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KITIMAT Business, Pleasure & Fishing

2012

VISITOR & TOUR GUIDE

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

Table of contents Fishing Capital of the Northwest Kitimat...a place made for you - page 3 Fish on! - page 5 Hatchery a great catch - page 8 Catch the experience - page 9

The Great Outdoors A great place to hit the trail - page 11 True north getaway - page 13 Mind the bear necessities - page 14 Winter wonderland - page 15 Map of Kitimat/Kitamaat - page 16-17

Our Summers Are Eventful Dragons in the water - page 18 The northwest’s biggest party - page 19 The longest eight seconds - page 20 Derby lures anglers - page 21

An Enviable Lifestyle It doesn’t get better than this - page 23 Community Snapshots - page 25 Spend your best years in Kitimat - page 27

Industry Meets Nature Let the good times roll - page 28 Life’s a gas in Kitimat - page 39 There’s still more on the way - page 30

This guide is brought to you by: Beitz - page 24 City Centre Mall - page 4 Coastal Taxi - page 28 Dee’s Flowers - page 21 Hirsch Creek Golf & Winter Club - page 29 Home Hardware - page 32 Kitimat Lodge - page 6 Kitimat Museum & Archives - page 12 Kitimat Veterinary Hospital - page 7 Lapointe Engineering - page 30 Lynn’s Hair Flair - page 20 Minette Bay Lodge - page 13 MK Bay Marina - page 18 MJ’s Ladies Gym - page 24 Rent a Wreck - page 26 Re/Max Kitimat Realty - page 28 Re/Max Theresa Couto - page 24 Reliable Guide & Charters - page 8 RG’s Auto Marine - page 30 Scotia Bank - page 20 Shoppers Drug Mart - page 31 Snipz - page 10 Snow Valley Ford - page 20 OK Tire Service - page 26 Overwaitea - page 12 Pyrotek - page 28 Worship in Kitimat Church Guide - page 22 Christ the King Catholic Church Kitimat Pentecostal Fellowship Kitimat Presbyterian Church Mountain View Alliance Church Pacific Cornerstone Baptist Church

Cover photo by Harry Gladwin.

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2012

An Enviable Lifestyle

Kitimat ... a place made for you Entering Kitimat by road, the first thing you’ll see of this idyllic hamlet is the iconic aluminum snowflake which decorates the side of Highway 37S. The snowflake is the official symbol of the community. Indeed, in the winter months you may find yourself among skyscrapers of snow piles, the playground of choice for the community’s children. Yet it’s not just the snow that makes Kitimat stand out as a jewel of the Northwest. In fact, the second thing you’ll remember as you come into town is Coghlin Park, a green space along Haisla Boulevard that offers a stunning view of the Kitimat Arm of the Douglas Channel. If that aluminum snowflake is the symbol of Kitimat, the viewpoint at Coghlin Park is the spirit. From that vantage point you’ll see just about everything that Kitimat has to offer. With the Kitimat Arm, you’ll see the immense opportunities of aquatic sports — boating and kayaking are core activities of residents and visitors, which With the mountains you’ll see provide ample opportunity to visit the the wilderness to explore on many nearby hot springs, and sightseers may of the local hiking trails, plus the see some of the many seals that sunlandscape in store for winter crossbathe on small rocky islands. country skiing and snowmobiling.

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By land or sea, there is so much to do in this quiet little town. Kitimat began as a planned community, and you’ll soon come to think it was planned just for you.

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626 Enterprise Avenue Kitimat BC V8C 2E4 • Phone 250.632.6144 Fax 250.639.9373 newsroom@northernsentinel.com advertising@northernsentinel.com classifieds@northernsentinel.com ALL CONTENTS ARE COPYRIGHTED.

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

Header

Shopping as it should be . . . Your Dollar Store With More Big Jim's Spirits Store Cook's Jewellers Beitz Computers and Office Supplies SnipZ Salon Elan Travel

Sight & Sound Penny Candy Store Jitters Café Kitimat Pizza Factory Caprice Trading Post MOM'S Cuisine

. . . and much more!

REGULAR MALL HOURS: MONDAY through THURSDAY and SATURDAY 9:30 am to 6 pm FRIDAY – 9:30 am to 9 pm SUNDAY – Noon to 5 pm Mall office: 276 City Centre Mall, Kitimat, BC tel. 250.632.2433 email: info@citycentremall.ca

www.citycentremall.ca

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2012

Fishing Capital of the Northwest

Fish on!

The Kitimat River is, quite simply, an angling paradise. Which is why visitors flock here every year, why nearly every local home has its stock of rods and gear and why new residents who previously had only a passing interest in sport fishing soon find the lure of the Kitimat irresistible. With five species of salmon and two of trout available to anglers, you can see there’s no shortage of action. So when are there fish in the Kitimat River? Twelve months of the year. When’s the best time to fish it? Depends on what you’re after. If your heart is set on a monster chinook (Spring) salmon, the main run will start heading into the river in late June and there will be plenty of battles royal to enjoy right through July. These tackle busters are often in the 30-40 lbs. range but

