preference but some brands stood out when it comes to quality/price. Moving Comfort offers 14 different styles with cup sizes that vary from A-E and have an on-line “sports bra fitting room” at movingcomfort.com. You can find their collection at the Running Room stores. Under Armour, a newcomer in the world of welldesigned sports bras, offers a variety of good quality ones. So whatever your sport or activity you have no excuse for not wearing a good, comfortable bra, that in the long run may keep you looking and performing better. Nadyne Rousseau is a BCRPA certified personal trainer, weight trainer, group fitness leader, prenatal and postnatal fitness specialist and owner of Fit 4 Two-Richmond.

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Page 20 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

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Richmond Review · Page 21

Friday, September 14, 2012

Chan, sentenced to two years, spent eight months behind bars From Page 1 Ng had already been rushed to hospital when Thiessen arrived at the crash site, but it was clear at that point that Ng wasn’t going to make it. Thiessen was greeted by the carnage, remembering the sight of the completely destroyed cruiser, parts of Ng’s uniform, and fellow officers who worked alongside Ng nearly every day, struggling to deal with what had just happened. As investigators pieced together the puzzle of how the crash occurred, through witness interviews and crash reconstruction, at one point it became clear that this wasn’t an accident at all. Chan had intentionally blasted his way through a red light. That took it to an entirely different level, Thiessen said, “where an individual trying to protect the community, keep it safe every day, now lost his life with what appears to be a street racing speed related incident.” Street racing was at the time a big issue in Richmond and the Lower Mainland, with a number of deaths associated with highspeed hi-jinx involving what was often young drivers in powerful and often pricey vehicles. Chan and Ying Hua David Guian were eventually charged and convicted, though Chan’s handling of his sentence still upsets Ng’s parents, Dr. Chris and Therese Ng. Chan initially fled the scene after the crash, and Ng’s parents would argue he continues to flee to this day. He had promised to give a street-racing related presentation to a group of high school students as part of his probation, a commitment that remains unfulfilled to this day. The Ng family brought their complaints to the justice system, but once Chan had been released and after the expiry of his probationary period following his sentence of two years less a day in jail— of which he served just eight months behind bars—there was nothing the legal system could do to force Chan to keep his word. Asked if he’s still angry at Chan, Thiessen paused.

“I wouldn’t say I harbour anger toward him. I don’t know him.It would be good for the community to see that maybe, hopefully some good has come into his life over the last 10 years since that incident.” – Peter Thiessen “I wouldn’t say I harbour anger toward him. I don’t know him,” he said. “It would be good for the community to see that maybe, hopefully some good has come into his life over the last 10 years since that incident.” Whether Chan has changed is unclear, but the street racing culture certainly has since 2002. Ng’s death strengthened the resolve of Richmond Mounties to cut down on the incident of high-speed racing on public streets, he said. While there are still incidents of street racing today, the amount of carnage isn’t what it was prior to Ng’s death. Asked if he could ask Chan any questions during a face-to-face discussion, Thiessen said he wants to know why Chan hasn’t followed through with his promises. In a 2009 e-mail written to the Ng family, Richmond Community Corrections manager Wes Hawkes tried to explain why Chan wasn’t held to his promise. “Since you first contacted me, Mr. Chan has consistently agreed to make good his moral responsibility to complete the presentation, however, now is unwilling to speak with me or other members of Community Corrections,” Hawkes wrote. “We have had no legal authority over him since expiry of his parole. I am sincerely sorry to communicate this information to you and your wife.” Thiessen said Ng’s parents have “every reason to be upset and concerned about that. It’s unfortunate that our system allowed something like that to happen.” Meanwhile, Chan continues to live anonymously at his Richmond condominium, with his mother, father and sister living just a block away.

The Review attempted to reach Chan at his home through his parents. Angel Tam, Chan’s mother, declined to comment saying her son was “out of town.”

A high-performance Honda Civic careened through a red light at No. 3 Road and Williams on Sept. 15, 2002 at 130 km/h, broadsiding Jimmy Ng’s police cruiser.

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Page 22 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

community

Mayor among Diamond Jubilee medal winners

R

ichmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie and tireless community leader Michael Chiu were among many Richmond residents awarded with the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

The medal recognizes the selfless contributions of these community leaders

in Delta-Richmond East who each represent the highest ideals of community service,” said DeltaRichmond East MP KerryLynne Findlay. Among the Richmond residents honored were: • Mahmood Awan—who has served on many community committees including Touchstone Family Association and the Muslim Canadian Federation • Malcom Brodie—mayor

of Richmond since 2001 and a member of council since 1996, he has served on the Metro Vancouver Board, and was a director of TransLink. • Michael Chiu—has served tirelessly as a member of the Richmond Sunset Rotary, Richmond Information Services Society, the Richmond Community Foundation and the Richmond Chinese Community Society

• Charmis DeBoer—passionate community leader and volunteer who has been instrumental in a number of Steveston community projects including the annual Steveston Salmon Festival. • Georgina Patko—creating the first Families Eating Together campaign and founded Caring About Kids mentoring program. • Bruce Rozenhart— a community business

Sylvia t Winners and Losers Fiddler on the Roof t Sisters Harvest t Molière’s Don Juan

leader with more than 25 yeras of experience in public affairs. • Dave Semple—has volunteered in Richmond for more than 30 years and his knowledge of the Gulf of Georgia National Historic Site helped it become a beacon for the west cost fishing industry. • Wilbur A. Walrond— contributed more than 50 years of continuous service to the commmu-

City Centre community police station to open Richmond RCMP’s new community police station in City Centre will host a week of activities for residents to mark the building’s opening. From Sept. 17 to 21, the public is invited to visit the new station for a series of drop-in information sessions that relate to the station’s crime-prevention programs. Opening week activities include an official opening ceremony on Thursday, Sept. 20 at 2 p.m. Other

Subscribe: gatewaytheatre.com Or Box Office: 604-270-1812

nity and helps immigrants from Trinidad and Tobago to settle in Canada. The new commemorative medal was created to mark the 2012 celebrations of the 60th anniversary of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the Throne as Queen of Canada. Some 60,000 deserving Canadians will be recognized this year.

information sessions: child identification on Sept. 17 from 3 to 6 p.m.; police vehicle, Block Watch, victim services, volunteer opportunities on Sept. 18 from 3 to 6 p.m.; all-terrain vehicle on Sept. 19 from 3 to 6 p.m.; and bike safety and engraving on Sept. 21 from 3 to 6 p.m. The station is located at 1405671 No. 3 Rd. (former home of The Richmond Review) at Lansdowne Road.


Richmond Review · Page 23

Friday, September 14, 2012

opinion

Towns tackle modern problems

L

ocal politicians are preparing for their annual convention, to be held Sept. 25-28 here in the provincial capital.

One of the first orders of business this year will be a vote to raise the dues paid by local governments to the Union of B.C. Municipalities, to cover rising travel costs for staff to serve on provincial committees. The plan is also to change the name to Union of B.C. Local Governments, to reflect the participation of regional districts and aboriginal communities. So what do these committees and conferences accomplish? The UBCLG, as it will soon be known, is mainly a lobby group for local politicians to seek changes to federal and provincial laws to keep up with changing times. The resolutions offer a snapshot of modern problems facing local governments. A major theme is public safety, and this year it is the Columbia Shuswap Regional District renewing a long-standing plea for more provincial policing money for rural communities. Surrey has a resolution seeking better notice and control of a growing number of medical marijuana licences issued by Ottawa. Local fire and police departments end up dealing with licensed grow-ops that spring up quietly and create electrical hazards, or expand production beyond their licences as this stealth legalization continues. Pitt Meadows, home to a Hells Angels clubhouse and

supplies. But alas, most will be lost in the convention noise, overshadowed by political posturing over matters best left alone. Last year’s convention featured the low comedy of delegates voting with wireless devices to condemn smart meters, after displaying their ignorance of the subject. This year, in addition to factually challenged railing about oil tankers, there will be a tough stance taken PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until October 31, 2012. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 0% finance for 72 months, upon credit approval, available on 2012 Corolla, Matrix, RAV4, and Tundra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus HST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. **$8000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on 2012 Tundra Crewmax models. $3000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on 2012 Corolla Sport, LE and XRS models. $3000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on 2012 Matrix AWD and XRS models. $4000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on 2012 RAV4 V6 4WD models. Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services lease or finance rates. Vehicle must be purchased, registered and delivered by October 31, 2012. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. Informational 72 month APR: Corolla 4.36% / Matrix 5.11% / RAV4 3.88% / Tundra 7.14%. Government regulation provides that the Informational APR includes the cash customer incentive which is only available to customers who do not purchase finance/lease through Toyota Financial Services at a special rate, as a cost of borrowing. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not special rates), then you may be able to take advantage of Cash Customer Incentives. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

B.C. Views

Tom Fletcher

drug-related crime familiar to most urban communities, wants B.C. to follow Alberta’s lead and give police authority to remove known gang members from bars and clubs. Gangs tend to adopt certain establishments, and there isn’t much the owners or police can do about it. This year, the debate may go further. Metchosin is seeking support to call on Ottawa to decriminalize marijuana, ending a “failed policy which has cost millions of dollars in police, court, jail and social costs.” No chance of that under the Stephen Harper government, but it’s worthwhile to send the message. Another long-shot demand, sparked by the abduction of threeyear-old Kienan Hebert of Sparwood last year, is for Ottawa to make its sex offender registry public for convicted repeat offenders. Ashcroft councillors want to give emergency services authority to deal with another modern hazard: hoarding. Yes folks, it’s more than just a show on TV that exposes a creepy side effect of our bloated North American consumer culture. The Ashcroft resolution notes that obsessively piling stuff to the rafters is a growing problem. And as with marijuana grow ops, “local governments have little or no authority to enforce compliance with health and safety standards when a building is owner occupied.” Another First World problem is the “pocket dialing” of 9-1-1 by mobile phones. This is more than just a nuisance, because local emergency services are obliged to respond to every call they get. And mobile phones can’t be traced to their location with any precision, creating time-consuming searches that weaken response to real emergencies. Other resolutions tackle complex and important issues, such as the effect of hydro development on municipal water

against shark’s fin soup, which will no doubt strike fear into the Chinese fishing fleet. Once delegates vote themselves more taxpayers’ money to run this show, perhaps they should keep their grandstanding to a minimum. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews. com. He may be reached at tfletcher@blackpress. ca

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Page 24 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

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he folk musician known as Petunia returns to Britannia

Heritage Shipyard Sept. 20 for a Steveston Folk Guild concert.

