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Historic memories

A risky mix

S.S. Beaver medal brings back plenty of memories for an Oak Bay woman. Page A3

Mixing energy drinks and alcohol boosts dangerous behaviour, says a UVic researcher. Page A13

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Watch for breaking news at www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

New site eyed for tennis bubble Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Tour de Oak Bay

Continued from Page A1

A group of cyclists ride along Beach Drive during the annual Ryder Hesjedal’s Tour de Victoria on Sunday. More than 1,500 riders took part in the mass cycling event, which featured 140-kilometre, 100k or 50k routes.

OAK

BAY

tomf@vreb.bc.ca

Concerns over Bowker Creek could see the tennis venue moved at Oak Bay Recreation Centre. With a target of 2013, Oak Bay must rally the options for replacement of the tennis bubble that boasts four courts. Oak Bay council was already considering upgrades and replacement on site, and offered some ideas to the parks and recreation commission: replacing the bubble at the current site; replacing at an alternative site; replacement with a permanent structure on site; and replace with a permanent structure on another site. “They’ve now asked for some information on trying to site it elsewhere on the property,” said Ray Herman, parks and recreation director. “Now is an opportunity to explore options and determine what the most feasible options are and what they might cost.” PLEASE SEE: Tennis bubble’s, Page A7

A rare find offering FOUR good size full height bedrooms upstairs including a master bedroom with ensuite!! This home has been nicely updated and is absolutely spotless and ready to move in. Located on one of Oak Bays most sought after streets, and adjacent to a Garry Oak preserve which offers privacy and space. The home has a great plan such as a family room off the kitchen that opens onto a fantastic deck with access to the yard, a 5 bedroom/den, formal living room and dining room, as well as lots of room downstairs for a growing family, hobbies or just great storage. This home really is a rare find! Offered at $899,000

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A2 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

OAK BAY NEWS -

BAY NEWS

www.oakbaynews.com • A27

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

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OAK BAY NEWS -

www.oakbaynews.com • A27

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Medal ignites memories Great-granddaughter of former steamship captain hopes spirit of S.S. Beaver continues Brittany Lee News staff

Dagmar Haupthoff slowly flips through the pages of a book written about her great-grandfather, John Swanson. The text, which was never published, is about five centimetres thick and looks like it belongs in a high school classroom. The book, Captain John Swanson and the Hudson’s Bay Company in Frontier B.C. 1842-1872, was given to Haupthoff as a gift from author Lloyd Bailey many years ago. It’s one of the few things she has left that connects her to Swanson. Swanson was a captain of the S.S. Beaver, a steamship built by the British in 1835 and used as a floating trading post for the Hudson’s Bay Company in parts of B.C. The Beaver was the first steamship on the West Coast. It came to Victoria in 1843, leading James Douglas to the site chosen for Fort Victoria. During the gold rush, the boat transported people between Victoria and the Lower Mainland, and was later used as a tug and transport vessel. It operated for 17 years, before it ran aground at Prospect Point in Stanley Park in 1888. Haupthoff’s Oak Bay home is decorated with paintings of ships, such as the Beaver, and Indian-inspired portraits. A lamp resembling a captain’s wheel sits

on a small table. Above her couch a model of a ship is on display. Haupthoff, who is in her 80s, was never told much about her great-grandfather. Her grandmother Emily Caroline Bendrodt, the daughter of Capt. Swanson, didn’t talk about him, she says. Swanson married a woman named Hytah from an Alaskan First Nation known as Tlingit. “(In those days) some of the families, including my own, were ashamed of that, that they had married out of their colour, and I think that’s why I didn’t hear about it from any of my family,” Haupthoff says. The stories that Haupthoff knows of her great-grandparents come from books that she’s read and stories other people have told her. One memory she has from her childhood is digging through a chest in her old family home on Quebec Street. “Up on the second floor there was a big chest. … It was coloured in orange and it had Indian motifs on it,” she says. “I used to love, as a child, to go and look in this chest because there were all kinds of interesting things in there.” Haupthoff later discovered that the chest belonged to her great-grandmother. It was her hope chest, Haupthoff explains, a trunk full of belongings that she kept to bring with her into her marriage.

Brittany Lee/News staff

Oak Bay resident Dagmar Haupthoff has a family connection to S.S. Beaver Capt. John Swanson Once the family home was sold, Haupthoff assumed the chest went along with it. “I often think about it, the hope chest,” she says. “It probably went with the house, and I find that very disturbing, that (my aunt) didn’t keep that.” Haupthoff does, however, have a few souvenirs to remind her of her greatgrandfather. She places two brooches on the kitchen table. One is made out of granite found by Swanson, and one is made of copper from the Beaver. Her father had the granite brooch made for her and a matching ring made for himself, she explains. “I don’t wear it very much,” she adds. “I should wear it more often.” The other pin, which displays the Beaver, she received from a lady who

has a matching necklace, Haupthoff says. This fall, copper medals, similar to the piece that Haupthoff has, will be awarded to individuals making outstanding maritime achievements in B.C. The Maritime Museum of B.C. introduced the S.S. Beaver Medal for Maritime Excellence early this year. The deadline for nominations is Friday (June 29). With few relatives left, Haupthoff hopes the medal will help keep the story of the Beaver alive. “I think it’s a great idea,” she says. “We have to keep the local history in the forefront to remind the young people of the sacrifices made by the pioneers (of our country).” For details about the medal and nominations, see mmbc.bc.ca. reporter@vicnews.com

POLICE NEWS IN BRIEF

Doorbell ringer could be scouting Police are warning residents to be wary after a teen repeatedly rang a doorbell in the Cubbon Drive and Hampshire Road area. Around 11 p.m. on June 23, police were called after a resident opened the door and saw a boy holding what appeared to be a crow bar. The teen indicated that someone was after him and quickly fled, police say. The teen is described as having olive skin and about five-foot eightinches tall. Police say he may have been looking for an unoccupied residence to enter.

Party call nets unlicensed driver A 20-year-old driver will have his day in court after police saw him run a stop sign. Oak Bay officers were investigating a noisy party complaint in the 2700-block of Eastdowne Rd. on June 20 when they spotted a vehicle skip a stop sign. Officers saw signs of impairment and suspended the driver’s licence for 24 hours. The man was also issued a court appearance notice for driving with a cancelled licence.

Vandals strike police car Oak Bay police continue to investigate

vandalism of one of its own vehicles. While investigating a noise complaint in Carnarvon Park area on June 20, the police vehicle was spray painted.

Stolen goods recovered in park A stolen purse made its way back to its owner last week. The purse was discovered in Anderson Hill Park on June 19 after being stolen from a nearby residence overnight. The suspects entered the home through an insecure garage door. Police later recovered a stolen electric bicycle taken from the garage of the same home. Several unrelated vehicles were also entered in the Newport area that night.

Pot stop means suspended licence Officers at a Foul Bay Road checkpoint stopped a driver smoking pot on June 19. The driver had his licence suspended and the vehicle impounded.

Got a story? Share it with readers of the Oak Bay News. You can contact editor Laura Lavin in several ways: ■ Email: editor@ oakbaynews.com. ■ Phone: 250-381-3633 (Local 3239 ■ Office: 818 Broughton St. in downtown Victoria

Best of the City unveiled soon Watch this Friday’s paper for your copy of our annual best-of magazine Christine van Reeuwyk News staff

An amazing city like Victoria always holds out a few select secrets, and who better to help expose them than the people who live here. Chosen by readers, the annual Best of the City magazine highlights those tantalizing tidbits of information for residents and visitors. “The publication brings together readers and advertisers to showcase the people and places that exemplify the best Greater Victoria has to offer,” said Kevin Laird, Black Press editorial director. “After nearly 20 years, it’s become expected and anticipated as an annual guide to all that is good about the city.” This year’s Best of the City magazine and survey is published Friday (June 29) as a special supple-

ment to the News. From favourite place to snag a great martini after work to the best shops for outfitting a home, the magazine provides wide insight. Each year newcomers make the list, as do longtime favourites. Rebar Modern Food has taken top spot in the hearts of many seeking vegetarian fare over the years, earning the nod in 2010 and 2011. “When we get these awards it’s just satisfaction knowing that we started off with a plan and we’ve kept to it,” said Billy Hilton, who’s been with the Bastion Square eatery for 21 years. He still remembers the inaugural Best of the City awards. “It’s nice that people choose us and vote for us, because it’s nice to hear that people still love us after all these years.” For meat eaters it’s been about

the burgers at Pink Bicycle on Blanshard Street. “We don’t prompt our patrons, so it was a surprise the first time we got one,” said Morgan Hradecky, who owns the restaurant with wife and partner Jennifer Hobbins. They’ve won the best burger category each year since they opened in 2008. “We’re patiently waiting for this year. We’re biting our nails,” Hradecky said. “We’d love to win it again, there’s good products out there … but we’re pretty hopeful.” Award winners learn their fate Thursday; readers can snag an issue of the News on Friday morning to discover who they voted the best of the best. The magazine can also be picked up at our business offices at 818 Broughton St. or on the West Shore at 117-777 Goldstream Ave. cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

True alley cats Hopper, left, and his brother, Elwood, watch the world go by from a doorway in Fan Tan Alley. The narrow shopping area is always among readers’ favourites in Best of the City.


A4 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Swim and win to celebrate summer

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Start summer with a pair of swims Friday (June 29) at Oak Bay recreation centre. As schools let out, the pool’s ready to welcome kids to 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. swims filled with games and prizes to start the summer season.

Trust Your Hearing to An Audiologist Edward Storzer, M.Sc., Registered Audiologist,

A family pass is $14. Recreation Oak Bay is providing a number of activities over the summer months from swimming to summer camps. For details, please go online to recreation.oakbaybc.org.

has been a practicing audiologist with us for nine years. He first worked with the McNeill Audiology team during a summer externship as a graduate student in the UBC audiology program. He has undertaken research and

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"If you informally gather a group (at the park), you may show up there and find a group that actually does have a permit to have an activity on the park." The proper process to get an activity approved involves approaching the commission with an idea, discussing it at the commission's monthly Brittany Lee meeting, and then waiting for approval, according News staff to Ray Herman, director of parks and recreation. Any questions the commission has would be An attempt to introduce free yoga at Willows asked during the meeting, he said, and pros and Park has been anything but a walk in the park for cons would be discussed before a decision is organizers. made. Free yoga classes, mentioned in an article Pete Rose, who organized the yoga sessions, printed in the News on June 22, will not be held said he approached Herman with the idea in April this summer, as the organizer does not have per- but was denied because he initially suggested the mission from the Oak Bay parks and recreation yoga classes be by donation. commission to do so. Rose was advised, at the time, that his idea may The parks bylaw states that no person shall not be supported by commission staff, Herman give private instruction, operate a recreational said. program, or operate, stage, or present a tourna"From a staff perspective, we wouldn't support ment on or in any park, or in any indoor or out- what he was proposing at that time, which was door municipal recreation facilities, except with different than what he's proposing now," Herman the written permission of the commission. said. The bylaw ensures there isn't an overflow of "Even if I wanted to, I don't have the authority people using one space at the same time, accord- to grant him approval to conduct that activity in ing to Janet Barclay, manager of recreation pro- the park. That has to come forward in the comgram services. mission." Co-ordination and permission is needed for such Herman then suggested Rose bring his idea foractivities, she said. ward to the commission, Herman said. However, that did not happen. "I left it with him, in his hands," Herman said. Rose said he was told by Oak Bay Coun. Tara Ney, who is commission liaison, that he could move forward with his proposal if he provided the activity for free. But now, Rose is "backing off" and waitPrint lab quality prints in ing for the next commisminutes, from memory sion meeting in Septemcards, USB drives, ber to try again. However, an informal bluetooth for camera gathering of yogis may phones, and more. be found at the beach in coming weeks. Facial retouch, red eye "I'm personally backand pet eye reduction ing off. But there's (yoga) teachers who available. said they will be going Great gifts including down there (to Willows Beach) and doing it," calendars, greeting cards, Rose said. and collages. "It's gone from a formal movement to an informal movement." reporter@vicnews.com

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OAK BAY NEWS -

www.oakbaynews.com • A5

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Canada Day party gets early start in Oak Bay

Brittany Lee

of July 1 to allow people to participate and celebrate Canada Day in a sense of community, said Mandi Krieger, executive assistant of Oak Bay recreation. The event includes a free barbecue, entertainment, bouncey castle, facepainting, crafts, and games for kids. Cake is also on the menu.

