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OAK BAYNEWS Quidam brings magic Cirque du Soleil turns Memorial Centre upside Page A15 down.

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NEWS: Tracking Medal of Honor recipients /A3 ARTS: UVic student’s film screens at TIFF /A14 SPORTS: Major rugby championship landed /A18

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

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Watch for breaking news at www.oakbaynews.com

Berry bonanza Martin Anderson looks for the plumpest blackberries as he braves the brambles on the corner of Cadboro Bay Road and Cedar Hill X Road. Anderson picks as many of the berries as he can and freezes them to eat with his cereal during the winter months. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Offering sight earns Oak Bay man award CNIB volunteer recognized for more than 20 years of giving Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

The CNIB (formerly Canadian National Institute for the Blind) office on Richmond Road has a library named for Bob Carter. The annex is called Carter-Ainsworth. It’s a tribute to Carter and his partner of 45 years Frank Ainsworth. The weather drew them to Oak Bay from

Toronto 22 years ago. They moved in July, He started reading books onto tape – and by November both were signed up with despite not being big on reading – and proOak Bay Volunteer Services. “When you’re gressed to being a right hand document retired and relocate you man for Phil Crowson. don’t have the friends you “He’s done a lot for me,” “It makes you left, so you go looking for said Crowson, who’s in contact,” Carter said. charge of intake and referappreciate your own Not long after, he was for Vancouver Island situation. That you have ral inspired by a longtime Regional District of the friend losing her vision to your sight.” CNIB. “He’d read things add the CNIB to his volunfrom client files to me - Bob Carter teer duties. and helps fill in the client “Volunteering is a twoform.” way thing,” he said. “You meet so many As a sighted aide, he set up a file system people and get to understand their happi- and continues to organize those files for the ness and problems.” busy Crowson, who nominated Carter for

OAK

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tomf@vreb.bc.ca

the award. “It makes you appreciate your own situation. That you have your sight,” Carter said. “Now they’re changing the computers and systems so there isn’t quite the need for sighted help there used to be.” There’s still work for the sighted volunteers in creating welcome packages for the increasing clientele. “He comes in now and helps me do mailouts and other things for clients,” Crowson said. PLEASE SEE: Volunteer honoured by award, Page A4

This home has it all, completely renovated top to bottom to the highest standards, successfully creating an open floor plan. Features include a wonderful master bedroom with 2 more bedrooms on the main, a dream kitchen, beautiful HW floors, custom trim and detail throughout. The home is very bright and spacious and flows wonderfully into the AMAZING private, sunny, west facing park like grounds. Enjoy outdoor entertaining conveniently located off the kitchen on the fabulous slate tile deck ideally situated with SW exposure. The home sits on a quiet cul-de-sac on a 17,284sq.ft private lot located in a very desirable Oak Bay location. The lower level is finished to a high standard as well offering a 4th bedroom, family room with lots of room for the in-laws. Offered at $1,090,000

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A2 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

www.oakbaynews.com • A23

OAK BAY NEWS -Wednesday, September 5, 2012

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www.oakbaynews.com • A3

OAK BAY NEWS -Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Honour obsession and

Bart Armstrong is the lone historian hunting down stories of long forgotten Canadians who received the U.S. Medal of Honor

Natalie North News staff

B

art Armstrong sits alone at a table for four in the cafeteria of the Black Ball ferry. In front of him: a bag of chips, a pop and a book on the Civil War. It’s a history trap. As passengers look for seats, he invites them to join. They talk about the weather and other mundane chit chat. He asks if they have a link to someone in the military. Most do. “Tell me all about the Medal of Honor,” he says and sits back as his new table mates fumble through a definition of the honour. “For the next hour-and-a-half, they’ll get a lecture from me,” he says with a smile bursting beneath his grey moustache. Armstrong doesn’t have a U.S. Medal of Honor, but he has discovered many. The 63-year-old tirelessly researches forgotten recipients of the award – Canadians, or would-be Canadians, laid to rest often without recognition from their own country of the battles they fought in the U.S. Civil War. When Armstrong began his research 12 years ago, there were 54 known Canadian recipients of the Medal of Honor. His work has unearthed another 50. In his Shelbourne Street apartment, he wades through ancestry websites and newspaper articles from the 1860s, contacts museums and archives at cities and towns across the U.S. He speaks with people such as Diane Clarke at the Victoria Genealogical Society, who through her time spent chasing down vital records for Armstrong, has come to know him as “a bit off the wall, funny, and very passionate.” Around Armstrong’s tiny home office – warmly referred to as the Canadian satellite office by members of the American Medal of Honor Historical Society, of which he is the sole Canadian member – sits evidence of his obsession. File folders upon file folders, scrawled notes on sticky paper and a tiny hot plate, just big enough for a single mug of coffee, flank his computer station. Armstrong plunks down in front of his oversized monitor to tell me the story of those whose award has gone unrecognized or remembered by anyone, including the Canadian government.

Forgotten heroes May, 1863: the 99th Illinois infantry battles at Vicksburg – a bloodbath that leaves the entire

“(Armstrong has) connected families to their ancestors who were war heroes and they didn’t even know.” –Merv Scott Victoria Genealogical Society les, Armstrong stopped a man clad in U.S. Coast Guard garb. He asked this man if he knew the story of Douglas Munro, the only member of the U.S. Coast Guard to be awarded the Medal of Honor after lodging his own boat between U.S. Marines and enemy lines during the Second World War. The coast guard member’s response was emphatic: “That’s the guy that saved 500 lives at Guadalcanal.” While Munro’s grave in Cle Elum, Wash., may list his birthplace as Vancouver, Wash., it was actually Vancouver, B.C. – Munro was a Canuck. Armstrong throws his head back and bugs out his eyes in imitation of how he saw the coast guard member react to the knowledge. Shocked, but not disappointed, he says.

Getting the word out

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Bart Armstong, in his office in his home in Saanich, works tirelessly to unearth the stories of the dozens of Canadians and British Empire citizens who received the U.S. Medal of Honor. 100 attending members of the regiment maimed or dead. Amidst a constant barrage of lead, a lone remaining troop on the Union side crests the hill advancing toward Confederate lines. “He’s too brave to kill,” the Confederates yell as the man rests his regimental colours on the parapet. The Confederates take their hats off and applaud for Quebecker, Thomas Higgins. Later they’ll jail Higgins as a prisoner of war. And for 30 years after that, they’ll remember the bravery that transcended party lines and recommend him for a Medal of Honor. Dennis Buckley, a farming kid from Lindsay, Ont., was barely 20 years old and providing for his entire family when the allure of a $300 paycheque drew him into the Civil War effort. As he captured the enemy flag, he turned to his Union comrades in the 136th New York Infantry and offered a jovial wave of motivation. Just then, a bullet ricocheted off the flagpole in his hand, struck him in the forehead and killed him instantly. Of the 10,312 Civil War soldiers buried at Marietta, Ga., only two received the Medal of Honor. Buckley, who was buried under the wrong name for 140 years, was one of them. A monument to the young soldier was erected in Lindsay in 2007 following a story about Buckley, after Armstrong alerted the local paper. But a handful of new monuments scattered across the coun-

try isn’t Armstrong’s aim. He won’t rest until he publishes his findings in a book, though he has no publisher, or even a manuscript. “The goal is to have widespread dissemination of information about these people who we don’t know,” says Armstrong, the only known Canadian doing this kind of historical research. “There are a hundred stories – some of them are so incredibly moving and most people in this country don’t know anything about it.”

Investigator by nature Since I met Armstrong last November, his work has advanced. He already knew that Canadians (or colonial citizens of the British Empire) fired shots on both sides of Civil War lines during the 1862 battle of the Monitor and the Merrimack, the first duel between ironclad warships fought at the mouth of the James River in Virginia. But now he knows the names of 12 Canadians who fought in the battle. “In that regiment there were no less than 39 Canadians,” Armstrong says. “I find this sad. It’s not publicly known and it’s too bad because it’s our heritage.” Armstrong’s own heritage is rooted in military service and a drive to investigate. A high school drop-out and one of five children born to military parents in Toronto, Armstrong has been a

police officer, a private investigator, a journalist and now a historian, but always an advocate for the underdog. A seeker of truths. Signs of searches spill from his office and across the suite – some told, others left unfinished. Among his papers is the acknowledgment from Canadian authorities that his work is adding to the annals of Canadian history. “Dear Mr. Armstrong, I want to thank you for drawing our attention to a historical fact of which none of us at the Embassy was aware, namely that so many Canadians have been awarded the U.S. Medal of Honor,” wrote Frank McKenna, the former Canadian ambassador to the United States during his tenure in 2005. David Frandsen, the Consul General of Canada, in a letter dated July 27 of last year, thanks Armstrong for his successful research, documentation and bringing forth the results of this work. “It is, indeed, a worthwhile effort in the preservation of a very long and proud Canadian heritage that, unfortunately, has not been widely known,” Frandsen wrote. After 17 years in the Canadian Forces, Armstrong retired as a master warrant officer. He sometimes picks up work helping a friend ship items from the U.S. and frequently visits the Port Angeles post office, another prime venue for military education. On a recent trip to Port Ange-

If he had the chance, Armstrong would have more of these story-telling sessions south of the border, but he has already sunk more than $10,000 into his work – in photocopied files and cross-country flights – and his resources are slim. Merv Scott, president of the Victoria Genealogical Society, watched Armstrong miss an opportunity in March to travel to Washington D.C. during the 150th anniversary of the first awarding of the Medal of Honor. The man with what Scott describes as “an unabashed passion” couldn’t afford the trip. “He’s connected families to their ancestors who were war heroes and they didn’t even know,” Scott says. “He just lives and breathes this stuff.” “If there’s a fault with Bart, it might be marketing himself,” says Michael Bourque, a friend of Armstrong’s who has seen his body of research expand over the years. “He doesn’t want any of these heroes to be forgotten.” When he unearths a tale such as that of Joseph Noil – a Nova Scotia native who earned the Medal of Honor on Boxing Day 1872 after jumping from the USS Powhattan in Portsfeld, Va., to save a drowning crew mate – he can’t help sharing. No one knows if Noil, the only black recipient of the honour, actually received the medal before he died in 1881, but Armstrong has made it his mission to get the word out now. Armstrong closes his binder of clippings and replaces it on the shelf crammed with books. “The name of my book is going to be Forgotten Heroes and I don’t know if the word ‘forgotten’ is appropriate,” Armstrong says, “because I don’t know if they were ever known.” nnorth@saanichnews.com


A4 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Exactly how much is an inch of water? And how do you measure it?

An inch of water a week – from rainfall & watering – is all the water your lawn needs to stay healthy. More than one inch of water, and you risk weak, shallow roots, and damage by fungus, weeds, diseases and pests. Get a watering gauge FREE! If you have a water bill account number in the Greater Victoria area call 250.474.9684 for a free watering gauge. Watering gauges make it easy to see how much water your lawn is getting. For more information visit www.crd.bc.ca/water or call 250.474.9684 for a Waterfacts sheet on how to measure how much water your lawn is getting. www.crd.bc.ca/water Christine van Reeuwyk/News staff

Bob Carter of Oak Bay will get a queen’s diamond jubilee award this September after more than two decades working with the CNIB.

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Volunteer honoured by award

www.oakbaynews.com

Continued from Page A1

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“It gives me the opportunity to provide the best client services I can in a short period of time. … When I promise a client something I try to deliver it as immediately as I can, and Bob coming in on a regular basis allows me to do that.” The two decades of giving

spurred Crowson to nominate Carter for the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. “He’s very meticulous and very orderly, which is good because I am too. He’s patient as far as working with me. … After 21 years, he knows what my expectations are and it’s almost like we can read each other’s minds sometimes. It’s kind of scary really,” Crowson said with

a chuckle. Carter’s artwork of Egyptian eyes hangs at the CNIB office where he’ll get the award in a Sept. 5 ceremony. It’s a twofold honour for him. “I’m a monarchist, I believe in the system. I believe it has purpose,” he said. “The other thing is, it’s just nice to be recognized.” cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

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More about the jubilee medal The new commemorative medal was created to mark the 2012 celebrations of the 60th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the throne. The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal serves to honour significant contributions and achievements by Canadians. During the year, 60,000 Canadians will be recognized.

COMMUNITY NEWS IN BRIEF

New season of singing SingYourJoy, a young adult chorus based in the Oak Bay United Church welcomes new singers this season. SingYourJoy is a nonauditioned chorus for ages 16 to 29 from all walks of life. The door is open for new singers and there is no fee. First rehearsal of the season is Monday, Sept. 10 at 7 p.m. at the Oak Bay United Church, 1355 Mitchell St.


www.oakbaynews.com • A5

OAK BAY NEWS -Wednesday, September 5, 2012

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CALL TODAY! Oak Bay • 1964 Fort St.

250.590.2932 The Corporation of the District of Oak Bay

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that all persons who deem their interest in property affected by the following bylaws will be afforded a reasonable opportunity to be heard or to present written submissions to Oak Bay Municipal Council on the matters contained therein at a Public Hearing to be held at the Oak Bay Municipal Hall, 2167 Oak Bay Avenue, Victoria, B.C., at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, September 10, 2012. Reference Map

Christine van Reeuwyk/News staff

Lily Walls, left inspired by her son Don's vision impairment volunteered more than five decades with the CNIB. The Saanich woman will be recognized for her work at a Sept. 5 tea in Victoria.

CNIB recognizes 50-year volunteer Saanich woman offers more than five decades of time Christine van Reeuwyk

sight feeling success and pride in the dishcloths Lily taught her to knit to near perfection. “I used to drive a lot,” she said with a smile. “I’m When Lily Walls started volunteering, the CNIB letting other people drive me now.” was still called the Canadian National Institute for Over the years she was in the ladies auxiliary, the Blind. In the 50-plus years since then much served as the volunteer coordinator and on the has changed, from shortening the title officially to board, among other duties. Walls was awarded CNIB in 2006 to the disappearance of residences for 52 years of volunteer service in 2008, and still for the blind run by the non-profit. attends the annual general meeting with her husThe Saanich woman started her volunteering band Gerry. career in 1955 when she registered her visually This year she’s being honoured with the CNIB impaired son Donald with the CNIB Arthur Napier Magill Distinguished in Ottawa. Her volunteering spanned Service Award – the organization’s the country, as well as decades, as highest public recognition for volthe family moved back and forth unteer services. ■ Each business across Canada over the years. “When you have the knowledge, day, CNIB’s dedicated Don recalls the impact his mom you like to pass it on because a specialists and had on people throughout her lot of people need help,” Lily said. volunteers spend more volunteer work. Once she taught “It’s a help sometimes just to know than 3,600 hours the hand alphabet to doctors and where to go for help.” empowering Canadians nurses, making the medical proLily Walls’ work will be celebrated who are blind or cess less terrifying for their deaf Sept. 5 with tea and ceremony at the partially sighted to live and blind patients. He remembers CNIB office, 2340 Richmond Rd. independently. – cnib.ca a woman miserable with her failing cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com News staff

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The legal descriptions for the properties outlined in bold on the map above are as follows: (a) Amended Lot 1 (DD155452I), Block 2, Section 28,Victoria District, Plan 1755 (b) Lot 1, Section 28, Victoria District, Plan 8380 (c) Lot 2, Section 28, Victoria District, Plan 2376, except part in Plan 8380 (d) Lot 3, Section 28, Victoria District, Plan 2376, except part in Plan 8380 (e) Lot 1, Sections 28 and 29, Victoria District, Plan 12892 (f) Lot 4, Section 28, Victoria District, Plan 2376 (g) Lot 2, Section 28, Victoria District, Plan, 8380 (h) Lot 5, Sections 28 and 69, Victoria District, Plan 2376 (i) Lot 6, Sections 28 and 69, Victoria District, Plan 2376 Bylaw No. 4570, Oak Bay Official Community Plan Bylaw, Amendment Bylaw No. 1, 2012 This bylaw will change the land use designation of 2283 Cranmore Road, identified as property (a) on the Reference Map, from Single Family to Institutional. The purpose of this bylaw is to work in concert with proposed Bylaw No. 4571 to accurately reflect the long-term use of the subject property as a parking lot for Oak Bay High School. Bylaw No. 4571, Eighty-Ninth Zoning Bylaw Amendment Bylaw, 2012 As a companion to Bylaw No. 4570, described above, this bylaw will rezone 2283 Cranmore Road, identified as property (a) on the Reference Map, from One Family Residential Use (RS-5) to General Institutional Use (P-1). Bylaw No. 4572, Ninetieth Zoning Bylaw Amendment Bylaw, 2012 Bylaw No. 4572 will amend the Zoning Bylaw with respect to all nine properties (a to i) outlined in bold on the Reference Map to allow for the construction of a new high school. This bylaw will consider all nine properties as a single lot (defined as Oak Bay High School Lands) and will add community theatre, arts facility and neighbourhood learning centre as permitted uses, and will set out where and to what extent parking, as required pursuant to the Parking Facilities Bylaw, is to be situated, along with required setbacks and permitted heights of building and structures. Bylaw No. 4573, Parking Facilities Bylaw Amendment Bylaw, No. 1, 2012 This bylaw, although not the subject of the Public Hearing, will also be considered in conjunction with the above bylaws. Bylaw No. 4573 will amend the Parking Facilities Bylaw with respect to all nine properties (a to i) outlined in bold on the Reference Map to require a total of 195 parking spaces for the Oak Bay High School Lands. Copies of the above-described bylaws, and all other background material which has been considered by Council may be inspected prior to the Public Hearing between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday, excluding holidays, from August 30, 2012 to September 10, 2012 inclusive, at the office of the Municipal Clerk, Oak Bay Municipal Hall, 2167 Oak Bay Avenue, Victoria, B.C. Loranne Hilton Municipal Clerk


A6 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Cancer kayak moves to Willows Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

Black Press file photo

Kayak for a Cure, now launching from Oak Bay, is set to raise thousands of dollars for InspireHealth.

A year of shifting tides marks the fifth annual Kayak for a Cure. After four years in Brentwood Bay, the cancer research fundraiser will launch from Willows Beach this year. “Brentwood Bay is a beautiful spot but Willows Beach is pretty nice too,” said organizer Don Lowther. The change in venue is aligned with a change in benefactor this year. For the past two years the Kayak for a Cure event in Vancouver has funded InspireHealth. “Vancouver started supporting them a couple years ago. One of the organizers in Vancouver got brain cancer and as part of his treatment went to InspireHealth. Since they opened up in Victoria I decided to support them here in town,” Lowther explained. The non-profit integrative cancer care centre

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has a clinic on Oak Bay Avenue. “I think we’re going to get more first time paddlers because it’s closer to town and it’s an area familiar to most people,” he said. The paddle is set for Sept. 9 with registration starting by 8:30 a.m. at Willows Beach. “The event day is just a relaxed paddle from Willows Beach to Gyro Park beach and back again,” Lowther said. A barbecue will wrap the event slated to end at 2 p.m. Participants can register online and canvass for donations. “We’re already up over $7,500,” Lowther said. The goal is $15,000, a little higher than previous goals. Last year the event raised $11,000 for the Canadian Cancer Society with 20 to 25 paddlers. “This year we’re aiming for between 30 and 40 but we’ll take 50 or 100,” Lowther said. For details and to register visit InspireHealth.ca and click on the Kayak for a Cure logo. cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

Party in the works for Oak Bay volunteers Oak Bay Volunteer Services celebrates 35 years this month. The anniversary party is slated for Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the Sports View lounge at the Oak Bay Recreation Centre from 2 to 4 p.m. The free public event will include live entertainment by Viva Mexico traditional dancers, a visual history presentation, and the launch of a new social media site. Oak Bay's official Town Crier, Ken Podmore, will read out the anniversary proclamation from Oak Bay council. RSVP by Sept. 10 to 250-595-1034. Learn more about the services at www.oakbayvolunteers.bc.ca. cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

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www.oakbaynews.com • A7

OAK BAY NEWS -Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Labour dispute on back burner as schools open ‘Mixed emotions’ as teachers take on full duties after a year of work-to-rule The relationship between B.C. teachers remains on the mend, but a new teachers’ contract has put discord on temporary hiatus as schools in Greater Victoria opened up this week – although not everyone was celebrating. “It’s mixed emotions for sure,” said Sean Hayes, Natalie North president of the Saanich Reporting School District Teachers’ Association. “It’s relief that we’re entering the school year in a much more settled state with the prospects of a quiet and relatively peaceful year. “That’s a relief, but we’re also not happy

because the major issues for teachers remain unchanged: oversized classes, poor support for special needs students and dwindling resources.” After a year of stalled contract negotiations and six months of work-to-rule job action culminating in a walkout last March, B.C.’s 41,000 public school teachers came to a collective agreement on June 26. The short-term contract, which is valid just until just June 2013, offered some degree of relief for Hayes. But others, such as Greater Victoria Teachers’ Association president Tara Ehrcke, stood vehemently against the plan. Though unlikely, Ehrcke said, the possibility exists of job disruptions through the fall. “There will be a lot of teachers returning to school this fall with a real sense of disappointment and that we’re also going to see some larger classes than we’ve seen in a number of years,” Ehrcke said. “I wouldn’t be surprised to see individual teachers taking a step back from some extracurricular activities, simply because they have larger

Student numbers Projected full-time students enrolment for 2012-13 ■ K-12 public schools: estimated 534,691, compared to 540,696 for the September 2011, 6,005 fewer students ■ Greater Victoria School District: 18,825, compared to 18,995 in 2011. ■ Saanich School District: an estimated 7,137, compared to 7,398 in 2011. ■ Camosun College: estimated 9,300 students for 2012-13; up two per cent from 9,100 students last year. ■ University of Victoria: Expected to surpass 20,000 this year; last year 20,199 students enrolled.

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

French Immersion teacher Julie Fisher goes through books as she cleans shelves to get ready for the new school year at Reynolds secondary school. classes and more responsibilities.” Although people are happy to be heading back to work fully and completely, Hayes said, people are upset about how the last round of bargaining went. “There may be a little holdover,” he added. During an Aug. 28 teleconference, Education Minister George Abbott said he was hoping for a much more positive, harmonious year in terms of labour relations. “We do have the second year of the twoyear agreement still to go,” Abbott said. “That will likely see, perhaps in March or April, a recommencement of bargaining discussions, but I’m hoping that this year gives us an opportunity to try to build at least a little better relationship between

government and the teachers’ federation and between government educational partners, including the teachers’ federation.” Abbott will not be involved in much of those discussions, however, since after 16 years as an MLA, he announced Thursday that he would not seek re-election in the spring. “We’ve been in the same drama for 40 years,” said Thomas Fleming, University of Victoria professor emeritus in education. “Teachers complaining about government; government saying teachers are withholding services. The dialogue doesn’t change; the actors don’t change. Essentially this dialogue is no dialogue. It’s not going any place. It’s a system built for another age.” Despite the history of unrest at the provincial level, teachers and administrators are expecting a relatively calm school year across the region. After 11 years as superintendent of the Greater Victoria School District, John Gaiptman said 2011-12 was by far the most difficult year in the role, and like others on both sides of the dispute at the local level, he’s looking forward to a smoother road ahead. “Last year was a tough year on everybody,” Gaiptman said. “This year we are really focused on the important things and the important thing is creating classes that are flexible and relevant and engaging for our students … that will be the reason for any actions we take.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

Deer report expected today Brittany Lee News staff

The Capital Regional District’s deer management advisory committee is one step closer to submitting its final report to the CRD board. The appointed citizen’s advisory group, currently consisting of 10 members after two resigned in early July and a new member, Glenn Jim of the Tseycum First Nation, was appointed July 19, is expecting to have final recommendations to the board by today (Sept. 5). “We are currently examining the draft for our final recommendations,” Jocelyn Skrlac, CAG chair, told the News in an email. The group has been meeting regularly since the beginning of May. A report to the CRD was initially expected in July, but the board decided to continue meetings in order to extend CAG discussions about possible strategies. “Because we have so many different landscapes (agricultural, rural, and urban) fairly

close to each other within the area covered by the CRD, the CAG has had to address all the management options available from the perspective of each landscape’s residents,” Skrlac said. The CAG has studied as many known practices as possible in order to find safe and effective ways to deal with deer on private property, she said, noting “there is no one solution to fit all CRD landscapes.” Possible recommendations include doing nothing; crop protec-

tion; capture and relocate; repellants; public education; controlled public hunt; professional sharpshooting; immunocontraceptives; deer-vehicle collision mitigation; capture and euthanize; hazing and frightening; and fencing. Members of the public have been able to provide their input on each management option through the CRD website since early July. The group’s final report will include short term, medium term, and long term suggestions,

with possible strategies that could be implemented almost immediately, and others within five to 10 years. “The efficacy and sustainability of control methods will also have to be monitored as the CAG’s recommendations for today’s (regional deer management strategy) may change over time,” Skrlac said. For more information about the CAG or to stay up to date with meeting minutes, see crd.bc.ca/deermanagement. reporter@vicnews.com

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Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Laura Lavin Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Oak Bay News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-598-4123 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.oakbaynews.com

OUR VIEW

Schools get back to the real job T

he summer holiday is over and school kids are back in the classrooms for another 10 months of education. Along with the ABCs and three Rs, this year they might even get report cards. This year students and their parents don’t have to worry about scrapped after-school activities or navigating the simmering tensions between teachers and administrators. In September 2011, students entered classrooms with teachers on a work-to-rule job action. Instruction didn’t stop, but teachers didn’t write report cards, wouldn’t host parentteacher conferences after school hours and in some cases, coaching for sports teams was taken over by volunteer parents. In the Saanich and Sooke school districts, for one, the administrators – principals, vice-principals, superintendents, managers – scrambled to cover watching elementary kids at recess and after school. A three-day strike in March capped off a terrible year in public education. This year classrooms are somewhat back to normal, but the labour war between teachers and government remains – especially with the issue of class size and composition. The B.C. Teachers’ Federation is suing the government to regain bargaining rights over these points, and to challenge the hated Bill 22. BCTF has a court date in December. This kind of posturing could be moot. Education Minister George Abbott said that he expects the next round of bargaining with teachers to begin next March or April 2013, mere months before next provincial election. By then Abbott, and many other high-profile Liberals, will be coasting toward retirement. This awkward gap between the start of the school year now and the likely demise of the ruling Liberal government means it could be a quiet year for labour relations in education. The BCTF won’t waste its time seriously negotiating with a lame-duck administration when it could re-start negotiations with a more labour-friendly NDP government. Outgoing Liberals will be more than happy to hand this hornet’s nest to their friends across the aisle. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@oakbaynews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Oak Bay News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

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Separating oil from manure I

was as surprised as anyone to lution identified. By far the largest hear about the plan by this news- source was oil runoff from land into paper’s owner, David Black, to drains, from oil changes, municipal begin regulatory work on and industrial wastes and an oil refinery for Kitimat. other sources: 363 million I’ll leave it to others to gallons. comment on the practiBilge cleaning and cality of that plan, and other routine ship mainwhether it would make the tenance added 137 milproposed Northern Gatelion gallons, four times way pipeline project more the tanker spill average. acceptable to B.C.’s govAir pollution from ernment and population. vehicles and industry Black Press news coverdeposited hydrocarbon age, columns, letters to the particles equal to another editor and other reader Tom Fletcher 97 million gallons; natural comments are not affected seeps added 62 million B.C. Views by this project, and there gallons; offshore drilling has been a range of views discharges accounted for expressed already. 15 million gallons. Whatever the merits of the refinSo that’s the first thing to underery idea, it has advanced the debate stand. It’s not tankers and pipelines over pipelines and the place of oil in doing most of the polluting. It’s you our society. And that’s a good thing, and me. because as someone with a basic Then there is the propaganda knowledge of chemistry and some about greenhouse gas emissions experience in oil refining, I have from the oil sands crude. Actor noticed a lot of ignorance about the Robert Redford is one of the highsubject. est-profile pitchmen for the false Today I’d like to address some notion that “tar sands” oil generates of the main misconceptions, which three times the greenhouse gases have been exploited by some oppoas conventional oil. nents. The first one is oil pollution The facts are clear. The most in general and how it gets into the widely cited source is a graph environment. prepared by Cambridge Energy A global study by the SmithsoResearch Associates, which shows nian Institution in 1995 calculated that 75 per cent of greenhouse the amount of oil making its way gases from all types of crude occur into oceans this way: when the gasoline, jet fuel and dieBig tanker spills accounted for sel are burned by the end user. 37 million gallons a year, about five Yes, there are variations in emisper cent of the total marine oil polsions on the remaining quarter.

Emissions from mined oil sands crude are slightly higher than steam extraction, which is slightly higher than conventionally drilled and pumped crude. The most greenhouse gas-intensive crude used in North America is California heavy crude, which is conventionally drilled. Burning coal produces far more greenhouse gases than oil, as University of Victoria climate scientist Andrew Weaver has calculated. Two U.S. environmental groups, including the one fronted by Redford, have lately been promoting a study that suggests oil sands crude is more corrosive to pipelines. False, says the industry, showing analysis of pipes that have carried diluted bitumen for decades. The Trans-Mountain pipeline has been carrying crude from Alberta to Burnaby and Washington state for more than 60 years. It has periodically carried heavy crude for 40 years, and diluted bitumen for 25 years. Some of that crude is refined in Washington and the gasoline and diesel barged up to supply B.C. gas stations. And of course Vancouver Island, Haida Gwaii and all other B.C. islands depend on marine fuel shipments. And let’s not forget the most common heavy oil used in B.C. It’s called asphalt. –Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Whatever the merits of the refinery ... it has advanced the debate over pipelines’


www.oakbaynews.com • A9

OAK BAY NEWS -Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Marion McGuire uses a bamboo skewer to determine lines of a house on Beach Drive during a Monterey Recreation Centre architectural drawing class. The class of about 13 students, taught by Ken Campbell, was at Willows Beach Park learning the techniques of drawing homes. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

LETTERS Saanich roads remain dangerous for cyclists Re: The future of cycling, News, Aug. 24) As one who has cycled in many countries, many cities, and in Vancouver while it developed a safe and respectful cycling infrastructure, I was shocked, dismayed, and discouraged from cycling when I moved to Saanich five years ago and discovered a deeply fragmented and dangerous cycling infrastructure. However, this summer I was hopeful when witnessing the building of a new and very safe cycle path on the east side of Cedar Hill Road in the 3500-block. My hopes are now crushed. This path is a one block wonder with no safe cycle path leading to or from the fabulous new path, and no cycle path on the west side of the street. In fact the west side of Cedar Hill Road from Cedar Hill Cross Road south is extremely dangerous for cyclists as it has uneven shoulders with numerous infrastructure hazards, for example, a drain cover that could stop a bike dead and that is located in a tight traffic pattern. I am a confident, experienced cyclist who holds my breath and prays when I head out for a ride from my home. Lynne Young Saanich

CRD deer population needs to be decreased I agree that a cull is the only option left to resolve and alleviate the pressure between humans and the deer. To restore the balance in nature it would seem to be the most humane action to take control the growing urban populations. It’s a sad situation. The growing problem has been ignored by local and provincial entities for more than 30 years. In my opinion, I don’t believe our elected representatives have acted in a responsible manner or worked toward protecting the health and well being of the animals living in our urban setting. Now the public is asked what we think we should do. I am sympathetic to both humans and animals. Hundreds of deer populate our area lots of twins and triplets again this year. Deer roam our streets day and night and do not move away when challenged at a close distance. Many seek refuge in this forested area. The number of injured deer has increased with over the years. We’ve also noticed deer appetites

have changed. They devour every bite of greenery if it’s not protected in some manner. So, to preserve and restore the natural plants on our property, we put net around the backyard. This problem is not going to go away by itself, that is clearly evident. Deborah Dickson Saanich

Good drivers save lucky dog On my way from Cordova Bay to the University of Victoria to see astronaut Julie Payette speak, I drove through Mount Doug park and met one lucky dog. I watched in horror as I saw in the near distance this little cream puff dog run playfully away from his elderly owner and into the street directly in front of an on-coming vehicle. It first appeared that the dog stood no chance as he disappeared under her vehicle. The driver immediately slowed and somehow in that slowness, that rascal puppy was able to scamper along underneath the car and came out behind it. The driver assumed the worst and through her shock opened the window, hollering to the owner of the dog that she was so sorry. Still driving my car slowly in the opposite direction, I was able to yell at her that the dog was OK and had run out the back. The dog’s owner watched helplessly as that lucky pooch went running like a dart down the Mount Doug roadway. As he was ahead of me with no apparent sign of slowing down, I drove cautiously and kept honking my horn at oncoming cars. “Lucky” had two more close calls, but thankfully, every on-coming car was able to spot the little dog as he careened along in a frenzy. As I caught up to him a few hundred yards from his home, there was a short break in on-coming traffic and I yelled out to him to stop and amazingly, he did, just for a moment and turned to look my way. I could see that cars behind me were travelling slow enough in a queue that I immediately stopped my car, opened the door and tried calling the pup. The woman traveling in the Volvo behind me did the same, and Lucky ran towards her and without stopping to greet her, jumped right into her car through the open door. While our line-up of cars waited patiently, I helped signal oncoming traffic to give her a chance to turn around, and

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I presume she saw Lucky home to his distraught owners. By my calculation, Lucky got run over (but not injured) and skirted two more car accidents in that short strip of roadway. I felt so grateful for the cautious, patient and compassionate drivers in our city. Fay Melling Saanich

DIAMOND OPTICAL EYECARE VICTORIA 1320 Douglas St. 250.380.6919 DOWNTOWN

Pedestrians need to be street-wary Last month’s pedestrian death on Douglas Street is a sad reminder that when pedestrians and motor vehicles compete for space, the results can be fatal. The pedestrian may be in a crosswalk, but it really offers no protection all by itself. What amazes me is how many pedestrians step off the curb, either into a crosswalk, or to just plain jaywalk, without a single glance around to see if a vehicle is coming. No amount of traffic engineering is going to make our streets safer as long as so few bother to look before they leap. Robert McInnes Victoria

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ACROSS FROM SAFEWAY

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Globe opposition raises eyebrows Re: Francis Drake globe could help rewrite history of B.C. (News, Aug. 22) In the early 18th century, England was flexing its muscle as an emerging world power. The foundation of this island nation’s might and income rested upon its maritime supremacy. Yet the increased trade and expanding navy of the British Empire were threatened by the uncertainty of oceangoing navigation. Securing prize money from the Board of Longitude proved as hard for John Harrison as creating his legendary marine chronometer, partly due to powerful opposition from royal astronomer Nevil Maskelyne and a rival for the prize. Ultimately, King George III had to intervene on Harrison’s behalf to procure his rightful winnings. It could be argued Maskelyne’s denial of the merits of Harrison’s chronometers set the search for simplifying longitude back a hundred years. The same could be said of the ne’er-do-wells opposing the publication of Sam Bawlf’s findings as you reported. Bill Irvine Saanich

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Changes in Your Vision You may find it disturbing if you are not seeing things as clearly and sharply as you used to, but as people get older, certain changes in their vision will occur. For example, the pupils of the eyes tend to become smaller, and the crystalline lenses inside the eyes become less clear. You may need more light to see and read comfortably. The decrease in clarity of the crystalline lenses tends to scatter the light entering the eye. This can sometimes cause a fogging of vision or a decreased tolerance to bright headlight glare. As people age the eyes’ focusing ability decreases and it may become more difficult to change focus from distant to near objects and vice versa. These are just a few of the changes in your eyes that may be interfering with your ability to see well and comfortably. If you are experiencing any of these changes in your eyes or if you have other vision problems you feel need attention, have your eyes examined by your Optometrist.

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www.oakbaynews.com • A11

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Try Scouting Struggling food banks to get helping hand The 5th Garry Oak Scouts is holding fall registration night on Monday Sept. 10. It will be held at the Scout Hall in Fireman’s Park on Monterey Ave. from 6 to 7 p.m., followed by a meeting for all parents and youth to meet the leaders and each other. The cub group is almost full, but there are a few spaces left. There are plenty of spaces available for Beavers and Scouts. B e a v e r s include boys and girls ages 5 to 7; Cubs include boys and girls ages 8 to 10 and Scouts include boys and girls ages 11 to 14. Beavers meet on Monday evenings from 6:30 to

7:30 p.m., Cubs meet on Tuesday evening from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Scouts meet on Thursday evenings from 7:15 to 8:45 p.m., with occasional weekend camping trips and weekend hikes. The 5th Garry Oak Scouts have been in Oak Bay for more than 50 years. They offer youth progressive and stimulating programs with a commitment to the values of doing one’s best, contributing to the community, respecting and caring for others and contributing as a family member and use outdoor activities as a key learning resource. editor@oakbaynews.com

Area Thanksgiving food drive begins next week

hopefully packed full of non-perishable goods – from participating families on Sept. 15 starting at 9:30 a.m. “We decided it was important that we have a day of service in our community, that we make as much of an effort as possible to connect to members of our community through service,� said Deborah Nohr, the food drive’s Victoria-area organizer. She said the Mustard Seed food bank is currently at its lowest level in 20 years, and she hopes the Thanksgiving drive will help ease that crisis. Last

Local food banks are hoping fortunate families will help feed more than 7,000 people this coming Thanksgiving. Next week, B.C. Thanksgiving Food Drive volunteers will be dropping off donation bags to Greater Victoria households. Those same bags will be picked up –

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A12 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

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www.oakbaynews.com • A13

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Community support • Lindsay Goulet of Hot Mama Health and Fitness is hosting another fundraiser for Hannah Day. Butt-kick for Bucks is a family bootcamp fundraiser planned for Sept. 8, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., at Eagle Ridge dry floor arena, 1089 Langford Pkwy. • Oak Bay Pharmasave, where Hannah’s grandmother is an employee, held a bake sale for Hannah on Aug. 29. • The Day family also received a generous donation of $10,000 from Re/Max Alliance on Aug. 24.

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Lizzie Whitney, 3, her sister Emma, 6, and brother Teddy, 1, with mom Kristina and Arnold Ranneris try to decide what treats to buy from Anni Atherton at the Bake sale for Hannah outside the Oak Bay Pharmasave on Oak Bay Avenue. Money raised from the event will help Hannah Day, 3, who has a rare form of cancer, Stage 4 habdomyosarcoma and will be at Vancouver Children’s Hospital undergoing treatment for at least a year. About 14 Oak Bay Pharmasave staff baked goodies to sell to show support for one of their longtime staff members and Hannah’s grandmother, Dalyce Irvin.

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A14 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

THE ARTS

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BAY NEWS

Cottage Artisans present Art By The Sea Sept. 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Tulista Art Centre, 9565 5th St. Sidney. Painted art and handcrafted items for home and garden. Enjoy light refreshments in a seaside setting, while browsing for art. For more information, call 250-391-1217 or go to cottageartisans.wordpress.com.

Ar t By The Sea

Student’s short film accepted to international film festival Gaston’s work shows startling maturity Natalie North News staff

As Connor Gaston’s classmates watched a sneak peek of his latest film, Bardo Light, the University of Victoria writing student kept his eyes glued on one friend who was visibly swept away during the 10-minute short. “It seemed like he was actually invested in the story,” said 23-year-old Gaston. “And whenever it’s a sci-fi story, or something you might not actually believe, it’s nice to get that reaction – even if it’s just for that moment.” This summer, the list of those invested in the drama inspired by the Tibetan Book of the Dead and Gaston having seen pug dogs watch television, expanded beyond Gaston’s supporters at UVic to include the programmers at the Toronto International Film Festival. Bardo Light, a reference to the light we cannot resist and would rather watch than breathe, now makes its big screen premier this weekend alongside the world’s top films at TIFF 2012. “There’s a maturity to his voice as a film director that’s quite startling, considering how long he’s been making films,” said Maureen Bradley, filmmaker and professor of screenwriting at UVic. “I see these kind of

Submitted photos

Local actors Shaan Rahman, left, and Chris Mackie take the screen in University of Victoria writing student Connor Gaston’s (inset) film Bardo Light, set to debut at the Toronto International Film Festival Sept. 6 to 16. heavy endings in Connor’s work that quite frankly, kind of terrify people. (Bardo Light’s ending) is terrifying in one way if your relationship with mortality isn’t settled and if it is, it’s quite a beautiful, calming moment.” Once Bradley gave Gaston access to filmmaking resources available through UVic’s writing department, including the school’s RED digital camera, Gaston fully committed to the project. “That really inspired me, thinking that I

have this camera that they use in Hollywood and if the story’s half-decent, what’s stopping me?” Gaston shot the film between Gabriola Island and Victoria, with a small volunteer crew and cast that includes local actors Chris Mackie, Donna Barnfield and Shaan Rahman with cameos from Gaston’s family dog Sally and his father, fiction author Bill Gaston. Bradley describes the film as chilling,

almost horrifying and ultimately moving through its use of metaphor similar to Gaston’s previous work. Gaston is reluctant to make any statements on the recurring theme of his films. “That’s for other people to decide. I’m just thinking about story. A good story: that’s all I care about,” he said. “If you want to make a movie, go do it. … You can shoot a movie on your phone. It shouldn’t be about the production value at all. Start off with a good story, a good character, whatever it may be and go out and shoot. You’ll learn a lot and you’ve got nothing to lose.” Though attending TIFF equipped with a feature film pitch and a freshly-printed set of business cards, Gaston plans to return to Victoria after the event and study screenwriting as a graduate student under Bradley’s guidance. “I think it’s really good for Victoria that he’s sticking close and I hope we don’t lose him to L.A.” Bradley said. “He’s going to miss the first week of class, but I figured that was alright. I’m not going to dock him any marks for going to the Toronto International Film Festival. I figured it was a pretty good excuse.” Also on the TIFF program this year: Frost, a sci-fi adventure short, written and directed by Jeremy Ball and starring Emily Piggford, both fellow UVic alumni. nnorth@saanichnews.com

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www.oakbaynews.com • A15

OAK BAY NEWS -Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Cirque du Soleil brings magic to Memorial Quidam captures the imagination Kevin Mills Black Press

Cirque du Soleil’s production of Quidam opens tonight (Sept. 5) at the Save On Foods Memorial Centre. While the performance itself has been called “spectacular” by critics, what goes on beforehand is equally impressive. Performers, musicians, costume designers and more were busy examining the stage in preparation for the show. As acrobats hung from the ceiling, skippers warmed up back stage. Jessica Leboeuf, spokesperson for Quidam said it takes 13 months for the production to be ready for a live perfor-

mance. different acts for Quidam, and Quidam features everything while she likes them all, she from acrobats to jugglers, seems to have found her niche clowns, skippers and a live high above the stage. band. “I learned aerial hoops after “Half of the time the per- being here for two and a half formers are following the years. That’s the act I perform music and half of the time the almost every night.” music is followThe hoops ing the perforhas Cameron “I still get mance,” Leboeuf forming nervous. … Before it pase rhigh said. as 12 Julie Cameron was scary-nervous but metres above is a 23 year old stage and now it’s nervous in a the aerial artist who like all Quidam has performed in good way.” acts, requires Quidam for the hours of prac- Julie Cameron past five years. tice. Born in the UK, “Almost she originally started out as a every day we do practice. It gymnast. But once she saw a goes in cycles. Sometimes you Cirque du Soleil show, she was feel great for 10 weeks and hooked. then you could have a really “That’s when I knew this bad 10 weeks and you’re in was something I really wanted pain. Most acrobats, they to do.” always have something wrong She has performed in three with them, but we’re all very

well trained so it’s not that dangerous.” Cameron has performed thousands of times, all over the world. “I still get nervous, just a little bit anxious. Before it was scary-nervous but now it’s nervous in a good way,” she said. While audiences are always appreciative of the performer’s talents, the acrobats themselves sometimes forget how impressive their routines can be. “We’re in a little bubble here. So when you speak to people outside the bubble then you are reminded of where you are and what you do and how important it is,” she said. Tickets are available at selectyourtickets.com . Quidam runs in Victoria until Sept. 9. llavin@vicnews.com

Matt Beard photo

Cirque du Soleil’s Quidam opens tonight (Sept. 5) at the Save On Foods Memorial Centre.

ARTS LISTINGS IN BRIEF

The Bills CD release show Since forming in 1996, The Bills have toured theatres and festivals from Copenhagen to California, thrilling audiences with their breathtaking musical explorations and their natural onstage humour and charm. Now The Bills are ready to take you on a joyous musical ride, with the release of their new CD Yes Please. Get on board and experience Canada’s foremost roots music sensation at the CD release concert at Alix Goolden Hall on Sept. 6. Tickets are available at Lyle’s Place, Ivy’s Books, and through the McPherson box office.

Anarchy reigns once more Victoria’s seventh annual Anarchist Book Fair, at Fernwood Community Centre, 1240 Gladstone Ave., runs Sept. 8 and 9. For both anarchists and non-anarchists, this bookfair includes workshops on a wide range of topics, music nights, a festival of anarchy and sees participants from all over North America. For more information, go to victoriaanarchistbookfair.ca.

Victoria Downtown Public Market Society Vancity business member The Greater Victoria Region has been without a year-round public market for over 50 years. Victoria Downtown Public Market Society (VDPMS) aims to change that, with Vancity’s help. In July 2012 the VDPMS signed a contract to establish an 18,000 square foot permanent indoor public market on the ground floor of the historic Hudson building on Douglas Street. Vancity has been a proud supporter of VDPMS’s efforts from the

start. Vancity’s downtown Victoria Community Branch was the sole sponsor of the first vendor consultation for the project. The project’s initial funding was structured through Enterprising NonProfits, an organization financially supported in part by Vancity. Slated to open in spring 2013, the new market will provide economic support for Greater Victoria’s food economy—farmers, bakers, butchers, restaurateurs and organic food producers of all kinds. With some 25 vendors selling everything from

fresh produce to organic meat to local cheese, it will also create a new permanent hub of values-based local food and artisan businesses in Victoria’s historic downtown district. Vancity shares VDPMS’s commitment to preserving the Greater Victoria community’s food security, and its goal to help local growers and independent food producers become economically viable. We continue to invest in the people and businesses who produce, deliver and serve locally grown food.

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When you make deposits with Vancity, you earn competitive returns that help you reach your financial goals. We then lend to businesses and organizations that create social, economic and environmental impact. That investment comes back to all of us in the form of a stronger economy, a healthier population, and a vibrant, more prosperous community.


A16 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

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Shoes found on Clover Point a ‘sick’ hoax Introducing Ryder Raccoon

Shoes filled with meatlike substance and bones discovered on the beach Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

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a significant alarm for our community and caused a lot of people a lot of worry and also expended numerous police resources,” Russell said. Three shoes, including one pair, were found around 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 30. The first was found by a tourist from the Lower Mainland, who alerted police. Officers, with the help of a canine unit, found two more during a search of the beach. The Clover Point turnaround was closed for about five hours as police searched. Both a local pathologist and a Simon Fraser University forensic anthropologist are analyzing the shoes and contents. “We anticipate being able to show the shoes sometime next week in hopes of generating tips or leads that will help us with this public mischief investigation,” Russell said. Conviction on public mischief charges carries with it up to a fiveyear prison sentence. Anyone with information on the hoax should call VicPD at 250-9957444 or CrimeStoppers 1-800-222-TIPS. cvanreeuwyk@ oakbaynews.com

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www.oakbaynews.com • A17

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Developer takes an electric step forward Unique amenities can be a selling feature for real estate properties, a fact Burnaby-based Bosa Properties is taking to heart for its Promontory at Bayview Place development. Purchasers of the yet-to-bebuilt condominium project in Vic West have the option of having an electric vehicle charging station installed in their underground parking space before they move in. The program, known as BosaDon Descoteau Volt, is being Biz Beat instituted in all of the company’s new projects in British Columbia, a first for North America. “Despite local and provincial governments’ push towards environmental sustainability, and despite the fact that British Columbian companies are emerging as leaders in green innovation, without the accompanying infrastructure to support green initiatives it is impossible for individuals to embrace the new technologies,” said Bosa senior vicepresident Daryl Simpson. The company, which is looking at installing 220-volt chargers – they take four to six hours to fully charge a vehicle – hopes to

call 250-386-7632.

Highland Pacific hosts summer fundraiser Applications for the first Golf to Conquer Cancer cross-Canada day of golf are being accepted at Highland Pacific Golf. The 2013 event, slated for next July 25, will see thousands of golfers play in four-person teams, using a maximum of four clubs each, for four hours under a Texas scramble format. Players are required to raise at least $360 for the cause. For more information, drop by Highland Pacific at 450 Creed Rd. (250-478-4653) near Victoria General Hospital, or visit www.golftoconquercancer.ca. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Bosa Properties marketing and development associate Rob Elliott plugs in a BosaVolt charger to a vehicle at the Promontory Bayview Place building site in Vic West. spur other developers into following suit. For information on Promontory or BosaVolt, visit bosaproperties.com/promontory.

Designers tackle custom chair project Eleven local furniture designers are putting their best creative feet forward to raise money for the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation’s B.C.-Yukon division. Lûxe Home Interiors initiated

the Pink Chair-ity fundraiser, in which designers create a unique chair in honour of someone who has had breast cancer. The chairs will ultimately be placed on display in the Lûxe showroom at 2655 Douglas St. throughout October. On Oct. 26 the chairs will be auctioned off at a gala event with all funds going to the cause. For more information and a list of the participating designers, visit yourstyleyourway.ca/ luxe-connects/pink-chairity or

Take Us With You! Read your Community Newspaper cover to cover — anywhere! Now available in an easy to read, downloadable and printable format.

GO TO: vicnews.com oakbaynews.com saanichnews.com goldstreamgazette.com Click on Link (on the right) or Scroll down to the bottom Instant access to our complete paper! Click on eEdition (paper icon) Editorial, Ads, Classifieds, Photos INCLUDES Archive of Past Issues & Special Supplements

Coffee sales benefit Tour de Rock campaign Serious Coffee locations are raising funds for the Canadian Cancer Society through their Tour de Rock Bean Drive, in which pictures of the 2012 Tour riders are printed on bags of coffee beans. Now until Oct. 5, $1 from every 300-gram bag of Coal Miners (dark roast) and Three Amigos (medium) beans will go to Tour de Rock. If you’ve got a favourite rider, visit seriouscoffee.com to see which outlet is paired with that rider and carries beans with their picture on the bags.

Business goings-on around and about town Sylvia Main, operator of the Fairholme Manor Inn in Rockland, has released her second cookbook, Easy Elegance from Fabulous Fairholme. The book, with breakfast, lunch and dinner suggestions, runs $29.95 and can be found in local bookstores … Dr. Malcolm Walker opened Biosundara at Uptown next to Urban Barn, in the same building as Future Shop. The medi-spa offers leading-edge cosmetic treatments and is open seven days per week. For more information visit biosundara.com … Stephen Whipp Financial at Manulife Securities Incorporated has moved into a bigger space, at 734 Goldstream Ave. The expanded space will help accommodate advisors Stephen Whipp and Annette Quan and their staff. For information visit stephenwhipp.com … Ruffell and Brown Interiors is celebrating 25 years in business this year. The blinds and draperies specialist, selected first in the News’ 2012 Best of the City reader poll, is located at 2745 Bridge St., or visit ruffell-brown.com … The Oak Bay Beach Hotel added former Hotel Grand Pacific chef Brock Bowes as executive chef to its staff ahead of its October opening. To submit business news, send an email to editor@vicnews.com.

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A18 • www.oakbaynews.com

How to reach us

Travis Paterson 250-480-3279 sports@vicnews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Painting

SPORTS

Rugby internationals coming to Victoria Rugby Canada to host Americas Rugby Championship Travis Paterson News staff

Twickenham, Bear Mountain Stadium is not. But the artificial turf field is undeniably Canada’s home for rugby, new and all, and its about to host six major International Board Rugby tests as the Americas Rugby Championship comes to town Oct. 12 to 20. The men’s 15s tournament won’t just survive out of Bear Mountain Stadium in Langford, it’ll thrive, said Mike Chu, Rugby Canada general manager of operation. “The seats are close to the field and it’s international rugby in an intimate setting. The community is excited and supportive and we can’t wait to fill all 2,800 seats.” That’s 2,800 seats, with added bleachers. Not the 82,000 of England’s Twickenham, but hey, it’s a start. Included in the Americas championship are Canada, ranked 13th in the world, U.S.A. (17), Uruguay (21st) and the favourite, Argentina (eighth), which was originally planning to host the tournament.

Travis Paterson/News staff

Coach Kieran Crowley will lead Canada on its campaign to the RWC 2015. The round robin tourney will happen with two matches a day on three separate occasions, Oct. 12, 16 and 20. It’s a crucial stage in the development of Canada’s domestic players as they campaign for the 2015 Rugby World Cup in England, said coach Kieran Crowley. “Each team will have its country’s best non-professional players and many of them we’ll see at the 2015 RWC.” Locally, the size of the event also serves to raise rugby’s profile, a reminder of the Canadian tax dol-

lars invested in the Rugby Canada Centre of Excellence, also situated at Bear Mountain Stadium. “It’s a great vote of confidence from the IRB to get this tournament. They hold strict guidelines around their standards,” Crowley said. Coincidently, Crowley offered his own vote of confidence. The former New Zealand All Black affirmed his commitment to lead Rugby Canada to the 2015 RWC, something that was in question earlier this summer. Reports from New Zealand listed Crowley as a finalist for the head coaching job of New Zealand’s Auckland Blues, which compete in the elite Super Rugby 15. The team hired another former All Black, the great John Kirwan. “That was just a sign that at some stage I would like to go back to New Zealand, but that’s all it was,” Crowley said. “I’m here for the next four years.” Looking ahead to the ARC, talk centres on Argentina. It’s no secret Argentina has been a major target of the IRB’s growth plan in recent years. This summer Argen-

tina was added to the Tri Nations rugby championship, now known simply as the Rugby Championship, against superpowers South Africa, New Zealand and Australia. Thusly Argentina will send a secondary squad to Victoria, but one that will be strong enough to win it all. Uruguay and U.S.A. will be in the same situation as Canada, using its top domestic players. One significant factor for Canada is the turf. It’s one of the few IRB sanctioned artificial turfs used in international play. More importantly, it’s the home training ground of Rugby Canada. “We welcome the (other teams)

SPORTS NEWS

Coach won’t tip his hand

IN BRIEF

Youth rugby camp at UVic

Royals preseason Travis Paterson News staff

Head coach Dave Lowry of the Victoria Royals won’t let on just which youngster has a chance to crack the lineup this fall. The Royals preseason continues against Kelowna in Maple Ridge on Friday (Sept. 7), in Kelowna on Saturday, and back to Victoria against the Vancouver Giants on Sept. 15. “Right now I’m not singling anyone out,” Lowry said the day prior to starting the preseason on Aug. 30. “Some guys have earned their right to play some exhibition games.” The former Calgary Flames assistant coach also wouldn’t dispel a scenario, however, where both 16-year-old defencemen Joe Hicketts and Jack

Travis Paterson/News staff

Hooker Ryan Hamilton (UVic Vikes) and centre Mike Scholz (Castaway Wanderers) from the national men’s rugby team hope to represent Canada in the Americas Rugby Championship.

Allen Douglas/Kamloops This Week

Victoria Royals hopeful Clay Spencer carries the puck against the Kamloops Blazers in Kamloops on Aug. 30. Walker could make the team. The speedy blueliners are equal parts flashy, yet undersized. “It’s going to be a good battle and I’ve said before, age is nothing. If you’re good enough, that’s what will determine who makes the team.” Last week the Royals made some key signings, led by that of Czech import goalie, 17-yearold Patrik Polivka. The club

also inked four 16-year-olds, forwards Brandon Fushimi and Michael Bell, defenceman Ryan Gagnon and goaltender Michael Herringer, and some 1013 Fushimi, from Colorado, stands out as the only nondrafted player. After impressing at last year’s rookie camp Fushimi was protected on the Royals’ 50-man list. sports@vicnews.com

Rugby World Cup veteran Ryan Hamilton, national centre Mike Scholz, and other players from the Canadian rugby program will lead the first National Youth Rugby Skills Clinic for girls and boys aged 12 to 19. The camp runs Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 8 and 9, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the turf fields of UVic next to Centennial Stadium. “We want to make it a one-on-one coach to player situation as much as possible,” said Hamilton, a UVic Vikes grad. Fees are $75 per day. To register email Hamilton at Ryan_ Hamilton1@hotmail. com.

and everything, and not to be cliche, but it’s our home,” national team hooker Ryan Hamilton said. sports@vicnews.com

ARC schedule ■ Oct. 12 5:30 p.m U.S.A. vs Argentina 7:30 p.m. Canada vs. Uruguay ■ Oct. 16 5:30 p.m. Uruguay vs. Argentina 7:30 p.m. Canada vs. U.S.A. ■ Oct. 20 5:30 p.m. Uruguay vs. U.S.A. 7:30 p.m. Canada vs. Argentina

Vikes, LISA want female coaches The Lower Island Soccer Association for youth players wants more female coaches, and it wants all of its coaches to be certified by the start of the 2015 Women’s World Cup, hosted by Canada. LISA is not alone UVic Vikes women’s soccer team also wants to engage more female coaches. This fall UVic is running a course titled Moms Coaching Daughters and a new campaign called She Kicks, created by the Vikes Soccer Women’s Alumni. Part of the campaign is to identify female players aged 16-to-18 who are interested in becoming coaches. For more info or to register, contact LISA’s Andrew Latham at headcoach@lowerislandsoccer.com and 250-888-5712, or Vikes coach Tracy David, tdavid@uvic.ca and 250-216-0682.

SPORTS STATS Tennis Island Open Tennis Series at Cedar Hill Rec. Centre, Aug. 20-26 (Seed) Men 3.0 Singles: (2) Josh Manzer d. (1) Joel Boon 7-5; 3-6; 6-1 Men’s 3.5 Singles: Jovan Sihota d. (1) Tim Hoare 6-0; 6-1 Men’s 4.0 Singles: Andres Joseph d. (1) Pat Sails 7-6; 6-3 Men’s 4.5 Singles: Aaron Diemer d. Sam Smyth 6-1; 7-6 Men’s Open Singles: (1) Wesley Bertsch d. (1) Kieran Bertsch 6-3; 6-2 Women’s 3.0 Singles: Jasmine Salehnia d. Georgia Tomsett 6-2; 6-2 Women’s 3.5 Singles: Lucy Ewart d. Tracey Stone 6-4; 3-6; 6-1 Women’s 4.0 Singles: (3) May Leong d. (4) Kim Ott 4-6; 7-5; 6-1 Women’s 4.5 Singles: Jenny Fu d. Kaitlyn Bettaur 6-3; 7-6 Women’s Open Singles: (2) Andjela Stojkovic d. (1) Harjit Gosal 6-2; 3-6; 6-4 Men’s 3.5 Doubles: Hershberg/ Thompson d. Abercrombie/ Sparkes 7-6; 6-1 Men’s 4.5 Doubles: (1) Brachat/ Stoffels d. (1) Baileys/Lee 6-2; 6-3 Men’s Open Doubles: (1) Bertsch/Bertsch d. Miller/Lusignan 6-2; 6-0 Women’s 3.5 Doubles: Trottier/Wooster d. Andrews/ Barbon 6-3; 6-3 Women’s 4.5 Doubles: Won by Heffelfinger/Ott in round robin Women’s Open Doubles: Stojkovic/Tronrud d. Gosal/ Takimura 6-4; 6-1 Mixed 8.0 Doubles: Baldwin/Leong d. Ho/Mack 2-6; 6-2; 7-6 Mixed 9.0 Doubles: (1) Bertsch/ Stojkovic d. (2) Bertsch/HartSeeton 6-3; 6-2


www.oakbaynews.com • A19

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Editor Goldstream News Gazette The Goldstream News Gazette has an immediate opening for a full-time editor. The News Gazette covers the West Shore area of Greater Victoria. Reporting to the editorial director, the Editor is part of the management team and will be instrumental in helping guide the overall strategic direction of the News Gazette. The successful candidate will possess above average leadership skills, will be a strong communicator, pay attention to detail and can manage and work under pressure in a deadline driven environment. Previous editing experience would be considered an asset. As well as editing copy and paginating pages, the successful candidate can expect to produce news copy and editorials, take photographs, attend events and generate story ideas. The ability to organize copy and supervise the production of special supplements is also required. In addition, the successful candidate will have a passion for all aspects of multimedia journalism, including a track record of turning around well-written, fact-based, concise, well-produced content quickly for posting online that day. In addition, you have skills in search-engine optimization of all content, social media (Facebook, Twitter) as both research tools and traffic generators. The News Gazette offers a great working environment with a competitive remuneration plan coupled with a strong benefits package. The News Gazette is owned by Black Press Ltd., Canada’s largest independent newspaper company, with more than 180 community, daily and urban newspapers and extensive online operations with over 250 websites. Interested candidates should send resume, clippings and cover letter by Sept. 14, 2012 to: Kevin Laird Editorial Director, Black Press-South Island 818 Broughton St. Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 or email: klaird@blackpress.ca Thank you for your interest. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

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A20 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE HOUSES FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

TRADES, TECHNICAL

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HOMES WANTED

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WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

SIDNEY- NEW 2 bdrm + den, W/D. NS/NP. $1700 mo. Avail immed. Call 250-217-4060.

1977 CADILAC Eldorado, beige metallic. Cruise control, automatic. Very good cond., only 80,000 km. Please call (250)477-7076. 2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

TRANSPORTATION

$50-$1000 CASH

AUTO FINANCING

For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

Call: 1-250-616-9053

858-5865

www.webuyhomesbc.com

RENTALS SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES APARTMENT/CONDO 1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250478-9231.

Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557 SIDNEY, 1bdrm, bright, freshly painted, close to amens, quiet, N/P, $800 mo. 250-658-9373

CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

2004 VW TOUAREG. Only 135,000 km, economical, spirited V6 engine, all wheel drive and tow hitch with electric brakes. Unique 6 speed Tiptronic auto transmission. Well equipped interior, rear mounted CD changer. Beautiful, well maintained. $13,900 obo, 250658-1123 mjmarshall@telus.net

Are your kids begging for new games?

TAKE ON A PAPER ROUTE! A paper route can provide money to buy new games for your computer, XBox or Wii or cover the cost of a cell phone each month. It’s so easy to get started... call 250-360-0817 circulation@vicnews.com | circulation@saanichnews.com | circulation@goldstreamgazette.com

SOOKE NEWS MIRROR


www.oakbaynews.com • A21

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, September 5, 2012

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CONTRACTORS

GARDENING

HANDYPERSONS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

BATHROOM REMODELING. “Gemini Baths” Plumb, Elec. Tile, Cabinets. 250-896-9302. CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

J&L GARDENING Specialty yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. John or Louise (250)891-8677

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397.

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

1st & last call- Auricle homes-commercial & strata’s Call 250-882-3129.

BIG BEAR Handyman. Decks, Stairs, Painting, General household repairs. Free estimate. Call Barry 250-896-6071

CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

(250)208-8535 WOODCHUCK No lawn we can’t fix. Cleanups, fall pruning, blackberry, ivy & weed removal, 24yrs.

SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Small hauls. Call Fred, 250-888-5345.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601 CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT

U.S. delinquent tax filings & U.S. personal tax returns. Accounting and Cdn tax preparation. www.victax.ca (250) 590-7030

CARPENTRY STEPS, DECKS, Fence, new repairs, rot, mould, painting, concrete, brick. 250-588-3744.

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES GREAT RATES! Guar. cleaning since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. (250)385-5869 MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estates, events, offices. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

COMPUTER SERVICES COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites, etc. 250-886-8053, 778-351-4090.

CONCRETE & PLACING RBC CONCRETE Finishing. All types of concrete work. No job too small. Seniors discount. Call 250-386-7007.

LOOKING FOR AN

250.388.3535

AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193 QUALITY Electric. New homes, renos. No job too sm. Seniors disc. #22779. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

250-216-9476 ACCEPTING clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups. ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualified, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com DPM SERVICES, lawn & garden, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

MOVING & STORAGE 2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

HAULING AND SALVAGE $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734.

CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

MALTA MOVING. Residential & Commercial - BBB Member. (250)388-0278.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

PAINTING

GEOF’S RENO’S & Repairs. Decks, stairs, railings, gates & small additions. 250-818-7977.

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Perimeter drains, driveway prep, Hardscapes, Lot clearing. Call 250-478-8858.

FENCING ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462. U-NEEK SEATS. Hand cane, Danish weave, sea grass. UK Trained. Fran, 250-216-8997.

BIG BEAR Painting. Interior & Exterior. Quality work. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071 OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

YARD ART. Yard Maintenance, Tree & Hedge Pruning, Lawn Care. Call 250-888-3224

PLUMBING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS 250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

✭BUBBA’S HAULING✭ Honest, on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service. 250-478-8858.

Today’s

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS DEMOSS Dr. $499 per/roof. 2 years warranty. We also install new roofs? Call 250-589-4998

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

STEREO/TV/DVD WANTED: FLAT screen TV (inexpensive) for a single parent. Please call 250-514-6688

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178. RE-STUCCO & HARDY Plank/Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

Classified ads get great results!

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

250.388.3535

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-812-3213, 250-590-2929.

READ THIS....

Sudoku

ACROSS

30. Hand (Spanish) 32. Overdose 33. A public promotion 34. Hat part 36. Turfs 39. 3rd or 4th Islamic month 41. Japanese martial art 43. Sec. of State 46. Off-Broadway theater award 47. Spiritual teacher 48. 98942 WA 50. Foot (Latin) 51. 84057 UT 52. Stalk of a moss capsule 53. Very fast airplane DOWN 54. The Wilderness Soc. 55. A meshwork barrier 1. Million gallons per day (abbr.) 2. Fake name 3. Film entertainments Answers 4. Turn away from sin 5. A course or path 6. Opposed to a policy 7. Screenplay outline 8. Free from ostentation 9. Makes older 11. Explorer Polo 13. This (Spanish) 16. Units of action in a film 18. Contemporary 20. Clifford _____, playwright

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

Crossword

1. Mother (British) 4. Macaws 7. Senior officer 10. Latch onto something 12. Quality of a given color 14. Tooth on a gearwheel 15. Prima donnas 17. Cereal grain 18. Member of an ancient Iranian people 19. Room cooler 22. Leave a union 23. Icelandic poems 24. Unit of sound loudness 25. Trim and stylish 26. And, Latin 27. The Ocean State 28. A military meal

DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior and student discount. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler 250-418-1747.

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

21. Integrated data processing 28. Martinet 29. Suitable for use as food 30. African tribe 31. Enhance or decorates 34. Influence payments 35. Actress Farrow 37. Palm fruits 38. Taken dishonestly 40. Large southern constellation 41. Belongs to Lifetime’s Heidi 42. Growing outwards 43. Beer ingredient 44. Round hut 45. They serve on a ship 49. Chapeau

To solve a Sudoku puzzle, every number 1 to 9 must appear in: • Each of the nine vertical columns • Each of the nine horizontal rows • Each of the nine 3 x 3 boxes

Remember no number can occur more than once in any row, column or box.

Today’s Solution

Auction Bedroom Suite Couch Deli Esthetics Fuel Garage Sale House Investments Jungle Gym Kiln Living Room Suite Moving Company Nail Care Open House Poultry Quilt Rolling Pin Sail Boat Venetian Blinds Window Washer Xylophone Yard Work Zebra

DRYWALL

PLASTERING


A22 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Three men charged with securities crimes News staff

A former rising star in real estate investment is one of three men in Victoria hit with securities charges linked to improper investment sales. Saanich police and West Shore RCMP assisted the B.C. Securities Commission criminal investigation team in the investigation, which led to the arrest of two men on Aug. 28. Daniel Barton, 29, a resident of Victoria, and Gregory Gillespie, 36, of Saanich, were arrested at their respective homes without incident, and made their

first appearance in court last Wednesday. They are due back in Victoria provincial court on Sept. 19. As of Aug. 29, Andrew Chengalath, 28, remained at large and the court has issued a warrant for his arrest. The three men are each charged under the Securities Act with selling securities through Oasis Properties Inc. without being registered with any regulating agency, and charged with selling securities without a prospectus. The alleged offenses took place between March 1, 2008 and Oct. 31, 2009. B.C. Securities Commission alleges the men improperly sold securities related to a real estate investment centered on

1250604 Alberta Ltd., a company controlled by Barton and doing business as Oasis Properties and Caprice Investments. Barton is the most high-profile of the three accused. In 2008, during the same time period of his alleged offenses, the Greater Victoria Chamber of Commerce awarded Barton the Young Entrepreneur of the Year award. The Oak Bay High grad was also noted in Monday Magazine in 2006 as an up-and-coming real estate entrepreneur who owned scores of homes in Alberta. Richard Gilhooley, a communications officer with the B.C. Securities Commis-

sion, said the commission is alleging that none of the men had registered with regulating agencies such as the B.C. Securities Commission or the Mutual Fund Dealers Association of Canada, for example. Selling securities without a prospectus – which details the business plan, financial audits, and future plans of the company – without an exemption, is also against the Securities Act. “We allege they acted contrary to the public interest. The requirements are there to protect investors,” Gilhooley said. B.C. Securities Commission wouldn’t say how many investors are involved, the amount of money invested or how the complaint against the men emerged. Gilhooley said the long gap to lay charges is not unusual in these types of cases. Oasis Properties, which had address listings in Langford and Victoria, no longer has a working phone number or website. Barton is listed as president of Oasis Properties Inc. and Gillespie was its chief operating officer. Anyone who invested with Oasis Properties and Caprice Investments is encouraged to contact the B.C. Securities Commission at www.investright.org or 1-800-373-6393. editor@saanichnews.com

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your source for FREE coupons


A2 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

www.oakbaynews.com • A23

OAK BAY NEWS -Wednesday, September 5, 2012

BAY NEWS

M E AT & P O U LTRY | F I S H & S E A F O O D

F R E S H FA R M & O R G A N I C P R O D U C E

Fresh! Fresh!

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4.98

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1

Chicken Drumsticks

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Fresh Skinless PaciďŹ c 5.35 Lb

Lilydale Air Chilled Frying 5.05 Kg

100 G

229 Lb

Shoulder Pork Steak Canadian Premium Grain Fed, Fresh 5.27 Kg

239

Strip Loin Australian Beef Boneless 10.98 Kg

.95

Red Flame Seedless Grapes #ALIFORNIA'ROWN53.O'RADE+G

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May Family Farms Assorted 200 Gram Shingle Package

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Maple Lodge 5.05 Kg

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Maple Lodge 450 Gram Package

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SEPTEMBER 2 0 12

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www.fairwaymarkets.com Photos used in this ad are for presentation purposes only. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some advertised items may not be available at some locations.

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A24 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - OAK

spend $150 and receive

GET A $10 JOE FRESH® GIFT CARD TOWARD YOUR NEXT PURCHASE WHEN YOU SPEND AT LEAST $50 ON JOE FRESH® APPAREL

Õ

Spend at least 50 before applicable taxes on Joe Fresh apparel (excludes sunglasses, jewellery, cosmetics, bath and beauty accessories, and gift cards) and get a $10 Joe Fresh® gift card to be used towards your next purchase where available at Real Canadian Superstore® stores where Joe Fresh® products are available. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Coupon valid from Wednesday, September 5, 2012 until closing, Thursday, September 6, 2012. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. $

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/lb 5.47/kg

2 lb strawberry clamshells product of U.S.A., no. 1 grade up to $7.76 value

ÕSpend $150 or more before applicable taxes at any Real Canadian Superstore location and receive free strawberries. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $7.76 will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, August 31st until closing Thursday, September 6th, 2012. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on free item. 680533

fresh style. fresh price.

Enfagrow toddler powder

BAY NEWS

steelehead fillet

10000 02367

98

5

club size, thawed for your convenience

/lb 13.18/kg

685550

9

Chef Boyardee canned pasta selected varieties, 418-425 g 119040

88

4

4/

or 1.77 each

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 2.47 EACH

Huggies Mega wipes 56-216’s 475185

98

5

each

fresh nectarines product of USA 724114

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 5.68 EACH

Tresemme hair care or styling selected varieties 380358 / 149290

50

3

each

/lb 2.12/kg

.96

fresh mini watermelon product of USA 731001

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 4.99 EACH

Kellogg’s Krave cereal, Mini-wheats or Kids selected varieties, 312-510 g 214984

88

2

each

98

2

each

®

PC granola bars

79

1

selected varieties, 187-206 g 388303

each

LIMIT 6, AFTER LIMIT 4.97 EACH

Swanson Hungry-Man dinners selected varieties, frozen, 360-455 g 151951

97

1

each

Deli World light rye bread 620538

00

5

3/

500 g

or 2.77 each

save $ 49

up to

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 19.99 EACH

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 4.99 EACH

Dove Ultimate deodorant value pack 573649

97

3

each

Soft & Pure premium bathroom tissue 36 rolls 202721

98

15

each

LIMIT 3, AFTER LIMIT 10.99 EACH

PC® 24 cm non stick skillet 527225

00

7

after savings

each

2

Crayola wild notes journal or 2 subject notebook 811572 / 858070

after savings

Prices are in effect until Thursday, September 6, 2012 or while stock lasts.

50

4

each

>ÃÌiÀ >À`

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 2.93 EACH

Herbal Essences hair care selected varieties, 300 mL 416235

00

2

each

Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2012 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

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Oak Bay News, September 05, 2012