Petunia has been swingin’ and swoonin’ audiences at bars, churches, theatres, folk festivals and street corners for a decade and has seven albums to his credit. Calling himself “an undiscovered Canadian treasure” on his website, the Quebec-raised talent has found a home on the road, playing 150 shows each year in Canada, and he’s beginning to

branch out into the States. Many of his shows are with his Vancouver band, the Vipers. Petunia spent the early part of his career playing on every major street corner, subway station and park bench in Canada and New York City. He set out picking, grinning and singing his way to a living, and became a regular on the Canadian touring circuit. He became known for his cutto-the-heart songwriting, with themes of living fearlessly and without regret. See Page 25


Richmond Review · Page 25

Friday, September 14, 2012

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Steveston to host home-based business fair Steveston will be a one-stop shop later this month for consumers interested in specialty products offered by homebased businesses. Steveston Community Centre is hosting a home-based business fair Saturday, Sept. 29 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., showcasing a variety of home-party merchants. “We’ve got a great lineup of

vendors including Tupperware, Pampered Chef, Stella and Dot, and many others,” said Marisa Achtymichuk, special events co-ordinator for the Steveston Community Society. “Our goal was to bring them all together to create a convenient solution for sales representatives to meet face-to-face with customers, and for shoppers to see all their home-party favourites

together at one time.” The fair—the first of its kind at the community centre—promises to be the ideal chance for shoppers to update their collections, replenish supplies, get an early start on holiday shopping or just to see what’s new. Steveston Community Centre is located at 4111 Moncton St. Call 604-729-7326 for more information.

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keithwestcoasthomes.com From Page 24 Petunia has been busy on the road of late, with near nightly shows this month in Atlantic Canada and Quebec this month. This summer, he performed extensively across Canada and some shows in Washington and Oregon states. After his Steveston gig, he’s in Bellingham the following night, with a show

in Vancouver the next day. With his extensive touring, Petunia boasts a feat of playing with “literally hundreds, and maybe thousands” of musicians throughout his travels. Petunia and his band play a wide variety of music, drawing heavy influence from rockabilly and western swing. He also has his hand in old-style Quebec

country and western. Also appearing at the folk guild show is Jimmy Roy, who will accompany Petunia on steel guitar. Tickets, $8, at the door. Show time is 7:30 p.m. in the shipyard’s Chinese Bunkhouse, 5180 Westwater Dr. To reserve a seat, e-mail dave@stevestonfolk.net or text Bob at 604-715-9329.

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Page 26 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

news

Shared wheels concept stuck in first gear Traditional car-share services slow to reach suburbs

by Jeff Nagel Black Press

W

hile the City of Vancouver has bloomed as a mecca for car-sharing – three services rent out more than 700 vehicles to users who typi-

cally forgo owning their own car – the concept has been much slower to roll into Metro Vancouver’s more car-dependent suburbs.

Modo, Vancouver’s original car-share coop, just added its third and fourth cars based in Surrey – both at the

new Quattro housing project and they were both paid for by the developer. The other two are at nearby Surrey SkyTrain stations and are Modo’s only four car-share vehicles offered south of the Fraser so far. Another Modo minivan has recently been added at the River

Market in New Westminster, its fifth shared vehicle in that city. But the bulk of the co-op’s 275 vehicles are in Vancouver proper, with a small smattering in North Vancouver and in Burnaby near SkyTrain stations. Even the Canada Line hasn’t yet brought

Modo into Richmond, although the co-op aims to be there soon. Marketing director Bernice Paul said car-share vehicles first need to be authorized to use on-street parking and a bylaw is expected to come to Richmond council this fall. She said Modo will also look to Port Moody and Coquitlam once SkyTrain arrives with the Evergreen Line. But she said most of Modo’s 9,000 members are in Vancouver and the co-op must provide cars where they’re wanted. “We don’t have the luxury of pushing demand – buying and placing a car somewhere to try to build up membership,” Paul said.

Density, transit a must While Modo and forprofit services Zipcar and Car2Go might seem a natural fit in neighbourhoods with less frequent bus service, observers say the opposite is true. Good transit and dense, walkable neighbourhoods are essential because those are areas where more residents are apt to give up their own wheels and opt to rent for just occasional trips. Users save the cost of owning, maintaining and insuring a vehicle

they might rarely use and instead typically pay about $13 an hour, with gas and parking costs included. They can rent the vehicle that suits their trip – car, minivan, SUV or truck – rather than being limited to the one they own. Mike Soron, a Chinatown resident and executive director of the non-profit Sustainable SFU, uses only car-sharing services to get around when he isn’t walking, biking or taking transit. He and his partner have memberships in both Zipcar and Car2Go so they can walk up to either service’s unreserved car, scan in and drive away. “Having access to trucks and bigger cars is just fantastic,” Soron said. “We have zero vehicles but we have all these vehicles to choose from.” He figures they save plenty of money, too. “We don’t have to worry about unexpected repairs and expenses,” Soron said. “So it’s very low risk and it just makes driving less stressful.” He sees plenty of potential for suburban growth, particularly in corridors where transit is slated to improve, and says cities can do more to help by relaxing parking requirements for developments that add car-share offerings. See Page 28

Getaround.com co-founder Jessica Scorpio says the service would like to expand into Canada and Metro Vancouver could be considered.


B:4.3125” T:4.3125”

Friday, September 14, 2012

news

SAVING

Blue box reformers seek extra year to hone plan Packaging, paper recycling system may be delayed by Jeff Nagel

Another issue is the government-set target that at least 75 per cent of the packaging and paper collected be recycled. 4631 Shell Rd., Unit 140, Richmond, BC V6X 3M4 That would leave up to a quarter of the material being landfilled or incinerated, UBCM notes, www.ashtonservicegroup.com arguing a higher stanCelebrating 25 Years in Business! dard could be achieved through incentives to encourage the use of greener packaging. Cities also want to be compensated for their costs of handling packaging that ends up in the garbage system. Langdon said 75 per cent would still mark a major gain from the current recycling rate of about 50 to 57 per cent of the same materials. He said producers are * reducing or improving * ® plus a $300 Solar Bonus with the purchase of a qualifying Lennox system packaging “all the time” but added much of it AND comes from offshore and Up to $1,500 in provincial rebates.† B.C.’s has little ability to influence their decisions. Offer expires 11/30/2012. © 2012 Lennox Industries Inc. *Rebate offer is valid only with the purchase of qualifying Lennox products. The UBCM paper also Visit www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca for more information on the application process and list of qualifying heating and cooling equipment. calls for the residential pickup system to be extended to cover packaging waste from the LEN_N_12705_BA_BW_DF.indd 1 9/7/12 industrial, commercial and institutional sectors within three years.

604-595-1664

T:7”

A controversial plan to expand blue box recycling and shake up how it’s run has proved more complex than first thought, leading organizers to seek a one-year extension. By May of 2014, a group of retailers and manufacturers dubbed Multi-Material BC is to take charge of recycling virtually every conceivable kind of packaging – from cardboard cereal boxes and plastic shrink wrap to tin cans as well as all printed paper. The change will shift all costs of blue box recycling from civic taxpayers to industry, potentially spurring producers to reduce packaging. But Multi-Material BC chair Allen Langdon says the timeline is coming up too fast in light of “significant challenges” in getting enough producers on side and addressing the concerns of municipalities. The non-profit had faced an early deadline of Nov. 19 to develop the plan and complete consultations on it, and has asked B.C. Environment Minister Terry Lake for an extra year both to complete that work and to launch the new system. “We want to have the appropriate time to manage that difficult and significant transition,” Langdon said. “All the steps we’ve taken so far have taken longer than we anticipated.” Unlike setting up an allnew product  recycling system – like the one for electronic waste –  the packaging stewardship initiative means business either taking over the existing residential curbside pickup systems or else cutting deals with local cities to have them carry on. Municipal politicians have objected for months that their cities or local recycling societies may be forced out of the recycling business, possibly upending union

while, are pressing the province to alter its instructions to Multi-Material BC. The issue is coming before the Union of B.C. Municipalities convention this month, where a policy paper argues cities should have a right of first refusal that lets them keep their existing recycling services if they wish. The paper said that would avert any disruption or decline in local service for cities that fear an industry-led system may be inferior. “Local governments believe that the product stewardship program should focus on clear environmental protection as opposed to simply the cost impacts on producers,” it said. It also recommends retailers charge refundable deposits or ecofees, while the industry group wants business to absorb the costs rather than hitting consumers with visible surcharges. “The municipalities have raised valid concerns and we need time to work through that with them,” Langdon said.

MADE EASY

S:7”

Black Press

contracts and leaving taxpayers out money they invested on infrastructure or trucks. Exactly what the new system will look like remains unclear. The industry group wants to keep blue box curbside pickup – which would expand to collect all packaging – but find ways to make it more efficient. Langdon noted the patchwork of existing recycling services run by each Metro Vancouver city means a collection truck heading along the Surrey-White Rock border can pick up on one side of the street but not the other. Rules of what’s collected differs from city to city and Langdon said a consistent B.C.-wide system would be easier and cheaper to market and promote. Multi-Material BC argues that since it will pay for the system it’s entitled to seek ways to wrestle the costs down from the current $100 million a year spent on blue box recycling by cities across the province. Civic politicians, mean-

Richmond Review · Page 27

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Page 28 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

news

Peer-to-peer car-sharing is a potential game changer From Page 26 Transportation blogger Stephen Rees, who lives in Richmond, said he wishes Car2Go would expand. Unlike Modo and Zipcar vehicles – which must be returned to their home parking stall – Car2Go’s two-seater Smart cars can be taken on one-way trips and left on any residential street, provided it’s north of 49th Avenue and west of Renfrew in Vancouver. Car2Go also offers a few cars at Kwantlen Polytechnic University campuses in Richmond, Surrey and Cloverdale, and a spokesperson said the service may consider extending that concept further. Rees argues more Car2Go satellite zones near SkyTrain or

Canada Line stations, or even some town centres, would work well. If fewer people owned vehicles but still had good mobility through car-sharing, he said, they’d use transit more.

A new alternative? Clark Williams-Derry, research director at the Seattle-based Sightline Institute, said the traditional car-share outlets are limited in their ability to expand rapidly. But he’s a big proponent of an emerging new option, called peer-to-peer car sharing. Under that model, people rent our their own vehicles to people they connect with through a service like

San Francisco-based Getaround, which handles the transaction and provides insurance for a 40 per cent commission. “The suburbs are perfect for this kind of thing,” Williams-Derry said, adding most residents need their car but may not use it for long stretches of time when it could be earning extra money for them. Getaround claims its owner members earn an average of $350 a month and the service saw huge growth this summer after launching in Portland. Users connect through Facebook and owners can limit who they rent their car to – perhaps only their Facebook friends or people they know through church. “As you get more

Modo user and competitive runner Joel DeYoung with one of the co-op’s 275 vehicles available for rent in Metro Vancouver.

comfortable with it or want to use it as a second source of income you can open it up to more people,” Williams-Derry said. Owners set their own prices and a rating system shows who has a trustworthy track record of past rentals.

Getaround’s iPhone app remotely unlocks a car once it’s rented. Getaround co-founder Jessica Scorpio said Metro Vancouver is “high on our list” of possible expansion areas but said there are no specific plans yet. “We’d love to bring

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Getaround to Canada,” said the Ottawa native. “I think the Vancouver area would be great for our offering.” The service’s insurance coverage system would need ICBC’s approval so members are shielded from all liability. Williams-Derry calls peer-to-peer car-sharing a potential game

changer that could rapidly pump up the number of rentable vehicles in places like Surrey and Langley, lowering the bar for residents who want to move to a greener, car-lite lifestyle. “There are all these cars just sitting there, so it could be easy to scale up really quickly.”