News staff

Get a head start on Canada Day celebrations in Oak Bay. A family-friendly event on the lawn of Oak Bay municipal hall will run from noon to 2 p.m., Friday (June 29). The annual event is held in advance

On Sunday (July 1), there will be a Canada-themed swim at Oak Bay recreation centre, from 1 to 5 p.m. Themed games will take place on the deck and in the pool. All ages are welcome and regular admission applies. reporter@vicnews.com

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Participants in a yoga class stretch at the Victoria Cool Aid Society’s Downtown Activity Centre on Pandora Avenue. Reaching high are Miranda Lane, left, Elizabeth MacKay, Bruce Williams and Josephine Navarro. A yogathon in Centennial Square will raise funds for low- to no-barrier recreation programming at the centre.

Yogathon goal to create recreation opportunites Classes will run all day in Centennial Square Don Descoteau News staff

As the sun streams in through an open courtyard door, a line of people on mats listen and watch intently, so as to mimic yoga instructor Alicia Corsiglia’s movements. On Wednesday afternoons, the gym at the Victoria Cool Aid Society’s Downtown Activity Centre on Pandora Avenue has been dedicated to yoga. Corsiglia will be among the volunteer instructors leading classes from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on July 7 in Centennial Square, as the centre hosts its first-ever yogathon. The event will raise funds for the centre’s health and wellness programs, which range from floor hockey and kindergym to tai chi and dance/movement. Miranda Lane, assistant co-ordinator for the centre, says the fundraiser is also a way of raising awareness of its programs and services. “All of our programs are low- to

no-barrier,” she says, noting that inclusivity is key. With many clients either homeless, battling addiction problems or facing other life challenges, she says, it’s important to have a place where they can take part in activities that are healthy for them, without judgment. The yoga class ended last week, but Lane says the hope is to attract more volunteer instructors and expand the program. The suggested drop-in donation for each class during the yogathon is $5. Classes are scheduled every hour and for various ability levels. For those participants who wish to raise money for the cause, pledge forms are available at the centre, 755 Pandora Ave. Tours of the facility are also planned for July 7 at 10 a.m., noon, 2 and 4 p.m. For more information, visit CoolAid.org/yoga or call 250-383-0076. editor@vicnews.com

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A6 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

First Nations’ history recognized in Oak Bay Artwork honouring Coast Salish heritage unveiled at municipal hall Brittany Lee/News staff

Artist Charles Elliott, left, Oak Bay-Gordon Head MLA Ida Chong, Lekwungen elder Butch Dick, Songhees Coun. Ron Sam and Oak Bay Mayor Nils Jensen celebrate the unveiling of a welcome panel honouring the history and heritage of Lekwungen people in Oak Bay.

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SEXY in 60 minutes. Jazzercise classes at Henderson, Monterey & Oak Bay Rec Centers

Brenda Richardson 250.598.0830 www.jazzercise.com —Cheryl Burke, Two-time Champion, Dancing with the Stars

Brittany Lee News staff

A large frame of First Nations cedar renderings now sits inside the entrance of Oak Bay municipal hall. Mayor Nils Jensen, councillors, volunteers from the community and representatives from the Songhees celebrated the completion of eight First Nations cairns with the unveiling of a welcome panel June 16. The First Nations artwork, done by artist Charles Elliott, consists of eight renderings representing the different monuments along the waterway, from Ogden Point to Cadboro Bay, honouring the Coast Salish history and heritage in Oak Bay. The monuments represent the First Nations past and present connections to Oak Bay and the panel at municipal hall brings it all together. “Every time someone comes in here and sees that plaque, that connectivity will be symbolized by this wonderful artwork … and it will be a constant reminder of the importance of First Nations to our heritage, to our history,” Jensen said. “This is a wonderful and historic and a proud moment for Oak Bay.” The project, launched by the Oak Bay Heritage Society and funded in part by the provincial government, has been eight years in the making. Several of the monuments will also have native plant gardens, with plants donated by Marion Cumming and the Pacific Forestry Centre, surrounding them. The artwork is a reminder of the thousands of years of First Nations culture and history in Oak Bay, and a reminder to express thanks to the Lekwungen people, said Cumming a member of the Oak Bay Heritage Society. “Now that we are on (Lekwungen) land, it’s a way of spreading the knowledge and helping the generations to come to appreciate how we love this land. In a way we’re caretakers and guardians and stewards (of the land),” she said at the ceremony. The “beautiful harmony” of the First Nations stories are shown in the cairns, Cumming added. The monuments depict what happened on our shores many years ago, and include illustrations such as a seal, buck, otters, salmon and loon. A plaque underneath the panel at the hall includes a map of where the eight cairns can be found. Songhees Coun. Ron Sam called the unveiling a momentous occasion because, he said, First Nations sites in Oak Bay haven’t always been respected the way they should be. “I think with the mayor and council grasping this and showing (the art) in municipal hall, where people come from this municipality, people will start to see that the municipality cares about it,” he said. “So maybe the people will start embracing it also.” The recognition of First Nations heritage is important because it creates awareness for people and creates a link between First Nations and non-native people, Sam added. Elliott said the recognition was a lovely gesture, but long overdue. “I think it’s nice for them to do things like that because it shows that First Nations people used to live here,” Elliott said. “I appreciate that recognition for the First Nations.” Elliott also has work displayed locally in the First People’s House at the University of Victoria, as well as in the healing room at the Royal Jubilee Hospital. reporter@vicnews.com FUTURE SHOP – Correction Notice

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www.oakbaynews.com • A7

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, June 27, 2012

MAKING A DIFFERENCE EVERY DAY Learn about the winners of the 2012 Excellence in BC Health Care Awards… www.BCHealthCareAwards.ca

www.oakbaynews.com Don Denton/News staff

Celebrating the big 5-0 UVic grounds worker Dan Giles plants flowers in the rain as he works on a new garden bed along McKenzie Avenue that celebrates the university's 50th anniversary.

Tennis bubble’s future up for debate Continued from Page A1

The commission asked for additional information to come to its September meeting looking at the potential for replacing and relocating the tennis facility. Moving it would tie in with the Capital Regional District’s Bowker Creek 100-year plan to daylight the creek. “If we were to go with a permanent building, then we need to relocate it,” said Monty Holding, chair of Oak Bay’s recreation commission. That would be a major undertaking, he noted, and would need to take into

account funding the building as well as future operations considerations such as staffing. “The problem right now is if we’re going to go with a permanent structure … we need a little bit of time to figure out where it will go, how are we going to fund that?” he said. The tennis bubble is on a replacement schedule so funding for that is in place. “If we’re going to go with a permanent building we’ve got to find that money,” Holding said. “What we’re discussing is (perhaps) replace the bubble again next year and begin work right away on where a permanent building would go

and start to get financing in place.” The recreation commission includes three active tennis players who are also gathering input from the instructors and other users. “The best time to replace it is September because that’s when there’s probably the least amount of impact on tennis,” Holding said. That would help protect the tennis program which generates roughly $100,000 a year in profit. The information will go to the recreation commission that meets in early September before it’s presented to council. cvanreeuwyk@oakbaynews.com

Diabetes Study • Are you 18 years or older?

PARTICIPANTS IN THIS RESEARCH STUDY WILL RECEIVE:

• Have Type II diabetes? • Treating diabetes with insulin (with or without oral medication)? You could qualify as a candidate.

Volunteer today.

• Regular close monitoring by a physician • Lifestyle, diet, and weight control counseling • All study materials, including glucose monitors, test strips and medications provided at no cost. • Compensation to cover study visits (travel, parking, etc)

For more information contact Dr. Michael Jones, Cook Street Medical Clinic 250-383-3311 or Email cookmed.research@gmail.com

Celebrate...

CONVERT TO NATURAL GAS WITH Sunday Mornings 10:00 Monterey Centre, Oak Bay Canada Day Sermon:

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Canada Day Closure

The Hartland Landfill Facility will be closed on Monday, July 2, 2012. Hartland will reopen on Tuesday, July 3 from 9 am to 5 pm. Registered account customers will have access to the active face from 7 to 9 am.

For more information, please call the CRD Hotline at 250.360.3030 or visit www.crd.bc.ca/waste/hartland

The Oak Bay Community Initiatives Committee and Recreation Oak Bay invites you to this FREE fun family event!

Friday, June 29, 2012

Capital Regional District

Hartland Landfill

CANADA

Please make sure your load is covered and secured.

Noon-2pm • FREE! Front lawn of the Oak Bay Municipal Hall, 2167 Oak Bay Avenue • Jumping Castle • Button Making • Face Painting • Tattoos

• Free Canada Day Birthday Cake • Free Hot Dogs and snow cones • Tennis & Golf games

• Fire Truck & Police Car on site

• Music • Giant Bubble Making

www.recreation.oakbay.ca


A8 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Photo app turns to gold for Oak Bay grad Don Descoteau Biz Beat

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products for Android smartphones or others, is looking to get another boost when the iPhone 5 launches this fall. Bettany returned earlier this month from a trip around the world, one on which she only took her iPhone as a camera. Having spent years lugging piles of gear around, the experience was “freeing,” she said. “I did it to prove you don’t have to spend thousands of dollars on camera gear to get great pictures.” She admits that creating a good app takes far more than simply a good idea. There’s a lot of trial and error involved in development, and timing is everything. “(Camera+ was) definitely a timely idea. It’s been an exciting couple of

Look for your

✔Featured Profiles • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

on top of the world. Camera+ has achieved the eight-million mark in downloads from Apple’s Apps Store. Two years since it was introduced, it still sits at No. 12 on Apple’s list of most popular pay apps. “I remember when we started and just the thought of one million was a huge number,” she said recently in a phone interview from her Manhattan home. “I guess it’s surprised me that it’s continuing to be successful in a market that’s so competitive,” she said. “Everyday there’s a new app that launches (in competition) with us. But we have the most loyal users that are excited about our product and what we’ve done.” Her company, which has so far resisted the urge to create

L

VICTORIA HO

To say Lisa Bettany has gone through several incarnations in her life would probably be an understatement. As a competitive figure skater in her late teens while attending Oak Bay High, she dreamed of hitting the big time. But a back injury at 21 dashed that dream and left her wondering what her future would hold. After earning a Masters degree in linguistics at the University of Victoria

and a bachelor’s in journalism, but finding little in the way of job prospects, she began to blog and more seriously get into photography. A self-confessed computer geek who grew up tinkering with electronics – her dad was a computer science professor – she eventually combined her three passions – photography, blogging and technology – and met some people along the way who helped hone her vision of taking great pictures easier for amateurs. The result? Camera+, a 99-cent iPhone application that allows users to adjust everything from lighting to cropping and many functions in between on the fly from their mobile phone. Now 31, Bettany is

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Photro courtesy Lisa Bettany

Photographer-turned-entrepreneur Lisa Bettany practises taking a picture with her iPhone. Her company’s photo application for the iPhone has been a great success worldwide. years to see that transition in people who would never take photos before, to getting creative with their photos and sharing them online. People are expressing themselves.”

How about that? The youth placement staff at Volunteer Victoria experienced something unique earlier this month, when a young woman dropped in to look for volunteer work. It seems the woman was sent by her employer, Canoe

Brewpub, to put her skills to use until things got a little busier on the patio at the restaurant. The impressive thing was Canoe promised to pay her regular wages for any volunteer work she does in the community. For more information about youth volunteer opportunities, visit volunteervictoria. bc.ca/youth, or call 250-386-2269, or drop by their office at 306620 View St.

New digs Frank Bourree’s

Chemistry Consulting and subsidiary GT Hiring Solutions have opened two WorkBC Employment Service Centres to help local jobseekers find work. The new offices, at 102-415 Gorge Rd. E. and 201-3962 Borden St., give the company three locations in Greater Victoria, after the first opened at Pandora Avenue and Douglas Street. The centres also act as recruiting services for employers. For more information, visit gthiringsolutions.ca. To submit business news, send an email to: editor@vicnews.com.

Writing contest focuses on teens The Greater Victoria Public Library teen writing contest returns with a theme of Timing is Everything. Teens can enter original poems or short stories based on the theme. Winners will be selected by a

judging panel. For details, contest rules, and online entry form, visit www.gvpl. ca. For ages 13-18. For details, email teens@gvpl.ca. Contest runs until Aug. 11.

www.oakbaynews.com

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www.oakbaynews.com • A9

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, June 27, 2012

‘Awesome’ Wi-Fi project gets slow start in Victoria

“I think, in general, it’s becoming a bit of an expectation that the service of Wi-Fi is provided.� – Jon Woodland

Roszan Holmen News staff

Four months since a grassroots initiative scored a $3,500 grant to launch wireless Internet service downtown, the project has hit a speed bump. “We are a bit behind,� admitted Liam McLachlan, volunteer project manager for the non-profit named MeshMesh. In February, it was the darling of community judges belonging to the Awesome Sh*t Club, which doles out small grants to help community groups launch “awesome� ideas. MeshMesh pitched a plan to convince downtown businesses to share their Internet with the public, simply by installing a router to send their wireless signal to anyone within approximately 30 metres. Six businesses initially signed on, each paying $150 for the hardware. In exchange, an ad for their business flashes on the screen of people logging on. But today there are still only six business signed on, serving six to 15 people with free Wi-Fi each day. “The interest is still there, people are still getting in touch with us,� McLachlan said, adding the volunteers at MeshMesh are too busy with their day jobs to respond. Meanwhile, the Downtown Victoria Business Association launched its own $25,000 Wi-Fi network in April. It targets pedestrian traffic at nine of the heaviest traffic areas downtown. “It’s thriving,� said Ken Kelly, DVBA general manager. “We’re pleased with it. We’ve got as many as 40 users at any one moment in time.� The association plans to monitor the new service over the summer and may expand the service, pending results. McLachlan welcomes the business group’s initiative, saying the more Wi-Fi coverage downtown, the better.

Liam McLachlan, co-founder of non-profit MeshMesh, is struggling to sign merchants up for his organization’s shared Wi-Fi service. Black Press file photo

And despite the slow start for MeshMesh, he’s not giving up. Rather, he’s now calling out for more volunteers. People are needed to sell the idea to more businesses and help install routers. McLachlan also hopes to attract a group of more technically-capable volunteers for a different, but related goal of MeshMesh: to enable food carts or other market vendors to use it for high-speed debit and credit transactions. “We think that would make open-air markets a lot more accessible,� he said. “It’s a real benefit to those small businesses, because then it’s a no-cost, or low-cost, merchant

service for them.� Free Wi-Fi is also catching on in Saanich. Municipal buildings such as recreation centres, fire halls and the municipal hall now offer the service. “I think, in general, it’s becoming a bit of an expectation that the service of Wi-Fi is provided,� said Jon Woodland, assistant manager of infrastructure in Saanich’s information technology department. Next up, Saanich is looking for partnerships that can help provide free Wi-Fi at parks during municipal events. rholmen@vicnews.com

Inaugural vegan festival launches Event takes root July 1 in Market Square Roszan Holmen News staff

Cooking classes, ukeleles, juggling and even a reality-show style competition will come together on Canada Day to celebrate all things vegan. The festival, running from noon to 5 p.m. July 1 at Market Square, will also feature activities for kids and a full schedule of presentations on topics such as activism, nutrition and others. “We’ve assembled a crack team of amazing local vegan volunteers to organize this most fantastic festival,� said co-organizer Sarah Kramer, author of several vegan cookbooks. She’ll also host a game called Canada’s Next Top Vegan. The festival builds on the momentum of four vegan shops established in Victoria: Kramer’s boutique, called Sarah’s Place; Vshoen, Green Cuisine and Lotus Pond. “It’s amazing it’s taken this long to see this type of festival here, as Victoria is known as being a top vegan-friendly city in North America,� said Dave Shishkoff, festival co-organizer and Canadian correspondent for Friends of Animals, an international animal advocacy organization active in Victoria for the last six years. “An event like this proves that Victorians are progressive and forward-thinking, and concerned about animal issues and willing to act on that concern.� rholmen@vicnews.com BEST BUY – Correction Notice Please be advised that the Samsung Galaxy S III advertised on the June 22 flyer, page 3, will NOT be available for purchase until its official release date, which has been moved to June 27, 2012. (WebCode: 10205984/82/79/77, 10205983/81/78/76, 10207234/33). Also, please be advised that the Samsung Galaxy S III accessories advertised on page 3 may NOT be available for purchase due to delayed launch of the phone. (WebCode: 10208733/ 8734/ 8735/ 8736/ 8729/ 8732/ 7774/ 7772). We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

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A10 • www.oakbaynews.com

2009 WINNER

OAKBAYNEWS

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

EDITORIAL

BAY NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Laura Lavin Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Oak Bay News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-598-4123 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.oakbaynews.com

OUR VIEW

Saanich chips from the rough P

erhaps it’s human nature to want what you can’t have, or can’t afford. Last Wednesday, scores of people interested in the fate of the vacant restaurant at the Cedar Hill golf course made their wishes known on sticky notes pasted to the wall. The resounding majority called for a renewed restaurant, which is exactly the opposite of what Saanich council wants to do. Some residents call the restaurant an integral part of the social life for that area of the municipality. For council and district budget managers, it’s a financial black hole. Last year the municipally owned Cedar Hill golf course hit well over par and wracked up a $820,000 deficit. Of that, $520,000 was from food services. (Saanich clawed back $100,000 after closing the restaurant.) Should the District of Saanich be in the restaurant business? No, but it has trapped itself. It can’t reopen full food services without employing unionized labour, which a private operator is unlikely to take on. Opening the restaurant probably seemed like a good idea back in 1997, when the golf course operated in the black. In the 1990s and 2000s, its links averaged 71,000 rounds per year. In 2011 that dropped to 42,000 rounds, a 40 per cent drop. The course has been in the red since 2007 and is paying off an expensive irrigation system. Until the golf course can attract more golfers, Saanich council is right to be reluctant to reopen a full-service restaurant on the backs of all district taxpayers. At most, it could open perhaps as a cafeteriastyle operation under privatized management, if a compelling business case can be made. Saanich should be proud to own a magnificent piece of greenspace that is Cedar Hill golf course, and golfers are lucky to have a course that has the lowest green fees for 18 holes in Greater Victoria. But people who love Cedar Hill need to be less concerned about food services, and more concerned that it survives as a public facility.

What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@oakbaynews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Oak Bay News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2009

‘Poverty’ declines, nobody notices Y

ou probably didn’t hear year. “To illustrate,” the report said, this on TV: the percentage “take a hypothetical future Canada of Canadians deemed “low where every citizen earns no less income” went down slightly in 2010, than $100,000 (and assume there according to the latest Stahas not been rampant tistics Canada analysis. inflation in the meantime, This news was delivered such that buying power in the annual “Income of is not dissimilar to what Canadians” report last exists today) and millionweek. The share of people aires are common. who fall below the fed“In that kind of Canada, eral Low-Income Cut-Off those at the low end of (LICO) went from 9.5 per the income scale (that cent to 9.0. is, those earning ‘merely’ The CBC couldn’t bring $100,000) would be conitself to admit any actual sidered poor if LICOs Tom Fletcher were used as a measure improvement, reporting on its website that the of poverty.” B.C. Views number of people with Math aside, that’s the “low income” was about alleged “poverty line” three million, “virtually unchanged routinely cited by the usual media from 2009.” authorities, like B.C. Federation of Other media outlets followed Labour president Jim Sinclair. the unwritten rule that nothing Sinclair campaigned for years to remotely positive must be preget the B.C. government to raise the sented as news, particularly if it minimum wage from $8 to $10 an reflects positively on a right-wing hour. They did, in three increments, government. (Plus they had the and on May 1 it increased to $10.25 Montreal body parts case to update an hour. As soon as the series of each day.) three increases was announced last This information likely won’t November, Sinclair called a news have any effect on the political conference to announce it’s not discussion about “poverty” in B.C. enough. The LICO survey will continue to be To get to the LICO level, the used as a measure of absolute povminimum wage should be $11.50 erty, despite the fact that it isn’t. It’s an hour, Sinclair said. Of course, if a relative measure that will always B.C. businesses ponied up for that, designate the same share of people the goalposts would shift again and at the low end of the scale. the same proportion of “poverty” B.C. Stats, the provincial equivawould magically still exist. lent of the federal agency, explained The B.C. NDP government-in-waitthis problem in a special report last ing continues to demand an “action

plan” on poverty, with annual goals. All the progressive provinces have one, which I guess is why poverty is all but eradicated in enlightened places like Manitoba. There are signs of the reality behind this political smokescreen. Here’s one. For what may be the first time in history, we now have a North American society where one of the most reliable indicators of poverty is obesity. This often gets explained away with a popular theory that poor people are somehow forced to eat fast food and drink pop because they can’t afford healthy food. People who advance this theory presumably don’t do much grocery shopping. There are plenty of processed, sugary, fat-laden choices at the supermarket too. But there is also whole wheat bread, rice and fresh or frozen vegetables that are as cheap as anywhere in the world. Given basic cooking skills and some effort, it’s easy to demonstrate which diet is cheaper as well as healthier. Most immigrants know this. Which diet you choose isn’t a function of money, but rather one of education and self-discipline. There is genuine poverty in our society. What’s needed is a useful way to define it. tfletcher@blackpress.ca —Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com.

‘There is genuine poverty ... what’s needed is a useful way to define it.’


OAK BAY NEWS -

www.oakbaynews.com • A11

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

FUTURE SHOP - CORRECTION NOTICE

Please be advised that on page 21 of the June 22 flyer, the Nextbook 7" Touch Android eReader (WebCode: 10179386) has an invalid savings claim. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

Vision Matters Dr. Neil Paterson

Healthy Eyes. Doctor Delivered.

Macular Degeneration The enemy of central vision

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

A moment in the sun Mitchell Pennimpede and Jen McAuffe take a break from their bike ride to enjoy the sun and view from the rocks in Queen’s Park near the Oak Bay Marina.

Readers respond: to planning, dogs, deer and politics Waterfront planning needs a serious look Thanks Jean Sparks for your thoughts (Letters, June 20). The absence or lack of professional urban planning is common in this country. Although often located in extraordinary settings, Canadian cities are often ordinary and fail to live to their potential. In Oak Bay, our waterfront and beaches are our most valuable assets. What we do and do not do with them speaks volumes about where we are as a society. At this point, our waterfront infrastructure is semi-moribund and the way we use our waterfront is often thoughtless or at best, an afterthought. Yet, somehow, despite the current levels of pollution and degradation, we still have one of the most beautiful waterfronts in Canada, scenery, wildlife, sunshine and all. Time has come to give it a serious, professional thought. Jacques Sirois Oak Bay

Attach dog owners to leash During a recent trip to Europe I was impressed by the significant numbers of stray, dispossessed mongrels in Spain and Portugal which roamed the streets and public areas and were free to scrounge for scraps of food from master’s tables, and lick the hands and feet of the unwashed beggars, and defecate whenever and wherever. Upon returning home I

began to take notice of people walking in the vicinity of dogs with what appeared to be a leash of some kind curled and held in their right or left hand. Of course, I wondered if the leash should be attached to the dog which was usually out of “leash range” of the human being. These observations occur at all times of the day and night along the sidewalks and lanes in the vicinity of Monterey Avenue. The observed dogs can be described as mostly cross breeds ranging in size and temperament from a vicious bulldog to a yappie Yorkie. In the cities of Spain and Portugal I did not see squirrels, raccoons and immature wild deer in the streets frequented by wild dogs. Maybe our political leaders in Oak Bay can learn a thing or two from these slowly evolving European societies and enforce the laws and regulations which require dog owners to be attached by

leash to their animals while in public space. This action would no doubt be welcomed by those who love to observe young deer and young children using our streets, parks and sidewalks. Lloyd Rowsell Oak Bay

Deer cull option appalling It seems that hardly a day goes by when someone is not complaining in our daily and weekly newspapers about the so-called deer problem. I will admit that deer are possibly causing some people headaches but are these people in the majority? I hardly think so. Deer have eaten the tops off my tulips this year and frankly, so what. Granted, I am not a gardening fanatic and I’ll just wait and see what happens to the flowers next season. The one option of culling the deer being proposed by some of these people is

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes your opinions and comments. Letters to the editor should discuss issues and stories that have been covered in the pages of the News. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to less than 300 words. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity or to discuss using your letter as a guest column. Phone numbers are not printed. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Oak Bay News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 386-2624 ■ Email: editor@oakbaynews.com

downright appalling. Just because a garden gets damaged by a deer, does that give the gardener the right to place a death sentence on these majestic creatures? Some say yes. If my finely manicured lawn gets eaten, then kill them. Kill the raccoons and the rabbits and let’s not forget the gulls and crows that cause us unbearable noise at times, not to mention leaving deposits on our precious property. The wildlife are here because more and more development (read that as greed) is destroying their habitat. People who are obsessed with eradicating wildlife are to me, selfish and egotistical and think they are better than anyone. Folks, you could learn from these creatures. William Jesse Oak Bay

Premier’s days are numbered It was no less than a year ago that I supported Premier Christy Clark in her campaign to become the leader of the B.C. Liberals. Those days are gone. Ms. Clark has become a huge problem for the Liberals – and one not easily solved. While she has sound policies, she has become nothing but a whipping boy (girl) for every critic out there. I still like Christy, but she has much too much political baggage in hopes of forming another government. But God help us if that next government is NDP. P.M. Peterson Oak Bay

Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMT) is the leading cause of vision loss among people over the age of fifty. The macula is the part of the eye that provides central vision. There are two types of age-related macular degeneration, “wet” and “dry”. The most common is the “dry” type, where the gradual thinning of the macula causes a slow loss of central vision. This affects key activities such as reading, driving and recognizing faces. Peripheral vision is usually not affected. Currently, there is no treatment for “dry” ARMD, although research suggests that certain vitamins, minerals and diet may play a role in prevention. A growing body of research has linked lutein, an antioxidant found in green, leafy vegetables, to the prevention of ARMD. Diet has been examined to determine if nutrients can slow the aging process in the eye. Vitamins A and E, selenium and zinc are among the nutrients being studied. Other factors, such as smoking, alcohol intake, cumulative sun exposure and genetics have been linked to the occurrence of ARMD. “Wet”: age-related macular degeneration is less common, but may cause sudden, severe vision loss. This form of ARMD is caused by the rapid growth of abnormal blood vessels under the macula. These abnormal vessels leak fluid resulting in scarring and the subsequent loss of visual acuity. The key to treatment of “wet” ARMD is to stop the leakage of the abnormal blood vessels and thereby stop the scarring of the affected tissue. Early detection and prompt treatment is vital in limiting damage. Currently, laser therapy is used to treat this condition by destroying some of the leaking vessels. This treatment can only be used in a minority of cases. Regular eye examinations allow optometrists to look for signs of ARMD as well as other eye diseases such as glaucoma and cataracts. Optometrists can also help patients with significant vision loss by prescribing magnifying devices or low vision aids. You owe it to yourself and others to have regular eye examinations.

Dr. Neil Paterson Dr. Suzanne Sutter Optometrists

100 -2067 Cadboro Bay Rd.

250-595-8500

www.oakbayoptometry.com


A12 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Travel in style, comfort and space. And yes, it is that affordable.

Diving in Divers Anita Holland (checking her fins), Alan Wong and Kerry Enns (back) say their farewells before their dive in McNeil Bay. The divers, who were visiting from the Lower Mainland took advantage of the cheap ferry fare planned three dives including Ogden Point, Willis Point and McNeil Bay before heading home Sunday.

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OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, June 27, 2012

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Caffeine, booze a risky mix: UVic study Mixing energy drinks and alcohol boosts dangerous behaviour, says researcher Natalie North News staff

A researcher at the University of Victoria is calling out the dangers of consuming energy drinks and alcohol, a widespread practice that poses serious risks to health and public safety, officials say. Kristina Brache, a graduate student in the department of psychology with the Centre for Addictions Research, found that out of 465 university students, those who combined caffeinated energy drinks with alcohol, or consumed premixed caffeinated alcoholic beverages, were more likely than those who drank alcohol alone to engage in risky behaviour, including driving intoxicated or getting in a vehicle with a drunk driver. Brache, who is the first to publish research of this kind in Canada, wasn’t surprised by the outcome of the study, given similar findings south of the border. “What is important is that even after accounting for intrinsic risk-taking, we’re still finding there’s some difference in this group that combines alcohol and energy drinks,” she said. Reported reasons for combining the substances included a desire to eliminate drowsiness and to stay awake longer. “(Drinkers) may actually not be able to judge how intoxicated they are ... given that some of the depressant effects have been attenuated,” Brache said, noting lab studies have documented a reported sense of feeling less intoxicated when people consume both substances at the same time. Earlier in the year, Brache, in seeking support for stronger restrictions around the marketing of energy drinks and alcohol consumption, presented her data to the Capital Regional District’s traffic safety commission. Alan Perry, acting chair of the commission, called the talk “eye-opening” and “dismaying.” It may be a while before the commission, though interested in mitigating the risks to public safety, launches into action that

Seen here at Felicita’s Campus Pub, Kristina Brache, a UVic graduate student with the Centre for Addictions Research, found consuming alcohol with energy drinks goes hand in hand with high risk behaviour, such as drinking and driving. Her work has caught the attention of the CRD traffic safety commission. Don Denton/News staff

could possibly include a public education component, he said. “The energy drink industry is a highly profitable industry, a multi-billion-dollar a year industry,” Perry said. “It appears that sector is investing a lot of time and money in trying to ensure that their profits are not eroded.” Once the commission has mulled over Brache’s findings, they will likely put forward recommendations to the Liquor Distribution Branch to restrict licensed establishments from marketing energy drinks and alcohol together. “We’re struggling with this because we

sense it has the potential to really have a negative impact on both health and public safety, but we’re up against a marketing juggernaut,” Perry noted. Concern over energy drink consumption is too new and reliable statistics relating deaths to caffeinated alcohol consumption don’t yet exist, said coroner Barbara McLintock of the B.C. Coroners Service. “The fact is, there are these risks being posed,” McLintock said. “It’s a new risk and a risk that people … all need to be looking at.” Brache is currently analyzing Canada-wide data on alcohol and energy drink consump-

tion and its relationship to drinking and driving and alcohol abuse and addiction. nnorth@saanichnews.com

Did you know? ■ Sales of premixed alcoholic energy drinks in Canada has increased by 296 per cent between 2005 and 2010. ■ Young adults consume the drinks at a level four times higher than the general public, according to the Canadian Centre for Substance Abuse.


A14 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

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BAY NEWS


www.oakbaynews.com • A15

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Oak Bay skating rink reopens on Monday People looking to cool down with a summer skate will have to wait until Monday (July 2), when the arena at Oak Bay recreation centre reopens. The arena has been closed since June 11 for general maintenance and upkeep. It’s a process the facility goes through every two years. “What generally happens each time is the arena and warm room,

these all get a fresh coat of paint, (and) floor tiles that maybe are sticking get re-glued,” said Caroline Lawrence, sports programmer at Oak Bay rec. The three-week shutdown also allows arena staff to complete projects that otherwise would not get done during opening hours. This year the arena’s skate shop had its skate cubbies replaced to fit the often bigger skates

made today. The arena is also striving to be more energy efficient by having a new compressor and motion sensor lights installed. New global induction lights will be placed in the ice rink, and come September in the indoor sports field, as well, said Ken Olson, operations and energy supervisor. “They give us way more light for less power,” Olson said.

Olson estimates the cost for the compressor and lights is $85,000. However, B.C. Hydro contributed more than

$37,000 towards the project. The gym at Henderson recreation centre has also been closed

for maintenance since June 18. Annual upkeep at the centre includes painting, repairing walls,

improving storage and floor resurfacing. The gym will reopen Tuesday (July 3). reporter@vicnews.com

YOU CAN RETURN

EVEN MORE

We’ve expanded to recycle more electronics.

A day of fun

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Five-year-old Calla Wagorn crawls through a tunnel during St. Christopher’s Montessori School’s annual sports day in Windsor Park.

Sunday, July 1st, 2012

Don Denton/News staff

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ZOE

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WHAT’S NEW? As of July 1, 2012, even more electronic devices can be recycled free of charge at any Return-It Electronics™ Collection Site. Among the newly accepted consumer products are console gaming systems and accessories, e-readers, electronic books, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and calculators. For the full list, please visit return-it.ca/electronics/products WHY IS THIS PROGRAM IMPORTANT?

The Return-It Electronics™ recycling program provides an environmentally sound recycling option for unwanted electronics. It ensures these items will not be landfilled or illegally exported. You can drop off any of the acceptable products at designated Return-It Electronics™ Collection Sites without charge and be assured they will be recycled responsibly.


A16 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

THE ARTS

HOT TICKET Pride Week 2012

BAY NEWS

Victoria Pride Society presents Pride Week 2012 including an art walk and exhibition in Trounce Alley June 30. Visitvictoriapridesociety.org for information on other events throughout the week.

Printmakers capture layers of area history Kyle Wells News staff

To celebrate Victoria’s 150th anniversary a group of artists is using the medium that would have originally captured some of the city’s most well-recognized historic sites for all to see. Fifteen artists with Ground Zero Printmakers visited seven historical sites in the city to make original artworks in a variety of printmaking mediums, such as etching, silkscreen and drypoint. These prints will then be used in a series of handmade albums, one of which will be presented to the City of Victoria at the Oct. 25 council meeting. That edition will go into the city archives. Another copy will go to the library system for the public to access, another for Ground Zero’s own collection. “So that the public can enjoy these prints for the next 150 years,” said Victoria Edgarr Ground Zero creative director and project contributor. Printmaking is a form of artwork that uses a variety of materials, such as wood or metal, to make art that can be printed onto paper. The process allows you to make many nearly identical prints of the

Don Denton/News staff

Ground Zero Printmakers’ Creative Director Victoria Edgarr watches (back) as artist Gail Lamarche pulls a print (entitled Botanical Lesson at St. Annes) from a press at the Ground Zero workshop. same piece of artwork. Edgarr said that printmaking is a particularly apt artform to help commemorate Victoria’s history because it has been around as long as the city itself. In the days before the mass use of photographs, artists would

draw locations in the city and then engravers would use those images to make prints for newspapers and other print materials of the day. Ground Zero launched the project with an open air printmaking session at St. Ann’s Academy and have since visited the Rock Bay

neighbourhood, Beacon Hill, Bastion and Centennial squares, the Chinese cemetery at Harling Point and Chinatown, Ground Zero’s ground zero. “Every place tells you about the people who made it,” Edgarr said. “What was there before, what

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is there now, historically when those things were made and the assumptions of the people who made them.” Beyond that, the artists are seeing the sites through their own experiences, influences and perspectives adding another layer of interpretation. Edgarr said that the experience has changed the way she looks at the city. Learning about the look of the city and how it developed influences her perspective as she walks its streets. “(You’re) really trying to relate it to the story of the place, the people that have lived here and that live here and that will live here.” The albums will feature 15 to 20 pieces along with text from the artists describing each work. While only a few albums are being produced, prints of individual works will be available to the public. They invite the public to see the process of creating the prints during studio visits June 30, July 28 and August 11. Ground Zero Printmakers, at 549 1/2 Fisgard St., third floor, will be open from noon to 5 p.m. those days. kwells@goldstreamgazette.com

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www.oakbaynews.com • A17

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Eclectic offers plein art

Montreal ensemble brings chamber music Join Montréal-based ensemble Les Amusements de la Chambre for Le Salon d’été: Baroque works for harpsichord and strings, a concert of intimate chamber music. The ensemble will present a selection of 17th and 18th-century chamber music at the Church of St. John the Divine, 1611 Quadra St., on June

Eclectic Gallery is offering a taste of summer with vibrant oils by plein air painter Frank Mitchell. A member of the Al Frescoes plein air painters of Victoria, Mitchell’s work explores alternative points of view ranging from landscape, portrait and life drawing to political satire. Eclectic Gallery, 2170 Oak Bay Ave., presents its feature artist, Mitchell from June 16 through July 28. The gallery’s summer hours are Tuesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Sundays from noon until 4 p.m.

30 at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. The concert features music by Francesco Maria Veracini, Jean-Philippe Rameau, and anonymous English masques. Tickets are $5 for children, $10 for seniors/students and $20 at the door. Call 250-595-7105 or email amusements.de.la.chambre@gmail. com for details.

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Jack Lohman, Chief Executive Officer of the Royal BC Museum was appointed CBE – Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire – in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list published on June 16. The CBE recognizes and rewards a prominent national and leading role demonstrated through a highly distinguished, innovative contribution with a wide impact. In addition to his duties at the museum, Lohman holds the position of chair for the National Museum in Warsaw, Poland and

ADDRESS: ___________________________________________________________________

Jack Lohman is the professor in museum development at the Bergen National Academy of the Arts, Norway. He was previ-

ously director of the Museum of London (2002-12), where he led a $32 million redevelopment of the Museum’s Galleries of Modern London and the creation of the Museum of London Docklands. Previously, Lohman was Chief Executive of Iziko Museums of Cape Town, South Africa, (1999-2002), an organization consisting of 15 national museums. He was Chairman of ICOM (the International Council of Museums) UK (2002-08) and a member of the UK National Commission to UNESCO (2002-10).

He is editor in chief of UNESCO’s Museums and Diversity series. Lohman studied History of Art at the University of East Anglia and Architecture at the Freien Universitat in Berlin. He has received doctorates from the Polish University in London (PUNO) and Westminster University, London. The Order of the British Empire is the order of chivalry of British democracy. Valuable service is the only criterion for the award, presented in this case for services to museums. editor@oakbaynews.com

ZOE

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Open Space brings licorice show Clarinettist Krista Martynes, and composers Cassandra Miller and Wolf Edwards will descend upon Open Space in a short residency from June 28 to 30 with some Electric Licorice. The clarinet, affectionately called the licorice stick in some circles, will come alive as its range and colours are expanded through the use of electronics and computer processing. During this short residency Miller will work with Martynes on the creation of a new work.

Edwards’ newest work will be rehearsed for its premiere on Saturday night, the concert that will close the week showcasing the culmination of this three-day stretch. The concert will also include works by David Lang, Zosha di Castri, Karlheinz Essl, and Steve Reich as well as a premier of Adam Basanta’s “Feelings I’m Too Tired For”. Rub shoulders with Martynes, Miller, and Edwards while learning a thing or two about every-

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Peninsula Co-op supports students with annual awards Peninsula Co-op is committed to supporting youth, both through its employment of young people and their community outreach. The Peninsula Co-op Student Awards program recognizes students’ academic efforts, athletic achievements, and community service. Intended to financially assist with post-secondary studies, the program invites active Co-op members and their immediate family to apply. Two awards will be presented in six categories, one of $1,500 and one of $1,000. Deadline for applications is Aug. 31, 2012. In addition, Peninsula Co-op has also established bursaries at Camosun College and the University of Victoria, with applications made directly to these institutions.

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With their active membership of more than 58,000 – and growing – Peninsula Coop shares their success with their memberowners and the communities they serve. In addition to the $5.6 million distributed directly back to members in patronage rebates this fiscal year, Co-op also allocated approximately $400,000 through their Community Fund. Supporting Southern Vancouver Island volunteers, community groups and events, over the last year Peninsula Co-op sponsored initiatives through Boulders Climbing Gym, Jeneece Place, KidSport Victoria, and lent their name and support to the Women’s League of Highlander’s Soccer. In addition, the Co-op provides support to countless volunteers, non-profit clubs and community events through financial and inkind donations, plus more than 2,000 hours of staff volunteer time – building relationships and saying thank you to the communities. 100% locally owned

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Ralph Phillips makes repairs to the stairs in front of St. Patrick’s Parish on Haultain Street. The church has had to replace tiles and fix the handrails because of damage caused by skateboarders.

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Despite losing a $26,000 grant for Internet service, the Greater Victoria Public Library will not cut any of the coveted computer stations at its branches. “Because we are a larger system, it does impact our operating budget, but we are in the fortunate position that we can absorb the reduction,” said Maureen Sawa, CEO of GVPL. “But (for) many of our colleagues on the Island, in some of the smaller library systems on Vancouver Island, this is really going to be a blow.” Sawa was speaking out in solidarity with these smaller libraries, which stand to lose their only public computer stations. Earlier this year, the federal government cut its Community Access Program, which has helped to fund computers and Internet technologies in libraries since 1995. According to Industry Canada, the program met its objective to make Internet accessible. It launched in an age when only 10 per cent of Canadian households had Internet service at home. As of 2010, that proportion had grown to 79 per cent. But from the perspective of GVPL’s manager of public service, the need for computers at the library has not changed “We see no sign of that diminishing, in spite of statistics that say that a huge number of Canadians have access to Internet in their own home,” said Patricia Eaton. The computer stations are well used and often have a queue, she said. A wide cross-section of people use the stations, including those of limited means, students and seniors without the knowledge to set up a home computer. The issue of the cut came to the attention of Victoria city council. “All Canadians, regardless of economic status or location, should have the ability to access information and services through broadband connection to the Internet,” Coun. Pam Madoff wrote in a report. GVPL’s management are now looking at ways to absorb the $26,000 cut without affecting service. “A lot of the funding that we received helped to do the upgrades to our computers,” Sawa said. “It will mean that in some of our locations, that won’t happen as quickly.” Whether the library will ask for an increase in its annual budget request to compensate for the cut is yet to be seen. “We’re going to adjust some other areas,” Sawa said. rholmen@vicnews.com

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The eighth annual Bowker Creek Brush-Up Outdoor Art Show and Sale takes place Aug. 12 in Oak Bay. Celebrity artists Pat Martin-Bates, Martin Machacek, Robert Amos and Jim McFarland will be among more than 30 artists of all mediums displaying and demonstrating their work. Students have also been invited to participate. Crumsby’s and the Oak Bay Rotary Club BBQ Team will provide refreshments. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. between Hampshire Road and Armstrong Avenue. Admission is free. For further information, call 250-294-1944.


www.oakbaynews.com • A19

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, June 27, 2012

How to reach us

Tools

SPORTS

Travis Paterson 250-480-3279 sports@vicnews.com

No time for tea Countdown for Canada’s Londonbound Olympians Travis Paterson News staff Garrett James

And away they go, almost. The majority of the Victoria-based athletes heading to this summer’s Olympic Games were celebrated with the English flavoured Lift-off to London event, a theme fulfilled by the Fairmont Empress Hotel. Some did the queen wave longer than others (swimmers), as the spirit of the event came alive when the group left the Ivy Ballroom for a group photo on a double-decker bus in front of the Fairmont Empress Hotel. The Olympics run July 27 to Aug. 12. “It’s not long now, which is nice because this is the most exhaustive training block I’ve ever done,” said swimmer Alec Page. The Victoria native has his days ahead figured out before he competes in the 400 individual medley on July 28. “No easy ones until we get to London the week before the Games,” he said. That includes the internationally attended Canada Cup swim meet in Montreal, July 5 to 8. Page is one of seven swimmers going to the London Olympics from the Victoria Academy of Swimming at Saanich Commonwealth Place. At 18, Page will be one year younger in London than Ryan Cochrane was in Beijing. “I have a few Olympics ahead of me, that’s for sure.” Lift-off to London opened with Wendy Pattenden, CEO of the Canadian Sport Centre Pacific, explaining that Greater Victoria-based athletes account for approximately 15 per cent of the Olympic squad. “The goal is to finish among the top 12 nations,” she said.

Canucks draft pick Wes Myron exploded as an NHL prospect in the fall of 2011. His BCHL scoring pace of 42 points in 26 games with the Victoria Grizzlies earned him a last-minute spot on Team Canada West, which won the World Junior A Challenge in November.

Hockey’s other season heats up Royals, Grizz change bosses Travis Paterson News staff

Travis Paterson/News staff

Swimmer Blake Worsley, rower Derek O’Farrell, and swimmers Stephanie Horner and Alec Page pose atop the London flavoured double-decker bus with two dozen members of the Canadian Olympic and Paralympic teams. The Lift-off to London event celebrated athletes going to the London Olympics and Paralympics at the Fairmont Empress Hotel last Wednesday (June 20). Canada would be happy to beat its second best result from the Summer Olympics, which was seven golds and 18 medals in total from the 1992 Games in Barcelona. Canada’s top finish was

the 1984 Games in Los Angeles when it benefitted from the Soviet Union’s boycott, winning 10 golds and 44 medals in all, and ranking sixth place. sports@vicnews.com

Men’s eight on course Travis Paterson News staff

Travis Paterson/News staff

Rowers Conlin McCabe and Rob Gibson of the men’s eight hope to defend their boat’s gold medal in London.

Drifting in late to the June 20 Liftoff to London event were members of the men’s eight boat. The crew raced in from the ferry, returning directly from a rowing stint on Burnaby Lake. Their absence from the formal introductions of the event was notable, and rightly so. They are the defenders of something precious, one of Canada’s three gold medals from the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Their boat was recently featured in MacLeans and Sportsnet magazines, among others, and gets more attention than any other boat. Rob Gibson is one of six rowers

new to the crew since 2008, and is quick to complement coxswain Brian Price for handling the first wave of questions thrown at the team. “We’re lucky to have Price, and it’s good that he gets that focus,” Gibson said. “He doesn’t get enough of it.” The men’s eight will be the centre of attention once again this week as Rowing Canada will officially confirm its Victoria-based Olympic crews at Elk Lake on Thursday. Among the many crews to be named are David Calder and Scott Fransden of the men’s pair (heavyweight), and Patricia Obee and Lindsay Jennerich of the women’s double (lightweight). Canada Post will be on hand to release a commemorative stamp. sports@vicnews.com

With core changes happening to the Victoria Royals and the Victoria Grizzlies, and one of Saanich’s own getting drafted to the NHL, it’s like hockey season all over again. In the span of three days, from June 20 to 22, Memorial Cup winner Marc Habscheid resigned as coach and general manager of the WHL Royals; B.C. Hockey League legend Bill Bestwick was appointed as coach and GM of the Grizzlies; the Vancouver Canucks selected Saanich’s Wes Myron in the sixth round (177th) of the 2012 NHL Entry Draft; and two Royals were also drafted, Steven Hodges to the Florida Panthers, in the third round (84th) and Logan Nelson to the Buffalo Sabres in the fifth round (133rd). Hodges joins a long line of Royals/Chilliwack Bruins to be drafted, including a handful of Bruins who’ve dressed for NHL games, while Nelson wears the badge as the first player drafted from the Royals who didn’t play for Chilliwack. For Myron, getting drafted to the NHL is an extension of his sensational start to the 2011-12 season with the Grizzlies. If anything, the Lambrick Park grad should be seen as a poster boy for the benefits of a heavy offseason workout regime. Myron was near the top of the BCHL in scoring when he left for a school tour of Boston University and other NCAA universities in October. He came back just in time to help Team Canada West win the World Junior A challenge in mid-November, and then committed to Boston University. A shoulder injury ended his season 26 games in and was the beginning of the end of the Grizzlies’ season. But the Canucks and Boston University saw enough of what they liked. Habscheid’s resignation comes as a surprise. His family relocated to Victoria in 2011 so he could continue his role with the Royals, although he is not leaving the Royals’ family per se. He has taken an executive role as an advisor with GSL Holdings Ltd., which owns RG Properties Ltd. (owner of the Royals), Officepools.com, a successful hockey pool website, and the chain of Planet Ice community rinks in B.C. His successor will likely be named within a month. Across town, local finance man Ron Walchuk took majority ownership of the Grizz and hired Bestwick. sports@vicnews.com


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Rain delay The crummy weather which kept Union JumpShip spectators to a minimum on Friday and Saturday, lifted for a wellattended finale on Sunday. The Inner Harbour sparkled with spandex on Sunday as 1,650 Tour de Victoria cyclists finished in front of the legislature, adding to the thousands of cyclist fans who turned up for the last day of the Victoria International Cycling Festival. Bottom right: Jillian Legare and Meaghan Thorkelson come prepared for Saturday’s showers. The two were part of an enthusiastic crowd which braved the wind and rain that cancelled the JumpShip contest on Saturday.

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AArchery h Athletics Badminton Bocce Bridge Carpet Bowling Cribbage Cycling Darts Dragon Boats Five Pin Bowling Floor Curling Golf Horseshoes Ice Curling Ice Hockey Lawn Bowling One-Act Plays Pickleball Slo-Pitch Snooker Soccer Swimming Table Tennis Tennis Whist

BAY NEWS

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

SPORTS STATS

Wolverines: Declann Micheilin, defensive player of the game Registration for fall football season, nineman (Victoria Hitmen & Victoria Outlaws) for players aged nine to 11 years old, and Victoria Renegades for players aged 12 to 13 at www.victoriafootball.ca.

Lacrosse

Football Greater Victoria Minor Football Association Gold Cup results, June 24 at City Centre Park in Langford Pre-Atom Peninisula Wildcats 14 Saanich Wolverines 12 Wolverines’ Peter Primeau, defensive player of the game Atom Saanich Wolverines 32 Peninsula Wildcats 0 Wolverines’ Ben Periek, offensive player of the game

B.C. Junior A Lacrosse Association GP W L Coquitlam 16 13 3 New West. 15 11 4 Delta 16 10 5 Port Coq. 16 9 7 Langley 17 9 8 Victoria 17 7 10 Burnaby 16 3 13 Nanaimo 17 2 14 Recent scores: Coquitlam 12 Victoria 10 Victoria 9 Langley 11

T Pts 0 26 0 22 1 21 0 18 0 18 0 14 0 6 1 5

Pee Wee Saanich Wolverines 24 Nanaimo Redman 6

B.C. Intermediate-A Lacrosse Association

Western Lacrosse Association

GP W L T Pts Richmond 14 12 2 0 24 Victoria 15 11 4 0 22 Coquitlam 13 10 3 0 20 New West. 14 9 5 0 18 Maple Ridge 14 8 6 0 16 Langley 15 7 8 0 14 Burnaby 11 4 7 0 8 Port Coq. 14 4 10 0 8 Delta 12 2 10 0 4 Nanaimo 16 2 14 0 4 Recent scores: Delta 9 Victoria 16

GP W L Victoria 8 6 2 Langley 10 6 4 Burnaby 11 5 4 Coquitlam 10 5 5 New West. 10 5 5 Nanaimo 8 4 3 Maple Ridge 11 1 9 Recent scores: New West 10 Victoria 12

Pacific Northwest Junior B Lacrosse League GP W L T Pts Westshore 15 12 3 0 24 Saanich 15 10 4 1 21 Peninsula 13 9 4 0 18 Cow. Valley 15 4 8 3 11 Campbell Riv. 16 4 10 2 10 Nanaimo 14 2 12 0 4 Recent scores: Peninsula 6 Nanaimo 3 Cowichan Valley 5 Saanich 16 Saanich 8 Westshore 13 Campbell River 3 Westshore 16

Rank 1 Ranger, Scott 2 Shattler, Jeff Benesch, Ryan Bremner, Cody Small, Corey 6 Veltman, Daryl 7 Stevens, Dane Iannucci, Athan 9 Gajic, Ilija Lowe, Derek Conway, Cory

T 0 0 2 0 0 1 1

Pts 12 12 12 10 10 9 3

WLA leading scorers Team NAI VIC VIC NAI VIC COQ BBY LGY NEW MPR NAI

GP 8 7 7 8 7 10 9 9 8 11 6

G 26 20 16 14 13 14 15 14 14 12 7

A 22 16 20 22 23 21 19 20 19 21 26

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Duncan Tourism Totem Sub-Committee/ Duncan Business Improvement Area Society

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Re: ESTATE OF BESSIE FLORENCE DAVIES, LATE OF VICTORIA, BC, DECEASED. NOTICE is hereby given that creditors and others having claims against the estate of the above deceased are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Executor at Suite 402, 1321 Blanshard Street, P.O. Box 8043, Victoria, BC before the 3rd day of August, 2012, after which date the Executor will distribute the said estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard only to the claims of which it then has notice. The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company Executor By its Solicitors HORNE COUPAR

The City of Duncan Tourism Totem Sub-Committee (City) and the Duncan Business Improvement Area Society (DBIAS) would like to commission a commemorative totem pole to celebrate Duncanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s centennial year. Master Artists with experience carving totem poles are encouraged to submit a proposal that meets the criteria laid out in this Request for Proposals.

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Design Details, SpeciďŹ cations, and Deadlines: Design: Preference is for the Artist to incorporate Coast Salish aspects into the cedar carving. The story depicted will commemorate the 100 year history of the City of Duncan. Log Dimensions and Criteria: The cedar log measurements are to be minimally 30 ft. in length, 2 ft. in diameter at top, and 3 ft. at bottom. The log must be of exceptional quality. Model Totem Poles (maquettes): The applicant selected to carve the Totem Pole must carve and paint to scale, two 18 inch tall yellow cedar totem poles. The maquettes must be completed prior to beginning the carving of the 30 ft. pole. These will serve as models for the actual pole. Completion Date: The two 18 inch tall totem pole maquettes must be completed by October 1, 2012. A penalty up to 10% may be imposed upon failure to meet requirements and deadlines outlined in the RFP and the contract. A realistic timeline for completion of the 30 ft. totem pole must be included with the proposal. For full proposal requirements, please view at www.duncan.ca â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jobs, RFPs & Tenders Three (3) copies of the proposal should be received by 2:00 pm, local time, July 17, 2012 at the Duncan Business Improvement Area Society ofďŹ ce, 203-111 Station Street, Duncan, BC, V9L 1M8. Questions about this Request for Proposals document can be directed to: Peter de Verteuil at 250-746-6126 or via email at peter@duncan.ca

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HELP WANTED

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PETS HAULING

For more information on these roles or to apply online, please visit: www.catalystpaper.com/careers.

WE HAUL CHEAP LTD. Moving & Hauling. (250)8811910. www.wehaulcheap.com

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division. STEEL BUILDING - Huge clearance sale! 20x24 $4,658. 25x28 $5,295. 30x40 $7,790. 32x54 $10,600. 40x58 $14,895. 47x78 $19,838. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca. STEEL BUILDINGS for sale. Need some extra storage or workspace? Alpine Steel Buildings is an authorized Metallic Builder. Kelowna company with 1300+ sold. 1-800565-9800. www.alpinesteelbuildings.com

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS CLOSE OUT sale, Sidney Musicworks. 40%-80% off everything! Last day; June 30th, 4pm. 2353 Bevan Ave, Sidney. (250)656-1900.

SPORTING GOODS WANTED: DUMBBELL Weights (inexpensive) for working out. 250-514-6688.

REAL ESTATE BUSINESSES FOR SALE LIVE THE Dream. Harbours End Marine, 27 year history on beautiful Salt Spring Island, BC “the best place on earth!” Owner retiring, well-established business only $129,000 email: bjg_cormorant@shaw.ca

FOR SALE BY OWNER

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391. SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

4210 QUADRA 3250 sq.ft. 5-bdrm, 3 bath. Private, well-kept yard. Lot size 11,000 sq.ft. Must be seen! $619,000. (250)479-1194.

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

ARIAT TALL BOOTS. Leather upper, woman’s size 7.5, regular calf, medium height. Worn once, excellent condition, still need breaking in. Originally $400, asking $250 obo. 250391-5992, leave message.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

BUILDING SUPPLIES www.catalystpaper.com

WORD PROCESSOR, Brother, portable, daisy wheel. $10. obo. (250)721-0308.

HOUSEHOLD GOODS SALE Everything Must Go! Furniture, bedding, dishes, books, lamps, etc. German language VHS tapes. Call (250)384-1573.

CAYCUSE Well-Maintained Recreational Property/Home 1500 sq.ft, 3 bdrm 2 bath, 5 acres, garage. A stone throw from pristine Cowichan Lake. $399,900. Furnished. Ready to move in! Call 250-478-2648 or 250-745-3387.

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

ROY VICKERS PRINTS. Complete set, 13 original Roy Vickers limited edition prints with certificates. All professionally framed. All the same print number, which can’t happen again. Series of 100 prints and all of this set are #77. Asking $33,000 for complete one of a kind 13 print set. Call 250-245-2263 (Ladysmith).

FREEZER, $20 obo. (250)656-1673 mornings only.

th

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

ESTATE & Like New Furniture, Mattresses, Tools & More! No HST Stock Reduction Sale! BUY & SAVE, 9818 4th St., Sidney. We Buy, Sell & Trade. buyandsave.ca

COMPLETE SET 1939 Cambridge History of English Literature, $30. (250)656-2477

Licensed, Government Approved, BBB Accredited.

1 to 4 Class Power Engineers Electrician Instrument Mechanic Millwright Pipefitter

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

BAVARIAN DINNER SET for 8 + serving dishes. Variety of glasses, different styles. 1000’s collectible German books for your library. Call (250)592-7188.

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

Our mills on Vancouver Island and the Sunshine Coast are now accepting résumés for: st

BAY NEWS

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other financing options available to qualified applicants.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


www.oakbaynews.com â&#x20AC;˘ A23

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, June 27, 2012 REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

FOR SALE BY OWNER

VICTORIA

APARTMENT/CONDO

ANTIQUE/CLASSICS

AUTO FINANCING

CARS

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

ROCKLAND AREA Apt, lrg 1 bdrm, incls heat & H/W, $780 (Immed) 250-370-2226 to view

GUARANTEED

Auto Loans or We Will Pay You $1000

MODULAR HOMES WESTSHORE. 3-BDRM, 2 bath. $5000. cash back! 671 Daymeer Pl. (250)884-3862. Complete details/ more pics at www.propertyguys.com ID# 192309

HOUSES FOR SALE COWICHAN BAY-Oceanfront, $425,000. The Cowichan Bay Stilt Homes are rarely offered for sale and this one is absolutely charming. 3 bdrm, updated interior, 5 appls, large deck & priv dock. Perfect for vacation style at home living or just a weekend getaway. Ben at 250-732-1710 to view.

1362 GRANT ST (Fernwood) MLS #309272 SELLER VERY MOTIVATED! bright 2 bdrm, 2 bath, character duplex, lrg priv fenced back yrd. Lisa, (250)882-0868.

OTHER AREAS 20 ACRES- Only $99/mo. $0 Down, Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Money Back Guarantee! Free Color Brochure. 1-800-755-8953. www.sunsetranches.com

HOMES FOR RENT PROSPECT LAKE, spacious 1 bdrm in exec home, hrdwd ďŹ&#x201A;rs, granite counters, lndry room, priv ent, access to lake, patio w/ beautiful view, $1250 mo. Call (250)383-9966.

All Makes, All Models. New & Used Inventory.

1-888-229-0744 or apply at: www.greatcanadianautocredit.com

1956 CONSUL MKI Estate Wagon, ONE OF APPROX 15 IN THE WORLD. Body, paint and motor all done. Lots of new parts. The car needs assembly. Will Trade for British and Cash. MUST SELL. No Time. Have all receipts. Call 250-490-4150 (Penticton, BC).

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO

SUITES, LOWER

FA I R F I E L D / VA N C O U V E R , 1bdrm, hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors. Heat, hot water, storage, parking incl $795 ns or pets. 250-383-1491

COLWOOD- COZY 1 bdrm bsmt suite, $700 inclds utils & wiďŹ . Close to Royal Roads Univ, shopping, Galloping Goose trail. Pet friendly, N/S. Avail now. Refs. 250-294-5516 SIDNEY- BRIGHT 1 bdrm + den above ground suite, new carpet, priv patio, all inclusive but cable/internet. NP/NS. $900/mo. Call 250-880-1414.

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427 1960 ENGLISH Morris Minnor Conv. Must sell, new top, tires, rear seal, top end, carpets, etc. (Penticton, BC). Was $10,000, now asking $8000 obo. Call 250-490-4150.

AUTO FINANCING

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 ďŹ rm. 250-755-5191.

WANTED TO RENT PROFESSIONAL FAMILY requires 2 or 3 bedroom rental $1400 or under in FairďŹ eld, Oak Bay, Esquimalt or Gorge/Saanich for Sept 1. Must allow 2 small well trained dogs. Please call 250-8842295.

Call: 1-250-616-9053

CARS

149,000 km, grey colour excellent condition. $7,000.00 (250)514-4535

SIDNEY: 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 appls, utils included, N/S. $1500. July 1. (778)426-4262.

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell? Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call us ďŹ rst & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

2003 BUICK RENDEZVOUS

SUITES, UPPER

WE BUY HOUSES

WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in June, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. 1-888-593-6095. www.creditdrivers.ca

SPORTS & IMPORTS

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

SIDNEY: BRIGHT, 2 bdrm. Yard, storage. Updated unit, parking, W/D, NS/NP. Refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 1 yr lease, avail July 15. $900 mo + utils. 778-426-4556.

HOMES WANTED

Must be employed w/ $1800/mo. income w/ drivers license. DL #30526

AUTO SERVICES

SHARED ACCOMMODATION GOLDSTREAM AREA1400sq ft, newly furnished, w/d, d/w, a/c, big deck & yard, hi-def TV, parking. $650 inclusive. Ray, 778-433-9556.

PANORAMIC MOUNTAIN & Ocean Views. 11yr old, 2,480 sq.ft. 3bdrm, 2.5baths, on 1.5 secluded acres in gated community 20 mins. N of Qualicum Beach. Double garage, paved driveway, RV parking, heat pump, landscaped yard with pond. $489,000. (250)7523023 or (250)720-207 Email: cerritos68@gmail.com

www.webuyhomesbc.com

JUNE SPECIAL Brand New 16â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wide Modular Homes. From $69,900 Double Wide Modular 1350 sq ft from $99,900 mark@eaglehomes.ca

$50-$1000 CASH DreamCatcher Auto Loans â&#x20AC;&#x153;0â&#x20AC;? Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557

This beautiful 2004 Volkswagen Touareg has been well maintained. With only 135,000 KM on an economical and spirited V6 engine, all wheel drive and tow hitch with electric brakes. Unique 6 spd Tiptronic auto transmission which will do the shifting for you or let you shift yourself for a sportier driving exp. Boasting a well equipped interior, rear mounted CD changer, this SUV cannot be missed! $15,900

(250)658-1123 mjmarshall@telus.net

1999 MERCEDES BENZ C230, 4 doors, white, very good condition, recent overhaul & service. Senior driven. $5600 obo. (250)658-5055. RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

1992, 26 ft TRAVELAIRE, Class C Motorhome. Bright, clean, sleeps 4. Twin beds in back and fold down double bed. Excellent and clean condition. Full shower with skylight, gas generator, air conditioning, second owner, new internal batteries (worth $600), new water pump, only 91,300 km. Reliable, clean and functional. REDUCED to $14,250. (250) 748-3539

TRUCKS & VANS 2004 F350 Lariat Crew Cab short Box, 127,800k. Towing package with 5th wheel foot and tool box. Fully loaded. For sale by owner, located in Colwood, $20,000. 250-217-4879

4&--:063 $"3'"45 XJUIBDMBTTJmFEBE 

Watch for our Auto Section

IN MOTION

silly ďŹ lly

IN ALL SOUTH VANCOUVER ISLAND COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS

Every Friday

For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away SOOKE NEWS

858-5865

MIRROR

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEĂĽGUIDEĂĽTOĂĽPROFESSIONALĂĽSERVICESĂĽINĂĽYOURĂĽCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

250.388.3535 HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CLEANING SERVICES

DRYWALL

FENCING

GARDENING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

SPOTLESS HOME Cleaning. Affordable, Experienced, Reliable, EfďŹ cient. (250)508-1018

BEAT MY Price! Best workmanship. 38 years experience. Call Mike, 250-475-0542.

DECKS/FENCES, licensed & insured. Call Fred (250)5145280. thelangfordman.com

AURICLE LAWNS- Superior lawn care-gardens, hedges & fert-weed mgmt. 882-3129

ELECTRICAL

COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites and more. Call 250-886-8053.

250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Expert: new homes &renos. No job too sm#22779.

QUALITY CEDAR fencing, decks and installation, pressure washing. For better prices & quotes call Westcoast Fencing. 250-588-5920.

DPM SERVICES, lawn & garden, landscape, power wash, etc. 15yrs exp. (250)883-8141

EWINGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOVING & Hauling. Apartment & Condo relocation specialist. $80/hr. Call Dave at 250-857-2864.

COMPUTER SERVICES

250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates.

CONCRETE & PLACING

AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550.

CertiďŹ ed General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601 PENNIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237.

RBC CONCRETE Finishing. All types of concrete work. No job too small. Seniors discount. Call 250-386-7007.

CARPENTRY

CONTRACTORS

GEOFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RENOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S & Repairs. Decks, stairs, railings, gates & small additions. 250-818-7977.

250-216-9476 FROM the Ground Up, custom landscapes, home renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, garden clean-ups, accepting clients.

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES GREAT RATES! Guar. cleaning since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d. (250)385-5869 MALTA HOUSECLEANING Estate organizing, events, parties, ofďŹ ce cleaning. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

BATHROOM REMODELING. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gemini Bathsâ&#x20AC;? Plumb, Elec. Tile, Cabinets. 250-896-9302.

EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

LANDSCAPE & TREE care hedges/pruning/shaping. Lawn & garden. Maint. 18 yrs exp. WCB. Andrew, (250)893-3465. QUALITY LAWN Care. Low rates. Support two Oak Bay students paying for UVic. 250 361-0014

U-NEEK SEATS. Hand cane, Danish weave, sea grass. UK Trained. Fran, 250-216-8997.

GARDENING

HANDYPERSONS

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BIG BEAR Handyman & Painting Services. No job too small. Free Estimates. Senior discounts. Barry 250-896-6071 YOUNG SENIOR Handyman. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Call Fred, 250-888-5345.

HAULING AND SALVAGE

J&L GARDENING Specialty yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. John or Louise (250)891-8677

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood ďŹ&#x201A;oor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

BUBBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Perimeter drains, driveway prep, Hardscapes, Lot clearing. Call 250-478-8858.

250-208-8535 WOODCHUCK: Neglected garden? Spring clean-ups, hedges, power raking, aerating, weed/moss stump, blackberry & ivy removal. 24yrs exp. WCB.

YARD ART. Yard Maintenance, Tree & Hedge Pruning, Lawn Care. Call 250-888-3224

DRYWALL

FENCING

AARONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RENOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualiďŹ ed, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com

PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter Cleaning, Repairs, Demossing, Upgrades. WCB, Free estimates. 250-881-2440.

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

#1 JUNK Removal & Hauling. Small Renos. Moving/Packing. Free estimates. Cheapest in town. Same day emergency removal. Call 250-818-4335. $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. PARRYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

â&#x153;­BUBBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HAULINGâ&#x153;­ Honest, on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service. 250-478-8858. SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.


A24 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

PAINTING

PLUMBING

STUCCO/SIDING

CBS MASONRY BBB A+ Accredited Business. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Patios, Sidewalk Repair. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. Call (250)294-9942 or 250-589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com ROMAX MASONRY. Exp’d & Professional. Chimneys, Brick Veneer, Rockwork, Cultured Stone, Interlocking Paving. Fully insured. Estimates. Call 250-588-9471 - 250-882-5181

217-9580 ENIGMA PAINTING Renos, commercial, residential Professional Friendly Service.

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

RE-STUCCO & HARDY Plank/Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

INSULATION MALTA WOOL-BLOWN insulation/ Spray foam application. (250)388-0278. BBB member.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS HAULING & 250-889-5794.

RECYCLING.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

MALTA ASBESTOS, Mold removal. Attics, drywall & more. (250)388-0278. BBB member.

CBS MASONRY BBB A+. Chimney, Fireplaces, Rock, Flagstone, Concrete, Pavers, Repair, Rebuild, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee.” Free Competitive Est’s. Call (250) 294-9942/589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE bcclassified.com

MOVING & STORAGE 2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734. MALTA MOVING. Serving Vancouver Island, surrounding islands and the Mainland. BBB Member. (250)388-0278.

BLAINE’S PAINTING- Quality workmanship. $20 hr, 20 yrs exp. Blaine, 250-580-2602. B L Coastal Coatings. Quality, reliable, great rates. All your painting needs. (250)818-7443 OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

PLUMBING EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

PLASTERING PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

WINDOW CLEANING BOB’S WINDOW Cleaning. Power Washing, Gutters. 25 yrs. 250-884-7066, 381-7127. DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping, Roofs, Roof Demossing, Pressure Washing. 250-361-6190.

RUBBISH REMOVAL

GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-590-2929, 250-812-3213.

STEREO/TV/DVD

WE’RE ON THE WEB

WANTED: DVD PLAYER. Please call 250-514-6688.

bcclassifieds.com Crossword Tilting Was in front Immediately! Atlanta player Isinglass Gambling game Danish currency Implied Give approval to Water nymph Courteous Although Filament Supply with oxygen Land agent Dignified Mode of dress 72. Male turkey 74. Yap 75. Regarding 76. this matter 77. 67. Or’s associate 78. 70. Flightless bird 79. 71. Shortly 80. Answers 81. 82. 83.

ACROSS 1. Peak 4. Greek letter 7. Cattle stick 11. Spot of light 15. Friend 16. Frequently, in poems 17. Garment of India 18. Continental currency 19. Collected sayings 20. Stable morsel 21. Partner for alack 22. Praise 23. Bolted 24. High notes 26. Complain 28. Fastens with cord 30. “Pirates of the Caribbean” drink 31. Citizenship type 32. Barbecue briquettes 35. Deli offering 38. St. Bernard’s cargo

Today’s

40. 41. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 57. 58. 59. 60. 64.

Sudoku

Gold leaf Half a pair Prickly seedcase Traded for cash Of an epoch “Salem’s ____” Double curve Reason Hawaiian goose Sheep’s ma Vary the color of

Old Danish money Mask Lo and ____ Poi party Pupil surrounder Skier’s apparatus Clear tables Carry on Skimpy Tee off Aboard Stir Thyroid, e.g. Extract Narrate Stock trader Spin Bellowing Calendar entry Scheme Pipe material

45. 47. 48. 50. 51. 53. 54. 56. 57. 59. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 73.

Ailment Skewered meat Tattered Gaseous element ____ jacket Level Garment opening Program Obtained Name Implant Miserable Analyze a sentence Catch Organic compound Beaver Cleaver, e.g. Dash of panache Plenty, once Neural network Anger

To solve a Sudoku puzzle, every number 1 to 9 must appear in: • Each of the nine vertical columns • Each of the nine horizontal rows • Each of the nine 3 x 3 boxes

Remember no number can occur more than once in any row, column or box.

Today’s Solution

DOWN 1. Into pieces 2. Maui patio 3. Aircraft 4. Whistle 5. Way off 6. Absolutely 7. Biblical song 8. Congestive sound

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 25. 27. 29. 31. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 42. 43. 44.


www.oakbaynews.com • A25

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Thurs. June 28 and Fri. June 29, NOW EXTENDED UNTIL SAT. JUNE 30, 2012 Save up to 35¢ per litre up to 100 litres at our gas bar. buy this amount save this amount in groceries at our gas bar

250* 150* $ 100*

$

with this coupon and a valid in-store purchase

25¢/L 15¢/L 10¢/L

$

35¢/L 25¢/L 20¢/L

With this coupon and a minimum one time store purchase of $100, save cents per litre as detailed above, up to a maximum of 100 litres. Single fill-up only. STEPS TO REDEEM THIS OFFER: 1. Make an in-store purchase of $100 or more (excluding taxes, prescriptions, tobacco, alcohol, gift cards, phone cards, gas bar, post office, dry cleaning, lottery tickets, and other provincially regulated products) at Real Canadian Superstore from Thursday, June 28, through Thursday, July 5, 2012. 2. Present this coupon along with the valid Superstore receipt to the gas bar cashier at time of gas purchase by Wednesday, July 11, 2012 and save cents per litre, as detailed above, off fuel (not valid on pay-at-pump transactions). Save an additional 10 cents per litre of fuel when paying with a President’s Choice Financial® MasterCard®. One coupon per family purchase and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Cannot be combined with any other coupon or promotional offer. ®PC, President’s Choice, and President’s Choice Financial are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. ®/TM MasterCard and the MasterCard Brand Mark are registered trademarks and PayPass is a trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Bank a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. Redeem at participating stores only.

@.C2

all Tera Gear™ sleeping bags and tents

or save this amount when you pay for your fuel with your PC® Mastercard®

" 

NO TAX

'

ON MOST ITEMS IN-STORE.

'WE PAY THE HST IN ON AND BC, OR THE PST & GST IN MB AND SK. No returns accepted or rain checks issued for taxable items during the promotion. We reserve the right to limit purchases to reasonable family requirements. Offer only valid in participating stores. Cannot be combined with any other promotional offers. Does not apply to prior purchases. EXCLUDES ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, PRESCRIPTIONS, DRY CLEANING, GAS BAR, LOTTERY, POSTAL SERVICES OR PRODUCTS FROM THIRD PARTY BUSINESSES WITHIN OUR STORES.

@.C2

"

 @.C2

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Tera Gear 48K BTU Backyard BBQ grill

$

718165

139

after savings

Tera Gear 62K BTU The Sizzler BBQ grill

$

after savings

395549 / 950610

209

" Bonzai Castle Bouncer $ 97 

Also available in natural gas at select stores.

fast set pool

$

8’ X 26’ 926148

after savings

55

325263

after savings

44

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 Blue Clean electric power washer 1600 PSI 876097

Also save $50 on the RCA 32” Super Slim LED TV, NG 183565, $298 after savings. Quantities are limited and vary by store.

Royal Sovereign portable air conditioners RCA 46” super slim LED TV

$

after savings

89

7,000 and 11,000 BTU 763901 / 189919

$

after savings

97 $

97

299 - 399

62¢ PER BURGER

251558

80

24

each

308697

after savings

Kingston 4 GB USB drive

598

LIMIT 2, AFTER LIMIT 2.98 EACH

PC® Thick & Juicy Bear Paw burgers fresh whole seedless watermelon 40 frozen burgers, 4.54 kg

$

include: 1080p, 120 Hz LED

product of USA 727547

96

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Quantities are limited and vary by store.

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Prices are in effect until Sunday, July 1, 2012 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2012 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

©MasterCard & PayPass are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Back a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial banking services are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC. PC points loyalty program is provided by President’s Choice Services Inc. ©PC, President’s Choice, President’s Choice Financial and Fresh Financial Thinking are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. Trademarks use under licence.


A26 • www.oakbaynews.com

Special Rates for BC Residents!

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

On a quest to remember

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Book online at backyardbc.com Enjoy premium stays by quoting the property code below:

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At night, the lights on Bill Emberly’s merchant navy cargo ship were blacked out, to ward off attack from German u-boats skulking in the ocean. It took three harrowing weeks for convoys of ships to transport goods and personnel from Canada to Britain during the Second World War. The sun is now setting on the aging veterans of Canada’s merchant navy fleet, as well as those military personnel who played a vital role in the Battle of the Atlantic during the war. For that reason, Emberly, who joined the merchant navy as a teen, is on a quest to create a Battle of the Atlantic monument that would be unique to the Island. It would pay homage to Canada’s civilian merchant navy, the Royal Canadian Navy vessels that escorted the merchant ships and Royal Canadian Air Force bomber planes that patrolled the skies above. “It was a six-year campaign, night and day, chased by

Erin McCracken/News staff

Merchant navy veteran Bill Emberly is asking for permission to install a monument in Memorial Park in Esquimalt, honouring the efforts of the Canadian navy, merchant navy and air force in the Battle of the Atlantic, during the Second World War. submarines and everything else,” Emberly recently told Esquimalt council, when he requested to place the monument in the township’s Memorial Park. “Britain was starving to death. The war could not have been won without that convoy fleet.” The black marble memorial, valued at $7,000, would not cost Esquimalt taxpayers anything, Emberly said. He said he has people lined up to pay for the cairn and the installation of the monument’s base.

“It’s almost too late for even thinking about this,” said Emberly, 84. “The average age of the merchant seaman is 87 years.” Between 50 and 60 merchant seamen, on average, pass away every year, he said. “This is a thing that we should never forget; there was 60,000 to 70,000 men who died (in the battle).” The monument would feature engraved images of a Canadian merchant navy cargo tanker, a navy corvette ship and an air force bomber.

“I think that we should be honouring all those who have helped make our life what it is today,” said Coun. Tim Morrison. Esquimalt municipal staff have been asked to bring back a report to council, as well as seek input from the township’s parks and recreation and heritage advisory committees. “I think it’s a worthy thing for us to consider, and we need to figure out how we might be able to do that,” Coun. Lynda Hundleby said. emccracken@vicnews.com

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A2 â&#x20AC;˘ www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

OAK BAY NEWS -

BAY NEWS

www.oakbaynews.com â&#x20AC;˘ A27

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

M E AT & P O U LTRY | F I S H & S E A F O O D Fresh!

F R E S H FA R M & O R G A N I C P R O D U C E

Fresh!

Chicken Breasts Pork Sausages

Marinating Steak

298

All Size Packages 6.57 Kg

Sirloin Tip Boneless Premium AAA Beef Aged Min. 14 Days 8.13 Kg

Lb

369

Lb

Chicken Wingettes Lilydale Frying Air Chilled 8.13 Kg

369

Hallmark Top Choice I.Q.F. Boneless & Skinless 6.35 Kg 4 Kg Box/Works out to $25.40 a Box

2

88 lb

5

Buns

299

Raspberries

4/$

s(OT$OGs(AMBURGER Fairway 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pack

BC Grown Pint Weather Permitting

2

Corn on the Cob

ea

5/$

California No. 1 Fresh

Lb

Fresh! Fresh!

Fresh!

Pork Tenderloin Canadian Premium Grain Fed Whole Boneless 10.76 Kg

4

Marinating Steak

88

Eye of Round Boneless Premium AAA Beef Aged Min. 14 Days 8.80 Kg

Lb

Snapper Fillets

&RESH0ACIlC 5.85 Lb

Previously Frozen 8.58 Lb

Dutch Boy Assorted 250 Gram Jar

J U N E /J U LY W E D 2 0 12 27

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129 189 499

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Maple Lodge 450 Gram Package

Maple Lodge Frozen Assorted 908 Gram Box

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3

99

Australia Beef Boneless 10.98 Kg

4

98 lb

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2

99

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99

Extra Large Beefsteak BC Grown Canada No. 1 2.18 Kg

ea

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2

99

53.O-INI Seedless Whole

lb

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Ea

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Buy any participating* 12x355mL or 6x710mL PepsiCo soft drinks at any FAIRWAY MARKETâ&#x201E;˘ location and 50¢ will be donated to C-FAX SANTAS ANONYMOUSâ&#x20AC; .

&ORT(ARDYs0REVIOUSLY&ROZENs&ULLY#OOKED 568 Gram Each

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Romaine Lettuce

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599

Island Farms 12 x 125 Gram Package

599

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Baby Carrots

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69

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2/$

French Fries McCain Red Bag Assorted 1 Kg Bag

Pizza s#RESCENDO2ISING#RUST s)NTERNATIONAL McCain Assorted 465-900 Gram Box

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5

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Ice Cream Novelties Popsicle Breyers 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s-12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Frozen Hashbrowns McCain 1 Kg Bag

3

Gorge Centre 272 Gorge Road West, Victoria Shelbourne Plaza 3651 Shelbourne St., Victoria Athlone Court 2187 Oak Bay Ave., Oak Bay Quadra Street Village 2635 Quadra St., Victoria

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California No. 1 Whole

2/$

Lb

4

IC IC

Strawberries California Grown No. 1 #ERTIlED/RGANIC 1 Lb Clamshell

2

99

Spinach 53'ROWN #ERTIlED/RGANIC

2/$

Ea

1521 McKenzie at Cedar Hill Rd., Victoria Westshore Town Centre 2945 Jacklin Rd., Langford Sidney-By-The-Sea 2531 Beacon Ave., Sidney Brentwood Bay Village 7108 W. Saanich Rd., Brentwood

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BBQ Sauce Multipack Yogurt

1

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Mozzarella Cheese

s2EDs'REEN)MPORTED.O Large Seedless 3.73 Kg

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www.fairwaymarkets.com Photos used in this ad are for presentation purposes only. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some advertised items may not be available at some locations.

Pizza s2ISING#RUSTs4HIN#RUST

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TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

359 Chicken Wieners 169 Marinated Chicken Wings 1199 Maple Lodge 375 Gram Package

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Lilydale Frying Air Chilled 8.80 Kg

Strip Loin Grilling Steak

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100 G

Calico Scallops

3

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Chicken Drumettes

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2/$

4

Pickles

Marshmallows

Ketchup

Bickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premium Selected 1 Litre Jar

Kraft 400 Gram Bag

s%ASY3QUEEZE s2EGULAR Heinz 750 mL - 1 Litre Bottle

299

199

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Picnic Pack Heinz 3 x 375 mL Package

499

Chilled Juice Tropicana 1.75 Litre Carton + Dep

399

Medium Grain Rice 15 Lb Bag 3EKKAs7HITEs"ROWN

s3YRUP 460-700 mL Nesquik s0OWDER 540-750 G s)CED4EA Nestea, Good Host 640 Gram - 1 Kg Tin

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Potato Chips Layâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 270 Gram Bag

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Rhubarb Strawberry Pie 550 Gram Each

2/$

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Salad Dressing Kraft Assorted 414-475 mL Bottle

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s7HITE s7HOLE7HEAT Fairway 570 Gram Loaf

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Long Grain Rice 4EXANAs7HITEs"ROWN 2 Kg Bag

Bread

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Cranberry Trail Mix Per 100 Gram

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Ramyun Noodle Bowl Nong Shim 117 Gram Bowl

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249 99

¢

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Fruit Flavour Ice Bars Melona 8 x 80 mL

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349 3

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49¢


A28 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - OAK

®

th

This Friday, June 29 Only! 2 Packages!

Double 15 Roll!

FRIDAY JUNE

29 Gourmet Meat Shoppe Stuffed Chicken Breasts Select varieties. Or Turkey or Veal. Frozen. 284 g. LIMIT SIX. While supplies last.

Corn on the Cob

Sweet Corn!

Purex Bath Tissue

BAY NEWS

Product of U.S.A. No. 1 Grade. LIMIT FIFTEEN.

ea.

Double 15 Roll. WEEKLY HOUSEHOLD LIMIT FOUR.

2 for $5

Hot Price!

Summer Freshh Dips Assorted varieties. 227 g.

Stock Up!

Original TTwo Bite Brownies

Old Spice or Olay Body Wash &295Bar Soap to 532 mL or 2 x 120 g

300 g.

or 4 x 120 g. Select varieties.

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One awarprize EVE ded Y monR th!

AIR MILES® reward miles* Visit www.safeway.ca/emaildirect for details! Become a fan of Safeway! Follow us for more recipes, how-to videos, great savings and AIR MILES® reward miles bonus offers! Prices effective at all British Columbia Safeway stores Friday, June 29, 2012 only. We reserve the right to limit sales to retail quantities. Some items may not be available at all stores. All items while stocks last. Actual items may vary slightly from illustrations. Some illustrations are serving suggestions only. Advertised prices do not include GST. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Canada Safeway Limited. Extreme Specials are prices that are so low they are limited to a one time purchase to Safeway Club Card Members within a household. Each household can purchase the limited items one time during the effective dates. A household is defined by all Safeway Club Cards that are linked by the same address and phone number. Each household can purchase the EXTREME SPECIALS during the specified advertisement dates. For purchases over the household limits, regular pricing applies to overlimit purchases. On BUY ONE GET ONE FREE items, both items must be purchased. Lowest priced item is then free. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

JUNE 29 FRI Prices in this ad good through June 29th.


Oak Bay News, June 27, 2012