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VICTORIANEWS VICTORIA COMMUNITY

SPORTS

Showing their pride

NHL to WHL

Supporters of all stripes came out in full force for the annual Pride Week parade. Photo page A25

Victoria Royals announce their new GM, a former assistant to the Rangers’ Glen Sather. Page A19

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

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Local lawyer scores windfall for nurses Landmark settlement redefines gender discrimination in battle between ‘David and Goliath’ Roszan Holmen News staff

O

n his big day to shine last week, Victoria lawyer Laurence Armstrong was stuck in hospital, undergoing surgery. For someone not shy of the media glare, the timing was terrible. “It’s so unfair,” said Armstrong, laughing. On July 3, the Canadian Human Rights Roszan Holmen/News staff Tribunal issued an order Lawyer Laurence Armstrong awarding Armstrong’s specializes in civil litigation clients – more than 400 and tax disputes, but has Canada Pension Plan nurses – $160 million and gained notoriety with counting. It compensates two high-profile gender discrimination cases. them for nearly 35 years of discrimination. Armstrong describes it a simple tale of David and Goliath – with one twist: David is a woman. On the surface, the win is small in scope compared to previous pay-equity cases, involving thousands of publicsector employees and payouts worth billions of dollars. But the case against the federal government is precedentsetting in that it effectively broadened the way the tribunal defines gender discrimination. As Armstrong went under the knife, lead complainant and nurse Ruth Walden spoke to the press in Ottawa, where she lives. “It has taken years of effort by the nurses to get to this day,” she wrote in an email to the News. PLEASE SEE: Drawn-out battle, Page A3

Photo by Jacek Szymanski/Used with permission, Department of National Defence

Submarine HMCS Victoria arrives at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii before taking part in the annual Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2012 combined and joint exercise. The events are taking place off Hawaii now through Aug. 3.

West Coast in capable hands Much of naval fleet absent, but ships could be redeployed to respond to emergencies Erin McCracken News staff

With hundreds of West Coast military personnel, seven ships and a submarine away at sea, CFB Esquimalt may seem like a ghost town. Two warships, three maritime coastal defence vessels and submarine HMCS Victoria are sailing in Hawaiian waters as part of a multinational Rim of the Pacific exercise until Aug. 3. Warship HMCS Regina left for the Arabian Sea on Tuesday. HMCS Van-

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couver will sail with her until they reach Hawaii. Two frigates remain at the base, though there are other smaller naval vessels training in local waters. HMCS Calgary just left the shop and HMCS Winnipeg is about to undergo a midlife refit. Having the bulk of the West Coast fleet sailing at the same time is, in fact, an ideal situation, in the eyes of navy leaders. “What we want is to have as many ships at sea doing (the) training and operations that are ultimately what we are all about,” said navy Capt. Luc Cassivi, chief of operations for Maritime Forces Pacific. “This is good news that we are getting as much as we can out of our ships.” Ships sailing abroad or at home can be quickly reassigned to respond to an emergency situation, though there is typically advance intelligence

         

that allows the navy to prepare, Cassivi said. In the event of a domestic emergency, several provincial and federal government agencies would respond before the navy was called in. “They tap on us as a force of last resort if they don’t have capacity, or if the situation is beyond what they are capable of managing,” he said. The navy is always ready to support other agencies, which doesn’t limit it from carrying on with regular activities, such as training exercises and missions abroad. “We need to train our sailors and we need to get our ships ready and our crew used to managing life at sea and operations, so that when we do get a tasking for international (or), national operations we (will) have as ready a crew that we can to deal with those situations,” Cassivi said. editor@vicnews.com

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A2 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

www.vicnews.com • A27

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

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www.vicnews.com • A3

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Drawn-out battle worth the wait: local nurse but the final tally could prove higher, in part because all CPP nurses are eligible for compensation, even those who didn’t register as official complainants. That means hundreds more nurses may step forward to claim their due.

Continued from Page A1

“While the agreement reached with our employer doesn’t compensate us for all our losses, I’m very happy that it will compensate all victims of the discriminatory practice.” The payout could be life changing for CPP nurses employed across the country, including for many of the roughly 65 employed in the Victoria office. ■

The CPP disability benefits program launched in 1966. At first, the program director only hired doctors to assess applicant files, but soon began hiring registered nurses as ‘medical adjudicators’ to keep up with the mounting workload. In the years that followed, the doctors sometimes played a supervisory role, but typically, their work differed little from the program’s nurses. Each reviewed applications and had authority to reject or approve claims. Their job classification in the public service classification system, however, differed greatly. The doctors were classified as health professionals; the nurses were classified as program administrators – a designation that did not recognize the nurses’ professional expertise. The consequences of this distinction were far-reaching for the nurses, whose careers were mostly stuck at entry level. They received little funding to update their medical knowledge in a field that demands keeping up to speed on the latest research and practices. As a result, their salary, pension, advancement and other benefits suffered. By the time Ruth Walden joined their ranks in 1993, CPP nurses had been working to be reclassified as medical professionals for several years. “I fully believed that there was just some sort of misunderstanding,” she said. “Our employer depends on us every day to use our knowledge, skills and experience to make really tough decisions that affect people’s lives.” ■

In 2001, the nurses started to organize themselves to form a united front. Despite being scattered in regional offices across the country, they connected through word of mouth, finding employees willing to speak out in each office. “Gradually we built a nationwide network,” said Walden. “We were pretty much on call 24-7.” Through late-night and early-morning emails, they shared information, co-ordinated their approach and

Photo credit: Professional Institute of the Public Service Of Canada

Heather Wellman, left, a partner is Laurence Armstrong’s Victoria-based law firm, attends a press conference in Ottawa announcing a settlement between Canada Pension Plan nurses and the federal government. Also shown are nurse Ruth Walden, in white, and union president Gary Corbett, right. supported each other – all without ever meeting in person. In 2004, Walden filed her complaint, without the backing of her union, the Public Service Alliance of Canada. Undeterred, she and her team hired their own lawyer, at their own expense. Walden heard of Armstrong through a gender-discrimination complaint he launched on his own behalf, seeking free prostate cancer screening tests for men. He later lost that case. But in representing the nurses, Armstrong took a different tack than most of the big genderdiscrimination cases won before. Instead of arguing equal pay for work of equal value, he argued different sections of the Canadian Human Rights Act. Section 7 and 10 forbid employers from treating different groups of employees differently on the basis of discrimination. His 2007 victory in the tribunal was precedent-setting. “It really is another way at looking at human rights,” said Philippe Dufresne, director and senior counsel of the Canadian Human Rights Commission’s Litigation Services Division. “It goes beyond pay equity because it talks about classification. It talks about opportunities for career advancement. It talks about training and professional recognition.” ■

But that landmark ruling was far from the end of the story. Since 2007, Walden and her team have fought to uphold the original decision through three tribunal hearings, two

judicial reviews in federal court and one appeal. “It’s been quite a struggle every step of the way,” she said. “My daughter, she knows everything about this case,” said Adele McLean, one of the CPP nurses representing the Victoria office. “She’s grown up, literally, hearing about this.” Her co-representative in Victoria, greyhaired Chuck Morris, joked he had brown hair when he signed up for the job. Morris, the token male in this fight for women’s rights, helped to keep discussions light by sending jokes over email. At critical junctions in the case, Morris would consult his “voodoo chicken.” The silly digital persona served as a barometer of who’s happy or not happy, explained Morris, a former military nurse who took a $21,000 cut in pay when he was hired on by the CPP disability benefits program. The Victoria office is the second-largest in the country. The group made a point of celebrating the small victories along the way, McLean said. When they were finally reclassified as health professionals in November 2010, they sculpted pigs of papier-mâché, attached pipe-stem cleaner wings, and decorated the office. They called it the “Pigs have Flown” party. The tribunal’s July 3 order prescribes $16,500 in payment for every year worked between 1999 and 2011, as well as smaller lump sums for nurses who worked between 1978 and 1999. Many nurses can expect more than $200,000 from the settlement. Estimates peg the value of the total compensation at more than $160 million,

This big payout was an outcome the federal government has fought hard to avoid – in part because of its potential to rally other groups of employees. It could trigger a similar change in other departments, causing significant increase in the Public Service payroll, argued a representative of the Treasury Board during the original 2007 hearing. Ramifications of the Walden decision could also extend to the private sector. That’s because it proved individuals such as Walden, rather than powerful unions, can file complaints involving systemic issues that extend beyond the individual. “This is one of the reasons we said this could be precedent setting,” said Dufresne. Walden’s case is likely the largest gender discrimination case won without union representation. “They really did this themselves,” said Gary Corbett, president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service Of Canada. “They had to become their own union, to a certain extent,” he explained, shortly after winning representation over the nurses in 2011. “It’s not easy in this day and age to organize everybody to pull in the same direction. I can tell you that as a union boss … I run an organization of 60,000 people and I would love to see that level of solidarity.” ■

Whether Walden’s case will open the floodgates to new gender discrimination complaints is yet to be seen, however. In 2009, the federal government changed the rules of complaint resolution through the Public Sector Equitable Compensation Act. With a stated goal of speeding up the process, the Act requires that complaints about compensation be directed to the Public Service Labour Relations Board. The change leaves human rights watchdogs and academics skeptical. “They’re not a human rights tribunal,” said Armstrong. As he recovered in hospital, Armstrong said he got “rock star” treatment from the nurses, who caught wind of his win for their CPP nursing colleagues. “I’ve never had so much fun,” he said of the case. “I don’t think I’ve ever had such worthy clients. It’s been an honour to represent them.” rholmen@vicnews.com


A4 • www.vicnews.com

The Great Quidam™ Character Hunt

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

Sailing on dry land Sailors from HMCS Calgary are temporarily trading in their standard navy-issue ball caps for white stetsons during a 10-day visit to the Calgary Stampede, now underway. Calgary sailors typically participate in the annual event and this year are joined by CFB Esquimalt’s Naden Band and crew from submarine HMCS Chicoutimi. During their visit, the sailors will visit the Foothills Hospital Burn Treatment Centre and donate more than $7,000 from their charity. editor@vicnews.com

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Beacon Hill Park population up over last year Roszan Holmen News staff

Staccato squawking fills the air around Goodacre Lake at Beacon Hill Park. All the racket is a good sign. “We’re hearing children demanding food, loudly,� explains Fred Hook, Victoria’s environmental technician. For the past four years, the city has been keeping a close eye on the number of heron nests in the park. After they almost disappeared in 2009, the number of nests has climbed from 11 to 54 this year. That’s almost exactly half the number that were in the park in 2008. It doesn’t take long to spot the endangered species, high in the sequoia trees. Spectators on the stone bridge point out several nest sites, visible only by the large flapping wings of parent herons. Typically, herons build their nests in lower, more open trees. Hook speculates that this year’s switch to the tall bushy sequoias may be motivated by a desire to stay hidden from eagles. Eagles have been more of a threat in recent years. In 2008, a long-time resident eagle in the park died. His departure sparked the sudden drop in the herons’ population. The presence of an eagle’s nest nearby actually serves to protect the heronry, explained Hook. “When we don’t have an eagle nesting in here, then random, marauding eagles come off the shoreline and look for an easy food source.�

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Herons sit in a tree at Beacon Hill Park, attracting birdwatchers and photographers. The number of heron nests in the park is up this year, but the absence of eagle nests – resident eagles ward off poaching ones – may doom many of the unborn offspring of the birds. Herons are primitive birds, he said. “You see that when they fly, they need to do those long swoops. They can’t turn quickly in the air, which is one of the reasons the eagles have such an easy time taking their eggs.� This year, there are no new eagles nesting in the park, lowering the chances of success for the 54 heron nests, each with two or three babies. “As to the long-term success rate, we don’t know,� Hook said. “We do what we can to protect them, but we can’t get up there to chase off predators.� To help out the herons, the city planted 180 native species of fast-growing trees – but these

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won’t be big enough for nesting for another decade. Next, the city intends to improve its signage to inform dog owners that their pets aren’t welcome in the heron rookery, south and west of Goodacre Lake. Saanich is also working on a plan for its own heron habitat at Cuthbert Holmes Park. The park has undergone an environmental review and mapped out sensitivity zones, including areas where herons nest, said Rae Roer, Saanich’s manager of parks. That includes limiting activities, maintenance and development in these areas, he said. rholmen@vicnews.com

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www.vicnews.com • A5

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Council calls for housing checks

CITY NEWS

People on income assistance can tend to fall through cracks

Beacon Hill Park road-change preps begin

Coun. Pamela Madoff said. “What happens is we’re the ones that are put into an enforcement role. (That) can result in people being displaced from their accommodation, when many of them are actually having their rent paid or subsidized through the provincial government.” It’s happened several times in the last few months, she said. For instance, this spring bylaw officers discovered an illegal rooming house at 830-832 Queens Ave., containing 10 to 12 unrelated adults. The landlord was living in an illegal suite located inside the duplex. “We feel that there should be some due diligence on the part of the provincial government to make sure that when they are putting folks in accommodation, that the accommodation is legal for the use,” Madoff said. “It’s just been really difficult for us on the planning committee, because we feel like we’re the ones displacing folks.”