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Richmond Review · Page 29

Friday, September 14, 2012

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Richmond Review · Page 31

Friday, September 14, 2012

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Half-price Port Mann Bridge tolls unveiled Unlimited monthly pass, other incentives also offered by Jeff Nagel

they get the full time $1 at first instead of $1.50 and have the opsavings.” Drivers who register tion of a $50 monthly get a free windshield pass. decal that acts as a tranDrivers who don’t regsponder that’s detected ister before March will by the electronic tolling pay the full tolls ($3 for standard vehicles), system. Provincial officials say which are set to kick in registered accounts for all users in December set up for automatic of 2013. monthly payment mean Unregistered drivers less money will be spent who don’t pre-pay or mailing out invoices to pay within seven days of non-registered users crossing will be invoiced who are detected by and charged a $2.30 prolicence plate cameras. cessing fee, which will be The cameras aren’t com- waived for the first three pletely accurate either, months. so some revenue is lost The electronic tolling that way. Transportation Investment Corp. CEO Mike Proudfoot said the aim is get 80 per cent of bridge users registered, instead of the industry standard of about 60 per cent, and the extra efficiency would cover the cost of the reduced first-year rates. Another reason for the break is construction on parts of the Highway 1 corridor will also continue next year, as will work on the South Fraser Perimeter Road (SFPR). The northeast section of the SFPR in Surrey will open by December, carrying motorists who don’t want to pay tolls on the Port Mann Bridge to the free Pattullo Bridge. Construction on the rest of the perimeter road will continue until late 2013, when it will also open up a free alternate route to the Alex Fraser Bridge and Massey Tunnel. Heavy trucks won’t •get earrings any introductory on the previously • earrings •break bracelets announced $9 tolls for bracelets •the rings Port Mann, • but they will pay half price if • rings • gold charms they cross at night between 9 •p.m. dental and 5gold a.m. • gold charms cars gold •ordental • Lighter broken trucks chains pulling trailers will pay • broken chains •$4.50 goldinnuggets the introductoperiod, instead of $6,nuggets •rysterling silver• gold and they’ll be offered a •monthly sterling silver •$225 sterling flatware unlimited • sterling flatware •pass. coins Motorcyclists will pay

system is to operate seamlessly with the one on TransLink’s Golden Ears Bridge, and the two bridges will move to a common payment system early next year. The province says the new bridge will chop commute times in half and save commuters up to an hour a day. The $3.3-billion infrastructure project is the largest in B.C. history. NDP transportation critic Harry Bains, who favoured lowering or eliminating the tolls in the first year since motorists

to take in $100 million in tolls in its first year – even with the discounts. Public unrest about Port Mann tolls have led some drivers to vow to boycott the new span. “You’re just going to move a bottleneck from one area to another,” Bains said, referring to concern drivers who refuse to pay will clog other roads in Surrey, Delta, New Westminster and Burnaby. “We believe there’s sufficient capacity to handle the people who might go elsewhere,”

wouldn’t yet have access to the whole bridge, nevertheless called it a “desperate attempt” by the government to shore up votes ahead of the provincial election. Tolls are required by law to cover the entire $3.3-billion cost of the Port Mann/Highway 1 Improvement project over its 40-year contract – including construction, operation and maintenance by the private partners and the financing costs of the provincial government. The bridge is expected

Polak responded, predicting once drivers try the bridge it will “change quite a few minds.” Polak said she’s “absolutely confident” a new Port Mann rapid bus running from Langley to Burnaby will be operating despite TransLink’s lack of funding for it. Ministry officials said there are no plans to charge to park at the new Langley park-andride, but the province will turn it over to TransLink, which would decide if fees were to be charged.

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Drivers crossing the new Port Mann Bridge will pay $1.50 a trip – half the price previously announced – as an introductory toll, and the provincial government is dangling more incentives to encourage users to sign up early. The cut rate applies for the first three months –  until the end of February – but those who register for a tolling account by then will be guaranteed the halfprice toll for the first year, Transportation Minister Mary Polak announced Wednesday. And those who sign up by Nov. 30 also get a $30 credit, equivalent to 20 free crossings. A further 25-per-cent discount previously promised for registered HOV lane users during peak hours will apply on top of the introductory rate, meaning commuters who car pool will pay $1.13 per crossing for the first year. Frequent bridge users can also opt for an unlimited pass –  $75 per month for standard vehicles that register early. The introductory discount is being justified on the basis that only eight of 10 lanes of the new bridge will be operational when it opens in December, as the final two can’t be used through 2013 while the old bridge is being dismantled. “We concluded we could and should sharpen our pencils on the initial toll rate,” Polak said. “Drivers shouldn’t have to pay the full toll until

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Friday, September 14, 2012

sports

More artificial turf being floated Richmond Rugby Club says it and other sports groups are hampered by condition of sand field by Don Fennell Sports Editor Another artificial turf playing field is being floated for Richmond. This time, by the Richmond Rugby Club. “We are currently hampered by the fact our main field and practice area at King George Park is a sand field which can’t keep up with the demands we and the community at large put on it,” says longtime Richmond Rugby Club official Gary Stewart. While sporting three teams in the Fraser Valley Rugby Union men’s league as well as a second-year women’s side, the club is primarily a youth organization that features teams from under-14 to under-19. In addition, the club is efforting to further its development program having recently brought longtime Hugh McRoberts Strikers coach Joe Clemente aboard as junior co-ordinator. Many of the Richmond Rugby Club players are former or current Hugh McRoberts students. The Strikers have enjoyed considerable success during the past decade, consistently placing among the top high school teams at the provincial championships. Since being formed in 1957, the Richmond Rugby Club has proudly supported high school and junior rugby through volunteer coaching and financial support, says Stewart. He notes that

Richmond’s Ian Chan and Australia’s Ryley Batt battle for a loose ball during a wheelchair rugby competition at the Richmond Olympic Oval last year. They renewed acquaintances in the final last weekend at the London Paralympic Games. File photo

eight homegrown players have earned international caps for Canada, including former Dragon Jim Donaldson and current national team player Nathan Hirayama. He also confidently predicts a bright future for Richmond junior captain Harjun Gill, who is a member of Canada’s under-17 squad. Maintaining, and hopefully expanding its grassroots program is essential to the club’s very survival, says Stewart. “You can never depend on players from outside the community,” he says. “It’s difficult to maintain a standard or identity without having local players. The whole idea is to build a base at the bottom by looking attractive (successful) at the top. If we only had five kids graduate from our junior to senior program each year, in five years we’d have 25 players under the age of 23. That’s huge, and that’s how the most successful clubs do it.” Stewart also believes an artificial turf approved by the International Rugby Board would benefit local sport tourism. He envisions the opportunity to host many provincial, national or international events. However, such a field would have to feature a deeper depth of turf with a higher blade of grass than is traditionally used. “When walked upon it

File photo With three men’s teams and a women’s team (in action above), as well as an extensive number of junior sides, the Richmond Rugby Club maximizes the use of its home at King George Park. But longtime club official Gary Stewart says conditions at the sand field deteriorate with the weather and says an artificial turf would resolve that dilemma and perhaps even provide the club with opportunities to help boost sport tourism locally.

has a notable give to it,” says Stewart, who is confident the field—despite its uniqueness—can still be used by other sports such as soccer and perhaps even baseball. “We’d certainly welcome it, especially if it would help us extend our season,” says Rich-

mond City Baseball Association president Trevor Rennie. “Right now our (natural) fields last until Aug. 15 and there’s no chance of playing on them afterwards and not even really getting on them again until March at the earliest. This could potentially extend our

training or games by at least three months.” Richmond Sports Council chair Jim Lamond anticipates the population of Richmond to be at least 250,000 by 2020 and says the demand on facilities is also only going to increase. He believes another ar-

tificial turf would help address the needs of the sporting community, while perhaps also allowing some current playing fields to be converted into passive-use neighborhood parks. “We certainly need to look at it, but I think it’s important that any ar-

tificial turf be for multisport use,” he says. Richmond Coun. Bill McNulty says it makes “imminent sense” to add more artificial turfs, noting they allow for fulltime use and are more cost efficient in terms of maintaining than are natural playing fields.

Silver for wheelchair rugby team After scoring four goals to lead Canada to a 58-50 win over Belgium in the playoff quarterfinals, then adding a pair in a 50-49 semifinal win over rival United States on Saturday, Richmond’s Ian Chan and his teammates appeared out of gas in the wheelchair rugby gold medal match Sunday at the London Paralympics. Instead, it was the strong defensive play of Ryley Batt, generally considered the world’s best player that stood out, as Australia defeated Canada 66-51. Richmond’s Travis Murao also played for Canada, making his Paralympic debut. –by Don Fennell


Page 34 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

sports

KidSport applications are up 36 per cent locally Numbers have increased in each of the four years Richmond chapter has existed by Don Fennell Sports Editor The Richmond chapter of KidSport has nev-

er been busier fielding requests for financial assistance. “We’ve had a 36 per cent increase in appli-

cations to date this year over 2011,” says registrar Bob Jackson. As of Sept. 1, there have been 235 applications compared to 173 during the same period a year ago. In dollars and cents, the local chapter has issued $35,000 to Richmond

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youth sports groups to assist in covering the registration costs of local athletes. That compares to about $25,000 to Sept. 1, 2011. Jackson anticipates the Richmond chapter of KidSport will distribute more than $50,000 by the end of this year, though it is still waiting on significant corporate donations in excess of $10,000. Currently, Richmond KidSport will contribute a maximum of $250 per child per year to help

cover the registration fee (for sports sanctioned by Sport BC), but Jackson fears that may have to be rolled back to $150 per child if more donations are not forthcoming or the demand becomes too great. “It’s good corporate citizens that are helping (these) kids to be physically active in the community,” said Jackson, noting the City of Richmond contributed $6,200 this year. Applications or donations may be sent to Box

162, 185-9040 Blundell Rd. V6Y 1K3. Application forms are also available at any Richmond community centre or downloaded on the city website at richmond.ca or the Richmond Sports Council website at richmondspor tscouncil. com. KidSport’s mission is to help families overcome financial barriers so that all kids have the opportunity to participate in organized sport and experience the benefits of active living.

In its four-year history, the Richmond chapter of KidSport has consistently had more applications than the year before, averaging an increase of between 25 to 35 per cent per annum. •Friday, Oct. 19 will be KidSport BC Night at BC Place Stadium with $3 from every $33 end zone ticket sold for the Canadian Football League game between the BC Lions and Edmonton Eskimos going to the local chapter of KidSport.

