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NEWS PENTICTON WESTERN

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Forum searches for ways to lessen the burden of poverty

VOL.46 ISSUE 46

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Pinnacles FC district teams net wins at home

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FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

business Penticton invited to make busine

presentation to WestJet executives

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entertainment nment Artists set up for en Plein Air this Saturday

LOOKING PAST THE TEARS

Service offered to help parents cope with the loss of a child Mark Brett Western News Staff

Even after the “of¿cial” grieving process ends, for parents who have lost children, the heartache and emptiness remain daily reminders of a life that could have been. For many it is a private pain that is never far away — easily rekindled by a picture or a song or just a Àeeting memory. “People have this unconscious timeline about what is the acceptable period for grief,” said Sam (Sandra) Lucier, a private counsellor and former chaplain at the University of Victoria. “They can even give you the ¿rst year. It’s tough because you have all the anniversaries and the birthdays and the holidays, but after that they think parents should be able to move on, but I don’t think it’s something anybody ever gets over. “I believe people who haven’t experienced the loss of a child would be surprised at how much that child continues to be a part of a parent’s life even years later.” In her dealings with people who have endured a mother and father’s worst nightmare, Lucier has found they somehow ¿nd the means of going on with their own lives. Helping them do that is why she and others have arranged a special memorial service called Ended Beginnings this Sunday at Everden Rust Chapel. Organized through the Penticton and District Hospice Society and the Bereavement Resource Centre,

Mark Brett/Western News

SAM LUCIER prepares for the Ended Beginnings remembrance service that takes place this Sunday at the Everden Rust Chapel at 2 p.m. It is for parents who have lost children and is sponsored in part by the Penticton and District Hospice Society and Bereavement Resource Centre.

this is the ¿rst of what is hoped to be an annual event. “This gives people an opportunity to be with the memory of that child,” said Lucier. “It’s not just the loss of that life, but for the hopes and the dreams that you had for that life. I think it’s an opportunity for healing for some, and validates and is a reaf¿rmation of that life. “It’s basically an opportunity for people to gather around the memory of their own child, to know that life continues to exist somewhere, and in the quiet of your own thoughts

you can connect there.” Those attending can participate as much or as little as they wish. There is also the aspect of being with others in a similar situation. “Nobody (who has not lost a child) wants to go there. That’s not a pain people want to imagine: ‘Oh my God, I don’t know what I would do. My world would end because I can’t imagine life without my child.’ That’s the reality of that loss.” During the session, counsellor Lizbet Rosenfeld will speak about the lessons of loss, and parents can

light a candle, write a letter to their loved one and take part in guided meditation. The timing of the service — between Mother’s and Father’s Day — is not coincidental, according to Lucier, because these can be two of the most dif¿cult times of the year. The counsellor was involved with similar services during her time in Victoria and found them very helpful for participants. “People loved it because they felt it gave them permission to be with that memory, honour that memory,

think about that child without feeling like they’re ruminating or being depressive,” she said. Someone who went each year was a woman whose 10-year-old daughter died in a car accident a week before Christmas — a funeral Lucier conducted. Other regulars were the mother of a girl who committed suicide and a father of a boy who was so distraught at the time of his son’s death he barely remembered the funeral. “He told me the Ended Beginning service gave him the opportunity to go back and say the goodbye he wanted to say to his son,” said Lucier. Other parents she felt especially bene¿ted were those who had suffered miscarriages or abortions because those deaths sometimes went unacknowledged. Although not religious in the strict sense of the word, the service does have a strong spiritual undertone. “For many people, when they experience a loss, it is kind of a confronting moment for them about what they believe,” she said. “What this does is very much validate a person’s own beliefs, even those who don’t have religious beliefs but who still believe there is something.” And while she admitted that not insulating herself from the pain of the service can be dif¿cult personally, what she gains in knowing someone may have taken a little comfort in the session makes it all worthwhile. The chapel is located at 1130 Carmi Ave. and the service begins at 2 p.m. and those attending are asked to bring a candle, paper and envelope.


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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

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Forum focuses on faces of poverty Kristi Patton

Western News Staff

A single mom working a part-time job charged with shoplifting to put food in front of her two kids and a parent with three children trying to live off $1,000 a month. These are just some of the faces of poverty in Penticton that were highlighted at a forum held at the Shatford Centre on Tuesday by the Community Foundation. The forum was held to search for solutions to close the gap between the rich and the poor, a category that surveyed residents gave a D grade in the Community Foundation’s Vital Signs report published last year. Bernadette Otto from the Penticton and Area Women’s Centre told the crowd of about 50 people at the forum about a man who recently turned 65 that came into her of¿ce. He was once a proud farmer, landowner, parent and partner, but now is living out of his van. “Living on $80 a month for the past couple of years with the help of some friends and family. His ¿rst old age pension cheque was to come in. Tears welled in his eyes when he tells his story of how he wants to help his family, not be a burden for them,” said Otto. The man was seeking help and wondering why his cheque hadn’t come in, worried he was going to be denied his pension funds. “We smiled and laughed and (cried) together looking for solutions. Then he came back to give me a hug, the cheque came and he wanted me to know he would be OK,” said Otto. The mom living off $1,000 a month with her three children needed assistance to complete the forms that would designate her as disabled. “She told me her independence was very important for her. She needed to believe she was strong and capable so her children could understand no matter what happens in life you can make decisions not to be a victim — her words not mine,” said Otto.

Kristi Patton/Western News

BARB HAYNES, executive director of the Downtown Penticton Association, holds up a Street Survival Guide they publish with contacts for community service groups.

Otto said over 30 men and women came to get toiletry supplies from their free shelf this past week. She said many of these people feel the system is against them because they have spent much of their lives battling to get what they need just to survive. Still, she sees those just struggling to get by often drop items off to the free shelf to help others. “Though some seem a bit more battered and bruised, they all seem like me and like you. They have strengths and desires, funny stories as well as sad stories. And given a chance, they are likely to help someone else,” said Otto.

The stories were heart-wrenching, even bringing some at the forum to tears. But Otto wasn’t the only one to see the face of poverty in Penticton, panelists from the Downtown Penticton Association, Penticton and District Community Resources Society and Salvation Army also had their stories. Christine Simmons, director of community and family services for the Salvation Army in Penticton, said the face of poverty doesn’t discriminate. She has seen people that work two jobs, seniors and others who feel they have failed or disappointed their families, reaching out for

food. In fact, she herself once needed the service. “I too can relate to these people. Some years ago, when my husband and I were ¿rst married, we had two young children, and when we were able to buy groceries it meant we could splurge and have hotdogs for supper. The rest of the time we ate bread and mostly oatmeal,” said Simmons. “What I have learned over the past 17 years is that poverty is no respecter of persons. It is not picky, it chooses at will and it affects us all.” The Community Foundation held the forum to get ideas from the public on what changes the community can put into place to affect positive change. Barb Haynes of the Downtown Penticton Association said a recent report on poverty in B.C. showed it costs $2,100 for every man woman and child in the province each year. The Vital Signs report showed that an average family of four needed $14.44 per adult a day to survive in Penticton. Gloria Talbot told the crowd she is a single grandmother who has been homeless for two years and often struggles to even ¿nd bus fare to get to the Salvation Army or any of the community services. She suggested that there should be a hotline for people looking for assistance to call. Talbot also commended a book called the Penticton Street Survival Guide published by the Downtown Penticton Association. It includes important numbers to community services for those in need. “Often people get so disheartened, they don’t know who to phone. This book saves lives. These people up here save lives everyday,” said Talbot, motioning to the panelists. The Community Foundation plans on setting up a Facebook page to continue the discussion. They also will be hosting another forum on housing, which received a D- grade in the Vital Signs report, on Sept. 11. The public is invited to share their ideas at the forums, on Facebook or via the foundation website www.cfso.net.

Hospital expansion caught up in political turf war Joe Fries Western News Staff

Mayor Dan Ashton has enlisted the public’s help to keep a pair of political heavyweights from derailing the drive for expansion of Penticton Regional Hospital. At Monday’s council meeting, he told the audience that Kamloops MLAs Kevin Krueger and Terry Lake had been pushing to have a hospital expansion there given priority over one here.

A new, $300 million patient care tower at PRH is currently at the top of Interior Health’s wish list; a new surgical tower at Royal Inland Hospital is No. 3. Ashton asked the public to write to IH and local MLAs to ensure Penticton retains priority. “We’ve heard through the grapevine that Minister Lake and (MLA) Krueger would like improvements to the Kamloops hospital, and it’s our understanding that we are at the top of Interior Health’s list and we want

to maintain that,” Ashton said in an interview Thursday. Ashton was uncertain how the MLAs had been expressing their desire: “I don’t know how it goes, I’ve just heard comments.” Lake told the Western News he has never asked Health Minister Mike de Jong to ignore guidance from IH, although they have discussed the situation at RIH. “We talk about Kamloops and the hundreds of million dollars that have been invested in the Okanagan. And

that doesn’t go unnoticed in Kamloops,” Lake said. Penticton MLA Bill Barisoff said he hasn’t discussed the matter with his Liberal colleagues, but said he and Boundary-Similkameen MLA John Slater are pushing “extremely hard” to get the new tower built at PRH. Barisoff said he was told by former health minister Kevin Falcon that politics are kept out of such capital spending decisions, and IH “makes the calls and where they think things

should be.” That said, “Everything’s always a political process to a certain degree,“ he allowed. IH chief ¿nancial of¿cer Donna Lommer said the wish list itself is removed from the political process, and all items are “critically important.” “We certainly wouldn’t put something on the list just because it’s come forward from a political arm,” she said. However, “I’m not privy to the behind-the-scenes decisions that happen at the ministry level.”

BCNULPN.ORG


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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

news

Gas station fuels concerns Steve Kidd Western News Staff

The plan to build a new gas station on a triangular corner lot at Westminster Avenue and Eckhardt has faced some strong opposition from both staff and council in Penticton, but after a public hearing on Monday, council voted to give the rezoning application conditional approval. When the rezoning proposal ¿rst came before council, on April 2, the staff report recommended against it, citing a number of reasons, including traf¿c concerns. But a key concern was that as a prominent lot on the northern gateway to Penticton, the proposed Petro-Canada station, with its trademark red logo and large awning, would not be suitable for that area. Complicating the issue was that the intention of the applicant was to relocate the existing Petro-Canada operation a little farther down Eckhardt to the new site, possibly leaving another contaminated area to add to the city’s list of brown¿eld sites. Council attached a number of conditions to the potential rezoning, including a revised traf¿c planning assessment and architectural plans for the city to review. But when the rezoning came to public hearing on Monday, concerns were all about how it would make the city look.

Loraine Stephanson wondered why council chose to ignore the staff recommendation not to approve. “Is Penticton a beautiful city per se, or are we just coasting on the beauty of the natural surroundings? Or is it time for us as a city to start catching up to what our natural surroundings look like?” she asked. “The gateways to the city are very important and that feature should reÀect OCP guidelines for the area. “We should really be taking a long hard look at the north gateway to our city and whether or not this project is appropriate.” “It should be a landmark building,” Stephanson said, concerned that a Petro-Canada representative seemed reluctant to talk about any changes to the design, especially the lighted signs with the bright red Petro-Canada logo. “This site involves curb appeal,” she said. “It’s a key point of entry to the city.” The proponent, Gary Johal, said concerns were groundless, and an architect had already been hired to design a station in keeping with the city’s preferences. Asking for it to be shown via Google Maps Street View on the council monitors, Johal explained that a Petro-Canada at 80th and Scott Road in Surrey was an example of what can be done. “We’re not using any PetroCan design. The design is totally different, it won’t even look like a gas

station,” said Johal, explaining that he plans to have better landscaping than what the city currently maintains, though the station will still have to display the two trademarked Petro-Canada logos. With Johal acknowledging the city’s concerns, council voted to give the application third reading and allow it to move to the development permit stage. However, several of the councillors commented that they are not setting aside concerns that the gas station design be an attractive addition to the area. “I am very sensitive that this is our gateway and will be looking for signi¿cant changes that will be in keeping with our community plan,” said Coun. Judy Sentes. “This concept has to come a long way in order to garner my continued support.” According to Anthony Haddad, director of development services, Johal will now need to providing a revised traf¿c impact assessment and meet Ministry of Transport conditions as well as a more detailed architectural plan. “One of the conditions is the requirement to submit development permit drawings. Council will be able to review the development permit for the character of the building prior to the adoption of the rezoning bylaw,” said Haddad. “That will come back to council once the applicant has provided the information.”

Mark Brett/Western News

HAPPY CAMPERS — Tim Hortons staff member Sam Wright gets in the spirit of Camp Day at the Fairview location in Penticton Wednesday. Proceeds from coffee sales and other donation opportunities were available throughout the day to help raise money to send kids to camp this summer.

A place to stay forever WATERING RESTRICTIONS

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL SKATING LESSONS FALL 2012/WINTER 2013

Stage 1 Watering Restrictions are in effect from May 1 to August 31, 2012 - Watch for updated restrictions to appear throughout the summer!

The City of Penticton is currently seeking Proposals from individuals or businesses qualified to provide skating lessons at McLaren Park Arena.

By being water wise you are doing your part for the environment and saving money on your water bill. Remember, when watering your lawn… Every drop counts! The Stage 1 Water Restrictions state that landscaping on even-numbered street addresses can be irrigated on even numbered days of the month and vice versa for odd numbered street addresses. Please note: Mobile Homes can water according to their pad number.

For a copy of the full Request for Proposal, please visit the City of Penticton website: h t t p : / / w w w. p e n t i c t o n . c a / E N / m a i n / business/tenders-rfps.html.

PUBLIC NOTICE

For further information regarding water restrictions, please contact Environmental Coordinator at 250-490-2562 City of Penticton Bylaw 2005-02 Fines for non compliance can be served Odd/Even Address System Automatic Irrigation

Manual Sprinklers

10:00 pm to 4:00 am

6:00 am to 8:00 am

Based upon your calendar day as of 10:00 pm

7:00 pm to 10:00 pm

and

City of Penticton Purchasing Department Ph: (250) 490-2500 The City invites companies to provide a price quotation for: REMOVAL, SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF DECKING ON THE S.S. SICAMOUS AND S.S. OKANAGAN For a copy of the full Request for Quotation, please visit the City of Penticton website: h t t p : / / w w w. p e n t i c t o n . c a / E N / m a i n / business/tenders-rfps.html City of Penticton - Purchasing Department: 250-490-2500 Please note the Closing Date & Time: Tuesday, June 19, 2012 @ 2:00pm

NOTICE OF A WINERY LOUNGE AREA ENDORSEMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS AREA ENDORSEMENT 425 MIDDLE BENCH RD. N., PENTICTON, BC PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an application has been made for a Winery Lounge Area Endorsement and Special Events Area Endorsement located at 425 Middle Bench Rd N, Penticton, B.C. The applicant has made application for a Winery Lounge Area Endorsement and Special Events Area Endorsement with proposed hours of operation from Sunday to Saturday (11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.). Council will consider this application at a Regular Meeting scheduled for Monday, June 18, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall, 171 Main Street, Penticton, B.C. Any person who wishes to comment on the proposed application may appear in person, or by agent, at the 6:00 p.m. Council meeting. Submissions or written comments will be received no later than 12:00 p.m. noon on Friday, June 15th, 2012 attention to the Building & Permitting Manager.