Roszan Holmen News staff

Landlords are benefiting from government money – directly or indirectly – by illegally housing tenants who receive rental or income assistance. It’s a situation that leaves the City of Victoria in the position of having to boot vulnerable tenants out of their homes. At a meeting in June, Victoria city council voted unanimously to write a letter to the provincial government, requesting that it take more precautions to ensure recipients of rental assistance or other income assistance are living in housing that is properly zoned and permitted. “A property will come forward, where the city has become aware, via a complaint, that there may be illegal occupancy or work done without a permit,”

UP TO

Coun. Pamela Madoff: tenants can inadvertantly be displaced through city enforcement actions. A spokesperson for the Ministry of Social Development, which is responsible for housing, said responsibility lies with the landlord and the municipality. “Under the Residential Tenancy Act, landlords must comply with health, safety and housing standards required by law,” the spokesperson wrote in an email to the News. “This includes local government bylaws. If the city is having zoning issues with privately owned buildings, then that is a municipal responsibility; the province has no jurisdiction. Local government has the responsibility and the authority to enforce their own bylaws.” rholmen@vicnews.com

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Transit routes unfilled due to scheduling blip Early morning transit users were left scrambling on the holiday Monday, July 2, when an error in scheduling left five B.C. Transit routes unfilled. Transit spokesperson Meribeth Burton, said as soon as the error was discovered, it took about an hour to get drivers in place on the routes. rholmen@vicnews.com

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On Monday the city began working to convert some of Beacon Hill Park’s roads to temporary multi-use trails and change the direction of traffic flow in the park. The changes, which include installing temporary bollards, signage and curb improvements, are part of a pilot project. Prep work runs throughout July and the pilot begins Aug. 1. Three months later the city will consult with the public to assess their reaction to the changes. If feedback is positive, the city will make the temporary measures permanent. Road access will remain to all the park’s amenities and parking lots will remain open throughout the pilot project.

now serving lunch. This latest addition to the Inner Harbour marks the only floating lunch spot in Victoria. The 45-foot catamaran Pride of Victoria is from Salt Spring Island and serves smokehouse food. Its landlord, the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority, announced the new business on Friday. “The Pride of Victoria is a welcome addition to the dynamic activity at Ship Point,” said harbour authority CEO Curtis Grad.

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

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The West Bay neighbourhood of Esquimalt is the focus of proposed new urban design guidelines meant to shape a clear, long-term vision that balances the needs and desires of residents, business owners and developers. “The problem is the (current official community plan) design guidelines for West Bay are the same as the design guidelines for some of the property along Esquimalt Road,” said Bill Brown, Esquimalt’s director of development services. “West Bay is something different. In my opinion, it deserves its very own unique set of design guidelines.” With council’s approval, Brown developed a set of draft guidelines in recent months in response to a development proposal for a 10-storey residential tower with groundfloor commercial space. It would be located on a triangle-shaped parcel of land at the meeting of Head, Gore and Lyall streets. It’s not unusual for municipalities to make changes to their OCPs in the face of active development applications, Brown said. “There’s nothing for us to adjudicate (the current) application against. A building of that size is going to have substantial impacts on the neighbourhood.” Prominent West Bay property and business owner Mark Lindholm is behind the proposal. It has generated anger from neigh-

bouring business owners and residents, who say it does not fit in with the commercial marine village feel of the neighbourhood, home to singlefamily and float residences and small marine businesses. “This project is a major departure from that direction,” said Carole Witter, who lives in the neighbourhood and is co-owner of Hidden Harbour Marine Centre.

“West Bay is somewthing different. In my opinion, it deserves its very own set of design guidelines.” – Bill Brown, Esquimalt director of development services Her comments echo statements made by the West Bay Neighbourhood Association. “Not only is it a major departure, it is actually a threat to what exists here,” she said. Lindholm did not respond to the News’ requests to speak to the matter. Among Witter’s other concerns were that the area be protected as a natural resource, one that serves as a waterfront recreational destination. She added that the proposed highdensity tower is out of scale with the current neighbourhood. For that reason, she supports a clear vision for West Bay in Esquimalt’s OCP. The community has until July 15 to provide feedback on the proposed West Bay urban design guidelines and can do so by calling Brown at 250-414-7146. Another public input meeting will be held in the fall, before council considers the proposed OCP amendment. editor@vicnews.com

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VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Make policing proposals public: Esquimalt council Township looking at legal options in wake of minister’s policing decision Daniel Palmer News staff

Esquimalt Mayor Barb Desjardins is calling on the Victoria Police Department and the RCMP to release details of their policing services proposals to the public. Council held a closed-door meeting July 4 to discuss how to respond to Justice Minister Shirley Bond’s decision to accept a mediator’s recommendation that allows VicPD to continue to provide police services to Esquimalt. The township’s own police advisory panel had rec-

ommended switching to RCMP contract policing. “We’d like those submissions to be released, because it’s very difficult for people to understand what they’re getting or not getting if they don’t have that information,” Desjardins said. “The RCMP were recommended because they best fit the model that we received from community input.” Desjardins said concerns about the cost, governance and service delivery under the current VicPD contract have motivated council to seek legal advice to determine if the township can challenge the province on the issue. “Our residents are wondering why council is continuing to question this, but what they don’t know is what was offered to them,” she said. “There’s just

a lot of angst in the community.” Coun. Dave Hodgins, who walked out of the in-camera meeting in protest, said public angst can be attributed in part to council’s closed-door decision to spend more money on a drawn-out debate. “Some say we’ve already spent $300,000, others are saying $500,000 when you consider staff and council time. Does our public want us to put more money into this?” he asked. Hodgins hopes council will embrace the mediator’s report and resolve sticking points around governance and finance with the City of Victoria and VicPD in the coming months. The mediator’s report was scheduled for public discussion at a council meeting on Monday, after the News’ deadline. dpalmer@vicnews.com

City being sued over parking lot In 2010, the owner of the old Lens and Shutter building successfully sued the City of Victoria for the right to demolish the 1926, single-storey brick building. Now, Jurgen Weyand of Fort Street Properties is suing the city again – this time for the right to build a surface parking lot on the now-bare site at 615 Fort St. in the city’s Old Town. City council rejected Weyand’s application in March. In the city’s response filed to the court, it argued that “as a condition of the demolition permit, the petitioner agreed to construct and maintain special hoarding to preserve the continuous building frontage, or “street wall,” to provide pedestrian interest continuity along Fort Street.” A parking lot would disrupt this continuity, and is therefore inconsistent with city policies, the reply read.

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Police arrest suspected drug dealer A Victoria woman faces a charge of possession for the purpose of trafficking after Victoria police searched a condominium in the 800-block of Johnson Street last Thursday. VicPD’s Strikeforce unit arrested a 30-year-old Victoria woman accused of dealing cocaine in the downtown.

“Our investigation led us to believe she was actively dealing,” said Strikeforce Det. Cst. Jason Eagles. “Fortunately we were able to act quickly and get these drugs off the street and hold our target accountable.” Strikeforce and Emergency Response Team members

searched the home around 10:30 a.m. They seized seven ounces of cocaine, more than $4,500 in cash, a digital scale, and packaging materials. The cocaine has an estimated street value of $10,500 and police believe she was supplying dial-a-dope dealers in the downtown. cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

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Weyand disagrees. Through his lawyer, John Alexander, he argued in his submission, “That the council of the City of Victoria erred in law by refusing to approve a development permit that meets all applicable development permit guidelines as set out in the Official Community Plan.” Alexander said his client still plans to develop the site, but is waiting for construction to finish on the adjacent rear lot. The Soveriegn condominium project on Broughton Street backs onto 615 Fort St. A parking lot would be preferable to its current state, said Alexander. “What’s going on there now would probably be described as the most disruptive – it’s just a big mess.” A tentative court date is scheduled for August. rholmen@vicnews.com

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A8 • www.vicnews.com

VICTORIANEWS

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Victoria News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-381-3484 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Time for fighting needs to end Note to Esquimalt council: There’s no shame in licking your wounds, putting your head down and moving forward with the issue of figuring out how to best police the township. News that Esquimalt was investigating its legal options against the province, in the wake of B.C. Justice Minister Shirley Bond’s decision to go against the recommendations of a local police advisory panel and stick with the Victoria Police Department, was a headscratcher. Esquimalt taxpayers are not going to have an appetite for their municipality spending potentially hundreds of thousands of dollars on legal fees fighting the province just to make a point. The point is, Bond used information from the advisory panel, as well as the third-party mediator, in making her decision to have VicPD continue as the service provider for Esquimalt. Fighting the province on what amounts to a matter of process is a losing battle that the municipality can scarcely afford to wage. Releasing details of contract proposals made by VicPD and the RCMP for policing Esquimalt, a move suggested by Mayor Barbara Desjardins last week, isn’t going to help either. As with a lawsuit, such a move seems aimed at proving the province doesn’t know what’s best for the township. But at the end of the day, the provincial government makes the rules that govern municipalities and Esquimalt knew going in that the advisory panel’s recommendations weren’t binding. One has to wonder just how far Esquimalt council will go to prove they had it right, rather than moving forward and trying to make the best out of an imperfect situation. Rather than dwelling on correcting a perceived slight, they need to refocus on the reasons the township started looking elsewhere for policing in the first place. Yes, VicPD hasn’t done the best job it could for Esquimalt. But now’s the time to use the extra resources promised by the province and hammer out, at the board and street policing level, a better and more equitable way of getting the job done. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Victoria News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2009 WINNER

Nuggets from Barlee’s goldpan Shortly after word came of accounts that begin with an the death of B.C. historian and aboriginal miner known as Slumach, politician Bill Barlee, my wife who would periodically arrive in searched through her seemingly New Westminster to squander a endless trove of B.C. small fortune in gold, then books and produced half disappear up the remote a dozen of his original tidal lake. Slumach was self-published quarterlies, hanged for murder in known as Canada West 1891 and in the next 70 magazine. years, 11 more men would The earliest one is die trying to find his Winter 1970, where the secret. A scientist as well publisher’s note advises as a storyteller, Barlee that subscription rates concluded that the area’s were increasing 20 geology is wrong and the cents per year to $2.95. Tom Fletcher fabled gold-laden creek Subscriptions were “probably does not exist.” B.C. Views up to more than 1,600 A passion for and counter sales were prospecting runs through increasing, but costs were also the magazines and hints at Barlee’s up and Barlee refused to accept aversion to treasure-seeking either display advertising or U.S. Americans. They overran B.C. in subscriptions. historic waves to take gold, and The only colour pages in the according to Nelson Star reporter issue are high-quality prints of four Greg Nesteroff, Barlee believed they majestic paintings commissioned continued to loot Canadian heritage for the magazine. Irvine Adams’ sites. Nesteroff was inspired by scenes of sacred aboriginal sites in Barlee’s work and traced his lonely the Okanagan-Similkameen include mission to restore the ghost town of The Gateway to Inkameep, where Sandon, “the mining capital of the Barlee remarks: “Today that stream Silvery Slocan.” which once teemed with redfish no Barlee bought a surviving block longer surrenders its once-valued of buildings in an effort to make harvest and the perimeter of the Sandon another Barkerville, but desert is gradually being eroded by heavy snow collapsed them. As man’s questionable progress.” tourism minister, Barlee found With the typography of Old West money to build replicas, and wanted posters, Barlee provided construction began on three. tightly sourced accounts of B.C.’s But Barlee lost his Penticton seat legends. to Bill Barisoff in the 1996 election, “Lost gold mine at Pitt Lake” and today only half-built shells analyzes and adds to earlier remain.

“He was still selling Sandon’s restoration as an economic saviour for the region when he ran for federal office in 2000,” Nesteroff writes. “But by then he was ridiculed for it, and finished a distant second.” Barlee’s 1972 Canada West profile of the boomtown of Hedley would resonate in his career as an NDP MLA and cabinet minister in the 1990s. Hedley’s Nickel Plate and Mascot mines produced fortunes in gold, silver and copper before they played out, and Barlee led the fight to preserve their history. Today you can tour the Mascot mine, a proud historical site with a spectacular climb up the rock face that serves as the Grouse Grind of the B.C. desert. I first discovered Barlee as a reporter at the Kelowna Capital News in the early 1980s, when he did a weekly history show on CHBC television called Gold Trails and Ghost Towns. A bare-bones studio affair with tales and artifacts displayed for host Mike Roberts, the show lasted a decade. Barlee didn’t lack courage, quitting a teaching career in Trail and Penticton in 1969 to start his magazine. On subscription fees and a few classified ads, he built a life’s work that allowed him to walk the boardwalks of history and the halls of power. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Barlee provided tightly sourced accounts of B.C.’s legends.’


www.vicnews.com • A9

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

OPINION

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes opinions and comments. Letters should discuss issues and stories covered in the News and be 300 words or less. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity. Phone numbers are not printed. ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Victoria News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 386-2624 ■ Email: editor@vicnews.com

Reducing stigmas key to fighting homelessness We do not need to dig into our pockets to provide a loonie every time a homeless person asks, but we can eliminate actions that worsen the stigma. Considering our actions in the presence of a homeless person is one step towards a solution to the larger problem in Victoria. Homelessness is one of the toughest challenges that a person can face. If we all took a second to smile, or acknowledge the struggles and courage of that coin collector, the outcome is more likely to be positive for people involved in the interaction. Rather than judging, stigmatizing or victimizing, we should help people to succeed; whether it be securing a job, a home or seeking medical attention. As well, we are able to carry on with our day feeling more positive about our contribution to solving the problem rather than feeling irritated by its existence. To that end, we all share the same goal to end homelessness. Yukon native Jeff Cousins is a fourth-year nursing student at the University of Victoria who has volunteered at Our Place Society on Pandora Avenue.