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Richmond Review · Page 35

Friday, September 14, 2012

sports

Jugadores start off on right foot What a difference a year makes. For much of the 2011-12 season, the Jugadores struggled. But a 4-2 openingday victory over the Richlads Sunday has them singing a positive tune. The Spanish word for players, Jugadores dominated play from the opening kickoff in the Richmond Senior Soccer Association Second Division match. Their efforts were rewarded by a three-goals-in15-

Richmond Senior Soccer Association president Steve Valenzuela scored both fhis team’s goals as Insurgency kicked off the 2012-13 season with a 2-0 win over Club Ireland Celtic.

minutes span early in the first half.. Right midfielder Pablo Schor scored twice. Richlads’ keeper Elias Imsismade some notable saves in the game to keep the score close. His teammates rewarded his effort by netting a pair of late goals to keep things interesting. Elsewhere in the Second Division, the Rangers blanked McKesson FC 9-0, Graduates debuted with a 3-2 win over Young FC, and the

Sockeyes outscored Monday Knights 5-1. A First Division match between the Club Ireland Celtic and IFC Insurgency also provided plenty of highlights on opening weekend, with league president Steve Valenzuela scoring both goals in Insurgency’s 2-0 victory. Meanwhile, Subway FC gave Libertad a rude welcome to First Division, posting a 11-0 victory with Varinder Jhutty scoring six goals.

Speakers series set for runners

In other games, Istanbul Spor downed Heatherbrae 3-1, Clippers and Firefighters tied 2-2, and the Hounds earned a 1-0 win over McNair Shooters. Premier Division teams are set to make their 2012-13 debuts tonight (Friday) with AC Richmond meeting the Athletics at 7 p.m. at Minoru Park, followed by Kelevra and All Blacks at 9 p.m. Jugadores CF 1 will meet the Islanders FC at King George Park at 9 p.m.

Christine Blanchette, who writes a weekly running column for The Richmond Review, will be the final speaker at the second annual Runner Girl Speaker Series Oct. 7 at South Arm Community Centre. The workshops begin Sept. 16 with Rackets and Runners’ Andrew David speaking on shoes and clothing from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registered dietitian Crystal Higgins is scheduled to speak Sept. 23, with local chiropractor Dr. Sean Graham giving an overview on injury prevention Sept. 30. Admission is free, but registration is recommended at christineruns. com. Donations will also be accepted for the SOS Children’s Village. Tea and coffee will be provided by Starbucks.

Terry Fox Run Sunday at Garry Point Park “I’m not a dreamer, and I’m not saying this will initiate any kind of definitive answer or cure to cancer, but I believe in miracles. I have to.” —Terry Fox This Sunday, Sept. 18, Richmond residents are en-

couraged to take at least a few moments out of their day and paritcipate in the annual Terry Fox Run for cancer research. This year’s run begins at 10 a.m. at Garry Point Park. To date, more than $600 million has been raised worldwide for cancer research in Fox’s name. The Terry Fox Foundation is responsible for supporting

close to $20 million in discovery based research each year in Canada. The Foundation recognizes the duality of its mandate. Not only does it raise money for research, but it also continues to share the story of Terry Fox. The Terry Fox Foundation strives to maintain the heroic effort and integrity that Terry embodied.

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Friday, September 14, 2012

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Abrey to play for Canada at Pan-Am softball championship Richmond’s Bryan Abrey is one of the 16 players named to the Canadian senior men’s national team that will compete at the eighth Pan-American Softball Championship Sept. 16 to 22 in Medellin, Colombia. This event will serve as a qualifier for the International Softball Federation World Championship to be held

March 1 to 10, 2013 in Auckland, New Zealand. The top five teams at the Pan-American championship will earn a berth to the world championship. Canada will play Ecuador in its opening game Monday, followed immediately by a game against Puerto Rico. Additional opponents include Bahamas, Colombia,

Guatemala, Argentina, Mexico, Venezuela and Dominican Republic. A graduate of R.A. McMath Secondary where he was an athletic star in basketball, golf, soccer and volleyball, Abrey, 25, is one of only two B.C. players on the national team. Tyson Barkman of Abbotsford is the other. –by Don Fennell

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Richmond Review · Page 37

Friday, September 12, 2012

Finding an oasis of calm in South Surrey

Live naturally at Wills Creek Take advantage of a natural lifestyle at Wills Creek, by EMAAR Canada. EMAAR is currently selling the seventh and eighth phases of Wills Creek. Eight units were sold last week, demonstrating the popularity of these amazing homes. With features like custom-designed Shaker-style cabinetry complemented by a handset textured natural stone backsplash and polished granite countertops in the kitchen, there are plenty of things to love at Wills Creek. The townhomes range from 2,400 to 4,400 square feet, so there is no shortage of space. Many homes include 10-foot vaulted ceilings on the main level, and

tons of natural light pours through the large windows. The ensuite bathroom is gorgeous, with an oversized soaker tub with a marble deck (perfect for holding your glass of wine), a frameless glass walk-in shower with a rain shower head and a handset imported glass tile tub and shower surround. Buyers will be able to take advantage of all the amenities of Morgan Creek, including schools and shopping. There is also an amenity centre that includes a fitness centre, multi-purpose room, outdoor swimming pool and a hot tub. Homes start at $539,900. For more information, visit www.willscreek.ca or call 604-542-8971.

glass walk-in shower with modern tile surrounds and accents (depending on your chosen floorplan) are perfect for relaxing in after a long day. Though fall is now on its way, the air-conditioning that comes standard in every home is also a popular feature, Kwok says. Buyers are able to take possession of their new home immediately, so there will be no waiting for construction to finish. Atrium is part of the Pier masterplanned community, which includes the Pinnacle International hotel. The area is a former shipyard that now holds a seawalk, 700-foot pier and heritage buildings. Restaurants, transit, leisure activities and shopping at the Lonsdale Quay Market are all in close proximity, making The Pier a great

place for homebuyers looking to be connected to everything. Downtown Vancouver is just 15 minutes away via SeaBus, so the annoyances of a long commute can easily be washed away. “After coming home from work ... this is a totally different world, because it has the (serenity) of a resort,” says Kwok. Owners at Atrium will also have access to the amenities at the Pinnacle Hotel, including an 80-foot pool, fitness centre with a yoga studio and the hotel concierge services. The hotel also houses 8,000 square feet of meeting and banquet space. One-bedroom homes start at $399,900 and two-bedroom homes at $649,900. For more information, visit www.thepier.info or call 604-983-9065.

‘This is a totally different world’

Atrium at Pinnacle Pier showcases quiet elegance by Kerry Vital

If it’s modern waterfront living you’re yearning for, you need look no farther than Atrium at Pinnacle Pier, located on Vancouver’s North Shore in the Lower Lonsdale area. “It’s one of the very few waterfront communities on the North Shore” says Grace Kwok of Anson Realty Ltd. “They are buying into a master-planned waterfront community.” Ranging from 654 to over 3,000 square feet, the homes at Atrium at Pinnacle Pier are spacious and open, with a custom-designed electric fireplace with granite mantle and designer carpeting. The kitchens include chic granite countertops and a porcelain tile floor, complemented

by designer cabinetry and Bosch appliances. The recessed pot lighting and pendant lighting over the breakfast bar combine to illuminate your tasks without being harsh, while the Kohler faucet in the dual stainless-steel undermount sink make cleanup easy. The nine-foot ceilings and welldesigned floorplans have proven particularly popular, Kwok says. The elegant bathrooms with their own recessed pot lighting and designer cabinetry and vanities with a granite or marble countertop are chic and clean, while the luxurious soaker tub or

It’s one of the very few waterfront communities on the North Shore,” says Grace Kwok of Anson Realty Ltd.

Submitted photos

The homes at Atrium at Pinnacle Pier are full of chic details, such as a stainless-steel undermount sink and gorgeous tile backsplash in the kitchen, above. Living right on the waterfront, below, has its perks, including a short commute across to downtown Vancouver on the SeaBus.


Page 38 · Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

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Page 40 路 Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012


Richmond Review 路 Page 41

Friday, September 14, 2012

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3471 HUNT STREET • $1,098,000

5631 ANDREWS RD • $1,088,000

TUSCAN COUNTRY STYLE HOME in STEVESTON VILLAGE. This home has a SERIOUS WOW FACTOR upon entry! Over $300,000 spent on renovations in the last 5 years! There is THE ULTIMATE GREAT ROOM; a combination of kitchen,family room and allseason covered living space (16x12). The kitchen has Knotty Alder Nickels cabinets, with an island and matching desk,all with granite counters. Family room has peaked ceiling,gas fireplace and dbl French doors to the OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE outfitted with brick feature walls,built-in fireplace,Fire Magic BBQ and infrared heaters. FANTASTIC MASTER SUITE; with Bay Window Seat, double sided fireplace to ensuite. French leaded glass doors open into the Ensuite; Featuring a Claw foot tub 3x4’ shower,Custom cabinets and tiles

STUNNING HERITAGE style home in South Steveston. SUPERB QUALITY by Sommerfeld Construction. Located on the quiet part of Andrews Road, away from the townhouses. Fantastic floorplan feels bigger and is LIGHT and BRIGHT. Great room kitchen/family room shows FANTASTIC! NOTE: bedroom sizes and BONUS ROOM over garage 18’x15’, is not included in square footage. Corner lot with lots of windows in all rooms. Private backyard faces south.

12311 TRITES ROAD • $869,900

201-8500 GENERAL CURRIE • $228,900

GREAT STEVESTON FAMILY HOME! NEW LAMINATE floors in living and dining rooms,with French doors, SPACIOUS kitchen with windows facing the backyard. NEW DECK off family room,fully fenced PRIVATE backyard with hot tub. Note large bedroom sizes, all with laminate floors. Master has walk-in closet and 5 piece ensuite with separate shower. 3 skylights make the home LIGHT and BRIGHT. High ceiling in double garage and FRESHLY PAINTED OUTSIDE.

QUEENS GATE. SPACIOUS and BRIGHT one bedroom. PEACEFUL outlook into WEST courtyard. Note large living and master bedroom, separate sink and make up area outside en suite. NEWER carpets, paint plus crown mouldings, 9’ ceilings, in suite storage plus locker. UNBEATABLE AMENITIES; ENGLISH STYLE PUB and billiard room, grand-children’s playroom, library and caretaker in this building. Plus indoor pool, swirl pool, and lounge in nearby building. PLUS 3 guest suites.

7811 GOLDSTREAM DRIVE ~ ASKING $1,388,800 ~ Well kept Rancher on Southwest picture perfect corner Lot in prestigious Maple Lane/Shangri-la subdivision. Quiet location near No 3 Road. Livein or Invest & build in the future. Features 3 bedrooms 2 baths, huge family room off kitchen, separate 2-car garage with solarium. Gorgeous park like yard and garden! Some updates but very well cared for, 12 year roof, furnace & hot water tank newer. Walk to Steveston London High School & Maple Lane Elementary, Broadmoor Mall Visit Richmond’s new waterfront community. ~ BLUE HERON MARINA ESTATES! ~ 9 homes with their own docks! #1602- 4900 FRANCIS RICHMOND Seafair area. Asking $419,800

7860 TWEEDSMUIR AVE. RICHMOND Maple Lane area. Asking $1,398,800

66 WEST 44th ST. VANCOUVER Cambie area. Asking $1,428,800

10672 RAMONA WAY NORTH DELTA Nordel area. Asking $512,800

SOLD!

SOLD!

SOLD!

SOLD!