Those persons with special hearing, language or access needs should contact City Hall at 250-490-2400 prior to the meeting. The proposed application and supporting documentation may be inspected at the offices of the Building and Permitting Manager, located on the 2nd floor at 171 Main Street between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, excluding holidays, up to and including Monday, June 18th, 2012.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL – CUSTODIAL/SECURITY SERVICES The City invites qualified companies to provide Proposals for: Custodial/Security Services for Penticton Library/Museum Complex For a copy of the full Request for Proposal, please visit the City of Penticton website: h t t p : / / w w w. p e n t i c t o n . c a / E N / m a i n / business/tenders-rfps.html City of Penticton Purchasing Department: 250-490-2500 Please note the Closing Date & Time: Tuesday June 26, 2012 @ 2:00pm

THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF

PENTICTON

| 171 Main Street Penticton, British Columbia V2A 5A9 | Phone 250.490.2400 | Fax 250.490.2402 | www.penticton.ca


Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

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Offender’s release sends chills through community offender status, which comes with an inde¿nite jail sentence, for Bakker when he was before the courts in 2005. The sentencing judge, however, suggested there were some holes in the case.

Joe Fries Western News Staff

He may have paid his debt to society, but a high-risk sex offender who this week moved to Penticton has created worries for his new neighbours in a southend mobile home park. There are, however, some tools at the Crown’s disposal to mitigate the ongoing risk posed by Donald Michel Bakker, 48, whose parole documents describe as a “sadistic” offender, despite good behaviour behind bars that he attributed to having become a Christian.

Neighbours notified

Neighbours who spoke to the Western News on Wednesday said they were noti¿ed of Bakker’s presence on Monday night by an unidenti¿ed man who distributed copies of an RCMP news release. Although none would go on record, residents expressed worries about their new neighbour, who they said is living with his parents. A woman at the family home identi¿ed herself as the cleaning lady, and said no one else was there at the time. The Western News did not receive a response to a note left to request comment from Bakker. The manager of the 55-plus mobile home park also declined comment.

Court-imposed public safety

Although the ¿vefoot-six, 155-pound Bakker ¿nished his full 10-year sentence on June 1, he must still abide by temporary, court-imposed conditions until a formal hearing on July 4.

Caught on video

Donald Bakker

Among other things, he is prohibited him from visiting any places where children are known to congregate; possessing recording equipment or pornography; accessing the Internet; and having contact with sex workers. He must also abide by a nightly curfew except to work. At the July hearing, the Crown will argue that Bakker should be placed on a peace bond to keep similar conditions in place for a maximum of two years. The Crown may seek to have such an order renewed every two years, and a breach can result in a maximum one-year jail sentence. B.C. Criminal Justice Branch spokesperson Roger Cutler said about 40 such orders are sought each year for inmates who ¿nish their jail sentences but are felt by case workers to “remain a risk to the community.” When the orders are granted, it’s usually up to local police to monitor the offender, although other community members can assist. “There can be a number of people dealing with them on a regular basis, (who) are all looking for signs of an individual who may be entering their crime cycle,” Cutler said. But he was unable to say why the Crown didn’t seek dangerous

Brutal details of Bakker’s crimes are contained in the transcript of his sentence hearing on June 2, 2005 in Vancouver, in front of provincial court Judge Joseph Galati. Bakker pleaded guilty to 10 charges: one count of sexual assault and two counts of sexual assault causing bodily harm on three Vancouver sex workers; and seven counts of invitation to sexual touching on Cambodian girls between the ages of seven and 12. The adult sex workers bore the brunt of his sadistic tendencies. Bakker whipped one of the women’s naked buttocks with an electrical cord, and wore hiking boots when he kicked another victim’s vagina several times. The Cambodian girls, meanwhile, were ¿lmed performing oral sex on Bakker. He had gone to the country under the guise of doing charity work. His crimes were revealed on two videotapes he made that were found inside his car when police searched it on Dec. 9, 2003. At the time of his arrest, he had been employed for 16 years at Vancouver’s Pan Paci¿c Hotel. Judge Galati noted some dif¿culties with the Crown’s case, because the sex workers “consented, at least initially, to the acts,” and because the victims were drug addicts, who wouldn’t have made “perfect witnesses.”

Bakker’s guilty pleas, which spared his victims the dif¿culty of testifying at trial, and lack of a criminal record were also mitigating factors. The judge went along with the 10-year sentence proposed in a joint submission by the Crown and defence, and gave Bakker double credit for 18 months pre-sentence custody, leaving seven years new time to serve. Galati noted in his reasons that Bakker’s lawyer told the court his client, who had maintained a relationship with his wife and child, “will take such treatment as is made available to him while in custody.” Such treatment was made available, but Bakker never took it.

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apprenticeship program and his conduct behind bars was “appropriate with no institutional charges or incidents.” Bakker attributed his good behaviour to having become a Christian, and told the board he realized he had been “living in a very sel¿sh life.”

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Parole board says ‘No’

According to documents obtained from the National Parole Board, Bakker was denied early release in 2009, 2010 and 2011. In its ¿nal set of reasons for denial, dated July 20, 2011, the board concluded Bakker was “likely to commit an offence causing the death of, or serious harm to, another person” if released early. The decision referenced a June 2011 assessment that found he “demonstrated a longstanding proclivity towards the sadistic and degrading sexual abuse of vulnerable females.” It goes on to say Bakker had yet to complete any recommended programming and was considered “an untreated sex offender with a high risk to reoffend.” Numerous sex offender treatment programs were made available to Bakker, according to the decisions, all of which he

fuse treatment and psychological interviews due to apparent frustration with the Correctional Service of Canada. At the ¿nal hearing in 2011, the board noted he “performed well while employed in the kitchen” and “demonstrated a good work ethic.” He was accepted into a cook

rejected. In 2009, however, he told the board he refused an offer the previous year because he would have had to leave a building where he felt comfortable and did not wish to associate with violent offenders at a different institution. Later decisions show Bakker continued to re-

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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

opinion

Published Wednesdays and Fridays in Penticton at: 2250 Camrose St., Penticton B.C. V2A 8R1 Phone: (250) 492-3636 • Fax: (250) 492-9843 • E-mail: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

EDITORIAL

Health care should be above political fray

T

here’s nothing unusual in a politician of any level trying to secure bene¿ts for their constituents. In fact, Penticton and the South Okanagan have bene¿ted from having well-connected MLAs like Rick Thorpe and Bill Barisoff, as well as MP Stockwell Day. They have brought funding for roads, schools and a range of other projects to the region. But when it comes to medical care, playing political funding games is much more questionable. According to Penticton Mayor Dan Ashton, a longawaited expansion to Penticton Regional Hospital may be delayed, due to political jockeying. According to Ashton, Penticton currently holds the top spot on Interior Health’s priority list, but MLAs Kevin Krueger and Terry Lake from the Kamloops area are trying to get IHA — which is supposed to operate without political interference — to shift that priority to give Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops the No. 1 position. The ambulatory care extension, as Ashton said, is critical to the South Okanagan. Not only will it add badly needed services in Penticton, where the number of seniors in the population outstrips the provincial average, but it will expand facilities at a hospital that consistently operates at 110 per cent capacity, serving a large region of the Southern Interior. Nothing is free from politics, according to Penticton MLA Bill Barisoff. Which, sadly, is true. But there should be limits, and bringing political pressure to bear on an arms-length organization like Interior Health to force it to allow your community to queue jump, shows extremely bad form, if not a questionable sense of ethics. We join with Mayor Ashton in his call for not only city council and regional district directors to step up and speak out for PRH, but for residents of Penticton and the many communities served by the hospital to let their voices be heard by their local MLAs and Interior Health about the critical need for this long-overdue expansion.

NEWS PENTICTON WESTERN

2250 Camrose Street, Penticton, B.C. V2A 8R1 Tel: (250) 492-3636 Fax: (250) 492-9843 Publisher: Mark Walker Editor: Dan Ebenal Sales Manager: Larry Mercier Creative Director: Kirk Myltoft

The Penticton Western News is a member in good standing of the Canadian Community Newspapers Association and the British Columbia & Yukon Community Newspapers Association. The Penticton Western News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888687-2213 or go to <www. bcpresscouncil.org>. This publication reserves the right to refuse any material — advertising or editorial — submitted for publication and maintains the sole right to exercise discretion in these matters. Submissions by columnists and guest writers do not necessarily reflect the opinion of this newspaper. All material contained herein is copyright.

Survival planning turns undeadly There is a running joke amongst my close circle of friends about how we’d cope, maybe even thrive, in a zombie apocalypse. We came up with a business idea: Apoca-luggage, for all your bugout needs, and our roaming Mad Max food truck Apocataco. These plans, of course, are secondary to ones aimed at maintaining our own well-being. They include where we would all plan to meet up, how we would defend ourselves, which garden we would raid and what stores or neighbours we would have to knock over for supplies. While it is mostly tongue-incheek, anxiety in my household felt all too real last week when I received a text from one of my survivor friends that a zombielike incident took place in Florida where a man ate another man’s face. While I lamented that my request for a bugout bag for my birthday wasn’t more aggressive, I successfully convinced my boyfriend that my addiction to Twitter on Blackberry really is a preapocalyptic survivor skill. I think by now some of you are scof¿ng at my ridiculousness. But I know others are probably actually closet zombie planners, too. TV shows such as Doomsday Preppers on National Geographic offer a hint that I’m not alone in this thought process. I recently

Kristi Patton

At Random spotted at a U.S. Wal-Mart an aisle dedicated to paint can-sized tubs ¿lled with typical ‘prepper’ foods of powdered milk, chicken supplement and freeze-dried fruit. I even found Zombie Max ammo in an outdoor store (YouTube the promo video, it’s worth it), conveniently shelved beside paper targets featuring zombies as the bull’s-eye. In Winnipeg, an entrepreneurial bunch hosts a workshop for urban survival and disaster preparedness also playing on the whole zombie thing. I know the fact that someone wants to chase me to the ends of the earth to eat my brain seems unlikely, but zombie Àicks and bath salts causing gruesome incidents have me jumpy. “Really?” you still query. Yes, says Kelly Doyle, a PhD candidate at UBCO in Kelowna that will be writing

a dissertation on the zombie as a political and cultural ¿gure. “In the wake of 911, we have had this rupture of identity and complacency in North American society,” she said. For her, watching the ¿lm 28 Days Later, in which a virus infects people causing a rage to overwhelm them and turn them into Àesh-eating monsters, was what ¿rst caught her attention. “Films like Resident Evil that are about biological warfare coincided with historical events like mad cow disease and anthrax. They have made people anxious,” said Doyle. “28 Days Later, for me, made me think we could make some mistake like that where there is some kind of virus that really creates a change that is irreversible. If it doesn’t make us zombies, it could create an apocalyptic situation in so many other ways. So for me, the idea of a doomsday apocalypse might be more that our species could propagate something we couldn’t come back from.” Doyle said unlike their sexy villain counterparts of vampires and werewolves, zombies are too real of a monster. They are people who do the most disgusting thing we can think of, and worse yet, we fear how the people who survive will respond. As a zombie ¿lm buff myself, I always put myself in the shoes

of the survivors, which sometimes means yelling at the screen when they make their stupid decisions or somehow ¿nd time to get romantic amongst the chaos, even though they haven’t bathed in eons. Other times while watching I am putting mental post-it notes up in my brain — yes, the crossbow could become a useful skill. Doyle said maybe what I really fear most is what becomes of us as survivors. “A group of survivors always tears itself apart. So it is not really the zombies in the end that is the undoing of humanity, it is the people themselves, their sel¿shness, which I think is even scarier. That fear of what we are capable of is sitting below the surface of all of this ... maybe we are the monster, maybe it lives in us. For me, the zombie, more than any other monster, brings that directly to the forefront,” said Doyle. So what kind of monster am I? I’ll take comfort in knowing our jerry-rigged escape plan has some merit, and I am probably at least ¿ve steps ahead of others who will undoubtedly be taken ¿rst. Wait, does that make me the monster again? Kristi Patton is a reporter at the Penticton Western News who is determined to keep zombies away from her brain.

To d a y ' s L a u g h


Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

letters

Dinner Cruises Each Friday from 6 pm - 8 pm

Bill will place environment at risk This is an open letter to Okanagan-Coquihalla MP Dan Albas, I have read your column in defence of Bill C-38. Dan, I beg to disagree with you. Bill C-38 is an abuse of the federal budget approval process. To lump so many pieces of separate and signi¿cant federal legislation into one omnibus document (much like throwing all the dirty dishes into the kitchen sink), and then ramming everything through Parliament in the space of a couple of weeks is an outright abuse of the democratic tradition of thorough deliberation and debate. It is also unbecoming of the political af¿liation that I have supported for most of my life. Dan, be careful not to make our Okanagan River Channel an example of “responsi-

Dogs should be on leash

I have lived in Summerland for almost two years and have some questions and concerns regarding the animal laws in town. I have seen the signs in the parks and school yards that say “No Dogs”, yet day after day I see pet owners disobeying the posted regulations. And I am wondering if there is a leash law or not. I have two large dogs who are always leashed when out in public, but there have been many times when I have come across people walking their dog unleashed. There is a law for picking up your dog’s feces and people are always complaining about not picking up the mess. And yet not one person complains or makes a fuss for the unleashed dogs or dogs in school yards and parks. The other thing that really irks me is when we do come across dogs with no leashes — when you see another dog and its owner walking towards you, and you can plainly see that we are trying to avoid a confrontation, why do you continue to walk towards us without a care in the world. A lot of these dogs are “ankle biters” or “squawk boxes” (smaller dogs) as I call them. My dog is clearly larger than theirs, yet they let it come running and barking towards my dog, who takes it as a threat. And then they just stand there clueless as if they don’t see what is happening or is about to happen, and do not even bother to restrain their dog. What if the dog tries to engage my dog in a ¿ght

ble resource management”. If you have ever Àoated or snorkelled in the channel, you would notice that it is devoid of any riparian vegetation along its sides and bottom. The only ¿sh species inhabiting the channel are the occasional whiskered suckers or carp, grubbing for a few scraps of left overs from our sewage outfall. And by the way, as you swim or Àoat through the treated efÀuent from other communities farther north, and past our own Penticton sewage plant outfall near Green Mountain Road, you might have noticed the pungent odour of the treated wastewater from our own Penticton sewage treatment process, wafting up from the water you are swimming in. Dan, you and Mr. Harper’s ministers ought not try to convince us that weaken-

and my dog defends itself, then the owners would be crying and complaining that their dog was hurt and somehow it would turn out to be my dog’s fault. I never let my dogs wander freely outside of my fenced residence. I always try to avoid other dogs, even to the point of having to yell at the person to grab their dog. Not all dogs know each other, not all dogs like each other, so to avoid a confrontation you should always have your dog on a leash or restrained in your yard so that it doesn’t wander into the street when others are walking their dogs who are leashed. Why invite a confrontation between two dogs by walking them unleashed? Even more so when the unleashed dog is the aggressor towards the person walking their leashed dog. E. A. Worobetz Summerland

Smokers leave a mess

I ¿nd it rather sad that they wish to stop me from taking my wife, who can no longer stand, up into the hills and trails, but allow this situation to continue. I am not advocating banning smoking outright, but perhaps the cigarette companies should be required to make the packets and ¿lters returnable and refundable. In a short two-hour walk around the city and trails, one can easily see thousands of these ¿lters. It would not cost the smokers any more in the long run if they saved and returned all these ¿lters and packages. My wife did smoke for years, but

ing and “gutting” the Fisheries Act is a good way to create more jobs. As the old saying goes, if the canary dies in the coal mine, you’d better get out in a hurry. Same goes for the ¿sh stocks of Canada, and the government’s arbitrary approach to all the environmental checks and balances that I helped put in place over the past quarter century. Please get the proposed amendments to Canada’s environmental legislation separated out of the budget bill, now, and deal with them responsibly and methodically before the appropriate Parliamentary committees. That should not be too much to ask of you, as our elected representative. Tom Siddon Former Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Kaleden

not once in all that time did she leave a butt or match anywhere, but put them in a can to put out with the household garbage. Something to think about. Bob Richards Penticton

Stamp club raises funds

This is to inform your readers that as of last September until our meeting on May 6, the Penticton and District Stamp Club has been able to raise $315 for each the Cancer Society and the Moog and Friends Hospice House. Cheques will soon be presented to these two charities. The funds were raised through the auction of donated stamps to our club, which comes down to approximately $70 per regular meeting from our membership. We are proud of our accomplishment and hope to do more in the future if the community support is there. Even though the Stamp Club is in recess until September, people who wish to donate can do so throughout the summer by contacting Gus Boersma at 250-492-3875 or email gboersma@telus.net. The behind-the-scenes work doesn’t stop and we do need more material for auction to start the new club year in September. Gus Boersma, president Penticton and District Stamp Club

Children in need

Immigration Minister Jason Kenney recently stated that Canada contributes “billions” of dollars to the United Nations, much of it to be used to feed hungry

children abroad. The United Nations recently released a report indicating that in Canada one in 10 families with children under age six cannot meet the basic food requirements. There are 100,000 Canadian families in this category and over 900,000 Canadian families are using food bank resources because of their inability to afford basic necessities, through no fault of their own. What’s wrong with this picture? Patrick MacDonald Penticton

We want to hear from you The Penticton Western News welcomes letters to the editor for publication. We suggest a maximum length of 400 words and reserve the right to edit letters for length, brevity, clarity, legality, abusive language, accuracy and good taste. All published letters remain the property of the Penticton Western News, which is the sole judge of suitability for publication. Letters must include the writer’s address and daytime phone number, which will not be published. Letters should be signed with the writer’s full name and be sent by e-mail to letters@ pentictonwesternnews. com; mailed to the Penticton Western News, 2250 Camrose St., Penticton, B.C., V2A 8R1; or faxed to 250-492-9843.