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fish running 50 lbs. and up have sent anglers home with stars in their eyes — and aching arms. How to catch yourself a trophy chinook? The most relaxing is “still” fishing — anchoring your line and gear in the current with a weight and using a spin-n-glo or a spin-n-glo/ hoochie combo as the lure. Both come in a bewildering array of colours and sizes. For the more active angler, casting and “bottom bouncing” is the method of choice using either a spoon — there is even one named after our river — or again a spinn-glo/hoochie, but with a lighter weight. Bottom bouncing is also the more successful method since, by varying your cast length and retrieve, you’re searching out the fish rather than waiting for them to bump into your gear. (The use of bait in the Kitimat is prohibited until Labour Day - and don’t forget it’s single barbless hook only.) Because water conditions have a lot to do with your choice of lure and/or colour, it’s a good idea to check with a

local tackle shop to find out what’s working when you arrive. Another tip: get a copy of the tide tables even if you’re fishing on the river because a lot of fish tend to come in on the high tide. As the chinook peak, the first of the next wave start arriving in the river, chum salmon. Granted they are not as highly prized by many anglers, but if you get a fresh 20lber. on the line you’ll be in a battle you won’t soon forget. You can be sure of lots of chum action through July and into mid-August and they are excellent smoked. During this run in particular you’ll see numerous fly fisherman on the river and be impressed by their rate of success. This is also when the pinks come in - known as “humpies” for the hump back the spawning males develop. They are utterly unpredictable in terms of the strength of the run - this is the only purely wild fish run in the Kitimat. Historically, pink runs show huge swings in continued on page 6

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

continued from page 5 alternating years but that pattern changed about seven years ago with big returns for several years. The pattern appeared to reassert itself the last couple of years but it should be noted that what is regarded as a “low” return for pinks still exceeds 100,000. With chum and pinks both in the river, it can get insane. The first week of August last year I tried my luck using a pink/ pink spin-n-glo/hoochie combo. Landed a beauty pink, ideal for supper, on the third cast. A female chum destined for the smoker on the next. A too-small trout on the next. And had limited out with two chum and two pink in just 11 casts. Did I mention I released two more pinks? As I said, it can get insane. By the way, while gear colours are generally important, there are days - especially with pinks - when,

to quote a young lady at a local tackle shop, “You could throw a soup can out there and they’d hit it.” And there are days when the opposite applies and the fish get very strange tastes. Which is why I always carry a couple of ghastly yellow spin-n-glos to chuck out there if all else fails - a few times that tactic has rescued a quiet morning, once producing three fish in as many casts. Finally, the coho hit the river, making up for what they lack in size with a fighting spirit that often translates into an unforgettable aerial display. Coho will start showing up in the latter half of August with the peak coming in September. This fishery can extend right into October, though by then you’ll be facing a mix of fresh silvers and darker fish. They are not as numerous as chum/pinks and can be a lot more stubborn about hitting — or maybe

they just don’t like me - but hauling one of them on to the beach is about as satisfying as it gets. Returning to gear for a second, a relative newcomer is the jig, and one that is gaining in popularity in leaps and bounds. Two years ago I got down to Radley Park at about 7 a.m. to find there were already three others there. They had been there awhile and landed just one pink. Soon after another two anglers joined us to make for six rods in action. Although the fish were there, we weren’t getting any. “Don’t worry,” one of the guys – a local retiree – assured us. “The fish will come at eight o’clock.” And at five past all hell broke loose for him and his buddy as they hooked into eight in 15 minutes, leaving the rest of us chartreuse with envy. The difference? They were the only two

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2012

using jigs. Our sea-run cutthroat trout make their return in late August through September, winter in the river to provide excellent fishing in what most people would consider the off season, spawn in February and head back out the next month. This past winter was an especially rewarding year for the dedicated trout angler. And to complete the 12-month cycle, there are the prized steelhead. Recent fabulous winter runs are reminiscent of earlier times and are attracting the hardy off-season anglers. However, there’s more action with the spring run from mid-April until midMay. These hard-fighting and elusive beauties can get up to 20lbs.-plus and provide one of the most exciting challenges on the Kitimat. Just remember you can only retain hatchery steelhead - they’re the ones with the clipped adipose fin. As you can see, it’s no surprise Kitimatians consider they have the best angling in the world. Malcolm Baxter

Fishing Capital of the Northwest

Affectionately dubbed ‘The Three-foot Anglers’, kids eagerly head for the riverbank when the pinks are in. Tussling with the Humpies is invaluable experience and training for later years when they take on the big fellas.

Full Service Veterinary Hospital including

Radiology, Surgery, Orthopedics and Veterinary Dentistry KITIMAT VETERINARY HOSPITAL 587 Mountainview Square, Kitimat Tel. 250.639.2299 Regular Hours: Monday to Friday 8:30 am to 5:30 pm Closed for lunch noon to 1:00 pm After hours call, available for emergencies only.

Voted 2011 Business of the Year ~ Service for Kitimat Chamber of Commerce Business of Excellence Awards www.northernsentinel.com

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

Kitimat hatchery a great catch It’s no secret the Kitimat River offers some of the best fishing in the province. It’s also no secret we owe that to our hatchery. That’s particularly true when it comes to steelhead. Four years ago the provincial government introduced a ban on retaining wild steelhead. However, you can catch and keep a hatchery fish – and the Kitimat is the only river in the Northwest that offers hatchery steelhead. The Kitimat River Fish Hatchery was first started in 1977 as a pilot project, located across from the Eurocan Pulp and Paper mill. It came into being to rebuild salmon stocks, particularly chinook, which had been hard hit by overfishing, habitat degradation and a couple of floods that had ravaged spawning beds. At that time it consisted of an Atco trailer containing a few troughs and only released 50,000-150,000 fish a year. Six years later a new, $10-million facility was built and now the annual release is in the millions. At the hatchery five different species of salmonids are raised: chum, chinook, coho, cutthroat, and steelhead. Steelhead and cutthroat are actually trout, but they are searun trout, which means that they have the same life cycle as a salmon by going out to the ocean to mature and returning to the rivers to spawn. Each year adult fish of each species are caught by angling, tangle netting or seine netting to obtain

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eggs and sperm. Once the raised fish are ready for release — the time varies from species to species — they are taken back to the streams from which their parents were taken except for a small percentage released through a pipe directly below the hatchery. From there, they swim out to the

ocean to mature, eventually to return to the Kitimat system to start the cycle all over again. Incidentally, while they may not be the most prized fish, the hatchery is top heavy on the production of chum salmon. That’s because they were historically the most numerous local species.

R E L I A B L E G U I D E an d C H A RT E R S FRESH AND SALTWATER FISHING

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65LB SPRING

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2012

Fishing Capital of the Northwest

Catch the experience Although it’s the abundant fish that draw most people on to the waters of the Douglas Channel, the beauty and marine life of the fjord is a bonus none forget. It’s also the reason why an increasing number of nonanglers leap at the opportunity offered by local charter operators to take to the briny and capture that beauty through the lens of their favourite camera. There, sheer rock walls rise out of dark green waters, towering literally thousands of feet above passing boats. Waterfalls cascade down mountainsides as the last of the winter snow on the peaks surrenders to the heat of another summer. The forest marches down to the foreshore of numerous bays and coves, each inviting the passerby to stop in and enjoy the tranquillity. Porpoise suddenly appear to keep the salt chuck mariner company and in the middle distance, the distinctive plume rising off the water’s surface alerts all to the presence of an orca. But, back to the fish. www.northernsentinel.com

Salmon, of course, are the big draw with chinook/ springs and coho being the favourites. Although the early chinooks/springs, destined for spawning grounds in the upper reaches of the Kitimat River, arrive in mid-to late-May, the peak period begins in mid-June with the first couple of weeks of July bringing “prime time.” Mid-July sees the beginning of the coho run which will peak a month later. They often mill around “out front” waiting for the right river conditions. But there are also salmon to be had in the depths of winter. Known by the contradictory name of winter springs, these are US chinook whose ocean-going lives bring them north. The first can show up as early as the end of November, but the peak is February and March when the herring come in to spawn. They generally run up to 15-lbs. but you just might be lucky enough to tie into an exceptional one weighing 30-lbs. The herring also pull in sea lions and seals which in turn draws in the orcas. But while salmon remain a big draw, the popularity continued on page 10

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business & Pleasure Guide 2012

continued from page 9 of halibut has been growing over the years. Apart from the mellower taste, they offer the chance of a true monster of the deep. Given halibut are the scavengers of the sea and “fish follow fish,” experienced operators pin down August and early September as the best times to pursue them in close to Kitimat. Add ling cod, red snappers, crab and prawns and you sense there’s a wealth of opportunity simply waiting for you. As for the sights? One of the many remarkable views is Jesse Falls, just 13 nautical miles south of town on the Douglas Channel. It is the outfall of Jesse Lake, a 5-NM-long millpond that is dammed by a natural rock dike which rises just above the high water mark and over which massive volumes of water tumble into the channel. One of the other unique features of the salt chuck are the natural hotsprings. If, heading south from Kitimat you take Devastation Channel instead of the Douglas, the first one you come across is Weewanie, just under 19NM from town. Pull into the cove and you’ll see the hotsprings hut to your left. There’s also room to camp and picnic. We’ve only scratched the surface here, but you get the idea.

Running wild

Above, Dougie Reid snapped this amazing photo of a not-at-all camera shy wolf. Below, one of the best places to spot the famed Kermodei is down channel at Gribbell Island where 30 per cent of the black bear population carries the recessive gene that creates a “Spirit Bear”. That’s where New Brunswick visitor Mike Donavan got this photo.

MEN’S & LADIES’

HAIR STYLING 250-632-5552 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK WALK-INS WELCOME SENIOR’S RATE

Lower 211 City Centre Mall, Kitimat

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2012

The Great Outdoors

A great place to hit the trail Locals are sure to say that one of the joys of Kitimat life is the abundance of hiking opportunities just outside their doorsteps.

the park off the highway, just before the Hirsch Creek Bridge on the way into town, take a right at a fork in the road and watch out for the trail signs. Once at the trail head you’re set for a relaxing 15 or 30 minute walk in the forest. Notwithstanding the leisurely Those seeking the refreshment strolls on Kitimat’s many sidewalks — which take you behind our of cold glacial water can set out neighbourhoods to parks and open for Humphrey Creek Falls. About 16-kms north out of town you take green spaces — there is a whole the first gravel road on the right after network of trails to explore just the Humphrey Creek bridge, then minutes away. the second right once on that road. Take the Hirsch Creek Park When you run out of road, there’s a trails for example. An easy set of trails, families can simply pull into short trail to the canyon and the falls

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which send up a constant plume of spray. You can walk to the top of the falls, but be careful if you have small children with you – there are no fences and it’s quite a drop to the pool below. Another spectacular view awaits at the Hirsch Creek Canyon. This one is a 6-km (approximately three hour) return trip, but the trail is again an easy one, climbing only 100-m throughout its length. The trail begins at the highway on the Kitimat side of the Hirsch Continued on page 12

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

from page 11 Creek bridge and follows the creek to a ledge overlooking the canyon. Kitamaat Village Road takes you to the Robinson Lake trail. After driving along that road for about two and a half kilometres, turn left after crossing Cordella Creek into a gravel pit. Head up to the right, following the road for another 0.7-km and you’ll reach the trail head. Rated moderate, the 4-km trail takes you past a series of small lakes. Hike time is about 5-7 hours. Although the last 1.5 km can be very wet, most of that problem has been taken care of by the construction of a raised wooden walkway. If the alpine and views over the Kitimat Valley and Douglas Channel are what you seek, try the Clague Mountain trail (locals pronounce it Clack). From the Service Centre, head

north along Enterprise Avenue until you reach the gravel logging road. Follow that for about a kilometre then turn left and follow the side road 2km to the trail head. It’s a difficult 6km hike with a return time of 8-10 hours, but is well worth the effort. Looking for an even greater challenge? Then the steep and difficult Mount Elizabeth trail is for you. Drive north out of Kitimat for approximately 7.5km, then turn right just south of where the transmission lines cross Hwy 37. Follow the gravel logging road for 13.5km. From there, a narrow 4WD road runs 2.5km to the trail head. A hike of 6km gets you to the alpine and panoramic views from what’s called Little Elizabeth. If you want to tackle the peak, it’s due east of you, but be very aware you are now essentially mountaineering -

you will be traversing an exposed ridge that is at points extremely narrow. Therefore we urge you not to try for the peak unless properly equipped and the weather is absolutely clear. For a full list of trails in the area pick up a brochure from the Visitor Information Centre on the way into town. 293 City Centre Kitimat, BC 250-632-7429

Kitimat Museum & Archives

Visit our

Museum Displays and Gift Shop! Open 10:00 am to 5 pm Monday through Saturday June to August

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We are BC's very own food people. Prepared Meals Fresh Meats Barbeque Supplies Camping Supplies Phone Cards and so much more!

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2012

The Great Outdoors

A true north getaway While Kitimat is not short of excellent motel accommodations, it can also meet your needs if you prefer to “rough it.” Operated by the city, Radley Park is the community’s premier campground, superbly located a literal stone’s throw from the banks of the river. And yet it is also only a couple of minutes from all the amenities of

the downtown area. Set amongst trees, the sites come equipped with fire pits and picnic tables with sturdy shelters and plenty of supplied firewood. There are electrical hook-ups available at a number of sites and the washroom facilities include coin-operated showers. And there is a sani-dump, fishcleaning station and even a smoker for your catches of the day. Believe it or not, Radley Park is so appealing even local residents frequently camp there for

a weekend. Many visitors like to get even closer to their chosen fishing spots by camping on the banks of the Kitimat River itself. However, in consideration of other anglers and the environment, you are asked to make camp at least 30 metres from the water’s edge. For those who really want to get away from it all, the Kitimat Valley has several Forest Recreation rustic campsites such as Mount Elizabeth, Deception Lake, Enso Park and West Lake.

inette M BAY LODGE Kitimat, British Columbia www.minettebaylodge.com

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xperience the ultimate of northwest hospitality, set at the mouth of the Douglas Channel, among the old growth forest. Feather beds and down quilts ensure comfort in rooms overlooking creeks, forests or the ocean. Enjoy a delicious breakfast outside on the deck, perhaps witness a deer or moose walking by, and listen to the silence. The library or sitting room, accented with a cozy fireplace, is a spot to relax or email home accessing wireless internet. If you’re looking for adventure, that can surely be arranged – heli hiking, kayaking, bear viewing, or just good old fishing. Don’t miss these experiences of a lifetime. Contact us today.

Minette

BAY LODGE 2255 Kitamaat Village Road tel 250.632.2907 fax 250.632.2903 info@minettebaylodge.com

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

It didn’t require a trek through the bush to get this picture of three cubs out on a stroll.

Mind the bear necessities Visitors to Kitimat should always remember there’s a large local black bear population and, although less numerous, grizzly bears also frequent the area. Campsites, with their food and cooking smells and garbage, are very attractive. So it’s not unusual for campsites to receive visits from hungry – or just plain curious – bears. That means being “Bear Aware” is a necessary approach in every campsite. The following are a few simple common sense rules that can reduce the risk of a confrontation. ❑ Don’t provide an attraction to bears by leaving food unattended on the picnic tables. Ensure coolers, barbecues and other cooking utensils are kept in safe storage. ❑ Store food in your camper or in the trunk of your vehicle in airtight containers. ❑ Cooking or eating inside a tent could be an invitation to a hungry bear to join you.