®

Please call Randy Larsen at 604.290.2650

Kendall Ayres 604.250.6981

WAYNE W. KINNA, REALTOR® 604.290.2621

Keri Frasca Kelvin Luk 778.828.2925 604.338.3263

Westcoast #110 - 6086 Russ Baker Way, Richmond, BC

Bruce Vipin Bajpai MayLarkin Lau 604.328.3415 604.812.7565 604.839.7547

Tina Aaron Gonzalez Cheng Bruce Larkin 604.767.3381 778.837.1144 604.328.3415

A STUNNING 2,600+ sq.ft. 5440 4817 English Bluff Court, Tsawwassen 4817 English Bluff Court, Tsawwassen Lackner Cres. Completely updated, Beautifully updated traditional home Beautifully updated traditional 1 owner home,home great location, paradise with the right address! A showstopper with the right address! A showstopper for a back garden, gleaming hardwood in every way and open most days. gorgeous ~ come see in every way andfloors, openabsolutely most days. report to qualified withPre-inspection Wayne Kinna, Pre-inspection report to qualifi ed 604-290-2621.. buyers. Reduced to $739,000! WEST $1,350,000! buyers. Reduced VANCOUVER to Wayne $739,000! 604.290.2621 201 - 6093 IONA DR 1622 Sq Ft 2 Wayne 604.290.2621

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

604.618.9605 778.833.1201

Jan Rankin Georgina Primar 604.329.0830 604.644.5821

604.418.2996.

STEVESTON DREAM HOME with a COACH HOUSE! $1,100,000 will give

#107 - 4233 Bayview, Steveston

Townhouse Richmond

Harry SteveGarcha Baker

Four bedroom, 1,449 sq ft townhouse. Beautiful & townhouse. meticulously maintained, this is Four bedroom, 1,449 sq ft the perfect home for raising a family! 4,000+ 2-1/2 baths, side-by-side, 2-car garage. 2-1/2 baths, side-by-side, 2-car garage. sq.ft. of living space on a huge 10,100 sq.ft. Call May 604.812.7565. Call May 604.812.7565. lot! You will fall in love with this home. Richard

townhouse. 100 sq ftschools deck, parks and nearby… schools nearby…INCREDIBLE PANORAMIC Call Enrique 778-998-3072 VIEWS of Price reduced! Chilliwack and Chilliwack River Valley. .18 Call Enrique 778-998-3072 acres. Ready to build your dream home. Site has been pre-loaded. Blueprints available. sell. Well below #107 -Priced 4233 to Bayview, Steveston Assessment. Call Vipin 604-839-7547. One bedroom garden patio, end unit 326-8060 Jones Rd 4702 46 Ave. end#1-3051 Springfield granite/stainless steel. bedroom garden patio, unit Richmond Ladner Richmond Call Enrique 778-998-3072 granite/stainless steel. Call Enrique 778-998-3072

778-837-1144 604.418.2996

- 7331 No. 4DR, Rd. $529,000 BARNES RMD. $1,049,000. #5 - 7331 No. 12231 4#5 Rd. $529,000

bedroom in the “COAST”, of #15 - 9339 Albertathe Rd,heart Richmond UBC, school U-Hill Elementary/Secondary, #15 - 9339 Alberta Rd, Richmond/ 2-1/2 bathroom Two bedroom mountain views, beach nearby. Two bedroom / 2-1/2 bathroom townhouse. 100 sq ft deck, parks and Call Kelvin Luk 604-338-326

12231 Barnes Dr. One Richmond

Tina Gonzalez Richard Chan

“Deerfield” Burnaby

you a stunning new home, exceptional quality, 9 ft. ceilings, 4 bedrooms & baths, walk to Garry Point. Call Tina Gonzalez 778.837.1144 for details!

WOW! ONLY $199,000! BLUNDELL PLACE! Top to bottom remodelled 1 bedroom with a huge balcony, new kitchen, bathroom, closet organizers, flooring & paint. Call Steve Baker 778.833.1201. Marpole Vancouver

9671 Shell Road Richmond

Woodridge Estates Richmond

301-6033 Katsura Richmond

SOLD

Over 35 years of Award Winning Service & 1000 homes SOLD!


Richmond Review · Page 43

Friday, September 14, 2012

DEBBIE SHEPPARD

604-312-3705

Thinking of a Move? I can help

Jim Hinchcliffe

604.328.1164

jhinchcliffe@sutton.com Serving Richmond since 1984 sutton group - seafair realty . #550 - 9100 Blundell Road . Richmond . 604.273.3155

debbiesheppard.com

MAPLE RIDGE PRICES ◆ Come See For Yourself! OPEN SUNDAY 1-4

OPEN SATURDAY 2-4

$

398,500

$

26-19171 MITCHELL AVE, P.M. • Original detached homestead in 55+ complex • Beautifully appointed character home • Offers caretaker/inlaw accomodation • Tranquil large garden with pond and walkways • View virtual tour at MLS# V961164

OPEN SUNDAY 1-4

404,900

$

20511-124A AVE., M.R.

22972-123RD AVE., M.R. • Panoramic views of the mountains • One owner basement home, lovingly maintained • Basement fully finished, newer roof • 70 x 105 fenced lot, heat pump/air conditioner • View pictures at MLS# V960097

639,900

• Triple car garage, 8019 sq. ft. private lot • Executive neighbourhood, easy access to bridges • 3712 sq. ft. two storey with basement • Fireplace and soaker tub in ensuite • View more info at MLS#V966407

LIZ MAYAN

604-273-3155 Seafair Realty QUEEN’S GATE! | JUST LISTED! ONLY $393,000!

PEN FIRST O AY D N SU :00 2:00–4

221 - 8580 GENERAL CURRIE RD.

Bob Schmitz W E S T M A R

604.908.2045

www.bobschmitz.net 73-11491 7TH AVE.

• Beautiful view of the Gulf • 2 bdrm and den with 2 bath • Bright open floor plan • Recent updates • Newer furnace/ hot water tank • Mariner’s Village in Steveston Village • Walk to shops and trails • Asking $479,000

• great NeW Price •

Caroline To

604-812-8228 www.carolineto.com

7731 Sunnydene Rd., Rmd. • $2,080,000

Beautiful family home in Richmond’s most prestigious established neighborhood, Sunnymede. Located on a sunny south facing 80 x 117 lot this 3083 square foot home features 5 bedrooms and 3 full baths. The spacious layout includes a huge living room with skylight, newer kitchen, beautiful hardwood floors and family room with vaulted ceiling. The private northern exposed backyard is great for kids and entertaining. Sunnymede is one Richmond’s best locations. A pleasure to show!

8691 Wagner Dr., Rmd. • $918,000

2451 wEllingTon cr.

• NeW listiNg •

One of the largest floorplans – 1,229 sq.ft. Two big bedrooms, 2 full baths, new appliances. Huge kitchen with large window and sundeck for barbecues. Living & dining room are perfect for housesized furniture. Queen’s Gate is a secure, gated community with “resort” like amenities, indoor pool, sauna, gym, guest suites, pub, workshop, etc., etc.! Call Liz to View. 604-277-4479.

• Great detached home opportunity • Under $600,000 • 3 bdrm/den with 2 baths • Hot water heat • Many updates over last 8 years • Big open kitchen and family room • 50 x 110 fenced yard • Lots of parking • Easy access to Vancouver and all transit • Excellent location in Burkeville. Richmond’s other community. • Asking $599,000

Great family home in central Richmond neighborhood. Upstairs has new paint and carpet, other renovations over the years include kitchen cabinets, roof, furnace, laminate flooring, garage and huge south facing sun deck. An attractive Spanish style exterior, inside it’s functional layout features main floor living with 5 bedrooms up. North facing backyard is great for gardening! Conveniently located its minutes from South Arm Park, Broadmoor Mall and Richmond Center. One of the neighborhoods best!

new g n listi

new g n listi

534-9651 Glendower Dr., Rmd. • $418,000 Delightful 3 bedroom, 2 bath with a newly fenced 19 x 18 backyard in Glenacres Village. Loads of upgrades including windows, furnace, roof, hot water tank, granite kitchen countertops, newer kitchen, garburator, plumbing, new jacuzzi tub and flooring. Utility is included in the maintenance. Mins to transportation, South Arm Park, Broadmoor Mall, Walter Lee Elementary and McNair Secondary. A great value!

new g n listi


Page 44 - Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . . . . . . 1-8 COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . 9-57 TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61-76 CHILDREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80-98 EMPLOYMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-198 BUSINESS SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . 203-387 PETS & LIVESTOCK . . . . . . . . . . . 453-483 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE . . . . . . 503-587 REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-696 RENTALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-757 AUTOMOTIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 804-862 MARINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903-920

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

OBITUARIES

108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

114

NEED A Business loan? Now you can get up to $5million business or start up loan with an interest rate starting at 2.5%. Bankruptcy or bad credit welcome. Apply with us now at 1-866-253-7914.

Reach most sportsmen & women in BC advertise in the 2013-2015 BC Freshwater Fishing Regulation Synopsis! The largest outdoor magazine in BC, 450,000 copies plus two year edition! This is the most effective way to advertise your business in BC. Please call Annemarie at 1-800-661-6335. or email: fish@blackpress.ca

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

BRUCE, Pamela Maureen Born Rangoon, Burma, died Richmond, BC. Predeceased by loving husband Peter in Jan 2009. Survived by daughter Virginia (Ginny) Halpenny, son in law Dennis, grandson Chad, grandaughter Jacqueline (Jeremyah) and family and friends in Canada, Scotland and England. Pam was a WWII A.T.S. Vet serving as an AFV Electrician in R.E.M.E.. Pam was employed by Parks and Recreation at the Richmond Arenas for 25 yrs. The family would like to extend heartfelt thanks to Bernadette, Doni, Freda and Jean, the staff of RGH ER and Pallitive Care, VGH 6N, BCCA, and Richmond Continuing Care for their care and kindness during this difficult time. No service as requested.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

COMING EVENTS ~ Sale ~ Jewelry, Watch & Designer Collections Saturday, Sept. 15th 9:30 am to 4 pm

Industrial Equipment Manufacturing Ltd. designs and manufactures bulk materials handling equipment typically used in mining, forestry and oil sands. The business has been in operation since 1955 and is located in the Port Kells area of Surrey. IEM has an attractive remuneration package including an employee ownership program.

• LOCAL DRIVERS

Steel Fabricator

125

FOSTER/SOCIAL CARE

Labourer The successful candidate will have a valid forklift certificate, and material handling experience in a steel fabrication shop. Millwright type experience will be an asset. To apply submit resume by Email to jwurz@iem.ca or fax to 604-513-9905 INDUSTRY Training Authority (www.itabc.ca) is hiring Full Time CSR’s. Starting salary of $16.82 per hour + excellent benefits. Send resume to dpattani@itabc.ca. Strictly no phone calls.

111A

CHILDCARE

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

CHILD CARE PROVIDER

108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

Honey Bear Childcare Ltd. Hiring Child Care Provider. Wage $10.25/hr. Mail – 2311, Gagnon Place, Richmond BC V6X 1W9 or Fax 604-447-4334

Attention: We need serious & motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet/phone essential. Free online training.www.trainerforfreedom.com

EDUCATION

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. NO Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. Apply online! IHEschool.com 1-866-399-3853

Machinist

Hospice Cottage Charity Shoppe

1521- 56 St. Tsawwassen

Our organization is committed to employment equity and encourages applications from Aboriginal people, members of visible minority groups and women.