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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

letters

Wars have nothing to do with political evolution Re: Ernie Slump’s May 25 letter: “Take a good look at Canada’s military history, more white Anglo-Saxon men than any other race in Canada fought, bled and died for the rights and freedoms you and your generation enjoy and take for granted today.” Yes, let’s do that Mr. Slump. In the past you have referred to the four wars of the 20th century Canada fought. Those would be the Boer War, the First World War, the Second World War and the Korean War. Those wars have absolutely nothing to do with Canada’s political evolution or rights and freedoms. The Boer War saw the British empire and its satraps (for our purposes, Canada) wage a despicable war against Boers (Dutch in origin) i.e. white (and black) Africans. Two independent states were subjugated and enslaved (just like Canada earlier) within the (Anglo) British empire. The Boer War witnessed the spectacle

of the 20th century’s ¿rst concentration camps, where Boer women and those too young (infants and children), those too old and those too in¿rm to ¿ght against the (British) empire troops, were detained. As the same sources of water were used for bathing, cleaning, cooking, drinking and as latrines, and as there was inadequate housing and food, many died from cholera, dysentery, typhus, exposure and malnutrition-related maladies. The First World War saw thousands upon thousands of soldiers being mowed down by machine guns, blown apart by artillery, eradicated like bugs or vermin by poison gas or left to drown or die horribly from infected wounds while left out in a sea of mud somewhere in noman’s-land. All that and a war where wealthy of¿cers felt greater loyalty to the of¿cers of their enemies than to the enlisted men who served under them.

The Korean War, led by the U.S., saw B29s (the bomber that dropped atomic bombs on Japan) drop napalm on cities and hamlets in both North and South Korea. Where both sides accepted troop surrender, often bound their hands, then gunned them down in cold blood. Where both sides tortured, abused and tried “brainwashing” techniques on PoWs. The result? The war is not of¿cially over between the two states, as although there is a cease¿re (armistice), there is no formal treaty that ends the war. The two Koreas’ border is the most heavily forti¿ed, violent and deadly in the world. The Second World War had nothing to do with ¿ghting for the rights and freedoms of Canadians. C’mon, Nazi Germany couldn’t even pull off a cross-Channel invasion of Britain. Do you seriously believe they would have been able to cross the Atlantic and successfully invade Canada and the U.S.A? Do you

seriously believe Imperial-fascist Japan would be able to successfully invade and occupy the U.S.A. — with Canada thrown in? I can’t tell you what veterans of the Second World War fought for. Their reasons are probably as varied as the number of veterans who participated. But I can tell you what they fought against: What spews out of that mouth of yours (and soils the pages of our local newspapers), Mr. Slump. Let me put this to you the way they would in the military: Close your mouth, open your eyes and ears, read and listen to what more intelligent people than yourself have to say. Heaven forbid, you might just learn something (worthwhile, that is). Paul Demetrick, Canadian Army Reserve (Retired) Penticton

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The constant barrage of letters from Ernie Slump provide us with so much drivel and misinformation, I don’t know where to start. His recurring theme is: Prime Minister Trudeau was bad for the country; French people are bad for the country; Women have done nothing for the country; We all owe Ernie and his white Anglo-Saxon male cohorts a big debt of gratitude. In fact, Ernie has been living in a vacuum for a long time. Back in November 1981, the Canadian Constitution was being hashed out by Prime Minister Trudeau and the 10 provincial premiers. There are two important facts that Ernie missed: 1) Trudeau was the person who challenged the premiers to go back home, and call a referendum. They refused, since the new constitution was so popular. 2) Voting on behalf of British Columbians was none other than Bill Bennett, who voted af¿rmative. There wasn’t a gun held to his head. As for Trudeau promising Quebec to turn the rest of Canada into a French-speaking country, that’s totally bogus. Canada has, since the beginning, been a bilingual country. What Trudeau promised Quebecers in 1981 was equal rights from coast to coast, the same as Ernie’s white Anglo-Saxon males have. The basis for French Canadian malaise has always been people like Ernie who constantly spout off that they are the chosen race, and language. Not so in bilingual Canada, it’s the law. In the real world, speci¿cally in Penticton, English children are clamouring to enter the French immersion programs. There is only one proponent for teaching Chinese Mandarin instead of French, and that’s our Ernie. As for your condescending remarks to Sharry Schneider, I won’t even dignify your snooty remarks with a comment. Bottom line: Some of us have actually moved here from Quebec, and love it here. We feel right at home speaking both English and French. We don’t even feel like second-class citizens, in spite of your repeated rants in the paper. Guess you’ll have to learn to live with it, since we’re not leaving. Steve Brooks Penticton

Study shows support

After hundreds of meetings of citizens of the Okanagan-Similkameen area, the group responsible for putting together a report on the establishment of a national park reserve has ¿nally released its study. The report gives approval for such a park. It is now up to the regional, provincial and federal bureaucrats to listen to the citizens that helped put together this study and advocate for the residents of our district and make sure the recommendations are followed. We have the support of business persons, chambers and ranchers as well as environmentalists to save one of the richest biodiversi¿ed parts of Canada for present and future generations. The Liberal government of B.C. has promised that it would follow the decision of the study makers. Let’s see if they keep their word. Frank Martens Summerland


Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

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With the work week done, Saturday nights are often the night of choice for young people to celebrate by going out, mingling, dancing the night away, and more often then not, waking up to a breakfast of Gatorade and Tylenol. This Saturday will be no different; in fact, planners from the city are counting on it. The City of Penticton is holding Penticton by Night, an event targeted at the users of the downtown area at night to ¿nd out what people think about current state of the city’s nightlife. The event will take place Saturday from 7 p.m. until late at the Elite Restaurant at 340 Main St. Along with live music and a vinyl DJ, there will also be prizes and taxi vouchers given out to those who attend. By ¿lling out a survey on what they think of downtown’s nightlife, participants will also receive a free poutine. This effort comes a week after the city held an alternative transportation scavenger hunt, where participants who rely on getting around by something other than a car were cut loose downtown to ¿nd speci¿c objects and services in the area, while keeping

track of what works and what doesn’t. These events mark the latest efforts by planners to further develop their Vibrant Penticton project. Vibrant Penticton refers to plans by city hall to revitalize the downtown and waterfront areas of the city, updating aging infrastructure and catering to the new desires and needs of a much different population than when it was built. “It’s like when you go in and decide to redecorate your tired home, there’s a greater sense of people wanting to gather in that space and that place, and I think that’s the opportunity for the downtown core as well,” said Barb Haynes, executive director of Penticton’s Downtown Business Association, and co-chair of the downtown revitalization committee. The downtown revitalization project has just entered its second phase, the learning phase. Whereas the ¿rst phase saw data collected from everyone, planners are now narrowing in on speci¿c users, such as those who rely on alternative transportation or those who use the downtown at night. The next step for the downtown revitalization project is a

design charrette, which will be held between July 9-13, where designers and stakeholders will come up with designs to address the concerns and desires of the people of Penticton. These designs will then be shown to the public in the dialogue phases where the public and planners have a back-andforth on the designs, and tailor them to further meet the desires of Pentictonites. The downtown isn’t the only area that’s getting a makeover. After the city took a look at the aging infrastructure on the Okanagan Lake western waterfront area, while there was a lot of work to be done, they also saw it as an opportunity, said Rod King, chair of the waterfront revitalization committee. Rather than performing the needed maintenance and leaving it at that, the city decided to completely redo the area, creating “a more vibrant, engaging, inviting atmosphere for the waterfront, not only for tourists, but I personally believe for our local citizens as well,” said King. In order to discover what would create this vibrant waterfront atmosphere, project planners have spent the last several weeks doing research and gathering information from the pub-

lic, said Mitch Moroziuk, director of operations with the City of Penticton. When it comes to the waterfront, he said a staggering 98 per cent of respondents said they used the area for walking — a number far above any of the other uses. In terms of priorities, Moroziuk said it’s clear that people want a wide, multi-use walkway separated from traf¿c. As well, when people listed their priorities in the area, the beach was number one, walking was two, parking was third and the street itself was fourth. There were other suggestions brought forward by the public as well, such as better washrooms, more trees, vendor areas, along with others. Now that the surveys have been collected and analyzed and these ideas have come out of them, it’s time to start looking at some actual designs, said Moroziuk. “The intent now is to take the information we have and develop three options, go back to committee, do some ¿ne tuning, and go to the public,” he said. Designs will be brought before city council, and hopefully both projects will begin construction following next year’s city budget.

SPCA investigating abuse of horse Kristi Patton Western News Staff

The B.C. SPCA has launched an investigation into a horse that had to be euthanized by RCMP of¿cials in Keremeos on Tuesday. “On June 6 our constables were alerted to allegations that the horse may have been beaten,” said Marcie Moriarty, general manager of cruelty investigations for the B.C. SPCA. Witnesses have been interviewed and Moriarty said the body of the horse will be exhumed to determine the nature of any inju-

ries sustained prior to the onsite euthanasia. She said the SPCA is con¿dent it will uncover the facts in the case, but cautions the public about jumping to conclusions until the investigation is complete. “This case has understandably raised a lot of public concern and anger, but it is important that people wait for the truth to be uncovered rather than reacting to the many rumours that are circulating. We want to assure people that we are investigating thoroughly, and if an offence has occurred we will de¿nitely take appropriate action,” said Moriarty.

Tim Robertson was one of the witnesses who came upon the horse that he said was brutally beaten and left to die for three-anda-half hours in a nearby ¿eld by a horse trainer. He snapped photos of the horse before RCMP arrived that he claims show the horse suffered severe trauma in the back of the head between the ears, and was in shock. “These are absolutely helpless animals. We have them in our domestic care, that is like a child to me. You don’t mess with that, you give it everything you can,” said Robertson.

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10

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

business Businesses looking for diplomas Western News Staff

As the summer employment season begins across the country, a new study has good news for students with a post-secondary education, as well as other Canadians who are working to upgrade their education and skills. Accoring to the report, 70 per cent of Canadian

businesses are looking for post-secondary education when they are hiring and a third are seeking job applicants with specialized educational backgrounds. “Competitiveness, the growing knowledgebased economy and demographic shifts are changing not just the types of jobs being created across the country,

WestJet campaign heads to Calgary

but also the skills and educational requirements businesses are looking for,” said Cathy Pin of the Bank of Montreal. “In fact, many of Canada’s most successful and fastest-growing small and medium-sized companies are innovation-focused and depend on their employees’ skills and knowledge.

Steve Kidd

Western News Staff

Steve Kidd/Western News

DAVID AND CYNTHIA ENNS’ Laughing Stock Winery on the Naramata Bench has recently been named to Profit magazine’s Profit 200 list.

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symbol on an electronic stock ticker background — to the names of some of their wines, like their flagship PortfoPrestigious awards and gold medals lio Bordeaux and constantly changing are stock in trade for wineries. They are Blind Trust blends. a major part of helping create a winery’s “We’ve leveraged that theme all the image and reputation, finding and claim- way along,” said David. “Companies are ing their niche in the highly competitive recognized by their products and their industry. brands.” But Laughing Stock Ranking companies by Vineyards is focused on five-year revenue growth, building their corporate the Profit 200 profiles the image as well. There’s country’s most successno shortage of bling, like ful growth companies. winning the Lieutenant Laughing Stock comes in Governor’s Award last at No. 159 on the list, with The Naramata 279 per cent growth from year, but you are as likely to find owners David and 2006-2011. The compaCynthia Enns written up Bench could be nies’ overall growth is in business magazines as more substantial, on that list in even in wine columns, even from 500 cases in their earning a spot this year first year, 2003, to 6000 general. on Profit magazine’s list cases last year. — Cynthia Enns of the 200 fastest grow“That makes us a meing Canadian companies. dium-sized winery on the This recognition follows a year after the bench; it makes us a tiny winery on the couple were named as finalists for Ernst global scale,” said Cynthia, adding that & Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year. it is good to have accolades for their sucFor the two escapees from the finan- cess, but it is mirrored by other wineries cial industry, having a well-run business along the bench. is serious. But it’s also a running gag that “I think we have also rode the wave they have kept up since they started in of the growth of the B.C. wine industry. 2003. The Naramata Bench could be on that “When we launched the winery, we list in general. What we experienced is did a tongue in cheek initial public of- part and parcel of what many of the winfering, as if we went public — but we’re eries along here have experienced,” said not, this is a family owned and operated Cynthia. “We were joking it’s the tenwinery,” said David Enns. They’ve kept year overnight success. We were winery that as part of their theme, from the win- No. 9 when we started in 2003 and now ery’s logo — a four-letter LFNG stock there are over 25 wineries.” Steve Kidd

Western News Staff

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Representatives from Penticton are heading to Calgary later this month to make a pitch to WestJet executives. Unfortunately, they won’t be able to fly direct. But that will change if WestJet selects Penticton as one of the cities they will expand regional services into. “That will factor into our presentation,” said city manager Annette Antoniak. “Our understanding is that we have 30 minutes to do our presentation. We want to profile not only the city of Penticton, but the need for increased service in the South Okanagan.” Penticton also has an airport survey/study on the go, and Antoniak said they will have that completed and compiled for the presentation as well. “We will be able to give them those statistics as part of the presentation, which I believe will be very helpful,” she said. “We’re trying to make it very creative so that we truly stand out.” Penticton received the invitation to meet with WestJet last week, according to Antoniak. Brandon, Man., another leading contender, has also been invited to present, as well as a variety of communities that have expressed an interest in having WestJet regional services at their airport.