LETTERS Rapid transit’s benefits dubious Trying to find ways to pay for light-rail transit is putting the cart before the horse. In May 2011, the Greater Victoria Transit Commission and the Capital Regional District adopted the $950 million LRT scheme. Four months later, the technical reports were released that document LRT’s benefits. Over a 23-year study period, total LRT benefits to existing and new transit riders are stated as $19 million. Environmental and Social/Community benefits are $24 million. It is absurd to invest almost $1 billion in LRT when these combined 23-year benefits total $43 million. The LRT proponents’ justification, if it can be believed, is that there will be huge savings in auto travel costs in the LRT corridor. The technical report absurdity continues. Why invest in LRT to try and raise transit ridership, when virtually all the benefits go to auto travel? Why would

individual drivers transfer over to LRT when the stated travel cost and time benefits are many times greater if they stay in their car? Our local elected representatives at the transit commission and CRD have not asked these questions. They should do so now. B.C. Transit has just restated its commitment to the LRT project. If implemented, the evidence shows that this would be a financial disaster for regional taxpayers. David Langley Saanich

Police name change seems pointless Re: Rebranding could carry big price tag (News, July 6) I wonder why we need to bother changing the name of the police force. Someone writing a postcard from a vacation spot would address the card to Victoria, regardless if the recipient lived in the outskirts. No one east of Vancouver knows the difference between Oak Bay, Esquimalt, or Saanich. I say we should leave it at

Victoria Police Department and be done with it. Barry Tateham Victoria

Secrecy over police contract shameful B.C. Justice Minister Shirley Bond has declared that she, and she alone, can make the decision on whether to release the proposals put forward by VicPD and the RCMP for the policing of Esquimalt. Furthermore, her spokesperson suggested to media that they use B.C.’s Freedom of Information Act to obtain copies of the documents. This avenue could take many months, only to produce a heavily edited version. Shame on you Madam Minister. The ministry is still living in the old times. Since the release of the documents could hardly be called a breach of national security, it is almost a certainty that all, or part of the documents are already accessible through social media, and so they should be. At the very least, the

residents of Esquimalt are entitled to be made aware of the two proposals, since it is they who will be expected to pick up the tab. Rob Edington Victoria

Recreation passes a poor use of funds Re: Esquimalt council to consider rec pass freebies for spouses (Vic News online) How have the spouses of council members managed, up until now, to occupy themselves while the council is meeting up to four nights a week? Seems to me the taxpayer should not be on the hook for something the councillors need to work out on their own within their families. This seems like a frivolous expenditure when we face a lot of serious financial considerations as a municipality. I would appreciate my council to look at ways to cut the fat, not add to it, however well-deserved anyone thinks these perks are. Monty Wiseman Esquimalt

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through people’s attitudes, as homeless people are overlooked and frowned upon day after day, which reinforces the barrier between them and the rest of society. The effect of these subtle actions or judgments on the victim is incredible. I escaped the stigmatic judgments by biking to my car and driving to my home, but for many, this is not a possibility. Escaping the pressure of societal judgments is more difficult for those living on the street. A homeless person may be stigmatized in many aspects of his or her life: housing, employment, health care and recreation. In addition to such immediate effects as being declined after job or housing interviews, a person suffers deeper effects. They may suffer low self-esteem or lack of motivation. Research has shown that inequalities such as judgments, blame and discrimination contribute to mental and physical health problems. Battling stigma is a significant barrier that needs to be overcome if we are going to eliminate homelessness.

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Do you have any spare misperceptions of street change? people. These forms of This is something that judgment are simply I have heard assumptions and frequently while far from accurate, walking the streets and they stigmatize of downtown homeless people Victoria. This from society. phrase reminds I experienced me of the number this firsthand as of people living on a nursing student the streets due to working with the poverty. Feet First Program How should one at Our Place. respond to this Upon leaving Jeff Cousins there one day I was question? I have Guest column seen some people accused by the snicker, others give Victoria police of a look of disgust, while many dealing drugs or partaking in simply ignore the question. illegal activity. While waiting Activists and people who with my bike at a crosswalk support the street population outside of Our Place, I was of Victoria believe poverty interrogated with questions and homelessness is not a aimed at revealing a problem to be fixed with supposed drug stash or plan spare change. to break the law. Homelessness is a current While I was being and complex social issue. questioned, many people There are many paths that walked by and I couldn’t can lead an individual to help but recognize fear homelessness, and people and judgment in their body living on the street are often language. The experience victims of quick judgments. lingered with me for the For example, a common remainder of the day. assumption is that all Stigma has many negative homeless people are drug effects. By categorizing users, mentally ill or HIV people on the street as positive. homeless, a barrier is These myths contribute created, separating “us” and to unfounded fears and “them.” This is demonstrated


A10 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

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NEWS

Buddies foster strong readers Public library program aims to enhance kids’ love of books Brittany Lee News staff

Learning to love reading will make for a stronger reader. That’s the concept behind the reading buddies program at the Greater Victoria Public Library. The program, developed in 2001, pairs teen volunteers with elementary-aged children for week-long sessions to help build on children’s reading abilities. It provides children with one more way to get extra help with reading, said Tracy Kendrick, coordinator of children’s and teen services. “We’ve found that the reading buddies program makes a huge difference for so many children,” she said. “Because we make it so fun, and because they really love the attention of the teen big buddy, it’s almost sometimes the thing that really turns their reading around for them,” Kendrick added. The program also includes literacy-based games and activities, such as board games, scavenger hunts, and crafts, in which both big and little buddies take part. This year, children will also have the opportunity to practice reading digitally. Six new Kobo Vox e-readers will be shared among local libraries, thanks to a partnership between the GVPL and Orca Book Publishers. Little buddies will also have access to new Orca titles, Kendrick said. “It’s a great way to introduce them to digital reading. We think they’ll really enjoy it and we hope that the enjoyment will further engage them in reading and make them into stronger readers.” Devon Tatton, children’s librarian at the Oak Bay branch, said she looks forward to seeing the partnership between big and little buddies evolve throughout

Brittany Lee/News staff

Devon Tatton, children’s librarian at the Oak Bay library, displays booklets from this year’s “Strange … But True” kids’ summer reading club. their week together. “They really learn a lot from each other,” she said. “You can totally see the bond form as the days progress. It’s really sweet.” Reading buddies at the Oak Bay branch runs from July 30 to Aug. 3. Registration started June 15 and runs just prior to the start date. Each library takes up to eight pairs of buddies. Little buddies are defined as children in Grades 2 to 4. Registrants should have at least finished Grade 1. Teens aged 13 to 18 can volunteer to be a big buddy for a week or more throughout the summer. “It’s a great way for them to get their volunteer hours that they need to have to graduate from high school,” Kendrick said. “And it’s a very enjoyable type of volunteering to do because they really get a chance to help a little buddy build up their reading skills.” New volunteers are required to attend a training session, where they learn about their role

as a big buddy, what’s expected of them, and tips on how to interact with little buddies. Upcoming training sessions take place July 19 to 20 at various GVPL locations. Registration for training sessions must be done separately from reserving a volunteer spot. Teens can register in person at any local branch or online. For more information, see www.gvpl.ca. reporter@vicnews.com

Reading buddies July 9 to 13 Saanich Centennial, Central Branch July 16 to 20 Central, Juan de Fuca July 23 to 27 Nellie McClung, Bruce Hutchison July 30 to Aug. 3 Esquimalt, Oak Bay Aug. 7 to 10 Saanich Centennial Aug. 7 to 11 Emily Carr Aug. 13 to 17 Nellie McClung, Juan de Fuca

There’s more on line -

Please pitch in with your thoughts on garbage, recycling, and composting in our region. We’re preparing a new plan for the management of garbage, recyclables and compostable materials in our region. This new plan will determine what we do with our solid waste for the next 10 years. And since the plan has a lot to do with conserving resources, it seems right to begin by surveying our most valuable resource — you. So please visit www.crd.bc.ca/wastenot and take a few minutes to fill out the feedback form. Your input will play an important part in the future management of recyclables and compostable materials in our region. And you could win a $100 gift certificate to a local restaurant of your choice. www.crd.bc.ca

vicnews.com The Great Quidam™ Character Hunt

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www.vicnews.com • A11

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

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A12 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

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NEWS


www.vicnews.com • A13

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

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VIHA videos earn international awards in New York City The Vancouver Island Health Authority’s MultiMedia Services won three awards at the international Questar Festival for excellence in corporate video. “Grief, Loss and Dementia,” in which family members of people with dementia talk about their losses, grief and the importance of support, won the Questar grand award for best Health Awareness video. It also won a gold award in the Non-Profit Organizations Health Awareness category. MultiMedia Services also won gold for “Violence Prevention – What role do I play?” in the category of NonProfit Organizations Safety. The video was created for VIHA Occupational Health and Safety and is used by facilitators as part of the Provincial Violence Prevention Curriculum. “It is an honour to be part of this prestigious group of winners,” MultiMedia Services manager Robert Martin said in a release. “Our team of creative experts produces world-class resources for VIHA and it’s gratifying to be recognized internationally.” The production team for the videos included Ken Smith, Stewart Lockhart, Bill Blair, Wayne Dupuis, Alex Paredes and Sherry Lepage. The awards ceremony was held last month in New York City. editor@vicnews.com

Junior warrior Ayo Choy, 3, does a fierce warrior pose along with her mom, Carolina, at Centennial Square during a family class at the Victoria Cool Aid Society’s Yogathon on Saturday. The event, a fundraiser for the society’s Downtown Activity Centre, saw 45-minute classes held from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

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Exactly how much is an inch of water? And how do you measure it?

An inch of water a week – from rainfall & watering – is all the water your lawn needs to stay healthy. More than one inch of water, and you risk weak, shallow roots, and damage by fungus, weeds, diseases and pests. Get a watering gauge FREE! If you have a water bill account number in the Greater Victoria area call 250.474.9684 for a free watering gauge. Watering gauges make it easy to see how much water your lawn is getting. For more information visit www.crd.bc.ca/water or call 250.474.9684 for a Waterfacts sheet on how to measure how much water your lawn is getting. www.crd.bc.ca/water


A14 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Big is beautiful, say Victoria fashionistas S

arah Frejd may not yet be making money selling plussize women’s fashions. But her Curvalicious Boutique operation is providing the fledgling retailer with much more than that. A former chef and restaurateur who wowed diners at a popular Campbell River eatery, Frejd now cooks up boosts in self-esteem for women Don Descoteau who may Biz Beat not consider themselves beacons of fashion. “I think it’s life-changing,” Frejd, 35, says of the experience Curvalicious offers clients. Whether it’s women who have always shopped for larger sizes, or those whose bodies changed, perhaps after having children, she receives them in various states of humility. “When they come into our store, we work on their insides as much as their outsides. We make them feel like a million dollars.” The idea of selling plus-size fashion came to Frejd – one of her own best customers – during

her sales calls as a food rep for Saanich-based Islands West Produce. “I have to get dressed up and look pretty and go around to pubs and restaurants all day long,” she says. “People would stop me and ask, ‘where did you get that dress?’ or ‘Where did you get those boots?’” After researching the market for one-off, plus-size creations, she found little to choose from on Canada’s West Coast. She created an online store in 2009 and, combined with hosting fashion shows around town and selling at markets around the Capital Region, built a loyal following. After hearing enough clients tell her, “just get a store, Sarah,” Frejd began searching for a location. She found a modest space and moved in last November. With Frejd still working her sales job, much of the pampering falls to store manager Cathy Andrews, a former client and fashion model of Frejd’s who brought a healthy body attitude and some smarts about plus-size fashion to the job. “I love it here,” says Andrews, who is studying to be a nurse. She blogs on such topics as “health at every size” and “fat acceptance” on her tumblr.com page, Big Fat Cherry Bomb.

plaza off Kings Road, behind Subway. Call 250-590-2799 or visit curvaliciousboutique.com.

New titles, new digs, fresh beginnings

Don Descoteau/News staff

Curvalicious Boutique manager Cathy Andrews, left, and owner Sarah Frejd cater to plus-size women, providing unique fashions and giving clients a self-esteem boost along the way. “People come in with the idea of wearing clothing to cover up,” she says. “We try to convince them to love the body you have at the size you are.” Both Andrews and Frejd talk of clients who came in unsure of themselves and left dancing on air. An example was a Grade 12 student from Salmon Arm who came searching for a prom dress. As the girl tried on various dresses, beaming with the experience of seeing herself in a different light, her mother and grandmother dissolved into tears, Andrews recalls.

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“I still get goosebumps thinking about it,” she says. The store contains only a smattering of pieces available to clients, but the idea is to pamper women when they come in and make the shopping experience as personal as possible. An ever-present tray of cookies looms just inside the entrance, and beverages are occasionally on hand. “We want to make people feel comfortable, hang out and have a good time,” Andrews says. Curvalicious is located at 774 Bay St. in the Blanshard Street

Economic development officer Sasha Angus has a new title to go with his existing job at the Greater Victoria Chamber of Commerce: manager, policy and government affairs … Retired London police veteran of 28 years, Fraser Dodds, has taken the position of director of business development and training with Themis Security Services Ltd., at 185-911 Yates St. … Ron Burton has relocated his IT operation, Face to Face Computers to a storefront at #6-50 Burnside Rd. W. from its Douglas Street location … Hudson Yoga has opened up in the Hudson Walk building, formerly The Bay, at 8-1701 Douglas St. Visit hudsonyoga. ca or call 250-590-8206 for class details … Victoria chartered accountant Michael Macdonnell was recently named treasurer for 2012-13 for the Council of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of B.C. He currently works as B.C.’s assistant auditor general. Send your business news to editor@vicnews.com.


www.vicnews.com • A15

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

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A16 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

THE ARTS

HOT TICKET

NEWS

Selected artists produce interpreted souvenirs inspired by Emily Carr’s handmade pottery. Visit Souvenir, a pop-up gallery on Government Street, Wednesday to Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. until Aug. 3. See souvenirgallery.ca for more information.

Souvenir, a pop-up gallery

Putting the squeeze on classical tunes Accordion parade helps promote annual festival Kyle Wells News staff

What makes a loud noise when you squeeze it and loves a good bellow? No, it’s not the beginning of a bad joke. It’s an accordion. From July 19 to 22 the Sixth International Victoria Accordion Festival will be taking place around town and hosting some of the top accordion acts in the world. Friday night is Russian night and will feature a concert by worldfamous accordionist Alexander Sevastian, from Minsk, Belarus, at St. Andrew’s Church (680 Courtney St.). Sevastian has won four international accordion competitions and played with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. On the Saturday night, Torontobased Quartetto Gelato will be performing at St. Andrew’s. The group, which features Sevastian on accordion, is a crowd favourite. On oboe, violin, cello and,

of course, accordion, along with tenor vocals, the quartet serves up a variety of world and classical music styles. “They are so famous and so popular, particularly in this city,” festival director Aleksandar Milojevic said. “We’re sure people will appreciate their concert.” Another highlight is the Accordion Parade, a first-time event for the festival. The parade kicks off from Market Square at 1 p.m. on the Saturday and will see squeezebox players coming together to play and parade through downtown to Centennial Square and back. “Just imagine if you have many orchestras together, that’s the sound that you get,” Milojevic said. All accordion players are invited to take part in the parade, but are asked to arrive at noon to prepare. Most exciting for organizers is that this year’s festival is a precursor of sorts to what will prove to be the big event in 2013. The success of the festival over the past five years was one con-

Photo courtesy of Quartetto Gelato

Toronto-based Quartetto Gelato will be playing July 21 at St. Andrew's Church as a part of the Sixth International Victoria Accordion Festival running from July 19 to 22. tributing factor to Victoria being named host of the 66th Coupe Mondiale event in 2013. This will be the first time that the world’s biggest accordion event has been held in Canada and it will run from Aug. 17 to 25. Hundreds of accordi-

Summer Camp Fun for Everyone

onists and even more visitors from all over the world are expected to attend the event, which takes place in a different country every year. “People are so happy,” Milojevic said. “So that means that we’re doing something good here

Saanich Parks and Re creation Active Living

Summer Contents

Summer Camp Inform ation ......... 2 Camp & Playground Locations..... 3 Summer Camps at a Glance ... 4-5 Early Childhood Camp s .................. 6 Playground Progr am ....................... 7 General & Arts Dayca mps ............. 8 Arts Daycamps ........... ......................... 9 Performing Arts & Dance ............. 10 Specialty Camps ........... .................... 11 Sports ...................... .................... 12-13 Skating ...................... .......................... 14 Leadership ........... ............................. 15 Registration ........... .......................... 15 Swimming ........... ............................. 16 Special Events & Festivals .......... 16

in Victoria.” For Milojevic one of the best parts of the festival is seeing the younger players getting involved and falling in love with the instrument, and seeing accordions begin to regain a popularity they haven’t enjoyed since the rise of rock and roll. “Accordions became a not very cool instrument with all the electric guitars and drums and everything that youngsters could express themselves differently with. But now it’s picking up again,” Milojevic said. “We have kids seven years old or eight years old competing, which is amazing and you don’t see everyday, everywhere.” Tickets for the Sevastian and Quartetto Gelato concerts are $25, $20 for seniors and students. The workshop is $25 per person or $30 at the door. Tickets are available at Tempo Trend Music and Long and McQuade, by phone at 778433-8700 or by email at contact@ bcaccordion.ca. For a full schedule go to bcaccordion.ca kwells@goldstreamgazette.com

Guide

JUNE 2012

Camps Join Saanich Parks & Recreati on on Facebook

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Cedar Hill 250.475.7121 | Gordon Head 250.475.7100 | GR Pearkes 250.475.5400 | Commonwealth Place 250.475.7600 |


www.vicnews.com • A17

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

An immigrant’s story Christine van Reeuwyk

parents’ challenging marriage, News staff years of separation because of Canada’s immigration laws and One Saanich woman is telling the ultimate Canadian reunion. the tale of her parents, forced “I’m hearing that it’s a story to live apart for 25 that resonates with years because of a lot of immigrants Canada’s immigraand it doesn’t mattion laws. ter if you’re Chi“It needs to be nese,” May said. told, it’s not frivo“It’s a story that is lous, but I’ve also universal because injected some Canada is made up human stories, that of so many immiproject the humangrants. People are ity,” said May Wong. moving around the “I didn’t intend it to world now, so it’s a be a book that constory about adaptdemns, but a book ing and finding a that shows what it country to become was like for people, May Wong your home and individuals.” finding a new and A Cowherd in Parbetter life. I’m hearadise is the moving tale of her ing that people are starting to parents – father Wong Guey Dang identify with it … it’s been really (1902-1983) and mother Jiang heartening to hear that.” Tew Thloo (1911-2002). It tells A Cowherd in Paradise, pubthe intimate family tale of her lished by Brindle and Glass,

is nearly a decade in the making and launched at Silk Road in April. It’s been making the rounds of readings and media since. She was invited to read at Word on the Street in Vancouver this September. “I know that my parents would be proud of me,” May said. cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

IN BRIEF

dance and salsa lessons. Go to victoriamexicancanadian.org for more information.

Viva Mexico

Highland happening

Festival Mexicano is on July 13 to 15. Dinner and dance at the Victoria Event Centre, 1415 Broad St., July 13 at 6 p.m. Activities in Centennial Square July 14 and 15, from noon to 5 p.m. include music, mariachi,

Pacific Tattoo, a musical extravaganza featuring international military bands, massed pipes and drums and dancers is July 14 and 15 at the Bear Mountain Arena, 1767 Island Highway. Find more information at pacifictattoo.ca.

ARTS LISTINGS

Did you know? In 2006, the prime minister apologized to the Chinese people for the legislated discrimination created by Canada’s head tax laws in the first half of the 20th century, acknowledging the consequences it had on their families.

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Ian Case photo

Amy Lee Radigan as Beatrice and Adam Holroyd as Benedick – who have both forsworn marriage but later find themselves in the throws of love for each other, keep up a ‘merry war’ of wits, trying to outdo one another with clever insults throughout the show, Much Ado About Nothing, directed by Ian Case.

Watch for the next Quidam Characters July 25th Winners will be contacted within two weeks after contest closing date. No purchase necessary. Odds of winning are dependant on the number of participants. The contest is open to all residents of British Columbia of the age of majority. One ballot per week per person. Valid ID may be required. Winners may be required to answer a skill testing question. Prizes must be accepted as awarded. Full contest details are available at the front desk of Black Press Victoria, open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Perfect weather for Shakespeare Greater Victorians are showing their support summer festival. for Shakespeare, says Greater Victoria ShakeTheir artistic objective is to creatively explore speare Festival artistic director Michael Glover. Shakespeare in a way that is interesting and accesThe festival is already celebrating sible to the general public, making a successful pre-season launch after Shakespeare for the people. The “Victorians nearly three times the number of society is keen to transfer the unipre-sale tickets were sold on their loves their outdoor versality of Shakespeare to modern first available day as compared to speakers. Since 2005, sumShakespeare festival.” English previous years. mer shows have been performed in - Michael Glover “It’s clear to us that Victorians an outdoor location on the Camoloves their outdoor Shakespeare sun College Lansdowne Campus. festival, and it’s thrilling to see This season the festival showits popularity explode even further as we head cases Much Ado About Nothing and As You Like into our special 10th anniversary season,” said It July 16 to Aug. 18. Pre-sale tickets are sold at Glover. a discounted rate of $10, or 55 per cent off the Since being formed in early 2003, the Victoria regular price of $22 and are on sale until the first Shakespeare Society has produced works of the- 500 are sold. Go to vicshakespeare.com for more atre, primarily, but not limited to, the works of information. William Shakespeare and their Shakespeare in the llavin@vicnews.com

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A18 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

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452221

ALL DECOR, TOOLS, POTS & BOXED SuApVtEo frozen pork tenderloin % FERTILIZERS 0off 2 per pack, cryovac

88

2

3

While quantities last. Selection may vary by store.

638808

/lb 6.35/kg

BBQ shelter BBQ grill not included. 109013

Ziggy’s® Internationale turkey breast

save

1

cooked or smoked, freshly sliced from our full service deli counter 256067

30

%

78 /100 g

JUMBO

SeaQuest® wild Pacific salmon portions 454 g 345439

98

5

Bakeshop bulk bagels assorted varieties, mix and match, bulk

each

301956

00

2

5/

or .48 each

4 lb. box

all solar lights EQUAL TO .85/lb

fresh cherries product of Canada or USA, no. 1 grade

save

725536

30

%

save

96

1

/lb 4.32/kg

LIMIT 2, AFTER LIMIT 11.97 EACH

30%

Maxwell House ground coffee original or dark roast, 925 g 769356

97

6

each

fresh greenhouse tomatoes on the vine product of Canada, Canada no. 1 grade 861884

38

3

LIMIT 2, AFTER LIMIT 5.97 EACH

Kellogg’s family size cereal selected varieties, 515-850 g

each

705234

LIMIT 2, AFTER LIMIT 4.87 EACH

Tropicana pure premium orange juice selected varieties, not from concentrate, refrigerated, 1.75 L 436499

97

3

97

4

each

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 7.99 EACH

97

4

Insect Defend 5 pk

each

978673

each

all fireplaces and firepits LIMIT 2, AFTER LIMIT 8.29 EACH

LIMIT 2, AFTER LIMIT 10.29 EACH

50

96

Off! Smooth and Dry, 113 g or Off! Skintastic Kids, 175 mL

save

30

%

715182 / 347957

after savings

6

each

Off! Deep Woods Sportsmen 544965

7

after savings

LIMIT 4, AFTER LIMIT 9.99 EACH

Banana Boat or Hawaiian Tropic suncare selected varieties and sizes

each

909898 / 617438

97

6

each

>ÃÌiÀ >À`

all rocking chairs includes adirondack chairs

Prices are in effect until Thursday, July 12, 2012 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/ TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2012 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

©MasterCard & PayPass are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Back a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial banking services are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC. PC points loyalty program is provided by President’s Choice Services Inc. ©PC, President’s Choice, President’s Choice Financial and Fresh Financial Thinking are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. Trademarks use under licence.


www.vicnews.com • A19

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

How to reach us

SPORTS A new hope for Royals Travis Paterson 250-480-3279 sports@vicnews.com

Former New York Rangers assistant GM is new Victoria Royals boss

the idea found support at home. The first order of business for Hope is hiring a head coach. Both the coach and GM positions came available last month when Marc Travis Paterson Habscheid, who handled both News staff roles, moved from hockey to business executive with the Royals’ parLike the great Lester Patrick before him, Cam- ent company, GSL Holdings Ltd. eron Hope comes from a vice president role with “The process is underway,” the NHL’s New York Rangers to act as general Hope said. “Most of the names are manager of Victoria’s Western Hockey League in, but I haven’t (shortlisted) them franchise. as some may come in yet.” To be fair to Hope, the similarities stop there, The new coach is expected in a as Patrick was, well, Lester Patrick, and his return matter of weeks. was at the helm of the minor league “Once we finalize Don Denton/News staff 1949 Cougars. the list, it’ll be a fast “Once we Cameron Hope was introduced as the new general Hope, however, is highly regarded process.” in his own right, and was sought finalize the list, Plenty of success- manager for the Victoria Royals WHL hockey team at after by Royals’ owner Graham Lee. ful, experienced gen- Save-On-Foods Memorial Centre on Friday. The 48-year-old has never been a GM (hiring a coach) will eral managers from before but comes with a decorated be a fast process.” the WHL were availmonths ago. Hope said he was not connected to resumé. able and in the running when Lee the Royals in its previous incarnation, though he – Cameron Hope He was introduced at Save-Onpicked Hope, taking a chance on a knew of the team, and had scouted the league as Foods Memorial Centre on Friday rookie GM. a member of the Rangers’ staff. morning (July 6). “For a new GM, it’s a positive thing having that As a youngster growing up in Edmonton, Hope “(Lee) contacted me, it came from left field and NHL experience,” said Lee, who’s been highly vis- was a Western League fan, catching the Oil Kings he was persistent,” Hope said. “I liked his vision, ible around the rink since swapping the ECHL for at the old Edmonton Garden. He got a law degree we shared the idea of what it takes to build a his original love, the WHL. from the University of Alberta in 1988, and later successful program here. And Lee’s vision is con“You always take a risk with whoever you hire, found his way into the Canadian Football League tagious.” and Hope fits in well with the pieces we have.” Players’ Association, representing its players in Hope’s tenure with the Rangers lasted seven Hope’s name first came up when Graham grievance matters, before moving on to the Big years and ended in 2011, during which he was dining with some NHL suits. “I told them I Apple in 2004. swapped from VP into an assistant GM role with was looking for a new GM and they were very “For me, the key to long term success is to the legendary GM Glen Sather. Hope was practis- impressed with Hope,” Lee said. fill the system with quality players ... you need ing law, his original career, back in his hometown None of those at the dinner were named Sather, a sustainable form of hockey (development),” of Edmonton when Lee came calling. however, who was part of the Chilliwack Bruins Hope said. With his wife’s parents already living in Victoria, ownership group that sold the team to Lee 16 sports@vicnews.com

Hesjedal recovering from Tour crash Ryder Hesjedal finishes Stage 6 on Friday, 13 minutes back of the lead. A Stage 6 crash injured Hesjedal, forcing him out of the Tour de France. Casey B. Gibson Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda

Ryder Hesjedal now focusing on Olympics Travis Paterson News staff

He’s the reigning Giro d’Italia winner and is London-bound for his third Olympic Games. But even the chance to gorge – guilt free – on all the

French cuisine he can this weekend will do little to lift the spirits of Ryder Hesjedal. The wiry Victoria cyclist withdrew from the Tour de France prior to Saturday’s Stage 7 after a major crash set him, and some of his Team Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda teammates, 13 minutes back of the leaders on Friday’s Stage 6. Hesjedal finished the stage, but subsequently pulled out. “Its a huge disappointment,” Hesjedal said.

“I was in good form and feeling comfortable, just really settling in to the first week with an eye on the mountains.” Hesjedal said he’s now focused on the Olympics, and has resigned himself to rooting for his Garmin teammates still on the Tour. At the moment of the crash, which happened 26 kilometres from the end of Friday’s stage, Hesjedal was one of the top contenders in the hunt for the yellow jersey as the overall winner of the Tour. Dozens of riders piled-up in front of him and he sustained a hematoma to his left leg and hip. The team released a statement about the injury, saying it prevented a normal pedal stroke. “The injury would only be worsened if he tried to ride (Saturday),” team doctor Prentice Steffen said. “He needs to go home, keep working with the medical staff, and recover.” “(Garmin) still has a strong group of riders here and they will still do great things,” Hesjedal said. Garmin’s Tom Danielson, who Hesjedal helped to ninth-overall in the 2011 Tour, was also part of the crash that led to Hesjedal’s demise, and was forced to abandon mid-race. Hesjedal will represent Canada at the London Olympics in the men’s road race on July 28 and time trial on Aug. 1. sports@vicnews.com

Tires

SPORTS NEWS IN BRIEF

Vikes rookie shines on UVic Vikes runners Rachel Francois (St. Albert, Alta.) and Thomas Riva (Qualicum) competed in the 800-metre for Canada at the under-23 North American, Central American and Caribbean track championships in Guanajuato, Mexico, over the weekend (July 6 to 8). Francois, a first-year Vike, won bronze with a time of two minutes, 6.77 seconds. Riva was fifth among the men with a time of 1:52.84.

Triathlete swims Subaru triple Victoria’s Brent McMahon swam the swim portion of the Subaru Vancouver Triathlon three different times at Jericho Beach on Sunday. The London-bound triathlete was on three different relay teams, for the sprint, Olympic and Half Iron distances, and was first out of the water each time. He and Olympian Paula Findlay used the triathlon as an Olympic tune-up. Findlay, a five-time world champ, was the top woman in the sprint distance.

Vic golfers lead boys’ qualifying Uplands Golf Course member Jack Lilly tied for the lead in Sunday’s qualifying round for the Junior Boys’ Championship at the Sunshine Coast Golf and Country Club in Roberts Creek. The tournament began on Tuesday. Lilly tied Stuart Macdonald of Vancouver and with a one-underpar, 71. Seventeen other players claimed the remaining spots in the field by shooting 81 or better during the qualifier, including Sean Hay, Michael Griffin and Jake Hamilton.

Ko shoots 11th at B.C. golf title Naomi Ko was the top Victoria golfer at the B.C. Women’s Amateur Title in Christina Lake, 11th overall.


A20 • www.vicnews.com

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Jr. Rocks draw New West Shamrocks the final seed in junior lacrosse playoffs Travis Paterson News staff

Coach Larry Smeltzer wants to believe his team will come together in the playoffs. The Victoria Shamrocks are the sixth and final seed to qualify for the B.C. Junior Lacrosse League postseason, drawing the third-place New Westminster Salmonbellies. “(Hockey’s) Los Angeles Kings were the final seed and they (won the Stanley Cup),” Smeltzer said. “Are we the Los Angeles of our league? We just need to come together at the right time.” The stage is certainly set, as the Shamrocks will open the first-round series on the road against the Salmonbellies, likely Saturday night. New West won all three meetings this year, 9-7 at Bear Mountain Arena, and 12-4 and 10-9 at Queen’s Arena. “It’s funny, we didn’t beat (New West) but we still hoped we would get them (in the playoffs),” Smeltzer said. “We feel they felt they were lucky to beat us. And the games are more predictable from our perspective.” There is a lingering expectation that the core of this Shamrocks team, which won the 2010 provincial intermediate-A championship, will one day make a similar run at the junior A level. But time is running out, as the core of the squad is 20 years old, and next year will be its last. The team is talented offensively, second overall in goals scored with 209. There’s also been a series of tweaks to Smeltzer’s old-is-new-again system. To start the season, all players were responsible for offence and defence, as Smeltzer moved away from the current trend of the day, which is to lean heavily on specialized players. Instead, he emphasized fast breaks and taking advantage of the other team’s line changes. The fast break has continued, but the Rocks Greg Sakaki/Black Press now use a hybrid system of sorts. “Sometimes we change it up period to period, Victoria junior Shamrocks player Conrad and sometimes parts of (the new) system are Chapman, left, grabs a loose ball against the quite hidden,” Smeltzer said. “But we’re tied for Nanaimo Timbermen during a B.C. Junior the most short handed goals (21), goalie (Cody Lacrosse League game earlier this season. Hagedorn) has 20 assists, and we’ve scored lots of goals on the breakout, so it’s there.” The Shamrocks ended the regular season with a 14-11 road loss to the first-place Coquitlam AdanSalmonbellies at Shamrocks, Saturday, acs on Sunday. 5 p.m. at Bear Mountain Arena, Game 2 of Coquitlam put the Shamrocks under the gun quarterfinals best-of-three series. from the start with a 7-1 lead in the first period. It looked like the Shamrocks had already lost when Brody Eastwood scored a hat trick and the Rocks New West scored once to win the game. stormed back to outscore the Adanacs 7-3 in the “As the season went on we’ve pulled it together, second period. The Adanacs’ lead slipped to 10-9 and if we play our game plan we’ll be fine,” in the third period before they scored four more. Smeltzer said. “It’s not uncommon for us, and we’re beyond Adam Brown, Brody Eastwood and Devon Casey panicking because of it, though sometimes we get finish the season as the sixth, seventh and ninth in trouble,” Smeltzer said. overall scorers in the league, respectively. It’s not ideal, but isn’t from a lack of preparation, Transition player Jesse King will miss the first the coach added. round of the playoffs with Team Canada at the It also happened in the Rocks last game in New under-19 world field lacrosse championships in West. After two periods, New West led 9-4. The Finland, July 12 to 21. Rocks scored five goals in the third period and sports@vicnews.com

Game two

B.C. Junior A Lacrosse Association

SPORTS STATS Lacrosse Western Lacrosse Association

Langley Victoria Burnaby Coquitlam New West. Nanaimo Maple Ridge

GP 14 12 13 12 13 11 13

W 10 7 6 6 6 5 2

L 4 5 5 6 7 5 10

T 0 0 2 0 0 1 1

Pts 20 14 14 12 12 11 5

Recent games: Langley 14 Victoria 11 Victoria 8 Coquitlam 9

GP W L *Coquitlam 21 16 5 *Delta 21 14 5 New West. 21 14 6 Langley 21 12 9 Port Coq. 21 11 10 Victoria 21 9 12 Nanaimo 21 3 17 Burnaby 21 3 18 *First round playoff bye

T 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0

Pts 32 30 29 24 22 18 7 6

B.C. Intermediate-A Lacrosse Association

Recent games: Victoria 11 Coquitlam 14

GP W L T Pts Richmond 16 13 3 0 26 Coquitlam 16 13 3 0 26 Victoria 16 12 4 0 24 New West 15 9 6 0 18 Maple Ridge 16 9 7 0 18 Langley 16 8 8 0 16 Port Coq. 18 7 11 0 14 Burnaby 15 4 11 0 8 Delta 14 2 12 0 4 Nanaimo 16 2 14 0 4 Recent games: Victoria 23 Burnaby 10

Quarterfinal playoff series (best-of-three) July 14 Victoria at New Westminster, 5 p.m. July 15 New West at Victoria, 5 p.m., Bear Mountain Arena July 17 Victoria at New West, 5 p.m. July 11 Port Coquitlam at Langley July 12 Langley at Port Coquitlam July 14 Port Coquitlam at Langley

Pacfiic Northwest Junior B Lacrosse League GP W L T Pts Westshore 19 16 3 0 32 Peninsula 18 12 5 1 25 Saanich 19 12 6 1 25 Cowichan 18 6 9 3 15 Campbell Riv. 19 4 13 2 10 Nanaimo 19 2 16 1 5


www.vicnews.com • A21

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, y July 11, 2012

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A22 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

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Please send resumes to: 1100.marquise@ hiredesk.net or or fax: 604-214-8526 PROFESSIONAL/ MANAGEMENT

GROCERY MANAGER. Jasper Super A. The Grocery People Ltd. (TGP) provides goods and services to a large, independent grocery and food service industry and manages a number of Super A Food Stores. Located in scenic Jasper, Alberta, you will be responsible for all aspects of managing a grocery department including marketing, merchandising, controlling and human resources management. Applicants need five years grocery department management experience. The successful candidate must be customer service focused, show self initiative and leadership to achieve the required results. TGP offers a competitive compensation and benefit package as well as the opportunity for personal and professional development. To apply, send a resume, stating salary expectations to: Director, Human Resources, The Grocery People Ltd., 14505 Yellowhead Trail, Edmonton, AB, T5L 3C4. Fax 780-447-5781. We thank all applicants, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

EDUCATION/TUTORING

HAULING

FURNITURE

FOR SALE BY OWNER

ST. JOSEPH’S Elementary School is accepting applications for full day kindergarten for September 2012. Fees are $3960 for a Catholic parish supporter, or $4932 for a nonCatholic. The school is located at 757 West Burnside Road, Victoria, BC. The school is a Catholic school, and students wear uniform. We offer an excellent early learning program in a Catholic Christian atmosphere. Applications are available from the school or at www.stjosephschool.ca, and be dropped of at the school until June 29th, or mailed to St. Joseph’s Elementary School 757 West Burnside Road Victoria, BC V8Z 1M9

WE HAUL CHEAP LTD. Moving & Hauling. (250)8811910. www.wehaulcheap.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE ART OBJECTS

ANTIQUE DROP leaf table and 4 chairs. Very good condition. Priced to sell. Call Joanne at (250)381-0438.

GARAGE SALES N. SAANICH, 1520 McTavish Rd., Sat & Sun, July 14 & 15, 10am-4pm. Estate Sale.

ROY VICKERS PRINTS. Complete set, 13 original Roy Vickers limited edition prints with certificates. All professionally framed. All the same print number, which can’t happen again. Series of 100 prints and all of this set are #77. Asking $33,000 for complete one of a kind 13 print set. Call 250-245-2263 (Ladysmith).

BUILDING SUPPLIES METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

FLOORING

PERSIAN RUG 18’x12’ Medallion pattern. Like new. $12,000 obo. 250-287-2009

FREE ITEMS DROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll Free 1 877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

SECURITY PERSONNEL Required immediately. FT/PT permanent. Must have valid security workers licence. Please email resume to: hr@footprintssecurity.com

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161.

TEMPORARY OFA 3 Attendant req’d for shutdown at Jordan River. Sept 4 - Oct 4. Not a camp job. Email resume and drivers abstract to Rescue One: raychickite@hotmail.com

PERSONAL SERVICES

HOMEWORKERS NEEDED! Earn extra cash! P/T, F/T Immediate openings, no experience needed. www.hwc-bc.com Get paid daily!!! Easy at home computer work, instant acceptance, free registration. www.mysurveysjobs.com

SLIM DOWN For summer! Lose up to 20 lbs in just 8 weeks. Call Herbal Magic today! 1-800-854-5176.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HEALTH PRODUCTS

Applied Business Technology 9 month Business Office Assistant with Bookkeeping Applications program. Students become productive employees upon graduation.

Practical Nursing Diploma Program Now with a newly revised 2 year curriculum! Practical Nurses can work in a variety of settings provincially, nationally and internationally. (*pending CLPNBC approval)

M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

LEGAL SERVICES A PARDON/WAIVER for work and/or travel? Guaranteed fast, affordable, criminal record removal. Call for free consultation. Qualify today and save $250 (limited time offer). BBB Accredited. 1-800-7361209, www.pardonsandwaivers.ca. CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind and a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

Community and School Support Worker 8 month employment-ready certificate program for a career such as teachers’ assistant, group home or respite worker, or life skills coach. Programs start September 5, 2012. Apply Now!

250-392-8020 or 1-800-663-4936 www.tru.ca/williamslake

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO RETOUCH, RESTORE, Edit Photos. Portraiture-Baby+Family Maternity. Home Movies to DVD. Call 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

Looking for a NEW job? www.bcjobnetwork.com

10353 Devlin Place, Sidney Private Rancher in the heart of Sidney. $518,000; 3 bdrm, 2 bath, lrg treed lot. Details at: w w w. p r o p e r t y g u y s . c o m ID#192295 www.realtor.ca mls #307481

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

FINANCIAL SERVICES

2 MOTHER of the Bride dresses, size 16 and 18, never worn, $150 obo. Nurses uniform tops (8), $10 each. Call (250)294-6238 or cell (250)413-7301. 3 PORCELAIN Collector dolls, 2 are $75 each and 1 is $50. All 3 for $200. All of them in good condition. Call (250)6564853 or (250)889-5248 (cell).

COMPUTER DESK, chair. Bottle green carpet, 9x12 good cond. (250)383-6776 FREE: FIREWOOD, you pick up. Call (250)655-1849. FREE: HORSE radish plants. You dig. Call (778)265-1615. FREE: OAK entertainment center (56”x53”x22.5”), mint condition. You pick up. (250)595-0733.

FRIENDLY FRANK 8 SMALL lawnmower wheels, good condition. $3. all. 250656-1640, Sidney. BAG-BOY GOLF pull $25. Call (250)477-5798.

cart,

BERNARDIN 10, 250 ml jars, 8 white jar lids, $5. Call (250)383-4578. GRAVITY LOUNGER$40. Call 250-592-8509.

new,

JUTE RUG, 4’ x 6’, woven from hand spun fibers, $40. Call (250)721-9271. LARGE 12” steel bottom drum, very old, ancient, $90. Call 250-480-0812. OSTER FOOD crafter; slicer, shredder, salad maker & meat grinder, new $30. 250-5980750. SAILOR WOOL pants, $50. Table, 47”x30”, wood top, (tube legs), $10. Call (778)265-1615.

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391. SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

FURNITURE ALL NEW Queen MATTRESS SET Still in Original Plastic! Must Sell. $150 - CALL: 604484-0379

40 ACRE OASIS Adjacent to the Salmon River Sayward, BC. Farm status, Natural spring water, park like. Linda, 250.282.3681. $574,900. www.bcisland homes.com/sayward

ARIAT TALL BOOTS. Leather upper, woman’s size 7.5, regular calf, medium height. Worn once, excellent condition, still need breaking in. Originally $400, asking $250 obo. 250391-5992, leave message. BAVARIAN DINNER SET for 8 + serving dishes. Variety of glasses, different styles. 1000’s collectible German books for your library. Call (250)592-7188.

4210 QUADRA 3250 sq.ft. 5-bdrm, 3 bath. Private, well-kept yard. Lot size 11,000 sq.ft. Must be seen! $600,000. (250)479-1194. CAYCUSE Well-Maintained Recreational Property/Home 1500 sq.ft, 3 bdrm 2 bath, 5 acres, garage. A stone throw from pristine Cowichan Lake. Reduced to sell $378,800. Furnished. Ready to move in! Call 250-478-2648 or 250-745-3387.

TRADES, TECHNICAL

Holbrook Dyson Logging Ltd Has vacancies in the following job: 1)Heavy Duty Mechanic 2)Driller/Blaster 3)Loader Operator, for Town Jobs. Details can be seen at http://hdlogging.com/ Fax resume to 250287-9259

INCOME OPPORTUNITY

PETS

Commercial Wave Vibration Machine. Clinically proven effective for building bone density, muscle mass & balance. Great for a spa or gym. (250)287-2009. COMPLETE WINE making kit (bottles), printer with a built in fax machine and a rotor (used for your internet on your lap top). Call (250)381-1557. FOR RESTLESS or Cramping Legs. A fast acting remedy since 1981, sleep at night, proven for 31 years. Mon-Fri 8-4 EST 1-800-765-8660. www.allcalm.com LIFT CHAIR Brown, bonded leather, near new. $750. Excellent value. Moving! (250)478-5205. NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

STEEL BUILDING, Huge clearance sale! 20x24 $4,658. 25x28 $5,295. 30x40 $7,790. 32x54 $10,600. 40x58 $14,895. 47x78 $19,838. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

SPORTING GOODS WANTED: Dumbbell Weights (inexpensive) for working out. Please call 250-514-6688.

WE’RE ON THE WEB

REAL ESTATE HOUSES FOR SALE COWICHAN BAY-Oceanfront, $425,000. The Cowichan Bay Stilt Homes are rarely offered for sale and this one is absolutely charming. 3 bdrm, updated interior, 5 appls, large deck & priv dock. Perfect for vacation style at home living or just a weekend getaway. Ben at 250-732-1710 to view.

GRAND HERITAGE HomeCraftmans style (Nanaimo), original stain glass, fir flrs, excellent wood detailing, claw ft tub, electrical upgrades, oil heat, 1300 sqft main flr, 3 stories. $369,900. 250-716-9340.

PANORAMIC MOUNTAIN & Ocean Views. 11yr old, 2,480 sq.ft. 3bdrm, 2.5baths, on 1.5 secluded acres in gated community 20 mins. N of Qualicum Beach. Double garage, paved driveway, RV parking, heat pump, landscaped yard with pond. $489,000. (250)7523023 or (250)720-207 Email: cerritos68@gmail.com

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

LOTS FOR SALE BY ORIGINAL OWNER A rare find in North Nanaimo Vancouver Island, this 2003 home has 2 bdrms & 2 bath rooms, 1300sq ft w/double garage. Quality built patio retirement home with strata owned priv park is on the market has large bdrms, ensuite in the master bdrm and his & hers closets. Sm pet allowed, low strata fees. This nonsmokers and pet free home is affordably priced at $324,900. For more information please phone or fax owner 1-250-758-2078.

PARKING LOTFurniture, Mattress & More Sale! Lots Cheap! BUY & SAVE, 9818 4th St., Sidney. We Buy, Sell, Trade. buyandsave.ca SEMI ELECTRIC hospital bed, power lift chair, microwave stand, maple dining room set, bedroom set, fan, duvets, sheets and blankets, dishes and pots, books etc... Call (250)384-1573

NEWS

TREED .57 ACRE LOT. on Aldergrove Drive, Courtenay. 5 min. walk to Kitty Coleman Beach & camp site. Reduced by $20,000. Perfect for investment or dream home. Timber valued at $5,000. Asking $167,000 NO HST. 250331-0299 or 250-949-6184

OTHER AREAS 20 ACRES- Only $99/mo. $0 Down, Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Money Back Guarantee! Free Color Brochure. 1-800-755-8953. www.sunsetranches.com

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO GARDENER’S PARADISE 1 acre. 4-bdrm character home, 1800 sq.ft. Wired shop, Shed. 1720 Swartz Bay Rd., $565,000. (250)656-1056.

WESTSHORE 3 BDRMS, 2 bath. We pay the Buyer’s Agent 3+1.5. 671 Daymeer Pl. (250)884-3862. Complete details/ more pics at: www.propertyguys.com ID# 192309

1 & 2 Bdrm suites & cabins. Perched on a cliffside with panoramic ocean vista, overlooking The Saanich Inlet. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250478-9231. 2 BEDROOM 2nd floor apt. 1993 Kaltasin. South facing deck. $775/mo. hot water incl., coin laundry in building. Close to schools, bus and beach. Call Wendy at 250-360-1385 or John at 778-425-2201.

HOUSES FOR SALE CORDOVA BAY. $610,000. (Bring Offers). 3 bdrm, 3 bath. Handicap features, suite, view, on bike trail. 250-818-5397. VIC WEST/ESQUIMALT, single family, 2-3 bdrms, 2 bath, flower beds/vegetable garden, mostly fenced yard, RV parking, side patio. Open House Sat & Sun, June 9 & 10, 1pm3pm. (Please call 778-4300872 for more info).

C. SAANICH condo, avail Aug 1st, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, small pet ok, 6 appls, underground prkg, $1200 mo. (250)896-6502.


www.vicnews.com • A23

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012 RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

APARTMENT/CONDO

APARTMENT/CONDO

SUITES, LOWER

AUTO FINANCING

CARS

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

BRENTWOOD: COUNTRY setting 1 bdrm, 1000 sq ft, NS/NP. $1300. (250)213-2989

COLWOOD- 1 bdrm, shared W/D, own ent, patio, NS/NP. $850 incls utils, 250-391-7915 ESQUIMALT, DUPLEX, main floor, 2 bdrm, N/S, N/P, lease, ref’s, $850 mo + utils. Close to Rec Centre. Avail now. Call after 5 PM. (250)595-7077. GORDON HEAD, 1-bedroom. Close to University, bus routes. Separate entrance, kitchenette and shared laundry. Quiet. No pets/smokers. Damage deposit and references required. $670/month. Free wi-fi, heat and hydro. Available August 1st. 250-727-2230; 250-516-3899. LANGFORD: 2-BDRM. W/D, F/P, N/S, cat OK. $1000 inclds utils. Call (250)220-5907. MNT DOUG area: Large 1 bdrm, reno’d. Inclusive, small dog welcome, N/S. $850. Call (250)721-0281, (250)858-0807 Sidney Waterfront- furnished 1 bdrm. $1000 inclusive. Refs. NP/NS. Call (250)656-4003.

SENIOR ASSISTED LIVING

SUITES, UPPER

NOW AT THE CAMELOT

BRENTWOOD, LARGE studio country setting, furn’d, $750 mo, N/S, N/P, 250-213-2989.

ESQUIMALT

Unique Building Must see

1 BDRM. Very quiet, ocean views, Clean, well maintained. Laundry, Sauna, Elevator, Hot Water, Heat. (250) 388-9384 FA I R F I E L D / VA N C O U V E R , 1bdrm, hardwood floors. Heat, hot water, storage, parking incl $795 ns or pets. 250-383-1491

COTTAGES METCHOSIN: 1 bdrm coach house, avail. Aug. 1st. $800 incld’s; cable, W/D. Util’s not incld’d. No cats. Call (250)4788438.