The successful candidate will have at least 5 years experience using manual machines. Experience assembling bearings and doing drive alignments will be an asset.

The successful candidate will have at least 5 years experience as a steel fabricator.

bcclassified.com

• FAST-CARDED

Requirements/Qualifications: · Valid BC issued Class 1 license & min. one (1) year of safe driving experience · Driver’s abstract · Knowledge of HOS / DOT regulations · Professional in appearance

Some great kids aged 12 to 18 who need a stable, caring home for a few months. Are you looking for the opportunity to do meaningful, fulfilling work? PLEA Community Services is looking for qualified applicants who can provide care for youth in their home on a full-time basis or on weekends for respite. Training, support and remuneration are provided. Funding is available for modifications to better equip your home. A child at risk is waiting for an open door.

HELP WANTED

JOB FAIR

(Washington and Oregon)

WE OFFER; • STEADY F/T WORK • COMPETITIVE WAGES • EXTENDED MEDICAL & DENTAL BENEFITS • OPPORTUNITIES FOR ADVANCEMENT

130

WAREHOUSE POSITIONS

• HIGHWAY

(BC Interior, AB. & Sask.)

115 Industrial Equipment Manufacturing Ltd. Positions Available

HELP WANTED

CLASS 1 TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED

Please submit resume & current drivers abstract to: bccareers @canadacartage.com or fax: 604-888-5887

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

130

An Alberta Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilfield road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051.

F/T FORKLIFT OPERATOR NEEDED Min. 32hrs/wk. Must have a valid ticket. Send resume to: supervisor1@surreyleader.com JOBS! JOBS! JOBS! No experience necessary, we will train. Must be 18+yrs. of age and be available F/T. 604-435-2345 Email:info@skynyx.ca RICHMOND Food Co. req’s a permanent F/T late afternoon janitor. Fax resume 604-275-1682

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

London Drugs Distribution Centre 12831 Horseshoe Place (off Horseshoe Way) Richmond, BC V7A 4X5 Tuesday - Sept. 18th Hours: 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Long term warehouse positions available for various shifts. Must be comfortable working in fast paced repetitive environment. Comfortable lifting up to 50 pounds. Available to work weekends. Criminal background check required. Please bring your resume, two pieces of valid ID and two work related references. If you have any questions please email: jkhakh@is2.ca

HELP WANTED

Customer Service Rep/Estimator Van Press Printers div. of Black Press has an opening in our Burnaby office for a detail & customer-oriented Customer Service Rep./Estimator to support our Sales Rep. The CSR will be the main contact in addressing and solving customer needs. Key Responsibilities: • Coordinate with customer, production and outside vendors • Ability to analyze information and perform costeffective, production efficient quotes and work closely with our sales rep to advise and provide solutions to customer requirements • Confer with production staff to develop resolutions to production challenges • Communicate with new and current customers to help generate sales • Ensure customer deliveries are met • Handle client calls regarding quality, new items and delivery status Requirements: • Min. 4 years customer service experience in web printing • Excellent computer skills (Word, Excel, Outlook) with attention to detail • Exceptional organization and prioritizing skills • Excellent communication & interpersonal skills to develop a strong bond with a variety of internal & external customers • Ability to multi-task and manage time efficiently and under strict deadlines • Positive attitude, self-motivated and energy to maintain enthusiasm This is a part-time, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm, Tuesday to Thursday position but will require some flexibility to work extended hours when necessary. This position offers a competitive compensation and attractive benefits package. If you describe yourself as a team player, enthusiastic, possess a high level of integrity and the willingness to make a significant contribution, we invite you to apply for this opportunity by emailing your resume to:

paulbrzeski@vanpressprinters.com

LOOKING FOR A NEW JOB?

www.blackpress.ca > www.bclocalnews.com

160

TRADES, TECHNICAL

NOW HIRING!!!

PARTS REPRESENTATIVE

10 Customer Service positions available! Up to $20.00/hr paid weekly Must work well with others!!! Call Erica 604 777 2195

P & R Western Star & Freightliner Trucks in Duncan, BC requires a full time parts representative. Applicant must have thorough knowledge of heavy duty truck and trailer parts.

Required for an Alberta Trucking Company. One Class 1 Driver. Must have a minimum of 5 years experience pulling low boys and driving off road. Candidate must be able to pass a drug test and be willing to relocate to Edson, Alberta. Scheduled Days Off. Call Lloyd 780-723-5051

Excellent benefit and wage package to successful candidate.

138

WORK with water pumps, willingness to learn and understand technical instructions, attention to details, capable of working in a fastpaced environment and willing to go the extra mile. Fax resume to: 604324-0086

142 OFFICE SUPPORT/CLERKS FRONT DESK COUNTER PERSON w/computer knowledge & exp in Simply Acct & able to speak Punjabi/Hindi. Fax 604-247-1473 email richmondcabinets@gmail.com

130

Please fax or e-mail resume to 250-746-8064 or michele@prwstar.com

163

VOLUNTEERS

The British Columbia Press Council

LABOURERS

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Make it yours. Call 604-708-2628 www.plea.bc.ca

Use bcclassified.com - Employment Section 100’s

130

HELP WANTED

is seeking three persons to serve as public directors on its 11-member Board of Directors. Public Directors serve two-year terms and are eligible to serve four terms. A nominal per diem is paid for meetings. Candidates should have a record of community involvement and an interest in print and online media issues. Applications together with names of two references and telephone numbers should be submitted by Sept. 30, 2012, to: The B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby, Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. See www.bcpresscouncil.org for information about the Press Council.

130

HELP WANTED

Kids and Adults Needed

Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either! Deliver 2x week, Wednesdays and Fridays, right in your neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.

Call Roya 604-247-3710

or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com

Route 15101018

Boundaries

Number of Papers

Capstan Way, Regina Ave, Stolberg St

53

14701362 Armstrong St, Breden Ave, Bridge St, General Currie Rd, Shields Ave 71 14500461

Foster Rd, McMath Rd

44

14500451

Carmichael St, Cullen Cres, Lismer Ave, Gate

88

14302277

8000 Blk of Railway Ave

24

14401544

10000 Blk No 4 Rd

65

14302320

8000 Blk of No 2 Rd

78

14301274

Cormorant Crt, Steveston Hwy

52

14303630

Buttermere Dr, Pl, Kimberley Dr, Monashee Dr, ThirlmereDr

94

Kids and Adults Needed

Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either! Deliver 2x week, Wednesdays and Fridays, right in your neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.

Call JR 604-247-3710

or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com

Route 14100170 14202010 14202012 14202011 14202022 14201154 14901174 14903081 14203153

Boundaries

Number of Papers

Regent St (Steveston) Barmond Ave, Newmond Rd, Oakmond Rd Trumond Ave, Wellmond Rd Desmond Ave/ Rd, Earlmond Ave Diamond Rd 5000 blk Williams Rd 5000 Blk Blundell Rd Robson Dr, Barnard Dr Claybrook Rd, Claysmith Rd, Coldfall Rd, Crt

87 79 51 56 44 71 62 60 73


Friday, September 14, 2012 PERSONAL SERVICES 182

FINANCIAL SERVICES

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

188

Richmond Review - Page 45

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES 287

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES 329 PAINTING & DECORATING

DANICO CONSTRUCTION LTD. ALL KINDS OF RENOVATIONS

A-TECH Services 604-230-3539

Additions/Extensions

(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls Cloverdale Premium quality paint. NO PAYMENT until Job is completed. Ask us about our Laminate Flooring & Maid Services.

BASEMENTS KITCHENS & BATHS HARDWOOD FLOORS FINISH CARPENTRY SPECIALISTS Over 25 Years Exp. DanicoConstruction.com

LEGAL SERVICES

CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES 356

Running this ad for 8yrs

RUBBISH REMOVAL

3 rooms for $299, 2 coats any colour

• Estate Services • Electronics • Appliances • Old Furniture • Construction • Yard Waste • Concrete • Drywall • Junk • Rubbish • Mattresses & More!

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

www.paintspecial.com

604.587.5865

A-1 PAINTING CO. 604.723.8434 Top Quality Painting. Floors & Finishing. Insured, WCB, Written Guarantee. Free Est. 20 Years Exp.

www.recycleitcanada.ca

bradsjunkremoval.com

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

Haul Anything...

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

604.

206

REPAIR FRIDGES, Stoves, washers, dryers, d/w’s & garberators. Plumbing. Reas. 604-916-6542

218

BUSINESS/ OFFICE SERVICE

WE WILL design a sleek professional website for your business. Call us at 604-307-6489. YOU NEED IT!

242

But Dead Bodies!!

MILANO PAINTING & RENOS. Int./Ext. Prof. Painters. Free Est. Bonded & Insured. 604-551-6510

APPLIANCE REPAIRS

CONCRETE & PLACING

DBathrooms DKitchens DCountertop Replacement DEntrance Doors DFrench Doors DSiding DSundecks DLaminate Floors DEnclosures DCeramic Tile DCustom Mouldings DReplacement Windows DInterior Painting

WE GUARANTEE no-hassle Service Backed by Professional Installation and our no-nonsense Home Improvement Warranty

PLACING & Finishing * Forming * Site Prep, old concrete removal * Excavation & Reinforcing * Re-Re Specialists 34 Years Exp. Free Estimates.

Call: Rick (604) 202-5184

CALL FOR A FREE IN HOME ESTIMATE

STAMPED CONCRETE FPatios FPool Decks FSidewalks FDriveways FForming FFinishing FRe & Re All Your Concrete Needs 30yrs exp. Quality workmanship Fully Insured

Rona Building Centre 7111 Elmbridge Way Richmond, BC

PLUMBING

MIN. EXPRESS PAGING SYSTEM Reasonable Rates 604-270-6338 10% OFF if you Mention this AD! *Plumbing *Heating *Reno’s *More Lic.gas fitter. Aman: 778-895-2005

341

PRESSURE WASHING HANDYMAN - 604-518-4778 WCB & Liability Insured. www.lwrestoration.com

Call Ian 604-724-6373

AT SKY VIEW ROOFING LTD Lic. & Ins. Exc. Refs. 10% Discount 604-317-4729 skyviewroofing1.com

FIVE STAR ROOFING All kinds of re-roofing & repairs. Free est. Reasonable rates. (604)961-7505, 278-0375

GL ROOFING. Cedar shakes, Asphalt Shingles, Flat roofs, WCB Clean Gutters. $80. 604-240-5362

320

MOVING & STORAGE

1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING. Real Professionals, Reasonable. Rates. Different From the Rest. 604-721-4555. ABE MOVING - $35/Hr. Per Person *Reliable Careful Movers. *Rubbish Removal. *24 Hours. 604-999-6020

Mainland Roofing Ltd. 25 yrs in roofing industry

Family owned & operated. Fully insured. We do Cedar Shakes, conversions, concrete tiles, torchon, fibreglass shingles, restoration & repairs. 20 yr labour warranty. 604-723-2626 www.mainlandroof.com

Local & Long Distance

$45/Hr

From 1, 3, 5, 7,10 Ton Trucks Licenced ~ Reliable ~ 1 to 3 Men Free estimate/Seniors discount Residential~Commercial~Pianos

604-537-4140 GET the best for your moving 24/7 From $40/hr Licensed & Insured Senior Discount 778-773-3737 SPARTAN Moving Ltd. Fast & Reliable. Insured Competitive rates. Wknd Specials. Call Frank: (604) 435-8240

329 PAINTING & DECORATING HOME IMPROVEMENTS

356

RUBBISH REMOVAL

21 Years Serving Rmd. Residential & Commercial Clean Courteous Service FREE ESTIMATES Joe 604-250-5481

DISPOSAL BINS Residential & Commercial Services

“ ABOVE THE REST “ Interior & Exterior Unbeatable Prices & Professional Crew. • Free Est. • Written Guarantee • No Hassle • Quick Work • Insured • WCB

778-997-9582

604-726-0503 RESIDENTIAL-RES & comm. 25 years exp. Large or small job welcome. Drywall painting & tiles. Free estimates. Refs. 604-722-4411

PETS PETS

• Portable Toilets • Fencing • Containers • Waste Management • Storage

Immaculate Workmanship Int/Ext. ~ Reasonable Rates

We Recycle! GO GREEN!