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❑ Respect bears and never feed them. ❑ Use a flashlight when moving about your campsite after dark. Of course, your selected fishing hole may also be a bruin’s favourite spot as well. Believe it or not, there have in the past been instances of some anglers refusing to give ground when a bear showed up on the gravel beach where they were fishing. As a conservation officer pointed out at the time, the bear is only doing what comes naturally. He accordingly advised people to move on and let it do just that. Good advice, because no-one wins an argument with a bear about who was there first. When walking trails, whether fishing or hiking, be sure to make noise. Most bears will leave if aware of your presence. Also keep an eye open for “evidence” of a bear’s passing. Be especially alert when travelling into the wind – a bear may not get your scent until it’s too late. Bear attacks are extremely rare around here. And a few sensible precautions will ensure they stay that way.

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2012

The Great Outdoors

Winter wonderland The name for the community comes from Git-a-maat, the Tsimshian description of the Haisla and meaning “People of the Snow.” And the city’s symbol is an aluminum snowflake. So you won’t be surprised to find that, yes, we do have real winters here. And the arrival of the white stuff is welcomed by countless Kitimatians. Picture this: it’s a crisp, blue sky day and the snow is gently packed and fast. A pair of cross country skiers round the corner and silently glide down a slope, following a trail that weaves through a tall stand of evergreens.

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Up ahead a moose appears from the bush, ambles across the trail and disappears into the trees. Welcome to Onion Lake ski trails, home of the Snow Valley Nordic Ski Club. Laid out by a professional, the trails run over a variety of terrains, ensuring that there is something to suit skiers of all skill levels. With so much snowfall, we do much more than simply ski. Take the Kitimat Snowmobile Club. The group takes responsibility for two wilderness cabins, one atop Robinson Ridge and the other on the Clague (pronounced Clack) Mountain trail. The public is invited to use both cabins, but people are asked to leave them as they found them. Haven’t caught your fancy yet? How about snowboarding? When snowbound, the golf course is a favourite destination for boarders. And if they are looking for more

challenging conditions, they head for Shames Mountain, the regional ski hill near Terrace. Amazingly, the heli-skiing potential of our local mountains (photo below) was only “discovered” a few years back, and that business has, if you’ll pardon the pun, really taken off. Not that we spend all winter outside. And we wouldn’t be Canadian if that didn’t mean hockey and curling. The Tamitik arena — a facility that stuns visiting players from much larger communities — is home to Kitimat Minor Hockey, the Senior Men’s league’s Ice Demons and the Snow Valley Skating club. Then there’s the curling sheets at the Hirsch Creek Golf and Winter Club offering regular leagues and the full range of bonspiels. With all that, how could we ever get cabin fever?

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business & Pleasure Guide 2012

Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business & Pleasure Guide 2012

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KITIMAT ARM

Kitamaat Village Marina

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

Dragons ns in the water Fear not, Kitimat’s dragons are a friendly bunch, as you’ll find out if you take in this year’s Community Dragon Boat Races. Each July at Minette Bay, located a few clicks down Kitamaat Village Road, paddlers from throughout the region join in good-natured competition and fun that has been the hallmark of the event since it started six years ago. Dragon Boat racing here began with the female Northern Spirit team which paddled to conspicuous success at the Dragon Boat festival in Vancouver. Their desire to get as many people as possible involved led to this event which is now a popular

mainstay of our summer calendar. Ruth Mills, a founding member of the Spirit squad, says the benefit of the sport is that anybody can get involved. “There are no age or fitness limits, somebody with no experience can do it.� And that has been demonstrated each year with the entry of teams that until then had never been on the water in a dragon boat. Which is what puts “Community� in the name of the event.

This year’s event will see 12 teams from Kitimat, Terrace and Kitamaat Village compete, four at a time. There will be delicious food and craft vendors, a beer garden and music playing all day. Parking is extremely limited at Minette Bay so organizers have put on a shuttle bus service from Christ the King Church. For details on this event, check with the Kitimat Visitor Information Centre on the way into town.

Bay Marina Fisherman’s Pier

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18

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2012

Our Summers Are Eventful

Spirit of the Kitlope dancers celebrate after being awarded first place in the Service Group division in the Canada Day parade.

The northwest’s biggest party When it comes to celebrating Canada’s birthday, nowhere in the Northwest does it like Kitimat. Which is why every year our party draws visitors from across the region. Making sure the day-long celebration gets off to a satisfying start will be the Kitimat Kiwanis club with its delicious pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. until 11 a.m. At 12 noon the Kitimat Kinsmen’s Club parade takes pride of place as it meanders through the cheering throngs from Mountainview Square to the Riverlodge Community Centre. This the sixteenth consecutive year the Kinsmen have organized the parade and this year the theme is ‘Canadian Spirit’. Spectators can be sure of a colourful and imaginative show as floats, bikes, horses and marching groups vie for the awards that will be handed out once it’s all over. By which www.northernsentinel.com

time you’ll probably be ready to eat again, and the International Food Fair offers just what you need. The array of ethnic delicacies available - reflecting the multicultural character of Kitimat - has rightly made this event famous. But leave room for a piece of the giant birthday cake offered by the Girl Guides Trefoil Guild which can be found in the Riverlodge gym. Now settle back and enjoy a stage show featuring numerous talented entertainers from the area, including singers, musicians and dancers. The stage show program also takes time to honour and recognize individuals and groups for community service and achievements at provincial, national and international levels in sports and the arts. But wait, there’s more. The Kids Fun Zone will have activities for kids of all ages including face painting, pie in the face, balloons, clowns and tons of prizes. And the day will wind up with an explosive fireworks finale. For the official schedule check the Festivals Kitimat office in the lower City Centre Mall.

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

t s e eight seconds g The lon It takes only eight seconds for a ride to end, but before it does these cowboys come away bruised, dizzy, and most often ready for more. Now in its fourth year, the community’s famous Bull-O-Rama returns on June 9. Everyone is invited to buy some tickets and watch cowboys strain to hold on to 800 pounds of bucking steer. Oh, and mind those horns. The action is fast and furious and the bruises are real. Hosted at Kitimat’s impressive Tamitik arena, Bull-O-Rama transforms the facility from ice to dirt especially for this event. Every seat is close to the action and there are refreshment areas available for adults. Rodeo funny man Tyson Wagner, from Saskatchewan, will be this year’s rodeo clown. Other attractions at the event include the llama chase for the kids. Yes you heard it correctly, a llama! Live music will be provided by country artist Rick Stavely. Profits from Bull-O-Rama are given to local worthy causes. The Snowflake Community Fairgrounds Society, the

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group which puts together this event each year, will use the money raised to maintain and overhaul the Kitimat Fairgrounds, just outside of town. Bull-O-Rama will also be a fundraising platform for other groups, from the local animal shelter to the ice skating club. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Kitimat General Hospital Foundation for health care services. Tickets for the event are

SNOW VALLEY

available at Kal Tire (Kitimat and Terrace), Cooks Jewelers (Kitimat and Terrace) and locally at Pyramid Office Supplies and the Kitimat Chamber of Commerce; you can call them at 250-632-6294 for more information.

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KITIMAT

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Lynn Boudreau

538 Mountainview Square Kitimat BC OPEN Monday to Saturday and LATE on Fridays Tel/Fax

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2012

Our Summers Are Eventful

Above, Julie Wakita was understandably happy with this beauty coho, caught out on the chuck. At left, Noah Groves displays a priceless expression as he shows off his prize winning catch at last year’s Fish Derby.

Derby lures anglers Catching the big one is always a thrill. Even more-so when it comes with a $1,000 cheque. And that’s the prize for the lucky anglers who weigh in the biggest coho and biggest halibut in this year’s 25th annual Fish Derby. The Chamber of Commerce and District of Kitimat event takes place on September 1 and 2. Last year Noah Groves pulled in the biggest coho at 15lbs 1 oz. That fish also earned him the biggest catch in the junior category. Kelly Houston’s 14lb halibut earned him the prize in that division. Julie Wakita won the women’s division with her 12lbs 2oz coho. But the great thing about this derby is you don’t have to catch

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a fish to win a prize – in fact you don’t even have to get your line wet. That’s because all derby ticket holders have a chance of winning one of the more than 100 prizes donated by local businesses. In the past those have included fishing gear, gift certificates, clothing, free accommodation at our finest establishments, – well, you get the idea. This prize draw was introduced years back when, with conservation in mind and ahead of the curve in that area, organizers decided to end the hidden weight system. Food and refreshments are also available on Sunday along with the Fish Stock music festival in the upper City Centre Mall parking lot with both beer and ‘root beer’ gardens. For final details on the weekend’s schedule, just drop in at the Chamber of Commerce’s Visitor Centre.

Your Special Touch

Florist

Come and see Rachael for Fresh Flower Arrangements; or find something from the great selection of Giftware available, of Garden Accents, Home Decor. We have flowers and so much more!

Dee’s Flowers across from the Chalet

Flowers for every occassion. 317 City Centre, Kitimat Tel. 250-632-2311 raepressacco@hotmail.com Open Tue. to Fri. 9am to 5:30pm Saturday 11am to 5pm Sun., Mon. and Holidays CLOSED

~ WE DELIVER ~

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

Worship Together Christ the King Catholic Church

KITIMAT

PENTECOSTAL F E L LOWSH WSHII P

1760 Nalabila Blvd. Ph. 250 632-2215 www.catholickitimat.net

Celebration of the Eucharist SATURDAYS 7:30 pm

SUNDAYS 10:00 am

(ages 5-11) Jesus Fun • Music Crafts • Games

2012 Joint Summer Services at 10:00 am (July 1 at 9:30) July Services at First United Church (Kingfisher and Albatross Avenues) August Services at Kitimat Presbyterian Church “Come and join our church family.”

Pacific Cornerstone Baptist Church Sunday Mornings at 11 am

www.mountainviewalliance.ca

Summer Hours (July & August) 6:30 pm Kitimat Chamber of Commerce Meeting Room

1332 Lahakas North Ph. 250 632-4658

Welcome to our new Pastor

PASTOR PAUL LAGACE

Worship Service and Kids Program 10:30 am

Starting Sunday evening, July 1 Salvation by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone, to the Glory of God alone!

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GREAT COMMANDMENT PEOPLE LIVING GREAT COMMISSION LIVES.

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SUNDAY

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Mountain View Alliance Church

K

1274 Nalabila Boulevard Ph. 250 632-2044 or 250 632-2568

10:30 am WORSHIP SERVICE AND SUNDAY SCHOOL

“Where everyone is someone, and Jesus is LORD!”

July 9 to 13

Presbyterian Church

1340 Kingfisher • 250 632-5623 Pastor Mickeal Hoffman email: pastrrrmike@telus.net

Worship & Kids Church 10:30 am

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

KITIMAT

T

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For more information call 250-632-4924

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in Kitimat

Sentinel

Northern

The Northern 626 Enterprise Avenue, Kitimat BC V8C 2K6 tel 250-632-6144 fax 250-639-9373 advertising@northernsentinel.com newsroom@northernsentinel.com classifieds@northernsentinel.com

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2012

An Enviable Lifestyle

It doesn’t get better than this

East Indian dancers brighten the Luso Canadian Hall with their traditional dancing at the Kitimat Multicultural Society’s annual potluck dinner.

Big city dwellers likely assume that Kitimatians, living “way up north,” have to accept sacrifices when it comes to quality of life. We forgive them. After all, if they haven’t lived here how would they know? Obviously, our location means we are surrounded by Super Natural British Columbia. Imagine you found yourself standing at the edge of a clear, fish-filled creek, perhaps watching a bald eagle circling above in search of a meal, and at your back the

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towering trees of the famed coastal rain forest. Would you be likely to believe that just over the hill that is the opposite bank of Hirsch Creek was a city of 9,000 and one of the largest industrial complexes in Canada? Or you’re fishing the Kitimat River at a popular spot called the Lower Dyke. Out of the bush on the other side appears a sow black bear and her two cubs. They work their way down, the mother fishing and the cubs offering huge entertainment as they struggle with the conflicting desire to join her and fear of the deep water she is in. What else would you expect in the wilds of the northwest?

Except, just behind the trees on the opposite bank is the methanol and condensate import tank farm. If Kitimatians want to “leave it all behind,” they can be in the bush in just minutes. And if they don’t, the bush will come to them. That apparent contradiction – living in a modern, industrialized community while able to enjoy all that Mother Nature has to offer is one of the main reasons so many people who came here “just for a couple of years” are still here decades later. Granted, it takes 45 minutes continued on page 24

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

from page 22 to drive to the nearest community. But then it takes that long for a lot of people elsewhere to drive to work each day – and they don’t get to enjoy the same fantastic scenery on the way. Well, being way up here we must be culturally deprived? Far from it. Thanks to the sterling work of the Kitimat Concert Association and the Friends of the Mount Elizabeth Theatre, each year we have an opportunity to enjoy performances by internationally-acclaimed vocalists, musicians, dancers and theatre troupes. And through the annual Multicultural Potluck and Entertainment and the International Food Fairs at the Spring and Christmas fairs we get to enjoy an ethnic diversity usually found only in the metropolitan jungles. We are also an extraordinarily generous community. The Relay for Life has in the past 11 years raised more than $1 million for the fight against cancer, an

Ladies Gym MJ’s

extraordinary amount given the size of our community. And after 30 years the Aluminum City Telethon, held each October, remains the most successful in North America in terms of the amount it raises per capita. One of the often under-rated pluses that comes from living in a community like ours is you are not just one more ant running around in a concrete colony. Here, we are neighbours. We run into each other in the produce aisle of a local supermarket, when we go out for a meal or take in a soccer or softball game at Riverlodge. Because of the kind of community we are – and the way it is designed – Kitimat was from the beginning touted as a good place to raise children. That hasn’t changed. Which is why there are people born and raised here who are now raising their own children in our fair city. And why they intend to stay here in retirement. You have to live here to appreciate all we’ve got. And we do.

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2012

An Enviable Lifestyle

Community snapshots

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

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2012

An Enviable Lifestyle

As can be seen from this overhead shot of the foyer, Kitimat General Hospital was designed to be light and airy.

Spend your best years in Kitimat Retirees looking for an affordable, active, west coast retirement find it in Kitimat. Not only is it a retirement paradise for sportfishermen, it’s an ideal retirement location for outdoor enthusiasts of all kinds. They enjoy boating on the Douglas Channel, hiking, kayaking, cross country skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, ATVing, hunting, camping and golfing. Those who prefer the indoors also find much to keep them busy and happy. Kitimat has outstanding recreational facilities

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including a state of the art aquatic centre, a 2,000 seat arena, a curling rink, library, museum, busy seniors centre, and a recreation centre with a wide range of programs. Yoga, anyone? How about water colour painting or salsa dancing? More than 60 clubs and organizations provide opportunities for fun, learning and socializing. Affordability is also a big draw! Housing prices are amazingly low in contrast to many other communities. Property taxes are low and municipal utility fees are only $200 a year. Winters are milder than in inland areas so heating costs are lower than in most parts of Canada.

The membership fees at the 18 hole golf course are very affordable. Kitimat’s new hospital opened in 2001. Family doctors, dentists, optometrists and a chiropractor are available. Everything is only a short drive or walk away in our safe and friendly planned community with lots of green spaces, 45 kilometres of walkways and quiet looped residential streets. Interested? Find out more at www.retirekitimat.ca or phone 250-632-8900 for an information package or to book a discovery tour.

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

Let the good times roll The economy of Kitimat is looking up with billions of dollars of investment coming this way. More than 200 people packed the dining hall of the construction camp of Rio Tinto Alcan last December as Jean Simon, president of Primary Metal, said the magic words: “Ladies and gentlemen, this is formally a go.” Simon told the crowd that the Rio Tinto board of directors had officially approved an additional $2.7 billion to take the smelter modernization to completion. Those words were the start of

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good times for Kitimat which is in the midst of its biggest construction boom in decades. Rio Tinto Alcan’s aluminum smelter is the centre piece of Kitimat’s industry. In the ‘50s, when the company was then just called Alcan, their smelter was the start of the entire community of Kitimat. Now the billions being invested will mean a new, state of the art facility. The new plant will have only four pot buildings instead of the original six but they will produce 420,000 tonnes of metal a year. The old smelter was producing about 225,000 tonnes. (Incidentally, the very latest technology used in the new smelter

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28

will see emissions from the plant drop by 40 per cent). “Once completed, Kitimat will be one of the lowest cost smelters in the world,” said Simon at the big announcement. It would also guarantee 1,000 long term jobs while generating many spin-offs for local businesses and the community as well as tax revenues for the municipality. Kitimat Mayor Joanne Monaghan said RTA’s initial multi-million dollar investments in KMP had let the world know that Kitimat was “a strategic place to invest.” Michel Lamarre, RTA’s project director for the modernisation, said first metal in the new smelter will be poured in the first half of 2014.

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Advanced Metals Processing Technology 221 Enterprise Avenue Kitimat BC V8C 2C8 Ph 250-632-2717 Fax 250-632-2719

www.pyrotek.info Celebrating 20 years in Kitimat www.northernsentinel.com


2012

Industry Meets Nature

Life’s a gas in Kitimat Economic development is an unstoppable machine in Kitimat these days as the town is flooded with proposals and possibilities for development. The latest news to make this community buzz is Shell Canada announcing their partnership to develop a liquefied natural gas [LNG] plant. The proposal, called LNG Canada, could be the largest LNG operation in Kitimat. Shell will own 40 per cent of the company, with KoreaGas Corporation, Mitsubishi Corporation and PetroChina Ltd each owning 20 per cent. LNG Canada will initially

consist of two LNG processing units referred to as “trains�, each with the capacity to produce six million tonnes of LNG annually, with an option to expand the project in the future, the company says. This would be the third LNG plant for the Kitimat area, and the largest. Kitimat Mayor Joanne Monaghan said that the project would need between 5,000 and 7,000 workers, as well as hundreds upon hundreds of permanent jobs. Shell is making use of a former Kitimat industry, the site of the Methanex plant, to build the facility. After some hard economic times, Monaghan said this news shows the community getting back to vibrancy.

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Kitimat Northern Sentinel Business, Pleasure & Fishing Guide 2012

There’s still more on the way There is so much going on in this town it’s hard to keep up with exactly what’s happening.

Kitimat LNG This project involves building a plant to liquefy natural gas and export the LNG to Pacific Rim countries. To get the natural gas to Kitimat from the gas fields in Northeast BC, a 470 kilometre pipeline - called the Pacific Trails Pipeline - will be built to connect to the existing Spectra Energy Westcoast Pipeline system near Prince George. Both the proposed LNG plant and the pipeline are owned 40 per

cent by Apache Canada, 30 per cent by EOG Resources and 30 per cent by Encana. The company is still in the midst of doing their front-end engineering and design studies (called FEEDs). When that is done, and with their export approval received, the company has given clear indications a decision on whether to proceed will be made later this year. If construction begins next year — preliminary site work is already going on — the plant would be in production by 2015. The plant will export 5 million tonnes of LNG a year but this is only the first phase. Apache has indicated that once the first “train” is built it expects to immediately begin

construction on the second, doubling production.

BC LNG Export Co-operative The project, a partnership of the local Haisla Nation and LNG Partners LLC of Texas, is somewhat different — and smaller — than Kitimat LNG.

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2012

The plan is to have a barge-based plant which will be grounded at a site on the west side of the Douglas Channel, about halfway between the RTA smelter and the proposed Northern Gateway oil terminal. Given the limit of capacity of the PNG line, production would be 700,000 tonnes per annum.

Northern Gateway Project This Enbridge project would build two pipelines from Edmonton to Kitimat and a terminal including a tank farm here. One pipeline would carry an average of 525,000 barrels of bitumen per day from east to west and the other 193,000 barrels of condensate — a diluent for raw Alberta oil sands product - from west to east. The pipelines would be 1,172 kilometres in length. The $5.5 billion project is currently before the Joint Review Panel, a process that will still take some

Industry Meets Nature

time to complete. After the panel has delivered its findings, it will be up to the federal government to make the final call on whether it proceeds. It must be noted that Northern Gateway, unlike the LNG projects, is facing significant and persistent opposition from environmental groups and First Nations, including the Haisla.

Sandhill Materials The company had plans to export aggregate from our huge Sandhill - it is estimated there is 93 million tonnes of sand and gravel there - to markets in California and Hawaii. The materials were to be used in construction and housing. But the housing crash in the US put a hold on this project being taken any further. However, the resource is still here and a construction turnaround south of the border could quickly breathe life back into the project.

250

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Tourism Guide - 2012 Kitimat Business Pleasure and Fishing Guide