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Big shoes to fill

The right stuff

Victoria MP Denise Savoie steps down this week, and pundits weigh in on the ramifications. Page A3, A11

Many are called but few will make the cut. An inside look at the Victoria Royals rookie camp. Page A21

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

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A hidden treasure of Saanich

Cutting rider ‘pass ups’ remains priority

Horticultural Centre of the Pacific volunteer gardener Jock von Kaldenberg clears deadwood at Outerbridge Park in Royal Oak. Volunteers work at the park every Thursday morning, and together with Saanich workers, have restored much of the natural beauty in one of Saanich’s hidden treasures. To help volunteer at the Horticultural Centre of the Pacific, see hcp.ca.

Natalie North News staff

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B.C. Transit tweaks bus routes to UVic Madeline Keller-MacLeod says she’s lucky to ride the No. 26 and 27 bus routes to Camosun and the University of Victoria on weekdays. They’re not what the Camosun College Student Society external affairs officer calls most “ridiculous routes,” and so, unlike some of her peers, she always gets on the bus. But she’s still bracing for the tight ride students have come to expect each September when classes resume – a seasonal problem B.C. Transit is hoping to dramatically reduce following a revamp of service to UVic and Camosun. Trips with low ridership were reduced and the service was re-allocated to the busiest routes. The majority of new trips are now added in the morning peak period to UVic. As well, 5,000 service hours on UVic and/or Camosun-bound routes that came into effect last spring will continue through the fall. “That might help us a bit in terms of pass ups, but I’m not sure if it’s going to be enough,” Keller-MacLeod said. “In September we see people trying to get on the buses, then after a few weeks of missing classes, or being late for classes, they do try to do something different, and often it’s driving, unfortunately.” Between Sept. 1, 2011 and Jan. 31, 2012, transit drivers reported a total of 29,296 pass ups, with the vast majority of that number (20,448) on routes servicing Camosun and UVic.

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Drug shortages strain pharmacies Daniel Palmer News staff

Greater Victoria pharmacists are dealing with an extraordinary scarcity in certain injectable drugs. While shortages are common in the health-care industry, the supply of anesthetics, narcotic pain relievers and other sedatives has dwindled since the country’s largest manufacturer, Sandoz, reduced output at its sole Canadian plant in February. “It’s been an unusual or unique situation,” said Caren Heughan, Victoria pharmacist and B.C. Pharmacy Association board

member. “But shortages are something we deal with on a regular basis.” Heughan, who works at Victoria Compounding Pharmacy, said pharmacists often work around shortages by finding alternative forms of the medication in oral or capsule formats. But in certain cases, Heughan has been forced to contact drug manufacturers to access an emergency supply of hard-to-find medications. “The manufacturer does have a small amount of these medications on allocation so the pharmacist can sometimes request emergency quantity,” she said.

The shortage of injectable drugs impacts hospitals as well, but the fear of postponed surgeries from a lack of anesthetics is unfounded, said Susan Evans with VIHA. “There’s been a shortage of drugs for a number of months, going back to February,” she said. “It’s an issue that really lies with the supplier.” Sandoz Canada’s plant, located in Boucherville, Que., specializes in the production of specific injectable generic drugs. Sandoz slowed production after a warning letter from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration identified quality control

concerns in February. The company secured a thirdparty manufacturer at the end of July and anticipates greater supply of anti-nausea, diuretic and pain management drugs soon. “This alternative supply is expected to ... be available to Canadian patients before the end of 2012,” Sandoz president Michel Robidoux said in a statement. Heughan said pharmacists will continue to work with doctors to provide medication for patients, regardless of the shortage. “It’s not the patient’s fault that the medication has become unavailable,” she said. dpalmer@vicnews.com

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A2 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

www.saanichnews.com • A27

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www.saanichnews.com • A3

SAANICH NEWS -Wednesday, August 29, 2012

COMMUNITY NEWS IN BRIEF

Man accused of sex assaults on teen girls A Saanich man is facing six charges relating to sexually assaulting and molesting two teenage girls, one of them over a period of four years. Scott Wesley Shirley is charged with sexually assaulting the first teenage girl sometime between January and June 2011. Two charges indicate Shirley allegedly touched the girl, who was under the age of 16 at the time, for sexual purposes between June 2007 and June 2011. Two of the four charges related to the first victim describe Shirley as being “a person of trust or authority,” or a person who the young person has a dependent relationship with or who is being exploited. He is also accused of both sexually assaulting and sexually touching a second teenage girl who was under the age of 16, sometime between January and June 2011. A publication ban prohibits revealing any information that could identify the girls. The charges were sworn on May 31. This week a preliminary hearing was set for July 2013 in Victoria provincial court.

Arrest made for theft of Tour de Rock donation Saanich police arrested a 36-year-old man with a long history of petty crimes for stealing a gift basket donated for charity. Changing Times Hair Salon in Tillicum Centre donated a gift basket, worth about $180, for a Cops For Cancer - Tour de Rock fundraiser at Pearkes arena on Friday. The basket went missing around noon. Police picked up the suspect on Saturday at Hampton Park on an unrelated matter, and an officer recognized the man from video surveillance at Pearkes. The man had most of the stolen hair care products in his possession. The suspect was released on conditions of staying away from Pearkes. Police say the man’s criminal record goes back 20 years. He is due in court on Oct. 10 for theft and possession of stolen property.

SEAT UP FOR GRABS The sudden resignation of Victoria MP Densie Savoie opens the door to speculation on who might replace her. The byelection could also be the first big political test of the region’s controversial sewage treatment project Daniel Palmer News staff

As federal political parties adjust to the surprise of Victoria MP Denise Savoie’s resignation last week, the focus is turning to potential candidates and hotbutton issues for the likely fall byelection. Victoria Mayor Dean Fortin is rumoured to be considering a run at the NDP nomination, an opportunity that would see him take leave of city hall during the climax of the Johnson Street Bridge project. “He’s made it quite clear among friends that he’s got aspirations for higher office,” said Mat Wright, former communications director for 2011 Liberal candidate and former Oak Bay mayor Chris Causton. “I think he’s going to look at this as an opportunity he can’t miss.” Fortin’s office refused comment on his potential candidacy. Former Conservative candidate Patrick Hunt said he will be making a decision next week on his candidacy. “I certainly haven’t ruled it out,” he said. “We’ll come with a game plan to win this time.” As a rule, byelections do not favour the governing party and local candidates tend to be magnified more than in a general election, said University of Victoria political scientist Norman Ruff. “All four parties have something to prove,” he said. “The NDP will want to retain (the seat) as continuing evidence of (Tom) Mulcair’s leadership appeal while the Liberals are hungry to regain the seat as a sign of some party revival.” The Conservatives are able to run a strong campaign, Ruff added, while the Greens will be

hoping for some “contagion” from Green Party leader and MP Elizabeth May’s success in Saanich-Gulf Islands. A byelection also provides more of an opportunity to capitalize on local issues than in a general election, said former Liberal MP David Anderson, who held the Victoria seat from 1993 to 2006. While major national issues like the Enbridge pipeline project, and environmental assessment are going to weigh on voters’ choices, local concerns like the Capital Regional District’s secondary sewage treatment project – which Anderson opposes – could prove to be paramount to electoral success, he said. “This could be the sleeper that wins either the Liberals or the Greens the election,” Anderson said. “But it’s for the NDP to lose. They are the favourites.” May said the Greens do advocate for regional sewage treatment, but that the proposed project – of which one-third will be funded by federal dollars – is not the right fit. “The current system isn’t sustainable forever, but it’s certainly not an urgent crisis where we jump to the wrong system,” May said. “Municipally, provincially and federally, there are a lot of us who don’t think the solution that’s being proposed right now is the right one.” The byelection provides the first democratic outlet for residents of Victoria, Oak Bay and a large portion of Saanich to voice their support or rejection of the controversial $782-million sewage treatment project, which will increase annual municipal taxes by hundreds of dollars per household. “(Prime Minister) Stephen Harper’s leadership style will inevitably be the larger backdrop

Black Press file photo

Victoria MP Denise Savoie announced her retirement due to health reasons. The race is on to find a replacement. (in the byelection),” Ruff said. Nathan Rotman, the NDP’s national director, called Savoie’s resignation disappointing and said the candidate nomination process will likely open after the Labour Day weekend. “Certainly, we expect this to be a popular nomination race,” Rotman said, adding the federal government will likely call Victoria’s byelection this fall in conjunction with several others in Calgary Centre, Durham, Ont. and possibly Etobicoke, Ont. “I would speculate it will be a late October call for a late November election date,” Rotman said. The federal government has 180 days to call a byelection when a seat becomes vacant. If Victoria is not called until February, the byelection will occur in the middle of

the provincial 2013 election campaign, an undesirable scenario for both levels of government. Last Thursday, Savoie announced she would step down on Aug. 31 for unspecified health reasons. She served as Victoria MP for three terms since 2006, winning an impressive 50 per cent of the vote in the 2011 election. Savoie’s challengers in the last federal election were Conservative Patrick Hunt, Jared Giesbrecht for the Greens and Christopher Causton, Liberal candidate and former Oak Bay mayor. Causton, who has taken a job as a Inner Harbour water taxi captain, could not be reached for comment on his interest in running for the federal Liberals. dpalmer@vicnews.com


A4 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

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www.saanichnews.com • A5

SAANICH NEWS -Wednesday, August 29, 2012

UVic developing drone aircraft for civilian use Kyle Slavin News staff

Jenner Richards foresees a not-so-distant future where any farmer in Greater Victoria could send an unmanned aircraft into the air – whenever they want – to check on the health of their crops. “The special cameras (on the aircraft) can tell you whether it’s getting enough water, whether it’s stressed out, whether it’s healthy; and by looking at that you can optimize where (crops are) worth planting, where it’s not worth planting, where you should harvest first,” says Richards, manager of the University of Victoria’s new Centre for Aerospace Research. The small centre, located north of the Victoria International Airport, will become a site for students to research and develop unmanned air vehicle (UAV) technology to make it commercially accessible and available to civilians. “We will be looking at the airplane design, the electronics, avionics, we’re talking about propulsion, payload, how to do the processing of the data. All these things will be part of this program,” says Afzal Suleman, an aerospace engineer and chair of UVic’s Aerospace Centre. “The idea is to create better (UAVs). We’re talking smaller ones, but also (UAVs that have) lighter environmental footprints.” On Friday, North Vancouver MP Andrew Saxton, on behalf of Western Economic Diversifi-

cation, announced $671,500 in funding for the centre. Richards says there’s currently a huge gap in supplies in the UAV sector – there’s little offered between million-dollar military drones and pieced-together hobby shop airplanes. “We’re trying to fill this huge market in the centre with something that’s cost-effective, still reliable and can be easily operated,” Richards says. And the potential commercial uses don’t just stop at farmers monitoring crops. UAVs could be used for forest fire patrols, coast guard surveillance, port security, border patrol, avalanche prevention, wildlife preservation and management and pipeline patrols. “Over the past decade, unmanned air vehicles and unmanned air systems have shown tremendous commercial potential,” Saxton says. “They can provide a cost-effective solution for tasks that are repetitive, hazardous, or that needs to be performed on short notice.” UAVs vary in size, with wingspans ranging from 50 centimetres to 3 metres. A UAV can fly for up to 30 hours with a highresolution camera affixed to the undercarriage, and follows a predetermined route, directed by a nearby mobile control centre. When the UAVs are at a stage for commercial use, Suleman says clients would rent or lease the aircraft, but they'd gather data and be operated by trained engineers. Richards says the federal gov-

North Vancouver MP Andrew Saxton, left, University of Victoria president David Turpin and Afzal Suleman, director of UVic's Centre for Aerospace Research, chat about unmanned air vehicles following a funding announcement aimed at getting UVic's new Aerospace Research program off the ground. Kyle Slavin/News staff

ernment’s investment will allow UVic to be at the forefront of this embryonic technology. Ultimately the Centre for Aerospace Research intends to produce prototypes for commercial and research purposes and UVic's Industry Partnerships will help the centre file patents for inventions, and create UAV licensing agreements. “We are really looking to bring more people in from different areas … bring all those people together and design products that are tailored to the specific applications, like agriculture monitoring,” he says.

Camosun to upgrade heritage Young building A nearly century-old building at Camosun College has been many things over the years: Victoria Normal School in 1915, a military hospital during the Second World War and home to Victoria College until Camosun opened in 1970. This year the Young building will be the focus of a renewal

and restoration process, buoyed by the province’s $1.3-million capital funding investment in Camosun College, announced Aug. 24. About $700,000 will be used for campus upkeep. Taxpayers are providing $52 million for Camosun's operations for 2012-13 – including an allowance for general infrastruc-

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A6 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

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Saanich teenager earns jump wings

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NEWS

Natalie North News staff

While a summer job or travel experiences might supply enough summer adventure to satisfy most new high school grads, some spent the past few weeks jumping from an airplane. “You just hear them say ‘Go!’ and immediately just jump out and you don’t even think about being scared,” said Jordan Wikstrom, one of 45 Canadian cadets awarded his jump wings this summer. “When you parachute, you can relax and enjoy the view.” After completing a rigorous training program at the Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre at CFB Trenton, Ont., and smoothly parachuting back down to earth five times, Wikstrom was presented with his wings by commanding officer Lt.Col. Paul Lockhart on Aug. 17. Completing the training was a decision the 2012 Reynolds secondary grad made when he first became a member of Saanich’s 3005 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps and learned a previous member of his corps had earned her wings. But before Wikstrom and his bold counterparts could jump, they were pushed to their limits by their commanding officers, he said. “They try to break you mentally and physically so that you won’t be able to push on, but you push yourself to keep going and you become more skilled,” Wikstrom said. “If you’re doing lots of push ups and you think you can’t handle it, you

Photo contributed

Jordan Wikstrom, 18, earned his parachute jump wings this summer at the Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre at CFB Trenton. have to engage your mind and think that you can handle it and then you’re able to do it.” At 18, Wikstrom has less than a year left with cadets and hopes to spend that time encouraging others to try out parachuting, to earn their wings and to reap the benefits, of both fitness and leadership skills, he said. “Once you’ve finished it, everything’s easy after that. It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

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COMMUNITY NEWS IN BRIEF

Saanich police seek victims of car break-ins Saanich police nabbed a chronic offender early Thursday morning for stealing from vehicles on Kimberly Place. An alert resident called police at 2 a.m. after seeing a man go into

his neighbour’s vehicle. Police found the suspect hiding in nearby bushes, and soon found electronic items, such as vehicle GPS devices. He was well known to officers for stealing from cars. Officers believe the items were stolen from vehicles left unlocked. People missing items from the their vehicles from the night of Aug. 22 or 23 and live in the area near the Pat Bay Highway, McKenzie Avenue and Quadra Street, can contact Saanich police at 250475-4321, and refer to SPD No. 12-17220.

Randall Garrison, MP ESQUIMALT–JUAN DE FUCA

Celebrate Labour Day Labour Day Picnic Sept. 3, 11am - 3pm

Irving Park in James Bay

Office: 250.405.6550 FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK!

www.randallgarrison.ndp.ca


www.saanichnews.com • A7

SAANICH NEWS -Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Aging centre seeks to craft better entry to long-term care Natalie North News staff

As Greater Victoria’s senior population grows, so will the strain on long-term health care systems. Last week federal and provincial governments awarded two University of Victoria researchers from the Centre on Aging more than $330,000 toward investigating how older adults transition through long-term care services. Margaret Penning and Denise Cloutier will lead the study aimed at understanding the common pathways that people experience, with an ultimate goal of providing better care. “Once we identify some of those common patterns, we want to say ‘Are there particular individual and social factors that are common to their experi-

ences?’” said Cloutier, a professor in the university’s department of geography. The study will evaluate data collected from people aged 75 or older connected to the Fraser Health Authority, the fastest growing health authority in B.C. Penning, of the UVic department of sociology, and Cloutier, will evaluate individual trajectories based on age, gender, income, social factors and available community resources. “We don’t understand a lot about what makes people spend a certain amount of time in home care and then transition into residential care. Or why they would go to residential care immediately, and then around that, what happens when they go in and out of hospital,” Cloutier said. “It is on those transitions that people are the most vulnerable. If we can learn more about those

transitions and who’s most vulnerable, we can presumably, plan better care and services in the years to come.” Diane Finegood president and CEO of the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research spoke to her own personal experience of having just witnessed a family member’s transition to long-term care. “I know we really need to understand those transitions better and really think about how to ease them and make them less inconvenient,” Finegood said. “If we’re going to tackle and overcome the challenges we face with the changing demographic of our culture, the rising costs associated with new technologies and the availability of resources, we need research and we need to put that research into practice.”

B.C. Ferries to cut 98 sailings Kyle Slavin News staff

B.C. Ferries will scrap 32 roundtrip sailings between Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen this fall and winter, making it a little harder to get off the island. The service reduction on the major route will impact periodic afternoon sailings on Fridays

and Sundays, as well as some Saturday morning sailings. “We certainly have the enough capacity (to carry all passengers) with the sailings we will sail,” said Deborah Marshall, executive director of public affairs for B.C. Ferries Regular odd-hour service will continue, but the reduction will impact some even-hour sailings.

Two other major routes – Horseshoe Bay to Departure Bay, and Horseshoe Bay to Duke Point – will see fewer sailings, also. “This is all in an effort to save dollars, which helps keep fares lower,” Marshall said. It’s estimated the 98 total scrapped sailings will save B.C. Ferries $1 million this year.

Students urge CRD takeover of transit planning Continued from Page A1

“Our efforts cannot eliminate pass ups entirely, but they will go a long way to address the high demand for transit service during the peak fall season,” said B.C. Transit president and CEO Manuel Achadinha in a prepared statement. “We ask our customers to be patient as our operations team makes the best possible use of our resources.” The Victoria Regional Transit Commission (VRTC) has also requested B.C. Transit order two additional buses for 2013-14 and will be presented with the

associated service hour options as part of a service review and three year budget process this fall. Keller-MacLeod and Lucia Orser, chairperson of the UVic Students’ Society, applauded the restoration of the hours earmarked for routes No. 4, 14, 16, 21 and 26 when the latest transit budget was released in April, but their goals reach beyond service hours. Last week the student representatives began a media campaign urging Transportation Minister Blair Lekstrom to abolish the VRTC and turn authority

for transit planning over to the Capital Regional District. While their focused efforts to rally support for changes to transit governance are relatively new, it’s all a part of the student groups’ long-standing mandate to ramp up student political engagement. Their efforts will be measured next spring during the provincial election. “We want students to know that there’s an election happening,” Orser said, “to go out and find out what party has the best platform on post secondary education and go out and vote.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

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Vision Matters Dr. Charles Simons

Healthy Eyes. Doctor Delivered.

Your School-age Child’s Eyes A good education for your child includes good schools, good teachers and good vision. Your child’s eyes are constantly in use in the classroom and at play. When his or her vision is not functioning properly, learning and participation in recreational activities will suffer. The following are the basic vision skills used at school: Near vision: The ability to see clearly and comfortably at 10-13 inches. Distance vision: the ability to see clearly and comfortably at arm’s reach and beyond. Binocular coordination: The ability to use both eyes together. Eye movement skills: The ability to aim the eyes accurately, move them smoothly across a page and shift them quickly and accurately from one object to another. Focusing skills: The ability to keep both eyes accurately focused at the proper distance to see clearly and to change focus quickly. Peripheral awareness: The ability to be aware of things located to the side while looking straight ahead. Eye/hand coordination: The ability to use the eyes and hands together. Disruption to any one of the above skills will cause your child’s eyes to work harder. This can lead to headaches, fatigue and other eyestrain related problems. Symptoms include: losing their place while reading; avoiding close work; holding reading material closer than normal; tending to rub their eyes often; complaining of headaches; turning or tilting head and appearing to use one eye only; making frequent transpositions of letters or words when reading or writing; omitting small words when reading; consistently performing below the level of their peer group. Since vision changes can occur without anyone noticing, children should visit the Optometrist at least every two years. More frequent visits may be necessary if specific problems or risk factors exist. The doctor can prescribe treatment if needed. Remember, a school screening is not a substitute for a thorough eye examination.

The Little Society That Could Its been 20 years since SVSS began assisting the residents of the Saanich community with ‘Neighbours Helping Neighbours’ and we’re hosting a garden party to celebrate this milestone. The event is scheduled for Thursday, September 20th from 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. and we invite present and former volunteers, clients, neighbours, supporters and friends to join the festivities. The occasion will be commemorated with the unveiling of our ‘Wayfinder’ map on the chip trail adjacent to McRae House, tea and goodies will be served and guests will have an opportunity to socialize under the big top in our yard. You must RSVP so call 250-595-8008 by September 13th if you plan to attend. Include Us in Your Fall Schedule As you get ready for the upcoming fall season you might want to venture into volunteering for a change from your usual activities. You can volunteer as much time as suits your schedule on whatever day you choose. Some of our tasks include gardening, visiting, driving clients to medical appointments, home repairs, and taking folks shopping. Join our team and start something new in life – call Heather at 250-595-8008. Drive and Shop We have clients who need a drive to the store and help in the store to make purchases. Presently we’re looking for a volunteer to take a client on her errands every other Wednesday or Thursday. You may have errands of your own to do at the same time. Give Heather a call if you like to shop and would like to help a Saanich neighbour do theirs. Thank You Volunteers We wanted to give a special thanks to our drivers and receptionists as we recently started booking drives on the computer. To the drivers for their patience and understanding and to the volunteer receptionists who are meeting the challenge with grace under pressure and still keeping their sense of humour. Thank you all. Community Partners:

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A8 • www.saanichnews.com

SAANICHNEWS

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Edward Hill Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Saanich News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-920-2090 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.saanichnews.com

OUR VIEW

Savoie earned city’s respect M

ost Victorians put politics aside upon hearing of Victoria NDP MP Denise Savoie’s decision to step away from her position. Citing a “health warning” from her physician, Savoie said last week she could no longer “represent her constituents to the standard they have come to expect.” Reactions ranged from shock to sadness, and the consensus formed around the region was that Savoie leaves big shoes to fill. With a career in politics running from her election as a Victoria councillor in 1999 to her rise as NDP MP in 2006 – a seat she held onto during two subsequent elections – Savoie earned a reputation as a steadfast representative. Despite political barriers, Savoie helped bring millions of federal dollars to the region for the Johnson Street bridge and sewage treatment projects. She previously spearheaded many regional environmental and humanitarian projects, including the development of the Galloping Goose Trail and the regional housing trust. That type of commitment and devotion to Greater Victoria citizens will be difficult to replace. Savoie’s “city council-style” politics will be missed. Her passion for bringing local concerns to federal ears made her stand out among her cohorts in the chamber. In stepping down from her post at the end of this week, she will leave a legacy of championing crossparty co-operation and initiatives that helped lead the government toward integrating provincial and municipal policymaking. Although Savoie would not speculate on her replacement, she is looking forward to a “pretty exciting” race for her seat. Among the names of potential byelection candidates being tossed about in local pubs are Victoria Mayor Dean Fortin for the NDP, as well as 2011 federal election candidates Patrick Hunt of the Conservatives, former Oak Bay Mayor Christopher Causton for the Liberals and former Green Party candidate Jared Giesbrecht. Beyond that, anyone who wants the job will have to answer to the people of Victoria and be able to speak clearly for them in Ottawa in order to earn the respect Savoie gained during her tenure in politics.

Victoria MP’s departure leaves big shoes to fill

What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@saanichnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Saanich News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Studying projects to death N

DP leader Adrian Dix has and more complaints to justify announced that one of his refusal at the provincial level, to go first acts as premier would along with court cases and directbe to withdraw B.C. from the joint action protests. review of the Enbridge Speaking of which, pipeline proposal from the frontal assault by Alberta to Kitimat. agitators at the federal The two-year federalEnbridge hearings has led review will be mostly mostly petered out. After done by next May, but Dix 4,000-odd people were proposes to start a new signed up to speak, most provincial assessment to didn’t bother, and some examine the B.C. portion. hearings were cancelled. He doesn’t know how Apparently slacktivists much it would cost, and such as “Jonathan L. under questioning he all Seagull” and “Cave Man” Tom Fletcher didn’t make it out of their but admitted the intention is to study the pipeline to Vancouver basement B.C. Views death. suites to tell the panel oil Fresh from a summer is bad. tour of the pipeline route to reaffirm Professional environmentalists solidarity with its opponents, Dix are now wringing their hands over is hardly in a position to consider Ottawa’s decision to leave smalleranything but maximum resistance. scale reviews to the province. This As Premier Christy Clark did means, for example, that there in her showdown with Alberta won’t be a duplicate federal review over benefits, Dix hinted that of the urgently needed refit of the provincial permits for river and John Hart Dam on the Campbell wildlife crossings would be made River. as expensive as possible, if not One reader suggested that refused. environmental pioneer Roderick The same fate awaits the Kinder Haig-Brown is still spinning in his Morgan plan to twin the existing grave over the damming of this Trans-Mountain oil pipeline to legendary salmon river. Perhaps, Burnaby. Dix left the impression but that was in 1947. Does it make that he would undo the years sense today to lard pointless of work that have gone into bureaucracy onto a reconstruction bringing some rational sense to that replaces wooden pipes and environmental approvals that can provides earthquake protection, be, and have been, dragged out for without expanding river impact? years. NDP environment critic Rob The B.C. hearings would provide Fleming hammered away at the another platform for opponents, B.C. Liberals about this in the

spring, reminding them that Auditor General John Doyle had exposed a lack of resources in the B.C. Environmental Assessment Office, even before Ottawa’s changes. Fleming makes it sound like a huge new burden has been dumped on B.C. False. Provincial assessment already must be done with the participation of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Transport Canada, the provincial ministries of natural resources and energy and mines, and of course aboriginal communities. This is why it’s so long and expensive. And don’t be fooled into believing that a federal review would go out and count the tadpoles and caribou again. It’s only the desk jobs that have proliferated. There weren’t just two levels of duplicate review, but three. Earlier in their mandate, the B.C. Liberals exempted major projects such as mines and energy generation from local government control, citing the “provincial interest” similar to the federal authority over projects that cross provincial borders. I agree with the NDP that B.C. environmental assessment needs more resources, in particular to do the follow-up on approved projects, as called for by the auditor general. Forest management needs more money too. All the more reason not to waste resources on political gestures. –Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Slacktivists didn’t make it out of their basement suites to tell the panel oil is bad.’


www.saanichnews.com • A9

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Canny coin collector Stephen Spigelman checks the date and value of coins at the Cedar Hill Recreation Centre. Spigelman spends time at the rec centre coffee shop sorting his vintage money at least twice a week where people often stop to chat, and then learn about the history of coins. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

LETTERS Leave Panama Flats property as-is Re: Saanich moves on planning for Panama Flats (News, Aug. 17) I don’t believe much “progress” is needed in terms of developing the Panama Flats. As a runner, walker, dog owner and new mom, the Flats is already, in my opinion, developed enough. There are trails all throughout the area where birds do not nest, and it’s wonderful watching the flora and fauna change with the seasons. Where else in suburbia do you have wild, wide open spaces like this? I suggest that council members spend some time walking the area. I believe they would see that the Flats already serves its function as a floodplain, salmon-bearing habitat, rare ecosystem and recreational area. If council wants to strengthen our community, as any good council should seek to do, then why not spend the $45,000 “consulting” dollars to install signage and implement a local team of naturalists to lead tours? Lauren Hudson Saanich

More garbage cans needed in Saanich Once again the municipality of Saanich has done a splendid job of beautifying one of their traffic islands at Cedar Hill Cross Road and Richmond. While a short distance up the road at Mt. Tolmie Park the garbage cans are overflowing. Several times this summer I have seen fast food containers and beverage cups lying around at the summit parking lot at the mercy of the birds and the winds. During the summer it would be prudent

for the municipality to install additional receptacles at the beaches and parks, and make sure they are emptied on a more regular basis. Dennis Robinson Saanich

ICBC executive pay over the top Re: ICBC executives make drunken sailors blush (Guest comment, Aug. 22) I was a sailor and I wish I had even the expense account ICBC executives have. The unbelievable pay these people are getting is nothing short of disgusting, and mostly at the expense of customers whose rates keep going up. As with so many other companies and employers, wages keep going up and up, mostly due to the people in charge increasing their own wages. One particular statement in the column bothers me though: “Government monopolies like ICBC need to be constantly monitored by politicians.” Are you kidding me? Politicians are as bad, if not worse, for giving themselves raises and huge benefits while cutting back on everything to the taxpayers. They’re the last people we need watching how bureaucrats manage our money. We need people that can honestly relate to the taxpayer to watch the bandits. Larry Zilinsky Saanich

Rail could ship Alberta oil to B.C. Re: Oil refinery proposed for Kitimat (News, Aug. 22) A pipeline is not needed. Bitumen oil from the Alberta tar sands can be shipped across B.C. by liquid cargo containers shipping tanks on CNR flat cars

to Kitimat or Prince Rupert for shipping on cargo container ships to Asia or for a Kitimat refinery. Condensate could be shipped in returning containers to the oil sands. Two pipe lines are not needed, the railway is there. All we need is liquid cargo container shipping tanks. Herbert Matthews Saanich

Refinery could keep fuel dollars in B.C. Re: Oil refinery proposed for Kitimat (News, Aug. 22) As a non-user of petroleum (I make my own biodiesel) I have long argued that the first stage of action against the petroleum industry is not buying it. More than 80 per cent of gas and diesel are imported from Alberta, and almost 100 per cent of the five per cent mandated renewable content is imported from the U.S. That’s billions of dollars fleeing the province, which is not good for B.C.’s trade balance or deficit. If David Black is talking about refining fuel to sell within B.C., I almost think I would support the proposal wholeheartedly. My logic is: B.C. citizens are already burning billions of litres of this toxic stuff, but all the money goes out of province. At the very least we could make the poison here and at least keep the energy money internal. But this is a separate issue from the pipeline. Should the Enbridge threat go through, a refinery making fuel for use within B.C. would still mean that much crude would not be shipped to the coast and onto our waters. Kenji Fuse Saanich

Kitimat refinery proposal a good idea Re: Oil refinery proposed for Kitimat (News, Aug. 22) Media mogul and owner of the Saanich News David Black has my support for his proposal to build a $13-billion oil refinery near Kitimat to process heavy oil from the Enbridge pipeline. Why should we let the Asian countries buy our Canadian crude oil and refine it for their markets when we could add value by refining it here in B.C. and shipping them the finished product? This is a strategy that would create local jobs for our own citizens and address the environmental concerns around oil tankers travelling in B.C.’s coastal waters. And as long as Enbridge meets the conditions and standards set out by the premier, moving heavy oil from Alberta through a pipeline would be a heck of a lot better than shipping it by rail or truck. Shipping gasoline, jet fuel and other refined oil products by tanker is just as practical as shipping crude oil and lot safer from an environmental standpoint. There’s a lot we could do here in B.C. with a piece of the oil industry pie. Roop Virk Chilliwack

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes your opinions and comments. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Saanich News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 250-386-2624 ■ E-mail: editor@saanichnews.com


A10 • www.saanichnews.com

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Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

Bambi goes on offensive Woman chased by deer in Rockland calls for CRD action Daniel Palmer

tion officer Peter Pauwels. “Some pets have been attacked, but no people A Victoria woman who have been injured.” And your BANK was chased by an aggresPauwels said conservaturned you down? sive deer is afraid to walk in tion officers have only two her own neighbourhood. options with deer – kill Mary-Jo Morin, a Rockthem, or leave them alone. land area resident, said she “We don’t move deer,” he Lori Lenaghan was walking her dog Aug. 14 said, adding that tranquilMORTGAGE AGENT on Rockland Avenue when a izing only occurs when an lori.lenaghan@vericoselect.com deer came within a metre of animal is confined to an C. 250-888-8036 her and exhibited extremely area, such as when cougars F. 250-590-0736 aggressive behaviour. climb a tree. Each VERICO broker is an independent owner. “I started screaming, my “If it’s a serious threat to neighbours came out and public safety, we’ll have to chased it off,” Morin said, put it down. But in 20 years adding the incident is the on the job, I’ve never heard fourth encounter she’s had of a deer attacking a perwith what she believes son,” he said. is the same doe and her The Capital Regional Disfawns. trict’s 10-member deer manMorin called a provincial agement committee is nearAugust at the conservation officer, who ing its Sept. 5 deadline for a 31 Jericho Rosales attended the area but was final report on how to deal VICTORIA 31 Storyoga presents: unable to locate the deer. with urban deer. VICTORIA VICTORIA VICTORIA Girls Night Out (8 - 12yrs) “He asked me to take a “My feeling is now that September picture of the deer next it’s probably not going to 2 Antique, Retro & Collectibles Show time. I said that would be a be a case (where) the board Hair, Makeup & Fashion Shows by 6-8 Peninsula Players - Cinderella Auditions bitShows difficult because gets the final report and Hair, Makeup &&Fashion by Hair, Hair, Makeup Makeup & Fashion Fashion Shows Shows byby I was running away from it,” she then quickly makes a firm Sidney Fine Art Show - Adjudication 9 -12 said. and final decision. I suspect 11 Triple Threat Musical Theatre VICTORIA VICTORIA Conservation officers there will be a lot further Sharon Tiffin/News staff Fall Classes Begin NANAIMO rank calls by the level of discussion,” CRD chair Geoff Mary-Jo Morin is ready to defend herself and herNANAIMO dog Zeebo 13 - Dec 6 Grounded Yoga for Girls NANAIMO NANAIMO risk to the public, and with Young told the News. with a golf club, if necessary, from another deer attack. 16 Remembering Rosie only one officer Morin hopes the CRD can A Rosemary Clooney Tribute Hair, Makeup & Fashion Shows by Hair, Makeup & inFashion Shows on shift the come toby a conclusion so she Groom’s and 19 &Bride’s 20 Blood Donor Clinic Capital Region at can regain a sense of safety Groom’s and Fall 2012 Bride’s Groom’s Groom’s and and Bride’s Bride’s 20-Oct 4 ‘Into the Ice’ Lois Brown Enter to any given time, in her neighbourhood. COURTENAY Photography Exhibit tototo Enter Enter Enter bear and cougar COURTENAY COURTENAY NANAIMO “We went through the 26 Live Life to the Plus+ NANAIMO COURTENAY sightings tend to bunny situation (at the UniStoryoga presents: 28 take priority. versity of Victoria), it took VICTORIA Girls Night Out (8 - 12yrs) “We’re getting them years to resolve that. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th, 2012 29 Peninsula Garden Club - Plant Sale Pearkes Recreation Centre 10am-4pm a lot more calls Now, there are so many Tickets $10 Advance/ $15 @ the Door Bride’s and Groom’s EXHIBITORS Bride’s and Groom’s about aggressive deer around that you can’t Hair, Makeup & Fashion Shows by October A FASHION SHOWSEnter to to Enter deer, but so far, walk anywhere. I’ve started A A A 6 Caribbea Math Out Loud n Cruise COURTENAY COURTENAY nobody’s been carrying a golf club,” she FREE BRIDAL PLANNER 6 YoUnlimited: Inspirational NANAIMO nnCruise Caribbea Cruise nCruise Caribbea Caribbea injured by them,” said. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd, 2012 Women’s Conference Vancouver Island Conference Centre 11am-4pm said conservadpalmer@vicnews.com Tickets $10 Advance/ $13 @ the Door 12-14 Sidney Fine Art Show News staff

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www.saanichnews.com • A11

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Savoie lauded as dedicated public servant News staff

The day after the first anniversary of the death of Jack Layton, Victoria MP Denise Savoie (NDP) announced she will step down on Aug. 31 due to unspecified health reasons. “This spring, my doctor gave me a health warning,” Savoie said at her Victoria office Thursday with federal NDP leader Tom Mulcair. “After I considered these facts over the summer, I realized that I can’t continue to represent my constituents to the standards that they have come to expect.” The former Victoria city councillor and CRD director was first elected MP in 2006 (and was the first woman elected for the Victoria riding) and named NDP deputy speaker in 2011. She won re-election in her staunchly left-of-centre riding without much trouble in 2008 and 2011. “I got into politics to help make a better world for my children and

grandchildren. Now, it’s time for me to devote myself full-time to my family and to seeing my grandchildren grow up,” said Savoie, a 68-year-old grandmother of six and mother of three. Victoria Mayor Dean Fortin called Savoie a friend and a colleague, and said her skills advocating for Victoria in Ottawa will be sorely missed. The mayor credits her with helping bring millions in federal dollars to the city for the bridge and sewage treatment. She also helped the city navigate jurisdictional issues of the proposed and controversial marina near the Inner Harbour and live-aboard boaters on the Gorge Waterway. “She has shown a unique ability to really stay in touch with citizens, to work on behalf of local issues, and push much larger issues at the national stage. It's hard to do,” Fortin said on Thursday. “For a lot of local issues she was a great voice for us in Ottawa dealing with the federal

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bureaucracy.” Like Fortin, fellow NDP MP Randall Garrison (EsquimaltJuan de Fuca) worked with Savoie during their days as civic politicians. “It’s a great loss to Victoria. She was a dedicated pubic ser-

vant as a city councillor and MP,” he said. “It’s a very hard decision to make, but I don’t think she’ll regret taking care of her health. It’s the right thing to do.” Garrison noted Savoie’s role as deputy speaker was perhaps not appreciated in Victoria, but

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A12 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

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Prices are in effect until Sunday, September 2, 2012 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (avour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental chargeâ€? where applicable. ÂŽ/ TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. Š 2012 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

ŠMasterCard & PayPass are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Back a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial banking services are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC. PC points loyalty program is provided by President’s Choice Services Inc. ŠPC, President’s Choice, President’s Choice Financial and Fresh Financial Thinking are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. Trademarks use under licence.


www.saanichnews.com • A13

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Langford Lake residents capsize school rowing plan St. Michaels University looking for new location Kyle Wells News staff

Langford city councillors have voted down a proposal to build a rowing facility on Langford Lake after listening to the concerns of nearby residents. The decision, made in-camera because it dealt with a property issue, was unanimous among councillors. “The letters we were getting and the information we were getting showed that the people weren’t in favour of it,” Coun. Lanny Seaton said. “And we kind of said that it’s up to them.” The proposal was a joint venture

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between Langford and St. Michaels UniSt. Michaels director of finance and versity School. The plan was for rowers administration, Michael Murgatroyd, said to use the lake for practices from Septem- council’s decision is disappointing, conber to June, mostly after school. A rowing sidering the time and effort that went into lane would have gone up the centre of developing the proposal. However, he the lake. understands the decision. A report posted on Lang“It’s a community’s lake “It looked like ford’s website said that, and they do have other according to a consultation it was quite a bit for activities on it,” Murgatroyd process, two out of every said. “We did think we had one little lake. ” three residents on the lake a chance, we thought we opposed the plan. could fit in with them, with –Lanny Seaton “There’s no sense in going their activities, but they Langford councillor ahead with something if most don’t agree.” people are not in favour of St. Michaels is now lookit,” Seaton said. “I kind of think some peo- ing for another practice location to house ple were right. I was open to what the its rowers. people wanted to say but in my own mind It needs a sheltered body of water someit looked like it was kind of bunching the what close to the school, which complilake up a bit. It looked like it was quite a cates the search, Murgatroyd said. bit for one little lake.” kwells@goldstreamgazette.com

Victoria police target club drugs Four people face charges after Victoria police polished off a drug investigation that included the first known undercover drug purchase of ketamine. Over three months, VicPD’s Strikeforce and street crime undercover officers purchased ecstasy, ketamine and cocaine from a group of people dealing to the local bars and clubs. “Our primary concern was public safety, and getting these potentially deadly drugs off the street,” said Const. Harvey Stevenson. “These type of club drugs pose significant risks to the user given that their chemical composition is oftentimes compromised.” The undercover project, dubbed King of Clubs was a response to the increased popularity of club drug use in Victoria and the ecstasy-related deaths. In late 2011 and the early part of this year, three people died on the Lower Mainland and another went to hospital after taking ecstasy. Several deaths in Calgary were also related to the drug. In January, a 19-yearold man took the drug at a party in Saanichton. When friends noticed him convulsing, they called 911. He survived the overdose. VicPD say there’s a

5 year fixed

recent increase in ketamine use on the local bar scene. Ketamine, also known as Special K, is an anesthetic typically sold as a powder on the street. It is usually snorted, mixed in drinks or smoked. Four people were arrested and face numerous drug-related and trafficking charges: David Orchard, 36; Cheryl Weeks, 29; Christopher Cook, 42, and Sara Clough, 30.

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Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

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www.saanichnews.com • A15

SAANICH NEWS -Wednesday, August 29, 2012

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A16 • www.saanichnews.com

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Please be advised that on page 16 of the August 24 flyer, the Bell HTC Wildfire S White Prepaid (Web ID: 10215046) was displayed with an incorrect image. The phone is in fact a Bell HTC Wildfire S NOT a Rogers Nokia C3, as previously advertised. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

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B.C. health care workers will be required to get an annual influenza vaccine or wear a mask in all patient contact areas in the community or publicly funded facilities, starting this year. Provincial Health Officer Dr. Perry Kendall announced the regulation Thursday, a first for Canada. It applies to health authority staff, doctors, volunteers, students, contractors and vendors who come into contact with patients. Free flu shots have been made available to B.C. health care workers for years, and despite encouragement, fewer than half take advantage of them. The average vaccination rate for longterm care employees is closer to 60 per cent, but Kendall said that rate is still too low and has declined in recent years. Canada’s national advisory committee on immunization considers it a “professional responsibility” for health care workers to get their flu shot every year, Kendall said. The mask is being offered for workers who have a medical reason not to be vaccinated, and to avoid disputes with employees who simply refuse. “Progressive

Black Press photo

discipline” would be imposed on employees who refuse both during flu season, just as it would be for those who fail to wash their hands or take precautions when coughing, Kendall said. B.C. is the first province to move to mandatory influenza protection, following the lead of U.S. jurisdictions where vaccination has increased to more than 95 per cent. The B.C. Centre for Disease Control estimates that complete vaccination of health care workers would reduce the risk for patients by 47 per cent, as well as protecting the workers from infected patients. The annual influenza shot is made available around Thanksgiving each year, to prepare for a season that typically runs from

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late November until March. A new formulation is used each year to match the strains most likely to be circulating in North America during the winter. Kendall said he doesn’t know why immunization rates for health care workers have declined. But he cited persistent myths about hazards of contracting the flu from the vaccine or experiencing other adverse effects, which he said are very rare. “Some people believe they are healthy and don’t get influenza,” he said. The Canadian Nursing Association, the College of Registered Nurses of B.C. and the B.C. College of Physicians and Surgeons all support vaccination for health care workers.

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www.saanichnews.com • A17

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, August 29, 2012

THE ARTS

HOT TICKET Saanich Fair

The theme for this year’s Fair is Hats off to 145 Years and features the tractor. Mark your calendar for Sept 1 to 3 to experience amazing food, fabulous entertaiment, animal displays, enter a food eating contests, or just have fun. Adult admission $10, seniors/youth (ages 7-13) $7, kids under 6, free. Saanich Fairground, 1528 Stellys X Rd., Saanichton.

Toopy and Binoo bring theatre to tots Live action, animation and giant screens add to colourful production Charla Huber News staff

Toopy and Binoo are coming to town. If you are are wondering who they are, just ask a toddler. The mouse Toopy and his toy cat stuffed animal Binoo, household favourites on the small screen, are coming to life at the Royal Theatre, Sept. 16 for the show Toopy and Binoo and the Marshmallow Moon. Creating a stage play from an animated television program had its challenges for Patti Caplette, the show’s writer, director and choreographer. “We want people to expect a very imaginative, goofy and fast-paced show,” Caplette said. “Of course, the show will have the look and feel of animation and we are very aware of colour and texture to make them identifiable.” Toopy and Binoo travel with their imaginations to various lands and go on many journeys together in their animated series shown on Treehouse TV. In Toopy and Binoo and the Marshmallow

Submitted photo

The popular television characters Toopy and Binoo are hitting the stage at the Royal Theatre, Sept. 16, for Toopy and Binoo and the Marshmallow Moon. Moon, Toopy sets out to find the perfect song for the show. But finding the perfect song to sing to the children is only half the

battle because he also has to search for the perfect place to sing it. On his search, with Binoo of course, the

lovable pair run into a blue cat blues band, a crooner fish, some adorable sheep, a pair of love struck dragons and many other crazy musical characters. “Toopy can open the door and go into any land,” said Caplette, adding that animation and giant screens are “We want to incorporated into the show. “One see grown-ups minute they are standing up and under the sea and the next they are up dancing.” in space.” - Patti Caplette The show, which combines music, theatre, dance, puppetry and innovative multimedia technology should be a hit with the tots, but is written for members of the whole family to enjoy – including parents. “I always produce our shows for people two to 92 (years old),” Caplette said. “We want to see grown-ups standing up and dancing. Come and let your hair down.” The show runs 60 minutes with an intermission. Toopy and Binoo and the Marshmallow Moon is at the Royal Theatre, Sept. 16 at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Tickets are $33.50 and can be bought online at rmts.bc.ca. reporter@goldstreamgazette.com

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A18 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

Shakespeare with a view Daniel Palmer News staff

For those who didn’t get their outdoor iambic fill this summer, another Shakespeare play is popping up along Dallas Road. Shakespeare by the Sea is staging A Midsummer Night’s Dream nightly at 7 p.m. until Sept. 2 at Holland Point Park, in a relaxed and intimate setting for 100 guests

each night. “There is no Bard on the Beach here yet, but we’re going to be it,” said director Robert Light, who already has plans to expand to two plays next summer. “You look out onto the Juan de Fuca and Olympic mountains; it’s the perfect backdrop,” he said. As part of the process, the organization is holding a twoweek education program for young actors, ages 8 to 12 as

well as 13 to 19, to teach the essentials of Shakespearean acting. Students will then appear onstage as fairies and elves in the Sept. 1 and 2 performances. The 20-actor playbill is made up of local professional and community actors, including UVic acting students, who have been rehearsing for the past two and a half months. Light, who has been

involved in more than 80 plays in his career, said the success of A Midsummer Night’s Dream will see it return next year, along with a tragedy like Macbeth. “This is a very educated and artistic city. We know the audience is there and they want to see our show,” he said. Call 250-213-8088 or go to vicshakesea.ca for more information. dpalmer@vicnews.com

THRILLIONAIRE MEAL & REVEAL NIGHT Dine for $10 and get $5 to $50 in FREE SLOT PLAY. Bring this coupon to a participating* BC Casino or Chances on Wednesday and Thursday nights between 5 and 9pm, from August 22 to September 27, to get the $10 entrée special. After dining, take this coupon along with your receipt to Guest Services to get your mystery gaming chip with $5 to $50 in FREE slot play.

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NEWS

Ronson takes on new job at art gallery Jon Tupper, Director of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria announced that Janyce Ronson is the new Director of Advancement at the gallery. Ronson has been a member of the gallery’s senior management team since 2007 as the manager Janyce Ronson of gallery services. Ronson’s new role will see her take responsibility for the Advancement Department which includes the AGGV’s annual fundraising and community outreach initiatives. “Janyce has a deep understanding of the gallery, our donors and the community,” said Tupper, “She and her team will be working to build on and achieve new heights of success for the AGGV in the years ahead.” Ronson has an extensive background in working with non-profit and government organizations in strategic planning and development in both Alberta and Ontario. Prior to joining the gallery she had a successful career in retail management in Victoria. Ronson holds an M.Sc. from the University of Guelph in resources development and planning and a bachelor of environmental science from the University of Waterloo in urban and regional Planning. She began her new role at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria on Aug. 20. llavin@vicnews.com

Submitted photo

The Carinthia Double Sextet performs at Grace Lutheran Church, 1273 Fort St. at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30.

A taste of Austria The Carinthia Double Sextet is on a tour of North America and Victoria will be their last stop before heading back to Austria. The group has travelled the world over and were invited to China and South Africa, where they sang for Nelson Mandela. They are known for singing Austrian and international folk music as well as sacred and secular classical repertoire. The concert, sponsored by the Linden Singers of Victoria, will be at Grace Lutheran Church, 1273 Fort St. at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30. Admission is by donation. Go to kaerntnerdoppelsextett.com for more information. llavin@vicnews.com


www.saanichnews.com • A19

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Stay in Richmond. play for FREE in Vancouver

Get a FREE Vancouver Attraction Pass* and see the best of Vancouver by staying 20-minutes away in Richmond. Visit the Capilano Suspension Bridge Park, Science World at Telus World of Science, the Vancouver Art Gallery, the Vancouver Lookout and more - like the Stanley Park Horse-Drawn Tours. With a value of over $800 for a family of four and hotel rates in Richmond starting at only $89.95, it might just be the best summer getaway yet!

Kyle Wells/News staff

Capital City Centre’s sales office in Colwood features a display of what the suites will look like, complete with a balcony and view.

Capital City Centre opens sales office Building includes mock suite with view Kyle Wells News staff

Capital City Centre is taking the next step forward with the opening of its sales centre at the intersection of Sooke Road and Goldstream Avenue. The centre, which is now open to the public, features a model suite from the first tower, including a balcony and its projected view. Throughout September, buyers will have their first opportunity to select suites. “So you can actually get a feel for what the condos are like, including the view itself,” said League Financial Partners CEO Adam Gant. “It’s the launch of the main part of the first wave of residential units to be offered on the site.” Capital City Centre is a $1 billion project that, once complete, will be a

Breaking News All of Victoria’s breaking news online at vicnews.com oakbaynews.com saanichnews.com goldstreamgazette.com

14 acre community – the largest new development underway on Vancouver Island. League has also announced its new equity mortgage, intended to assist first-time buyers by offering its own financing to reduce mortgage payments. Much of the shoring is complete and the focus is now on removing dirt and readying the site for building. Foundations are predicted to begin going up early 2013. Spring 2014 is still the target date for the first commercial businesses to move in. The first residential high-rise is slated to open December 2014. The former CrossRoads Bar and Grill building is still up for sale. Gant said a new party (though he wouldn’t disclose who) has come forward with an interest in buying the building. Royal Road University, which showed initial interest, is still in the mix, Gant said, but noting that whoever can close a deal first will get the building. kwells@goldstreamgazette.com

**Valid only on new bookings made after July 15th for bookings of two consecutive nights or more between July 16 and September 16, 2012. No cash value. One attraction pass per person and one one-day transit pass per person up to a maximum of four people, per hotel room booking at participating hotels. Each pass valued over $200 based on general admission for all 11 attractions plus a one-day transit pass. $800 value based on a party of four or the individual pass rate multiplied by four.

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A20 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

The lonely job of tracking high-risk offenders Single officer keeps tabs on 50 people with histories of violence, sexual assaults Erin McCracken News staff

Like clockwork, Det.-Const. Shawn Robson’s smartphone beeps every few minutes, alerting him to a newly arrived email in need of his attention. Sitting at his desk in the Victoria Police Department’s intelligence section, the plainclothes officer mans two phone lines and two computer monitors connecting him to a network of contacts. This web helps him keep tabs on people living in Victoria who have committed terrible acts of violence in their pasts. “My Blackberry doesn’t stop,” Robson said. It’s indicative of the workload that comes with his job as the department’s lone high-risk offender officer. There are upwards of 300 convicted offenders who have been released and are now living in the Capital Region, a high number for the population size, Robson said. He monitors about 50 individu-

als deemed a high risk to reoffend. Some have sexually abused children and some have committed murder or other violent acts, while others have histories as prolific drug dealers. “It’s basically the top 50 that make me lose sleep at night,” he said. “The most stressful aspects that keep me awake at night are the most violent offenders or the fellows who have committed sex offences against children and, depending where they are in their life, are at a high risk to reoffend.” Victoria is home to three halfway houses that serve as a first stop for some people coming out of prison. That’s a lot for one city, Robson said, considering there are only a handful on the entire Lower Mainland. VicPD established its own highrisk offender unit about 10 years ago – the only one on the Island – and it is still considered relatively unique for a mid-size agency. The Vancouver Police Department has about a dozen officers to monitor their list of offenders. Given the logistical challenge of monitoring 50 high-risk offenders, Robson relies on high-tech computer programs and threat assessment training to try and predict whether someone is going to reoffend. Despite best efforts, offenders

“It’s basically the top 50 that make me lose sleep at night.” –Det.-Const. Shawn Robson

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Det.-Const. Shawn Robson, a nine-year police veteran who serves as the Victoria Police Department's lone intelligence officer responsible for monitoring high-risk offenders in Victoria. The undercover officer’s face is not shown to protect his identity. regularly skip town or reoffend. Roger Badour, who had been convicted of sexual assault with a weapon, forcible confinement and uttering death threats, was under strict parole conditions when he fled Victoria. Victoria police alerted the public in January 2011 that he posed “a risk of significant harm.” Badour was eventually

arrested on the Mainland and subsequently charged with firstdegree murder in connection with the Nov. 8, 2011 shooting death of a Princeton woman. “That’s an example of a fellow, despite our best efforts, who didn’t reach out for help when he clearly knew he was struggling,” said Robson, who was monitoring Badour at the time.

“He fled and he was in hiding for a long time and ended up (allegedly) killing that lady. That’s a tragic event.” To monitor such a high number of high-risk offenders, Robson works closely with fellow intelligence officers, as well as with Victoria parole and probation officers, Crown counsellors, corrections officials and several provincial ministries. Robson ensures those on his list have access to employment and housing, which help offenders rebuild their lives in society after sometimes spending decades behind bars. But, for Robson, the bottom line is the community’s safety. “While I care about the offender and I want to keep him stable, I care about the community more,” he said, his words punctuated by the sound of his beeping smartphone. “If that means put him in jail, that means put him in jail, 100 per cent.” editor@vicnews.com

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SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, August 29, 2012

www.saanichnews.com • A21

How to reach us

Gardening

SPORTS

Travis Paterson 250-480-3279 sports@vicnews.com

Teenage

agenda A look inside Victoria Royals rookie camp Travis Paterson News staff

Wearing baby blue socks, Brandon Fushimi stood out among the rest during Team Campos’ debut on the first day of Victoria Royals rookie camp last week. Fushimi, 16, is a return invite from last year’s camp. It wasn’t the socks that got him noticed, but it was easy to spot the right winger as he and centreman Tyler Soy, the Royals top draft pick in the 2012 WHL Bantam Draft, found early chemistry. The duo showed exemplary poise and skill as the banged home three goals in the second half of their first game, each off a passing play with each other. Along with speedy defenceman Jack Walker, they led the team to first place at the Rookie Camp, winning the Marty the Marmot Cup. Tracking 148 players on eight teams may seem daunting for head coach Dave Lowry. The new boss had plenty of help in assess-

ing the promising talent of last week’s rookie camp. But there’s no denying the magnitude of the four-day tournament which, for many players and families who made the trek to Victoria, was an introduction to the Western Hockey League. For regular fans who showed up to watch, it can be little more than a messy game of awkward 15- and 16-year-old teenage boys spinning out of control in an effort trying to impress the Royals brass. Players are adjusting to growth spurts and their play can vary from spastic and awful to slick and impressive on the same shift. “And that’s just it,” said Royals general manager Cam Hope, who was previously with the New York Rangers. “At an NHL rookie camp guys come in with a lot of energy but they’re fully grown and well aware of themselves – their skills are developed.” With 15-year-olds and even 16-year-olds, he said, there is a graceful allowance of error built into each player’s assessment. It’s more about what they show in terms of skill and potential. Intangibles are noted while mistakes,

Don Denton/News staff

Brandon Fushimi, No. 16, of Team Campos steps onto the ice to face and Team Grant during the second day of Victoria Royals rookie camp on Friday. for the most part, are not. But with 148 players, including two dozen or so top-end bantam draft picks swallowing up the bulk of the attention, players need to do something to stand out. And that’s why Lowry relies heavily on help from the entire front office of assistant coaches Enio Sacilotto, Ben Cooper and Geoff Grimwood, goalie coach Brady Robinson, director of player personnel Grant Armstrong, and head scout Garry Pochipinski. Throw in a dozen more community coaches brought in by Grimwood to oversee all eight teams, allowing Lowry and company to hold a birds-eye view from the press box. Not to mention the team has

a whole whack of scouts, 18 in all. They aren’t all here, but they have a vested interest, as they’re the ones responsible for inviting the players in the first place. Only 12 to 24 players actually moved from rookie camp to main camp this week, many of them draftees, only a few of which will actually play with the Royals this year. “We have a pretty good idea who will get first crack at gametime this year,” Lowry said. The most important factor for the 16-year-olds is improving their stock on the team’s depth chart. For the non-drafted 15-year-olds, it’s getting that all-important invite back for 2013.

“With rookie camp we can’t talk much with every player,” Lowry said, “but we can try to answer any questions they have.” So who organizes the camp, its 148 wide-eyed players and 300 equally wide-eyed parents? “It’s probably the busiest week of the year for hockey operations and communications guys Corey St. Laurent and Jeff Harris,” Hope said. Upwards of 100 players played in main camp beginning on Monday (Aug. 27), whittled down to two teams for Wednesday night’s National Bank Intersquad Game, 7 p.m. at Save-On-Foods Memorial Centre. sports@vicnews.com

Royals unite Walker brothers Top U.S.A. prospect joins Royals Travis Paterson News staff

The Victoria Royals have added a second Walker to the roster. Jack Walker, 16, has joined elder brother Ben, 19, in pursuit of a career in the Western Hockey League. Though Ben was the first to join the team when he made his debut part-way through last season, it was Jack who initially caught the Royals’ attention. In January, Jack represented his country at the 2012 Winter Youth Olympic Games in Austria and last month he played for Team U.S.A. at the Under-17 Five Nations tournament in the Czech Republic, where he helped his team win gold. “(The Royals) contacted me first,” Jack said on Thursday.

“My mom wasn’t all that fired up about giving a college scholarship.” – Jack Walker When you’re from Edina, Minn., the NCAA is kind of a big deal. Giving up your chance to play in Div. 1 hockey is a decision the whole community notices. “It took my brother going to the WHL to change things, and convince my family that this is the right path for me. I have an agent who had a couple of NCAA schools interested in me, and my mom wasn’t all that fired up about giving up a college scholarship.” By signing to the Royals, Jack, like Ben, has waved his NCAA eligibility, even though Jack has yet to make the team. The minor stipend of less than $100 per

week gives him professional status in the NCAA’s eyes. Right from the start, Walker is being compared to fellow 16-year-old Joe Hicketts, the Royals top draft pick from the 2011 WHL bantam draft. “Getting Jack is like having two first round draft picks from 2011,” said general manager Cam Hope. With the likes of Hicketts and sizeable defencemen Keegan Kanzig, 17, and Chaz Reddekopp, 15, the Royals are stocked with blue chip prospects on defence for the next few years, Hope said. Both Jack Walker and Hicketts are slightly on the smaller side but have explosive speed and are offensively gifted, projected as puck-moving, powerplay quarterbacks. Hicketts may hold a slight edge in making the team this year, while Jack might have to wait another year before joining Ben as a WHLer. sports@vicnews.com

Jack Walker skates during rookie camp Friday. Don Denton/ News staff


A22 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

Chargers promote coach Scot Cuachon has been named to the vacant basement of the men’s PacWest (B.C.) conferCamosun Chargers men’s basketence to a bronze medal at ball head coaching position. the 2012 provincial chamCuachon started with the Charpionships. gers two years ago as assistant “I’m excited about taking coach to Craig Price. Earlier this over a program on the rise summer Price took a job coach... it’s a very big opportuing and teaching at Medicine Hat nity for me,� he said. College in Alberta. Cuachon studied high “Price left the program in fanperformance development tastic shape and because of that, at the University of Westthe transition will be a much ern Ontario and has 10 smoother one,� stated Cuachon years of coaching experiin a release. “We have a great ence, including time with group of returning athletes, some B.C.’s U15 and U14 BC who have had opportunities elseyouth teams. where including the CIS to play.� Chargers basketball seaCamosun Chargers son starts in October. Cuachon was part of the program’s resurgence from the Scot Cuachon sports@vicnews.com

Arnold Lim Photography

Still kickin’

Victoria Regional Transit

Kickboxer Stan Peterec connects with a left kick against Tracy Huber at Summer Slugfest in the curling rink of the Archie Browning Sports Centre on Saturday night. He might look like a 53-year-old but Peterec fought like a 33-year-old as he defeated 35-year-old Huber. It’s Peterec’s fifth decade of fighting, joining a rare club in the history of prize fighting. Local fighters Ben Lee and Lindsay Ball won their fights while Alex Tribe fought to a draw and Hal Kreisel suffered a loss.

Effective September 4, 2012

Canada sweep rugby sevens tourney

Service Change Each September service is revised to best match customer demand. Service with higher ridership demand receive more service hours while trips will low ridership see some reductions.

More trips on routes with high demand: t t t t t t t

4 11 14 21 22 25 26

Hillside/UVic UVic/Tillicum UVic/Vic General Interurban Hillside/Vic General Maplewood/Admirals Walk UVic/Dockyard

1 10 24 50

trio of longtime Castaway Wanderers nationals, Chauncey O’Toole, Ciaran Hearn and Nanyak Dala. On Day 1, Canada blasted Bermuda, the Bahamas and Mexico. On Day 2 Canada defeated Barabados 45-7 in the quarterfinal and Jamaica 31-0 in the semifinal. It set up Canada versus U.S.A. in the final. U.S.A. scored first but Canada responded with three tries in the first half and won 26-19. John Moonlight (James Bay) ran in two tries in the final, including one off an interception at the end of the first half. Conor Trainor and Sean Duke (UVic Vikes) also scored one try each. Duke’s was the game winner, breaking a 19-19 tie late in the match. The CDI Premier rugby season starts Sept. 15. sports@vicnews.com

I am a newspaper carrier ‘‘and I’m a somebody’’

Reduced service on trips with low use: t t t t

Canada’s men’s and women’s teams both qualified for the 2013 Rugby World Cup Sevens tournament in Moscow by winning their respective divisions at the North American Caribbean Rugby Association Sevens (NACRA 7s) tournament in Ottawa on Friday and Saturday. The Langford-based women’s team outscored their NACRA 7s opponents by a combined total of 284-0 to grab the only qualifying spot for Moscow, The story was similar for the men, except with U.S.A. there, it meant a stiffer competition for the final. The men carried a heavy contingent of Victoria players, with three graduates of Oak Bay High, captain Phil Mack, Connor Braid and Sean White, as well as UVic Vikes sevens star Sean Duke, James Bay’s John Moonlight and, a

Richardson Royal Jubilee/Dockyard Cedar Hill/Admirals Walk Langford

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SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, August 29, 2012

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!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMING EVENTS

LOST AND FOUND

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

A COURSE IN MIRACLES. New Zealand’s ACIM Master, Jaedra Bullock, shares this life changing material in a simple, clear manner. Public Talk: Sept. 7th, 7-9 pm, Church of Truth, 111 Superior St. Workshops, Sept. 8th & 9th, 10-5 pm, Fine Arts Building, UVic. For info: Rachel 250-592-4338

LOST: SMALL leather black key pouch w/ 2 sets of keys in each outside zipper. Willows Park area. Please call (250)370-5414.

HSSE Supervisor Competition #BU12-0012 We have an immediate opening for a Health, Safety, Security & Environment Supervisor in BC. The successful candidate can be located in either lower mainland or Okanagan area. Responsibilites: Health, Safety, Security and Environment support to the Ready Mix, Aggregate, and Landscape divisions in Metro Vancouver, Okanagan Valley, the Shuswapp and Central BC, not limited to these locations. Duties: promote job safety and environment awareness; implement acceptable working methods and practices; compliant with Safety responsibilities; and champion on deďŹ ned HSSE topics. You will have 5 years of HSSE experience and have excellent verbal and written skills. Must be able to deal with sensitive issues and conďŹ dential information. QualiďŹ cations should include: Construction Safety OfďŹ cer and a combination of education and experience. Extensive travel will be required. Submit your resume by quoting competition number by August 31, 2012 to: BURNCO Rock Products Ltd Fax: (403) 440-3454 Attention: Human Resources OR E-mail: careers@burnco.com Visit www.burnco.com We thank all applicants for their in- terest. Only those chosen for an in- terview will be contacted.

INFORMATION Have your say. Get Paid. Voice your opinion on issues that matter and receive cash incentives for doing so.

Also, participate to win one of 10 prizes totalling $1000! www.yourinsights.ca

LEGALS

Notice is herebye given to Richard Norga that a sealed bids auction will take place at 4695 Blenkinsop Rd., on Sat, Sept. 1, 2012 from 2-4pm to sell approx 50 boxes of unknown possessions.

LOST. WOMEN’S coat, blue & white check w/pale oral print. lost in May. (250)656-8852. STOLEN: BRODIE HELLION AND SIMS OATH BMX BIKES. Locks cut and taken from home in Colwood. Brodie Hellion is silver/grey with spray painted red maple leaf, ďŹ ve years old, much loved and used for transportation to work. Sims is black with purple rims and black pegs, brand new. Please call Westshore RCMP 250-474-2264 ďŹ le #2012-10190. Cash reward, 250-514-4142.

TRAVEL TIMESHARE CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No risk program. Stop mortgage and maintenance Payments today. 100% Money back guarantee. Free consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

TRAVEL PERSONALS GET PAID To lose weight. $5,000 For Your Success Story. Personal Image TV Show. Call to qualify: 1-888-7717607. AVA@mertontv.ca www.mertontv.ca. HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 250220-3334 or 800-777-8000. www.interactivemale.com MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-888-744-3699

VISITING ARIZONA for the Winter? Meridian RV Resort. Good Sam-Trailer Life Top 100 RV Resorts in America. Check us out at: www.meridianrvresort.com or call 1-866-770-0080.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES MAKE A FORTUNE with $3000, we know how. Free info pack. Call (250)590-9634.

1-Up Single Parent Resource Centre is seeking caring individuals to participate in the Peer Helper

for Single Parents volunteer training. Successful candidates will receive training to provide one-on-one support for parents. Training will run once a week from mid Sept to late Nov. Interested individuals please contact Cheryl Dyck at cheryl@1-up.ca or call 250-385-1114.

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

ART/MUSIC/DANCING

BUILDING SUPPLIES

GROCERY STORE PRODUCT SAMPLERS

INTERVIEWS ARE taking place now for Fall Piano Lessons. All Ages & Levels welcome. 250-881-5549....on the web musiciswaycool.com

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

Need To Get Out Of The House, Talk To People & Create Extra Income? Try part-time work as a Food Demonstrator 6-10 days a month in major grocery & department stores. Job Description: You must be outgoing, able to work on your own, enjoy talking to people & doing basic cooking. Great for men & women, seniors, retirees & mature adults. Availability: Fri & Sat and/or Sat & Sun (the 2 days vary; you need to be available any 2 of the 3 days) from 11-5, 11-6 or 12-6. Requirements: • Fully uent in English • Able to stand 6-7 hr./day • Own a vehicle to carry supplies • Be well groomed & bondable • Able to carry medium weight equipment into stores. Pay starts at $10.50/hr. Training via DVD at no charge. Call JMP Marketing toll-free at 1-800-991-1989, press ext. 21 JMP Marketing Services Reliable since 1979 HAIRSTYLIST WANTED full time/part time for First Choice Hair Cutters in their Victoria location. Guaranteed $11/hour, 25% proďŹ t sharing, paid overtime, beneďŹ ts, paid birthday, vacation pay, annual advanced training and advancement opportunities. Call 250360-1923 today for an interview.

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, FOOD COMMERCIAL BEEKEEPING CertiďŹ cate Program. GPRC Fairview Campus, Alberta. Extensive study of beekeeping, Queen rearing and honey business. Paid work experience. Affordable on-campus residences. Starts January 7, 2013. 1-780-835-6630; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview

MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-888-744-3699 STEAMWORKS: A club for men to meet men. 582 Johnson St., Victoria. 250-3836623 steamworksvictoria.com

ADRIENNE’S RESTAURANT and Tea Garden at Mattick’s Farm has following job positions open: Chef/Cook, Dishwasher, Server. Only experienced and mature individuals apply to: t-garden@shaw.ca

TRADES, TECHNICAL LEARN FROM Home. Earn from home. Medical Transcriptionists are in demand. Lots of jobs! Enroll today for less than $95 a month. 1-800-466-1535. www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com

LOST AND FOUND FOUND: SET of 10 keys, Thurs, south side of Fort, between Vancouver/Quadra. Call 250-388-7744, 250-813-0716.

COMING EVENTS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

PERSONAL SERVICES

COMING EVENTS

BUYING & SELLING GOLD, SILVER, COINS, BANK NOTES

Local Numismatic Experts paying TOP prices.

SEE US AT THE COLLECTIBLE SHOW Sunday, September 2, 2012 9:30am - 4pm Sidney, Mary Winspear Centre Jack or Nancy Noble (250) 478-4418 www.paccoin.com

TRAIN TO Be an Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 31 years of success! Government certiďŹ ed. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456.

HELP WANTED An Alberta Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilďŹ eld road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051.

ALBERTA BASED Company looking for qualiďŹ ed & experienced: Equipment Operators, Mulcher, Feller Buncher & Processor Operators. Out of town & camp work. Safety tickets & drivers abstract required. Email resume: jobs@commandequipment.com Fax 780-488-3002. Journeyman Mechanic Do you love the outdoors? OK Tire in Terrace, B.C. NOW HIRING! Excellent renumeration for successful applicant. Fax resume to (1)-250-635-5367 Attn. General Manager or Email: momack@citywest.ca QUALITY CONTROL Person experienced with Piping & Structural Welding needed for a growing Northern Company. Competitive wages & beneďŹ ts. Please email resume to: info@torqueindustr ial.com. Fax 250-775-6227 or apply online: www.torqueindustrial.com

FLOORING

PIANO OR ute lessons with a qualiďŹ ed experienced teacher. Hillside/Landsdowne area. Call (250)386-8476 or email: salmongvpl@yahoo.ca

HEALTH PRODUCTS CASH BACK- $10 for every pound you lose. Lose weight quickly and safely and keep it off, results guaranteed! Call Herbal Magic today! 1-800854-5176.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

PERSIAN RUG 18’x12’ Medallion pattern. Like new. $12,000 obo. 250-287-2009

FREE ITEMS FREE: EXTRA large pet cage, call (250)721-0308. FREE. Two 6’4� x 3’10� glass panels. (778)265-1615.

FRIENDLY FRANK 16 GLASS and canning jars, all different sizes, $4 for all. Call (250)656-1640. 1940ish NECKTIES 30 for $30. Box of material $10. (778)265-1615. 3.2 CU ft Danby Fridge, $90 obo. Call (250)920-7472. DROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll Free 1 877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com M O N E Y P ROV I D E R . C O M $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certiďŹ cation, adoption, property rental opportunities. For peace of mind and a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

GREEN VELVET love seat, good condition, $45. Call (250)595-3562. KITCHEN TABLE, 4 chairs, Canadian Maple. $99. email: hellochrissy1@yahoo.com LAWNMOWER, Electric Compact Mulcher, used once. $75. (250)727-7741. PORCELAIN Collector doll, $75. Call (250)656-4853 or (250)889-5248 (cell). TWIN EXTRA long Springwall chiropractic mattress. Pillow top. $40. (250)598-2472. UBC BOOK of Medicine, 100 photos of 1985 graduation class. $75. (778)440-5771.

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, ďŹ r, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391. FIREWOOD - $200/cord, seasoned ďŹ r. Super dry, bone dry ďŹ r, $200/cord, no delivery fee. Yellow Cedar, $250 cord. Call Mike at 778-679-7687 or 250-642-6647.

RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Portraiture-Baby+Family Maternity. Home Movies to DVD. Call 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest ďŹ rewood producer offers ďŹ rewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

PETS

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

LEGEND 4 wheel Scooter...1 year old, only driven 4 times. Comes with all the bells and whistles...canopy, cane holder, basket and more. Asking $1800 OBO. Also available a $500 ramp for 1/2 price OBO. Phone 250-655-3849.

ANTIQUES/VINTAGE

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

3-PIECE ANTIQUE Rattan furniture, Imperial Rattan Co. Sofa, chair, ottoman. Great condition. $150. Call (250)6564853 or (250)889-5248 (cell).

HOME THEATER Audio system, boxed, never used, $300. Collector plates (endangered species), full set (10), $200. Call (250)474-2325.

PETS FREE KITTENS to good home. Call (250)818-8813.


A24 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

FOR SALE BY OWNER

HOUSES FOR SALE

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

AUTO FINANCING

2 MOTHER of the Bride dresses, size 16 and 18, never worn, $150 obo. Nurses uniform tops (8), $10 each. Call (250)294-6238 or cell (250)413-7301.

LOWREY ORGAN Symphonic Holiday.4 channels, upper/lower keyboard, about 4’L x 2’W x 3.5’H, $600. obo. SCOOTER Rascal Continental,good working order $400. (250)544-2116

YAMAHA ELECTONE Organ C35, good condition, great for home, hall or church. Asking $2500. Call 250-386-9881 (afternoon or evenings.

CEDAR HILL, female seeking roommate, 2 bdrm, clean, $480 mo + utils. 250-686-0603

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0� Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division. POCKET COIL MATTRESS Sets w/10 yr FULL (Non prorated) Warrantee $399., Q/Size $499., K/Size $699.; Q/Size Leather-Look Beds $299., Cherry Bunk-Beds w/Mattresses $489.; 3Pc or 5Pc Wood Dinettes $159.; Rockers, Recliners, Loveseats 1/2 PRICE! Carpenter, Mechanic’s, Handyman Tools & Hdwe to 50% OFF & No HST! All On Sale, Must Go! BUY & SAVE, 9818 4th St., Sidney. buyandsave.ca Visa, M/C

FOR RESTLESS or cramping legs. A fast acting remedy since 1981, sleep at night, proven for 31 years. Mon-Fri 8-4 EST 1-800-765-8660 www.allcalm.com

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED Osteoporosis~MS~Fibromya lgia? Increase Performance? Commercial Vibration machine. Clinically proven. (250)287-2009.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER

10353 DEVLIN Plc, Sidney. Private rancher $499,000, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, lrg treed lot. Complete details at w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192295 www.realtor.ca mls #307481

SHOP-RIDER 4W SCOOTER new batteries, annual checkup. New Evolution 4 wheel walker w/basket+ additional Walker. Very fancy wine rack, w/lock & key. Fireplace tools. Call for more details, (250)380-4092. STEEL BUILDINGHuge Clearance Sale! 20x24 $4,658. 25x28 $5,295. 30x40 $7,790. 32x54 $10,600. 40x58 $14,895. 47x78 $19,838. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

LANGFORD, FURNISHED large rm, tv, internet, utils incl, $550. Sept. 15. 250-883-0157

FABULOUS SWEEPING OCEAN VIEWS Looking for an incredible low maintenance home with minimal yard work, amazing views & move-in ready? Beautiful 2bdrm + large den, two sunrooms, two decks, hardwood oors, gas F/P, skylights, 2.5 baths, garage + more. Built for view & privacy. 2200 sq ft. Dead-end, quiet street steps to beach. Saxe Point Park area. $575,000. 250-383-0206, 250-382-7890. Seasidevictoria@gmail.com

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

STUDY.WORK. S U . O

SUCCEED.

TRAIN TO BE A PRACTICAL NURSE IN VICTORIA TODAY!

With the aging population, Healthcare & Healthcare providers are some of the hottest career opportunities available. Practical Nursing is one of the fastest growing segments in healthcare. Train locally for the skills necessary in this career Àeld.

MAYFAIR AREA (Open House), Sept. 1, 10:30-12:00 PM. 4 bdrms, 3 bath, 1 bdrm suite. $464,900. 3174 Yew St. 250-812-4910.

BRENTWOOD 3-Bdrm above ground bsmnt suite. 1600 sq.ft., 4-pc bath, W/D, inline kitchen, dining & living room. Utils incld. Close to schools, bus stop & shopping. Avail now. $1500./mo 250-652-0038 BRENTWOOD Bachelor quiet, priv entr, central area. NS/NP. $600 incl. 250-652-6680 eve’s. LANGFORD: SPACIOUS 1 bdrm, 1 bath, laundry, $900 mo all util’s incl. Avail Sept. 1st. NS/NP. (250)389-0983. LARGE BRIGHT 1 bedroom suite, $900 month! Includes heat, hydro, hot water, garbage pick-up, shared laundry, separate ground level entrance, small pets considered. Large shared fenced back yard, on main bus route, close to West Shore Mall. Located in Colwood on a quiet dead end street. Call 778-433-2056 for viewing.

RENTALS

Qualicum Beach: $295,000 1512 sq.ft. modular, 5yrs old, on own land in 45+ Coop Park. 2bdrm +den, 2baths. Close to beaches and golf courses. (250)738-0248

SOOKE RANCHER Beautiful, immaculate, 1,649 sq ft executive rancher located in Whiffen Spit Estates, Sooke, BC. 10,000+ sq ft lot. Asking price $429,900. 250-686-5372

250.384.8121 www.sprottshaw.com

CALL VICTORIA:

1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, ďŹ rewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250478-9231. LANGFORD TOP FLR 2 BR DEN 2 BA LUX CONDO w POOL, nr RRU; vaulted ceilings, gas ďŹ replace, u/g pking. Sept. No smokers/pets. 1 yr lease. $1550. 778-433-2239 MT. DOUGLAS Court- 1550 Arrow Rd, Bachelor Suite, $450. Lower income seniors 55+ only. NS/NP. Cable, heat, hot water incl’d. Avail immed & Sept. 1st. Call 250-721-1818. SIDNEY, 1bdrm, bright, freshly painted, close to amens, quiet, N/P, $800 mo. 250-658-9373

METCHOSIN (near Metchosin Golf Course) 2 bdrm walk out suite (approx 900sq ft, 9’ ceilings). Bright, open plan with private entry, private deck w/view, 5 appls, F/P, storage, parking, quiet area. NS/NP. Refs. Avail Sept 1. $1200+ cable/internet/phone. Call 250)727-7878. SIDNEY: BACHELOR suite, by park, ocean, bus. ND/NS/NP. Appl’s, some furn, most util’s. $875. Leave message and ref’s (250)655-8826.

or

apply

at:

www.

greatcanadianautocredit.com

SOUTH OAK BAY- 650 Victoria Ave. Solid 1939 2 bdrm, 1 bath, sunroom+ patio. 947 sq.ft.+ full 6’ bsmnt. Sep. wired garage, 49’ x 110’ lot. New roof. Natural gas. $550,000. ďŹ rm. 1(250)653-9799.

SUITES, UPPER 2 NEW Furnished suites, $600, $700, utilities included near Elk Lake, buses, parking, no smoking/pets 250-7040325 captain@headsupnav.com SIDNEY, 3-bdrm. Quiet, large yard. Quality area near park & bus.N/S. $1375. 250-665-7324

TOWNHOUSES SIDNEY- NEW 2 bdrm + den, W/D. NS/NP. $1700 mo. Avail immed. Call 250-217-4060.

CORDOVA BAY Character House. $599,900. (Bring Offers). 3 bdrm, 3 bath. Walk out private suite, view, on bike trail. Handicap features. Call 250-818-5397.

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

BUYING OR SELLING?

TRANSPORTATION

SIDNEY(5TH STREET) Available now & Sept 1. 1 bdrm & 2 bdrms. $800, $925, $1100. New paint, Sm pet ok. Coin op, includes H/W. Call Equitex 250-386-6071.

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

HOMES FOR RENT CENTRAL SAANICH- (Arthur Dr) 1 bdrm suite, waterfront, quiet neighbourhood, 640sq ft, own W/D, F/S, 1 car parking. $800. NS/NP. Refs. Call (250)544-0470. COLWOOD: 3 or 4 bdrm + hot tub avail Sept. 1. Great family home located on quiet a cul de sac in the desirable Wishart area. $1900/mo inclds water, garbage pickup. You are responsible for 2/3 hydro (you have your own heat thermostat). Private laundry, D/W. Will consider pet (not a fenced yard). Pet deposit req’d, ref’s, Absolutely NO smoking. Call 250-478-4606.

WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in August $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. 1-888-593-6095. www.creditdrivers.ca

AUTO SERVICES $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

CASH PAID

FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427 Call us ďŹ rst & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

CARS 1977 CADILAC Eldorado, beige metallic. Cruise control, automatic. Very good cond., only 80,000 km. Please call (250)477-7076. 1984 380 SE Mercedes, 126. Daily driver, gold with sunroof. Leather interior, no rust. $1800. obo. (250)595-7573.

UVIC AREA, avail now, fully furn’d, all utils incld’d & hydro, N/S, no drinkers. $600 mo. (250)721-0418.

SIDNEY. 1-BDRM top SE corner. Balcony, near ocean, parking. $850. 250-812-4154.

WE BUY HOUSES

COMMUNITY COLLEGE S i n c e 1 9 0 3

-229-0744

SUITES, LOWER

LAKEFRONT PROPERTYDesirable location in Sooke, $575,000. View by appt. (250)658-9133.

HOMES WANTED

SproUStt-S ha w JOIN ON:

Loans1-888

CLEAN, INSULATED, centrally located in Sidney. Garage for rent. Available immediately. $375. abroad5@live.com

CAYCUSE Very rare 5 acre treed park-like Property with well-maintained furnished home - 1500 sq.ft, 3-bdrm, 2 bath. Extremely close to Pristine Cowichan Lake. Perfect for recreational property or full time living. Reduced to sell $378,800. Exceptionally low yearly cost. Not leased land. Call 250-745-3387 or 250-478-2648

HOUSES FOR SALE

JOIN US ON:

Auto

STORAGE

APARTMENT/CONDO EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557 Guaranteed

1956 CONSUL MKI Estate Wagon, ONE OF APPROX 15 IN THE WORLD. Body, paint and motor all done. Lots of new parts. The car needs assembly. Will Trade for British and Cash. MUST SELL. No Time. Have all receipts. Call 250-490-4150 (Penticton, BC).

AUTO FINANCING

LANGFORD, 3 bdrm, 2 bath house, $1500 mo + utils, N/S, pets neg, large sundeck, W/D hookups. (250)478-6272.

2004 CHRYSLER 300M, 135,000 kms. Fully Loaded, including Winter tires and rims. Asking $5300. 250-508-4663. 2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 ďŹ rm. 250-755-5191.

$50-$1000 CASH For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

858-5865 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

1992, 26 ft TRAVELAIRE, Class C Motorhome. Bright, clean, sleeps 4. Twin beds in back and fold down double bed. Excellent and clean condition. Full shower with skylight, gas generator, air conditioning, second owner, new internal batteries (worth $600), new water pump, only 91,300 km. Reliable, clean and functional. REDUCED to $11,500. (250) 748-3539

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES 1999 ML 320 V6 Mercedes Benz SUV, good shape, low mileage. New tires, loaded, 4 wheel drive, $9000 obo. Call (250)478-5836 or cell (250)818-5754.

2009 ACADIA SLT, AWD, seats 7, loaded. 60,500km. $30,000. 250-923-7203

SIDNEY- (James White Blvd) 3 bdrms, 1.5 bath, quiet neighbourhood, close to bike path & all schools, easy access to all amenities. W/D, F/S, D/W. NS/NP. $1400. Call (250)5440470.

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SIDNEY. WATERFRONT 3 bdrm, 3 bath, heritage house, $2300 + utils. 250-812-4154.

 Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402


www.saanichnews.com • A25

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, August 29, 2012

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

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GARDENING

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HAULING AND SALVAGE

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

PLUMBING

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COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites, etc. 250-886-8053, 778-351-4090.

J&L GARDENING Specialty yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. John or Louise (250)891-8677

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

CONCRETE & PLACING

1st & last call- Auricle homes-commercial & strata’s Call 250-882-3129.

RBC CONCRETE Finishing. All types of concrete work. No job too small. Seniors discount. Call 250-386-7007.

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CBS MASONRY BBB. WCB. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Natural & Veneered Stone. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. (250)294-9942/(250)589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

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250-216-9476 ACCEPTING clients, From the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601 CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT

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BATHROOM REMODELING. “Gemini Baths” Plumb, Elec. Tile, Cabinets. 250-896-9302. CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

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DRYWALL

CARPENTRY BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748. COMPLETE HOME Renos. Carpentry, Drywall, Painting. Licenced insured. Call Darren 250-217-8131. DECKS, STAIRS, interesting projects. 30 years experience. Frank, (250)477-3315. GEOF’S RENO’S & Repairs. Decks, stairs, railings, gates & small additions. 250-818-7977. McGREGOR HOME Repair & Renos. Decks to doors. Small jobs OK. WCB. (250)655-4518 ROB’S RENO’SDecks, stairs, fences. Carpentry; interior, exterior. Concrete forming & placement. 250-8181798, (778)433-1788. STEPS, DECKS, Fence, new repairs, rot, mould, painting, concrete, brick. 250-588-3744.

AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525. MUD on the RUN. Small drywall repairs, textures & renovations. Ross, (250)812-4879.

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193 QUALITY Electric. New homes, renos. No job too sm. Seniors disc. #22779. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202.

ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualified, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com DPM SERVICES, lawn & garden, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141 EXPERIENCED GARDENER - Have tools, will work - P/T or steady. Dean (250)727-7905. GARDEN OVERGROWN? Weeding, lawn cuts, cleanups, pruning. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

MOVING & STORAGE

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS 250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates. AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, Guards, windows, powerwashing, roof de-moss, repairs. Insured. Call (250)507-6543. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

HANDYPERSONS AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BEETLES RESIDENTIAL Renovations Ltd. Bathrooms, decks, painting, landscaping and handyman services. Fully insured and guaranteed. Free estimates. Call 250-889-4245. BIG BEAR Handyman. Decks, Stairs, Painting, General household repairs. Free estimate. Call Barry 250-896-6071

GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632.

CHIMNEY SERVICES JKG CHIMNEY. Clean, Repairs, Gutters, Roof Demoss, Torch On Flat. 250-588-3744.

KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Small hauls. Call Fred, 250-888-5345.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Perimeter drains, driveway prep, Hardscapes, Lot clearing. Call 250-478-8858.

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

WE HAUL CHEAP LTD. Moving & Hauling. (250)8811910. www.wehaulcheap.com

GREAT RATES! Guar. cleaning since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. (250)385-5869 MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estates, events, offices. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

U-NEEK SEATS. Hand cane, Danish weave, sea grass. UK Trained. Fran, 250-216-8997.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

YARD ART. Yard Maintenance, Tree & Hedge Pruning, Lawn Care. Call 250-888-3224

SMALL ADS, BIG DEALS!

✭BUBBA’S HAULING✭ Honest, on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service. 250-478-8858.

PRESSURE WASHING

MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

PAINTING

STEREO/TV/DVD

250-886-6446 YOUR Personal Interior Painter. No Job too Big or Too Small. Call Gilbert today for free quote. ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. BIG BEAR Painting. Interior & Exterior. Quality work. Free estimate. Barry 250-896-6071 COLOURS & IDEAS. Exterior/ Interior Painting. All work waranteed. Call (250)208-8383. LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

WANTED: FLAT screen TV (inexpensive) for a single parent. Please call 250-514-6688

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376. FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734. DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. Senior and student discount. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler 250-418-1747. MALTA MOVING. Residential & Commercial - BBB Member. (250)388-0278.

PLUMBING

CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

CLEANING SERVICES

SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578. SMART GUYS Hauling. Garden waste, junk removal, clean-ups, etc. Reliable, courteous service. 250-544-0611 or 250-889-1051.

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

PLASTERING

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS DEMOSS Dr. $499 per/roof. 2 years warranty. We also install new roofs? Call 250-589-4998

RUBBISH REMOVAL

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178. RE-STUCCO & HARDY Plank/Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB. NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-812-3213, 250-590-2929.

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

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A26 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

NDP aims to stop Enbridge pipeline Tom Fletcher Black Press

2012 Jetta - 2.0 Highline TDI Diesel Cash Purchase Incentive

MSRP from only

$32,245

WITH

Includes Freight & PDI

• • •

Navigation 17” Alloy Wheels Bluetooth Connectivity

$1,000

Lease for only OR

$391

per month for 48 months*

Off the MSRP

• • •

Sunroof Leather Interior Heated Front Seats

Volkswagen Victoria A new division of the German Auto Import Network

3329 Douglas Street | 250-475-2415 | vwvictoria.com *Limited time finance purchase offer available through Volkswagen Finance, on approved credit. MSRP of $32,245 for a new 2012 Jetta 2.0 Highline TDI is based on a 6-speed automatic transmission model, including $1,365 freight and PDI. Lease example of $391 per month is based on a base model with a rate of 4.9% for 48 months. Down payment of $3,048.98 or equivalent trade. Doc of $395, levy, air, PPSA, security deposit and all applicable taxes are extra. Total Obligation is $21,816.98. †Cash Purchase Incentive of $1,000 based on cash purchases only and off the MSRP of n-stock models Available financing at 0.9% APR for up to 36 months equals. Down payment or equivalent trade-in, due at signing, may be required. Dealer may sell for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Offers end August 31, 2012 and are subject to change or cancellation without notice. 2012 Jetta shown above is for illustration purposes only and may have additional options. Certain options and accessories may be extra. Vehicles may not be exactly as shown. Visit Volkswagen Victoria for details. “Volkswagen”, the Volkswagen logo, 60 year anniversary logo and “Jetta” are registered trademarks of Volkswagen AG. Motor Trend® Magazine is a registered trademark of Source Interlink Magazines, LLC.© 2012 Volkswagen Canada. DL 4991428

NDP leader Adrian Dix has found what he believes is a legal roadblock to the Enbridge Northern Gateway oil pipeline from Alberta to Kitimat. Dix announced Wednesday that if he becomes B.C. premier next spring, he will withdraw from the federal-provincial review of the pipeline that is currently underway, and launch a “made in B.C.” review of the pipeline. If that doesn’t result in rejection of the project the NDP opposes provincially and federally, Dix said the B.C. cabinet would have the final say. And if Prime Minister Stephen Harper tries to overrule the province, the battle would shift to individual provincial permits required for river crossings and wildlife corridors in B.C., he said. Dix and NDP environment critic Rob Fleming said the B.C. Liberal government’s decision to cede control over environmental assessment to Ottawa, and then present no evidence at the fed-

NDP leader Adrian Dix eral hearings, left the province out of the discussion. Premier Christy Clark and Environment Minister Terry Lake have announced pre-conditions of pipeline and tanker safety, and provincial officials are scheduled to cross-examine Enbridge before the federal review panel makes its recommendation to the federal cabinet next year. Dix emphasized that the B.C. cabinet can overrule its own environmental review, just as the federal cabinet can. A provincial

review of technical issues would have to be carried out to justify refusing provincial permits, he said. Lawyer Murray Rankin was hired to advise the B.C. NDP. He said the joint review agreement with Ottawa allows B.C. to give 30 days notice and opt out, and the existence of the agreement shows that B.C. does have jurisdiction over whether the pipeline proceeds. Dix said he wants to return B.C. to separate federal and provincial reviews of major projects, like the Prosperity gold mine near Williams Lake, where the B.C. government issued a permit, but the federal review later rejected it and spurred a costly redesign. Dix said he met Tuesday with Black Press chairman David Black, who is backing a refinery at Kitimat to process oil sands crude for shipment by sea. Dix said the idea of refining crude domestically is worth pursuing, but the Kitimat proposal doesn’t change his opposition to the Enbridge plan. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Smell gas? Get out, then call: FortisBC’s 24-hour Emergency Line at 1-800-663-9911, or 911. Natural gas is used safely in homes across B.C. every day. FortisBC adds an odourant that smells like rotten eggs or sulphur. If there’s a leak, you’ll smell it.

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from Fortis Inc. (08/12 11-001.5A)


A2 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

www.saanichnews.com • A27

SAANICH NEWS -Wednesday, August 29, 2012

M E AT & P O U LTRY | F I S H & S E A F O O D

F R E S H FA R M & O R G A N I C P R O D U C E

Fresh! Fresh!

buyBC™

Fresh!

Fresh!

Wild Halibut Steak

buyBC™

Chicken Breasts

BC Waters 13.56 Lb

2

Lean Ground Beef

99

Cooked Shrimp Meat

1

100 G

39

Previously Frozen Machine Peeled 6.30 Lb

Luncheon Meat Sliced

100 G

1

Lb

Fresh!

Pork Loin Chops

Chicken Thighs

Ea

AUG/SEPT 2 0 12

4

3

99

TH U R

Ea

FRI

29 30 31

S AT

SUN

MON

1

2

3

Ea

lb

3.59

Lactantia 454 Gram Package

6/$1.80

Corn on the Cob ea

BC Grown 0EACHES#REAM

Or 30¢ Each

3

Lilydale Zam Zam Frying 7.25 Kg

29

T-Bone or Porterhouse Canadian Beef Grade AA or Higher Family Pack 15.41 Kg

6.99

3.99

#HILLED*UICE lb

Tropicana Assorted 1.75 Litre Carton + Dep

.38

Watermelon ea

Product of USA Whole Seedless .84 Kg

Green Beans lb

Fresh!

California No. 1 #ERTIlED/RGANIC 1 Lb Clamshell

Ea

7

Canadian Premium Grain Fed 11.00 Kg

Ea

4.99

Pizza lb

s2ISTORANTEs0ANEBELLO Dr. Oetker Frozen 325-450 Gram Box

3.99

Nectarines ea

BC Grown Yellow Flesh Fresh Picked From the Okanagan 3.28 Kg

1.49

Grapes lb

69

= SAVINGS!

-ULTIPACKss6ANILLA0LUS Island Farms 12 x 125 Gram Pkg

s&ROZEN9OGURT s3HERBET s)CE-ILK Island Farms 1.65 Litre Ctn

5

99

4

59

s(EARTY"OWLS s2EGULAR46 Dinners Swanson Frozen Assorted 284-383 Gram Pkg

3

99

Weight Watchers Asst’d 170-332 Gram Package

Yogurt Activia Assorted 650 Gram Tub Danone

10

4/$

2

99

s$ELISSIO0IZZA627-927 G NestlĂŠ Frozen

s3AUT� Sensations 640 G Stouffer’s Frozen

5

99

Cheese s-OZZARELLAs#HEDDAR Faith Farms Random Weights Approx. 400 Gram Package

4

s+IDSs#HEERIOS s/ATMEAL#RISP General Mills Assorted 310-505 Gram Box

99

s$ICED6EGETABLE(ASHBROWNS s4ASTI4ATERS s3UPER&RIES s"REAKFAST0OTATOES

3

49

Breyers Assorted 1.66 Litre Carton

California Fancy

s,IMES

Grown in Mexico

5/ 2 $

Green Seedless California Grown #ERTIlED/RGANIC 4.39 Kg

99

¢

BC Grown Fresh Picked 2.18 Kg

Lb

Cantaloupe California No. 1 Grade Whole Large Size

2/$4 149

s+OREAN-ELON s$RAGON&RUIT s'UAVA

2 99 1

s'RANOLA"ARS

3

99

399

Nature Valley Assorted 160-230 Gram Box

s&RUIT3NACKS Betty Crocker 180-255 Gram Package

4

2/$

s*AM500 mL Jar s0EANUT"UTTER 500 Gram Jar Kraft Assorted

7

2/$

Granola Bars s#HEWYs$IPPS Quaker 156-187 Gram Pkg

5

2/$

Real Mayonnaise

99

Imported 3.28 Kg

lb

Asian Golden Pears

Certified ORGANIC

Imported *UICY3WEET

lb

4/$3

Nanaimo North Town Centre 4750 Rutherford Rd., Nanaimo Port Alberni Plaza 3737–10th Ave., Port Alberni STORE HOURS All Locations: 8am–10pm except Quadra: 7am-11pm Sidney-By-The-Sea: 7am–9pm Brentwood Bay: 7am–10pm

1521 McKenzie at Cedar Hill Rd., Victoria Westshore Town Centre 2945 Jacklin Rd., Langford Sidney-By-The-Sea 2531 Beacon Ave., Sidney Brentwood Bay Village 7108 W. Saanich Rd., Brentwood

2

99

Kraft 890 mL Jar

s#HEDDAROR-OZZARELLA Cheese 500 G s3HREDDED#HEESE 340 Gram Package Sargento/Black Diamond

5

99 Hoisin Sauce Lee Kum Kee 306 mL Jar

s#OKE XM,s6ITAMIN7ATERXM, s$ASANI7ATERX M, s!QUAlNA7ATERXM, s0EPSI!SSORTED 12x355 mL Tin + Dep s0EPSI!QUAlNAXM,

Cookies

Margarine

Salad Dressing

9

3/$ 99

McCain Frozen 454 G-1 Kg Bag

Classic Frozen Dessert

s,EMONS

Lb

Green Peppers

ASIAN & BULK FOODS

Cereal Yogurt

99

¢

California Field US No. 1 Grade Large Size 2.18 Kg

Certified ORGANIC

F RforE S H D A I RY & F R O Z E N F O O D S

%NTRĂ?ES Smart Ones

Lb

Gorge Centre 272 Gorge Road West, Victoria Shelbourne Plaza 3651 Shelbourne St., Victoria Athlone Court 2187 Oak Bay Ave., Oak Bay Quadra Street Village 2635 Quadra St., Victoria

FAIRWAY+ BACK TO SCHOOL

www.fairwaymarkets.com Photos used in this ad are for presentation purposes only. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some advertised items may not be available at some locations.

1

Lb

Tomatoes

ea

Pork Back Ribs 99

BC Grown Fresh Picked 3.73 Kg

Strawberries

699

Fletcher’s Boneless Asst’d 800 Gram Package

69

¢

Fresh!

Lb

Smoked Ham

Zucchini Squash BC Grown Green 1.52 Kg

Grilling Steak

Fletcher’s Assorted 750 Gram Package

Fletcher’s 500 Gram Package

3.99

Salted Butter

Lb

Smoked Sausage

19

WED

Lb

Sliced Bacon

Cooked Ham Fletcher’s Sliced 375 Gram Package

3

99

299

Lilydale Zam Zam Frying 6.59 Kg

Fresh!

Center Cut Boneless Premium Canadian Grain Fed 8.80 Kg

79

Except for Ham Fletcher’s Assorted 175 Gram Package

299

All Size Packages 6.59 Kg

Chicken Drumsticks

Product of BC Family Pack LIMIT 2 Pkg Per Family "ONELESS3KINLESS+G

Becel Soft 680-907 Gram Tub

4

99

s7AGON7HEELS ' s6IVA0UFFS' Dare Your Choice

Kraft 414-475 mL Bottle

5

2/$

s2ICE#AKES s#RISPY-INIS Quaker Assorted 100-214 Gram Package

Soup

5

2/$

Habitant Assorted 796 mL Tin

5

3/$

1

99

Snacks

Beverages

s"ITS"ITESs#RISPERS s3NACK#RACKERS Christie 100-454 Gram Package

Fruit Rivers Sun-Rype Assorted 1 Litre Carton + Dep

Potato Chips Lay’s Stax 155-163 Gram Package

2

49

5

4/$

Margarine

99

¢

Potato Chips s&AMILY3IZE 270 G s+ETTLE#OOKED 180 G

8

3/$

Lays Your Choice

s3OFTsÂź Squares Parkay 1.28-1.36 Kg Tub/Package

s3YRUP460-700 mL s0OWDER540-750 G Nesquik

s)CED4EAs.ESTEA Good Host 640 G-1 Kg Tin

3

69

4

99

Herbal Tea Drink Wong Lo Kat 310 mL Tin + Dep

Chocolate Chips Foley’s Per 100 Gram

1

99

Red Label Cooking Wine Taiwan 600 mL Bottle

89

Rice Sticks

59

Crystalized Ginger

¢

¢

Diamond Dongguan 400 Gram Package

Per 100 Gram

3

69

99

¢

1

79

Sauce s3OYs4ERIYAKI Kikkoman 591 mL Bottle

Soy Beans Wumu / TTEBUY.com Frozen 400 Gram Pkg

Scotch Mints Dare Per 100 Gram

399 1

79

49¢


A28 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, August 29, 2012 - SAANICH

RIVER ROAD

Friday 8 am - 9 pm Saturday 8 am - 7:30 pm Sunday 8 am - 7:30 pm Monday 8 am - 7:30 pm

Specialty Chocolates Dark Hot Chocolate Mix LACTOSE, SUGAR

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2/

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5

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Kiwi Fruit 3/ 00

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2.56 kg

COMPLIMENTS

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340 g

Chicken Breast

BC

NEW CROP!

Romaine Hearts 96 Each

312 g Pkg

MAPLE LODGE

NEW ZEALAND

Braeburn Apples 16 per lb

Blueberries

Yellow Potatoes ¢ per5 lblbbag

56

3 Pack

346

1.23 kg

LOCAL

Greek Yogurt

7

Select

Asst. Select Var.

00 500 g

LOCAL ISLAND FARMS

ISLAND FARMS

Milk 96¢

LOCALPARADISE ISLAND

46

5

500 ml Asst.

4

12x125 g

MEAT AT

Halibut Fillets

ISLANDD RAISE

966 2

396

per lb 21.29 kg

per lb 8.73 kg 2 Var.

Cooked & Peeled Prawns

per lb Ready 5.64 kg to Eat

2

56 per 100 g

BAKERY LOCAL

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Multigrain Bread

100% Whole Wheat, 12 Grain or Oatnut Bread

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800 g

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Classic Ice Cream

236

396

200-220 g Asst.

FENTIMANS

BASSILI’S

Brewed Beverage

Quickies Meals + dep. 275 ml Asst.

96¢

1.65 L

per 100 g

ARBUTUS RIDGE FARMS

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Beet & Onion Salad

96¢

per 100 g

per 100 g

Pancake Mix

Crackers

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905 g

236

225 g

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Napkins

Paper Plates, Cutlery & Cups

286

25%

250 Pack

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96 680 g

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250 g

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Sports Drink

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OFF Sizes

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96¢

POWERADE

ISLAND FARMS

Potato Chips

196

Asst.

Ground Beef

FRESH

56

Asst.

per 100 g

IND WE GR WN EXTRA LEAN OUR O

Whole Chicken Legs

No Back Attached

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3

Loin Lamb Chops

Bone-In

LOCAL

OLD DUTCH

ALIAN AUSTR

296

Variety of Flav.

5 Pack

GROCERIES ER

OCEAN WISE

Boneless/Skinless

250 g

Mild, Medium or Aged

per 100 g

Homous

Gouda

26

1

ARBUTUS RIDGE FARMS

DUTCH

Organic Butter

Multipack Yogurt

26

E COBBLL HIL

Greek Pita

DAIRY GREEK GODS

& GLUTEN FREE

www.peppers-foods.com

PRODUCE

N! W O R G BC

2/

NEW!

!

L LOCA

Holiday Hours

NEWS

Apple Juice

EUROPE’S BEST

Frozen Fruit

66

4

SEAPOINT FARMS

PRAIRIE HARVEST

Edamame Soybeans

Organic Pasta

¢

99

+ dep. 1L

Assorted 600 g

2 Var.

1

250-477-6513 • 3829 Cadboro Bay Rd. www.peppers-foods.com

We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some restrictions may apply on certain promotions.

96

Asst. Select 454 g Var.

226

454 g

Hours Mon-Fri: 8 am–9 pm Sat: 8 am–7:30 pm Sun: 8 am–7:30 pm


Saanich News, August 29, 2012