Free Estimates 21 Years Experience

www.EconPro.com 604-882-2733

K.D.P. PAINTING

CATS OF ALL DESCRIPTION in need of caring homes! All cats are Spayed, neutered, vaccinated and dewormed. Visit us at fraservalleyhumanesociety.com or call 1 (604)820-2977 DALMATIANS, 3M, born july 9, ckc reg., shots, dewormed, $1000-$1500. (604)793-5130, (604)723-2232

Exceptional P.B black lab puppies, 2 fem, 1 male, 1 golden male Born July 27, $650, 604-795-0686 KITTENS & CATS for adoption. Call Catcare Vet Clinic, full service hospital, appt to view 604-277-8511 LAB/SHEPHERD/ROTTI x pups, 9 weeks, shots/deworm, 2 males/2 females, $495. Call (604)864-1004 NEED A GOOD HOME for a good dog or a good dog for a good home? We adopt dogs! Call 604856-3647 or www.856-dogs.com

Richmond- Garage Sale Saturday September 15 8:00am- 3:00pm 3920 Bargen Drive

MATTRESSES starting at $99 • Twins • Fulls • Queens • Kings 100’s in stock! www.Direct Liquidation.ca (604)294-2331

560

Misc., Golf Clubs & Equip, Hsehld Goods, Garden Furn. & Equip, Kitchen, Books & More!

MISC. FOR SALE

Richmond

MOM’S UNITE (Kids Stuff) SWAP MEET

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper?

Sunday, Sept. 30, 10am-1pm Free Admission - Over 75 Tables South Arm Community Centre 8880 Williams Road Ph: 604-718-8060

566 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS ALTO CONN SAX $595. Tenor Sax $595. 604-859-5925

Richmond, Yard & Moving Sale. Sat Sept 15th, 9am-2pm 35398 McKinley Dr. (bsmt ste) No early birds.

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS bcclassified.com

REAL ESTATE HOUSES FOR SALE

PRESTIGIOUS BROADMOOR, walk everywhere. Big corner lot + lane. 4000+ sq. ft. w. great bones and floor plan. Perfect opportunity for someone who is not looking to build but wants to personalize this huge 21 year old house. Triple garage, 5 bedrooms up and sauna. Call 604-763-1063.

627

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES! Older House • Damaged House Moving • Estate Sale • Just Want Out • Behind on Payments Quick Cash! • Flexible Terms! CALL US FIRST! 604-626-9647

626

HOUSES FOR SALE

626

HOUSES FOR SALE

626

HOUSES FOR SALE

Sell your Home!

with the &laVViÀeG

Power Pack…

Sell your home FAST in the highest read community newspapers & largest online sites!

P/B Choc. lab puppies, 4 F. left, born June 27, CKC reg. vet✓ $700. 604-217-6551 or 604-825-1730.

LiPiteG Time Offer!

ONLY

ROTTI / PRESA cross. 2F / 3M Vet checked, 1 shots, dewormed. Born July 7. $250 obo. 778-242-6791

#1 AAA Rubbish Removal

10% OFF when you Mention this ad HARDI RENO SVS. *Plumbing *Tile *Drywall*Paint*More! 778-865-4072

FINISH CARPENTER Finish Carpentry-Mouldings, sundecks, stairs, siding, painting, drywall. Refs. Rainer cel 604-613-1018

www.treeworksonline.ca treeworkes@yahoo.ca 10% OFF with this AD

CATS GALORE, TLC has for adoption spayed & neutered adult cats. 604-309-5388 / 604-856-4866

AFFORDABLE MOVING

287

604-787-5915, 604-291-7778

477

604-720-9244

GARDENING SERVICES 21 yrs exp. Tree topping, pruning, trimming, power raking, aeration, cleanup. $15/up. Michael 604-240-2881

Tree removal done RIGHT! • Tree & Stump Removal • Certified Arborists • 20 yrs exp. • 60’ Bucket Truck • Crown Reduction • Spiral Pruning • Land Clearing • Selective Logging ~ Fully Insured • Best Rates ~

BORDER COLLIE PUPPIES P/B. black & white, male & fem. Vet chk, 1st shots, $500 ea. Loving homes needed. Call 604-250-4360

Expert In Electrical Repairs & Troubleshooting • Panel Upgrades • Reno’s * Guart. Work * Licensed * Bonded * BBB Approved ~ No job too small ~

FURNITURE

A New Pillowtop Mattress Set Still in Packaging! Can Deliver! $100 - Call: 604-484-0379

626

353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

SCOTGUARD ELECTRICAL LTD.

548

GARAGE SALES

MOVING Sale! Everything must go! Selling home furniture, home appliances, clothes, shoes. Open at 8am - 1pm on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 15th and 16th at Fastrade Bindery Inc #1 & 2 - 12800 Bathway Gate Richmond (close to Richmond Ikea)

WEED FREE Mushroom Manure $160/13 yds or Well Rotted $180/10 yds. Free Delivery Richmond area. 604-856-8877

TREE SERVICES

SAME DAY SERVICE AVAILABLE

ELECTRICAL

GARDENING

374

551

FERTILIZERS

Rubbish Removal, Caring for the Earth. Professional Quality Service at Great Rates. 604-787-8782

POWER WASHING GUTTER CLEANING

Mike 604-789-5268

533

RECYCLE YOUR JUNK!

TRY A BCCLASSIFIED.COM CLASSIFIED AD. THEY ARE INEXPENSIVE AND THEY WORK HARD!

DRYWALL

281

FREE! Scrap Metal Removal...FREE!!!

T & K Haulaway

DRYWALL

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call Lic #89402 Same day guarn’td We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

Serving The Lower Mainland Since 1988

778-233-4949

Reliable Work ❖ Res. & Comm.

260

220.JUNK(5865)

*Appliances *BBQs *Exercise Equip *Cars/Trucks/Trailers *Hotwater Tanks *Furnaces * Restaurant Equipment All FREE pickup!

604-244-9153

Danny 778 - 565 - 4797

257

338

PETS

RECYCLE-IT!

On Time, As Promised, Service Guaranteed!

604-313-8050

477

SHEP/ROTT/BOER BOEL MASTF 4Male 1Fem, born Jul10, 1st shots, dewormed, vet checkd, fam. raised. $500. Call 1-604-869-9905 (Hope).

JUNK REMOVAL Recycled Earth Friendly

PAINT SPECIAL

PETS

SURREY: 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, hardwood floors throughout and new roof. $549,000. 604-575-5555.

3-LINE EXAMPLE

Size not exactly as shown

$

12

Power Pack iQcluGeV 5ichmoQG 5eYiew PRINT AD: Includes photo and 3-lines for one week. %&&laVViÀeG.com ONLINE AD: BC-wide reach! For one week! 8S('9aQcouYer.com ONLINE AD: Local reach — until you cancel it!

call 604.575-5555


Page 46 - Richmond Review

Friday, September 14, 2012

HOME SERVICE GUIDE PLUMBING & HEATING

the richmond

REVIEW

BULK DELIVERIES We deliver up to 3 yards of soil and bark and up to 1 yard of sand.

t1MVNCJOH4FSWJDF3FQBJST t#PJMFST'VSOBDFT t(BT8PSL

To

HOT WATER TANKS Installed from $699

604-868-7062

Call 604-278-9580

GARBAGE/JUNK REMOVAL

PLUMBING/HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Westwind HOME IMPROVEMENTS

SUPPORT LOCAL

Green Dragon Services

185-9040 BLUNDELL ROAD, RICHMOND

Truck Mounted Systems

640

RECREATIONAL

Sun Peaks Duplex For Sale

706

APARTMENT/CONDO

2 BD, 1bth Chlwk suite for rent. No smk. no pets. $700/mnth. Call Gerry 604-861-7560 QUIET Building, 2 bdrm apt w/balcony, ht, hw, cable, prkg, storage,elevator, steps to all transit, schools, and shops, NS, NP, Avail Now, Lease RMD 604-241-3772 frm $995.

Each side: $449,000 5 bdrms. 3 bath, front & back decks. Exc. revenue opportunity We work with agents! 604-626-7100 www. northrockhomes.ca/peak-2-creek

641

TOWNHOUSES

RANCHER TOWNHOUSE in Richmond. Fully Updated. More details at: http://www.realtor.ca/index.aspx MLS #V951198

660 LANGLEY/ALDERGROVE HOMES FOR SALE-SUPER BUYS

www.dannyevans.ca

Homelife Benchmark Realty Corp. Langley

RENTALS 700

RENT TO OWN

STOP RENTINGRENT TO OWN

RICHMOND 9580 Blundell. 2 Bdrm grnd lvl ste, ns/np, avail Oct 1st. $1150/mo incl utils. OR 3 Bdrm ste $1450/mo. Call Gary 604-537-7899. RICHMOND, CAMBIE & #5 RD. 1 bdrm grd. level suite. $750. N/P. N/S. Avail. now. 604-278-1505.

Richmond 2BR fresh paint v/clean 5appl strg u/g prkg Citation Dr $1175 incl ht h/wtr NS/NP Avail now 604-304-9252, 778-230-3524

RICHMOND Cambie/Shell Reno’d 2 bdrm. NS/NP. Oct 1st. $950 incl utils./basic cbl/laund.604-270-7672.

RICHMOND, 7280 Lindsay Rd. 1 bdrm apt. $850 incl heat, h/w, 1 prkg. 604-321-9095,604-285-0668.

736

HOMES FOR RENT

3 rooms house for rent bet. No.3 & Granville close to McDonald at the low price. immed. available. interested pls. call (604)270-7808 RICHMOND WEST, 5/bdrms, 2.5 baths, 2 car garage. 7 yrs old. 2300 sq ft. Avail now. TJ @ Sutton Proact, (604)728-5460

748 SHARED ACCOMMODATION LARGE furn’d room Incl hydro, cble, shrd kit & prkg. $580. For clean, quiet person. Call 604-274-7079.

750

SUITES, LOWER

RICHMOND, 11111 Bird Rd. New clean 1 bdrm. ste, pri. prkg. no cats or dog $750 incls. utils. & cbl. Avail. now 604-273-6129 / 604-603-7936

Call Kristen 604-786-4663

RICHMOND #5 & Cambie. 1 bdrm, sep. entry. $525/mo. incl util. Close to amens. Call 604-278-7851

809

845

AUTO ACCESSORIES/ PARTS

845

847 SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

2 hr. Service www.a1casper.com (604)209-2026

2001 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 175K, fully loaded, Great cond. $5250 obo. Daniel 778-574-5081 2005 Mazda 6 Sport Wagon - 139k, 3.0 V6, 5 spd. manual, 220 hp exc. cond. BC car, dark grey w/ blk. int., no accid. sunroof, pwr. drivers seat, light duty hitch for bike rack, new clutch & starter, recent tires, car needs nothing $9500 778-861-5017

The Scrapper

HI-LITE Fiberglass Cover for 3/4 ton GMC, 6ft. 8 inch long. Pewter colour. $800 obo. 604-530-1197

810

AUTO FINANCING

851

AAA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Minimum $150 cash for full size vehicles, any cond. 604-518-3673

SUITES, UPPER

WANT TO REACH THE REST OF CANADA? Advertise in 600+ community newspapers across Canada. Call 604-575-5555

RICHMOND. 1 bdrm suite. Granite countertop, heated floors. Ideal for resp prof. $800/mo. incl alarm, heat, HW, cable. No laundry. N/S, N/P. Call 604-562-9054.

818

CARS - DOMESTIC

TRUCKS & VANS

2008 FORD 350, diesel. Black. 3 yr warranty left. $27,000. Call 604589-6032 or 604-807-6022.

#1 FREE SCRAP VEHICLE REMOVAL ASK ABOUT $500 CREDIT $$$ PAID FOR SOME 604.683.2200

RICHMOND 13051 Blundell, spac 2 bdrm w/sundeck, w/d, $1000 incl util. NS/NP. Sept 15. 604-728-5258

752

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

TOP CA$H PAID TODAY For SCRAP VEHICLES!

RICHMOND New 1bdr bsmt suite. Nr bus & grocery store. Avail now. $750 incl utils/cable. 604-720-4700

751

www.westwindhome.ca Fully Licensed, Insured, WCB

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

SUITES, LOWER

RICHMOND #5 near Bird Rd. 2 bdrm in new home. Lndry. prkg. ns/np $950 incl util. Avail. now. Refs. 604-214-0231 / 604-780-3793

RICHMOND,1 bdrm, cls to amenits, walk to Richmond Ctr. Heat, hot wtr incl., ns/np, $875. 778-322-0798.

• No QualiďŹ cation-Low Down • ABBOTSFORD - 2087 Lonsdale, HANDY MAN SPECIAL HOUSE, 3 bdrm. w/ 2bd. Suite,$1,388/MO.

www.ReadySetOwn.ca

RENTALS 750

               

4UFBN$MFBOJOHt$BSQFU6QIPMTUFSZ$PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM PS

“HAUL ANYTHING‌BUT DEAD BODIES!â€?

RENTALS

Call George 778 886-3186

Plumbing * Heating * Electrical * Carpentry * Painting * Tiling

4 SAME DAY SERVICE!

REAL ESTATE

email: admin@richmondreview.com

CARPET CLEANING

BradsJunkRemoval.com 6 220.JUNK(5865) 0 OVER 2O YEARS SERVICE

604-247-3700

P L A N T L A N D

Licensed, Insured & Bonded Local Plumbers www.1stcallplumbing.ca

advertise in the

Home Service Guide Call

Autos • Trucks • Equipment Removal FREE TOWING 7 days/wk. We pay Up To $500 CA$H Rick Goodchild 604.551.9022

818

818

CARS - DOMESTIC

CARS - DOMESTIC

Sell your Car!

TOWNHOUSES

RICHMOND QUEENSGATE GARDENS Conveniently Located

with the &laVViÀeG

Close to schools & public transportation. Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm townhouses. 6 Appl’s., balcony, 2 car garage, 2 full baths, gas f/p. 1 Year lease required. No Pets. Professionally Managed by Colliers International Call 604-841-2665

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0� Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557 GUARANTEED

Auto

Loans

1-888-229-0744

or

apply

at:

www.

greatcanadianautocredit.com

Power Pack‌

Sell your vehicle FAST in the highest read community newspapers & largest online sites!

LiPiteG Time Offer!

ONLY

818

CARS - DOMESTIC

1995 BUICK LE SABRE - loaded, 92K, Air Cared, No accident. Like new! $3700obo 778.565.4230

838

RECREATIONAL/SALE

1977 DODGE CAMPER VAN - exc. cond. all working cond. $3850 obo. Must See! (604)599-3835 1992 Class A 34ft WINNEBAGO ELANTE motorhome, 454 Chev motor, only 42,000miles. Low profile, awning, generator, air compressor backup camera, 2 TV’s & many other extras. This is a top of the line motorhome in top shape. Asking $21,000. Call 604-536-2899. 1998 Slumber Queen. AUTUMN SPECIAL! Immaculate light weight 8’ camper. Toilet, sink stove, furnace, a/c converter, 3 way fridge. Queen bed. Comes w/full propane tank, 12V electrical cord & rear step. $5,950: Tom 604-807-0209

845

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

Metal Recycling Ltd. We Pay CA$H For •Auto •Scrap Metals •Batteries •Machinery •Lead

Scotty 604-313-1887

2010 VENZA: Like new, only 20,000 kms, fully loaded, automatic, 6 cylinder, dvd system. $22,800. 604-575-5555.

3-LINE EXAMPLE

Size not exactly as shown

$

12

Power Pack iQcluGeV 5ichmoQG 5eYiew PRINT AD: Includes photo and 3-lines for one week. %CClaVViÀeG.com ONLINE AD: BC-wide reach! For one week! 8S('9aQcouYer.com ONLINE AD: Local reach — until you cancel it!

call 604.575-5555


Friday, September 14, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 47

Visit our website to check out and register for hundreds of parks, recreation and cultural programs.

kudos

www.richmond.ca/ register

G&F Financial Group co-CEO Jeff Shewfelt and West Richmond Branch Judy Lau present a $3,000 cheque to representatives from the Seafair Hockey Association. The presentation was made during Saturday’s grand opening of its newest branch at No. 1 Road and Francis. The War Amps Child Amputee (CHAMP) Program know the consequences of unsafe play. Many have lost limbs in accidents or know fellow Champs who have. They are accentuating the positive, however, by using their experience to pass on the PLAYSAFE message with a unique “kids-to-kids” approach. Local residents saw this message in action recently when area Champs joined The War Amps PLAYSAFE/ DRIVESAFE float in the Steveston Salmon Festival Parade. Along with fellow Champs, Richmond residents Owen Greaves, 10, a left hand amputee, and James Kwaksistala, 8, a right leg amputee, rode the float as Safety Ambassadors, while another Champ walked alongside the float as a Safety Walker.

Kudos is a weekly feature showcasing announcements, achievements and good deeds happening around town. E-mail submissions to news@richmond review.com

Sea Island-based UPS recently donated $31,600 to Odd Squad Productions Society, which will use the cash for its drugs and gangs prevention and education program. The society educates youth on the dangers of drug use and criminal behaviour through documentary film work, educational presentations and peer-topeer mentoring workshops. Pictured left to right: Odd Squad founding member and Vancouver Police Sgt. Toby Hinton; society president and retired police superintendent Rob Rothwell; Odd Squad founding member and Vancouver Police Sgt. Mark Steinkampf; the society’s Doug Charlton; Heather Moralek of UPS; and founding member of the society Chris Graham.

Kelly Dean and her family took a trip to Disneyland and Disney California Adventure and remembered to bring their favourite local newspaper with them. Kelly poses with her kids Melissa and Jason.


The Honda

MODEL

CLEAROUT

Up to

$

31,630

Or

INNER W Best of

bchonda.com **

INCLUDES FREIGHT AND PDI.

ALL OUR 2012’S ARE PRICED TO DISAPPEAR.

$4,000

ODYSSEY CR-V

STARTING FROM

STARTING FROM

$

27,630 **

INCLUDES FREIGHT AND PDI.

0.99%

RICHMOND

REVIEW

the richmond

2012

604-207-1888 604.638.0497

LEASE OR FINANCE.

Cash Purchase Incentive on select 2012 trucks.

Model YK1F5CKNZ

RIDGELINE PILOT

STARTING FROM

STARTING FROM

$

INCLUDES FREIGHT AND PDI.

36,630 **

$

#

HIGH RESALE VALUE. LOW COST OF OWNERSHIP. AFFORDABLE. RELIABLE. FUEL EFFICIENT. ADVANCED SAFETY. FUN TO DRIVE.

THE ONGOING BENEFITS OF OWNING A HONDA

Model RL5H9CK Model RM4H9CKN(S) Model YF4H9CKN

INCLUDES FREIGHT AND PDI.

36,560 **

¥*

on select new 2012 Honda trucks.

**MSRP is $36,730/$43,730/$50,160/$48,730 including freight and PDI of $1,640 based on a new 2012 CR-V Touring model RM4H9CKN(S)/ Ridgeline Touring model YK1F5CKNZ/ Pilot Touring model YF4H9CKN/ Odyssey Touring model RL5H9CK. ¥0.99% finance offer is based on a 36 mos./48 mos./48 mos./36 mos. term. Finance example based on a new 2012 CR-V LX AWD model RM4H3CE(S) and a 36 month finance term available only through Honda Canada Finance Inc. O.A.C.: $29,730 at 0.99% per annum equals $802.05 a month for 36 months. Freight and PDI of $1,640 included. Cost of borrowing is $436.20, for a total obligation of $28,873.80 Down payment of $5,000, first monthly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at finance inception. Offer includes freight & PDI. Taxes are extra. Finance on approved credit for qualified customers only. For all offers license, insurance, applicable taxes and registration are extra. Dealer may sell for less. Dealer trade may be required. *0.99% lease offer is based on a 24 mos./36 mos./36 mos./24 mos term. Lease example based on a new 2012 CR-V LX AWD model RM4H3CE(S) and a 24 month lease term available only through Honda Canada Finance Inc. O.A.C.: 0.99% lease APR for 24 months O.A.C. Monthly payment, including freight and PDI, is $398.00. Down payment of $2,492.32, first monthly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $12,044.32. 48,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. #$4,000 Honda cash purchase incentive is available on select 2012 trucks. Honda cash purchase incentive will be deducted from the negotiated price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease or finance offers. Dealer may sell for less. Dealer trade may be required. For all offers license, insurance, applicable taxes and registration are extra. Dealer may sell for less. Dealer trade may be required. **/¥/*/# Offers valid from September 1st through 30th, 2012 at participating Honda retailers. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.

Page 48 · Richmond Review Friday, September 14, 2012


Richmond Review, September 14, 2012  

September 14, 2012 edition of the Richmond Review

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