Are you looking for an investment advisor you can trust? As a CIBC Wood Gundy Investment Advisor, I have the tools and expertise to help you achieve your financial goals. In today’s complex financial landscape, it is important to work with an Investment Advisor who has your best interest at heart, and someone you can trust. Let’s talk about your financial objectives… contact me today. Jennie Birzins, RRC, PFP, Investment Advisor • 250 770-2105 • jennie.birzins@cibc.ca CIBC Wood Gundy is a division of CIBC World Markets Inc., a subsidiary of CIBC and a Member of the Canadian Investor Protection Fund and Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada. If you are currently a CIBC Wood Gundy client, please contact your Investment Advisor.


Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

11

news

City aims to curb parking congestion during events Steve Kidd Western News Staff

With ever greater numbers of special events coming to Penticton, Âżnding room to park all the cars is increasingly becoming an issue. Residents in the neighbourhoods surrounding Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park were so concerned about possible problems stemming from the upcoming Rock the Peach festival that they had a meeting with organizers of the three-day music festival and city staff. One thing that came out of it, according to Mitch Moroziuk, director of operations for the city, is the new special event parking bylaw introduced at council this week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They raised some concerns with respect to

loss of parking, as well as noise, time of day. We made a list of all those items and we are trying to action some of those,â&#x20AC;? said Moroziuk. But when he started looking into existing Penticton bylaws for ways to address concerns, he found that the bylaws already on the books donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow for that. There are two different parking problems related to special events. First, it hits residents of the neighbourhood around the event, who Âżnd they are unable to park in front of their own homes as eventgoers grab every available parking space. And the event organizers themselves sometimes need a portion of the street set aside to park equipment, trucks and other vehicles. Current bylaws have

provisions to create residential parking only areas, but only in terms of addressing permanent, not temporary parking issues, and include a time-consuming application and review process. The new bylaw allows staff to deÂżne a special event parking area and issue permits to residents or event organizers depending on the need. That would also include putting in parking signs, poles and placards as needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We intend to use poles that exist and signposts that exist wherever we can. We are not going to go and put new posts up all over the place if we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to,â&#x20AC;? said Moroziuk. The special events parking bylaw is accom-

Fortis eyes smart meters Joe Fries Western News Staff

FortisBC customers can expect to save 40 cents a month on their electricity bills if the company gets the go-ahead to install 113,000 smart meters in the Southern Interior. Bills wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually go down, but â&#x20AC;&#x153;will go up less than they would otherwise,â&#x20AC;? said Bob Gibney, a FortisBC senior manager who last month outlined the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smart-meter plans for the board of the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen. Smart meters are already on the way for customers of the City of Pentictonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electrical utility, but FortisBC, which serves outlying areas within the RDOS, has to Âżrst apply for permission from the B.C. Utilities Commission; its Âżrst such application was rejected in November 2008. Gibney said the company has to replace 70 per cent of its old-style meters to meet modern standards regardless,

E

and the new technology would also help the company pinpoint power outages and improve conservation programs. If approved, the $47 million retroÂżt project would begin in 2013 and take two years to Âżnish. According to Gibney, each meter would transmit for about one minute per day, and its electromagnetic radiation would be â&#x20AC;&#x153;literally thousands of times belowâ&#x20AC;? levels deemed unsafe by Health Canada. Noting another common concern about smart meters, Gibney said his company has no interest in using the hourly data to see what its customers are doing with their power. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I suppose if we were really interested, we could all sit around and try to Âżgure out: Is that a pool pump or is that the heating coming on?â&#x20AC;? he allowed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But really, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not our business.â&#x20AC;? Gibney also said the company would â&#x20AC;&#x153;probably notâ&#x20AC;? allow customers to opt out of the smart-meter program as the Penticton utility will.

panied by a list of charges that event organizers will be charged for placards, signs, posts and labour. The new bylaw will be triggered by requests for

road closures and special events permits, so it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t offer direct relief to people living around the South Okanagan Events Centre and Penticton Trade and

Convention Centre, where parking can overĂ&#x20AC;ow into surrounding areas. The bylaw could be used for larger events at the SOEC, according to

Moroziuk, but would likely be handled by working with the planners there to Ă&#x20AC;ag future events where special event parking would be needed.

Notice of planned power outage Tuesday June 12, 2012 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Apex Mountain Resort FortisBC would like to notify electricity customers about an upcoming power outage scheduled on Tuesday, June 12, 2012 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The outage will affect all FortisBC customers at Apex Mountain resort. The outage is required for maintenance at the Hedley substation. Please protect all sensitive electrical equipment and be aware that some building alarm systems may be activated by power interruptions. We regret any inconvenience this may cause and will restore service as soon as possible. For more information or tips on preparing for power outages, please call 1-866-436-7847 or visit fortisbc.com/plannedoutage. FortisBC uses the FortisBC name and logo under license from Fortis Inc.

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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

news

Offshore drug bust has link to Keremeos Steve Arstad Black Press

Three Canadians arrested in New Caledonia after police boarded their sailboat and found 200 kilograms of cocaine on March 31 have ties to the South Okanagan. Bob and Cindy Stanley and Gary Yuzik are reportedly being held in New Caledonia’s only prison, infamously known for its dirty and overcrowded conditions. The three are well known in the South Okanagan. Bob Stanley worked for the Village of Keremeos for 21 years in the maintenance department. He became the village’s maintenance foreman in 2006, retiring on a long-term disability in April 2010. The Stanleys last known address was in Summerland. Gary Yuzik had a Re/ Max real estate of¿ce in Keremeos for a period of time. The of¿ce was gutted by ¿re in 2009. A cause was never established. Yuzik also served as president of Similkameen Country, the local Chamber of Commerce, in 2009. The Osoyoos Times reported in November 2009 that Yuzik was arrested during a grow-op bust on Cactus Crescent in Osoyoos. Yuzik was charged with production of a controlled substance, but the charges were dropped in January 2010. Most recently, Yuzik was conducting business out of an of¿ce located in the OK Corral plaza in Okanagan Falls. Sources say the of¿ce was mysteriously and suddenly abandoned several months ago. Rumours circulated through Keremeos in March regarding the disappearance of the three when close friends did not hear from them for several weeks. New Caledonian authorities took several weeks to notify family members of their arrest, and to date have refused to disclose their identities to the public.

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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

13

news

Weather helps keep lid on start of ďŹ re season

ON NOW AT YOUR BC CHEVROLET DEALERS. CHEVROLET.ca 1-800-GM-DRIVE. Chevrolet is a brand of General Motors of Canada. */â&#x20AC; /â&#x20AC;Ą Offers apply to the purchase of a 2012 Chevrolet Cruze LS (R7A), 2012 Chevrolet Silverado Ext 2WD (1SA) and 2012 Chevrolet Equinox LS (R7A) equipped as described. Freight included ($1,495). License, insurance, registration, PPSA, administration fees and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in the BC GM Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer order or trade may be required. GMCL, Ally Credit or TD Financing Services may modify, extend or terminate this offer in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See Chevrolet dealer for details. â&#x20AC; 0% purchase financing offered on approved credit by TD Auto Finance Services/ Ally Financing Services for 84/72 months on new or demonstrator 2012 Cruze LS/2012 Silverado & 2012 Equinox LS . Rates from other lenders will vary. Down payment, trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $10,000 at 0% APR, the monthly payment is $119.05/ $138.89 for 84/72 months. Cost of borrowing is $0, total obligation is $10,000.00. â&#x20AC;ĄBased on a 48 month lease. Rate of 0% advertised on new or demonstrator 2012 Cruze equipped as described. Annual kilometer limit of 20,000km, $0.16 per excess kilometer OAC by GM Financial. Monthly payments may vary depending on down payment/trade. Other lease options available. ÂĽThunder package includes PDZ credit valued at $1,200 and PDJ credit valued at $350. Dealer trade may be required. Offer available to retail customers in Canada for vehicles delivered between May 1 and July 3, 2012x$7,500 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit available on select 2012 Chevrolet Silverado Ext (tax exclusive) for retail customers only. Other cash credits available on most models. ++ Cruze Eco equipped with 6-speed manual transmission. Based on Natural Resources Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 Fuel Consumption Ratings for the Midsize Car class. Excludes hybrid and diesel models. Your actual fuel consumption may vary.,Š The Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license.+ For more information visit iihs.org/ratingsÂĽÂĽ2012 Chevrolet Silverado, equipped with available Vortecâ&#x201E;˘ 5.3L V8 engine and 6-speed automatic transmission and competitive fuel consumption ratings based on Natural Resources Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 Fuel Consumptions Guide and WardsAuto.com 2012 Large Pickup segment. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. Excludes hybrids and other GM models. â&#x2C6;&#x17E;OnStar services require vehicle electrical system (including battery) wireless service and GPS satellite signals to be available and operating for features to function properly.OnStar acts as a link to existing emergency service providers.Subscription ServiceAgreement required.Call 1-888-4ONSTAR (1-888-466-7827) or visit onstar.ca for OnStarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sTerms and Conditions,Privacy Policy and details and system limitations.Additional information can be found in the OnStar Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide.** Comparison based on 2012Wards segmentation:Middle/Cross UtilityVehicle and latest competitive data available,and based on the maximum legroom available.Excludes other GM brands.

You may not know it by looking outside, but summer and the Âżre season are just around the corner. Actually when it comes to precipitation in June, the wetter the better, according to the WildÂżre Management Branch of the B.C. Forest Service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a crucial month for us. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sort of our monsoon season in this region,â&#x20AC;? said Âżre information ofÂżcer Kevin Skrepnek of the Kamloops Fire Centre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The amount of precipitation that we get in June, to a pretty signiÂżcant degree, dictates how the rest of the Âżre season is going to go forward.

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however, that did not happen. One home, however, was voluntarily evacuated. To date in the Kamloops region, there have been 67 Âżres, with all but one of which caused by people. Normally, it is a near equal split with Âżres started naturally, usually by lightning. Although the number of Âżres is on a par with other years, what is alarming to Âżre ofÂżcials is the 527 hectares that have been destroyed is nearly double the usual amount. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re seeing a myriad of different reasons, poorly planned, open burning, bad campÂżres and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve even had a few unfortunately caused by discarded cigarettes,â&#x20AC;? said Skrepnek. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had an intense season in a few years and people have gotten a little bit careless as a result.â&#x20AC;?

base of Puddinghead Mountain could be seen candling as Ă&#x20AC;ames moved through the sparsely treed hillside fed by moderately strong winds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my understanding that it was human caused, there was no lightning in the area,â&#x20AC;? said Skrepnek. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it was human caused, there is an open burning prohibition in effect right now, so if someone was doing a backyard burn or something like that it would have been in contravention.â&#x20AC;? Along with forestry ÂżreÂżghters from Merritt and Penticton, a Âżxed-wing and rotary aircraft were used to Âżght the Âżre Saturday evening. Several members of the Kaleden department also helped out. Due to the wind, there were some concerns about the Âżre reaching the landÂżll site and coming in contact with nearby buildings,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the things we look at is the dryness of the soil and depth of the moisture. A real wet June with long, sustained rains can really moisten that soil up quite deep, which really helps us later in the summer when it does get dry.â&#x20AC;? Since April 1 in the Penticton Âżre zone, there have been relatively fewer Âżres than usual, only eight including last weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s small Âżre in Keremeos which burned about four to six hectares. In total, only nine hectares have been destroyed in this region. While still under investigation, that Âżre â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like the vast majority of others in the entire Kamloops district â&#x20AC;&#x201D; appears to have been human caused. The Âżre is believed to have started at approximately 4 p.m. Saturday in a Âżeld near the west end of the bypass, spreading north. Trees at the

Mark Brett

Western News Staff

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14

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calendar FRIDAY June 8

ELKS CLUB on Ellis Street has Okie Dokie karaoke 6:30 p.m. FRATERNAL ORDER OF Eagles has dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Entertainment by Anything Goes at 7 p.m. All members and guests welcome to their hall at 1197 Main St. SENIORS SINGLES LUNCH Club welcomes 65-plus each Friday. For location call 250-496-5980 or 250-770-8622. FREE FALUN GONG class at Skaha Lake Beach near the pavilion. Runs from 10 a.m to 11 a.m. 890 WING OF South Okanagan Air Force Association gets together at 4 p.m. at the clubhouse at 126 Dakota Ave.

MARTIN HOUSE holds a recovery program for those between 16 and 30 suffering from a mood or anxiety disorder and/or psychosis daily between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. at 205 Martin St. Call 250-4937338 for info. AL-ANON MEETS AT the Oasis United Church at 2964 Skaha Lake Rd. from 6 to 7 p.m. For info call 250-490-9272. PENTICTON SENIORS’S Drop-in Centre will be holding a dance. Music by Destiny: The Dance Band. Doors open at 7 p.m., event starts at 7:30 p.m. $5 per person. OK FALLS LEGION #227 will be having a meat draw at 5 p.m. BEREAVEMENT

WALKING

Group every Friday for those grieving the death of a loved one. Meet at

Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

9:45 a.m. at the Japanese Garden Gate behind Penticton Art Gallery. Walk to be followed with coffee-time. Call Dawn at 250-492-9071 ext. 2203 for info. ANAVETS has karaoke at 7 p.m. THE THIRD ANNUAL Vino’s will be held at 7 p.m. at the Spirit Ridge Resort in Osoyoos. To purchase a ticket, call 250-498-0666, or visit the www.blackhills winery.com.

SATURDAY June 9

ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION branch 40 has crib at 10 a.m. and baron of beef at 11 a.m. FRATERNAL ORDER OF Eagles has hamburgers and fries from noon to

4 p.m. Beaver races at 4 p.m. Music by DJ Ivan at 6:30 p.m. Members and guests welcome to hall at 1197 Main St. ELKS CLUB on Ellis Street has Okie Dokie Karaoke and a meat draw at 4:30 p.m. and dinner at 5:30 p.m. DALE SEAMAN and Highway 97 will be playing at Summerlands IOOF Hall at 9536 Main St. from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tickets only $10, and on sale at The Sweet Tooth, the Dollar Store and at the door. For more info, call Sharon Stone at 250-494-8238 or visit www.dseaman.com ANAVETS has pool for fun at 12:30 a.m., dinner at 5:30 p.m. and entertainment by Buzz Byer at 6:30 p.m. THE THIRD ANNUAL

Survivorship Golf Classic will be held at Skaha Meadows Golf Course on June 9. It will be a nine hole, shotgun style tournament. Prizes and dinner available after the tournalment. Registration is $60. Call 778-476-4330 to pick up a registration package, which can then be dropped off at Morpheus Graphics or mailed to Sarah Johnston at 2920 Paris St. Penticton B.C. V2A 6J4. All proceeds go to Survivorship Dragon Boat Team. THE SALVATION ARMY will hold an indoor garage and bake sale, as well as M & M’s Charity Barbecue at the Salvation Army Community Church, 469 South Main St. from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. The proceeds from the

barbecue will go to the local food bank. L AKE G ALLAGHER VILLAGE PARK will be having their grand opening from noon to 4 p.m. For every person that attends, the park will substantially increase their contribution to Habitat for HumanitySouth Okanagan. The event will take place at Gallagher Lake Frontage Road. For more information, call Merle Kindred at 778-476-1319. ROTARY PARKING-LOT sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1185 Government St. PENTICTON BY NIGHT will be at the Elite Restaurant at 340 Main St. from 7 p.m. until late. The event is aimed at finding out what people think of downtown nightlife for future developments.

Participants who fill out a survey will receive free poutine. There will also be live music, a DJ, prizes and taxi vouchers.