HOMES FOR RENT

For sale (or rent) in this fine complex. Delightful corner suite near the Inner Harbour, shopping etc., designed for 55+ age group. Independent living with services in a friendly and secure home like atmosphere. Just move in & enjoy life! 455 Kingston St. Open House Saturday’s, 2pm to 4pm. Please call owner 250.652.9725 Cell: 250.415.1001

Fraser Tolmie Apts1701 Cedar Hill X Rd 1-877-659-4069 1701 Cedar Hill X Rd 1-877-659-4069 1 and 2 bdrms 1-877-659-4069 www.frasertolmime.ca 1 & 2 Bedrooms 1701 Cedar Hill X Road www.frasertolmime.ca for pics

GRANT MANOR, APARMENTS 6921 Grant Rd. Sooke Bachelor and 1 bdrm. apts. Some newly renovated For further information and to view call

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

250-642-1900 JAMES BAY- spacious 1 bdrm, $775+ utils. NS/NP. Avail. Aug 1. (778)430-2116

GOLDSTREAM AREA1400sq ft, newly furnished, w/d, d/w, a/c, big deck & yard, hi-def TV, parking. $650 inclusive. Ray, 778-433-9556.

TOWNHOUSES LAVENDER CO-OP is accepting applications for a quiet, bright 2 bdrm townhouse, W/D hookup, inside/outside storage,backyard. $876/mo. Share purchase $2500. Gross income $42,000+. Applications available in the glass case outside the Community Hall at 10A-620 Judah St. SIDNEY- NEW 2 bdrm + den, W/D. NS/NP. $1700 mo. Avail Aug 1. Call 250-217-4060.

WANTED TO RENT

LANGFORD, FURNISHED large rm, tv, internet, utils incl, $550, Aug. 1. 250-883-0157.

PROFESSIONAL FAMILY requires 2 or 3 bedroom rental $1400 or under in Fairfield, Oak Bay, Esquimalt or Gorge/Saanich for Sept 1. Must allow 2 small well trained dogs. Please call 250-8842295.

STORAGE

TRANSPORTATION

SHIPPING CONTAINERS 20’ or 40’. Buy or Rent. Safe and secure. Easymove Container Services. Serving Vancouver Island. 1-(888)331-3279

WE’RE ON THE WEB www.bcclassified.com

AUTO FINANCING DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557

2001 Nissan Sentra Automatic, Well Maintained, Clean 111,000 km $4999.00 250-999-3467 harlaeve@shaw.ca

2003 BUICK RENDEZVOUS

Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

GUARANTEED

Auto Loans or We Will Pay You $1000

All Makes, All Models. New & Used Inventory.

149,000 km, grey colour excellent condition. $7,000.00 (250)514-4535

1992, 26 ft TRAVELAIRE, Class C Motorhome. Bright, clean, sleeps 4. Twin beds in back and fold down double bed. Excellent and clean condition. Full shower with skylight, gas generator, air conditioning, second owner, new internal batteries (worth $600), new water pump, only 91,300 km. Reliable, clean and functional. REDUCED to $13,000. (250) 748-3539

2009 ACADIA SLT, AWD, seats 7, loaded. 60,500km. $30,000. 250-923-7203

TRUCKS & VANS

1992 MALLARD SPRINTER 30’ Class A, 109K, Loaded. 454 Chevy, Roof & Dash Air, Generator, Etc., Sleeps 6. Excellent Shape. $11,900 250-580-1152 1967 GMC Aluminum Panel Van 350cu.in., 3 spd, auto. Mechanically sound, with recent work. $3650 obo. Call 250-656-1801.

1-888-229-0744 or apply at: www.greatcanadianautocredit.com Must be employed w/ $1800/mo. income w/ drivers license. DL #30526

WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in July, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. 1-888-593-6095. www.creditdrivers.ca

AUTO SERVICES $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

2004 CHRYSLER 300M, 135,000 kms. Fully Loaded, including Winter tires and rims. Asking $5300. 250-508-4663. 2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

CASH PAID

1995 24’ Slumber Queen Ford E350. 135,200 km. New tires/ brakes. Smart fan, solar panels/1200W inverter, scooter carrier.$13,500. 250-474 5802

250-885-1427

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

2002 MONTANA Extended van, seats 8. Automatic, A/C, roof rack, CD, good tires Well maintained. 194,300 km. Great van but must sell, reduced, $2,500. 778-679-2044.

MARINE BOATS

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

CARS

SPORTS & IMPORTS 2004 VW TOUAREG. Beautiful vehicle, well maintained. Only 135,000 km, economical, spirited V6 engine, all wheel drive and tow hitch with electric brakes. Unique 6 spd Tiptronic auto transmission. Well equipped interior, rear mounted CD changer. $15,900, 250658-1123 mjmarshall@telus.net

1963 FORD T-Bird, 90% restored, new paint and upholstery, original miles (32,665), needs TLC. For more information call Jake (250)474-2249.

$50-$1000 CASH For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

858-5865

2004 BMW 330 Convertible Accident Free; 140,000 km, Auto, Fully Loaded, well maintained, recently tuned. $15,900. 778-403-1209.

BOAT HOUSE, 40’X20’, for up to 35’ boat, high door easily accommodates a command bridge boat. Located at North Saanich Marina $40,000 obo (250)665-6045, (250)999-3248 or (250)418-1780.

CONNECTING BUYERS AND SELLERS www.bcclassified.com

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

250.388.3535 HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

GARDENING

GARDENING

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CLEANING SERVICES

CONTRACTORS

ELECTRICAL

FURNITURE REFINISHING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estate organizing, events, parties, office cleaning. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

DRYWALL SPOTLESS HOME Cleaning. Affordable, Experienced, Reliable, Efficient. (250)508-1018

250-477-4601

COMPUTER SERVICES

CARPENTRY

COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites and more. Call 250-886-8053.

BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748.

CONCRETE & PLACING GEOF’S RENO’S & Repairs. Decks, stairs, railings, gates & small additions. 250-818-7977.

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES GREAT RATES! Guar. cleaning since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. (250)385-5869

RBC CONCRETE Finishing. All types of concrete work. No job too small. Seniors discount. Call 250-386-7007.

CONTRACTORS 250-216-9476 FROM the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups, accepting clients. BATHROOM REMODELING. “Gemini Baths” Plumb, Elec. Tile, Cabinets. 250-896-9302.

ARAM RENO’S Basement, bathrooms, additions Free est. WCB/Insured 250-880-0525 WESTSHORE/GYPSUM. Your one stop Drywall shop. Any questions give is a call. (250)391-4744 (250)881-4145

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Expert: new homes &renos. No job too sm#22779. AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Perimeter drains, driveway prep, Hardscapes, Lot clearing. Call 250-478-8858. SAMRA & Sons Excavating, Perimeter Drains, Driveway and Landscaping Preps. Call Randy 250-881-6365.

U-NEEK SEATS. Hand cane, Danish weave, sea grass. UK Trained. Fran, 250-216-8997.

GARDENING J&L GARDENING Specialty yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. John or Louise (250)891-8677

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

250-208-8535 WOODCHUCK: Neglected garden? Spring clean-ups, hedges, power raking, aerating, weed/moss stump, blackberry & ivy removal. 24yrs exp. WCB.

DECKS/FENCES, licensed & insured. Call Fred (250)5145280. thelangfordman.com

250-216-9476 FROM the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home reno’s, garden clean-ups, accepting clients.

QUALITY CEDAR fencing, decks and installation, pressure washing. For better prices & quotes call Westcoast Fencing. 250-588-5920.

ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualified, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com

FENCING

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca AURICLE LAWNS- Superior lawn care-gardens, hedges & fert-weed mgmt. 882-3129 DPM SERVICES, lawn & garden, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141 GARDEN OVERGROWN? Weeding, lawn cuts, cleanups, pruning. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236. LANDSCAPE & TREE care hedges/pruning/shaping. Lawn & garden. Maint. 18 yrs exp. WCB. Andrew, (250)893-3465. YARD ART. Yard Maintenance, Tree & Hedge Pruning, Lawn Care. Call 250-888-3224

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassified.com

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS 250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates. AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, Guards, windows, powerwashing, roof de-moss, repairs. Insured. Call (250)507-6543. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.


A24 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HANDYPERSONS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

INSULATION

MOVING & STORAGE

PLUMBING

STUCCO/SIDING

MALTA WOOL-BLOWN insulation/ Spray foam application. (250)388-0278. BBB member.

DONE RIGHT MOVING $80/hr. No travel time before or after. SMOOTH MOVES. Call Tyler 250-418-1747.

PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

MALTA MOVING. Serving Vancouver Island, surrounding islands and the Mainland. BBB Member. (250)388-0278.

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BIG BEAR Handyman & Painting Services. No job too small. Free Estimates. Senior discounts. Barry 250-896-6071 SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Call Fred, 250-888-5345.

CBS MASONRY BBB A+ Accredited Business. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Patios, Sidewalk Repair. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. Call (250)294-9942 or 250-589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

HAULING AND SALVAGE $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. EWING’S MOVING & Hauling. Apartment & Condo relocation specialist. $80/hr. Call Dave at 250-857-2864. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463. ✭BUBBA’S HAULING✭ Honest, on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service. 250-478-8858. SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

CBS MASONRY BBB A+. Chimney, Fireplaces, Rock, Flagstone, Concrete, Pavers, Repair, Rebuild, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee.” Free Competitive Est’s. Call (250) 294-9942/589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com ROMAX MASONRY. Exp’d & Professional. Chimneys, Brick Veneer, Rockwork, Cultured Stone, Interlocking Paving. Fully insured. Estimates. Call 250-588-9471 - 250-882-5181

MOVING & STORAGE

MALTA ASBESTOS, Mold removal. Attics, drywall & more. (250)388-0278. BBB member. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassified.com

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734.

PAINTING 217-9580 ENIGMA PAINTING Renos, commercial, residential Professional Friendly Service. 250-886-6446 YOUR Personal Interior Painter. No Job too Big or Too Small. Call Gilbert today for free quote. ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. BIG BEAR Painting. Free Est. Senior discounts. Quality work. Call Barry 250-896-6071 B L Coastal Coatings. Quality, reliable, great rates. All your painting needs. (250)818-7443 COLOURS & IDEAS. Exterior/ Interior Painting. All work waranteed. Call (250)208-8383. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

Crossword ACROSS 1. Bay Area Transit Auth. (abbr.) 5. Pull apart by force 9. Ancient Egyptian King 12. Missing soldiers 13. Capital of Japan 14. Diamond month (abbr.) 15. Spheres 16. Surpassing good 17. British thermal unit 18. Philippine island & seaport 19. Legally argued 20. Belonging to singer Fitzgerald 22. Bowler hats 24. Has a strong odor 25. Doyens 26. London Gallery 27. Rural delivery 28. Rods 31. Stonhenge plain

33. Withdraw from membership 34. Execute or perform 35. Central or Yellowstone 36. Municipality in Norway 39. Bay of NW Rep. of Ireland 40. Skin designs 42. Son of Jephunneh 43. Baseball’s Ruth 44. Clare Booth __, Am. writer 46. Black tropical American cuckoo 47. Filled with fear or apprehension 49. 6th Jewish month 50. Wide metal vessel used in cooking 51. Make by pouring into a cast 52. Colombian city 53. Heat unit 54. Carpenter, red and army 55. Adam and Eve’s garden

Today’s Answers

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

RE-STUCCO & HARDY Plank/Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

WINDOW CLEANING

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

BOB’S WINDOW Cleaning. Power Washing, Gutters. 25 yrs. 250-884-7066, 381-7127.

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

PLASTERING PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB. NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-590-2929, 250-812-3213.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

STEREO/TV/DVD

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

NEED REPAIRS? Use our community classifieds Service Directory to find an expert in your community

WANTED: DVD PLAYER (inexpensive) for a single parent. Call 250-514-6688.

Sudoku

29. Tuberculosis (abbr.) 30. Inspected accounting procedures 31. A twilled woolen fabric 32. Potato state 33. The work of a sailor 35. Involving 2 dimensions 36. Fanatical or overzealous 37. Consolation 38. Wild sheep of northern Africa 39. Erect leafless flowerbearing stalk 40. Afrikaans 41. Weighing device 43. Very dry champagne 45. Emerald Isle 48. A resident of Benin

To solve a Sudoku puzzle, every number 1 to 9 must appear in: • Each of the nine vertical columns • Each of the nine horizontal rows • Each of the nine 3 x 3 boxes

Remember no number can occur more than once in any row, column or box.

Today’s Solution

DOWN 1. Big man on campus 2. Made public by radio or television 3. Labelled 4. Inform positively 5. Drinks habitually 6. Supplemented with difficulty 7. SW Scottish river & port 8. American poet 1874-1963 9. Pads 10. Ingestion or intake 11. Tie up a bird before cooking 13. Bulrushes of the genus Scirpus 16. Turned rod on a spinning wheel 21. Having or covered with leaves 23. The 44th U.S. President 28. Midway between S and SE


www.vicnews.com • A25

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Pride Parade happy affair for watchers, participants

The Queen of the Pride Parade gives a royal wave to spectators on Government Street during Sunday’s procession.

Sunday’s event helps wind up Pride Week

A singer stationed on the Hush nightclub float, above, belts out a tune to the crowd during the annual Pride Parade Sunday. Ev Andrews, left, dances her way down Government Street in between the floats.

Photos by Sharon Tiffin

Pride Parade spectators, taking refuge from the sun under a large birch tree at the corner of Government and Wharf streets, are all smiles as they wait for the next participants to come along.

COVER-TO-COVER

On-Line

Now available in an easy to read downloadable and printable format!

Go to: vicnews.com oakbaynews.com saanichnews.com goldstreamgazette.com Click on Link (on the right)

BOGO Summer

Instant access to our complete paper! Editorial, Ads, Classifieds, Photos

Savings Event BUY 1 GET 1 OFF

50%

*Excludes TanJay & Alia

or Scroll down to the bottom Click on eEdition

Tanks, tees, capris, shorts & dresses. Limited time only!

Bathing suits have arrived!

(paper icon)

Westshore Town Centre 250-478-3885

Hillside Centre 250-598-3502

ON TWO WHEELS? See our Auto Section

9764 5th Street 250-656-0096

INMOTION

IN YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER EVERY FRIDAY


A26 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Elegant and refined, the all-new Passat is full of advanced features and bright ideas.

2012 Passat - 2.5 Comfortline In-Stock for only

Lease for only

$31,755

$379

OR

per month for 48 months*

OR Finance at 0% for up to 60 months! • • •

17” Alloy Wheels Bluetooth Connectivity Sunroof

• • •

Satellite Radio Heated Front Seats 6-Speed Automatic

Volkswagen Victoria ( at Speedway Motors - A new division of the German Auto Import Network )

3329 Douglas Street | 250-475-2415 | vwvictoria.com *Limited time finance purchase offer available through Volkswagen Finance, on approved credit. MSRP of $31,755 for a new 2012 Passat 2.5 Comfortline is based on a 6-speed automatic transmission model, including $1,365 freight and PDI. Lease example of $379 per month is based on St# V1030 with a rate of 2.9% for 48 months. Down payment of $2,500 or equivalent trade. Doc of $395, levy, air, PPSA, security deposit and all applicable taxes are extra. Total Obligation is $20,692. Available financing at 0% APR for up to 60 months equals. Down payment or equivalent trade-in, due at signing, may be required. Dealer may sell for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Offers end August 31, 2012 and are subject to change or cancellation without notice. 2012 Passat shown above is for illustration purposes only and may have additional options. Certain options and accessories may be extra. Vehicles may not be exactly as shown. Visit Volkswagen Victoria for details. “Volkswagen”, the Volkswagen logo, 60 year anniversary logo and “Passat” are registered trademarks of Volkswagen AG. Motor Trend® Magazine is a registered trademark of Source Interlink Magazines, LLC.© 2012 Volkswagen Canada. DL 4991428

Castle in the works Damon Langlois and Charlotte Kolf put their architectural skills to the test on a sunny Sunday at Gonzales Beach. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

We’d like to thank you with a kiss. Don’t worry, we’ll have a mint first. “Highest in Customer Satisfaction With Stand-Alone Wireless Service” 2012 J.D. Power and Associates

Drop in and visit our new Koodo Shop at Hillside Centre. Koodo Mobile received the highest numerical score among stand-alone wireless service providers in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2012 Canadian Wireless Customer Satisfaction StudySM. Study based on 14,000 total customer responses measuring 5 stand-alone providers and measures opinions of customers with their wireless service providers. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed in October 2011 and March 2012. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com


A2 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

www.vicnews.com • A27

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

NEWS

M E AT & P O U LTRY | F I S H & S E A F O O D

F R E S H FA R M & O R G A N I C P R O D U C E

Fresh! Fresh!

Fresh!

Fresh!

1

48

Wild Coho Salmon Wild Coho Salmon Fillet

2

Chicken Thighs

29

&IRSTOFTHE3EASON 10.39 Lb

100 G

Lilydale Air Chilled Boneless & Skinless 12.10 Kg

5

49 Lb

Simmering Steak 6.59 Kg Beef Boneless Blade Canadian Grade AA or Higher

Fresh!

Fresh!

Chicken Breast Fillets

Cross Rib Pot Roast

2

99

Head Off Whole &IRSTOFTHE3EASON,B

100 G

5

Bread

1

Strawberries

2/$

s#INNAMON2AISINs3ESAME7HITE s77$EMPSTERS 'RAM,OAF

49

California No. 1 Grade &RESH,B#LAMSHELL

Russet Potatoes

ea

3

49

US No. 1 10 Lb Bag

Lb

Cauliower US No. 1 California Grown

2/$

Ea

3

Broccoli Crowns

1

49

California No. 1 3.28 Kg

Lb

Fresh!

buyBC™

Cooked Shrimp Meat

3

19

West Coast Hand Peeled 14.47 Lb

Lilydale Air Chilled Boneless 13.21 Kg

100 G

Lb

Sliced Bacon

Wieners Olymel Vacuum Pack s2EGULARs!LL"EEF 450 Gram Package

2

69

Olymel Boneless Smoked s/LD &ASHIONEDs"LACK&OREST 800 Gram Pkg

7

Beef Boneless 7.25 Kg Canadian Grade AA or Higher

3

29

Chicken Wings

Olymel 500 Gram Package

Ea

3

99

99 Ea

WED

TH U R

FRI

S AT

SUN

11

12

13

14

15 16

Ea

1

5

Popcorn Chicken

48

#ANADIAN0REMIUM'RAIN&ED 7HOLE+G,IMIT0ER&AMILY

Lb

99

6ILLAGE&ROZEN Assorted Marinated 454 Gram Package

Ham

J U LY 2 0 12

5

99

Pork Picnic

4

3

3

Blueberries

99

)SLAND&ARMS 1.65 Litre Carton

99

US No. 1 &RESH")'OZ 'RAM#LAMSHELL

ea

Satsuma Mandarins

ea

Fresh!

Ea

99 Ea

O R G AN

Green Zucchini

2

48 lb

99

Orange Juice

2

BC Grown No. 1 &RESH$RY0INT

ea

O R G AN

53#ERTIlED/RGANIC 3.28 Kg

99

Raspberries

¢

&ROZEN+ENT#ONCENTRATED 250 mL Tin

Green Beans

ea

O

Ea

2/$

4

IC

Ripe Tomatoes US No. 1 #ALIFORNIA'ROWN&IELD 2.18 Kg

¢

Gold Kiwi Fruits

Lb

Product of New Zealand

99

¢ Lb

2 Chinese (White) Lo Bok 69¢ Long Eggplant 99¢

IC

3/$

for

Lb

Imported 1.52 Kg

Lb

Lb

Chinese California Grown 2.18 Kg

Lb

Gorge Centre 272 Gorge Road West, Victoria Shelbourne Plaza 3651 Shelbourne St., Victoria Athlone Court 2187 Oak Bay Ave., Oak Bay Quadra Street Village 2635 Quadra St., Victoria

www.fairwaymarkets.com Photos used in this ad are for presentation purposes only. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some advertised items may not be available at some locations.

US No. 1 Whole ,ARGE3IZE

R G AN I C

53#ERTIlED/RGANIC 6.59 Kg

MON

Cantaloupe

88 149 299

Imported No. 1 #ERTIlED/RGANIC 1.94 Kg

,EAN&AMILY0ACK 5.47 Kg

3

99

Grown in Peru Sweet Seedless 3 Lb Bag

Bananas

Ground Beef

6ILLAGE&ROZEN"READED 750 Gram Package

lb

Classic Ice Cream

F RforE S H D A I RY & F R O Z E N F O O D S

1521 McKenzie at Cedar Hill Rd., Victoria Westshore Town Centre 2945 Jacklin Rd., Langford Sidney-By-The-Sea 2531 Beacon Ave., Sidney Brentwood Bay Village 7108 W. Saanich Rd., Brentwood

Nanaimo North Town Centre 4750 Rutherford Rd., Nanaimo Port Alberni Plaza 3737–10th Ave., Port Alberni

STORE HOURS All Locations: 8am–10pm except Sidney-By-The-Sea: 7am–9pm Brentwood Bay: 7am–10pm

ASIAN & BULK FOODS Gluten

FREE

Cookies Yogurt Vanilla Plus )SLAND&ARMS 650 Gram Tub

Cheese

s-OZZARELLA s#HEDDAR Armstrong 500-600 Gram Pkg

Cheese &AIRWAY!SSORTED 570-600 Gram Package

2

99

799 7

99

Free Range Eggs Island Gold Large Brown /NE$OZEN

French Fries McCain Red Bag Assorted 1 Kg Bag

s3PAGHETTI s,ASAGNA s-AC#HEESE "ASSILIS"EST&ROZEN 454 Gram Package

4

79

279 2

99

Yogurt s!SSORTED 'RAM4UB s'REEK'RAM4UB Astro Your Choice

Hashbrowns McCain 1 Kg Bag

Pizza s2ISTORANTEs0ANEBELLO $R/ETKER&ROZEN 325-450 Gram Package

s#HIPS!HOYs&UDGEE / s/REOs#HUNKS!HOY Christie 280-350 Gram Bag

2

49

2

29

4

Snacks

Kraft 650 mL Bottle

s"ITS"ITESs#RISPERS s3NACK#RACKERS Christie 100-454 Gram Package

s-AYONNAISE s-IRACLE7HIP

3

99

2

49

BBQ Sauce Kraft Assorted 455 mL Bottle

Juice

1

99

Tropicana Chilled 2.63-2.84 Litre Jug + Dep

5

99

s!MOOZA4WISTS252 G s#HEESE Slices 500 G s#HEEZ7HIZ 500 G Kraft

4

99 Rice Sticks Erawan 454 Gram Package

Oats

Cereal

Beans

Quaker Assorted 900 Gram - 1 Kg Bag

s#HEERIOS!SSORTED ' s+IDS ' s/ATMEAL#RISP ' General Mills Your Choice

(EINZ!SSORTED 796 mL Tin

Soft Drinks

99

2

99

Squeeze

s0EPSI!SSORTEDXM, s!QUAlNA7ATERXM, Your Choice + Dep

2

99

699 3

99

3

99

s&IBRE/MEGA175 G s9OGURT"ARS175 G Quaker Granola Bars Your Choice

5

2/$

3

2/$

Fruit Rivers Beverage Sun-Rype Assorted 1 Litre Carton + Dep

5

4/$

Frozen EntrĂŠes Smart Ones Weight Watchers 4/$ Assorted 170-332 Gram Pkg

Beef Ravioli

White Flour

Cookies

Chef Boyardee 425 Gram Tin Case of 8 $6.99

Great Plains All Purpose 10 Kg Bag

Simple Pleasures Dare 275-350 Gram Package

99

¢

8

99

10

2/$

4

Frozen EntrÊes Stouffer’s Assorted 170-340 Gram Package

2

99

Taisun 320 mL Tin + Dep

Soft Drinks s#OKEXM,"OTTLE s-INI#ANSXM,4IN s$ASANI7ATERXM, Your Choice + Dep

Grass Jelly Drink

2

99

Regular Oats s1UICK s/LD &ASHIONED Per 100 Gram

1

59

79¢

19

¢

Jasmine Rice

99

Pure Sesame Oil

99

Fish Sauce

10

6ITA&ANCY,B+G"AG Limit 4 Per Customer Over Limit $12.99

Roasted Seaweed C.R.D. 12’s Package

BBQ Peanuts Per 100 Gram

5

Lee Kum Kee 443.6 mL Btl

Three Crabs 682 mL Bottle

45

¢

Candy Saybon Per 100 Gram

3

99

469

89

¢


A28 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - VICTORIA

proud to be a part of Greater Victoria

alid Coupon V TH

, JULY 11 TH 12TH & 13 ONLY! ! HURRY IN

new flyer dates check h k outt our

NOW

Friday to Thursday

free 10 gift card Save-On-Foods

GIFT CARD

Spend $75* with your More Rewards card & receive one $ $

10

Limit 1 free gift card & 1 spend/receive coupon per single grocery purchase Coupon valid July 11, 12 & 13, 2012 at Saanich & Westside Village locations. REWARDS

*Excl. Lotto, tobacco, gift cards, prescriptions, clinics, diabetes care, tickets, charities, insurance, bus passes, postage stamps, deposit & recycle fees, rewards and taxes, where applicable. Present this coupon with your More Rewards card to the cashier at time of purchase. Gift card must be redeemed on a subsequent visit. No substitutions. To the cashier: Confirm $75 have been spent. Scan gift card. Scan coupon. Enter $10. Place coupon in drawer.

Don’t have a More Rewards Card yet? It’s easy and free. Sign up in-store and start saving today!

Saanich: 3510 Blanshard St., Victoria • Westside Village: 172 Wilson St., Victoria

saveonfoods.com

V

NEWS

Victoria News, July 11, 2012  

July 11, 2012 edition of the Victoria News

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