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RICHMONDREVIEW.COM

Tall ship sets sail for Steveston 3

REVIEW WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

City targets idling vehicles Proposed bylaw amendments would make idling an offence in Richmond

32 PAGES

A day of caring—and weeding

Idling limits in Metro Vancouver municipalities

by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter Motorists who allow their vehicle to idle longer than three minutes could soon face a $60 fine. City council is considering changes to its traffic and parking regulation bylaws that would make idling on city property—including streets—an offence. Staff presented their proposal at city council’s community safety committee meeting yesterday—five years after elected officials asked staff to research an anti-idling bylaw. Forty-six B.C. municipalities already have bylaws restricting vehicle idling, according to a B.C. Ministry of Environment report cited by staff. “It certainly seems...that other cities are ahead of us on this particular issue,” said Mayor Malcolm Brodie. “Whether we’re trying for cleaner air, to enhance the environment or just to bring about awareness of the issue, it seems that we have to very seriously consider the kinds of bylaws that are being proposed.” Motorists who exit their vehicle while it’s running—for any length of time— would also be committing a bylaw offence. Bylaw officers frequently find vehicles idling unnecessarily on city streets, including large trucks, taxis and charter buses, according to bylaws manager Wayne Mercer. “The availability of an enforcement tool such as a clear and effective by-

•Lions Bay: 1 minute •Richmond: 3 minutes (proposed) •City of North Vancouver: 3 minutes •District of North Vancouver: 3 minutes •New Westminster: 3 minutes •Port Moody: 3 minutes •Surrey: 3 minutes •Vancouver: 3 minutes •Langley Township: 5 minutes •West Vancouver: 5 minutes * Source: City of Richmond law would assist as a deterrent in these instances,” said Mercer in his report. City staff say the impacts of unnecessary idling include a degradation of air quality, climate change and consumption of nonrenewable resources. Mercer acknowledged challenges in implementing idling restrictions. Enforcement by complaint, for example, is ineffective, as idling vehicles will likely have moved by the time an officer arrives. Nonetheless staff say the bylaw changes would serve as a deterrent, and public awareness via new street signs would help drive the restrictions home. New restrictions would also give authorities a new enforcement tool to deal with problem idlers. Motorists waiting in traffic are exempt from the proposed restrictions, as are those on private property. In other words, the bylaw wouldn’t apply to motorists idling in shopping mall parking lots or waiting in restaurant drive-throughs. Mayor Brodie said the wider the bylaw restrictions, the more effective they’d be, but he said city-controlled land is a good place to start. See Page 3

Amanda Oye photo Matthew Tryhuck with Ashton Service Group was among 100 volunteers who helped out at the Sharing Farm at Terra Nova Rural Park last Saturday as part of the first ever Richmond Day of Caring. See p. 14.

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Page 2 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Langley Farm Market LOCAL BUNCHED

LOCAL WHITE (new crop)

product of BC

product of BC (1.08 kg)

GREEN ONION

3 for

POTATOES

¢

¢

99

lb.

COCONUTS product of Thailand

¢ each

BLUEBERRIES

product of California (1 pint clamshell)

2 for

LETTUCE product of BC

2 for

$4.69 $3.99/lb. /lb.

(10.34 ...................................... ($8.80kg).. kg) ........................................

1

$ 00

5

PINEAPPLES product of Hawaii

$ 99

1

MEAT

Beef Sirloin Steaks (AA) (AA) Beef Top Chuck Steaks Boneless

$ 00

DOLE

FRESH

YOUNG

99

49

LOCAL RED, GREEN EEN LEAF LEAF, ROMAINE ROMAINE,

Fresh Wing Shrimp 3FishChicken Frozen Cooked

$1.99 $4.99/lb. ea.

(4.39 ......................................... (400 kg). g) .............................................

each

Black Shrimp Fresh Tiger Beef Short Ribs (AA)

$10.99 $5.49/ea. /lb.

31-40 2 LB. NET ............... (12.10pieces kg) ........................................

GROCERY

Newman's Own Salad Dressing (350 ml) Assorted flavours ...............................................................

$2.98 ea.

(190 ml) Assorted flavours.... ......................................................

Manitoba Harvest Shelled Hemp Seed (227g) .....................................................................................

Knorr Broth (900 ml) Assorted flavours .........................$1.95 ea. Edmond Fallot Mustard

$1.99 ea.

Foods Flour $6.99 ea. Rogers (2.5 kg) Assorted flavours.... ............................................................ 2/7.00

BAKERY Opera Cake (4" x 8").................................................. $10.00 ea.

Mango Swiss Roll (600 g) .................................. ...$4.50 ea.

Almond Square (2" x 2")...................................... ...$0.65 ea.

Cranberry Cake (265 g)................................... ...$2.99 pack

DELI Freybe Honey Ham

.................................

Freybe Lyoner Sausage

$0.99 /100g

............................................... ...

....................................................

Swiss Cheese

$0.79 /100g

$1.59 /100g

..................................................... .

Prices in effect Wed. June 13 - Sun. June 17, 2012. While Quantities Last


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 3

Kaisei sets sail for Steveston California-based tall ship heading to Ships to Shore festival at Imperial Landing by Matthew Hoekstra Staff Reporter

Port of San Diego photo The steel-hulled Kaisei will sail into Steveston later this month for the Ships to Shore festival. Admission to the three-day event is free.

A two-masted sailing ship that’s shed light on vast islands of ocean garbage is coming to Steveston for Ships to Shore. The 46-metre (151-feet) Kaisei will be among a trio of classic tall ships sailing into Imperial Landing June 29 for the threeday festival. “The Kaisei is the biggest of the ships that we’ll have in port for Ships to Shore this year. It is a beautiful tall ship itself, but what really makes it interesting is its primary role is environmental and scientific research,” said Ted Townsend, city spokesperson. Kaisei, a Japanese name roughly interpreted as “Ocean Planet,” has served as the iconic vessel behind research expeditions of Project Kaisei, a group that formed in 2008 to stem the flow of plastic and marine debris into the Pacific Ocean. Drawing attention to the volumes of plastic accumulating in the ocean over the past 50 years was the group’s initial focus, but Project Kaisei has since become an organization dedicated to finding solutions to how the world treats waste—much of which finds its way to sea. “For too long we’ve been using our oceans as dumping grounds and we’re starting to see the consequences of that. The Kaisei is engaged in trying to find ways to mitigate and reverse the damage that’s been done to our oceans,” said Townsend. Launched in 1990, the steel-hulled Kaisei is based in California and operated by Ocean Voyages Institute. It has frequently travelled to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch—a huge collection of marine litter in the North Pacific—to determine the feasibility of collection and recycling. The ves-

teacher and would love for her efforts and genuine kindness and love to be recognized." Bajramovic is one of 13 semifinalists selected from across Canada from a pool of 500 nominees. The top three candidates will receive a cash prize of $2,500 to be used toward programming and supplies for their school and will be featured in the September issue of Canadian Family magazine. To vote for Edina, visit tinyurl. com/EdinaBa. Voting closes on June 30, 2012.

•Tall ships festival featuring Kaisei, Hawaiian Chieftain, HMCS Oriole •At Imperial Landing, Bayview Street and No. 1 Road in Steveston Village •Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 29 and 30, and from 12:30 to 5 p.m. on July 1 •Ship boarding is free, but space is limited and scheduled activities vary •Visitors are encouraged to visit richmond.ca/shipstoshore in advance for boarding details and an up-to-date schedule of events •Select ships will also be offering day sails and youth day camps; visit richmond.ca/register or call 604-2764300 to register sel has also been tracking tsunami debris floating across the Pacific from Japan. Joining the Kaisei is another pair of tall ships, Hawaiian Chieftain and the Canadian Navy’s HMCS Oriole, both of which visited Steveston last year. Two schooners, Mallory Todd and Grail Dancer, will also be on display, along with the historic steam tug SS Master and Vancouver Island cutter Carlotta. Britannia Heritage Shipyard’s Silver Ann gillnetter will also join the festival, as will Juanita, a replica Spanish longboat, saluting one of the original European explorers of the B.C. coast. The final day of the event coincides with the Steveston Salmon Festival on Canada Day, July 1. “It’s going to be an exciting weekend in Steveston,” said Townsend, who noted Britannia Heritage Shipyard and Gulf of Georgia Cannery will also be open. “It’s going to be a great place to be.” Garry Point Park hosted the first Ships to Shore event one year ago, drawing four tall ships—Hawaiian Chieftain, Lady Washington, Zodiac and Adventuress— and attracting an estimated 40,000 people over four days. City council approved spending up to $115,000 to host this year’s festival.

$60 fine considered for first-time violators

Hamilton teacher up for great teacher award A Richmond teacher is in the running for Canadian Family magazine's sixth annual Great Teacher Awards. Edina Bajramovic, a kindergarten teacher at Alexander Hamilton Elementary School, is recognized as a national finalist thanks to her supportive and encouraging nature. "Edina takes it upon herself to ensure that each child has the best life possible," said one parent. "She 'raises' her students by teaching them kindness, sharing and overall caring. We know she is the most deserving

Ships to Shore Steveston 2012

Edina Bajramovic, a kindergarten teacher at Alexander Hamilton Elementary School, is recognized as a national finalist thanks to her supportive and encouraging nature.

From Page 1 “We can measure its effectiveness and, once it’s in place, see if it’s working for us and whether we should be increasing it in scope.” Andrew Gage, a staff lawyer at West Coast Environmental Law, said cities can extend idling restrictions to private property—and some B.C. communities have. “Almost all of the clean air bylaws are based on powers related to public health, powers related to nuisance. None of which are restricted to public lands. If they’re restricting it to public lands that’s a political choice.” Other exemptions under the proposed anti-idling rules extend to emergency

vehicles, tow trucks, armoured vehicles, utility service vehicles and bylaw enforcement vehicles. Also exempt are vehicles used in parades, those carrying passengers where loading or unloading can take more than three minutes and vehicles in which a running engine is required to power onboard equipment. City council has yet to vote on the new measures. The proposed $60 fine rises to $100 if not paid within 61 days. The city began cracking down on idling within its own fleet in 2004. Richmond School District followed the next year with anti-idling initiatives around schools.


Page 4 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Notice of Public Hearing Monday, June 18, 2012 - 7 p.m. Council Chambers, Richmond City Hall 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000 Fax: 604-278-5139

TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the City of Richmond will hold a Public Hearing as noted above, on the following items: 1. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8750 (RZ 06-344606)

3. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8825 (RZ 11-582830)

Location/s:

22560, 22600, 22620 Gilley Road

Location/s:

4820 Garry Street

Applicant/s:

Armit Maharaj

Applicant/s:

Kaiman Enterprises Co. Ltd.

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Single Detached (RS2/A)”, to permit development of two (2) single-family lots.

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/B)” to “Town Housing (ZT11) – Hamilton”, to permit development of a 35 unit townhouse project with vehicle access provided from Gilley Road only. City Contact: Kevin Eng 604-247-4626 Planning and Development Department

City Contact: Edwin Lee 604-276-4121 Planning and Development Department BYLAW 8825 5. Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw 8888

BYLAW 8750

2. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8769 (RZ 10-516267)

4. Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw 8880 and Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8881 (RZ 12-601319)

Location/s:

9160 No. 2 Road

Location/s:

23591 Westminster Highway

Applicant/s:

Western Maple Lane Holdings Ltd.

Applicant/s:

City of Richmond

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Medium Density Townhouses (RTM3)”, to permit development of eighteen (18) threestorey townhouse units on the site with vehicle access from Maple Road. City Contact: Edwin Lee 604-276-4121 Planning and Development Department BYLAW 8769

BYLAWS 8880 AND 8881

Purpose of OCP Designation Amendment: To amend the Land Use Designation in the Hamilton Area Plan to designate the subject property “Community Facilities” in order to permit child daycare use. Purpose of Zoning Amendment: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/F)” to “School & Institutional Use (SI)”, to permit development of a 33 space licensed child daycare facility. City Contact: David Brownlee 604-276-4200 Planning and Development Department

Location/s:

City Centre Area

Applicant/s:

City of Richmond

Purpose: To amend Richmond Official Community Plan Bylaw 7100, Schedule 2.10 (City Centre Area Plan) to clarify that within the City Centre the City may, in its discretion, include in the calculation of site area (for the purpose of determining buildable floor area) lands voluntarily dedicated or otherwise transferred to the City (i.e., fee simple lot) by developers for minor streets, lanes, mews, parks, and open spaces for which Richmond’s Development Cost Charge (DCC) program provides no financial compensation. City Contact: Suzanne Carter-Huffman 604-276-4228 Planning and Development Department 6. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8890 (RZ 11-586782) Location/s:

6471, 6491, and 6511 No. 2 Road

Applicant/s:

Matthew Cheng Architect Inc.

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Low Density Townhouses (RTL4)”, to permit development of 15 townhouse units. City Contact: Edwin Lee 604-276-4121 Planning and Development Department

Notice of Public Hearing continued on next page. City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 5

6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000 Fax: 604-278-5139 BYLAW 8895

Notice of Public Hearing continued BYLAW 8890

10. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8902 (RZ 09-496145) Location/s:

7840 Bennett Road

Applicant/s:

Timothy Tse

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Infill Residential (RI2)”, to permit development of two (2) new lots, each with a front and back duplex, and vehicular access from the proposed rear lane extension only.

7. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8893 (RZ 12-600991) Location/s:

6471 Blundell Road

Applicant/s:

Xi Chen (Chen Design Studio)

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Coach Houses (RCH)”, to permit development of two (2) coach house lots each with a single-family residence on it and a second dwelling unit above a garage, with vehicle access from a rear lane extension. City Contact: Edwin Lee 604-276-4121 Planning and Development Department BYLAW 8893

9. Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw 8900 and Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8901 (RZ 11-596457) Location/s:

7431 Francis Road

Applicant/s:

Avion Homes Ltd.

To redesignate the subject property from “Community Institutional” to “Low-Density Residential” in Attachment 2 to Schedule 1 of Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 7100 (Specific Land Use Map).

City Contact:

Edwin Lee 604-276-4121 Planning and Development Department

BYLAWS 8900 AND 8901

8. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8895 (RZ 10-522194) 11340 Williams Road

Applicant/s:

Khalid Hasan

Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Compact Single Detached (RC2)”, to permit development of two (2) compact single family lots with vehicle access from an existing rear lane. City Contact: Edwin Lee 604-276-4121 Planning and Development Department

City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca

BYLAW 8902

Purpose of OCP Designation Amendment: To redesignate the subject property from “Community Institutional” to “Neighbourhood Residential” in Attachment 1 to Schedule 1 of Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 7100 (Generalized Land Use Map); and

Purpose of Zoning Amendment: To rezone the subject property from “Assembly (ASY)” to “Single Detached (RS2/E)”, to permit development of a single-family dwelling on site.

Location/s:

City Contact: Edwin Lee 604-276-4121 Planning and Development Department

11. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8904 Location/s:

City-Wide

Applicant/s:

City of Richmond

Purpose: To set a maximum height for freestanding telecommunication towers and antennas at 15 m (48 ft.) or the maximum accessory structure height in a given zone, whichever is greater; and allow for buildingmounted telecommunication antennas to extend 3.0 m (9.8 ft.) above the maximum building height permitted in the zone. City Contact: Mark McMullen 604-276-4173 Planning and Development Department 12. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8884 (RZ 11-585209) Location/s:

7731 & 7771 Alderbridge Way

Applicant/s:

Onni 7731 Alderbridge Holding Corp. and Onni 7771 Alderbridge Holding Corp.

Notice of Public Hearing continued on next page.


Page 6 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

‘Most wanted’ rioter attacked PROTECT Richmond Good Samaritan HOME or BUSINESS YOUR

by Martin van den Hemel

• • • • • •

Security Systems CCTV Cameras DVRs Investigations Consulting Debugging

Phone: 604 - 251 – 2121 Email: okaban@telus.net

Staff Reporter Charges were recommended Tuesday by police investigators against more than two dozen suspected rioters allegedly involved in last June’s Stanley Cup riots in Downtown Vancouver. But one individual who’s eluded identification thus far, has been deemed the “Most Wanted” outstanding suspect, one of the 15 people who attacked Richmond Good Samaritan Robert Mackay. Mackay stood between dozens of people and the plate glass windows of The Bay, urging them to back off and not loot the retail store. Mackay was swarmed by 15 people in a scene recorded on video, which showed he was kicked, punched and beaten until two teens stepped in: Richmond’s Dean Seskin, then 18, and Chris McLelland, then 19. Thus far, 14 people have been identified in Mackay’s beating, of which 12 have been charged, and two remain under investigation.

“Today, we are doing another appeal for citizens to go to our website to help us identify our 10 worst unidentified rioters,” Vancouver Police Chief Const. Jim Chu said. “After a year of investigating the riot, we asked our investigators for the offenders who have not been identified yet and who were particularly violent. Number one is the man who is the sole unidentified suspect in the vicious and cowardly attack of a Good Samaritan, Mr. Robert Mackay, in front of the Hudson’s Bay store.” The city’s Integrated Riot Investigation Team will be downsizing, with these officers borrowed from surrounding jurisdictions, including New Westminster, West Vancouver and Abbotsford, returning to their detachments. “I would like to thank these officers and their chiefs for helping with what was a massive investigation,” Chu said. By the time the investigation wraps up, more than 300 people will face more than 900 criminal charges. See Page 7

Police have identified 14 of 15 suspects in the attack of a Good Samaritan. The person pictured above is the 15th suspect.

6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000 Fax: 604-278-5139

Notice of Public Hearing continued Purpose: To rezone the subject property from “Industrial Retail (IR1)” to “High Density Low Rise Apartments (RAH2)” and make minor amendments to the RAH2 zone in order to facilitate development of a 660-unit project in four, six-storey woodframe buildings over two (2) concrete parking structures. City Contact: Mark McMullen 604-276-4173 Planning and Development Department BYLAW 8884

How to obtain further information: • By Phone: If you have questions or concerns, please call the CITY CONTACT shown above. • On the City Website: Public Hearing Agendas, including staff reports and the proposed bylaws, are available on the City Website at http://www.richmond.ca/cityhall/ council/agendas/hearings/2012.htm • At City Hall: Copies of the proposed bylaw, supporting staff and Committee reports and other background material, are also available for inspection at the Planning & Development Department at City Hall, between the hours of 8:15 am and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, except statutory holidays, commencing June 8, 2012 and ending June 18, 2012, or upon the conclusion of the hearing. • By Fax or Mail: Staff reports and the proposed bylaws may also be obtained by FAX or by standard mail, by calling 604-2764007 between the hours of 8:15 am and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, except statutory holidays, commencing June 8, 2012 and ending June 18, 2012. Participating in the Public Hearing process: • The Public Hearing is open to all members of the public. If you believe that you are affected by the proposed bylaw, you may make a

City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca

presentation or submit written comments at the Public Hearing. If you are unable to attend, you may send your written comments to the City Clerk’s Office by 4 pm on the date of the Public Hearing as follows: • By E-mail: using the on-line form at http:// www.richmond.ca/cityhall/council/hearings/ about.htm • By Standard Mail: 6911 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC, V6Y 2C1, Attention: Director, City Clerk’s Office • By Fax: 604-278-5139, Attention: Director, City Clerk’s Office • Public Hearing Rules: For information on public hearing rules and procedures, please consult the City website at http://www. richmond.ca/cityhall/council/hearings/about.htm or call the City Clerk’s Office at 604-276-4007. • All submissions will form part of the record of the hearing. Once the Public Hearing has concluded, no further information or submissions can be considered by Council. It should be noted that the rezoned property may be used for any or all of the uses permitted in the “new” zone. David Weber Director, City Clerk’s Office


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Rioter gets jail time

Richmond Review · Page 7

Britannia restoration now in hands of committee by Matthew Hoekstra

From Page 1 Meanwhile, a young Surrey man was shocked Monday when a Vancouver provincial court judge sent him to jail for a month for his involvement in the riot. Emmanuel Alviar pled guilty to mischief and participating in a riot. The drywaller and former choir singer turned himself in to police early in the investigation. Vancouver provincial court Judge Reg Harris said the size, duration and damage done by the riot requires a substantial deterrent. He was also handed 16 months probation, 150 hours of community service, and was ordered to write letters of apology to Vancouver’s mayor and its chief of police. Crown prosecutors have charged 104 accused rioters so far and police are seeking charges against at least 120 more. The largest number charged so far– 44–are from Surrey, followed by 38 from Vancouver, 27 from Burnaby, 19 from Richmond, 14 from North Vancouver, 11 from Delta, eight in Langley and seven each in Abbotsford and Maple Ridge. —with files from Black Press

Staff Reporter A new committee will oversee the restoration of three remaining projects at Britannia Heritage Shipyard, city council decided Monday. Councillors Bill McNulty and Harold Steves will serve on the sevenmember building committee, which will determine the future of a trio of unrestored buildings on the heritage site: the seine net loft, Japanese duplex and First Nations bunkhouse. Other committee members will include three members of the Britannia Heritage Shipyard Society, the site’s supervisor and a city manager. The 3.3-hectare (8.1-acre) city-owned site has 12 buildings, a number of which have already been restored. Canada declared Britannia a National Historic Site in 1992. An estimated 55,000 people visited the site last year—nearly half attending the Richmond Maritime Festival, according to a staff report.

SUMMER 2012

ƌŽŽŌŽƉ ŐĂƌĚĞŶ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ Where nature paints and art blooms Where plants gather and people grow Where seeds oĨ tradiƟon harǀest innoǀaƟon ZŝĐŚŵŽŶĚ͛ƐƌŽŽŌŽƉŐĂƌĚĞŶ͕ƚŚĞƵƌďĂŶĐŽƵƐŝŶŽĨdĞƌƌĂEŽǀĂ͕ ŝƐůŽĐĂƚĞĚĂƚƚŚĞZŝĐŚŵŽŶĚ>ŝďƌĂƌLJͬƵůƚƵƌĂůĞŶƚƌĞ͘&ŽƌŵĞƌůLJ ĂŚŽŵĂŐĞƚŽĐŽŶĐƌĞƚĞ͕ƚŚĞƐƉĂĐĞŚĂƐďĞĞŶƚƌĂŶƐĨŽƌŵĞĚŝŶƚŽ ĂŐƌĞĞŶŽĂƐŝƐ͘dŚĞŐĂƌĚĞŶǁŝůůŚŽƐƚŽƵƚĚŽŽƌĂƌƚƐĞǀĞŶƚƐĂŶĚ ŝŶŶŽǀĂƟǀĞƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐƌĂŶŐŝŶŐĨƌŽŵŐƌŽǁŝŶŐĨŽŽĚŝŶƐŵĂůů ƐƉĂĐĞƐƚŽǁĂƚĞƌĐŽŶƐĞƌǀĂƟŽŶƚĞĐŚŶŝƋƵĞƐ͘

Real estate sales continue to slow Richmond’s real estate market is continuing to cool in terms of sales volume, according to the latest figures from the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver. May sales of condos were down 23 per cent, and May sales of single detached homes were down 11.5 per cent, compared to April 2012. But median selling prices remained strong, with the median house price of $985,000, up 1.1 per cent, and median condo price at

$355,000, up 4.1 per cent. The number of townhouses that changed hands was up slightly in May compared to April, up 8.5 per cent, with the median price virtually unchanged in that period, at $518,000. “Home sellers have outpaced buyers in recent months, however, there continues to be an overall balance between supply and demand in our marketplace,” said board president Eugen Klein.

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Page 8 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

opinion the richmond

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EDITOR BHREANDÁIN CLUGSTON, 604-247-3730 editor@richmondreview.com STAFF REPORTERS MATTHEW HOEKSTRA, 604-247-3732 mhoekstra@richmondreview.com MARTIN VAN DEN HEMEL, 604-247-3733 martin@richmondreview.com SPORTS EDITOR DON FENNELL, 604-247-3731 sports@richmondreview.com

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CIRCULATION MANAGER RACHAEL FINKELSTEIN, 604-247-3710 circulation@richmondreview.com CIRCULATION JR TUAZON, ROYA SARWARY, 604-247-3710 circulation@richmondreview.com

CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER JAANA BJORK, 604-247-3716 jaana@richmondreview.com CREATIVE DEPARTMENT GABE MUNDSTOCK, 604-247-3718 gabe@richmondreview.com PETER PALMER, 604-247-3706 peter@richmondreview.com JAMES MARSHALL, 604-247-3701 james@richmondreview.com The Richmond Review is a member of the B.C. Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the council. Write (include documentation) within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org Published every Wednesday and Friday by Black Press Ltd.

EDITORIAL: No reason for Conservatives’ omnibus bill

T

he Conservative government is set to pass Bill C-38, an omnibus budget bill which includes amendments and changes to many statutes. This has prompted a massive backlash from a number of groups, notably environmental groups. One aspect of their protest was the voluntary blacking out of a number of websites on June 4. While some of their rhetoric is overblown, it is puzzling why a majority Conservative government feels it needs to proceed in this way. If it wishes to amend specific statutes, why not do so, with-

out packaging a huge variety of changes in one bill? The Conservatives got used to doing this in their five years as a minority government. It was one way to keep at least one opposition party on side — put something in the budget bill that they wanted, and they would vote for it. It was an understandable tactic. The government had to compromise to the degree that it would propose legislation that one of its opponents would back. In fact, the Conservatives did have to go to the polls in 2008 and 2011 after it became clear that no opposition party was willing to back them any longer.

Now there is a majority government. No longer does the government have to keep one opposition party on side. And that’s fine. The parliamentary system is an adversarial one, with government and opposition on different sides of almost every issue. That’s why such omnibus bills don’t seem to make senese. All they do is hamper the public from paying closer attention to what the government’s plans are, and at the same time, raise fears which in many cases are exaggerated or non-existent. If the government doesn’t want to spend too much time on any given bill, it can invoke closure.

There is no longer any stigma about doing so, and the public recognizes the need for the government to be able to enact its plans after there has been reasonable time for debate. It seems that, with some moves like this omnibus budget bill, the Conservatives are deliberately provoking their opponents. While there may be a desire for political vengeance, they need to remember that their majority was granted to them by voters in 2011, only after a five-year testing period. That majority can easily be taken away by voters in the next election. —Langley Times

Goodbye greenhouse gas goals

B.C. Views Tom Fletcher

I

n February this column asked the question: “Are B.C.’s greenhouse gas reduction targets history?” The answer is contained in a new draft plan from BC Hydro on how to meet future power demand. And while it’s not explicitly stated, the answer is yes. The draft plan was released in May for discussion purposes, but so far there hasn’t been much discussion. This is surprising given some of the recommendations, such as firing up the Burrard Thermal natural gas power plant more often and buying fossil fuel power from the North American market to keep up to demand. The plan confirms a few things that have been evident for a while. Dreams of exporting B.C. hydroelectric power are gone for the foreseeable future. And with mining ramping up along with natural gas development and population growth, BC Hydro now projects electricity demand could rise by 50 per cent over the next 20 years. The emergence of huge shale gas sources in B.C. and across the United States has changed the North American

Artist’s rendering shows proposed liquefied natural gas processing and loading facility on Haisla reserve land near Kitimat.

energy picture dramatically, as U.S. electricity producers replace coal by burning cheaper and cleaner gas to ramp up power production. B.C. is losing gas market share in the U.S., its only export customer for heating fuel and electricity use. Former premier Gordon Campbell’s climate goals officially remain in place: 33 per cent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 and a whopping 80 per cent by 2050. If the gas boom proceeds as planned, B.C. domestic emissions will not be down, but up considerably by 2020. Premier Christy Clark has a new target for 2020: three liquefied natural gas production lines feeding high-pressure tankers at Kitimat, for

export to Asia. Not only will B.C. need to buy gas-fired power from outside the province to keep up to industrial and residential demand, but the natural gas industry will need its own new gas-fired electricity to produce LNG for export. Natural gas passed forestry as B.C.’s top resource revenue source many years ago. In 2005, the volatile gas price spiked up and produced $1 billion in windfall profits that allowed the B.C. government to buy a rare period of public sector labour peace through the 2010 Olympics. Now a glut of shale gas has pushed the North American price down from its historic range of $4 to $6 per thousand cubic feet to

about $2.40. Despite that low price, gas producers in B.C. are going flat out to develop the Horn River and Montney shale gas deposits in northeast B.C. I asked David Pryce, vicepresident of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, why so much gas is being developed now. He said producers have made huge investments in B.C. shale gas drilling rights, and are in an international race to supply LNG to Asian countries where the price is currently four times higher than in North America. Whatever the domestic price, B.C. gas producers have to show LNG investors such as Mitsubishi and Korea Gas that they can fill

a steady procession of LNG tankers at a competitive rate. If LNG doesn’t fly here, B.C.’s gas export market soon evaporates. Currently gas producers pay about $400 million a year in royalties, and that much again to buy up shale gas drilling rights. The industry already employs about 12,000 workers in B.C. The B.C. government has little choice but to redefine its climate targets. Instead of cutting domestic emissions, it will try to take credit for displacing coal power in Asia. Fortunately, B.C.’s main coal exports are for highgrade coal used in steelmaking. •Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter for Black Press.


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 9

letters City Board

There’s no benefit to transgenically modified organisms Editor: When one refers to “genetically modified organisms,” it is actually a euphemism. What it is is transgenic modification of two completely different life forms with DNA of one bombarded by another to form an organism that does not exist in nature (think Frankenstein, not husbandry). In the case of GMO foods that have been created (corn, soy, sugar beets, cotton and others) it is a fusing of a bacterium’s DNA with the food. The first purpose of transgenically modified organisms is so that the corporation that holds the patent can legally prevent the farmer from keeping any seeds for next year’s crop. Even if an adjacent farmer doesn’t grow GMOs, if the pollen blows over and contaminates his field he can

be sued for patent infringement. It is like a neighbour’s dog pooing on your lawn and you getting sued to pay for the “fertilization” of your lawn. The second purpose is that these seeds/plants are resistant to a weed killer, Round Up, so now the corporation can also sell Roundup to spray over the fields. The problem here is twofold: one, it chemically destroys the fertility of the soil; two, the weeds quickly become roundup resistant, so farmers spend more money on fertilizers while ruining their fields even faster. This is a global problem which as you learn the details of the misery caused, if you are an ordinary citizen, will make your blood boil. There is no health benefit, there is no community benefit, it is

not selective breeding and worst of all there are no meaningful safety studies that have ever been carried out on these transgenically modified foods. You are not warned if you are eating it (in Europe you are). And it is in virtually all processed foods. All your boxed breakfast cereals, salad dressings, margarines, cheap vegetable oils and the list goes on. Farmers who use GMOs report increased infertility among farm animals. In Canada, Stats Canada has reported a couple of months ago a threefold increase in human infertility since 1984. Congratulation to the City of Richmond for taking the bold stance that human life should take priority over corporate revenues. Dan Richards Richmond

City’s bold stand not based on science Editor: Re: “City takes bold, progressive stand on frankenfoods,” Editorial, May 24. In my humble opinion this is yet another example of city councils getting involved in issues that are well beyond their mandate and passing bylaws and regulations that are at best unenforceable and at worst an affront to our intelligence. It’s the same approach that Richmond council adopted to ban “cosmetic” pesticides. As the author of a report to Vancouver city council some years back on how to resolve the concerns attributed to the application of lawn maintenance chemicals on private property, we (Dr. Blatherwick and I) promoted a “Blue Box” type approach (which council rejected in favour of a largely unenforceable and unenforced bylaw).

City doesn’t have to spend surplus Editor: Re: The city’s $4.5 million surplus. Although a lot of the projects to receive funding from the surplus are worthwhile, it would seem more appropriate to put that surplus towards next year’s expenditures, so we can avoid the usual annual increase in property and other taxes. Just because we have a surplus does not mean we immediately have to spend it—we should be looking ahead instead. Ken Sykes Richmond

To us in the public health community, we had concluded, on the basis of evidence, that any health risks potentially associated with public exposure to lawn and garden pesticides were very low and could best be addressed through education, promotion of lowest toxicity pesticides, and influencing the federal government to deregister certain applications (such

as combination fertilizer/ weed killer products) and speed up the registration of lowest or no toxicity products. We also noted that a number of major chains had already been moving toward only selling the “low toxicity” or “non-toxic” sprays (e.g. Home Depot, Loblaws). While the “bold, progressive stand” taken by Richmond council on genetically engineered

goods was applauded by editorialists, it is another example of public policy that is not based on science, was influenced by false and misleading explanations of how these products might affect the public’s health or food supply, and ends up being largely “windowdressing” for the antieverything movement. Domenic Losito Richmond

Time limited parking in Steveston Village Increased parking enforcement from June 11 to September 30, 2012 To improve the availability of free public parking in the Steveston Village area, the following measures will be implemented for a four-month trial period effective June 11, 2012: • Strict enforcement of the existing two-hour time limit for on- and off-street parking within the Village core (bounded by Chatham Street, No. 1 Road, Bayview Street and 3rd Avenue). • On-street parking time limit increase, from two hours to three hours, on Chatham Street between No. 1 Road and 3rd Avenue. • Introduction and enforcement of a three-hour time limit on Bayview Street and Moncton Street between No. 1 Road and Easthope Avenue. • Permit parking only in each of the three lanes that run parallel to No. 1 Road between Chatham Street and Bayview Street. • Enforcement on a complaint basis only of the existing three-hour parking time limit between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. in the residential area north of Chatham Street and west of No. 1 Road. An owner may call Community Bylaws to report a vehicle parked in front of his/her property longer than three hours without the owner’s consent. At the end of the trial period, the effectiveness of these measures will be assessed and reported to Council, along with any adjustments deemed necessary to address any concerns received while ensuring the primary objective above is still achieved. For enquiries regarding parking enforcement and permit parking, please contact Community Bylaws at 604-276-4345 or parking@richmond.ca. City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca

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Page 10 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

community

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being sexually assaulted by a police officer tasked with protecting the family from extortion threats. And so the Ramirez family left the country Friday, in hopes that applications that are still under consideration will have a positive outcome. Jenny Marin, who has long advocated for the family, isn’t a fan of airport goodbyes, and so she didn’t see Mario, his wife Eloisa, their adult children Laurita and Ever, and two grandchildren off for their flight. Instead, Marin’s husband Carlos brought them to the airport, and exchanged sad goodbyes. “We hope they have a good trip,” Marin wrote in an e-mail to The Richmond Review. “I tried to infuse some enthusiasm and told them to think this was an opportunity

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Fundraising effort for St. John Ambulance at night market With the goal of purchasing a first aid vehicle and equipment, the Richmond branch of St. John Ambulance will be conducting fundraising efforts on Sundays this summer at the Richmond Night Market. Starting July 1 and for the following 13 weeks until the market closes for 2012, the Richmond Night Market Sunday Charity Show with Penny and Andy will be supporting the effort. Clara Chow, treasurer for the St. John Ambulance effort, said the vehicle they hope to purchase is a little smaller than an ambulance, and would be used for first aid services such as at special events, and emergency assistance in the event of a natural disaster. The Richmond Night Market is located at the north end of No. 3 Road, just west of the River Rock Casino Resort and beside the Bridgeport station of the Canada Line. It’s open on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays and holidays.


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 11

news

Council approves spending Richmond Sports Council eyes B.C. Summer Games bid last year’s surplus Sports council needs city and school district support by Martin van den Hemel Staff Reporter

Lamond said the B.C. Summer Games is roughly the same size as the B.C. Seniors Games, which were hosted in Richmond in 2009 and drew roughly 4,000 athletes. Should Richmond be chosen for the games—the event is being held in Surrey this August over the course of four days—the city will have to cough up $50,000 in cash, and $45,000 in in-kind donations, such as waived rental fees and such. The B.C. Summer Games are held in August, and last four days, comprising athletes between 12 and 18 years old. The Games are currently being hosted in Surrey. Richmond previously hosted the second annual B.C. Summer Games in 1979, with Penticton hosting it during its inaugural year. If Richmond wins the bid, 80 per cent of the Summer Games events could be held in Richmond, with organizers having to look at surrounding cities to assist with the other events such as sailing.

Richmond city council gave final approval to a surplus spending scheme Monday night. Last year’s municipal government surplus, which totalled $4,556,000 of taxpayers’ money, will now be divided among 17 projects or reserve accounts. The largest amount, $1.3 million, is being set aside for RCMP officers in line for retroactive pay once a wage dispute concludes. Among the spending is $100,000 to hire a consultant to update accounting procedures of community associa-

tions, which run the city’s community centres, to ensure proper financial checks and balances are in place. Another $100,000 is earmarked for Salmon Row, a play the city hopes to bring back to Britannia Heritage Shipyard this summer. It has an expected run of 10 days. Higher building permit revenues, vacancies in emergency services and a city hall directive last September to freeze discretionary spending contributed to the surplus, according to staff. —by Matthew Hoekstra

RENTALS

Is Richmond capable of hosting 4,000 young athletes during the 2016 B.C. Summer Games? Richmond Sports Council chair Jim Lamond seems to think so, and if he can muster support from Richmond city council and the Richmond board of education, the sports council will submit a bid for the games to be held in four years time. Last month, the Richmond Sports Council sent a letter to the Richmond board of education, expressing its interest in hosting the event.

That subject is on the agenda for discussion at Monday’s personnel and finance committee meeting of the school board. “Our base of volunteers and directors from our last games are all willing to participate and it would also be a perfect opportunity to highlight Richmond’s facilities for sports and culture and of course, our community pride,” Lamond wrote on behalf of the sports council. Earlier this year, the B.C. Games Society sent a letter to Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie regarding Richmond’s potential interest in hosting the 2016 or 2018 B.C. Summer or Winter Games. That letter was subsequently forwarded to the sports council. The Richmond Sports Council unanimously endorsed at a March meeting going forward with the bid for the 2016 event. Now it just awaits word from council and the board of education before planning its next move.

Fraser River Art Festival returns London Heritage Farm will host the Fraser River Art Festival art show Sunday, July 15. Various art clubs are participating in the lawn exhibition, including the Richmond Artists’ Guild, gem and mineral club, potters club and photography club. Also in store is live music and a kids paint-in. The event takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 6511 Dyke Rd. A wrong date for this event appeared in last Friday’s Richmond Review.

Rock the Peach contest winner The winner of our Rock the Peach contest is Michelle Gremsperger or Richmond.

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Page 12 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

food

Oatmeal: The perfect cereal for runners on the go

A Runner’s Mind Christine Blanchette

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Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 13

Volunteer Richmond: Celebrating 40 Years

Bringing people and service together for 40 years Community a big part of Volunteer Richmond’s success by Don Fennell Staff Reporter

F

rom its humble beginnings operating out of a cloakroom at the main branch of Richmond Savings Credit Union, to today’s clearing house for community information, Volunteer Richmond Information Services has always been about “bringing people and services together.” But as the organization celebrates its 40th anniversary this week, its executive director says none of its success would be possible without the support of the community at large. “We’re about providing opportunities for engagement,” says Elizabeth Specht. “And it’s by providing service to the community that facilitates, encourages and enables individuals, organizations, businesses and societies to make a difference. “To do that, you need a place to go to find information on what’s available, or to receive some training for specific areas of work in the volunteer sector.” A former president of Volunteer Canada, Specht is a shining example of the dedicated individuals who together make up Volunteer Richmond Information Services.

Since joining in July, 2000, she has done much to help solidify the organization and initiate new programs. “I’d always been in a field that was about working with and helping others, and Richmond is phenomenal place to do just that,” she says. “What keeps me there are the people, who I’m privileged to work with, and the continual challenges and opportunities. We’re always changing because our role is to always be serving the community, and with an incredible team of supporters we keep moving forward. We’ll be celebrating again at 50, 60 and 70 (years).” Among the many initiatives that Specht is proud of is Volunteer Richmond’s partnering with the City of Richmond to deliver the 2010 Information and Volunteer Program. The program involved operating a community information booth at Richmond Centre mall and co-ordinating volunteers for the city’s 2010-related special events leading up to and during the Olympic Winter Games. The highlight was the Richmond O-Zone, which attracted 500,000 visitors over 17 days. “It was an opportunity to attract some people who’d never volunteered before, but it was worth every single effort because we knew there would be a legacy there,” Specht says. “We had close to 250 volunteers and while it may be seeing through rose-coloured glasses, I’d like to say they are all still volunteering. But we certainly achieved what we set out to do which was to inspire people to be engaged in their community.” Since 2001, Specht has also helped to oversee an annual gala dinner and awards. Volunteers Are Stars recognizes exceptional contributions by volunteers in many capaci-

With a little help from our friends.

Volunteer Richmond partnered with Coast Capital Savings and the City of Richmond to the deliver the Information & Volunteer Program for the 2010 Winter Olympics. This involved running a community information booth at Richmond Centre mall and recruiting, training, and managing the volunteer workforce for the Richmond O Zone, the city’s celebration site during the Games. In total, 644 people volunteered at the O Zone, which attracted 500,000 visitors over the course of 17 days.

ties throughout Richmond. Launched in 2005 through a partnership with Coast Capital Savings, Youth Now is one of the more unique programs offered by the Volunteer Richmond Information Services. Alvin Ip is one of its recent graduates.

“I wanted to learn more about the purpose and functioning of local non-profit agencies and saw the leadership opportunity on the Volunteer Richmond website,” he says. “Applying was one of the best things I’ve ever done.” See Page 15

Congratulations to Volunteer Richmond Information Services on its 40th anniversary. For four decades Volunteer Richmond has worked to make our community a better place through the promotion of volunteerism and provision of critical community and social services. The City of Richmond is a proud partner of Volunteer Richmond, working together to make our community even better.

We get by with a little help from our friends. City of Richmond | 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 | Tel: 604-276-4000

www.richmond.ca


Page 14 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Volunteer Richmond: Celebrating 40 Years A Day of Caring at the Sharing Farm

Emily Pearson, the event and volunteer coordinator at the Sharing Farm, Mayor Malcolm Brodie holding Be Bop, and Kareno Hawbolt the Sharing Farm field manager.

Congratulations to Volunteer Richmond Information Services on your 40th Anniversary! Alzheimer Society of B.C. Canadian Hemochromatosis Society Centre for Ability CHIMO Crisis Services Family Services of Greater Vancouver Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada Richmond Hospice Association Richmond Multicultural Community Services Richmond Society for Community Living Supported Child Development Program Richmond Women’s Resource Centre Association S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Volunteer Richmond Information Services

RICHMOND CARING PLACE 7000 Minoru Boulevard, Richmond, B.C. V6Y 3Z5

richmondcaringplace.ca

Richmond Caring Place Society

Caring for our community together

Amanda Oye photos Larry Thompson with the Richmond Funeral Home and Zoe Cheng, Naia Choy and Dylan Cheng with Back in Motion.

The Richmond Museum Society congratulates Volunteer Richmond on their history of enriching the Richmond community by promoting and facilitating volunteerism for 40 years.

Michael Chiu and Lawrence Portigal who are both past presidents of Volunteer Richmond clipping blackberry bushes.

•For more photos, see richmondreview.com

More than 100 volunteers, representing local businesses and nonprofit organizations, arrived at the Sharing Farm at Terra Nova Rural Park last Saturday as part of the first ever Richmond Day of Caring. Volunteers spent the morning weeding, planting, and generally doing whatever they could to help out. Organized by Volunteer Richmond Information Services, the Day of Caring marked the conclusion of the inaugural Richmond Caring Companies program, a joint initiative of Volunteer Richmond, Coast Capital Savings, the Richmond Chamber of Commerce, and Ashton Service Group. The program helps businesses develop and implement corporate volunteering policies, while teaching non-profit organizations how to work with businesses to better meet the needs of the community. “With the Day of Caring, we saw the

Congratulations to Volunteer Richmond Information Services on 40 years of fostering volunteerism and relationships between the business community, volunteers and organizations in Richmond. Your efforts have contributed tremendously to enhancing the quality of life in this community. Richmond Chamber is proud to be a member of VRIS Circle of Friends.

Thank you for a wonderful experience with your Youth Now program. We are delighted with the way the young volunteers have brought so much of value to the table. We have all grown together. Join us at the Richmond Museum for our next exhibit opening! Garden City: Richmond's Agricultural Legacy Opens June 21, 5:30 p.m.

Richmondchamber.ca | 604-278-2822

beginning of something special,” says Elizabeth Specht, Volunteer Richmond’s executive director. “Really, we’ve seen it since January, when we started Richmond Caring Companies. The businesses we’ve worked with have all been so eager to get involved in the community, to make volunteering part of their corporate culture. That attitude will only continue to grow.” A total of six businesses and five non-profit organizations took part in the Richmond Caring Companies program, which consists of a series of workshops and consultations covering all aspects of effective corporate volunteering. Participating businesses included Ashton Service Group, Back in Motion, Beavis Wong & Associates, Misty Mountain Specialties, Richmond Funeral Home, and Scotiabank. Joining them from the non-profit sector were the Canadian Mental Health Association, MOSAIC, Richmond Addiction Services, Richmond Family Place, and Touchstone Family Association. “I can’t say enough about the program participants,” says Specht. “They deserve to be called caring companies, because they’ve shown that ‘community’ means more to them than the place they do business. It’s the place they call home, and they’re committed to making a positive impact.” For Tanya Oliva, manager of corporate leadership at Coast Capital Savings, the Day of Caring was an inspiring event. “It really represented the community coming together to honour the heritage of Richmond and support those in need,” she says. “I think it was an amazing example of the spirit of Richmond.” Starbucks, Cobs Bread, and Chart House Catering donated food and refreshments for the volunteers, yet another caring gesture on a day that was full of them. The second edition of the Richmond Caring Companies program is set to begin in September. To learn more about participating, call 604279-7020 or visit www. volunteerrichmond.ca.


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 15

Volunteer Richmond: Celebrating 40 Years Volunteer Richmond epitomizes ‘giving back’ From Page 13 Ip, who applied two years ago and graduated last May, also gained some valuable leadership skills while expanding his horizons. “I’d done a little bit of volunteering, but one of the biggest opportunities came directly from this program through partnering with the Richmond Centre for Disability,” he says. “I had an interest to work with people with a disability and one of the integral parts of the program is completing a final project which I believe is one of my greatest accomplishments.” Ip, who recently graduated with a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology from University of B.C., has been inspired to specialize in the field after overseeing the introduction of a comprehensive exercise program for people with disabilities at the Richmond Centre for Disability. He also led the weekly classes. Twelve youth are accepted into the Youth Now program each year, all matched with different agencies. “It provides a great platform where youth can get these opportunities,” says Ip. “It’s too bad only 12 or 13 youth are selected each year, but it’s a great opportunity to become a community leader in the future.” Bruce Rozenhart, who has been president of Volunteer Richmond Information Services for the last two years, says the local organization epitomizes the term “giving back.” “It’s all hands on deck and I’m very proud to be part of Volunteer Richmond, like the caring companies that give back,” he says. “I can’t believe the number of volunteers we have in Richmond and I’m totally impressed with the city and spirit of volunteers that crosses all boundaries.” Now director of visitor and partner services at Tourism Richmond, Ed Gavsie was a member of the Volunteer Richmond Information Services board for many years and its president for two years in the early 2000s. And after stepping away for a couple of years, a deep appreciation and respect for the programs the organizations carries out in the community has lured him back to help out with the Richmond Christmas Fund. “It’s probably closest to my heart because when I

Congratulations

Volunteer Richmond on 40 years serving the community VOLUNTEERS ALWAYS APPRECIATED!

Prior to becoming Volunteer Richmond Information Services, in 2001, the agency was known as Richmond Connections. While the name may have changed, the mission—bringing people and services together through community information and volunteerism— has remained the same.

Interested in volunteering for the Salmon Festival, Farmers & Artisans Market, or for the Steveston Community Society?

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Congratulations to Volunteer Richmond Information Services

Our Volunteer Richmond Executive Director Elizabeth Specht with former BC Premier Mike Harcourt (left) and YVR’s Michael O’Brien at the second annual Volunteers Are Stars Gala Dinner and Awards. The event, which recognizes Richmond’s star volunteers, marked its 10th anniversary in 2010.

was president I had the opportunity to talk to many of the recipient families,” says Gavsie. “Unfortunately I don’t think many think of Richmond as a community that needs that type of support, but the working poor is like in any other.”

on 40 Years of Sharing Key Information and Uniting Volunteers with Organizations to Get Things Done! We are proud to be among the Richmond Caring Companies that have worked with you over the years. RICHMOND FUNERAL HOME CREMATION & RECEPTION CENTRE A Division of Arbor Memorial Services Inc.

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Well Done! Coast Capital Savings extends its congratulations and appreciation to Volunteer Richmond Information Services for helping to create a vibrant and inclusive community since 1972.


Page 16 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Volunteer Richmond: Celebrating 40 Years

Volunteer Richmond through the years •In 1972 a small group of individuals connected with the Richmond Savings Credit Union started a community information service in the cloakroom of the credit union main branch. Later a permanent home was found in the Richmond Centre Mall. The founder of the Information Centre, Ishbel Elliott, devoted years

of her life to gathering together a group of dedicated people, including the chairperson for 14 years, Bob Simpson, and Lil Chesterman. •In 1976 the Chamber of Commerce and the United Way connected to support Lorene Petrini and her board of directors in the development of the Richmond Volun-

teer Centre. Soon the Centre moved into the old Library building on Park Road, with its fellow tenants, the United Way, Richmond Youth Services, Family Services of Greater Vancouver, and several other smaller agencies. •In 1986, after the retirement of Ishbel Elliott, the respective boards

Congratulations to everyone at Volunteer Richmond, and thank you for all you do for the residents of Richmond. We look forward to continuing to work with you for at least another 40 years!

www.vch.ca

Congratulations Volunteer Richmond for serving our community for 40 years. We are deeply grateful to you and our yearly 2000+ volunteers. The Sharing Farm grows fruits and vegetables year-round for the Richmond Food Bank and community meal programs.

of directors decided to merge the Information Centre and Volunteer Centre into the Richmond Information and Volunteer Centre Society. •A move to more spacious but less accessible offices at No. 3 Road and Cambie allowed the organization to grow. It was at this time that the seniors programs, the child care support program, and the host program were added, while maintaining the vital connections with neighbours and service providers such as the Multicultural Concerns Society and Family Services of Greater Vancouver. •The agency and 15 other organizations moved to the Caring Place in the summer of 1994. This building is a permanent example of a unique effort of community cooperation— connecting business, government, non-profits, and private citizens to serve the community in one facility. •Around the time of the move, the board changed the organiza-

tion’s name to “Richmond Connections.” “Bringing people and services together” became the theme which continues to present times. •2001 marked the International Year of Volunteers as declared by the United Nations General Assembly. This declaration represented an incredible opportunity for the agency to position itself as the community volunteer centre to lead Richmond in recognizing the tremendous efforts made by thousands of volunteers each and every day. Accordingly, the name changed to better reflect its mission and mandate, to Volunteer Richmond Information Services. •2001 also saw the launch of the first annual “Volunteers Are Stars” Gala Dinner and Awards. With a focus on capacity building, Volunteer Richmond Information Services also implemented several training initiatives—volunteer management series and workshops and board development training.

THANK YOU to the businesses, non-profits, and program partners who helped make the first ever Richmond Day of Caring A SUCCESS.

The Sharing Farm is seeking donations of money, time, tools, and materials so we can continue helping our community.

www.sharingfarm.ca (Formerly The Richmond Fruit Tree Project) 2631 Westminster Highway Terra Nova Rural Park

Building Community Through Volunteerism 's

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r

80

Richmo n

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The Richmond Review is a proud supporter of Volunteer Richmond and the Richmond Christmas Fund. We thank our readers and community partners for making Richmond a great place to live, work and play.

Ye a r s

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years 9

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•2005 saw an expansion of the Volunteer Richmond Information Services partnership with Richmond Health Services to include a centralized system to recruit and screen volunteers for facilities and agencies such as the Richmond Hospital, complex care facilities, seniors supported housing projects and others. •Also in 2005, Volunteer Richmond Information Services, with the Richmond Poverty Response Committee and supported by Coast Capital Savings, developed the Richmond Low Income Resource Directory. •Volunteer Richmond Information Services partnered with Coast Capital Savings to launch the Youth Now program designed to harness the leadership potential found in Richmond by training young adults to serve as board members for local nonprofit organizations. In 2006, Youth Now was continued and new Leadership Richmond modules were added to promote

Learn more about the Richmond Caring Companies program at volunteerrichmond.ca

employer-assisted volunteering and the transfer of business skills to the non-profit sector, helping volunteer organizations benefit from the skills and experience of adults aged 50+, and to build community capacity through volunteer management training, workshops and conferences. •In the fall of 2008 Volunteer Richmond Information Services announced a partnership with the City of Richmond to deliver the 2010 Information & Volunteer Program. This initiative, with support from VRIS partners like Coast Capital Savings, involved running a community information booth at Richmond Centre and coordinating volunteers for the City’s 2010-related special events leading up to and during the Games. The highlight of these was the Richmond O Zone, which attracted 500,000 visitors over the course of 17 memorable days. The 2,500 volunteers engaged during the Games will form the foundation of volunteer support at community events for years to come, leaving a powerful legacy for Richmond. •The Richmond Christmas Fund, under the leadership of Volunteer Richmond Information Services, has grown to meet the needs of the less fortunate in our community. With active profile building and fund raising, many organizations and businesses have stepped up to help those who are financially challenged and unable to celebrate the holidays. With a focus on children, the Skate with Santa event and McDonald’s Toy Room are just a few of the ways for kids to return to school with cherished memories to share in January.


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 17

His and hers summer hairstyles

Style Celia Leung Fashion Stylist

T

he warmer the weather gets, the less time we want to spend fussing with blow dryers, straighteners and curling irons. Keeping a low-maintenance, yet stylish, hairstyle will ensure more time will be spent playing in the sun than primping in front of the mirror. This month I talked to the experts at Suki’s in Richmond to get their take on the most popular styles for the season. For colour, ombre hair is the hottest trend of the summer, according to Suki’s colour designer Esther Kim. Seen on the likes of Jessica Biel, Jennifer Lopez and Lauren Conrad, Kim said the soft and sexy ombre look works for every hair type and length.

Jessica Biel wearing the ombre hair trend. Source: thefashionspot.com

Ombre is the lowest in maintenance as far as colour goes because the whole effect of the ombre is darker towards the root area and gradually lighter toward the ends, said Kim. There are endless possibilities in the way that we can make this look achievable by customizing which areas of the hair and face you’d like to enhance. For women with longer hair, volume is still very in for the summer season, as spotted on the runways of Versace and Anna Sui. Stylist and Suki’s salon manager James Valiant suggested pairing voluminous hair with a centre part to showcase one’s features. To achieve this look, Valiant said to start by towel drying clean hair and applying a blow dry enhancing cream.

Using products will protect your hair from the heat and it will ensure you have texture and hold, said Valiant. Then separate hair into sections and blow dry using a round brush, brushing away from roots to create volume. Once the hair is dry, make a centre part and brush the hair out, continued Valiant. This will give bounce and fullness to the hair. He said an alternative to the brush and dryer technique is to use Velcro rollers. The smaller the roller the more body and curls; big rollers will create volume but less body. Valiant suggested the use of medium-size rollers to achieve the right balance. The summer hair trend for men is the undercut style. Popularized by celebrities such as David Beckham and Michael Pitt from HBO’s Boardwalk Empire, the undercut is short and tapered on the sides and back, but the top is left longer. Valiant said the bold undercut look is very versatile and can be styled slicked back, in a pompadour, or given the indie rock treatment. For a slicked back look, use gel to hold the hair in place. To get the rocker style hair with an undercut, Valiant recommended using lightweight gel or paste. Sweep the hair forward and create details on top as you wish, said Valiant. The end result will be a relaxed style. The pompadour takes a little more effort but is well worth it. Valiant called it the coolest style for men. A look where the hair is swept upwards

from the face to create height on top, he said the pompadour can be worn textured or smooth for guys with straight hair. Blast a blow dryer on high and use your fingers to work the hair upwards while drying, instructed Valiant. Pull the hair forward and then bend it back so you get the quiff shape, and ensure you don’t miss the roots while drying. The main trick is to keep working your fingers through the roots—this will create an insane amount of movement from within. Whether you end up colouring your hair or making a drastic cut, wear it with confidence. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different styles this summer. One of the key factors when looking for activewear is fabric. Read the tags to see what material the item is predominantly made out of and whether it will suit the type of exercise you’ll be doing. For

moderate activity where you’re less likely to sweat, such as hatha yoga, try activewear made with a combination of spandex (or Lycra) and other breathable fibres. Spandex is durable and ideal for workouts dependant on flexibility. Keep in mind that although cotton is breathable and popular, it also loses its shape easily and absorbs perspiration, making the garment feel heavier at the end of a workout. For high-impact, sweatinducing activities such as running, hiking the Grouse Grind or hot yoga, look for moisture wicking fabrics. These are designed to move perspiration away from the skin and through the fabric where it can be evaporated quickly, leaving you dry and cooler in body temperature. There are a variety of synthetic, moisture wicking fabrics, with some of the major names being Coolmax, made from polyester fibres, and Supplex, made from nylon.

Also, bigger companies carry products made with their own moisture wicking fabrics—Nike has Dri-FIT and Adidas uses Climalite—so check the labels to see if the item is made with the performance fabric you need to stay comfortably dry. If you’re looking for a more eco-friendly alternative, there are a lot of green options as well that don’t just cater towards yoga tops and pants. Many of them are locally-based, such as brands Tonic, Silver Icing and Public Myth, to name a few. All three use bamboo jersey in their designs and two (Tonic and Public Myth) even do their manufacturing locally. A good ecofriendly fabric to look for when shopping for gym clothes is Tencel—it’s soft, breathable and absorbent, so it’ll keep you dry in the sweatiest of workouts. Tencel, which also goes by the name Lyocell, is durable yet

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Page 18 · Richmond Review

2012 FORD

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

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Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 19

sports Field festival

How does your garden grow? Enter the Steveston Salmon Festival Horticulture Show and see how green your thumb is! Don Fennell photos Richmond’s goalie (above) is quick to kick the ball out of harm’s way against West Vancouver, while at right Richmond and Cowichan players battle for possession during a B.C. Field Hockey-sanctioned festival for under-12 girls Saturday and Sunday at Minoru Park and at Richmond High.

SPECIAL CATEGORY FOR KIDS! Entry forms available on-line at www.stevestonsalmonfest.ca/events or from the two Richmond Art Knapp locations. Sponsored by: 11020 No. 4 Rd

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p we i s d po This d-si “ an a m d e l ac c o u o pl edd de sixa nte re c n u n o w a h A be nn old A c d i n g Day. beg adia nt w heir a l n e t h d wil e Ha an e a r- heir s we tine’s Trut m Ca desc p at i t h -y th an en hark f ro ese s o u r k s e e ke i c isl d h a e t h r ill ma — w h w i l l S . 14 hin fin S g e h C b an ov y t ts w t i n 8 — Fe f u l l h a r k t w s L b an vo J u n e ha o r r ve s . a r t z e d plic l i c y t ons c s e p t i o n y H e g a n i . Ap p u b D a y a i c eli cept t ac- , c e a p p t o r ro u p a n d e a n s d H t e s fit g e , O c s e n g re t . B u i a L i e n i n n c o n-pro onl orld er. Chi eddi spec laud tion no d g e o n W w i n n i s a a t w d re e r C c i m a p l e e n s t h e s o u p r ve d s a n o u n d s d e T op cide fin ly se statu th f mas ark de hark mon l of k Tru he “ Sh a r k S m bo har to t the s h o m on l l i o n year is c a sy g to S ding g i e n h a s rd i n o l e a sti 3 m ac to co als ks. n t p o i d 7 ins e cies it’s shar e c e i s a eir f spe n of n a r e , L r th e 25 so i r o I sit v m e is d f dri b s u d it w e ache uld y. o n an s t p o a t c o n t u r e s e c use, u r c u t h i s c e C h i n is ca o f o h e t h t T h e in o m “ rits e s g p cul c h a n to

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Page 20 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

business | PROFILE

Do you have a

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If you’ve never been to Cravings Restaurant and Lounge in Marpole, it’s unlikely you’ve driven by, as it’s tucked away behind a hotel and sits amongst low-rise condos on the Vancouver side of the Arthur Laing and Oak Street bridges, a half block north of Marine Drive.

Today, Cravings offers up a full menu of fresh, creative and healthy comfort foods, and strives to source locally grown seasonal and organic ingredients, which provide superior flavour and reduce its ecological footprint.

But for those searching for a new casual, relaxing and comfortable place to bring the family for a great lunch or dinner, it’s a destination you’ll want to program into your GPS. They are even open for breakfast on weekends.

Its tapas menu includes sauteed

Offering a hearty healthy menu in a casual and elegant environment, Cravings celebrated its 20th anniversary last year.

Richmond’s Perfect Patio

…it’s a destination you’ll want to program into your GPS.

Angelo Khoshaba plays host to a casual, relaxing atmosphere at Cravings.

Your Oasis is Waiting! Find Richmond’s only patio experience at Harold’s. We mix genuine service with a spacious and stress-free atmosphere. 604-233-3969 | HaroldsBistro.com | 7551 Westminster Hwy, Richmond

One Day Miracle for Denture Sufferers! Are you not eating what you want to because of problems chewing with your dentures? Do they jump, shift, or tilt? Are you tired of replacing them all of the time? Are you sick of the unsanitary denture goo and adhesive you use to try and get them to stay put? Have you ever been told that you couldn’t have dental implants? If you said yes to any of these questions, then you are one of more than 40 million people across the country who live with the pain and suffering of removable dentures and partials. The good news is that there are new ways to solve the problems of being unable to bite or chew the food that you want to eat. You no longer have to resign yourself to a soft food diet permanently. Dr. Greg Nelson has a new procedure where no surgical incision is required through the gum tissue. This new modern miracle called ‘Mini Dental Implants’ give your teeth a secure and solid foundation, so you can chew the foods you like and improve your nutrition. They also help preserve the bone of the jaw and help keep you looking younger. This is a tremendous advance even from just five years ago. This procedure is performed in a routine dental setting

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Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 21

business | PROFILE

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Page 22 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

sports

Gilles great in win over New West; Leonhardt shows Richmond tied for league lead consistency on links Richmond Roadrunners reinforced its position as one

of the top teams in B.C. Intermediate A Lacrosse League play

“We invest considerable time, money and effort into ensuring the highest quality service for the Buyers and Sellers that we represent. It only makes sense that we are backed by the industry’s best known brand, RE/MAX. Our investment in the RE/MAX brand brings our business and our clients the advantage of more than 20 million dollars per year in group advertising, services and tools which are unmatched. Thinking of entering the business, enhancing your business or Buying and Selling, consider the RE/MAX advantage.”

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with a hard-earned 13-12 victory over New Westminster Salmonbellies Wednesday at Minoru Arenas. Jordan Gilles set the pace at both ends of the floor, scoring three goals and assisting on two others while playing a strong defensive game. Brad Hoffman also had a standout allaround performance as well as dominating in the faceoff circle. Cody Nass kept pace with the league’s top scorers with four goals and two helpers. He’s now fourth in individual scoring with 27 goals and 46 points in nine games. The win, Richmond’s eight in nine games, leaves them tied with Coquitlam Adanacas and Victoria Shamrocks atop the standings, but with one and

two games in-hand respectively. Richmond not only outshot New Westminster 49-41 in last week’s game, but also played with discipline. They started the game on fire scoring four goals in the first half of the opening period, three of them of the shorthanded variety. But the momentum then swung in New Westminster’s favour as they scored four straight goals before Richmond regained dominance early in the third period and took a 13-9 lead. Brett Andersen, Jonah Sahota, Alex Morghese, Spencer Bromley and Connor Davidson also scored for Richmond. Wyatt Pinder (3), Bromley, Marcus Quon (2), Ryan Vogrig (2) and Sahota had assists.

BEST BUY – Correction Notice

Please be advised that the Samsung Galaxy S III pre-order offer (advertised on the June 8 flyer, page 7) will be closing after June 8. No more orders will be taken after this time. Also, please note that the item will be limited in quantity with no rainchecks on the the anticipated release date (June 20) due to unforeseen carrier-related issues. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

Local golfer believes he’s close to winning his first event on the Canadian Tour by Don Fennell Sports Editor Richmond’s Nathan Leonhardt was a model of consistency at last weekend’s 2012 Times Colonist Island Savings Open in Victoria. But as impressive as his four-round score of 1 under was, it paled in comparison to what Andrew Roque of Monterey Park, Calif. was able to accomplish. Roque birdied his final seven holes to finish with a course-tying record 61 Sunday to win the Canadian Tour men’s golf event. After shooting backto-back 69s and a thirdround score of 70, Leonhardt carded a final round 71 to finish tied for 21st. He was only four shots out of second place going into the final round. While the result was the best Leonhardt has managed thus far on the Canadian Tour, it was by

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LEONHARDT

no means his best. “That’s a good sign to know I can still do well and not have my ‘A’ game,” says Leonhardt, anxious to try to tame Edmonton’s Windermere Golf & Country Club in the ATB Financial Classic beginning June 21. “I feel like there’s definitely better things to come,” he says. “It puts a little pressure on you if you don’t play well, but I’m happy with the work I’ve done

to become more consistent.” Leonhardt figures it will take a final score of at least 10-underpar to win a Tour event, and believes it’s in his wheelhouse. “The biggest thing is learning to be composed under pressure,” he says. “(The Times Colonist Island Savings Open) was the first major tournament I’ve played in a long time so the nerves were definitely there. But basically one or two shots come down to putting, and in this event I counted—over four rounds—almost 10 shots that were lip-outs for birdies. They were half an inch to an inch off, and when those go in that’s when you shoot low rounds. I just have to learn to be patient.” After playing in Edmonton, Leonhardt will make his way to Fort McMurray, Saskatoon and Winnipeg before the Canadian Tour takes a month-long break. •Pumphouse Pub, one of Leonhardt’s new sponsors, will be hosting a fundraiser for him Friday. Visit tinyurl.com/ Nathanfundraiser.

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Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 23

sports

Moss writing ticket to London

Back-to-back medalists

Kajak thrower closes in on qualifying for Summer Olympics by Don Fennell

field of Olympic-bound athletes at the Harry Jerome Track Classic in his hometown of Burnaby, Moss threw a personal best 80.43 metres. “I had some good training sessions leading up, and my coach Don Steen said he thought I was ready to throw far,” says Moss, who threw 79.27 in a competiting in Germany last month. “Everything I was working toward in the off-season has finally started to come around. The hardest part is staying calm enough to let it happen.” In javelin, says Moss, a one per cent increase in distance is not a lot. He says it could be a simple as a gust of

Sports Editor

Richmond Islanders 2000B girls’ softball team went 6-1 at a tournament in Newton last weekend, defeating Langley Xtreme 4-1 in the gold-medal final. The previous weekend they went 4-2-1 and defeated Fleetwood 14-9 in the bronze-medal match.

Curtis Moss is hoping this is the night he’ll secure a spot in the London Games. All that’s needed is for the Richmond Kajak to throw the javelin 82 metres or more at The Victoria International Track Classic. The mark is the Canadian A standard established last year by Scott Russell. “It’s coming down to the deadline but I seem to peaking at the right time,” says Moss. “I’m pretty excited and confident I can do it.” On Sunday, competing among a

Curtis Moss points out his personal best throw of 80.43 metres Sunday at the Jerome Classic.

wind or throwing at altitude that can make the difference.

Community Worship

UNITED STEVESTON UNITED CHURCH 3720 Broadway Street (at 2nd Ave.) Rev. Rick Taylor

Please join us at 10am Sunday, June 17 for Worship Service and Sunday School 604-277-0508 • www.stevestonunitedchurch.ca A caring and friendly village church

SOUTH ARM UNITED CHURCH 11051 No. 3 Road, Richmond 604-277-4020 sauc@telus.net www.southarmunitedchurch.ca Minister of the Congregation - Rev. Dr. Gary Gaudin Children & Youth Team Ministry Music Ministry - Ron Stevenson Worship Service & Church School - 10:00 am ALL ARE WELCOME!

Richmond United Church

8711 Cambie Rd. (near Garden City Rd.) 604-278-5622 Minister: Rev. Neill McRae

Come for 10am Sunday Worship and Children’s Sunday School and after-service coffee and fellowship. Founded 1888. Richmond’s Oldest Church BRIGHOUSE UNITED CHURCH an evangelical congregation

8151 Bennett Road, Richmond, 604-278-7188 www.brighouseunitedchurch.org

ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA

BAPTIST

St. Alban

Broadmoor Baptist Church

an Anglican parish in the heart of Richmond Services at 8:30 and 10:00 am Sunday School 10:00 am The Reverend Margaret Cornish 7260 St. Albans Road, Richmond 604-278-2770 • www.stalbansrichmond.org

A safe place to connect with God and fellow travellers on your spiritual journey

8140 Saunders Road, Richmond, BC 604-277-8012 www.bbchurch.ca Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Sonshine Adventures for Kids Interim Pastor - Rev. Bob Bahr

ST. EDWARDS ANGLICAN

10111 Bird Road, Richmond V6X 1N4 Phone/Fax: 604-273-1335 • www.stedward.ca Priest-in-charge: Rev. Gord Dominey

ˁ̂๗‫ݜ‬ʔ˥ʓ㼳૦䑄ਿ੬

Richmond Baptist Church

Sunday Service: 8:30 &10:30 am Sunday School

Love God…Love People 6640 Blundell Road, Richmond BC • 604-277-1939 office@richmondbaptist.com www.richmondbaptist.com

St. Anne’s - Steveston Anglican Church 4071 Francis Road, Richmond, BC

WORSHIP SERVICES 9:00 AM AND 11:00 AM

The Rev. Brian Vickers, Rector • 604-277-9626

Promise Land (Children’s Church)

Sunday 8:30 a.m. - Contemplative Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Family Eucharist with Church School Sanctuary open for quiet prayer 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. weekdays • www.stannessteveston.ca

Children ages 4-12 • Nursery available Teaching Series: GALATIANS

CHILDRENS GYM NIGHT Ages 7-12

ADVENTIST

FRIDAYS 7:00-9:00 pm at Blundell Elementary School (until June 15) Youth, Young Adult and Adult programs Call the church office for more information (604 277-1939)

Richmond Seventh-Day ADVENTIST Church Worship Location and Time: Sat. 9:15 a.m. 8711 Cambie Road, Richmond www.richmondsda.org 778-230-9714

CHRISTIAN REFORMED

Sunday, June 17 2012, 10:00 am Worship Minister: Rev. Stuart W. Appenheimer, B.A., M.Div. Home of Brighouse Nursery Pre-School and Brighouse United Church Daycare

REFORMED CHURCH (RCA)

GILMORE PARK UNITED CHURCH

Fujian Evangelical Church

8060 No. 1 Road (corner of No. 1 & Blundell) 604.277.5377 www.gilmoreparkunited.org Rev. Scott Swanson & Rev. Jennifer Goddard-Sheppard

welcomes you to Sunday Worship Services

Worship and Children’s Program Sundays, 10:30 am

• • •

Everyone is welcome!

FOURSQUARE GOSPEL CHURCH OF CANADA

12200 Blundell Road, Richmond, B.C., V6W 1B3 Phone 604-273-2757 • www.fujianevangelical.org

Richmond Christian Fellowship

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

FILIPINO CHRISTIAN CHURCH

11960 Montego St. (corner No. 5 Road) Richmond

(1 block South of Williams Road) Sunday Celebration, Sharing & The Word - 10:00 a.m.

Dr. C.A. Coats – Lead Pastor SUNDAY EVENING SERVICES – 6:00PM “Multiple Learning Opportunities” – Dr. C.A. Coats Elevate (High School/College) – Pastor Joseph Dutko

www.myecc.org 604-270-4685

FILIPINO CANADIAN CHURCH Apostolic Pentecostal Church Intl. Be part of the new pioneering church in Richmond

SEA ISLAND

Leslie Rd.

er Riv

be rt . Rd

Sunday Service: 1:30pm-4:00pm Richmond Yacht Club 7471 River Rd., Richmond, BC, 604-277-9157

Where people find acceptance and encouragement. Lord Byng Elementary School – Gymnasium

Cambie Rd.

• Apostolic Worship • Prayer for the Sick • Counselling and Home Bible Study . Rd

Alexandra Rd.

ge rid erb Ald

y Wa

Alderbridge Way

9300 Westminster Hwy., Phone 604-278-3191 www.rpchurch.com

SUNDAY MORNING SERVICE — 10:00 AM

Kids Sunday School Youth Activities Everyone Welcome

Gil

..where you are always welcome Come and visit us Sunday School-1:00pm • Sunday Worship 2 :00pm Senior Pastor - Abdul Lagayan Tel. 604 520 0660 fcf.richmond.bc@gmail.com www.fcfbc.ca

RPC - A Place To Belong

Brown Rd.

8151 Bennett Road, Richmond tel: 604-271-6491

RICHMOND PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

10351 No. 1 Road

CHRIST-CENTERED CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Filipino Congregation) www.cccc-richmondbc.com COME AND JOIN US IN OUR CELEBRATION OF REDEMPTION! Worship Service 12:20 p.m. Sunday School 2:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL ASSEMBLIES OF CANADA

Hazelbridge Way

ENLIGHTENMENT.

icrc7600@yahoo.ca

r Rd .

Pastor Impam Moses

Rive

phone 604-270-6594 www.rcfonline.com

No. 3 Rd.

Worship Time 10:30am Location MacNeill High School 6611 No. 4 Rd., Richmond

English Services: 9:00 & 10:30 a.m. Mandarin Service: 9:00 a.m. Minnanese Service: 10:30 a.m.

3711 Georgia Street at No. 1 Road www.Steveston.org Phone: 604.271.3786 Senior Pastor - Rev. Kevin Jamieson Sundays 10:30 am Worship, Coffee & Fellowship *Relaxed Setting* Contemporary Music*


Page 24 - Richmond Review

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . . . . . . 1-8 COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . 9-57 TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61-76 CHILDREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80-98 EMPLOYMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-198 BUSINESS SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . 203-387 PETS & LIVESTOCK . . . . . . . . . . . 453-483 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE . . . . . . 503-587 REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-696 RENTALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-757 AUTOMOTIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 804-862 MARINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903-920

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

7

OBITUARIES

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

OBITUARIES

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 041

PERSONALS

Curious About Men? Talk Discreetly with men like you! Try FREE! Call 1-888-559-1255 Meet singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-888-744-3699

42

LOST AND FOUND

LOST: BUDGIE bird, 06/06,Steveston, near Moncton & Railway. Kids in tears. If found pls contact (604) 271-8348. Reward. bcclassified.com

TRAVEL

AGREEMENT It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. bcclassified.com cannot be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. bcclassified.com reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisment and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassified.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisment and box rental.

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

COPYRIGHT Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

SCULLION, MARY (nee Fallen)

CORBETT, Norman Earle

Passed away suddenly on Thursday, May 24, 2012 at the age of 61 years. Survived by his loving wife Irene and daughter Carla, and son Mark. A Celebration of his Life to be held on Saturday, June 16, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. in the Chapel of the Richmond Funeral Home, 8420 Cambie Road in Richmond, BC. Reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Richmond Funeral Home Cremation & Reception Centre 604-273-3748

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Mary Scullion on June 8, 2012 at the age of 80 years. She is survived by her daughter Rosemary (Lance) Gray and their children Shayne and Heather of Brampton, Ontario; her son Gary (Brenda Jankowski) and their children Kevin and Jamie of Kamloops; four grandchildren, five brothers Thomas, James, Gerrard, Joseph and Denis, four sisters Jean McDonald, Alice Hardie, Margaret Scott and Liz Dempsey. She was predeceased by her husband John Scullion. Mary was born in Glasgow, Scotland on January 3, 1932, immigrating to Canada in 1957. She was a long time employee at UBC. She was an active member of Royal Canadian Legion # 5 and was a volunteer at Richmond General Hospital for many years. She was a devoted wife, loving mother and a care giver to all. A Celebration of her life will be held on Friday, June 15, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. at the Abercorn Inn, 9260 Bridgeport Road, Richmond. Should friends desire, donation to the Alzheimer Society of BC, Box 277, Kamloops, BC V2C 5K6 in memory of Mrs. Scullion would be appreciated. Service arrangements entrusted to Schoening Funeral Service, Kamloops telephone 250-374-1454.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

PRINCESS Margaret Sr. Sec. Class of 1977 Reunion- Sun Aug.5, Welcoming all 1965-1985 students.Call 604-534-3981

LOOKING FOR A NEW JOB? Use bcclassified.com - Employment Section 100’s

33

Advertise across Advertise across the the Advertise across the Lower Mainland Mainland in Lower in lower mainland in the 18 best-read the 18 best-read thecommunity 17 best-read community community newspapers and newspapers and newspapers. dailies. 53 dailies. ON THE WEB: ON THE WEB:

COMING EVENTS

INFORMATION

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

NOTICE OF Annual General Meeting Special Olympics B.C. Richmond Will hold its AGM on June 21st, 2012 7:30 p.m. Brighouse Park 7840 Granville Ave. Richmond WITNESSES needed for a hit & run accident on Sunday, June 3/12 at 7:30PM at Steveston HWY and 99HWY overpass involving a black Nissan Altima and an unknown white truck with a logo ‘P2P’ on the box. If you have any info, please call 604-715-4220 or 604-836-8295.

74

TIMESHARE

CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. NO Risk Program STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248

CHILDREN 83

CHILDCARE AVAILABLE

CHILDCARE available in large Richmond home with experienced mature child minder. Reasonable rates and flexible hours. Playroom and large fenced backyard for indoor and outdoor supervised activities. Some drop in care available depending on daily schedule. Child must be at least 4 years of age. Please contact me for meeting to discuss your child’s needs. susan@bigspringresort.com

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 106

AUTOMOTIVE

EXPERIENCED PARTS PERSON required for progressive auto/industrial supplier. Hired applicant will receive top wages, full benefits and RRSP bonuses plus moving allowances. Our 26,000ft2 store is located 2.5 hours N.E. of Edmonton, Alberta. See our community at LacLaBicheRegion.com. Send resume to: Sapphire Auto, Box 306, Lac La Biche, AB, T0A 2C0. Email: hr@sapphireinc.net

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 114

BUSINESS FOR SALE Be your own boss publishing your own local entertainment / humour magazine. Javajoke publications is offering an exclusive protected license in your area. We will teach you our lucrative proven system, step by step by step to create the wealth that you want. Perfect for anyone FT / PT, from semi-retired to large scale enterprise. Call today to get your no obligation info packet. Toll FREE 1-855-406-1253 FREE VENDING MACHINES. Appointing Prime References Now. Earn up to $100,000.00 + Per Year. Exclusive Protected Territories. For Full Details CALL NOW. 1-866-6686629. Website WWW.TCVEND.COM Help Wanted!!! Make up to $1000 a week Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkinghub.com !! Home-Based GOLDMINE !! Young Growth Co. Creating Millionaires! Started P/T 6 mos ago - will earn $40K this mo. Everyone earns money! Fee required. MUST watch video first. www.EarnCashDailyFromHome.com

114

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING DRIVERS WANTED:

Terrific career opportunity outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects. No Experience Needed!! Extensive paid travel, meal allowance, 4 wks. vacation & benefits pkg. Skills Needed - Ability to travel 3 months at a time Valid License with air brake endorsement. High School Diploma or GED. Apply at www.sperryrail.com under careers, keyword Driver DO NOT FILL IN CITY or STATE

BUYING OR SELLING? Use bcclassified.com - Merchandise for Sale 500’s

33

INFORMATION

Attention: Tahltan Members Tahltan Central Council Annual General Assembly 2012 June 30 to July 4 Telegraph Creek, BC Recreational Centre Executive Election: An election will be held for the seats of: president, vicepresident and secretary treasurer. Voting will take place at the Telegraph Creek Recreation Centre. Nominations will be accepted from June 30 at 10:00am until July 2nd at 5 pm. Appointment of the 10 family representative seats will also be held. Visit www.tahltan.org or call 1-855-TAHLTAN (824-5836) for more information.

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING OWNER OPERATORS Surrey Terminal

Van Kam Freightways’ group of companies requires Owner Operators to be based out of our Surrey Terminal for runs throughout BC & Alberta. Applicants must have winter and mountain driving exp./training. We offer above average rates and an excellent employee benefits package. Call Bev at 604-968-5488 or send a detailed resume and current driver’s abstract, and details of your truck to: careers@vankam.com Fax, 604-587-9889 Van Kam is committed to Employment Equity and Environmental Responsibility. Thank you for your interest however only those of interest to us will be contacted.

TEAM DRIVERS required for regular USA runs. Must have 2 years mountain and highway experience and a clean drivers abstract. $22.50 per hour. Contact Yugo at Blueland Transport at 604-777-9720 x105 or email resume to y@blue-land.ca

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

e

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 114

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

TEAM DRIVERS required for regular USA runs. Must have 2 years mountain and highway experience and a clean drivers abstract. $22.50 per hour. Contact Ron Hutton at Coastal Pacific Xpress at 604-5750983 ext 351 or fax resume to 604575- 0973

115

EDUCATION

AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION RATED #2 FOR AT-HOME JOBS. Start training today. High graduate employment rates. Low monthly payments. Be a success! Enroll now. 1800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Classified Sales Representative Full Time Position Classified Business Centre Black Press is one of Canada’s largest independent media companies. We publish over 100 award–winning newspapers, host over 75 websites and create value for communities across British Columbia. We have a passion for growth and are courageous innovators. Black Press Classified Business Centre has a full time Classified Outbound Sales Representative position available immediately. Are you interested in: • 5 day work week ( Mon-Fri) • No weekends or holidays • Great earning potential • Opportunity for advancement You will work as an integral part of the dynamic classified sales team to achieve both departmental & personal goals. Your main focus will be to develop new classified business as well as building on an existing client base. You will have a professional manner, a passion for serving people and the desire to “WOW” customers. You will understand the basic elements of classified advertising and have a proven track record in sales. To apply, please send a covering letter with your resume to Lisa Farquharson, Classified Manager, lisaf@bcclassified.com or mail your resume with covering letter to Black Press Classified Business Centre, #100, 5460 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. V3S 5J9. Closing date is July 2, 2012.

www.blackpress.ca


Wednesday, June 13, 2012 EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION 115

EDUCATION

Richmond Review - Page 25 EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

130

HELP WANTED

DELIVERY PERSONS

CANPAGES

125

FOSTER/SOCIAL CARE

for Landscaping Work! Competitive, Energetic, Honesty a MUST!

PropertyStarsJobs.Com An Alberta Construction Company is hiring dozer, excavator and labour/rock truck operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilfield road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-7235051. Dollar Thrifty Auto Group Inc hiring a Rental Service Supervisor skilled at customer service, supervise staff, prepare schedule and daily sales report. $15.00/hr, 37.5 hr/wk Fax resume: 604-629-0754 F/T RECEIVER/DRIVER req imm. for warehouse in Richmond. Email resume, fharris@giafoods.com or fax,604-278-7423/Ph.604-505-7423 PRODUCTION HELP REQUIRED English speaking req. Call 604-2725758/ Fax resume to 604-272-0901

NOW HIRING! Up to $20/hr

Join our Marketing/ Advertising team now Busiest time of the year!

TRADES, TECHNICAL

HEAVY DUTY MECHANIC for a busy logging company in Competitive Wages & BeneďŹ ts After 3 mos.

Door to door delivery. ~No selling involved~ Start Immediately!

Porters/Cleaners Wanted P/T & F/T

Please fax 604-796-0318 or e-mail: mikayla.tamihilog@shaw.ca

PDC Logistics Call: 1-800-663-4383 To Book Info. Session

*Top Industry Wages / * Full BeneďŹ t Package Email: heather@viperconcrete.com Fax: 403-217-7795

Must be outgoing and motivated!

Marquise has multiple cleaning positions at Tsawwassen Quay! Morn/Afternoon/Eve shifts avail. Candidates will be required to complete a Criminal Record Check. Please e-mail resumes to 1090.marquise@hiredesk.net or fax: 604-214-8526

138

Maintenance (F/T) & Housekeeper (F/T & P/T)

Are required at the Holiday Inn Express Riverport (Richmond)

Send resume to:

kng@hierichmond.com

Fax 604-241-1840

TRUCK & TRAILER wanted for Langley Four 10 hour shifts, and benefits. Fax 604-513-8004 or email: tridem@telus.net

172 ASTROLOGY/PSYCHICS

May also involve some equipment repairs. We are fabricating rock and soil anchors. No experience required â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we will train. Please call us: Marek Zawierucha (604-946-5571) OR Sonya Schmitz (604-952-2632)

Angelena Physic Healer & Life Coach

PROFESSIONALS/ MANAGEMENT

182

182

FINANCIAL SERVICES

DEBT CONSOLIDATION PROGRAM Helping CANADIANS repay debts, reduce or eliminate interest regardless of your credit!

Required Full-Time for Surrey based cabinet shop. Must have previous experience.

Excellent Wages Paid!

Call 604-710-1581 REQâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;D Jouneyman Automotive Technician for Penticton Kia. Import experience required. Govâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Inspection an asset. Fastest growing Dealership in South Okanagan. Competitive wage and benefit package. E-mail Resume to Service Mgr. Dave Hehr dhehr@pentictonkia.com

EDUCATION

DROWNING IN DEBTS? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. AVOID BANKRUPTCY! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500

FINANCIAL SERVICES

320

191

From 1, 3, 5, 7,10 Ton Trucks Licenced ~ Reliable ~ 1 to 3 Men Free estimate/Seniors discount Residential~Commercial~Pianos

OPEN HOUSE - Herbal Magic Join for only $9.95 per week. Come in today, or call Herbal Magic at 1800-854-5176.

224

SPARTAN Moving Ltd. Fast & Reliable. Insured Competitive rates. Wknd Specials. Call Frank: (604) 435-8240

CARPET CLEANING

~CHOICE CARPET CLEANING~ Free Estimates. Guaranteed Work! 604-897-6025 (24 hr) 788-688-0117

242

   ! WEB OFFSET PRESSMAN WITH MINIMUM   !!"!! YEARSEXPERIENCE0REFERENCEWILLBEGIVEN "& &! $!% TO THOSE WITH EXPERIENCE WITH 'OSS 33# #!& PRESSES 0ERRETTA 2'3 AND 4ECHNOTRANS SYSTEMS!$  $ -USTBEAVAILABLETOWORKGRAVEYARDSHIFT

" !#"!" PM AM DAYSWEEK !  !    2EFERENCESREQUIRED " )NTERESTEDAPPLICANTSSHOULDDROPOFF FAX OREMAILTHEIRRESUMETO 6AN0RESS !TTN0RESS2OOM-ANAGER 2IVERBEND#OURT "URNABY "#6.% &AX       

%MAILBARRY VANPRESSPRINTERSCOM .OPHONECALLSPLEASE 7ETHANKALLTHOSEWHOAREINTERESTED INTHISPOSITIONHOWEVERONLYTHOSE SELECTEDFORANINTERVIEWWILLBE CONTACTED

Tel: 604-588-7248

#202 - 10252 City Parkway, Surrey

PLACING & Finishing * Forming * Site Prep, old concrete removal * Excavation & Reinforcing * Re-Re Specialists 32 Years Exp. Free Estimates.

260

ELECTRICAL

YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service Call Lic #89402 Same day guarnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;td We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

269

FENCING

S & S LANDSCAPING & FENCING Factory Direct Cedar Fence Panels for Sale & Installation. 8291 No. 5 Road, Richmond. 604 275-3158

281

GARDENING

Always! Pwr. raking, grass cutting, fertilizing, hedging, pruning, Rubbish rem. Free Est. 604-230-0627

www.blackpress.ca > www.bclocalnews.com

287

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

130

HELP WANTED

POWER WASHING GUTTER CLEANING SAME DAY SERVICE AVAILABLE

Call Ian 604-724-6373

Pressure Washing, window cleaning, sidewalks, parking lots, driveways & gutters. WCB.604-833-1462

130

HELP WANTED

Kids and Adults Needed Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either! Deliver 2x week, Wednesdays and Fridays, right in your neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.

Boundaries

Number of Papers 64 63 60 71 50 54 31 94 77 67 93

Kids and Adults Needed Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either! Deliver 2x week, Wednesdays and Fridays, right in your neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.

Call Roya 604-247-3710 or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com

Route

MLG ENTERPRISES All Aspects Landscaping & Garden Solutions

OF Home (604)501-9290

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Tel: 604-540-2421

(Close to New Westminster Columbia Sky Train Station)

INTERESTED IN PSYCHOLOGY?

www.counsellortraining.com

PRESSURE WASHING

283 GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS GUTTER Cleaning Service, Repairs Free Est, 20 yrs exp, Rain or shine. 7 days/week. Simon 604-230-0627

Canadian Health Care Academy

Moon Construction Building Services. Your Specialists in; â&#x20AC;˘ Concrete Forming â&#x20AC;˘ Framing â&#x20AC;˘ Siding 604.218.3064

300

LANDSCAPING

ACCREDITED

KELOWNA COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL COUNSELLING

â&#x20AC;&#x153; ABOVE THE REST â&#x20AC;&#x153; Int. & Ext., Unbeatable Prices, Professional Crew. Free Est. Written Guarantee. No Hassle, Quick Work, Insured, WCB. Call (778)997-9582

Route

Information Sessions Every Wednesday 6-8 PM

PCTIA

1ST CALL Plumbing, heating, gas, licensed, insured, bonded. Local, Prompt and Prof. 604-868-7062

14203135 Fairdell Cres 14201121 Gander Crt/ Pl, St.Johns Pl 14201126 Cornerbrook Cres, St Brides, St.Vincents 14201154 5000 blk Williams Rd 14901036 Turquoise Dr 14903060 Easterbrook Rd, Murchison Rd, Reeves Rd, Webster Rd 14903074 McCallan Rd, Tilton Rd 14903079 Hankin Dr, Musgrave Cres 14201084 Springhill Cres, Pl, Springmont Dr, Springside Pl 14100220 6th and 7th Ave in Steveston 14100174 4000 Blk Steveston Hwy

www.canadianhealthcareacademy.com

(250)717-0412

10% OFF if you Mention this AD! *Plumbing *Heating *Renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s *More Lic.gas fitter. Aman: 778-895-2005

Call JR 604-247-3712

Apply Now and Get a Free Laptop

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PLUMBING

or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com

Licensed Practical Nurse

Online programs also available CALL TODAY for information

338

POWER WASHING, Bird Control Resi/Com. Lic/Insur. Free Est: Call Dean 604-839-8856

508 Kingsway, Vancouver

for qualiďŹ ed on-campus applicants

CLEAN OUT YOUR CLOSETS WITH OUR â&#x20AC;?DOLLAR DEALSâ&#x20AC;? bcclassified.com 604-575-5555

341

Call: Rick (604) 202-5184

Vancouver Campus

BECOME A PROFESSIONAL COUNSELLOR Earn Your Diploma in 1 Year $1000 Tuition Allowance

3 rooms for $299, 2 coats any colour (Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls Cloverdale Premium quality paint. NO PAYMENT until Job is completed. Ask us about our Laminate Flooring & Maid Services. www.paintspecial.com

MIN. EXPRESS PAGING SYSTEM Reasonable Rates 604-270-6338

Tel: 604-879-5676

â&#x20AC;˘ Practical Nursing and Access to Practical Nursing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Classes Start on June 25 â&#x20AC;˘ Nursing Unit Clerk â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Class Starts on June 18 â&#x20AC;˘ Health Care Assistant Program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Class Starts July 16

Running this ad for 8yrs

PAINT SPECIAL

CONCRETE & PLACING

â&#x20AC;˘ Practical Nursing Program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Guaranteed Lowest Tuition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Class Starts June 25 â&#x20AC;˘ Health Care Assistant Program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Class Starts Every Month

(Across from Surrey Central Sky Train Stn)

329 PAINTING & DECORATING AAA PRECISION PAINTING. Quality work. 778-881-6096.

A-TECH Services 604-230-3539

CONCRETE Removal /Replace. Garages, sidewalks, patios. Call Santino (778)892-5559

Licensed Practical Nurse

Surrey Campus

 " 0RESSMAN #!& ! 6AN0RESSHASANOPENINGFORA*OURNEYMAN

604-537-4140

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

Apply Now and Get a Free Laptop & $1000 Scholarship

Royal Canadian Institute of Technology

Local & Long Distance

$45/Hr

EDUCATION

www.rcit.edu

AFFORDABLE MOVING

NUTRITION/DIET

If you own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS can lend you money: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is NOT an issue. 1.800.587.2161.

Information Sessions Every Friday 4-6 PM Student Loans Available & Job Placement Assistance Provided Morning, Evening and Weekend Classes Available

329 PAINTING & DECORATING

ABE MOVING - $35/Hr. Per Person *Reliable Careful Movers. *Rubbish Removal. *24 Hours. 604-999-6020

EXTRA INCOME

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

MOVING & STORAGE

TAX Debt Consulting CRA Assessments, Audits, Penalty/Interest? Victim of Tax Scam? We can Help! Call Today. TRC Services Inc. ph: (604)-781-6244 email: tax.trc@gmail.com

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

115

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING. Real Professionals, Reasonable. Rates. Different From the Rest. 604-721-4555.

Qualify Now To Be Debt Free 1-877-220-3328 Licensed, Government Approved, BBB Accredited.

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

MONEYPROVIDER.COM. $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877776-1660.

bcclassified.com 604-575-5555

TRADES, TECHNICAL

FULL AUTOMATED BEAM SAW / PANEL OPERATOR

115

Can solve all problems of life specializing in love, health, business, marriage, reunites loved ones. Call today for a better tomorrow. 3 readings for $45.00

PERSONAL SERVICES

604-447-3404

INSURANCE Sales Representatives required. Multiple locations throughout the Lower Mainland. You: Excellent customer service and proven sales ability with a general insurance license (Level 2 preferred). Us: Career advancement, Flexible work hours and benefits. Info: careers.cooperators.ca or joe_casciano@cooperators.ca

160

MECHANIC. Fleet Shop. good wages resume to:

PERSONAL SERVICES

General Labourer

151

LARGE CENTRAL BC cattle ranch seeks couple with horses to spend summer on range with cattle herd in the spectacular Chilcotin country. Travel trailer provided for housing. Low pay but an adventure of a lifetime. Alexis Creek Ranch 1-425-4818451 or email: cblakey@wesmar.com

LABOURERS

Harrison Mills . Must have valid BC drivers licence & provide own tools. At least two yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous experience required.

SEASONAL / FULLTIME

Online: www.viperconcrete.com

Classified ads are a direct line to extra income. Look around your home. You're sure to find items you no longer want or need. Somewhere there is a buyer for them. Call bcclassified.com 604-575-5555

109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

160

Call Rochelle 604.777.2195

HELP WANTED

$100-$400 CASH DAILY

HELP WANTED

Hiring 12 f/t CSR reps

Make it yours. Call 604-708-2628 www.plea.bc.ca

130

130

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

Seeking mature individuals with car or truck to deliver the new Canpage phonebooks in the Tsawwassen, Ladner & Richmond areas.

EXPERIENCED CONCRETE PUMP OP. / HEAVY DUTY MECHANIC Some great kids aged 12 to 18 who need a stable, caring home for a few months. Are you looking for the opportunity to do meaningful, fulfilling work? PLEA Community Services is looking for qualified applicants who can provide care for youth in their home on a full-time basis or on weekends for respite. Training, support and remuneration are provided. Funding is available for modifications to better equip your home. A child at risk is waiting for an open door.

EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION

Greenworks Redevlopment Inc. Hedges, Pavers, Ponds & Walls. Returfing, Demos, Drainage, Jackhammering, Old Pools Filled in, Irrigation 604-782-4322

Improvements,

14302277 14304052 14301144 14600555 14600673 14600670 14600671 14002280 14600550 14304072 15102996 14703680 14703424 15101184 15101182 15101180 15101030 15101026 15101024 15101021 14701366 14701370 15101011 15101018

Boundaries

Number of Papers

8000 Blk of Railway Ave 24 9000 Blk of No 2 Rd 67 Lassam Rd 77 Seagrave Rd, Seaton Crt,Pl, Rd, Seavale Rd 94 Sealord Rd , Sealord Pl 62 Seacote Rd, SeaďŹ eld Cres 82 Seacrest Rd, Seaham Cres 68 Moncton St, Trites Rd 100 Anahim Dr, Aragon Rd 86 Gilbert Cres, Neill Pl , Woodwards Pl 42 2000 blk Shell Rd, River Dr 55 St Albans Rd 54 7000 Blk Garden City Rd 15 Leslie Rd, Odlin Cres 9 Northey Rd, Odlin Cres, Pl, Sorenson Cres 46 Leslie Rd 44 Beckwith Rd, Charles St, douglas Str, Sexsmith Rd, St 47 Patterson Rd, Tuttle Ave 34 Cambie Rd, Garden City Rd, Odlin Rd 59 Cambie Rd, Patterson Rd, Sexmith Rd 64 6000 Blk of No 4 Rd 53 Alberta Rd 48 3000 Blk of Garden City Rd, Patterson Rd 60 Capstan Way, Regina Ave, Stolberg St 54


Page 26 - Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

the richmond

HOME SERVICE GUIDE 24/7 HEATING & PLUMBING

REVIEW

PLUMBING & HEATING

HOT WATER TANKS INSTALLED $649

RENOVATIONS

M.S. MAINTENANCE & RENOVATIONS

• Plumbing Service & Repairs • Boilers & Furnaces • Gas Work

• Plumbing, Drainage, Gas Plumbing • Fireplaces & Conversion to Gas • Furnace, Boiler Repairs & Installation

Plumbing • Electrical • Woodwork • Drywall • Bathrooms • Painting • Handyman • Textured Ceilings • FREE Quotes Door Repairs: Patio • Pocket • Bi-folds • Shower Insured / WCB and I’m a Nice Guy! Mike Favel • 604-341-2681

HOT WATER TANKS

HIGH EFFICIENCY FURNACE – $2499 installed

Installed from $699

604-275-8464 or 778-869-6288 www.cssheating.com

604-868-7062

Licensed, Insured, Bonded • Same Day Service

Licensed, Insured & Bonded Local Plumbers www.1stcallplumbing.ca

HANDYMAN

LAWN SERVICE

RENOVATIONS

• Residential / Commercial • Complete Fertilizing Programs • Rotary / Reel Cutting

BILL GILLESPIE

• Edging

• Hedge Trimming / Pruning

• Aeration / Power Raking

• Pressure Washing

• Trimming

CONSTRUCTION • RENOVATIONS ** COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL ** KITCHEN & BATHROOM SPECIALIST PLUS TIDDLEY THINGS

New fence installation • Gates & repair Roofing repairs • Powerwashing • Odd jobs • Renos • Gutters etc. Painting interior & exterior

STEVESTON HOME SERVICES Free estimates (fully insured)

604-272-2809 or cell: 604-841-2479

604-908-3596 6 04-9 -908-3 -3596

Call Darryn 604-339-5532

EXCAVATION

PLUMBING

CONCRETE SERVICE

RJ’S PLUMBING & HOME SERVICE

SSL ENTERPRISES INC COMMERCIAL ~ RESIDENTIAL •Backhoes •Mini excavator (rubber track) •Bobcats (forks/buckets) •Dump trucks

604-833-2103

•Backfilling/trenching •Ashphalt/concrete removal •Drainage •Retaining walls •Install concrete driveways/sidewalks

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES 372

353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

SUNDECKS

5 MINUTE EXPRESS PAGING SYSTEM PLUMBING SERVICES AT REASONABLE RATES CALL 604-270-6338

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE 509

AUCTIONS

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE 587

TOOLS

WEST CONCRETE

We specialize in driveway, sidewalk, patio, foundation and retaining wall, all kinds of concrete jobs. We also do fencing jobs.

Free estimate and free design. CALL WEST:

TRANSPORTATION

RENTALS 706

APARTMENT/CONDO

778-895-0968 RMD

810

TRANSPORTATION 845

AUTO FINANCING

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

TOP CA$H PAID TODAY For SCRAP VEHICLES!

EXCEL ROOFING LTD. All kinds of roofing work. New roof, reroof, repairs. Free est. (778)878-2617.

Aluminum patio cover, sunroom, gates, alum roof. 604-782-9108 www.PatioCoverVancouver.com

374 356

TREE SERVICES

RUBBISH REMOVAL

RECYCLE-IT!

JUNK REMOVAL Recycled Earth Friendly

Tree removal done RIGHT! • Tree & Stump Removal • Certified Arborists • 20 yrs exp. • 60’ Bucket Truck • Crown Reduction • Spiral Pruning • Land Clearing • Selective Logging ~ Fully Insured • Best Rates ~

• Estate Services • Electronics • Appliances • Old Furniture • Construction • Yard Waste • Concrete • Drywall • Junk • Rubbish • Mattresses & More!

604.587.5865

u-pick $1.50/lb, ready-pick $2/lb

4200 #6 Rd. Richmond

PETS 477

21 Years Serving Rmd. Residential & Commercial Clean Courteous Service FREE ESTIMATES Joe 604-250-5481

bradsjunkremoval.com

Haul Anything... But Dead Bodies!!

220.JUNK(5865)

604.

Black & Yellow lab puppies ready to go call to view $600 Vet checked, 1st shots dewormed. 778-885-9066

Open 7 days/week, 8am-9pm. www.birakfarms.ca

548

FURNITURE

MATTRESSES starting at $99 • Twins • Fulls • Queens • Kings 100’s in stock! www.Direct Liquidation.ca (604)294-2331

BORDER COLLIE PUPPIES P/B. fem. $550 red & white. Vet chk, 1st shots Call 604-250-4360

612 BUSINESSES FOR SALE LIVE THE DREAM. Harbours End Marine, 27 year history on beautiful Salt Spring Island, BC “the best place on earth!” Owner retiring, well-established business only $129,000 email: bjg_cormorant@shaw.ca

615 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY STEEL BUILDING - BLOWOUT SALE! 20X26 $5,199. 25X28 $5,799. 30X42 $8,390. 32X56 $11,700. 40X50 $14,480. 47X76 $20,325. One End wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca. TRY A bcclassified.com CLASSIFIED AD.

627

660 LANGLEY/ALDERGROVE HOMES FOR SALE-SUPER BUYS

www.dannyevans.ca

Homelife Benchmark Realty Corp. Langley

RENTALS

CATS GALORE, TLC has for adoption spayed & neutered adult cats. 604-309-5388 / 604-856-4866

706

CATS OF ALL DESCRIPTION in need of caring homes! All cats are Spayed, neutered, vaccinated and dewormed. Visit us at fraservalleyhumanesociety.com or call 1 (604)820-2977

PET WEEK OF THE

SPCA Thriftmart 5400 MINORU BLVD • 604-276-2477

5431 NO. 3 RD. 604-276-2254

PROUD TO SUPPORT THE LOCAL SPCA

734

MOVING SALE Sat. June 16th 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. 8280 Colonial Drive Garden, furniture, household items.

560

MISC. FOR SALE

FAN, Wood and gold coloured, great condition. Stainless steel KITCHEN SINK, 3 basins, (small in middle) (no faucet) Excellent condition. LIGHT FIXTURES, three. Gold/glass, for ceiling (flush against ceiling). HANGING LIGHT, used for entry way, gold & glass. North Delta. 604-591-9740

MODULAR HOMES

JUNE SPECIAL Brand New 16’ Wide Modular Homes. From $69,000.00 mark@eaglehomes.ca

736

HOMES FOR RENT

JULY 1, Shellmont. 3 Bed, 1.5 bath upper house. Very clean, new laminate. Large fenced yard. Pet OK. N/S $1,600 plus util. 778-386-1457 RICHMOND, #1 & Williams, 3 bdrm rancher,1.5baths,1800sf, 1850/mth. + utils. Immed. Call 604-518-3378.

750

SUITES, LOWER

RICHMOND 3 bdrm newly renovated, own entry & ldry. $1200 + utils N/S. 9551 Bissett Pl. 604-301-0818 RICHMOND, #4/Francis. 2 bdrm bsmt ste. New carpet. Nr elem/high schls. $900/mo. + utils. Incls lndry. Immed. NS/NP. 778-883-5127. RICHMOND, SHELL RD. 1 Bdrm, brand new 1 bdrm ste. Avail now. Close to Ironwood Plaza. N/S. N/P. $900 incl utils. Call 778-847-4803.

751

SUITES, UPPER

RICHMOND. Spacious, newly renod 3 bdrm w/priv. new 2 bdrm ste down. F/P. 8 appls, 3 baths, cov. patio. storage, garage, fenced. July 1. N/P. $2650/m. 604-833-2103

752

TOWNHOUSES

RICHMOND

Call 604-830-4002 or 604-830-8246 Visit our website: www.aptrentals.net RICHMOND, 7280 Lindsay Rd. 1 bdrm apt. $800 incl heat, h/w, 1 prkg. 604-321-9095,604-285-0668. RICHMOND Brickhouse area, 2 bdrm, 5 appls, strg, u/g prkg $1175 incl ht & h/wtr, NS/NP, Jul 1. 604304-9252 msg or 778-230-3524.

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557

GUARANTEED

810

AUTO FINANCING

The Scrapper

Auto Loans or We Will Pay You $1000

All Makes, All Models. New & Used Inventory.

1-888-229-0744 or apply at: www.greatcanadianautocredit.com Must be employed w/ $1800/mo. income w/ drivers license. DL #30526

WANT A VEHICLE BUT STRESSED ABOUT YOUR CREDIT? Christmas in June, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-5936095.

818

CARS - DOMESTIC

2001 CHEV CAVALIER, 5spd manual, 4dr, low kms, new aircare, $2250 firm. 604-538-4883

2005 CHRYSLER SEBRING, silver, convertible, 84,000 kms. Auto. Aircared. $4,900. obo. 604-826-0519

TRANSPORTATION

#1 FREE SCRAP VEHICLE REMOVAL ASK ABOUT $500 CREDIT $$$ PAID FOR SOME 604.683.2200

1-800-910-6402

Close to schools & public transportation. Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm townhouses. 6 Appl’s., balcony, 2 car garage, 2 full baths, gas f/p. 1 Year lease required. No Pets. Professionally Managed by Colliers International Call 604-841-2665

FREE TOWING 7 days/wk. We pay Up To $500 CA$H Rick Goodchild 604.551.9022

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

2002 BUICK REGAL LS 4 dr., auto, sunroof, gray leather, p.h.seats, CD & more. $3600. (604)541-0206

1 & 2 Bdrms Located in central Richmond, close to all amenities & Kwantlen College. Rent includes heat and hot water.Sorry no pets.

Autos • Trucks • Equipment Removal

QUEENSGATE GARDENS Conveniently Located

Available Immediately

Richmond

“COHLEE”, ID # 260715, SF, DSH, 1 YEAR 3 MONTHS

TO ADOPT CALL 604-277-3100

GARAGE SALES

2 hr. Service www.a1casper.com (604)209-2026

RICHMOND. LARGE 1 & 2 bdrm apts w/balcony, ht, hw, cable, prkg, locker, coin laundry, elevator, 3 storey, steps to all shops, transit & schools, very quiet bldg, NP, NS, lease. From $885. 604-241-3772.

RICHMOND

551

“COHLEE” NEEDS A GOOD HOME WITH YOU!

Cohlee was found as a stray, rescued by the Abbotsford SPCA and was transferred to the Richmond SPCA. Cohlee is a high energy cat would do better with older, respectful children. With younger kids, Cohlee could easily become overstimulated which would not be good for her. She would do best in a quiet home where she is the only pet, as Cohlee likes to be the centre of attention, and is not particularly fond of other cats. Cohlee will be a great cat in a multi-guardian home that has time for a playful, affectionate and loving cat.

APARTMENT/CONDO

2 BDRM ground level with 1 open parking. $825 per month. By Williams and No. 4. Utilities and laundry included. Radiant hot water heating system. Private entrance and alarm system. No pets. Available July 1. Close to corner store and public transit. Call (604) 722-8833

FLUFFY WHITE Maltese pups, 8 weeks old. Family raised. $750 firm. Call 604-597-4760. NEED A GOOD HOME for a good dog or a good dog for a good home? We adopt dogs! Call 604856-3647 or www.856-dogs.com

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES! Older House • Damaged House Moving • Estate Sale • Just Want Out • Behind on Payments Quick Cash! • Flexible Terms! CALL US FIRST! 604-657-9422

CAIRN Terriers. Shots, dewormed. Ready to go to good homes. $650: 604-807-5204.

359 SAND, GRAVEL & TOPSOIL Always! deliver Top soil, bark mulch, sand & gravel. 7days/wk. Simon 604-230-0627 will spread

PETS

6 beautiful farm raised kittens, ready now, litter trained, in/outdoor. $75/ea. 604-701-1680

Serving The Lower Mainland Since 1988

REVIEW

STRAWBERRIES

REAL ESTATE

50 Acre Farm (near Cambie)

#1 AAA Rubbish Removal

the richmond

FRUIT & VEGETABLES

www.treeworksonline.ca treeworkes@yahoo.ca 10% OFF with this AD

www.recycleitcanada.ca

PETS

542

604-787-5915, 604-291-7778

On Time, As Promised, Service Guaranteed!

477

UNRESERVED AUCTIONS - June 16 & 17, Redwater, Alberta. Collector vehicles & tractors, 1300 die cast toy tractors, wagons, buggies, show harness; old gas upright gas pumps; original case eagle; antiques. Thursday, June 21 - Harry Shapka, Vilna, Alberta. Phone 780636-2165. JD 8650, 4440, 4240; Concord air drill; 1977 & 87 Kenworths; Cat 966C loader; Komatsu D85; lowboy; 8820 & 860 combines; haying equipment. Saturday, June 23 - John Baranec, Innisfree, Alberta. Phone 780-592-2308. Steiger ST250, 9030 Bi-Directional; 4640 & 4320; MF 8450; Claas 98; 1980 Ford tandem; Kello 24’ disc; JD 820 & 830; plus full line-up. View full lists online: prodaniukauctions.com

CARPENTRY and Woodworking Tools - Routers and bits, saws, shaper, hand tools, blades, clamps - lots more. Sat. June 16th 9am 2818 Gordon Ave, or Annendale Lane Crescent Beach, Surrey .

821 CARS - SPORTS & IMPORTS 2002 TOYOTA Solara convertible, red, 91,000 miles. Good condition. $7,000. (604)854-3252

830

MOTORCYCLES

851

TRUCKS & VANS

2003 FORD WINDSTAR, rebuilt auto trans. Runs exc. Green. $3000 obo. (604)826-0519 2005 FORD F150, 4X4, crew cab , green, auto, 160 kms, options, $12,000 firm. Call 604-538-9257.

859

UTILITY TRAILERS

MOTORCYCLE / UTILITY CARRIER/TRAILER, fits 1-3 bikes, w/ gear box & ramp, hardly used $1175 trades? 778-888-6805.

MARINE 912

BOATS

NEED A LAWYER MONEY! Selling my 23’ Bitz Day Cruiser w/tandem axle trailer, 454 BB Chev Turbo 400, Coal V Drive w/22% overdrive, frest paint. Too much to list. $5,500. 604-820-1323

1989 6 CYLINDER, 1 owner touring motorcycle. Wineberry color. Always garaged when not in use. $7,200. Phone 604-852-9529

838

RECREATIONAL/SALE

2004 ITASCA SPIRIT 29.4 ft. Class C motorhome, 50,000km. 2 slide outs, awnings, generator & ext. warranty. Exc. cond. $39,900. 604856-8177 / 604-308-5489(Aldergrv)

845

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

AAA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Minimum $150 cash for full size vehicles, any cond. 604-518-3673

By virtue of the Warehouseman’s Lien Act and on behalf of Shelter Island Marina Inc., Consolidated Civil Enforcement BC Inc., will dispose of goods, namely: 32’ Power Boat, debtor “Barry Badenhorst” to recover $6,231.39 plus accruing storage and any/all other expenses related. This unit will be made available for sale after July 4, 2012.


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Richmond Review · Page 27

> A Collage of Cultures at King George Park

Grayson Pautler and Iris Ji.

Anna Lee, Cindy Ko and Soyeon Park.

Ifrah Chaudhry, Sereen Abumalouh, Minahil Chaudhry, Spiderman, Toleen Abumalouh and Eleen Abumalouh

Reaching back to move forward…

Riley Visack, Kelly Ma, Leilania and Shamika Perez and Selena Paolucci.

Celebrating cultures

Around Town Amanda Oye

A

diversity of cultures were brought together for a day of performances, games and other family-friendly

Around 300 people came throughout the day to partake in the festivities. “For us it’s a success already,” said Lot Ramirez, the president of FIRST Society. “We wanted to bring cultures together,” she said. FIRST Society has run

a similar event before, celebrating Philippines Independence Day, but this is the first year they turned it into a multicultural event. “It’s more welcoming,” Ramirez said. Their goal of being inclusive was highlighted by a parade of cultures. The various cultures and organizations represented at the event lined up and went on a parade around the park. “I firmly believe we have met what we envisioned,” said Machie Sumang, a FIRST Society board member.

There were 19 booths set up in the park by a mixture of businesses and non-profit organizations. At one point representatives from each booth had a chance to talk on stage about their organization. Meanwhile, the kids were kept busy by volunteers who were organizing activities including a game of tugof-war. Amanda Oye covers the social scene. amanda.oye@telus. net.

GATHERING

“Lets’ emót” one heart, one mind, one family. Le

activities at Family Integration and Resource Support Team (FIRST) Society’s A Collage of Cultures event last Saturday at King George Park.

36thANNUAL B.C. Elders ót

Elma Cardines and Nathanael and Zenia Delacruz.

FIRST officers and board members: Lot Ramirez, the president and a board member; Marlyn Dadural, the vice-president of operations; Debbie Alvarez, a board member; Evelyn Uy, the vice-president of administration; Cecilia Capalad, the secretary; Leonida Panlilio, the financial officer; Machie Sumang, a board member; Rodel Silva, the auditor; and Jericho Bundac the IT officer.

ts m ’ e

“Honouring our ancestors through our elders and recognizing our future through our youth”

Hosted by the Stó:lō and Tsawwassen First Nation

July 10, 11, and 12, 2012

TRADE AND EXHIBITION CENTRE 1190 Cornell Street, Abbotsford V2T 6H5 For more information visit

www.36theldersgathering.com


FLAGS GO UP. RATES COME DOWN.

0.99

$

STARTING FROM

INNER W Best of FG3B9CKN RM4H9CKN(S) CP3F8CKN RL5H9CK

CIVIC ACCORD CR-V ODYSSEY

STARTING FROM

STARTING FROM

STARTING FROM

STARTING FROM

YF4H9CKN

YK1F5CKNZ

GE8H7CE

TF2H5CKN

PILOT

RIDGELINE

FIT

CROSSTOUR

STARTING FROM

STARTING FROM

$

16,485 **

36,560

** $

$

26,530 **

36,630

**

RICHMOND

REVIEW

the richmond

2012

604-207-1888 604.638.0497

% *¥

ON ANY NEW 2012 HONDA

LEASE OR FINANCE

OFFERS END JULY 3RD

$

$

27,630

16,075 **

** $

$

31,630**

STARTING FROM

36,630**

Honda

$21,575/$40,630 including freight and PDI of $1,495/$1,640/ 95/$1 640 based on a new 2012 Civic Coupe EX-L model FG3B9CK/ CR-V Touring 4WD model RM4H9CKN(S)/ Accord Sedan EX-L V6 Navi model CP3F8CKN/Odyssey Touring model RL5H9CK/Pilot Touring model YF4H9CKN/ **MSRP is $26,385/$36,730/$37,130/$48,730/$50,160/$43,730/$21,575/$40,630 $1,495/$1,640/$1,640/$1,640/$1,640/$1,640/$1,495/$1,640 / Crosstour EX-L EX L Navi 4WD model TF2H5CKN. TF2H5CKN ¥0.99% ¥0 99% finance offer is based on a 36 mos./36 mos./60 mos./36 mos./36 mos./36 mos./24 mos./60 mos term. Limited time finance offer based on a new 2012 Fit DX model GE8G2CEX and a 36 month finance term available only through Honda Canada Finance Inc. O.A.C. Finance Ridgeline Touring model YK1F5CKNZ/ Fit Sport model GE8H7CE/ example: $16,075 at 0.99% per annum equals $548.49 for 24 months. Freight and PDI of $1,495 included. Cost of borrowing is $134.76, for a total obligation of $18,163.52. Down payment of $5,000, first monthly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at finance inception. *0.99% lease offer is based on a 24 mos./24 mos./48 mos./24 mos./24 mos./24 mos./24 mos./48 mos. term. Limited time lease offer based on a new 2012 Fit DX model GE8G2CEX and a 24 month lease term available only through Honda Canada Finance Inc. O.A.C. Lease example: 0.99% lease APR for 24 months O.A.C. Monthly payment, including freight and PDI, is $110.97. Down payment of $5,000, first monthly payment, environmental fees and $0 security deposit due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $7,663.28. Taxes, license, insurance and registration are extra. 48,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. Dealer may sell for less. Dealer trade may be required. **/*/# Offers valid from June 1st through July 3rd, 2012 at participating Honda retailers. Offers valid only for British Columbia residents at BC Honda Dealers locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Visit www.bchonda.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.

Page 28 · Richmond Review Wednesday, June 13, 2012


Page B4 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Report to the Community: 2011 milestones The new, post-disaster rated Richmond Community Safety Building was opened to serve as home for our RCMP detachment. Most of our policing services are now based in this Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-rated facility. By purchasing and retrofitting an existing building, Council was able to save millions of dollars over the cost of constructing a new building. The new Steveston Fire Hall, also built to LEED Gold standards, was opened. It is the third new fire hall built in recent years, with two additional new halls planned for the near future. Construction of the first phase of the Alexandra District Energy Utility (ADEU) in West Cambie was initiated. The City’s first district energy utility system will provide an economical alternative energy source for a broad number of users and will eventually generate net revenues for the City. The City has created a District Energy Office and is actively pursuing other opportunities to develop district energy utilities within Richmond. The Highway 91-Nelson Road Interchange was opened. This will spur further development of Port Metro Vancouver’s industrial lands, help create hundreds of new jobs and strengthen our role as a gateway to the Asia-Pacific. It has already reduced speeds and improved safety for local residents as well as farm vehicles on Westminster Highway. The City acquired the last remaining privately-held remnant of Richmond’s Northeast Bog Forest to create almost 50-acres of parkland forest. The Lesser Lulu Bog is unique to Richmond and thus its preservation is important for environmental, historical and recreational reasons. Additional parkland acquisitions included securing 12-acres of the former Fantasy Gardens site. The botanical gardens on this site will be restored and become the centrepiece of a major new civic park. 2011 Annual Report Highlights

Richmond Review · Page B1

Our vision is to be the most appealing, livable and well-managed community in Canada

The Hamilton Community Centre’s dramatic expansion was officially opened in 2011. New facility features include new multipurpose rooms, a fitness centre, an expanded reception and administration area, two meeting rooms, a separate entrance and lobby space and a green roof. The South Arm Community Centre also underwent extensive renovations. The Richmond Cultural Centre was enhanced with the opening of the new Media Lab, which is designed to increase technology, literacy and creativity, particularly for youth. The Rooftop Garden, an outdoor venue for arts programs and events, was also opened. The City launched two major new cultural events in 2011. Ships to Shore 2011 saw four tall ships visit Steveston, drawing more than 40,000 people in early June. An outdoor theatrical production, Salmon Row, was mounted at Britannia Heritage Shipyard. Depicting 150 years of West Coast fishing industry history, the show enjoyed a sold out run. Ships to Shore is being held again in 2012, while Salmon Row will be re-staged in 2013. The Richmond Film Office saw a 20 per cent increase in film activity with a number of major productions including the hit TV shows “Once Upon A Time,” “The Killing” and “The Secret Circle” booking multiple shooting days in Richmond.

CITY OF RICHMOND

2011 Annual Report Highlights For the year ended December 31, 2011

The ongoing post-Games retrofit of the Richmond Olympic Oval continued in 2011. The new LifeMark Sports Medicine Clinic opened, offering a wide array of new services to the community. The Oval continued to expand its array of both community and high performance sport, recreation and health programs, including the opening of the new Performance Training Centre. The Oval also hosted a wide variety of sport, community, corporate and other special events. www.richmond.ca

2011 Annual Report Highlights

www.richmond.ca


Page B2 ¡ Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Report to the Community: 2011 Annual Report In the interests of accountability and transparency, the Community Charter requires all BC municipalities to prepare an annual report for each preceeding fiscal year and make it available for public inspection by June 30. These requirements have been completed and the 2011 Annual Report was approved by Council on June 11, 2012. The City of Richmond prepares two versions of its Annual Report. Both versions of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Report are available at Richmond City Hall or online at www.richmond.ca (City Hall > Finance, Taxes & Budgets > Budgets & Financial Reporting > Annual Reports).

The first version is the comprehensive Annual Report which satisfies all legislative requirements and is submitted to the Province of BC. This report includes the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s audited consolidated financial statements, a statement of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate objectives and success indicators, as well as a listing of permissive exemptions as required under the Community Charter for British Columbiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local governments. In addition to the statutorily required information, the 2011 Annual Report provides commentary and other content reviewing milestones that occurred during the year.

Richmond Review ¡ Page B3

2011 actual revenue

Actual 2011 (in $000s)

2011 vs 2010 %

Revenue

424,042

6.14%

Expenses

313,245

3.91%

Net financial assets

415,723

13.02%

Outstanding debt

5,808

-37.37%

Total investments

563,162

12.10%

Statutory reserves

275,353

11.42%

City of Richmond As of Dec 31, 2011

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

The second version is the popular financial report, titled 2011 Annual Reportâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Highlights. It has been prepared for the purpose of informing the public about the City of Richmond, its services, highlights from 2011 and its financial condition. This simplified version is intended for a broader audience and is distributed to a variety of stakeholders.

As part of its own commitment to accountability and transparency, this year the City of Richmond is presenting highlights of its Annual Report through this special Report to the Community in order to ensure this information is more broadly available to all our citizens.

Much of the new growth in our City continues to be focused in the City Centre. Fuelled by the arrival of the Canada Line, construction of the Richmond Olympic Oval and our innovative City Centre Area Plan, we are on the cusp of an extraordinary new wave of development. Thus, a key focus in 2011 was the continued work to update our Official Community Plan (OCP). The new OCP Update, designed to guide growth through 2041, is expected to be completed in 2012.

land areas designated for continued commercial and industrial growth so we can maintain the robust and balanced economy that is our hallmark.

t PQFOJOHUIFOFX4UFWFTUPO'JSF)BMM  the third of five new halls being built in our ambitious community safety infrastructure renewal program.

The City also continued a major push to update our civic infrastructure to meet the needs of our growing community. Major milestones during 2011 included:

The end of 2011 also marked the beginning of a new Council term. I look forward to working together with all members of Council over the next three years as we continue to strive to make Richmond an even better place to work, live, visit and do business.

Combined with the previously-adopted City Centre Area Plan, the OCP Update will ensure Richmond continues to enjoy well-planned beneficial growth that supports local and regional objectives for sustainability. We are directing new growth primarily into a higher density City Centre which is supported by rapid transit. This allows us to protect our farmland, natural spaces and existing single family neighbourhoods. The OCP Update also provides a framework that ensures Richmond will have adequate

t PGGJDJBMMZPQFOJOHBNJMMJPO expansion of Hamilton Community Centre;

Gaming revenue 3% Investment income 5%

2011 actual expenditure

Licences and permits Other 2% 6%

Taxes and levies 38%

Other capital funding sources 12% Provincial and federal grants 2% Payment in lieu of taxes 3% Development cost charges 3% Sales of services 10%

Finance Oval charges Library 3% 1% Planning and 3% Development 4% Sanitation and recycling 3% Sewerage 7%

Water supply 11% Engineering and Public Works and Project Development 17% User fees 16%

Parks, Recreation and Community Services 14%

General government 13%

Message from the Mayor

t DPNQMFUJOHUIFBXBSEXJOOJOH No. 4 Road pump station, part of an ongoing major upgrade of Richmondâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s critical drainage and flood protection network; and

Source: BC Stats, Survey of Household Spending in 2009 (latest version)

   

Fire-Rescue

16.2¢ 15.2¢

Roads

5.4¢

Transfer to reserves Information Technology



Project Development and Facility Services

5.4¢ 5.0¢ 4.7¢

Richmond Public Library

4.3¢



Community Services



Corporate Services



Planning and Development

2.8¢

Surplus

2.5¢

Engineering

1SPQFSUZUBYFTSFQSFTFOUMFTTUIBOPGUIFBWFSBHF monthly household costs in the Vancouver area.

www.richmond.ca

19.6¢

Parks, Recreation and Oval

 

-

Malcolm D. Brodie Mayor, City of Richmond

2011 actual breakdown of NVOJDJQBMUBYFT Police

 

re ca al on s l rs xe o Pe ta coh s ift y cl G ert d a s op an Pr co ses ing c n h ba pe nis To r ex fur e ld th O eho us n Ho atio uc re a n Ed h c tio t ra al He ing ope n h io ot ld s Cl eho Pen us e / Ho anc r su on In ati e cr n Re tio od ta Fo por xes s a an l t Tr na o rs Pe er t el

2011 Annual Report Highlights

t PQFOJOHUIFOFX/FMTPO3PBE interchange on Highway 91, providing much-needed expanded traffic access to Richmondâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s port lands;

I hope you enjoy reading these Annual Report Highlights. As always, I welcome the opportunity at any time to talk to you directly about our City, our vision, our values and the services we provide.

Monthly average household costs in Vancouver

Sh

2011 will be remembered as a year of significant growth for the City of Richmond. With our population approaching the 200,000 level during 2011, your Council paid significant attention to managing this new growth, while ensuring we provided for the needs of our expanding city.

t PQFOJOHUIF3JDINPOE$PNNVOJUZ Safety Building, the new home for the Richmond RCMP;

Law and Community Safety 24%

2011 Annual Report Highlights

Corporate Admin Storm drainage

3.9¢ 3.4¢ 3.3¢

2.4¢ 1.8¢

Law, Emergency and Bylaws

1.6¢

Business and Financial Services

1.5¢

Fiscal expenditures including debt

1.0¢

About half of every municipal tax dollar collected goes to support police and fire services and parks and recreation facilities and programs.

www.richmond.ca


Page B2 ¡ Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Report to the Community: 2011 Annual Report In the interests of accountability and transparency, the Community Charter requires all BC municipalities to prepare an annual report for each preceeding fiscal year and make it available for public inspection by June 30. These requirements have been completed and the 2011 Annual Report was approved by Council on June 11, 2012. The City of Richmond prepares two versions of its Annual Report. Both versions of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Report are available at Richmond City Hall or online at www.richmond.ca (City Hall > Finance, Taxes & Budgets > Budgets & Financial Reporting > Annual Reports).

The first version is the comprehensive Annual Report which satisfies all legislative requirements and is submitted to the Province of BC. This report includes the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s audited consolidated financial statements, a statement of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate objectives and success indicators, as well as a listing of permissive exemptions as required under the Community Charter for British Columbiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local governments. In addition to the statutorily required information, the 2011 Annual Report provides commentary and other content reviewing milestones that occurred during the year.

Richmond Review ¡ Page B3

2011 actual revenue

Actual 2011 (in $000s)

2011 vs 2010 %

Revenue

424,042

6.14%

Expenses

313,245

3.91%

Net financial assets

415,723

13.02%

Outstanding debt

5,808

-37.37%

Total investments

563,162

12.10%

Statutory reserves

275,353

11.42%

City of Richmond As of Dec 31, 2011

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

The second version is the popular financial report, titled 2011 Annual Reportâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Highlights. It has been prepared for the purpose of informing the public about the City of Richmond, its services, highlights from 2011 and its financial condition. This simplified version is intended for a broader audience and is distributed to a variety of stakeholders.

As part of its own commitment to accountability and transparency, this year the City of Richmond is presenting highlights of its Annual Report through this special Report to the Community in order to ensure this information is more broadly available to all our citizens.

Much of the new growth in our City continues to be focused in the City Centre. Fuelled by the arrival of the Canada Line, construction of the Richmond Olympic Oval and our innovative City Centre Area Plan, we are on the cusp of an extraordinary new wave of development. Thus, a key focus in 2011 was the continued work to update our Official Community Plan (OCP). The new OCP Update, designed to guide growth through 2041, is expected to be completed in 2012.

land areas designated for continued commercial and industrial growth so we can maintain the robust and balanced economy that is our hallmark.

t PQFOJOHUIFOFX4UFWFTUPO'JSF)BMM  the third of five new halls being built in our ambitious community safety infrastructure renewal program.

The City also continued a major push to update our civic infrastructure to meet the needs of our growing community. Major milestones during 2011 included:

The end of 2011 also marked the beginning of a new Council term. I look forward to working together with all members of Council over the next three years as we continue to strive to make Richmond an even better place to work, live, visit and do business.

Combined with the previously-adopted City Centre Area Plan, the OCP Update will ensure Richmond continues to enjoy well-planned beneficial growth that supports local and regional objectives for sustainability. We are directing new growth primarily into a higher density City Centre which is supported by rapid transit. This allows us to protect our farmland, natural spaces and existing single family neighbourhoods. The OCP Update also provides a framework that ensures Richmond will have adequate

t PGGJDJBMMZPQFOJOHBNJMMJPO expansion of Hamilton Community Centre;

Gaming revenue 3% Investment income 5%

2011 actual expenditure

Licences and permits Other 2% 6%

Taxes and levies 38%

Other capital funding sources 12% Provincial and federal grants 2% Payment in lieu of taxes 3% Development cost charges 3% Sales of services 10%

Finance Oval charges Library 3% 1% Planning and 3% Development 4% Sanitation and recycling 3% Sewerage 7%

Water supply 11% Engineering and Public Works and Project Development 17% User fees 16%

Parks, Recreation and Community Services 14%

General government 13%

Message from the Mayor

t DPNQMFUJOHUIFBXBSEXJOOJOH No. 4 Road pump station, part of an ongoing major upgrade of Richmondâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s critical drainage and flood protection network; and

Source: BC Stats, Survey of Household Spending in 2009 (latest version)

   

Fire-Rescue

16.2¢ 15.2¢

Roads

5.4¢

Transfer to reserves Information Technology



Project Development and Facility Services

5.4¢ 5.0¢ 4.7¢

Richmond Public Library

4.3¢



Community Services



Corporate Services



Planning and Development

2.8¢

Surplus

2.5¢

Engineering

1SPQFSUZUBYFTSFQSFTFOUMFTTUIBOPGUIFBWFSBHF monthly household costs in the Vancouver area.

www.richmond.ca

19.6¢

Parks, Recreation and Oval

 

-

Malcolm D. Brodie Mayor, City of Richmond

2011 actual breakdown of NVOJDJQBMUBYFT Police

 

re ca al on s l rs xe o Pe ta coh s ift y cl G ert d a s op an Pr co ses ing c n h ba pe nis To r ex fur e ld th O eho us n Ho atio uc re a n Ed h c tio t ra al He ing ope n h io ot ld s Cl eho Pen us e / Ho anc r su on In ati e cr n Re tio od ta Fo por xes s a an l t Tr na o rs Pe er t el

2011 Annual Report Highlights

t PQFOJOHUIFOFX/FMTPO3PBE interchange on Highway 91, providing much-needed expanded traffic access to Richmondâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s port lands;

I hope you enjoy reading these Annual Report Highlights. As always, I welcome the opportunity at any time to talk to you directly about our City, our vision, our values and the services we provide.

Monthly average household costs in Vancouver

Sh

2011 will be remembered as a year of significant growth for the City of Richmond. With our population approaching the 200,000 level during 2011, your Council paid significant attention to managing this new growth, while ensuring we provided for the needs of our expanding city.

t PQFOJOHUIF3JDINPOE$PNNVOJUZ Safety Building, the new home for the Richmond RCMP;

Law and Community Safety 24%

2011 Annual Report Highlights

Corporate Admin Storm drainage

3.9¢ 3.4¢ 3.3¢

2.4�� 1.8¢

Law, Emergency and Bylaws

1.6¢

Business and Financial Services

1.5¢

Fiscal expenditures including debt

1.0¢

About half of every municipal tax dollar collected goes to support police and fire services and parks and recreation facilities and programs.

www.richmond.ca


Page B4 · Richmond Review

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Report to the Community: 2011 milestones The new, post-disaster rated Richmond Community Safety Building was opened to serve as home for our RCMP detachment. Most of our policing services are now based in this Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-rated facility. By purchasing and retrofitting an existing building, Council was able to save millions of dollars over the cost of constructing a new building. The new Steveston Fire Hall, also built to LEED Gold standards, was opened. It is the third new fire hall built in recent years, with two additional new halls planned for the near future. Construction of the first phase of the Alexandra District Energy Utility (ADEU) in West Cambie was initiated. The City’s first district energy utility system will provide an economical alternative energy source for a broad number of users and will eventually generate net revenues for the City. The City has created a District Energy Office and is actively pursuing other opportunities to develop district energy utilities within Richmond. The Highway 91-Nelson Road Interchange was opened. This will spur further development of Port Metro Vancouver’s industrial lands, help create hundreds of new jobs and strengthen our role as a gateway to the Asia-Pacific. It has already reduced speeds and improved safety for local residents as well as farm vehicles on Westminster Highway. The City acquired the last remaining privately-held remnant of Richmond’s Northeast Bog Forest to create almost 50-acres of parkland forest. The Lesser Lulu Bog is unique to Richmond and thus its preservation is important for environmental, historical and recreational reasons. Additional parkland acquisitions included securing 12-acres of the former Fantasy Gardens site. The botanical gardens on this site will be restored and become the centrepiece of a major new civic park. 2011 Annual Report Highlights

Richmond Review · Page B1

Our vision is to be the most appealing, livable and well-managed community in Canada

The Hamilton Community Centre’s dramatic expansion was officially opened in 2011. New facility features include new multipurpose rooms, a fitness centre, an expanded reception and administration area, two meeting rooms, a separate entrance and lobby space and a green roof. The South Arm Community Centre also underwent extensive renovations. The Richmond Cultural Centre was enhanced with the opening of the new Media Lab, which is designed to increase technology, literacy and creativity, particularly for youth. The Rooftop Garden, an outdoor venue for arts programs and events, was also opened. The City launched two major new cultural events in 2011. Ships to Shore 2011 saw four tall ships visit Steveston, drawing more than 40,000 people in early June. An outdoor theatrical production, Salmon Row, was mounted at Britannia Heritage Shipyard. Depicting 150 years of West Coast fishing industry history, the show enjoyed a sold out run. Ships to Shore is being held again in 2012, while Salmon Row will be re-staged in 2013. The Richmond Film Office saw a 20 per cent increase in film activity with a number of major productions including the hit TV shows “Once Upon A Time,” “The Killing” and “The Secret Circle” booking multiple shooting days in Richmond.

CITY OF RICHMOND

2011 Annual Report Highlights For the year ended December 31, 2011

The ongoing post-Games retrofit of the Richmond Olympic Oval continued in 2011. The new LifeMark Sports Medicine Clinic opened, offering a wide array of new services to the community. The Oval continued to expand its array of both community and high performance sport, recreation and health programs, including the opening of the new Performance Training Centre. The Oval also hosted a wide variety of sport, community, corporate and other special events. www.richmond.ca

2011 Annual Report Highlights

www.richmond.ca


Richmond Review, June 13, 2012