SUNDAY June 10

SUNDAY EVENING DANCES at 7 p.m. with DJ Emil at the South Main DropIn Centre on South Main Street. $3 per person. Call 250-493-2111 for more info. ELKS CLUB on Ellis Street has dog races, a meat draw, door prizes and last man standing at 2:30 p.m. FRATERNAL ORDER OF Eagles has Lorraine’s chicken wings from 1 to 5 p.m. Mystery draw at 4 p.m. Members and guests welcome to hall at 1197 Main St.

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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

15

calendar SURVIVORSHIP DRAGON BOAT TEAM flea market runs every Sunday, weather permitting, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. BC SPCA FLEA market is at 1550 Main St. (in front of Wholesale Club) every Sunday from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. For info, call 250-493-0136. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MEETS in OK Falls at 10:30 a.m. at 5328 Hawthorne St., then in Penticton at 11 a.m. for the women’s group at the Lawn Bowling Club at 260 Brunswick St. Also the Sunday 123 group meets at 8 p.m. in the Education Room in the basement of the Penticton Hospital. P ENTICTON R ADIO Control Club is hosting an off-road race at 99 Eastside Rd., at the corner of Eastside Road and McLean Creek Road. Registration at 9:30 a.m., racing at 10 a.m. All electric RV vehicles and spectators welcome. SPIRIT SINGERS CHOIR from Highlands United Church in North Vancouver will be performing at a special worship service entitled “Beautiful City” at the Penticon United Church on Main Street

at 10 a.m. ENDED BEGINNINGS, a service for those who have experienced the loss of a child, will be held at 2 p.m. at Everden Rust Chapel at 1130 Carmi Ave. at 11:30 p.m. Those participating are asked to bring a freestanding candle or with a candleholder, a piece of paper, a pen and an envelope. For information, call the Bereavement Resource Centre at 250-490-1107. LEGION LADIES invite everyone to come to their pancake breakfast in the hall at 502 Martin St. from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. $4 will get you pancakes, sausages, ham, orange juice and coffee. For an additional 50 cents, you can add strawberries and cream.

MONDAY June 11

M ENTAL WELLNESS CENTRE has Brown Bag family support group from noon to 1 p.m. weekly and individual support for family members from 2 to 4 p.m. weekly. As well, there will be a recovery group for those between 16 and 30 suffering from mood

ROAD

or anxiety disorders or psychosis from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 205 Martin St. Call 250-4937338 for info. ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION branch 40 has ladies fitness at 10 a.m., bridge at 1 p.m. and NHL hockey at 5 p.m. S ENIORS WELLNESS SOCIETY has stress and relaxation from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the United Church at 696 Main St. ANAVETS HAS POOL and dart leagues at 7 p.m. ELKS CLUB ON Ellis Street has darts at 7 p.m. LAND AWAKENING, an independent documentary exploring our relationship with the land will be screened at Okanagan College’s Penticton Campus Leture Theatre. Tickets $10 at the door, Theo’s or the Dowtown Penticton Association. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., screening at 7 p.m. Ottawa-based director Raul Alvarez will be available for questions and answers after the film.

TUESDAY June 12

TOPS B.C. 4454 has weekly meetings from

5:30 to 7 p.m. at 445 Ellis St. Use back lane entrance. Meetings are downstairs. Phone Susan at 250-4965931 or Sally at 250-492-6556. VICTORY CHURCH OF Penticton has a weekly men’s breakfast Bible study Tuesdays at 6 a.m. at Gathering Grounds Cafe on 756 Eckhardt Ave. AL-ANON for friends and family of alcoholics meets at 10:30 a.m. at 2800 South Main St. and 6:45 p.m. at 157 Wade Ave. at St. Andrew’s Presbytarian Call 250-490-9272 for information. S ENIOR ’S C OMPUTER CLUB on 439 Winnipeg St. has membership information at 10:30 a.m. in the computer annex room. M ENTAL WELLNESS CENTRE has individual support for family members in Summerland from 10 a.m. to noon at 13211 Henry St. P E N T I C T O N P HOTOGRAPHY C LUB welcomes all photographers for slide shows, speakers, tips and networking every fourth Tuesday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the

Penticton Museum. More info at pentictonphotoclub@gmail.com. $5 drop-in, $50/yr. 890 WING OF South Okanagan Air Force Association gets together for a gab and coffee every Tuesday at 9 a.m. at 126 Dakota Ave. OKANAGAN CALEDONIAN PIPE band practises from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Legion hall on Martin Street. All are welcome. ELKS CLUB ON Ellis Street has crib at 7 p.m. PIECEFUL EVENING QUILT Guild meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Penticton Seniors Drop-in Centre on 2965 South Main St. For more info call Sue 250-4920890, Fran 250-4977850 or Penny-April 250 493-8183. P E N T I C T O N TOASTMASTERS MEETS every Tuesday from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Shatford Centre at 760 Main St. Toastmasters is an excellent way to enhance confidence, speaking, and leadership skills in a fun, supportive setting. Membership is open to anyone 18 and up. Guests are always welcome and allowed up to three free meet-

ings. Call 250-492-2362 for more info. PENTICTON GOLF AND Country Club has mixed spring bridge every Tuesday at 10 a.m.. For info, call 250-492-6884. FREE WORKSHOP ON

with a presentation on self-neglect, as well as a presentation from the Penticton Fire Department on June 12 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Registeration required. Call 250-770-3434 to register.

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www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

life

Network gives patients a voice in health care Steve Waldner Western News Staff

On Saturday, Pentictonites will be given a chance to gain the tools to

make a difference in the province’s health care system. The Patient Voices Network will be hosting a free, one-day orientation at the Ramada Hotel to

prepare patients of B.C.’s health care to share their experiences and offer their input as how to improve the system. Going to the doctor

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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

a&e

A&E Editor: Kristi Patton • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 228 E-mail: kpatton@pentictonwesternnews.com

Artists breath fresh air into work Kristi Patton

Western News Staff

In the open air, the act of painting outdoors can be transcending, said Penticton artist Loraine Stephanson. On Saturday, 20 of the region’s best-known landscape painters and the Friends of the Summerland Ornamental Gardens will team up for a unique one-day celebration with the fourth annual en Plein Air. “It is a different experience of nature than if you are going for a walk, bike ride or horseback ride because you have to stop and be in one place and take it all in. It is a lovely thing to do, I recommend everyone try it,” said Stephanson, one of the artists working this weekend. “As a painter you have to make certain decisions very quickly because the light changes rapidly and you get elements like wind, so clouds change as well shadows appear in different places.” Painters will document amazing vistas found over 16acres that comprise the Summerland Ornamental Gardens from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Stephanson, who teaches Plein Air workshops, said the artist must look longer and deeper at the subject. “Sometimes it is really hard to get a whole day where you just feel you can spend it outside painting and away from all the other distractions. When you do get out there you get deep into concentration so much so that when it is time to go, you don’t want to,” said Stephanson. The artist said the added bene¿t of being outdoors is the sound coming from nature that gives contextual substance to your art. The Penticton Art Gallery will have a free limited edition guidebook to help viewers with

17

t.g.i.f. entertainment BARLEY MILL PUB — Karaoke 2.0 every Wednesday and Friday at 8:30 p.m. Watch sports on 23 TVs and one 11-foot screen. ELITE RESTAURANT — Open Mic Night every Friday at 8 p.m. Share your talents, hidden or otherwise, at the Elite After 6. Wednesday is vinyl night starting at 8 p.m. Thursday night karaoke starting at 8 p.m. FIBONACCI’S — Karaoke every Monday and Friday from 7 p.m. to midnight, Open mic on Thursday from 7 p.m. to midnight. Poker Wednesdays, no money involved play for prizes. VOODOO’S — Wednesday nights is Surrender the Booty — local artists are given space to show their wares for sale.

concerts File photo/Western News

CONNOR CHARLESWORTH, whose work is represented in Penticton by the Lloyd Gallery, paints the view from Poplar Grove Winery participating in last year’s En Plein Air event, organized by the Penticton Art Gallery.

a map, pro¿les of the participating artists, an introduction to the Summerland Ornamental Gardens and information on the Penticton Art Gallery. The book can be picked up at the gallery, will be available at the gardens on Saturday and can be found online at www.pentictonartgallery.com. Participating artists for this year’s celebration are Zach Abney, Laila Campbell, Connor Charlesworth, Rod Charlesworth, Colette Clark, Glenn Clark, Peter Corbett, Ken Gillespie, Jim Glenn, Kindrie Grove, Beverley Inkster, Robert Jenkins, Robyn Lake, Jan Little, Ingrid Mann-Willis, Angie McIntosh, Carol McQuaid, Dave Nicholas, Destanne Norris, Ron Stacy, Stephanson, Annette Witteman, Marjo Witteman and Nel Witteman. “We do get quite a few people out watching because they

are interested in the particular artists and how we do things, so it is fun,” said Glenn Clark, who is not only an artist at the event but also one of the coorganizers with Penticton Art Gallery curator Paul Crawford. Each of the artists will donate one of the works they create over the course of the day to be sold at the 35th annual fundraising Art Auction on July 7 in the Centre of Excellence at Okanagan College in Penticton. Tickets for the event are $75 for gallery members and $85 for non-members at the Penticton Art Gallery, or by phoning 1-800-442-2787. All of the works will be framed and on display for purchase at the Penticton Art Gallery from June 19 to July 6. Clark said the Summerland Ornamental Gardens is also looking at creating a calendar for next year with some of the

work featured in it. en Plein Air will go ahead rain or shine this Saturday. “It would have to be pretty sopping wet to get cancelled. I’ll paint in the rain with an umbrella. If it is a little cloudy with a bit of blue poking through I actually like it because you get some action in the sky and every once and awhile you can catch a nice rain squall over the lake and pop that into the painting,” said Clark. “There is an old story in Plein Air painting, all weather is good, just some is a little bit better.” Visitors are invited to watch and ask the artists questions while they work at the gardens located at 4200 Highway 97 across from Sun-Oka beach in Trout Creek. Admission is by donation in support of the Friends of the Summerland Ornamental Gardens.

June 8 — Aidan Mayes will be performing at the Cobblestone Wine Bar and Restaurant at the Naramata Heritage Inn and Spa. June 8 and 9 — Steve Jones performs on the patio at the Barking Parrot from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 9 — From Galiano Island comes Brad Prevedoros — Three Worlds at the Dream Café. His repertoire includes jazz, Latin, pop, classical, Celtic and Folk. Tickets are $19. June 14 — John Mellencamp at the South Okanagan Events Centre with opening act Cowboy Junkies. June 14 — Shotgun Dolls with opening act Oceans and Lights at Voodoo’s. Shotgun Dolls is a three-piece rock and roll band from Calgary.

events June 8 — The Vinos wine Àlm festival at Spirit Ridge Vineyard Resort in Osoyoos featuring food, wine, awards and afterparty with One More Girl. June 9 — FAB (Fashion meets Architecture on the Bench). Spend an evening watching exquisite fashion and touring a custom built home on the Naramata bench. Proceeds to beneÀt South Okanagan Children’s Charity. Show at 2 and 6 p.m. Tickets at Vintage & Vogue or Adhoc. June 8 to 10 — 17th Annual Summerland Bluegrass Festival at the Summerland Rodeo Grounds. Admission $15, day pass $10, children under 12 free. www.summerlandbluegrass.com. Until June 21 — Spring Palette, new exhibit of Àne art at the Leir House. For more visit www.pentictonwesternnews.com

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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

Stewart bites in Snow White

CELEBRATING OUR 60th YEAR!

Penticton & District

Community Concerts CONCERT SERIES: • Fine Arts Quartet • Cappella Artemisia • Natalie Choquette • South Okanagan Big Band Adults $90.00 / Students $15.00 Tickets Available at Wine Country Visitor Center or by calling 250-492-8326 www.pentictonconcerts.com

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Taylor & Howe

Reel Reviews Certain stories get told repeatedly and there’s a reason for this: they’re good. The olde European folklore made famous by the Brothers Grimm continues to entertain us to this day. Our current example and second incarnation of the tale this year is Snow White and the Huntsman. This is a darker and more mature version of the story: An evil and powerful Queen usurps a throne, imprisoning the fair Princess. A kingdom turns to ruin. The Princess grows up, escapes and leads a rebellion against the Queen, but not before making new friends, ¿nding her own power and falling in love. Can Snow White inspire her people and win back the throne? Can she even survive the magic and mystery of the Dark Forest? Can this ¿lm carry an epic treatment? We say, It’s the best ¿lm about Snow White in the last seven weeks. Mr. Howe was unable to attend this ¿lm, as he was held captive by sev-

Universal Pictures

KIRSTEN STEWART stars as Snow White in the classic tale retold as Snow White and the Huntsman in which she leads a rebellion against the Queen.

en dwarfs and I couldn’t afford the ransom. In his place I took my lovely wife, Dawn. TAYLOR: I was very pleased with the approach of this movie. It was dark, serious and set an appropriate tone for a tale of such grand scope. It’s a story of murder, power, greed, vanity, love, magic and death. The problem was one of casting, Snow White (Kristen Stewart) while not exactly ruining the movie, at the very least slows it down. This is supposed to be an epic adventure of extremely contrasted characters with emotional depth. Stewart fails to deliver the magic or the power that dwells inside

Snow White. DAWN: Kristen Stewart doesn’t embody the description of Snow White, as she is supposed to be the fairest in the land, not look like a skinny teen who smokes too much. TAYLOR: The wicked Queen, (Charlize Theron) delivered the goods with vanity and desperation. She was needy, cruel, mad, bad and dangerous to know. Theron can act and she is actually beautiful, unlike the contender for the title of “fairest in the land.” Snow White, it was noted, held her beauty inside. DAWN: Chris Hemsworth (the Huntsman) was virtually indistinguishable from his Thor

character, in terms of style. He runs around smashing things and has an accent. It’s not a bad performance, it’s just more of the same. TAYLOR: There were some great locations. Very moody and damp forests, the castle on the ocean unfortunately the cinematography was lacking. For the ¿rst time in any movie I’ve reviewed, there were shots out of focus. Perhaps it was too misty. Also, some shaky camera syndrome in the battle scenes bothered me, as it always does. I presume this is to be expected in the Braveheart of Snow White stories. DAWN: The computer graphics were well done and believable. The

transformation of actors such as Nick Frost and Ian McShane into the seven dwarfs was Àawless. Magical forests, fairies and nasty beasts alike looked great and we’re treated somberly. This movie will satisfy serious fairy tale lovers. Taylor gives Snow White and the Huntsman 2.5 poison apples out of ¿ve. Dawn gives it two buck teeth out of ¿ve. Snow White and the Huntsman is currently playing at the Pen Mar Cinema Centre in Penticton. Brian Taylor and Peter Howe are movie reviewers that live in the South Okanagan.

Chance Operations explores collaborative art Western News Staff

Chance Operations, an exhibition comprised

of a series of collaborative drawings, prints and collages is on display at the Penticton Art

August 3rd - 5th, 2012 Taj Mahal Trio Five Alarm Funk Gabriel Palatchi Band Phil Dwyer Band Septeto Santiguero Kirby Sewell Band Altered Laws Jimmy Bowskill Hornography The Harpoonist & the Axe Murderer Bessie & the Back Eddies Electric Monk Laura Landsberg & Homeward Bound BananaFish Dance Orchestra

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Gallery. Created in tandem by Rodney Konopaki and Rhonda Neufeld, the exhibition explores the element of chance in the work of making art. The pair literally worked together handin-hand as they explored their environment, documenting their journey together through their visual art. Their works evoke a number of questions about the very nature of making art, authorship and the role that both chance and determinism play in the ¿nal image. These works are totally dependent on the physical interaction and intellectual journey they have shared over the

past ¿ve years. In doing so, they formed a diary of their lives that pushes the boundary of collaboration and understanding of the creative and collaborative process. The artists have completed two residencies at the Banff Centre in 2008 and 2009 and at St. Michael’s Printshop in St. John’s, NÀd in 2010 and exhibited across Canada. This exhibit serves as a jumping-off point and will be an interesting document to come back to as this relationship continues to move forward. Neufeld is a print media artist who is also comfortable with

lithography, relief, intaglio and screen printing. She brings a sensitive approach to her prints and installations that disclose a deep commitment to and love of the land. Konopaki explores print media, painting and drawing to create work that he often grounds in anonymous pop culture. These works usually begin with images taken from historical sources, mass media and even material stolen from his friends that all ¿nd new meaning in unpredictable collisions with new elements. Chance Operations is open at the Penticton Art Gallery until July 8.


Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 19

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@pentictonnews

Photo Submitted PENTICTON’S EMILY ALLIN received top honour in Intermediate Classical Voice at the B.C. Provincial Festival of Performing Arts.

pended notes. The third piece is insane. There was so many lyrics, the rhythm was crazy and the pitches are so weird. It catches everyone by surprise,” said Allin. “I showed such a large range or repertoire and skill and I think that is why I won.” Allin felt many of her competitors at provincials were so focused on the technical aspects on singing they forgot the emotion. “Or, they displayed the wrong emotion. Singing in a different language, you have to know what you are saying and put the right emphasis on the right words. The

singers at this level are very prepared. They are the best in the province, but I think how I stayed in touch with what I was singing so I had a connection with the audience,” said Allin. The teen, plans on going into sciences at UBC in Vancouver and continuing with music, possibly through the music program at the university. She thanked her coach Lynne Leydier for helping her become the singer she is today. “My teacher really helped me a lot. I am so grateful for everything she has done for me. With her expertise I have learned a lot over the

years,” said Allin. In Senior Classical Voice and Senior Vocal Variety, Saige Carlson from Oliver took the top spot. Carlson also performed three pieces in classical, singing a song by Franz Schubert, one by Gabriel Faure and a modern song. “The french piece was the hardest for me because it was very light and slow. I tend to like the faster rhythm songs so it was hard to relax into it for me,” said Carlson, who also is taught by Leydier. Carlson said she started singing about ¿ve years ago and classical is her favourite style.

Fashion meets construction at FAB event Kristi Patton

Western News Staff

A trend popular in fashioncentric cities is being tested out in Penticton this weekend. The worlds of fashion, interior design, custom homes, food and wine will collide at Fashion Meets Architecture on the Bench, or FAB, on Saturday. Two shows featuring exquisite fashion from Vintage & Vogue will happen in a stunning custom built home by Barnett Construction on the Naramata Bench. Award-winning wines from Lake Breeze Winery will be available and tapas from Salty’s Beach House. “In bigger centres like Toronto, New York and Los Angeles this is getting more popular, with a house being shown in collaboration with fashion. I think people are looking for interesting and different events to go to so and this is a new twist,”

said Maria Nordlund, an interior designer who also will be showcasing her work at FAB. The event also opens the doors to a wider group of people who may not have attended a fashion show or toured a custom built home. “It is kind of neat that way because if it was just a fashion show it would be mostly women. With this, because there is also a brand new custom designed house with beautiful architecture, men are coming because they are interested in seeing the house and the new technology that has been put into it,” said Nordlund. The house is located on Lower Bench Road and is a family home with sweeping open spaces, a big kitchen and was designed speci¿cally for the homeowners, whom Nordlund said are all about entertaining guests and get-togethers. “That was my inspiration,”

said Kerry Younie, owner of Vintage & Vogue. “So all the clothes would be what you would wear to a cocktail party, pool party or while entertaining guest in your home.” Tickets to FAB are $75 or $125 for VIP seats, with all proceeds bene¿ting the South Okanagan Children’s Charity. An added perk that attendees to FAB receive is a messenger-style tote bag ¿lled with swag. “It is full of different items contributed by the different builders involved with the house. The bag value alone is worth $75, so on top of the wine, food and house tour it is a great deal for tickets,” said Nordlund. Two shows are scheduled at 2 and 6 p.m. but Nordlund said the afternoon show is almost sold out. Tickets can be purchased at Vintage & Vogue or Adhoc. For more information call 250-488-4448.

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South Okanagan performers danced and sang their way to the top at the B.C. Provincial Festival of Performing Arts. A number of performing artists scored top marks at the festival recently held in Nanaimo including Penticton’s Emily Allin who won the Intermediate Classical Voice. The 17-year-old has been singing for 10 years and said this has been her biggest accolade. Allin had won in both classical and musical theatre at the Penticton Kiwanis festival, but because she could only represent the community in one category she chose classical. “I enjoy both so much, but I have always loved classical music and the language of it,” said Allin, who has from singing learned basic conversation in several languages. At the provincial festival Allin performed three songs, an Italian piece called Amaimo that means let’s love, a french song called Le Colibri that is a metaphor about love and Visits to St. Elizabeth. “We chose songs that were more challenging and weren’t exact ¿ts for my voice so I could continue to get better. I started one that was upbeat and sophisticated and brought more energy to the room, the second song was slower and more beautiful with long lines and sus-

But, in vocal variety she wowed the judges with a cabaret song called The Crossword Puzzle. “It was really hard song and the adjudicator appreciated that because it was very wordy. It was really an honour to win because everyone was really good at provincials,” said Carlson, who hopes to pursue singing as a career one day. Johnathan Stuchbery was runnerup in Intermediate Guitar and received honourable mention in the Intermediate Chamber Group with Ben Stuchbery and Jasper Meiklejohn. Tia Meuller received honourable mention in Senior Speech Arts as did Tai Duong in Intermediate Shakespeare. Mariah Gauthier of received the runnerup prize in Junior Vocal Variety. All of these students are from Penticton.

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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

sports

Sports Editor: Emanuel Sequeira • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 224 E-mail: sports@pentictonwesternnews.com

Emanuel Sequeira/Western News

PINNACLES FC under-15 forward Michael Jones, left, watches as teammate Xavier Nadeau takes the ball into the offensive zone. The Pinnacles defeated the first-place Kelowna United 1-0 in Thompson Okanagan Youth Soccer League action at Kings Park on Sunday. Penticton’s Jessie Olfert heads to ball into an open area for a teammate with Emma McLeod of the Kamloops Blaze checking closely. The Pinnacles won the game 3-0 in front of the home crowd.

Pinnacles FC district teams perform well at Kings Park Western News Staff

A 3-0 shutout against the Kamloops Blaze helped the Penticton Pinnacles FC under-16 girls clinch first place in the Thompson Okanagan Youth Soccer League. Pinnacles coach Derrick Webb said his team’s effort was fantastic. He praised his backline and said Kylie Erb and McKenzie Ricard were “fantastic.” The shutout is also their third consecutive that Webb said Erb and Ricard played a role in earning. Webb was impressed with their third goal, scored by Emily Jones. “We strung four or five passes together, got the

ball out wide and knocked the ball into the middle and just a fantastic goal,” he said. Webb said the key to their win was ball possession. He said the work the girls did with (Pinnacles FC executive director/head coach) Ezra Cremers during the fall is evident. “The other teams are just ball chasing,” said Webb, whose team is 5-0 in league play. “We are stringing eight to 10 passes together.” Once the TOYSL playdowns begin, the Pinnacles will play the fourth-place team for a provincial berth. The Pinnacles FC under-15 girls team suffered a 3-2 defeat at the hands of Kelowna United on

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Sunday afternoon. Danielle Ruocco and Antonia DePieri scored for the Pinnacles. Coach Carlos Mendonca said it was an evenly-played match, with both teams generating scoring chances. “They were a bit better at finishing than we were,” said Mendonca. “Our play in the last third wasn’t as strong as Kelowna. It was a back and forth battle. I like how my girls played.” Mendonca said Ruocco had a strong performance up front and his players distributed the ball well. This weekend the Pinnacles play a homeand-home series with the Kamloops Blaze. Mendonca said the key will be playing with passion and applying pressure. When they are able to do

the latter, the Pinnacles have been able to force turnovers. The Pinnacles are 1-3-2 on the season. A 2-0 victory against Kelowna United helped the Penticton Pinnacles FC under-13 boys team finish its season with seven wins and one loss. Scoring for the Pinnacles were Simon Snyman and Landon Nicol. In goal, the Pinnacles received a strong effort by Jacob Stokker. Pinnacles coach Joe Afonso said his players performed as a team instead of individuals. “Against tough teams, players start doing things themselves,” said Afonso. Find full story at www.pentictonwesternnews. com.

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Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

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sports

Tigers score big win against West Kelowna Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

Submitted photo

JUNIOR TIGERS pitcher Shane Price played a key role in a 3-0 win over West Kelowna. His strong pitching added to the Tigers impressive defence.

A 3-0 shutout victory against West Kelowna improved the South Okanagan junior Tigers to 9-2. The Tigers got off to a good start, shutting down West Kelowna with strong defence and great pitching by Shane Price. The Tigers then made their chances at the plate count, driving in three runs. The remainder of the game was tight, as both teams had runners reaching the bases, but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t score. A strength to the club this season has been a dedicated group of players with â&#x20AC;&#x153;huge parental support,â&#x20AC;? according to Tigers coach Romeo DeCosse. The players are also responding to positive coaching. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to win

the league but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to go to the provincials and are close to reaching this goal,â&#x20AC;? said DeCosse. Players who have stood out are Mathew Brodt, Matthew Jones, Ryan Konno and Chase DeCosse. Coach DeCosse said Brodt â&#x20AC;&#x153;is an incredible centre fielder who consistently robs the opposing team of base hits as well as a very strong pitcher and solid on the bats.â&#x20AC;? Jones has been a â&#x20AC;&#x153;fabulous second baseman with a solid bat who brings strong, positive leadership.â&#x20AC;? Konno is a vacuum at first base and awesome closer with a fantastic bat. And DeCosse is the general behind the

Basketball camp gives youngsters chance to develop Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

The fourth annual Penticton Lakeside Basketball Camp is all about developing skills. Registration for the camp, aimed for kids aged seven to 13, is being held at Penticton Secondary June 13 from 5 to 7 p.m. Dustin Hyde, former Pen High Lakers senior boys basketball coach and current coach for the Grade 9 girls, will be running the camp. Hyde said the individual growth he sees after four consecutive days (three hours each day) of camp is incredible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Players have daily skills and drills along with fun competitions and games,â&#x20AC;? said Hyde. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a number of high school aged basketball team members from Pen High to help me coach the camp, demo the drills and act as positive role models â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the youth love this.â&#x20AC;? In the past three years, the camp has attracted 30 kids and Hyde is always looking for more. While the camp is geared to kids in Grades 2 to 6, he has also accepted those in Grade 7. Players must provide their own basketballs for all the sections. The camps are expected to be held at Uplands Elementary School July 9 to 12 from 9 a.m. to noon for the first section [Grades 2 to 3] and 1 to 4 p.m. for the

second section [Grades 4 and 5.] Hyde will place students in lower [Grade 1] or higher [Grades 6] in sections depending on situation. The cost per player is $75 and includes a T-shirt. There will be two registration nights at Penticton

Secondary School in the common area. Entrance to Pen High is off Eckhartd Avenue. The people registering and paying on these evenings will get first priority. Payments are due on these registration dates. After these dates are completed, phone and

email registration will be allowed. Cheques are payable to Penticton Minor Hoops Basketball Camp. Those not able to attend the registration may also email Hyde at dhyde@ summer.com or call him at 250-490-0050.

plate and a solid lead off with a consistent steal for the team. DeCosse said the team bonds well and they never want to leave the field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our season is strongly contributed to the never ending energy and positive support of our coaches, Joel Graff and Dallas Jannie,â&#x20AC;? said DeCosse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we call Tiger baseball!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

Emanuel Sequeira @pentictonsports

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22

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

sports

Wanted

Athlete of the Week Do you know someone who should be the Western News Athlete of the Week? If so email sports editor Emanuel Sequeira a brief discription and a photo to sports@pentictonwesternnews.com.

The Penticton Western News presents...

TENTH ANNUAL

SPECTACULAR CONTEST

Submitted photo

WARREN BROWN of Oliver defeated Penticton’s Steve Clement during the bike/sled class of the Wine Country Racing Association event. The final race of the spring season is this Sunday.

Wine Country Racing revved up for final race Special to Western News

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PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS

The Wine Country Racing Association (WCRA) will host its final race of the spring racing season on Sunday at Richter Pass Motorplex in Osoyoos. During its recent race on May 27, 47 cars competed in 179 separate drag races took place for the fans’ entertainment. Kyle Scanlon of Kelowna (black Mazda RX7) defeated

Kevin Clarke of Penticton (Black Chevrolet Cobalt) for the top prize in the Sportsman Warrior bracket. Walt Pearce from Twisp, Wash. raced his 1932 Chevrolet Coupe to victory in the Sportsman Bracket. He defeated Osoyoos’ Tim Heibert who drove a black 1990 Ford Mustang. Lee Deshaw of Tonasket took the Pro Bracket in his yellow 1929 Plymouth, defeating Don Cachola

Current Design Monday, June 11th 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm Marina Way Beach Kayak Clearance Current Design, Seaward, Impex In Stock Kayaks Only

Contact the store for more info 250-490-3334 • 214 Main Street www.peachcityrunners.com

valley summers too hot for drivers and cars alike, the club takes July and August off and will return in September. The gate opens at 9 a.m. for drivers and 10 a.m. for fans. Racing begins around 11 a.m. The final elimination event begins around 1 p.m. Cost is $10, with anyone under 12 admitted free with an adult. Grandstands are available or fans can bring their own lawn chairs.

Mixed slo pitch playoffs highlighted by big wins Western News Staff

Playoff action for Penticton’s Mixed Slo Pitch League hit the diamonds on Monday. In the A division, the Gurus edged the Infra Red Sox 11-9. They will now play Jack Kelly on Sunday at Lions Park at 1:30 p.m. Other matchups on Thursday featured Sporting Woods against I’d Hit It and the Dirtbags against Impact.

COME PLAY WITH US

KAYAK DEMO DAY

from Oliver. The Pro Bracket Fast win went to Ralph Pool of Kelowna as he drove a green 1968 Baracuda against Neil Ericson’s yellow 1969 Chevrolet Camaro. Warren Brown from Oliver reigned victorious in the Bike/Sled class. Brown snagged the win on his green Kawasaki motorcycle, defeating Penticton’s Steve Clement (black 2006 Yamaha snowmobile). With Okanagan

25

BC Seniors Games Anniversary

Your 55 + Games

Aug. 21 to 25, 2012

BURNABY Over 3500 BC 55+ Seniors Expected! Go to our website and click on “Zones” to find someone in your area who can help you become part of our

25th Anniversary Celebration! http://bcseniorsgames.org

AArchery h Athletics Badminton Bocce Bridge Carpet Bowling Cribbage Cycling Darts Dragon Boats Five Pin Bowling Floor Curling Golf Horseshoes Ice Curling Ice Hockey Lawn Bowling One-Act Plays Pickleball Slo-Pitch Snooker Soccer Swimming Table Tennis Tennis Whist

In B division, Konanz rolled over High Rollers 21-6 and faced the Musty Mitts on Thursday. The Assassins doubled up the Mad Hatters 8-4 and will play No Glove No Love. TWT Wise Guys crushed the Brat pack 18-3. In C division action, the Mad Dogs downed JM Classics 6-5 and will face the Good Time Buddies on Friday. Penticton Fire burned the Thugz 22-5. In D division, the Flushers defeated Clancey’s 13-7. The Master Batters defeated the BMO Blues 12-5. They then lost to the Smoking Aces 15-11. The Aces benfitted from a clutch two-run home run from Clay Kovach while up 11-7. The Aces next play on Sunday against the Lobsters, who defeated Bogners 18-17. The Loopers handed Looking to Score a lopsided 20-7 defeat. They face the winner between the Crushers and the Flushers.

RECRUITING BILLET FAMILIES

Okanagan Hockey Academy is beginning its 11th year of offering high quality athletic and academic programs to outstanding hockey players from all over the world. We are recruiting Billet Families in the Penticton and Westbench areas to host a player in their home for the upcoming school year. This year OHA will have 7 teams, 140 Male and Female athletes ranging in age from 13-18 years old and we will need homes for 90 players. This high level program focuses on positive personal growth in the areas of Academics, Athletics and Citizenship. We rely on Billet Homes to provide a home away from home for these young people. All transportation is provided by the Academy. Billet families will receive $600.00/month. If you would like more information about opening your home to a player and being part of this exciting opportunity please contact:

Ms. Daryl Meyers ~ Director of Residential Life 250.809.4202 • darylmeyers@hockeyschools.com www.hockeyacademy.ca


Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

23

life

Legislation aims to fix what isn’t broken

Robert Handfield

Nature Wise federal approvals have already been given to raise that ¿gure to 4.1 million barrels per day. I don’t see much sign of a bottleneck in these ¿gures.

Another argument repeated by our MP Dan Albas to support C-38 is that our environmental laws need changing to avoid duplication in assessment of major projects. However, Postmedia recently obtained government documents that show previous changes are already preventing duplication: “Amendments made in 2010 have made the CEA (Canada Environmental Assessment) Agency responsible for most comprehensive studies; this change is yielding positive results as all

agency-led comprehensive studies have started in alignment with provincial reviews, preventing process duplication,” said the presentation, dated Sept. 6, 2011 and released by Environment Canada through access to information legislation. So two of the major arguments the Conservatives are using to gut our environmental assessment laws seem to hold no water at all. Would the oil and mining companies like less strict regulations? Did the Huns like raping and pillaging?

You can help by calling our MP, Dan Albas, at 250-770-4480 or emailing him at Dan.Albas@ parl.gc.ca and let him know that you want C-38 broken into appropriate parts and subjected to thorough public hearings. If the proposed changes are as necessary and useful as the Conservatives say they are, why are they afraid to subject them to public assessment? Bob Handfield is vicepresident of the South Okanagan Naturalists’ Club but the views expressed here are his own.

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Last month, I raised some concerns about the omnibus budget implementation Bill C-38 and the federal government’s attack on the environmental community and Canada’s environmental laws. I want to look at some of that bill in more detail. Prime Minister Harper and his party have said that our laws governing the environmental assessment of major mining projects (Alberta’s tar sands are mainly mining projects, not typical oil projects) must be streamlined (read gutted) to keep “Canada competitive” and to ensure that major projects go ahead without undue delay. In fact, there is absolutely no evidence that we are not “competitive” — quite the contrary. In its 2011 annual ranking of the best countries in the world for mining investment, mining consulting ¿rm Behre Dolbehr Group rated Canada No. 2 in the world, second only to Australia. The U.S. was rated No. 6. It certainly doesn’t seem like the people in the business who know what’s going on consider us “uncompetitive”. One of the seven factors that Behre Dolbehr considered in arriving at their ranking was the length of the permitting process. In the U.S., some major mining projects have taken in excess of seven years in the permitting process. Have the companies gone elsewhere — not on your life. As a spokeswoman for Rio Tinto (the company waiting seven years) said: “Mining companies have to go where the minerals are.” You could also say “Oil companies have to go where the tar sands are.” It wouldn’t matter if Canada had the most draconian environmental laws on the planet, the oil companies would still be lined up waiting to extract our resources. There is nowhere else to go. In fact, under our current, supposedly uncompetitive regulations, the oil companies are literally lined up to get their hands on our oil, and make no mistake, projects are getting approved. In 1999, production from the oil (tar) sands was 300,000 barrels per day. By 2009, that ¿gure had risen to 1.5 million barrels per day — a 500 per cent increase in 10 years. Provincial and

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24 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, June 8, 2012 Penticton Western News

Your community. Your classikeds.

250.492.0444 fax 250.492.9843 email classikeds@pentictonwesternnews.com Announcements

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Funeral Homes

Business Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Career Opportunities

BUSINESS FOR SALE

21 WEEK HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM Prepare for a Career in Heavy Equipment Operation. Introducing our new Apprenticeship Program which includes:

ARE YOU EXPERIENCING FINANCIAL DISTRESS? Relief is only a call away! Call 250-979-4357 to set up your FREE consultation in Pentiction. Donna Mihalcheon CA,CIRP 31 years experience. BDO Canada Limited Trustee in Bankruptcy, #200 -1628 Dickson Avenue, Kelowna, BC. V1Y 9X1

Career Opportunities

is looking for a professional salesperson. Sales experience preferred. Computer literate,clean drivers abstract needed. Reply by email at: oklease@shaw.ca, fax: 250493-1981, in person. No phone calls please.

Credible Cremation Services Ltd. Basic Cremation $990 + taxes

Sensible prices for practical people

250-493-3912

24 Hours “No Hidden Costs” Pre-Pay and Save www.crediblecremation.com 559 Ellis Street, Penticton, BC

Nunes-Pottinger Funeral Service & Crematorium

Serving our South Okanagan communities with compassion, respect, and understanding.

John Nunes Daryn Pottinger

Be your own boss publishing your own local entertainment / humour magazine. Javajoke publications is offering an exclusive protected license in your area. We will teach you our lucrative proven system, step by step by step to create the wealth that you want. Perfect for anyone FT / PT, from semi-retired to large scale enterprise. Call today to get your no obligation info packet. Toll FREE 1-855-406-1253

GIFT BASKET FRANCHISE FOR SALE. Home based in Kelowna, (Okanagan Territory) $13,500 Includes gift baskets, product, ribbon etc. Also website, email, head office support, gift basket designs, selling & accounting etc. Serious enquiries only, Please Call 778-753-4500

• • •

ITA Foundation ITA HEO Theory Multi Equipment Training (Apprenticeship hours logged) Certificates included are: • Ground Disturbance Level 2 • WHMIS • Traffic Control • First Aid Reserve your seat for August 13, 2012. Taylor Pro Training Ltd at 1-877-860-7627 www.taylorprotraining.com

Motivated Parts Person /Labourer required immediately for heavy duty equipment shop; mechanical aptitude, computer skills, knowledge of hose/fittings & assembly an asset, steady full-time work, Class 3 license an asset but not required, wage negotiable, reply to Joe or Dave, 1698 Dartmouth Rd., Penticton, BC, V2A 4B8

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

OK Sales & Service

JOBS! JOBS! JOBS! No experience necessary, we will train. Must be 18+yrs. of age. Students Welcome. 250-8603590 Email:info@plazio.ca Looking for class 4 taxi drivers, no exp. required. F/T, P/T, AM & PM shifts avail. Call 250-490-7777, fax 250-4925215 Room Attendants required at Penticton Lakeside Resort. Experience necessary. Call Nancy 250-493-9756

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Phone 250-498-0167 (24 hrs) 34505 - 89th St. Oliver, BC www.nunes-pottinger.com

Established 1947 Established 1947

Hauling Freight for Friends for60 65Years Years Hauling Freight for Friends for Over

Coming Events North Thompson Arts Council Celebration of the Arts, June 23-24, 10am-4pm both days. 4307 Yellowhead Hwy, Barriere. More info at norththompsonartscouncil.com.

Personals Alcoholics Anonymous, if your drinking is affecting you and those around you, call 250-490-9216

Lost & Found LOST, hearing aid, beige with clear tube, between Shear Expressions and Cherry Lane, (250)493-5773 Lost in Penticton, black change purse with lots of black hockey tape wrapped around it. Reward offered. 250-4863535

OWNER OPERATORS REQUIRED

LINEHAUL OWNER OPERATORS

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking Class 1 Drivers to haul dry vans Western Canada & US. Only drivers with 2 years exp. & US border crossing capability. Local Drivers also required. Dedicated tractors, paid drops, direct deposit. No phone calls Fax 250-546-0600

DRIVERS WANTED:

20 - 2009 Electric Club Car golf carts, $2500 each, call 250-493-6791

Terrific career opportunity outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects. No Experience Needed!! Extensive paid travel, meal allowance, 4 wks. vacation & benefits pkg. Skills Needed - Ability to travel 3 months at a time Valid License with air brake endorsement. High School Diploma or GED. Apply at www.sperryrail.com under careers, keyword Driver DO NOT FILL IN CITY or STATE

Travel

Obituaries

Sports & Recreation

Help Wanted An Alberta Construction Company is hiring dozer, excavator and labour/rock truck operators. Preference will be given to operators that are experienced in oilfield road and lease construction. Lodging and meals provided. The work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Alcohol & Drug testing required. Call Contour Construction at 780-723-5051. Experienced housekeeper required, apply in person, 110 Riverside Dr., Penticton

Van Kam’s Group of Companies requires Owner Operators to be based at our Kamloops or Kelowna Terminals for runs throughout B.C. and Alberta. Applicants must have winter and mountain, driving experience/ PRINCE GEORGE training. Van-Kam Freightways’ Group of Companies We offer above average rates and an excellent employee benefits requires Owner Operators for runs out of our package. Prince Terminal.drivers, call Bev, 604-968-5488 or To join ourGeorge team of Professional email resume, driver’s to abstract and details of truck to: Van aKam is current committed Employment Equity and W careers@vankam.com ff ll t t or fax Wi604-587-9889 t /M t i Environmental Responsibility. Van-Kam is committed to Employment Equity and Environmental Responsibility. We thank you for your interest in Van-Kam, however only those of interest to us will be contacted.

Children Childcare Available

AOKI

In home childcare available, Mon-Fri, ages 9mo.+, breakfast & lunch incl., call Nicole, (250)809-1480 LOVE’S Family Daycare, Young St. area, licensed, (25yr olds), 2 spots avail. for your child . (250)493-0566 Pam’s Family Daycare licensed, spaces 1yr & up. CCRR member. 250-492-0113

Employment Business Opportunities EARN EXTRA INCOME! Learn to operate a Mini-Office Outlet from home. Free online training, flexible hours, great income,www.123bossfree.com

BONI (Nee REED)

Donna Louise

She will be sadly missed by her loving soulmate Joseph, father Gary (Doreen) brothers; Richard (Elaine) Brooke. Stepchildren; Amy (Mike) Desiree (Chris). Granddaughter Mya Dawn. Sister-in-law Agnes (Earl). Predeceased by her mother Dorothy (1987). She will be fondly remembered by all her nieces and nephews and all her friends who knew her. A Celebration of Donna’s Life will be held upstairs at the Eagles at 1197 Main Street at 1:00 pm on June 16, 2012. Funeral arrangements by Credible Cremation Service Ltd. In lieu of flowers donation to the BC Cancer Society. She will missed by her pets Rocco, Whispurr and her bird Boo Boo.

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Obituaries

Obituaries

Born May 23, 1958 in Penticton Passed away May 29, 2012

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Obituaries

Getaways BEAUTIFUL Okanagan Lake House weekly rental - Vernon Two bedroom two bath, fully furnished and equipped, dock, boat lift, private 300’ of lakefront, $2000/week plus HST avail. June 29-July 14; August 26-Sept. 3. 250-309-0675

JOURNEYPERSON MEAT CUTTER

Buy-Low Foods, grocery stores in Osoyoos and Oliver, BC, are recruiting for a FT Journeyperson Meat Cutter for 5-6 months for the vacation season. The ideal candidates will possess excellent interpersonal skills, take a genuine interest in people and have a strong commitment to customer service; while demonstrating excellent interpersonal skills and delivering budgeted results consistent with store operating standards in merchandising excellence, quality and presentation. The successful candidates will have previous, relevant grocery experience and postsecondary Meat Cutting training. Come join our friendly and outgoing team! We provide a flexible work environment. Please reply in confidence to: Human Resources: Fax (604) 882-5161 e-mail people@buy-low.com We look forward to hearing from you! We thank you in advance for taking the time to send a resume. We will respond to those whom we contact for an interview.

T i Tomie A proud life long Summerland resident, Tomie Aoki, passed away peacefully on June 2, 2012 at the age of 92 years. She is survived by sons: Don (Laurie) grandchildren Doug and Emily, David (Pati) grandchildren Ashley and Amanda. Predeceased by her husband Masao and sister Mat. Memorial Services will be held Saturday, June 16th, 2012 at 1:00 pm at Summerland United Church, 13204 Henry Avenue with Reverend David Sparks officiating. Interment to follow at a later date at Canyon View Cemetery, Summerland, BC. Memorial tributes may be made to Charity of your Choice. No flowers or Okoden please. Tomie will be greatly missed by family, friends and the residents of the Summerland Senior’s Village where she spent her last three years. Because of her love of doing jig saw puzzles, she became known as the “Puzzle Lady.” Tomie loved knitting, family gatherings, gardening, fishing and her grandchildren. Condolences may be directed to the family through providencefuneralhomes.com. Providence Funeral Homes “Summerland’s” Rosedale Chapel 250-494-7752

5226747

South Okanagan Seniors Wellness Society

‘Seniors Outreach & Community Supports Services’ The South Okanagan Seniors Wellness Society has a 38 year history of helping older adults and seniors to remain independent and healthy through outreach and educational programs and services. The Society is currently seeking candidate(s) for the following term certain positions: Regional Seniors Outreach Coordinator (June 25th, 2012 to May 7th, 2013 – 20 hours per week - funded by a Grant from The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation) Under the direction of the Executive Director, the Regional Seniors Outreach Coordinator will promote our ‘Seniors Outreach & Community Supports Services’ model of program delivery to communities within our service area outside of Penticton through the following initiatives: • Initiate contact with service providers and develop partnerships for program delivery • Promote our programs and services within those communities • Recruit volunteers and provide training where applicable • Research available seniors support services and organizations within those communities for data entry into our Seniors Information & Referral Database Resource Engagement Coordinator (Contract position - June 25th to October 31st, 2012, with the possibility of extension) • Research potential funders and Foundations • Develop an on-going fundraising plan • Initiate relationships with potential donors The desired candidate(s) will possess the following: • Exceptional interpersonal, communications (verbal/written/ public speaking) and organizational abilities • Success in networking with other agencies/community groups/businesses/industries • Ability to develop marketing and promotions strategies • Adept in Microsoft Office programs Applicants with a Bachelor’s degree and/or equivalent experience and knowledge of community services will be given preference. Please forward your resume to kellysws@telus.net or fax 250-4877441 Attention: Kelly Smith, Executive Director by 4:00 p.m. June 14th, 2012 We thank all applicants, but only those chosen for an interview will be notified.


Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

Employment Help Wanted Experienced Parts Counter person We are looking for a Parts Counter person to do Technician/Front Counter Sales and who will perform a variety of duties including; interacting with customers, filling parts orders for customers and internally. Great Customer service, knowledge of Chrysler/Dodge parts, mechanical aptitude and computer experience is an asset. Please apply by emailing resumes to: service@parkerschrysler.com, attention: Fixed Operations Manager

Experienced Service Advisor required at Parker’s Chrysler Dodge Jeep, motivated energetic individual wanted for a full-time position, excellent wages and benefits, send resumes to: service@parkerschrysler.com or fax to 250492-8069 NEEDED: Experienced floor stripping/carpet cleaning/janitorial staff. Good wages. Fax resume to: 250-764-6460, Tel: 250-764-6466 Email: evergreen-

Employment

Services

Services

Services

Labourers

Financial Services

Home Improvements

DEBT CONSOLIDATION PROGRAM

GREAT Canadian Builders Ltd. “Turning Houses into Homes.” Your complete renovation specialists. 25 years experience. All interior & exterior work, concrete, sheds, garages, fences, roofing, decks, drywall, framing. Restorations, additions. Licensed and insured, for your free estimate call Steve, 250-488-0407

Painting & Decorating

DAWSON Creek Manufacturing Plant is looking for 10 Framers & Exterior Finishers asap. Two years experience preferred. Call 250-782-2065 or fax 250-782-2061.

South Okanagan Women In Need in Penticton has an opening for a coordinator of volunteers, please check our website: www.sowins.com for more information

Help Wanted

Helping CANADIANS repay debts, reduce or eliminate interest regardless of your credit!

Qualify Now To Be Debt Free 1-877-220-3328 Licensed, Government Approved, BBB Accredited.

Medical/Dental MARIPOSA GARDENS (in Osoyoos BC) seeking RCAs. ($17.34/hr) email: becky.marlatt @balticproperties.ca

OfÀce Support PART-TIME Office Administrator Bookkeeping Experience Preferred. Starting June 18, 2012. Remuneration dependant upon experience. Resume to: riversidesociety2@gmail.com or fax: 250499-5954 or mail: Riverside RV Park Society, 134 4354 Hwy 3, Keremeos, B.C. V0X 1N1

buildingmaintenance@gmail.com

Sous Chef required for Penticton Lakeside Resort, must have previous management experience, call Chef Remington at 250-493-9754 or email: chris@rpbhotels.com

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 25

Trades, Technical COMMERCIAL Transport Mechanic wanted, $30/hr. plus, afternoon shift, flexible work week, email resume to: armand@okews.com EXPERIENCED WELDER for busy fabrication shop. Full time, mig & tig, good building skills. Apply with resume to: Hansel Aluminum Products, 709 Okanagan Ave. E. Penticton. Ph 250-487-1201 Fax 250487-1206, hap@shawbiz.ca

Help Wanted

SOUTH OKANAGAN EVENTS CENTRE COMPLEX Director of Finance

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

Cleaning Services Housecleaning, light yard work. Call Connie to get the job done! (250)496-5966 PEACE Of Mind Housecleaning. Weekly/Bi-weekly. Call Rosanne. 778-476-3187. Penticton.

Garden & Lawn Locally Grown Hedging

CEDARS $ 10

350

7-8 ft. for Other sizes available up to 9ft.

GIARDINO 250-493-0007 149 Upper Bench Rd. S.

Home Improvements BATHROOM and Basement Renovations. Looking to add a new Bathroom or finish off that Basement. Serving the South Okanagan. Call for a Free Estimate. 250-488-5338

BELCAN Painting & Reno’s over 15 years in business interior/exterior painting and any interior reno. includes kitchen & bath call Len (250)486-8800

Please e-mail resume to: Dean Clarke, General Manager dean.clarke@penticton.ca

CALL JOHN HIEBERT for all your framing and drywall needs, 30 plus years experience, competitive rates, for an estimate call 250-809-8708 or 250-809-8414 Custom Concrete and Stone, Retaining walls, driveways, fireplace facings, tile work, sidewalks, patios, cultured stone, fountains, paving stones, Free Consultations, (250)328-8340 Rob Hurren Carpentry, renovations big and small, kitchen and bath remodeling, doors trim work, finishing and more, professional design available, call Rob 250-809-7131

PLEASE NO PHONE CALLS

Help Wanted

The South Okanagan Events Centre Complex is accepting resumes for the Director of Finance. In this full-time salaried position, the candidate will manage, supervise and coordinate the activities and operations of multiple accounting functions, including payroll, accounts payable, accounts receivable, and the general ledger of the facility. Also, this position oversees Human Resources and General Administration.

JOURNEYMAN CARPENTER AVAILABLE New homes, renovations, kitchens & bath interior / exterior windows, doors, roofing, siding, framing, decks, fences & concrete 10% off labour cost call today for a free estimate 250-770-1314 250-462-3247

VINYL DECKING Armor Decking sales & installation. **10 year warranty** Serving the Okanagan Valley for the past 9 yearsFree estimates for complete deck repairs Composite decking Structure repairs / Tiling S. Okanagan 250-490-5630 Kelowna 778-214-0824 email: info@ricklynrenos.ca

Landscaping EMERALD CEDAR EDGING Buy Direct From Grower, 6ft.-10 for $240, Planting + Delivery available. Call Budget Nurseries 250-498-2189 Low cost sand & gravel, here to serve your needs, top soil, bedding sand, crush and other rock products. Rob 250-4623504, Ken 250-460-2286 Delivery available

Moving & Storage FAMILY Movers. Moving? Anything, anywhere. Local and long distance trips. Packing service available, weekly trips to Vancouver, Alberta, full and partial loads. Cheapest rates in the valley. Free Estimates, 250-493-2687

Painting & Decorating A-TECH Services 250-899-3163

WWW.PAINTSPECIAL.COM

3 Rooms For $299, 2 Coats Any Colour (Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls. Cloverdale Premium Quality Paint. NO PAYMENT, until job is completed!

Here Come the Painters, local & in 11th year, interior/exterior, free estimate, 250-486-2331

Help Wanted

Community Reporter Kelowna Capital News

NEW OPPORTUNITY A leader in the rental car industry is looking for fun, friendly, and outgoing individuals with a “Can Do” attitude for a full time customer service representative position at our rental locations in Penticton, B.C. We offer a great incentive plan, benefits and a very competitive wage. If you are self motivated, positive, and looking for a new and challenging career please apply with your resume and cover letter to: Tyler Mittelsteadt, Budget Car & Truck Rentals at tylerm@bcbudget.com. Applications received on or before June 8th, 2012 will be considered. Applicants must have a valid B.C. driver’s license. No Phone Calls Please.

The Kelowna Capital News has an immediate opportunity for a full-time community news reporter. We are looking for a talented individual who is able to understand the challenges and rewards of being a weekly community newspaper while working through the pressures to meet deadlines both for our website and print newspaper. Qualifications include familiarity with website and Internet information gathering tools, a strong work ethic and willingness to learn through experience, sound news story judgement and photography skills. The Kelowna Capital News, part of the Black Press newspaper group, is published three days a week. Black Press is Canada’s largest independent print media company with more than 170 community, daily and urban newspapers across Canada and the U.S.

Interior/Exterior Painting, satisfaction guaranteed, free estimates, insured, (250)488-1387 Painting and Paper Hanging Excellent work. 35 years experience. Small jobs welcome. Dave Barnett Decorating 497-7912

Painting, Installs & Repairs. 20 yrs exp., References, Insured, Licensed, WCB, Timely & reasonable cost, Glenic Industries, Nick (250)486-2359

Plumbing Electric hot water tanks installed for $149, incl. dump charge for disposal. Licensed and insured, seniors discounts, Summerland-Osoyoos. 250-276-4310

Rubbish Removal PENTICTON Junk Removal! Anything goes! Household waste, furniture and appliances to the dump 250-770-0827

Sand/Gravel/Topsoil Low cost sand & gravel, here to serve your needs, top soil, bedding sand, crush and other rock products. Rob 250-4623504, Ken 250-460-2286 Delivery available

Sundecks VINYL DECKING installs. Aluminum/Glass Railing Installs. Time for a new Deck?.. We build Decks too.!!! Call 250-488-5338 for a Free Estimate. Serving Kelowna to Osoyoos.

Swimming Pools/ Hot Tubs PENGUIN MFG. HOT TUB COVERS. 250-493-5706

Pets & Livestock

Feed & Hay EXCELLENT Quality grass hay and grass alfalfa mix hay. No rain barn stored $4-$6 bale. Straw $5 bale. 250835-4748 or 250-833-9595 FIRST crop grass hay, round bales, Stored inside, $40/ bale Round bale silage Alfalfa grass mix $30/bale Enderby 250-838-6684 HAY FOR SALE; Grass or Grass Alfalfa mix, Round bales $70 each, approx. 800lbs. Large square bales, 3x3x8, $160/ton. Delivery avail. on larger orders. 250838-6630 New first cut grass/alfalfa hay. $60 roundbale. Phone 250-838-7932.

Livestock Shavings Friendly service from Summerland since 1972 Les Porter 250-490-1132

Pets BULLMASTIFF pups, 5 female Brindle, born April 14, ready to go soon. $800. 250275-1248 or 778-932-2380

Hotel, Restaurant, Food Services

Pets & Livestock

Pets

Furniture

DOBERMAN pups, 1 left. Ready to go now. $400 Can deliver.(778)212-2468 Looking to buy Lhasa/poodle cross puppy for our family. Must be able to view the puppy in person and have proof of vet check. Please contact Lisa at 250-492-5323 and leave message. Multi-poo puppies, 1st shots, dewormed, vet checked, ready to go, $600. (250)540-2780 PUG pups, 2 males, 3rd shots, vet checked. $700.ea 250-503-2354 ROTTWEILER Puppies. 1 boy and 1 girl born Mar 21 looking for a loving home. 2nd shots. Family raised, parents on property. $800. 250-498-6553

Bedroom suite inc. queen mattress frame, head/foot board, 2-side tables, dresser $650 obo. Call 250-490-7383 Western Star Auctions the Okanagans Premier Auction Houses 161 Ellis street Always buying estates, tools, furniture. If looking to buy furniture check out our store front. Please call 250-492-3203

Merchandise for Sale

Appliances Slight scratch and dent. SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS! Washer/Dryer set starting at $399. Ranges starting at $299 LG TV 50’’ $499.CANADIAN LIQUIDATORS 250-490-0554.

Auctions GIANT RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT AUCTION at Auction World (Kelowna) June 13th, 6:00 pm 1-800-556-5945 KwikAuctions.com Western Star Auctions, the Okanagan’s Premier Auction Houses 161 Ellis Street, weekly auctions every Tuesday @ 6pm Always accepting consignments. 250-492-3203

Farm Equipment Kubota model B20, 4 wheel drive tractor with model TL420 front end loader, bucket mounted pallet forks, model BT 750 backhoe (2 buckets, $13,000 firm, (250)493-0633, delivery available Kverneland Bale wrapper, very good condition. $6500. Call (250)838-7932

Free Items Free: 2 male kittens, black/white, one fluffy one short haired, Born April 08th. 250-486-3631 or 778-4763681

Furniture 5224920 PENTICTON

BARGAIN STORE WE BUY AND SELL QUALITY FURNITURE IN STOCK THIS WEEK

• Apartment Size Dinette Sets • Coffee & side tables • China & Display cabinets • Dining room table sets • Dressers & night stands New Items coming in daily

256 Westminster Ave. W. Showroom Open 10-5 778-476-5919 www.pentictonbargainstore.com

Hotel, Restaurant, Food Services

CHEF REQUIRED FOR SHORT TERM CONTRACT

To be considered for this position, please send your cover letter and resume, completed with work-related references by no later than Friday, June 8, 2012, 5 p.m. Thank you for your interest. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Resumes & cover letters attention: Barry Gerding, Managing Editor Kelowna Capital News 2495 Enterprise Way Kelowna, BC V1X 7K2 Fax: 250-763-8469 Email: bgerding @kelownacapnews.com

Garage Sales 3rd Annual, Street Garage Sale, Croil Ave., Summerland, Sat., June 9, 8:30-2:30 Annual Multi unit sale, Country Pines MHP, Oliver, 3904197th St., Friday, June 8, 8am?, Sat. June 9, 8am-?, items too numerous to mention Critteraid Special Sale. Sat. June 9th 8am-2pm Sun. June 10th 8am-Noon. 3099 Coleman St. Manly man section, gardening, sports, office, camping, and even special stuff for ladies. All proceeds to help animals in residence. Garage Sale, 1649 Carmi Ave., Saturday, June 9, 8am1pm Garage Sale, Sat., June 9, 8am-1pm, books, Magic The Gathering, household items, tube playground slide, dvd’s, tv console & more, 660 Duncan Ave. East

Indoor Garage Sale & Bake Sale M&M’s Charity BBQ Saturday, June 9 8am-2pm

The Salvation Army Community Church 2469 South Main St. Moving & Garage Sale, Jun 9 & 10, 9am-5pm, furniture, tools, household items, gardening equipment, 2825 Noyes Rd., Naramata Moving Sale: June 9th/10th, 8am-2pm. 380 White Ave. Everything from A-Z, books, camping gear, exercise equip., garden tools, furniture and more. NO Early Birds Moving Sale, Saturday, June 9th, everything must go! 8am1pm, 126 McKeen Pl. Neighborly Yard Sale, 124 Phoenix Ave., Sat/Sun, June 9 & 10, antique wall clock, vintage linens, sewing machine & more, 9am-4pm

ROTARY PARKING LOT SALE Saturday, June 9 8am-1pm 1185 Government St. Sat. & Sun., 8am-12pm, toys, clothes, books, household items, motorcycle, scooter, canoe, 1450 Duncan Ave. E. SUNKATCHERS Co-op, 4155 Hwy 3, Keremeos, June 09th 7am-noon The Pines MHP Annual Yard Sale, Sat. June 9th, 98 Okanagan Ave. E, 8am-12noon

Heavy Duty Machinery A- STEEL SHIPPING STORAGE CONTAINERS / Bridges / Equipment Wheel loaders JD 644E & 544A / 63’ & 90’ Stiff boom 5th wheel crane trucks/Excavators EX200-5 & 892D-LC / Small forklifts / F350 C/C “Cabs”20’40’45’53’ New/ Used/ Damaged /Containers Semi Trailers for Hiway & StorageCall 24 Hrs 1-866-528-7108 Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com FORK LIFTS For sale, 18 to choose from, Toyota, Cat., & Hyster, 250-861-9171 Will pay cash for oversized scrap steel, cats, yarders, saw mill equipment, farm equipment, etc. All insurance in place to work on your property. 250-260-0217

Medical Supplies Okanagan Hockey School requires a Chef to oversee all food ordering, food preparation and staffing for our food services program at our Penticton Hockey School. Our food services program provides staff and participants three meals per day, 7 days per week for an 8 week period beginning July 1st. The contract will be a 9-10 week term beginning June 24th. Interested persons, or for more information email

kevingoodwin@hockeyschools.com www.blackpress.ca

Merchandise for Sale

Nearly new 4-wheel electric scooter, $1800. 250-490-0349 Shoprider Mobility Scooters & Powerchairs. New & Used, New Stair & Platform Lifts, Kel: 250-764-7757 Vernon: 250542-3745 T-free 888-542-3745 www.okmobility.ca

Misc. for Sale Char-Broil BBQ, 2 main & 1 side burner w/side table & cover, $75, 1 Motorola digital box, 1 HD Digital box, $100 (both), (250)493-2196


26 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Merchandise for Sale

Friday, June 8, 2012 Penticton Western News

Rentals

Transportation

Transportation

Apt/Condo for Rent

Duplex / 4 Plex

Antiques / Classics

Cars - Sports & Imports

207-1410 Penticton Ave. 2 bdrm, pet friendly. $800.00 incl. utilities

2 Bdr + den, 2 bath. 1200 sf, dbl garage, fenced yard, 6 appl. $1100 + utilities. References & 1 yr lease req. 250486-2229 Lakeview, large 1bdrm furnished duplex. Near Clinton. $275/mo. 250-459-2387

Real Estate

Rentals

Misc. for Sale

For Sale By Owner

Eaton Piano, $350, sofa bed, burgundy, $250, 2 recliners, gold fabric, $75 ea, china cabinet w/hutch, $450, