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The Lake Cowichan

Community:

Gazette Sports:

CLRSS annual river clean-up fast approaching

Annual 1/2 Cutz Tournament once again a success

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PAGE 8 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

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VOL. 16, NO. 33

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CRTC approval means long-range planning is possible for local radio Tamu Miles Gazette Editor

“Little radio station goes big time,” reads the headline of the press release sent out by CICV, 98.7 FM, the Lake. On August 9, at 9 a.m., the Cowichan Lake not-forprofit radio station received notice from the Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission that it has been approved to begin transmitting at 50 watts instead of 5. “This will definitely improve signal strength and reception to our present listeners,” said Mike Bishop, chair of the Cowichan Valley Radio Society. But it also means a much broader broadcasting area once the station’s transmission tower is relocated. “Our testing has shown that from the new transmitter site we can be heard as far to the east as Tansor and westward to the Youbou lands and beyond,” said Bishop. A location has been identified, but not released as the station is in the process of attaining the rights to the property. The announcement also means security for the radio station. “It’s good for seven years,” said Bishop. “We don’t have to go back and ask them for anything until 2019. It gives us a chance to do some long-range planning because we’ve got a long range future.” The biggest adjustment, says Bishop, will be that as of September 1, listeners will have to set their dials at 97.5 FM to tune in to CICV’s programming. On August 10, Area F Director, Ian Morrison used the announcement as an opportunity to present Bishop with a cheque for $1,000, half of which is in support of the Summer Nights program happening Saturday evenings all through August. “We’re using the radio station because they’re an established organization that can receive funding. There wasn’t an umbrella group that could have represented the loosely knit people that were putting that together,” said Morrison. The other half of the funds goes towards the station directly as a grant-in-aid. “It was in a sense partially in pursuit of the license and various expenses and upgrades. Now, I realize that this is sort of a small part . . . [they] will have to do some serious fundraising for the next stage,” said Morrison. “The radio station’s announcement is just huge in my book,” added Morrison. Morrison sees the radio station as a unifying force, tying together all those who live around the lake regardless of local government divisions. He also commented on the stability this provides local

AL OUT N I F AR E CL

2012

Tamu Miles

Once again the Clarence Whittingham tugboat made its annual appearance at this year’s Youbou Regatta on Saturday, August 11. Whittingham’s family brings the tugboat to Arbutus Park every year for the Clarence Whittingham 1/4 mile swim and the canoe race. For more pictures of all the fun, go to page 9.

students when looking to participate in radio station programming as part of their curriculum through Lake Cowichan Secondary and middle school. “You know, there’s kids that go into the school and help with techie stuff, but not knowing what the long range future of the radio station is, is somebody that is in Grade 7 or 8 going to want to invest time and energy into something like this if they don’t know if it’s going to be there,” said Morrison. Another thing that excites both Morrison and Bishop is the fact that the new transmission range will allow the station to become part of the emergency brodcast system, keeping Cowichan Lake residents up to date in the case of an emergency. To this end, Bishop has been speaking with Protective Services at the CVRD. “This is our main underlying goal,” said Bishop. “We’ve got standby power right now so that we can run the whole station in the event of a power failure.” The station has also recently acquired gear that allows them to broadcast back to the station from anywhere in

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the current range, and which allows them to be mobile at any time, transmitting from either cell phone link or landline. “In this area, ever since the start of the Great Shakeout, our station’s been involved with that ever since the first one,” said Bishop. “And our intention, once we get more established in that, is to coordinate with the school.” Bishop adds that the October deadline for the next Shakeout practice for the town is too close for the station to coordinate with them at this time. The station is still looking for a new studio location, as their lease with the town of Lake Cowichan for their current location on Wellington Road expires in February 2014. “But we are still looking at different options,” said Bishop. Stanley Gordon Elementary is not entirely off the table as an option, and Bishop says that Mike McKay, the Ministry of Education appointed trustee, is reviewing the station’s application.

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Lake Cowichan Animal Rescue’s Giant Garage Sale was a terrific success! Thanks to our many volunteers and supporters. All proceeds support the rehabilitation of homeless animals in our community.

TownofLakeCowichan NOTICEOFPROPERTYDISPOSITION Public notice is hereby given that the Town of Lake Cowichan is proceeding with the disposition of land legally described as Lot 1, Cowichan Lake Land District, Plan EPP20156 in the Town of Lake Cowichan to the Vancouver Island Regional Library.  The disposition of propertywillbefornominalconsideration.  For further information regarding this matter please contacttheTownofLakeCowichanat250Ͳ749Ͳ6681.  JosephA.Fernandez ChiefAdministrativeOfficer

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Proposed funding service for Cowichan Sportsplex could mean an end to continued grant-in-aid Tamu Miles Gazette Editor

The Cowichan Valley Regional District is looking for support from its municipalities and electoral areas for a new funding formula that would provide some stability in the ongoing funding of the Chesterfield Sport Society, the non-profit society that runs the Sportsplex in Duncan. For the past several years, the Sportsplex has relied on continued grant-in-aid from these municipalities and electoral areas, meaning a residential tax rate for all jurisdictions of .64 cents on every $100,000 for property owners. A new financial contribution service would eliminate the need for this continued grant-in-aid each year, and would provide the extra $46,000 being sought for 2013. In order to make this happen, the CVRD is looking to poll the municipalities and electoral areas to see which are willing to participate in the service, and as a result draft a bylaw which would define the partners and how the annual requisition would be allotted between them. If all 13 agree to the service, it would mean that residents would be paying a capped (using 2012 assessment data) .94 cents per $100,000 assessment. “Creating this service creates some permanence for the Sportsplex, at least more concrete than a regional grant-inaid,” said Joe Barry, manager, legislative services for the CVRD. This has been an ongoing issue for the CVRD and the Sportsplex, and the last time a poll was conducted was in 2010 with five municipalities/electoral areas voting for the service, four voting against (or choosing not to participate), Lake Cowichan and Areas F and I being among them, and four saying their participation was conditional. At the last Lake Cowichan council meeting on Tuesday, August 7, Coun. Tim McGonigle, who sits on the CVRD board, clearly outlined the proposal for mayor and council, and reiterated that in the last vote, the town did not support the service. “I don’t think it’s fair to the Sportsplex to continually come back year after year seeking a regional grant in aid . . . I think it’s fair for the people who want to finance this function be afforded that opportunity and those that do not wish to be afforded the opportunity to back away,” said McGonigle.

“I don’t think the answer lies in the elected officials at that table. I think it’s time to get this subject off the political realm and into the public’s hands,” he added. Currently, per area usage of the Sportsplex sits at 1.9 per cent for Lake Cowichan, .6 per cent for Area I, and .8 per cent for Area F. McGonigle would like to see taxation based on these numbers as opposed to a flat rate spread across all electoral areas and municipalities. Barry says that this formula is definitely an option, “but it has to be the political direction,” he said and added that the issue will go to the public after it is determined which municipalities and electoral areas are willing to participate and which funding formula will be used in order to draft a bylaw which will then be given three readings and be sent back to the municipalities and areas for review. The type of public input depends on the public process requested by the board; either an alternative approval process which would need 10 per cent no vote to see the service defeated, and would see a minimal cost to the public, or a referendum, which could cost the public $65,000 region wide, according to Barry. Catherine Brandon, the executive director of the Sportsplex says that as a not-for-profit, the facility does not just generate funding through municipalities and electoral areas, but also through fundraising, donations, and sponsorships, but these are becoming harder to come by. “In the beginning it was easier to generate these funds to build the facility,” said Brandon. “But now we need operating money,” for things like washrooms, maintenance, and staff wages. “The only way we can continue operating [in 2013 without a new funding service] is by tapping into reserves that are finite. We don’t have enough to continue,” she said. She states that without continued funding the facility would have to be turned back over to the Municipality of North Cowichan which would erode the tradition of the Sportsplex and end up costing tax payers more. Her plea to the public is for them to make their voices heard by their elected officials. “There are a lot of events here and a lot of Lake Cowichan people participate [in these events]. Give your director a call and let them know you are in favour,” concluded Brandon.

New agreement meant to provide better medical care for rural area patients Tamu Miles Gazette Editor

On July 24, the Ministry of Health released a statement saying that a new agreement has been reached with B.C. doctors that will support the recruitment and retention of physicians and will also improve access to specialists and medical care for those in remote communities. Part of this plan includes strategies in a new Physician Master Agreement. And while Lake Cowichan is not considered remote (though it is rural) or a community in need, many of the incentives in this agreement are meant to help communities such as this one. Dr. Jonathan Griffin of the Cowichan Valley Division of Family Practice says that the biggest issue doctors face is the delivery of health care, and that the new agreement works to try and solve many problems with delivery in B.C., and in the Valley. Though these initiatives were only started two years ago, Griffin says they are a “large change in how health care is currently delivered,” and that the Division of Family Practices is one way that this is being accomplished. “For example, the Cowichan Valley Health Network is a community body made up of 50 organizations,” said Griffin. Everything from church groups to politicians are involved and have input into what the community sees as the most prominent health care needs. “The group sits and determines these issues and then rethinks how to deliver appropriate solutions,” said Griffin. Other initiatives in the Master Agreement that are meant to help communities such as Lake Cowichan are things like the Practice Support Program. This program provides learning modules for doctors and

their medical office assistants. These modules provide them with information on how to better manage patient wait lists and scheduling, increase efficiency, and improve care for patients with chronic diseases. “When booking, this allows doctors to leave spots available for urgent visits,” said B.C. Medical Association president, Shelly Ross. It also provides information on things like creating group visits. “For example, doctors can set a morning aside for a group of 30 people with diabetes to come in and be given common information and learn from each other,” said Ross. This program also allows physicians to work directly with specialists to provide direct care for patients and reduce the need to set up separate appointments with these specialists. “In the past GPs were hesitant to talk to specialists, but now specialists are paid for these calls,” said Ross. Griffin states that though the Division of Family Practices is aware that there has been a loss of physicians in the Lake Cowichan area, “we have started work there both for immediate needs of patients and for the longer term. The clinic [Brookside Medical Clinic] offers services to assure needs are met immediately and will manage these needs while finding someone for long term care.” None of the doctors at Brookside Medical Clinic were available for comment at press time. However, we at the Gazette are interested to hear whether these incentives are making a difference at the clinic and with patient care in Lake Cowichan. Email us with your feedback to editor@ lakecowichangazette.com, or post to our Facebook page.


www.lakecowichangazette.com

Beth Kidd

Tamu Miles Gazette Editor

At its annual Giant Garage Sale, the Lake Cowichan Animal Rescue Society grossed approximately $2,700, according to Marg

Lake Cowichan mayor and council would like to remind local residents that there are sprinkling/watering restrictions in effect all year round, and it is especially important to abide by these restrictions now that summer has hit with full force. “Odd-numbered premises may water on odd-numbered days and even-numbered premises on even-numbered days. Sprinkling may occur between 6 and 9 a.m. and 7 and 10 p.m. on the appropriate day,” reads a memo from the Tuesday, August 7 meeting. Failure to comply with the restrictions could result in a fine, although hand watering of trees and shrubs, flowers or vegetable gardens may occur on any day of the week. Coun. Frank Hornbrook did note that he was surprised at the time frame for the restrictions, as he thought that they were only in effect from June 9 to September 30. This comment started a discussion at the table about the hours given for watering, and what works best for local residents and for Public Works town employees. “We used to have water regulations that restricted watering to six and ten-oclock,” commented Joseph Fernadez, the town’s chief administrative officer. “That was for the mornings and the evenings, and council changed it to three hours in the morning and three hours in the evening.” He went on to say that the problem with the current hours is that they cause a bit of confusion for residents because hours are not consistent for morning and evening. It also causes some difficulties for town employees who don’t start work until 7 a.m. on weekdays. “So it doesn’t work for Public Works,” said Fernandez. “You have them watering past nine at times, and as a result you have the public coming and saying, look you have them watering at all hours of the day. If the town doesn’t have to comply, why should we?” The table then discussed the possibility of either changing the hours to be more consistent, ie. From 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., and from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., or going back to the four hour morning and evening watering hours. Coun. Tim McGonigle did point out that the reduction in hours was an effort to ensure water conservation. “I think by evening the time-lines that we would negate the confusion, but I don’t think I would be in favour of adding an hour to that,” said McGonigle. He pointed out that people can still hand water if they need to. “What I would like to see in the water restriction is something along the lines of: should the [fire department] alarms go off that sprinklers are turned off to ensure water pressure for the fire department services,” added McGonigle. All at the table agreed that they would like to send a friendly reminder to town residents to turn off sprinkler systems in the event of a fire alarm. They also discussed how to deal with the Public Works watering hours issue, and whether or not these hours need to be separate from residential hours – though not more – and decided that town staff would look into alternatives and investigate what other municipalities are doing and come back to council with recommendations for the next Public Works meeting.

Livingstone, one of the society’s members. Even though attendance was a little spotty, and it was hard to gauge just how many people attended, Livingstone says it went well overall. “The auction alone generated just under $300,” said Livingstone. There was a tie for the kids contest to guess how many Lego candies were in a water bottle, so Livingstone filled another bottle with the candy to ensure that both received a prize. The basket from Country Grocer, one of the prizes in the raffle, went to Lorraine Oliver. The second raffle item was a pet portrait by artist Trudy Kungold Ammann. Livingstone says the portrait will not be drawn for until October 15, but she says that ticket sales for this raffle item did well. Two unexpected contributors to the event were Megan and Kyle McKechnie. The two local youth raised $19.36 through lemonade sales in one afternoon. The two informed their patrons the proceeds would be donated to the Animal Rescue Society. Both plan to volunteer with LCARS. Leftover items from the event will be sold at smaller garage sale events throughout the year. The next one will take place sometime in October.

being covered by the Ministry of Social Development, and Atkinson is starting to feel like he is, “feeling better now” and is getting “back to the grind.” Small crowds of concerned neighbours gathered on both sides of Youbou Highway on the night of the incident as Lake Cowichan RCMP, Fire Department, and B.C Ambulance responded to the scene. Paramedics tried to resuscitate the driver of the motorcycle and his passenger. Both were taken to Cowichan District Hospital and the passenger was released with non life-threatening injuries. The Youbou Highway was blocked off from Indian Road to the intersection with Highway 18 for several hours, and police along with the collision analyst were on the scene until approximately 3 a.m., according to Lake Cowichan RCMP Const. Preston. Residents trying to return home to the north side of Neva Road were asked to leave their vehicles on the south side and walk home. Const. Preston took the names and phone numbers of many so he could inform them of when they could retrieve their vehicles. —editor@lakecowichangazette.com

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Victims formally identified in motorcycle tragedy on Aug. 4 Regional coroner, Matt Brown, has released the names of the victims involved in the deadly crash on Saturday, August 4, on the Youbou Highway at the Neva Road intersection at approximately 8:40 p.m. The driver of the motorcycle was 60-year-old Arthur Randy Bernard of Chemainus. Bernard’s motorcycle struck and killed 48-year-old Sandra Dempsey, also known as Sandra Engstrom, as she crossed the Youbou Highway with a friend’s dog at Neva Road. According to Brown, both died of multiple trauma. Speed and alcohol are not ruled out as factors, but toxicology tests are yet to be performed and it could take as long as six weeks before results are known. Lake Cowichan RCMP Cpl. Krista Hobday says that a collision analyst is still working on the details of how the incident occurred, “but none of that information is available to us at this time.” A make-shift memorial has be set up along the side of the road at the site of the incident, and support continues to pour into Wayne Atkinson’s (common law spouse to Dempsey) Facebook page as he deals with the tragedy. According to this same page, funeral costs are

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Water restriction in effect

Giant Garage Sale brings in funds for local Animal Rescue Society

On Saturday, Aug 4, at Saywell Park, Megan (left) and Kyle McKechnie presented Marg Livingstone, of the Lake Cowichan Animal Rescue Society, with their lemonade stand sales.

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THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

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Got a news tip? Email us at: editor@lakecowichangazette.com

TO COMMENT We welcome your original comments on editorials, columns, on topics in the Lake Cowichan Gazette or any subjects important to you. Only letters that include name, address and day and evening phone numbers and that are verified by the Lake Cowichan Gazette can be considered for publication.

OPINION

Letters to the editor and articles submitted to the Lake Cowichan Gazette may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms and will be edited for clarity, grammar and length. Publication is not guaranteed. Email your thoughts to editor@lakecowichangazette.com or fax it to us at 250-749-4385

What merits a bylaw revision At last week’s council meeting, mayor and council reviewed a letter sent in by John and Dianna Bell, of Lake Cowichan, stating that because of medical issues the couple are having difficulty keeping up with the growth of broom on their section of the boulevard on the roundabout at the top of King George Road. Though council did take some time to consider what this meant for the couple, and some did suggest that perhaps the bylaw stating that boulevards be maintained might could be revised, the decision was ultimately reached to send the couple a letter saying that they must maintain it or risk facing a fine. It was decided that any revising of the bylaw would open a “can of worms” because in doing so everyone in town might decide they are too sick to maintain their own boulevards. While this is understandable to a certain extent — not every bylaw can be re-written because someone has an issue with it — the couple in question are by no means law-breakers with no regard for the esthetic beauty of their community. The central question they asked was also not addressed by council: where did the soil come from to fill in the roundabout? They claim that there was no issue with broom in the area until after the roundabout was built. Instead, the discussion around this couple’s concerns seemed dismissive and lacking any real compassion. I don’t think this was council’s intent, and I’m sure that not every request or complaint along these lines can be addressed with in-depth care, but it left me wondering how this couple is supposed to deal with their problem? It seemed that a lot of assumptions were made: council suggested the two could ask friends to help them or use a ride on mower. However, I’m sure council is not aware of the full scope of the Bell’s daily situation. —editor@lakecowichangazette.com

High Five

This week’s High Five goes out to the Lake Cowichan Fire Department, RCMP, and B.C. Ambulance paramedics, all of whom have been extremely busy over the last couple of weeks. Calls have included motorvehicle accidents, tubing and river related incidents, heat and sunstroke related calls and even a brush fire. Give these men and women a much deserved break by playing safe on the roads and waterways of Cowichan Lake.

BC Bureau

Pipeline won’t be imposed, Harper says Prime Minister Stephen Harper has rejected suggestions his government is considering pushing through the proposed Northern Gateway oil pipeline across northern B.C. Harper was asked about By Tom Fletcher Enbridge Inc.’s pipeline project at a stop in Vancouver Tuesday, and the frequent accusation that he has already decided it is in the national interest for it to proceed. “I’ve been very clear that decisions on these kinds of projects are made through an independent evaluation conducted by scientists into the economic costs and risks that are associated with the project,” Harper said. “I think that’s the only way governments can handle controversial projects of this manner, to ensure that things are evaluated on an independent basis, scientifically, and not simply on political criteria.” Harper told reporters he has spoken with B.C. Premier Christy Clark and other premiers about pipelines, but those conversations are private. It’s his first public comment since a dispute erupted between Clark and

Alberta Premier Alison Redford in July over Clark’s demand for more revenues. “I’m not going to get into an argument or discussion about how we divide hypothetical revenues,” Harper said. He did emphasize that in general, it is important for Canada to diversify its trade and open up new markets in Asia. The federal government is planning “huge investments” to improve environmental protection for shipping resource material, but it won’t favour any individual project, he said. Kinder Morgan hopes to twin its existing oil pipeline from Alberta to port and refinery facilities in Burnaby, to transport more heavy oil from the Athabasca oil sands. But the company has not yet formally applied for federal environment assessment. Clark initially said her government would wait until the federal assessment of Enbridge is concluded in 2013 before deciding whether to support it. Then in late July, the B.C. government presented a list of five preconditions, including a positive recommendation from the federal review. The others are “world-leading” oil spill prevention

Black Press files Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

and response capability on land and at sea, meeting legal requirements to consult and accommodate aboriginal groups along pipeline routes, and a “fair share” of oil revenues for B.C.

DENNIS SKALICKY Publisher

OFFICE/CIRCULATION Karen Brouwer Caycuse • Honeymoon Bay • Lake Cowichan • Mesachie Lake • Youbou

Box 10, Lake Cowichan, British Columbia V0R 2G0 Street Address: 170E-Cowichan Lake Road PH: 250-749-4383 FAX: 250-749-4385 Classifieds: 310-3535 (toll free) EDITORIAL: editor@lakecowichangazette.com ADVERTISING: production@lakecowichangazette.com PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY BLACK PRESS LTD. Canadian Publication Mail Sales Product Agreement #1090194 We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada, through the Canada Periodical Fund, for our publishing activities.

COLUMNIST TAMU MILES Editor The Lake Cowichan Gazette is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the BC Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to BC Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, BC V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org

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THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

5

Letters to the editor: YOUR SAY Letters to the editor are welcome, but writers are requested to keep their submissions to 350 words or less. All letters must contain the name, address and signature of the writer, and a phone number where they may be reached during business hours. Thank you letters will not normally be considered for publication. editor@lakecowichangazette. com

Traffic Jam The improvements to South Shore road have created a potential traffic delay. Previously, when turning left from South Shore Road onto King George Street, there was sufficient room for vehicles to pass on the right of the vehicle waiting to turn. Thanks to the new sidewalk this is no longer possible, and instead creates the possibility of a traffic back-up. Hubert Crevels Lake Cowichan

Contempt for democracy The disregard and contempt for democracy shown by members of the Liberal party (first, the Education Minister, and now, by the president of the Cowichan Valley Constituency Association of the B.C. Liberals) concerning public education in this school district is alarming! On July 1, Mr. Abbott dismissed our elected board, to inflict political damage on them as he did not consider them friendly. On July 23, Patrick Hrushowy, president of the Cowichan Valley constituency association of the B.C. Liberal Party, told us that we should rethink allowing the community and public

education stakeholders to elect “people” to be trustees. By the way, those people who explore the issues and value the opportunity to exercise their democratic right to vote feel your opinion doesn’t count for much. And, all those trustee candidates who put forth the effort to campaign across the district (working hard and not spending a lot of money) and were elected: step aside! We should, instead, have our capable staff expertly guided by a widely respected Liberal appointee and keep democracy out of the process. The capable staff found a $300,000 budget surplus on the day after the budget submission deadline. Had the elected board been advised of this surplus, before June 30, there could well have been budget adjustments and a more positive result. I wonder if other information has, or will, come to light that the board would have found useful? An extensive budget process determined that there are many supports and services that our students need and that should be addressed when funds were available. The respected appointee ignored these needs and expertly directed the surplus elsewhere. I have little doubt that this is exactly how the present Liberal Ministry of Education would like to manage the delivery of education at the local level.

Diana Gunderson Lake Cowichan

Appreciate volunteer fire fighters With all that went on in Lake Cowichan on the August long weekend, I do feel our local volunteer fire department must be given acknowledgement for all they did. It must have been a weekend of the most call-outs. What would we do if we did not have them? We appreciate you guys so much. Marie Bergstrom Lake Cowichan

Inspired by nature I have watched jets swoop over Abbotsford, model aircraft stunting in Victoria, but nothing can compare with the aerial display nature put on during a perfect, windless evening last week over Lake Cowichan. As dusk approached, they appeared. At first they were just dots in the sky, too high to identify. Were they swallows? We didn’t think so. The flight was very fast and the sudden change in direction was not swallow like. They came a bit lower and we could make out the shape of

their wings, which were beautifully tapered and swept back. The birds were hunting insects and as the light dimmed their prey came closer to earth. Close enough to see the white stripes on the hunters’ wings. Nighthawks — that most secretive of birds came out to demonstrate their complete dominance of the air. Like all true performers they left the best to last. They swooped down over our heads at dizzying speed as if to say, “Beat that, humans!” and disappeared; back to the woods where they hide their wing epaulettes and lie in the forest looking like piles of dead leaves. Perhaps they will return again this summer, perhaps not, but the memory of their show will stay with us as one of life’s spectacular events. David Ridley Lake Cowichan

After-thought boundary changes The residents of the Cowichan Lake communities should be aware of the proposed changes in our federal riding boundaries. We are currently part of the riding called Nanaimo-Cowichan which puts us in the same riding as the Duncan area. Proposed changes — suggested by the

B.C. Federal Re-distribution Commission — would have our area as part of the new NanaimoCowichan riding which would put us in with Ladysmith north. This means our member of Parliament would represent this up-island area with us as an afterthought. We would be separated from the area we have traditionally been a part of, namely the Duncan area. To visit your MP’s new office you would drive out Hwy.18, turn left and drive through Chemainus (which would be part of the Duncan area riding) to Ladysmith, or possibly Nanaimo. Currently, our MP has a Duncan office which can access with a short drive. The commission which drafted this report seems to have no concept of the Cowichan lake ties with the Duncan area. When I first saw the new riding proposal I presumed that an error was made and would be corrected. However, I now believe that if we do not make our voices heard to the commission we may find ourselves stuck as an isolated pocket of this new riding. Check out the website at federal-redistribution.ca or phone them at 1-855-747-7236 and let them know your feelings. Don Gordon Lake Cowichan

Ooblecks and other oddities at VIRL It was a sunny July 28, filled with green slime, outlandish creatures, and tall tales at the Cowichan Lake branch of the Vancouver Island Regional Library. The second event of this year’s Strange, but True Summer Reading Club celebrated Ooblecks and other Oddities with the familar Dr. Suess story (complete with a sample of green, gooey Oobleck to take home). Thanks to Lake Cowichan Country Grocer, kids could take their pick from a variety of fruits and vegetables to create creatures that truly were strange (but true!) SRC’s event on Thursday, Aug. 9

Daina Hutton From left: Caleb Spooner is startled by his creation, Mr. Silly. Alex Rudzik has a laugh at his yellow-finned, umbrella puffer fish, and Helena Barger proudly shows her blue-eyed dinosaur.

was Are You Magic? The final wrap-up for the Summer Reading Club will take place on September 8, at 11 a.m. The Summer Reading Club was started as a way to keep kids engaged with literature throughout the summer. Salt Spring Island artist Mike Deas, got kids’ imaginations on the path to exploration with his poster designs and wild and wacky creatures. For more information, head down to the Cowichan Lake branch of Vancouver Island Regional Library, or go to virl.bc.ca or kidssrc. ca. — editor@lakecowichangazette.com

Your Veterinarian... your other Family Doctor Overweight Pets Dear Doctor: My pet is overweight – what can I do?

Gillian Wiley Veterinarian

First, take heart – this is possible! You control the food – most animals can’t get into a locked container and feed themselves. Firstly add up all the food your pet consumes in a day – don’t forget cookies, snacks and table scraps. For free feeders (especially cats) you can provide a

measured amount at the beginning of the day and measure what is left the next morning to see how much was eaten. You will probably get a good idea of the true amount if you average several days. Now you know how much you are feeding. Next cut back on that daily amount by about one fifth to one quarter overall. Eliminate the items with less nutritional value first (rich dog treats, bacon, etc). Or consider switching to a lower calorie food so that you can feed the same number of cups daily

but your pet is getting fewer calories. There are many diet choices and when in doubt your veterinarian can help you to choose an appropriate one. Finally don’t forget the many benefits of increasing exercise - a raised metabolic rate can persist for a lot longer than just that hour’s run in the country. For cats and small dogs, a fun game with a favourite toy counts too. Good luck, and don’t forget to weigh in occasionally.

951 Canada Ave.

746-1966


6

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

www.lakecowichangazette.com

30% OFF Rolli Gunderson

Built on the former site of Scholey Brothers General Store, the Rails End Pub as it looked when it opened in 1992. It later became the Trails End restaurant, which featured an extensive (and expensive) model train collection that circled the restaurant much to the amusement of the customers. After standing empty for a period of time, it opened recently under the name Jake’s at the Lake.

Shoes • Sandals • Purses • Wallets

FOOTWEAR CENTRE 42 S South Shore Road

250-749-3721 Beside the Post Office

FAITH DIRECTORY Baptist

Pentecostal

Cowichan Lake Baptist Church

Lake Cowichan Christian Fellowship

8259 Beaver Road Lake Cowichan

57 King George St. South Lake Cowichan

Sunday Service 10:30 am Sunday School 10:30 am

Sunday Service 10:30am

Pastor Dale Winters

Pastor Terry Hale

250-749-3211

United Lake Cowichan United Church 10 King George Street Lake Cowichan

250-749-3771

Sunday Service 10:30 am

Rev. Greg Darjes

Courtesay Kaatza Station Museum

Built in 1913, Scholey Brothers General Store was situated in the centre of the village on property that today holds new restaurant, Jake’s at the Lake.

250-749-6492

Roman Catholic Congregational St. Louis de Montfort 60 Fern Road Lake Cowichan

250-749-4103

‘New Hope’ Community Church 10648 Youbou Rd, Youbou

250-745-3406

Mass Sunday at 10 am

Breakfast at 10:00 am Sunday Service 11:00 am

Fr. Alfredo Monacelli

Rev. Vikki Marrs

The March Meadows Ladies’ Division e xte nds sinc e re thanks and appre c iatio n to the fo llo wing b usine sse s and individuals fo r the ir ge ne ro us suppo rt o f o ur

Ladies Annual Amateur Golf Tournament Peterson Construction Dawn Coe-Jones Pro - Blair Caldwell Director, M.M, Corey Shewchuk Lake Cowichan Irly Bird I.D.A Pharmacy Country Grocer L.C. Footwear March Meadows Men’s Club Royal Bank Neiser Sales, Service & Rentals Carol Peterson Del Gamble Peden’s RV, Sidney Aroma Neighborhood Bistro Home Hardware Cowichan Valley Concrete Tipton’s Gas Bar Karen Kloske

1913: The new Scholey’s store

Suzanne Jones Angie’s Esthetics Wendy Klyne Island Savings Credit Union Legacy Wood Craft Sylvie’s on 5th, Courtenay Print Spot Remedy Hair Salon & Maggie

Rolli Gunderson

PAGES OF HISTORY When the Rails End restaurant opened its doors in 1992, it was a welcome addition to the community. Located near Saywell Park, its uniquely designed building is situated on a prime piece of riverfront property on the Upper Pool (mouth of the Cowichan River). After a series of different owners, different menus and name changes over the years, the building sat empty for a time until the newly opened restaurant, Jake’s at the Lake, made its recent debut. Over the past century the property that Jake’s now occupies has been home to several different buildings and businesses, residences, as well as the mooring place for float houses that clustered near the shoreline. The first known building, built in 1913, occupied the approximate location of where Jake’s is now. Brothers Ted and Sidney Scholey purchased two riverside lots on the land on which to build a general store. (The brothers had previously operated a store near the Lakeside Hotel, which was

situated a mile or two past the Riverside Inn on North Shore Road.) By late 1913, the new Scholey’s store, set in the midst of the community, was the only supplier of just about everything necessary for the residents of the small village and outlying area. The new store carried everything from food to kerosene, tools to dry goods, clothing and buckets to fence wire and hardware as well as everything in between. With the new railway and terminus (built in 1912) just across the way (near present day Kaatza Station Museum) the location was considered to be the ideal site. In 1919 the brothers bought a “motor truck to assist them in their business” The same year Sidney Scholey married Dorothy Jaynes “who became closely associated with the store and postal activities until Sid retired in 1950.” (KaatzaThe Chronicles of Cowichan Lake). The brothers dissolved their partnership in 1924 after which Sid built a house and new store (selling dry goods) across the road taking the post office with him. Ted, the elder of the brothers, carried on in the old store selling groceries until he married and moved his store across the road beside his brother. About 1936, Ted Scholey

up and sold his business then moved with his family to Victoria. Brother Sid carried on until 1945 when he sold his store but kept the post office of which he was the first official postmaster. In time, a larger post office was needed so across the road again he went, moving the post office to a space nearby. Several years later, another new post office was built further down South Shore Road. The building (between the auto parts store and the pharmacy/apartment building) now sits empty. When Sid Scholey retired in 1950 he moved to Victoria where he died in 1972. Several of his descendants remain in Lake Cowichan. Fast forward to present day. Almost everyday, during summer months, lots of activity takes place in the area near Saywell Park and the new restaurant (and tube rentals) not unlike the activity of yesteryear when Scholey’s Store was the busiest place in town. Although, one hundred years of change has occurred since then, there are some things that didn’t change. Mainly the constant activity that once took place at Scholey’s General Store of yesteryear and the present ongoing activity found near the new restaurant called Jake’s at the Lake.


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THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

250-749-6660

www.lkc .c a

TOLL FREE PAGE 1-800-729-3246 145 South Shore Rd., Lake Cowichan cowichanvalleyrealtor@shaw.ca

keith@lkc.ca

Keith Nelson

Sharon Kelly Sh

WH E N YO U WAN T I T L I S T E D - WH E N YO U N E E D I T S O L D

Alm ost ½ acre of RV living at Bayview Village. Backs onto forestland with nature all around. Includes a 1991 Fleetwood trailer with m etal roof. Shared lakefront with wharfs, sandy beach & m uch m ore.

COZY HOME

NEW LISTING

CUTE TWO BEDROOM RANCHER

$169,900

RIVERFRONT AT ITS BEST! This 6 bdrm & 4 bathroom waterfront property isbig enough forthe whole family + guests. Beautiful bamboo floors on the main w/kitchen designed forentertaining. Two fireplaces,large deckoverlooking the river & downstairs has a separate kitchen/ laundry – could be a perfect mortgage helper. Well priced in this market.

$476,000

MESACHIE LAKE ACREAGE Lovely 2 bedroom home on flat lot, tastefully designed with custom moldings & attached sunroom.Five bay windows to let in the light & wood stove to take away the spring chill. This home offers you privacy – it isn’t a drive by!

$340,000

6658 Bear Lake Road

THIS ONE IS FOR YOU!! NEW L ISTING

Double Wide in Cowichan Bay - First time buyer?? This is the one for you. Tucked away in a quiet setting minutes from Cowichan Bay. Two bedroom mobile with large yard. Move in condition.

SOLD

#23-1540 Cowichan Bay Rd.

$37,900

GREAT FAMILY HOME D RED U CE

120 Lake Park Road

CUSTOM DESIGNED

NEW LISTING

$199,000

PRIVATE, PEACEFUL & PERFECT D RED U CE

$529,900

413 Winter Drive

INVESTOR ALERT!

First tim e offered for sale in over 50 years.Three levels,4 bedroom hom e located on .89 of an acre. Unfinished basem ent – 20 x 20 sq ft detached shop/garage & carport. Subdivision off an extra lot is a possibility.

101 North Shore Rd

Long & narrow 5.6 level acres surrounded by forestry property. Steel construction shop, green house and the hom e is over 1500 sq ft with 2 bedroom s, 2 bathroom s & a loft.Make this your perm anent hom e or great for weekend living. Too m any extras to list – you have to view to appreciate it!

8975 Youbou Rd.

$368,000

GREAT PLACE TO LIVE! NEW I TING L IS

103-241 McKinstry Rd.

This.58 acre property providesseveral options,including building aduplexor renovating the existing home.Due to road location,rezoning to commercial may be apossibility.Vendor financing may also be available.

$119,000

TOWNHOUSE D RED U CE

D RED U CE

Lot A, South Shore Rd. $199,900 + HST

Over 18 acres of seclud ed p rop erty, lightly treed with terraced land.Magnifi cent views - a weekend getaway or b uild your dream hom e!

BUILD UP HIGH! •lake views from lot •geo tech report on file

271 South Shore $269,000 COMMERCIAL LOT – corner lot on almost an acre on main road in Town

Lot 2 - Wilson Road $120,000

Lot 48 Widgeon Way $89,900 Privacy guaranteed when you build on this lot.

LARGE HOME WITH TONS OF POTENTIAL Lots of room to build m ore bedroom s as basem ent is partially finished. Huge covered concrete patio off back of hom e which is great for entertaining.Big 60 x 220 ft lot for dad to build that big shop he always wanted.

NEW LISTING

193 MacDonald Rd $209,000 FIXER UPPER! Four bedroom hom e with good bones, just needs som eone with vision to give it their TLC. Nice yard, original wood floors in som e room s – bring your creativity to this property.

Two bedroom townhousewithin walking distance of all amenities.Nice layout,propane fireplace, great patio and good size storage locker.Quiet and peaceful –this is a 55+ community.

#13 - 300 Grosskleg Way

$179,900

LOCATION, LOCATION

$189,000

148 Comiaken Ave.

QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD Custom hom e with 5 bedroom s & 4 bathroom s – a place for all the fam ily. Special features throughout. Backyard is fenced & beautifully landscaped with a pond & deck for entertaining. View this outstanding hom e.

Close to the Cowichan River - three level Tudor style home with 4 bedrooms &3 bathrooms. Good sized attached garageshop area &property backs onto farmland acreage. Perfect for a growing family.

8007 Greendale Road

$215,000

CUTE HOME - READY TO GO!

Flat .81 acre property with large 2,900+ sqft building. Two separate titles to be sold together. Located on main road close to store, fire hall & restaurant. Bring your ideas!

$192,000

$239,000

250 South Shore Road

Two bedroom unit located close to downtown Duncan yet tucked away on a quiet side street. Building is in im m aculate condition – great location – great price.

COMMER COMMERCIAL PROPERTY IN HONEYMOON BAY HON

10054 South Shore Rd.

Welcom e to Paradise! Flat lot across the road from spectacular Cowichan Lake.Stunning views – great weekend getaway or full tim e living.

Over 3,100 sqft, this 4 bedroom FLAT LOT – for your new hom e or com m ercial & 3 bath home is located in “The venture & close to town core. Owner will have Slopes”. There are too many a hom e b uilt to suit your need s. beautiful features to list – a must MARBLE BAY LOTS see!Owner open to trades – will consider all offers. Lot 38 Kestrel Drive $125,000 Bring us your ideas! Awesom e lake views from this .44 of an acre lot.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE POTENTIAL!

5 year old home located close to town & the Five bbedrooms – h river. i Fi d complete with kitchen/bar area & rec room on 1st floor with full bath & laundry. Second level has large kitchen & living room plus 2 full baths.Large vinyl deck,2 car garage & RV parking. Nicely landscaped with small garden shed.A must see!

$289,000

$169,500

40 Hemlock Street

34 Hemlock Street

Lot 5 March Rd $139,900

267 Castley Hts. $99,900 Nice sized deck and partially fenced yard. Attractive kitchen & CHECK & COMPARE!– Lake view lot centrally living room has wood stove to located in town m inutes from D uck Pond,foot keep you warm.Located on quiet b rid ge & b oat launch. Gently slop ing, easy access & no HST! Build your d ream hom e. street & close to all amenities. Early occupancy possible. D D E R U CE 268 Castley Heights $75,000

Large living room for entertaining, nice cedar ceiling in bathroom , new roof, paint & newer flooring. Backyard has sm all workshop & fenced for your pets.

53 Somenos Street

$299,900

6780 3rd Street

$199,900

Lot 59 Blackwood Heights

NEW LISTING

Beautiful home in Honeymoon Bay – minutes from the lake & all recreational activities. New hardi-plank,windows &roof.Totally modern kitchen, wood & laminate floors – tastefully decorated. Great family or vacation home.

PRIVACY ASSURED

NEW LISTING

LOTS

TOTALLY RENOVATED

Listing d e r u t Fea

287 Grants Lake Road

QUIET CUL DE SAC Large 5 BR home w/beautiful oak floors on main & oak cabinets in kitchen. Propane fireplace in living room & a woodstove downstairs.Off master BR & LR is huge deck overlooking the garden area,which includes built-in hot tub, fishpond & raised beds to grow vegetables.Yard is fenced,workshop in house plus 2 bay garage with additional workshop. Lots of room to grow.

Many updates including roof, windows, kitchen, built in vacuum & new furnace (to be installed). Nice level yard with a single car garage & full unfinished basem ent.This one’s a keeper!

39 Coronation Street

$189,000

$339,000

243 Kwassin Cres

$339,000

7


8

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

www.lakecowichangazette.com

Firefighters called to brush fire

Gazette

On Friday, August 10, the Lake Cowichan Fire Department responded to a brush fire on Heger Crescent off Riverbottom Road. The alarm sounded at approximately 1:30 p.m. The fire was located next to a residence, but was soon brought under control. Because this fire was 5 kilometres past the last fire underwriters certified hydrant, and 8 km past the fire hall, the department had to utilize its tanker truck in order to put out the blaze. On the left, crews work to douse the blaze while a B.C. Forest Service helicopter monitors from above. In the top photo, crews refill the tanker truck from the hydrant on Neva Road.

Great Lake Walk Tamu Miles Gazette Editor

Gazette File Photos

From left: The use of a jet ski is creatively used at the big pool area of the river, off of the Town of Lake Cowichan’s Central Park. Nanaimo diver Sasha Buidick holds up a glass bottle of Boylan Cane Cola she found at the “big pool” area of the Cowichan River – next to Lake Cowichan’s Central Park – during the Third Annual Cowichan River Clean-up. Although the bottle was still full of cola, the well-worn nature of the bottle’s labeling implied that it is quite old and very likely expired.

4th Annual Cowichan River clean-up: Two-day event from weir to the bay Tamu Miles Gazette Editor

There is no time like the present to help keep the Cowichan River clean and pristine for all to enjoy. The Cowichan Lake and River Stewards Fourth Annual Cowichan River Cleanup is fast approaching. Starting on Saturday, August 25, CLRSS members will be accepting the help of volunteers (that means you) to clean all of the garbage from in and around the Cowichan River, starting at the weir and going right to Cowichan Bay, where the river dumps into the ocean. “I’m actually fired up about this year,” said CLRSS president Gerald Thom. “We’re doing from the weir all the way down to the bay, over two days. The Saturday event here at Lake Cowichan, which will get us down to as far as Sandy Pools [in Sahtlam] and then the next day we’re cooperating with Cowichan Tribes and the Cowichan Water Board to do from Sandy Pools to the estuary, which is really cool because it’s never been done before.” Registration to volunteer for the cleanup begins on Saturday at 9 a.m. at the Lake Cowichan Town Hall and will include a free continental breakfast. Organizers have also arranged for prizes for all volunteers, with items donated by local businesses, and the

day will wrap up at 2 p.m. with a free barbeque. Mountain Man Services is once again providing trucks to haul away the collected garbage, but CLRSS treasurer, Lois Atchison, who is also one of the event organizers, says that those who bring along extra trucks and/or boats to help out will not be turned away. “And CVRD provides us with free tipping at Meades Creek,” said Thom. “So we usually pull out in excess of a ton, believe it or not. It’s sad, but it’s getting way better than it was when we first started.” Volunteers are divided into teams and given designated sections of the river to clean up. “We have team leaders who have specific sections of the river, and they register the people and take them out and make sure that they’re safe and equipped,” said Thom. Organizers provide all equipment other than footwear and swimwear. “It’s not just for swimmers,” said Thom. “There’s jobs for people on the shore too. But if people do have a tube, or mask and snorkel, bring it along. It’s always difficult to gear up everybody.” Thom says that the problem has shuffled from the section between the weir and Little Beach to the Skutz Falls area. “The garbage down there, it’s so hard to get out,” said Thom. “Because it’s

canyon, so we’re going to have a hell of a time trying to get it out.” Don Barrie from Warm Rapids Inn will be helping out with this section of the river. Barrie has swift water training and will be working with a small group of volunteers. “Without him we couldn’t even do that section,” said Thom. “It’s too dangerous.” The Nanaimo dive club is also a key part of the cleanup, says Thom. “They send divers up every year to do the bottom of the big pool, because no word of a lie, there is feet thick of glass bottles down there.” Thom says these bottles are still around from when boat houses existed in the area. “Every year we bring up boat loads of antique glass bottles. And now we’re fishing them back out 100 years later.” There is no pre-registration required to be part of the cleanup, all you have to do is show up at 9 a.m. on the Saturday and be ready to participate in whatever way you feel comfortable. All children under the age of 14 must be accompanied by an adult, but all age groups are encouraged to participate. Gloves and appropriate footwear are a must and are not provided. For more information go to cowichan-lake-stewards.ca, or phone Atchison at 250-749-3055, or Thom at 250-749-7203.

When participants of the Great Lake Walk reach their goal at the end of the day, they are looking for some relief for their sore, and often very hot, feet. There’s nothing like a good foot soak and a massage to help restore those tired feet, and it’s up to up to volunteers organized by Chris Haslam to provide that service. This is Haslam’s fourth year organizing the volunteers for the foot care aspect of the walk, and she has been on the Great Lake Walk board of directors for the past three years. “My area, the downstairs of Centennial Hall, is the toughest area to fill,” said Haslam. She says that over the last few years it has been harder and harder to secure volunteers for this service as those who have volunteered in the past are getting older and they find it harder and harder to carry the tubs of water. This means that Haslam is looking for between eight and 12 people, each of which will be asked to fill two hour slots so that no-one is burned out by being on shift for too long. The foot care service runs from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the day of the walk, with the busy time being between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Volunteers are responsible for providing a foot soak and drying off of feet with a paper towel. If it’s wanted, volunteers will also apply lotion. Beyond this, eight members of St. John’s Ambulance are on hand to deal with things like blisters, and often there are massage therapists who choose to help out, including Rita Dustow, giving the added benefit and relief of massage. Dustow says she has participated almost every year and finds the event to be a great way to give back to the community. Haslam, added that those who offer massage in the area could bring along their card or information and pass it along as a way of promoting their business. Anyone wishing to volunteer for this aspect of the walk can contact Haslam by calling 250-749-4483, or by sending her an email haslamhouse@shaw.ca.


Regatta

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THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

Youbou

Saturday, August 11

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

9

Regatta Results Swim races – Front crawl Girls 7 & 8 – Maude Karlsson, followed by Reyna Mackey and Mackenzie Sherren Girls 9 & 10 – Victoria Speman, followed by Casey Tadla and Christiana Clark Boys 9 & 10 – Josiah Nolan, followed by Colby Pongracz and Gus Boehme Girls 11 & 12 – Lily Barner, followed by Emily Vaguhan and Jessie Porter Boys 11 & 12 – Keegan Mackay, followed by Dreyton Lawrence and Jonathon Hughes Girls 13 & 14 – Aislinn Ferns, followed by Alyssa Porter and Darian Wagner Boys 13 & 14 – Connor Mullin, followed by Jaden Pongracz and Gus Boehme Girls 15 & up – Angela Morrow Boys 15 & up – Roger Stuart, followed by Alex Mizak and Dana Tadla Swim races – Back crawl Girls 7 & 8 – Maude Karlsson, followed by Ginger Boehme-Vertfeville Girls 9 & 10 – Victoria Speman, followed by Casey Tadla and Kaiah Pratt Boys 9 & 10 – Gus Boehme, followed by Colby Pongracs and Dayton Mackay Girls 11 & 12 – Lily Barner, followed by Emily Vaughn and Jessie Porter Boys 11 & 12 – Drayton Lawrence, followed by Keegan Mackay and Jayden Pongracz Boys 13 & 14 – Connor Mullin Boys 15 & up – Tyler Falk-Chalmers

Tamu Miles Photos

Mike and Jordy Snider coming into the finish line for the first heat of the canoe races. The two brothers won the final heat and the trophy.

Tyler Falk-Chalmers and Alex Mizak win the third heat of the canoe races after an upset of their canoe in the first heat.

Swim races – Breast stroke Girls 9 & 10 – Victoria Speman, followed by Keegan Mullin and Caity Day Girls 11 & 12 – Hannah Guiney, followed by Emily Vaughn and Jessie Porter Boys 11 & 12 – Gus Boehme, followed by Dreyten Lawrence and Dayton Mackey Girls 13 & 14 – Alyssa Porter, followed by Darian Wagner Mixed boys and girls 15 & up – Lara Mullin, followed by Lyle Mullin and Lily Barner Swim races – Elementary backstroke Girls 9 & 10 – Victoria BrictStedman, followed by Maddison Vaughan Boys 9 & 10 – Eli Caine, followed by Gus Boehme and Jacob Mcalesky, Girls 11 & 12 – Lily Barker, followed by Jesse Porter and Emily Vaughn Boys 11 & 12 – Jonathon Hughes, followed by Dreyton Lawrence and Jaden Pongracz Boys 13 & 14 – Connor Mullen Boys 15 & up – Tyler Falk-Chalmers

Hunter Rowe digs into a large slice of watermelon during the watermelon eating contest. Lennon Court enjoys the sandy beach and poses for a picture before rinsing himself off in the lake.

George (dog on the left) and Bella wait patiently with dog sitters as their owner, Rob Turner, a Youbou volunteer fire fighter, participates in some of the competitive games.

Kaiah Pratt carefully flips a pancake as she makes her way to the finish line in the “Whistle, Splash, Flip” triathalon.

Alyssa Porter braces for impact then generates a large splash as she participates in the belly flop contest. There were two categories, 13 and under, and 14 and up, for the contest.

Other contests Bellyflop contest – up to 13 years – Alyssa Porter, followed by Josiah Nolan and Steven Finch. In the 14-plus category, winners were Alex Mizak, followed by Tyler Huskins and James Cummings. Cannonball contest – up to 13 years – Dreyton Lawrence, followed by Steven Finch and Jacob Mcklenskie. In the 14-plus category, winners were Nick Boehme, followed by James Porter and Alex Mizak. Whistle, splash, and flip triathlon – In first place was Alex Werk, Aislinn McKeown Ferris, and Bella. Canoe Race – Mike Snider and Jordy Snider Volleyball – in first place was Ricky’s Rockin Rollers Chalk art – in first was Tyler in the senior category and Alex M in the junior category. 1/4 Mile Swim – Best overall went to Bernard Hewitt. First from swim program went to Alex Werk, youngest to finish was Nathan, and oldest to finish was Bernard Hewitt. Parade – Best homemade float, the Fearons; best commercial float, Lady of the Lake; best pet, Bizzy Beez; best group, Ginger, Gus, and Rhonda Boehme-Vertfeville; best couple, Natalie and Violet Luchtmeyer; best individual; Tyler Falk -Chalmers. Names as provided by Cowichan Lake Rec


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Wednesday, August 15, 2012

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

www.lakecowichangazette.com

You’ll feel like family! C Bacon O U N 2/$500 T R Potato Salad Y V $697 A L Blueberries U E CAMPFIRE

FRESH DUTCH

Crunch Bread FRESH FROM THE OVEN

¢

97

Each

DEL MONTE

Juice Boxes

500 g

RESER'S RED SKINNED Fantastic Savings!

IN THE DELI

4 Lb Works out to be 39¢/100 g

FRESH BC

NEW CROP

Watch for our

FLYER EVERY FRIDAY in the Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

$ 44

4

2 Lb Clamshell

$ 97

1

10/ 180 mL

Limit 3 Total

CAMPBELL'S

Soup Broth Original • Low Sodium • No Salt Added

$ 00

2/ 3

900 mL

Limit 4 Total

KRAFT

Cheez Whiz The Original

$ 77

4

1 Kg Limit 1

BC GROWN

Peaches & Cream Corn on the Cob

$ 00

12/ 5

Proud to be Cowichan Valley’s leading grocery store since 1986. Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Deposits and/or environmental fees extra where applicable. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday August 15th- Saturday August 18th, 2012

Valley View Centre 1400 Cowichan Bay Rd, Cobble Hill • 83 Cowichan Rd, Lake Cowichan Open Daily 8am - 9pm

Offers valid at Lake Cowichan and Cobble Hill Country Grocer locations only.


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THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

You’ll feel like family! Locally Owned & Operated since 1984

Summer Hours 7am - 10 pm

SCHNEIDER'S

Juicy Jumbos • Original • Beef

3

CANADA

$ 97

Icefield Water

450 g

MITCHELL'S SMOKED

Half Toupie Ham

$ 00 1.5 L

FREYBE

Landjaeger Sausage

Boneless

3

3 2 F O R

$ 99

Lb

$8.80 Kg

ASSORTED VARIETIES

5

$ 99 Approx. 500 g

Vitamin Water

BACKYARD

3/ 5

$

Composter

$ 00 591 mL

39

99 While Stocks Last!

Photos for illustrative purposes only. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday, August 15/12 to Saturday, August 18/12

ALL ITEMS WHILE STOCK LAST!

www.countrygrocer.com

E X T R A V A L U E

These specials available at Country Grocer Lake Cowichan ONLY.

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Wednesday, August 15, 2012

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

www.lakecowichangazette.com

Lake Bloomers spend afternoon in lovely lakeside paradise Tamu Miles Gazette Editor

On August 8, members of the Lake Cowichan Lake Bloomers headed out to Susanne Thom’s home in Youbou for an afternoon barbecue, potluck, and garden tour. Thom is a Bloomers member and an avid gardener who has transformed her property from a rocky, dry section of land to a flourishing lakeside oasis. Thom has owned the property since 1992, but her and her husband have only lived there for the past few years, and in that time they have managed to make substantial changes. While the other members of the club enjoyed the outdoor fireplace, gardens, and view of Cowichan Lake, Thom took me on a tour of the property and explained the process of bringing it to where it is now and showed me the gardens. “When we first bought the property there was building material everywhere and gravel everywhere,” said Thom. “And we were trying to landscape it so I had some people come in at first and I thought, oh I’ll get the landscapers to do it, but they wanted $100,000 so I thought, oh I don’t think so.” She explained that all the perennials, shrubs, and landscaping features are still young and she is taking the endeavour on in baby steps. The garden beds are spread out with sections of lawns in between. Many of the mature trees that existed when the

couple moved onto the property are still there and have become, in some cases, central features. A rock wall, built by Thom and her husband, retains the slope that runs down to the water’s edge. Here, Thom has planted grasses, succulents, and a few shrubs such as Lavatera and Cotton Easter. “We have mostly native plants here,” said Thom. “Anything that doesn’t need watering very much because it gets really hot and dry.” Behind this are perennial beds and lawns spaced intermittently, reaching back towards the main house, a badminton area, and beyond that more flower beds and finally a vegetable garden. “In the back we get more sun,” she explained. “It’s two different climates between here [the waterfront] and the back. It can be windy and stormy here and quite warm and lovely in the back.” “I’m a bit of a plantaholic,” she confessed. “I see a plant in the store and I think, I’ve got to have that, then I come home and, oh, where am I going to put that?” She says that in this way, her gardens are not planned and are a bit on the experimental side (though you would never know that by looking at them). One of these beds is created below a large cedar tree and Thom says that she deals with the issue of acidity by trying to pick plants that are natural to the area and that can tolerate higher acidity.

Tamu Miles

Lake Bloomers members enjoy a late afternoon barbecue and potluck on Susanne Thom’s patio at her lake front property in Youbou.

“I’ve had a lot of this and that; things that work and things that don’t, but these seem to have settled in,” said Thom. “I put a little bit of lime on the lawn in the spring otherwise it is too acid for the grass.” Plants she has chosen for under this tree are things like Oregon Grape, grasses, and a few flowers. Other tree features on the property are a black walnut and an ash tree. There is also an old holly tree that Thom says

a group of doves come and clean the berries off every spring. “They start at the top and they clean it right out,” she said. Thom makes much of her own compost for her garden, and has a special area on the back of the property where she processes it. Thom’s gardens are a lovely example of what can be done in a relatively short time with some dedication and hard work.

Local artist feels her art has its own function in the world Tamu Miles Gazette Editor

Karola Schabernak has worked since she was 16 in the forest industry. She grew up in Youbou and says that though she has tried other forms of employment over the years, such as working in retail management when she lived in Vancouver, she could not make as much money as she could planting trees. Schabernak has also worked in the forest industry as a forestry technician, industry newspaper editor, and first aid attendant, but ever since she was a child, she has always been interested in art. After joining the Kaatza Art Group, Schabernak decided to renovate her basement and open RainFlower Studio, where she has on display the many forms of art she both works and experiments with. “The art I’ve been doing on and off since 1974,” said Schabernak. “[Though] not selling it up until about eight years ago.” On the walls of her studio hang examples of Japanese Sumi-e, Chinese brush painting, traditional landscapes and florals, logging cartoons from her days editing a logging industry newspaper, and much more. Over the last few years Schabernak has been delving into jewelry as well. She hand knots pearls using silk thread. “The reason for knotting them is that it protects one pearl from the other,” said Schabernak. This allows the strands to drape in a fashion that it does not using jewelry wire. Schabernak has also been learning how to create chain mail jewelry. “What I do is hand coil sterling silver wire on a mandril and then I cut it with a coil cutter [an electric saw]. Then, I take the little rings and I have these jewelry pliers.” She then takes the rings and links them together. It’s a complicated process that involves math calculations in order to get the pattern right or the chain will not drape properly. Schabernak is well read and very interested in history, and this shows in much of her art. Though she says she is a Christian, she states that she has read so much about

the many different religions out there in the world that she has come to her own conclusion about a common thread between them all. “All the good ones say the same thing, and I live by those tenants myself, but at the same time I have my own ideas about stuff.” Schabernak was raised a Catholic until the age of four, but the priest at the church her family attended didn’t

Tamu Miles

Karola Schabernak demonstrating how she links her chain mail jewelry.

like the fact that her parents came from Germany and Austria, and so they no longer attended. This experience taught Schabernak a lesson about the world. “So I thought, well there you go, that’s how contempt is bred, you know, by people not wanting me in that church, for example.” Years later she painted a tree of life that she had hanging behind her desk in one of the offices she worked in. The image triggered a conversation between a gentleman and herself. The gentleman wanted to know if Schabernak knew the difference between a tree of

life and a tree of knowledge, and he had many other questions. “This triggered a three hour conversation,” she explained. “And I know I learned something, but I would like to think that he learned something too.” She used this story as an example to illustrate how people can take their own meanings from art, but also how art can trigger conversations and learning circumstances between people. She also feels that even though each of her pieces has an emotional value to her, it has to be shared with the world. “For people to appreciate and view,” explains Schabernak. “When I wasn’t very good at it, I kept them because I wasn’t very good at it. I didn’t want to send something out there that I wasn’t pleased with. Although, if someone insisted they wanted it, despite the fact that I wasn’t very pleased with it, I would sell it to them because they saw something in it that I didn’t see. I’m perfectly willing to send them out into the world because that’s where they belong.” She takes this a step further though, too. Her art is not just passive in her eyes, it has a function in the world. “I try to imbue everything I do with positive vibration as well, and to send that positive vibration out there.” Generally, Schabernak says that when she begins creating a piece an idea will germinate within her imagination, and that one idea will feed off of subsequent ideas as the piece is being worked. “Then what happens is, you’re directing the piece and the piece is directing you,” said Schabernak. This symbiotic relationship helps to bring about the naming of her pieces, says Schabernak. “People often ask me, how did you get the names for your paintings? The thing about it is, by the time the painting is finished, it has told me its name.” Schabernak’s art is plentiful and varied in its forms, and it is well worth going to her studio to view. She is open to visitors, but only by appointment as she also has a day job at the Community Forest Co-op. You can reach Schabernak by phone at 250-749-3650.


www.lakecowichangazette.com

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Pat Duringer

Sandy Stinson

RE/MAX of LAKE COWICHAN 81 Cowichan Lake Road, Lake Cowichan | www.remaxlakecowichan.com

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408 Point Ideal Road

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Spectacular lake views, stunning home.

514 Johel Crescent

$399,000

A must view. High on quality, complete privacy and lake views. This 3 bedroom and den home has lots of rock work, shop, pool and hot tub. Must be viewed to fully appreciate.

82 Beech

$419,000

Home at the Slopes. Rancher with a bsmt.

10594 Youbou Rd.

#23 - 9041 Meades Creek Waterfront Park

$1,549,000

$215,000 Landscaped and garden area. Big Lot ,View, Duplex

93 South Shore Rd. REDUCED $5,000

MOTIVATED

Coon Creek Road

Lot 22 Kestrel Dr.

10549 Coon Creek Rd.

$309,000 $495,000 • Waterview • Low maintenance yard • recreation nearby

The Coffee Mill

• newer windows • roof & electrial • fully fenced • 3 bedrooms 10484 Youbou Road

lake view from the kitchen landscaped .52 of an acre

Lovely rancher, 3 bdrm, private landscaped back yard

$265,000

$259,000 $299,800

7797 Cowichan Lake Rd.

NEW LISTING

PENNY LANE -1 BDRM

This going concern could be a gold mine! House, pumps, carwash, convience store and take out counter

$2,200,000 10432 Youbou Road

C7 Commercial Waterfront. Perfect for resort or cabins. Offered at $1,350,000, recent appraised value. 96 Johel Rd.

Excellent canvas, big lot water access.

$269,000

101766 Youbou Rd.

$215,000

$829,000

D L O S

104088 Arbutus Street

$87,800 three bedroom A-Frame with separate shop

$279,000

10694 Youbou Road MLS# 334547, “Working Mans Waterfront” stunning kitchen and living area. 204-138 South Shore The Wellington All open concept with a fireplace.

$145,000

5990 Stoltz Road

$569,000 5.1 acres, Inlaw suite, potential B&B apartment over the garage.

$150,000

9646 Creekside

$510,000 • complete to lock up • two full stories and two half stories

Penny Lane Cottage

9590 Creekside Road Waterfront Dock

• 1 bdrm & den • Riverfront strata • Commercial zoned • Close to town

$675,000 10172 Youbou Rd.

$179,900 Wow! Amazing lakeview on the lakeside of the road.

LAKEVIEW

SLOPES

266 Hillside Road

$399,000 • Riverfront +/ residential+/ +business too! • Location, location,location • Established since 1960 • 1960 sq’ building • 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom • 62x104 riverfront lot

$339,780

• house + guest cottage + casita • A must experience!

Beautiful upscale development has attracted a lovely mixture of mostly retired professionals. Lake View Manor, 2 bedroom condo, 55 plus

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Marvelous lakefront. 250 ft of beach. .84 acre. Great Home.

• Water development • Ideal for retirees or snowbirds • I BDRM + DEN $249,000 CAN BE RENTED

67 South Shore Rd.

$800,000

• 2.87 acres • Lovely 4 bdrm cabin • Year round creek

$239,000

Riverfront with basement. Front & rear access, could have many varied uses. Enjoy the river & lake.

8724 North Shore Road

2 Homes

$278,000 The ESSO

102 Cowichan Avenue

Cute waterside home and three business storefronts and storage.

Log Home. Ever thought you would like to live off the grid?

$349,000

$169,000

$319,000

RIVERFRONT

3 bdrm logsmith home in Marble Bay. Lovely shared beach, “your own dock.”

27 Stevens Crescent

$529,000

26,000 Sq. Ft. of Gardening Paradise Huge Shop

$345,000 7428 Pintail

105 South Shore Rd.

$399,900

Huge lot in town, Big family home.

$79,000

103 South Shore Rd.

100 Elk Road

11445 North Shore Road

Lakeview lot w/ boat slip & beach access.

Coffe Shop & Cafe 10063 South Shore Commercial Lot.

REDUCED

#109 first floor, west exposure; #210 second floor, east exposure.

100 Cottonwood

Cute, Cute, Cute Waterfront Cabin, Great Beach.

Priced to sell. Great Opportunity.

$95,000 each

Completely renovated including heat pump.

• 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms • 30’ waterfront on river • BONUS 1 bedroom daylight suite • Commercial residential zoning

Youbou Mini Mart

18 King George Two 2 bedroom apartments!

$58,800

$429,700

$399,000

REDUCED

$2,800,000

10524 Youbou Rd. This first class Bar & Grill & restaurant with a liquor store below was just a bit ahead if its time. Youbou is just on the brink of exploding into its own. This building is world class, the cedar and art work are tremendous, the stair case alone coming up the back has been done by a true artisan. The kitchen is well laid out and the sports bar feel keeps it packed on those special days. The liquor store downstairs is well used.

• Waterfront + 2 Homes • All fenced • Boat ramp A great place to call home! 276 South Shore Rd.

REDUCED

481 Mountain View Rd.

$599,900

ATTENTION DEVELOPERS and Investors – here is a great opportunity to purchase a multi-family site within city limits with full community servicing. “The Slopes”, a new Lake Cowichan subdivision showcasing a variety of beautiful new homes. Close to town & minutes to the Lake with easy hwy. access.

470 Mountain View 489 Mountain View The SLOPES

New Dev New Dev BIG Lots

$114,000 $114,900 $ 99,000

$212,500 LOTS

REDUCED

13

389 Point Ideal PEWaterfront $339,000 NDING Private $69,000 Lot 30 Cypress Prime Loc WOW $89,900 470 Point Ideal Prime Loc $137,700 466 Point Ideal $134,500 Lot 22 Kestral Dr.r. #4 Meades Creek $374,900 Underground services and mountain vista

Waterfront LOTS Stin-Qua

LOT #1 . ... $399,000 LOT #3 . ... $349,900 LOT #4 . ... $309,900 LOT #6 . ... $329,000 LOT #15. Almost waterfront! $159,900 185 MacDonald Huge home, huge lot. Rents out for $1200 a month.

$199,000


14

Cowichan Lake Stay

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

www.lakecowichangazette.com

Heatherr Campsite te

Kissinger Lake Campsite

Maple Grove Campsite

Play

Nixon Creek Campsite Pine Point Campsite

Caycuse Cay aycuse

Youbou

&

Caycuse Campsite

N Bald Mtn.

Spring Beach

Gordon Bay Provincial Park

Wildflower W Wildflo ower Preserve Preserrve

Lake Cowichan H Honeymoon Bay

Mesachie Lake

Beaver Lake Resort

Several campsites are scattered around Cowichan Lake. A simple drive around the lake, or a perusal of the GAZETTE’S VISITOR GUIDE, which is available at the visitor centre, will reveal plenty of lake side campsites for you to enjoy.

TUBE and KAYAK RENTALS Open 10 am - 7 pm 7 days a week

250.932.2222

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Home Hardware 7 a.m. - 10 p.m. • Groceries • Service Deli • Produce • Fresh Bakery • Meat • Bulk Foods Lottery Centre and a whole lot more!

250- 749- 6335

Camping Supplies Water Toys Pool Supplies All your Tubing Needs

Shimano • Gibbs Cortland • Trophy XL G. Loomis • DragonÁy

INCLUDING INFLATION!

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Home Hardware Lake Cowichan

www.cowichanflyandtackle.com 98 South Shore Rd, Lake Cowichan, B.C.

250-749-4400

FOOTWEAR CENTRE ENTREE Welcome Visitors!

Summer ON SALE NOW

DUNCAN DUN AN DUNCAN AUTO PARTS INDUSTRIAL

42 South Shore Road

Cowichan Lake District Cham ber of Com m erce

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Welcome

☞ SUMMER NIGHTS: CENTRAL PARK BANDSHELL

Enjoy an evening at the park listening to music. A double feature in the Central Park Bandshell. Admission by donation and the Lake Cowichan Food Bank will be accepting donations of non-perishable food. Starts with an open mike at 6:30p.m., Saturday, Aug. 18.

SUPPLIES

Incredible prices on footwear for the entire family

Beside the post office in Lake Cowichan

Things to do around the Lake ☞

HIKE UP LITTLE BALD MOUNTAIN

VISIT ARTIST AND ARTISAN STUDIOS

WALK THE FLOATING BOARDWALK

250-749-3341

Visitors

Looking for information about this area?

Stop in at our Visitor/Business Centre entre located in the log cabin in in Saywell Park. Now Open Daily until September 2nd

This short hike (2km round trip) takes you from the parking area off Marble Bay Road up a pretty, fairly steep trail to the top of locally known “Little Bald Mountain”. From the top you will enjoy views of both the North and South Arms of Cowichan Lake. – excerpt from Our Favourite Hikes in the Cowichan Lake Area, available at The Cowichan Lake District Chamber of Commerce. Drop by the Cowichan Lake District Visitors’ Centre for a list of local studios open to the public. Anything from violin maker to mixed media and more. Located at Lakeview Park a couple of minutes west of Lake Cowichan on South Shore Road. The boardwalk is linked to a beautiful forest trail. Pick-up some picnic supplies in town first and find your favorite spot for lunch.


www.lakecowichangazette.com

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

15

Arbutus Park Swim Lessons

SPORTS

To August 24 Red Cross Levels 1-10 Call 250-749-6742 to register

Office Hours

Monday to Thursday 8:30am - 3:00pm Friday: 8:30am - 5:00pm 250.749.4383 50.749.4383 FAX 250.749.4385 www.lakecowichangazette.com ww.lakecowichangazette.com PO Box 10, Lake Cowichan, BC V0R 2G0 PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROC OCHURES S C CATALOG OGUES S CO CONTES STS S PRO ODUC CTS S STO S ORES S FLY LYERS ERS DE DEALS ALS CO COUPO UPONS UPO NS BRO BROCHU CHURES CHU RES CA CATAL TALOGU TAL OGUES OGU ES

Tamu Miles

From left: Tanner Cummings, Parker Bergstrom, and Nelson Wagner before heading into the change rooms after a two hour referee training sessions on the ice last week as part of the B.C. Hockey Summer Officiating School.

is now available on

B.C. Hockey Officiating camp is just where these kids want to spend a week of their summer holiday Three Lake Cowichan kids took part in the B.C. Hockey Officiating School at the Cowichan Lake Sports Arena this past week. The camp began on Monday and ended Friday afternoon. Tanner Cummings, Parker Bergstrom, and Nelson Wagner play baseball, but say that hockey is the sport they truly love. Each year B.C. Hockey offers summer officiating camps in August in both Lake Cowichan and Osoyoos. “Kids come from all over the province to attend these camps, choosing the one that is closest/easiest for them,” said Stacie Couch, B.C. Hockey assistant, communications. Students between the age of 12 and 18-years-old are welcome to participate. “However, in many cases the students have been selected because of their outstanding commitment last season and awarded attendance at the Summer Officiating School by their Minor Hockey Association,” said Couch. This year, 50 hockey loving kids converged on the Cowichan Lake Sports Arena to learn all about the art of refereeing hockey.

The kids spend time on the ice as well as in a classroom setting where they learn about technicalities and rules. They also go through conditioning exercises and fitness tests. At the end of the week they write a test, and if they pass, it allows them to referee games in the coming season for their age group and level. “Today we did the fitness test,” said Cummings. “We did the beat test; how many push-ups you can do without stopping, and how many sit-ups you can do in a minute.” But the school is not all about exercises and tests, the kids also get some down time with activities such as going to Cowichan Lake for a swim. Cummings, Bergstrom, and Wagner are in their second year of refereeing, and all three play hockey as well.

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Barrel of Fun: Aug. 7 men’s golf report John Leach pitched a perfect iron shot into the prize barrel from 60 yards out. John is the only barrel winner so far this year and collected a substantial prize. Earl Laforge was low-gross winner for the day and Dave Melnick had a great round for a low-net winner. Dave had a KP on the Seventh and two birdies in his round. Brian Crossan was KP on the First. Rocky Wise, Frank Fraser and Tom Clarkson also had Birds. Jug Kalar, Glen Richardson, Lance Lingren and Frank Magrin all had chip-ins. Sandy Pars were holed by Rick Nott, Tom Clarkson, and Jug Kalar. One of Duffer O’Doul’s golf opponents complains that when the Duffer can’t remember whether he had 6 or a 7, he probably had an 8. —Submitted by Rick Nott

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16

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

www.lakecowichangazette.com

Arbutus Park Swim Lessons To August 24 Red Cross Levels 1-10 Call 250-749-6742 to register

Fun in the Sun Day Camps

SPORTS

July 2 -August 25 | 5-11 years Mon.-Fri. | 10:30a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Call 250-749-6742 to register

Bottom from left: Matt Ellford, Alyssa Morris, Darcy Mayo, Matt Dunnae, Ross Forrest, and Rick Brubaker wait to select their team members through a random draw as Dustin Mayo, standing on stage, lets players know the rules of the tournament for the weekend.

Tamu Miles Photos

An emotional moment for Ashley Chadwick as the first lock of her hair is cut by Ayslin Veitch at the 1/2 Cutz Slo-pitch Tournament at Mesachie Lake Skydome over the weekend. Chadwick managed to raise just over $6,000 towards the Cody Classic Tournament happening in September, a fundriaser for families dealing with the expenses related to childhood cancer treatment.

Volunteers prepare burgers, hot dogs, and serve cold non-alcoholic beverages the first day of the 1/2 Cutz Tournament this past weekend.

Eric Wilkinson feels the burn after auctioning off fists full of his chest hair on Sunday.

1/2 Cutz Tournament helps strike out expenses for cancer afflicted families in the Cowichan Valley Tamu Miles Gazette Editor

Six teams were formed for the annual 1/2 Cutz tournament, a two day event to raise funds for Cowichan Valley families who are struggling to make ends meet while dealing with a child who has been struck by cancer. The event started on Friday evening, August 10, at the Mesachie Lake Community Hall where coaches picked their teams through a random draw. Coaches this year were, Matt Ellford for the grey team, Ross Forrest for the red team, Darcy Mayo for the orange team, Matt Dunnae for the green team, Rick Brubaker for the yellow team, and Alyssa Morris for the blue team. The Cody Classic tournament began 14 years ago when Cowichan Valley resident Wes Swain and his family found out that their four-year-old son Cody had cancer, says Dustin Mayo, one of the organizers for the 1/2 Cutz Tournament. “This started as a family thing,” said Mayo as he addressed the players, volunteers, and family members near the end of the tournament on Sunday. He explained that the Swain family decided they would carry it on for other families that are facing the same hardships. All funds raised in the Cody Classic go towards paying for transportation and

other costs for families who are having to travel for cancer treatment for a child. The 1/2 Cutz tournament began a few years ago out in Mesachie Lake, and all funds raised from this local tournament are combined with funds from the Cody Classic. “Last year we managed to raise $40,000 between both tournaments,” said Mayo. Much of the funds are raised through the $50 per player fee charged to anyone entering the tournament, however there is also a silent auction, raffles, a beer gardens, food concession, T-shirts and much more. Each year a brave soul steps forward to raise funds through having their hair cut or shaved. This year that brave soul was Ashley Chadwick from Duncan. “I’m nervous, really nervous,” said Chadwick on Saturday. “I’ve always had my hair long. My mom says the last time it was cut I was probably four-years-old.”

“It’s going to be weird. I won’t have to buy shampoo and conditioner every two weeks.” Chadwick has been raising funds since December through activities like beer gardens, and bottle collections from events like Lake Days. “I’ve played with the 1/2 Cutz for the past few years,” said Chadwick. Though sections of Chadwick’s hair were auctioned off for cutting to the highest bidder, with Ayslin Veitch Dustin Mayo stepping up first, Jennina Russell from Heads or Nails in Lake Cowichan once again stepped up to do the actual cutting. Russell has participated in this aspect of the tournament since its inception, and Mayo took a moment to thank her for time and continued support. In total, Chadwick raised $6,015, including monies donated at the tournament while her long locks were being snipped off. Mayo and his wife Kristal also brought

Last year we managed to raise $40,000 between both tournaments.

down a quilt that was started for the kids who have been helped and Mayo talked about how it shows the names of nine children in the valley who have been helped through the tournament. “It hangs in our bedroom,” said Mayo. “It means a lot to us.” The final fundraiser for this year was something new. Eric Wilkinson decided he would brave the pain and auction off fist fulls of his chest hair to those who thought they could rip it out. Though he didn’t seem too excited about the idea when it came time to actually do it, he still saw it through and for $20 each, Johnny Stinson and Drew Forrest tried to grab as much hair as they could. Mason Wall was also talked into allowing a couple of people try to pull out some of his back hair, much to the delight of the crowd. It is not yet known how much has been raised in total for this year’s 1/2 Cutz Tournament, but Mayo says that information should be available in the next week or so. In the meantime, stay tuned for the Cody Classic coming up in September in Duncan.


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THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

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CALL FOR ENTRIES 10TH ANNUAL Kitty Coleman Woodland Artisan Festival. Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show. Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting Sept 1,2 &3 Applications for Artisans are available at woodlandgardens.ca or phone 250-339-6901

IF YOU’RE interested in real estate, then take Appraisal and Assessment, a specialized two-year business major at Lakeland College’s campus in Lloydminster, Alberta. Your training includes assessment principles, computerized mass appraisal valuation of properties, farmland evaluation and property analysis. Start September; www.lakelandcollege.ca. 1-800-661-6490, ext. 5429.

Diesel Mechanic Position. Diesel engine and transmission repair shop located on Vancouver Island looking for a qualiďŹ ed mechanic. This person must be energetic and motivated, able to deal professionally with customers and neat in appearance. Marine and supervisory skills an asset. Competitive wage and beneďŹ t package. Fax:250-2860059 or email service@altechdiesel.com Attn:Service Manager.

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION rated #2 for at-home jobs. Start training today. Graduates are in demand! Enroll now. Take advantage of low monthly payments. 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com.

FULL TIME Class 1 or 3 driver, with air, required immediately for Port Hardy. Bulk fuel/off road exp. an asset. Clean abstract. Competitive wage package w/beneďŹ ts. Email/fax resume to: 250-9496381. port_hardy_agency@telus.net.

AUTOMATED TANK Manufacturing INC. is looking for welders. Due to a huge expansion to our plant located in Kitscoty, Alberta, 20km west of Lloydminster. We have openings for 10-3rd year apprentices or journey person welders. We offer best wage in industry. 3rd yr apprentice $28$30/hr, journey person $32$35/hr, higher with tank experience. ProďŹ t sharing bonus plus manufacturing bonus incentive. Full insurance package 100% paid by company. Good working environment. Join a winning team. Call Basil or Blaine at; (ofďŹ ce)780-8462231; (fax)780-846-2241 or send resume to blaine@autotanks.ca; p r o d u c t i o n @ a u t o t a n k s. c a . Keep your feet on the ground in a safe welding environment through inhole manufacturing process. No scaffolding or elevated work platform.

$2998

IF YOU ARE ... • New in Town • Expecting a Baby Call your Welcome Wagon hostess! It will be her privilege to give you free gifts from local businesses and civic organizations.

To make an appointment call:

Ladine at 250-932-4664 www.welcomewagon.ca

PERSONALS

COMING EVENTS

Legion Branch #210

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!DVERTISEĂĽACROSSĂĽ 6ANCOUVERĂĽ)SLANDĂĽ INĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽBEST READĂĽCOMMUNITYĂĽ NEWSPAPERS /.ĂĽ4(%ĂĽ7%"

COMING EVENTS

MEAT DRAW Every Saturday First draw at 3p.m. Prizes!

MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-888-744-3699.

TRAVEL TIMESHARE

SUNDAYS

2 p.m. to 7p.m.

CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. NO Risk Program, STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248.

KARAOKE MUSIC B I N G O K with Rick

Saturday, Aug.18th 8:30 p.m. p.m. Sing al along ong or listen!

Saturday, August 25th 4 p.m. p.m. Join the fun! Prizes!

Everyone Welcome • 250-749-6041 DEATHS

DEATHS

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES AUTOMOTIVE SCRATCH & Chip Repair. Lucrative. Easy to learn. Mobile. Exclusive territory. Income Potential $100/hr. Very low operating expenses. F/T or PT. 1(250)686-0808.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

NELSON, Leo September 7, 1937 – July 13, 2012 Leo Nelson passed away peacefully at St Joseph’s Hospital in Comox, surrounded by his loving family. Leo will be missed by his wife Gaylia; children Cheryl (Cliff), Richard (Laura), Cory (Kirsten) and Leonard (Liz); his brother Tom; many grandchildren; one great grandchild, one joyfully anticipated great grandchild due in November; and many extended family and friends. Leo is now with his son Gordon, and his brother Carl in the next world. After being born and raised on Gabriola Island, Leo spent many years in Victoria and Lake Cowichan raising his family with his wife Gaylia. In 1981 he founded the Lake Cowichan Salmonid Enhancement Society and remained president for many years. Leo worked with many dedicated members of the society, to build the ďŹ rst hatchery at the Lake. This project also led to the twinning of Lake Cowichan and Ohtaki, Japan. Leo was an avid ďŹ sherman, outdoorsman and handyman. He was always busy doing something and could be found in the shop, garden or greenhouse puttering on some project any day of the year. Leo spent his retirement years in the Cowichan, then Comox Valley living ďŹ nally in Cumberland. A private memorial for immediate family will take place in August. Our dear husband, father and grandfather and friend will remain in our hearts and prayers forever and is dearly missed by family, extended family and friends. May the ďŹ sh be even bigger where you are.

Build Your Career With us Journeyman Millwrights Meadow Lake, Sk. • Focus On Safety Performance • Industry Leader In The World Markets • Competitive Compensation Packages • Sustainable Business Practices • Progressive Environment Do you thrive in a dynamic and challenging environment with opportunities for continuous growth and development?

Apply online today and build your career with us!

www.tolko.com

CRESCENT VALLEY

Selkirk Paving, part of the Interoute Construction Ltd. group of companies, located in the Kootenay region of British Columbia, is looking for a F/T Shop Supervisor to manage a eet of over 300 pieces of construction equipment. Some travel will be required. Duties / Tasks; ¡Manage shop activities ¡Dispatch mechanics ¡Maintain maintenance records ¡Manage eet licences ¡Help purchaser w/ parts orders Knowledge / Skills; ¡Knowledge of asphalt, crushing, and ready mix equipment would be an asset ¡Able to create repair budgets ¡Familiar with safety codes / regulations ¡Fluent with Microsoft Word and Excel Experience/Education; ¡Post secondary education with Heavy Duty Mechanic training Competitive Compensation Package w/ a Comprehensive BeneďŹ t & Pension Plan. The Company Offers Development Opportunities Through Tailored Training Programs. For more information visit www.terusconstruction.ca Please send your resume stating position to the Human Resources department at: hr@terusconstruction.ca or by fax at: (1)604-575-3691

HELP WANTED An Alberta Construction Company is hiring Dozer and Excavator Operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilďŹ eld road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051. PARTS & Services Representatives at Jacobson Ford Salmon Arm BC- We are looking for exciting, customer friendly, dynamic individuals capable of working in a fast paced work environment. Parts and service experience an asset but not necessary, email resume to iwantacareer@jacobsonford.com

THE LEMARE GROUP is accepting resumes for the following positions: • Grapple Yarder Operators • Hooktender • 2nd Loader Buckerman • Line Machine Operator Chaser • Off Highway Logging Truck Drivers • Excavator Operator with Logging Road Construction experience • CertiďŹ ed Driller/Blaster • Heavy Duty Mechanics Full time with union rates and beneďŹ ts. Please send resume by fax to 250-956-4888 or email ofďŹ ce@lemare.ca. T-MAR INDUSTRIES located in Campbell River is hiring for the position of Heavy Duty Mechanic. Position comes with a competitive beneďŹ t package and applicant must possess a valid driver’s license. For details visit www.t-mar.com Contact Tyson Lambert by Fax: 250-286-9502 or by Email: tysonlambert@tmar.com

TRADES, TECHNICAL CONCRETE FINISHERS and Form Setters. Edmonton based company seeks experienced concrete ďŹ nishers and form setters for work in Edmonton and northern Alberta. Subsistence and accommodations provided for out of town work; john@raidersconcrete.com. Cell 780-660-8130. Fax 780-444-7103. CERTIFIED ELECTRICIANS wanted for growing northern company. Competitive wages and beneďŹ ts. Safety tickets needed. Fax 250-775-6227 or email: info@torqueindustr ial.com. Apply online: www.torqueindustrial.com.

Looking for a NEW job? .com

SHOP Welders Wanted Fort St. John, BC. Email resumes to info@hitimeservices.com Fax resumes to 1-888-731-8027. Competitive Wages & BeneďŹ ts. Check us out @ www.hitimeservices.com

SHOP SUPERVISOR

Required for an Alberta Trucking Company. One Class 1 Driver. Must have a minimum of 5 years experience pulling low boys and driving off road. Candidate must be able to pass a drug test and be willing to relocate to Edson, Alberta. Fax resumes to: 780-725-4430

CERTIFIED MILLWRIGHTS needed for growing northern company. Competitive wages and beneďŹ ts. Safety tickets necessary. Fax resume to 250-775-6227 or email: info@torqueindustr ial.com. Online: www.torqueindustrial.com. INSERTING MACHINE operator required for busy Alberta printing plant. Previous Alphaliner or other machine experience an asset. Mechanical & computer aptitude required; ejamison@greatwest.ca. SHINGLE SAWYER needed in Gold River. Pendragon Forest Products Ltd. Apply to: Box 1100 Gold River B.C., V0P 1G0. Call 250-283-2111 or 604-369-3045. Or Email: pendragonfp@xplornet.com

PERSONAL SERVICES HEALTH PRODUCTS COMMERCIAL BEEKEEPING CertiďŹ cate Program. GPRC Fairview Campus. Extensive study of beekeeping, queen rearing, and honey business. Paid work experience. Affordable on-campus residences. Starts January 7, 2013. Call Lin 1-780-8356630 www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview. SLIM DOWN for summer! Lose up to 20 lbs in just 8 weeks. Call Herbal Magic today! 1-800-854-5176.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

DROWNING IN debts? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500.


18

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

PETS AND LIVESTOCK

PERSONAL SERVICES FINANCIAL SERVICES

PETS

www.lakecowichangazette.com

REAL ESTATE

TRANSPORTATION

HOUSES FOR SALE

AUTO FINANCING

PURE-BRED GOLDEN Retriever puppies, pics emailed on request. Ready Oct. Denis 250-932-8350, 250-510 8350.

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE ANTIQUES/VINTAGE

Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557

CARS

.

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161. M O N E Y P ROV I D E R . C O M $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

FUEL/FIREWOOD

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES ELECTRICAL 1A ELECTRICIAN, licenced, bonded, Small Jobs Specialist, panel upgrades and renos. All work guaranteed since 1989. Rob at 250-732-PLUG (7584).

FURNITURE

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

Delivery Guy

REAL ESTATE

(250) 510-4745

HOMES WANTED

deliveryguy.shawwebspace.ca

Lowest Price Guarantee

PLUMBING

MOBILE HOMES & PARKS

GARAGE SALES MOVING SALE. August 19th 8-3 pm. 2074 Honeysuckle Terrace Nanaimo. Going overseas. Quality household, kitchen, shelving, camping, golf and windsurfing gear, LPs and CDs, stereo, books, antique dresser, MORE. For details, rawbbiemc@yahoo.ca

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper?

DELIVERIES HAULING/JUNK REMOVAL MOVING JOBS WELCOME

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

HIDE-A-BED, GREAT cond, $250. TV stand, 32” or less, $75. Call (250)749-6698.

LEGAL SERVICES

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

FIR: SPLIT & delivered, $180./cord. Fir long-butts, unsplit, approx 2 cords, $250. Short-log truck loads, approx 7 cords, $700. Call 250-7494112 evenings.

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES COAL HARBOUR- Oceanside retreat on N. Vancouver Island. 1750 sq. ft. 2 bdrm, 2 full bath, finished basement, deck, sauna, hot tub and new roof in 2011. Pad rent $300/mnth. All appliances included. Auto/boat shed. Fishing, boating, crabbing at your doorstep. $39,500. Call 250-949-6643 or 250-949-0527.

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO LAKE COWICHAN. 1 bdrm condo, fully furnished, immaculate, updated, grnd floor. N/S, N/P, $650 mo. Sept 1. Call 250-745-6618 after 6 pm.

COTTAGES

www.webuyhomesbc.com

LIONS’ CLUB HALL for rent $75. Deposit required. Call Eileen 250-749-3345.

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

HOMES FOR RENT

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 145 South Shore Road | Lake Cowichan |

www.lkc.ca

$600 1 bedroom suite #2-68 Stanley Rd. Very clean suite in six-plex. Close to everything. Coin laundry room, small pet upon approval. $650 2 bedroom suite #39-211 Madill Rd. Very nice suite in popular strata. Washer & dryer, N/S, N/Pets. $750 3 bedroom condo #30-215 Madill Very nice unit in popular strata. Washer/dryer, N/S, N/Pets. $850 2 bedroom suite 462 Pt. Ideal Rd. Lower, furnished suite in newer home. Great location, washer & dryer, garage. N/S, N/Pets. $900 2 bedroom suite 150 Cowichan Ave. Charming older home with large garage, washer & dryer, wood heat, N/S, pet upon approval. $1,000 Huge 1bdrm + Loft 10461 Youbou Rd. Lovely 2 bathroom house, deck with great view, fruit tree & wood heat. Pet upon approval. $1,050 3 bedroom home 112 Johel Rd. Ground level comfy home. Fully fenced yard, washer & dryer, N/S, small pet upon approval. Check out rentals online www.lkc.ca To View Call:

250-749-6660

2004 VW TOUAREG. Only 135,000 km, economical, spirited V6 engine, all wheel drive and tow hitch with electric brakes. Unique 6 speed Tiptronic auto transmission. Well equipped interior, rear mounted CD changer. Beautiful, well maintained. $14,900 obo, 250658-1123 mjmarshall@telus.net

MARINE BOATS

SAHTLAM- Riverside studio bachelor cottage. N/P, inclds satellite TV+ internet. $650. Avail now. (250)748-2031.

A SERVICE PLUMBER. Licence, Insured. Drains, HWT, Reno’s, Repairs. Senior Discounts. After Hour Service. Call Coval Plumbing, 250709-5103.

Call: 1-250-616-9053

1992, 26 ft TRAVELAIRE, Class C Motorhome. Bright, clean, sleeps 4. Twin beds in back and fold down double bed. Excellent and clean condition. Full shower with skylight, gas generator, air conditioning, second owner, new internal batteries (worth $600), new water pump, only 91,300 km. Reliable, clean and functional. REDUCED to $13,000. (250) 748-3539

HALLS

LAKEFRONT YOUBOU Exec 3 bdrm, 2 bath, level entry home, level beach, 5 appl. fireplace, decks, NS, $1200. Avail end August. 250-715-5484, email beeumz@hotmail.com

SUITES, LOWER YOUBOU: 1 bdrm, furn/unfurn, garden, N/S. $600 incld hydro. Call 250-217-1173. LAKE COWICHAN- 2 bdrm bsmt suite, spacious, clean, renovated, near town/bus, W/D, quiet tenants only. $775 iclds utils. Small pet cons, N/S. Avail Sept 1. (250)642-3707.

SELL YOUR CAR... FAST!

TRANSPORTATION AUTO FINANCING WANT A vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in August $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888593-6095.

with a classified ad Call 310.3535


www.lakecowichangazette.com

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

19

The Inside Back: A little of this and that -Air conditioners and ceiling fans. Make sure to turn these off. To minimize heat entering your home, draw blinds and close other window coverings. -Other electronic devices. Unplug all non-essential devices like phone chrgers. An average Canadian household wastes $43 a year due to standby power.

dance music and hosting a “Big Hunk� watermelon sale. All proceeds from this $1 per slice of watermellon goes to support community-wide work of the CVAC. Other performers will include the Medford Choir and the co-winner of the 2012 Duncan has talent, Carlson School of Dance student, “Vance the Dance.� The CVAC is also inviting event goers to dress in the area, “so dig out those 70s clothes,� said Judy Brayden, CVAC president.

RCMP Report

☞ SuperWalk for Parkinson’s

Lake Cowichan RCMP have had an Epiphone Guitar turned into the detachment. The guitar was found at the end of Johel Road and was turned into the detachement on July 10. The owner may claim the guitar by going into the detachment or phoning 250-749-6668. Police say a cougar was sighted at approximately 2 a.m., on Aug. 13, near A.B. Greenwell Elementary School. At the same time three males were in close proximity. The males were watching the meteor shower that night and made a hasty retreat to their vehicle once advised of the animal. Police caution the public to be aware of wildlife in the area and to report any further cougar sightings to the RCMP or the B.C. Conservation Service at 1-877-9527277.

Saturday, September 15 is the annual SuperWalk to raise funds for Parkinson’s research. Registration starts at 9 a.m. and the walk begins at 10 a.m. The walk is taking place at the Duncan Curling Arena, 3191 Sherman Road. For more information visit parkinson.bc.ca.

and

SAVE

☞ Power down while you’re away BC Hydro suggests the following way to save energy while you are away: - Turn lights off, and set up energy efficient lamps on timers for security. Use photo sensors or motion detectors for outdoor lights. - Fridge and freezer. For an extended period trip, consider emptying fridge and freezer and turning them off. For short trips try filling old containers with water to improve your fridges efficiency. - Water heater. Set electric heaters to the lowest temperature.

☞ Summer Nights The Cowichan Valley Arts Council will be hosting the next Summer Nights evening on Saturday, August 18. Featured performers will be Jan Matthews and a “Big Hunk� affair. Matthews will be playing 1960s and 70s

☞ Cowichan Valley Cruisers Cowichan Valley Cruisers president Corky Adams and his wife Korrin show off their 1931 Model A Coupe when the cruisers came into town on Thursday, August 2.

Cowichan Lake Service Directory FOR ALL YOUR HEATING and COOLING NEEDS CARPENTRY

accurate air

Finishing carpenter with over 23 years experience.

SERVICE, REPAIR AND INSTALL

Quality comes first.

– ONE CALL COVERS IT ALL –

• Renovations • Installations • Framing • All Finishing Carpentry • Custom Kitchens • Laminate Flooring • Decks • Fences • Sheds • Additions • Windows & Doors

For your free in home heating estimate

250.746.1666 Visit www.accurate-air.ca for internet specials!

PLUMBING

After hour service | Seniors’ discounts Renovations | New construction | Repairs Hot water tanks | Drain cleaning Septic Design & Installation Water services 20+ years experience

250-749-4997 250-709-5103

//////////////////

/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //

//////////////////////////////////

COVAL

INDEPENDENT CRAFTSMAN

//////////////////////////////////

JOHN PORTELANCE

250-749-3174 GAS BAR

TIPTONS GAS BAR Gas • Diesel Boat Gas Confections • Bait • Ice

• Hot water heaters • Fiberglass tubs • Acrylic jetted tubs • Pumps • Fish ponds • Faucets • Sprinklers • Repair parts from A - Z

GRIFFITHS HOME PLUMBING CENTRE

251 Government St. ,Duncan

250-746-4534

Come enjoy...

Serving Lake Cowichan for over 20 yrs

MINI EXCAVATOR & BOBCAT SERVICES

1-877-222-8876 250-749-0105

Licenced Ě° Bonded Ě° Insured

Landscaping | Septic Services

Reg #12129

73 South Shore, Lake Cowichan

MARKET

   

 

 Open May thru to  

Thanksgiving at the Coffee Mill site

250-749-7233 or 250-510-1113

PETS & SUPPLIES

Cowichan Pet Emporium (1996) Fish • Pet food/supplies • Otter Co-op Livestock Feed • Wood Pellets • Grooming •

MONTHLY VET CLINIC

En-TIRE-ly at your Service 250-749-6614

DUMP TRUCK: 1-6 YARDS PHYSIOTHERAPIST

Lake Cowichan Therapy Open: Mon., Wed., Thurs. #103 - 205 South Shore Rd.

250.749.3621

250-749–4454

Judith Quinlan Registered Physiotherapist

TRUCKING

VETERINARIAN

170A Cowichan Lake Rd.

TIRES

Open 7 Days a Week

Store: 250-749–3355 Garage: 250-749–3213

250-732-4570 Shane Baker

Towing and Repairs

Convenience Store • Gas Bar

250-701-1755 CALL Ian Balding TODAY

Everything is grown, baked, or hand crafted by our vendors. New vendors or buskers welcome. Call Bob at:

(1958) Ltd.

Residential & Commercial

Single off -season rates start at $59/night – $295/week www.lakecowichan.org

OPEN: Mon.-Sat: 5a.m.-10p.m. Sun: 7a.m. - 8p.m.

Cowichan Motors

EXCAVATING

PACIFIC-WEST ELECTRIC

Waterfront Patio Suites King-sized Bed | Jacuzzi Wharf | CampďŹ re Pit | BBQs

Saturdays 10 am - 2 pm

SERVICE STATION

All your plumbing needs under one roof!

Need space for relatives?

BOUTIQUE WATERFRONT LODGE

250-749-6133 14 North Shore Rd. Lake Cowichan

ELECTRICIAN

ACCOMMODATION

â?€ It's Garden time. â?€

• Oil, Gas & Electric Furnaces • Heat Pumps • Refrigeration • Duct Cleaning

TOP SOIL • BARK MULCH COMPOST • SAND • GRAVEL

Specializing in delivering 1 - 5 yard loads. Lorne: 250-749-6601 Cell: 250-701-5153

r Open foss e in Bus 2 -555

250-932


20

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

THE LAKE COWICHAN GAZETTE

www.lakecowichangazette.com

Back to School Sale! Te l u s r e u s a b l e b a g w i t h e v e r y p u r c h a s e

ACCESSORIES SALE! BY DONATION OF CASH OR A BAG OF GROCERIES TO FOOD BANK Sat. Aug. 18 10am – 2pm Sun FM at Canada Avenue location & Rotary Club of Duncan BBQ. Support the Food Bank!

HTC One S $0*

HTC One X $79.99*

Bold 9790 $0*

Samsung Galaxy S II X $29.99*

Bold 9900 $49.99*

Samsung Galaxy Note $99.99*

iPhone 4S 16GB $99* *Based on 3 year term, some conditions apply!

Check out the latest offers & arrivals at www.cowichansound.com 951A Canada Ave 250-748-4847 Cowichan Commons 250-715-1599 B1- 845 Deloume Road, Mill Bay 250-733-2626

We SERVICE what we sell!

Lake Cowichan Gazette, August 15, 2012  

August 15, 2012 edition of the Lake Cowichan Gazette

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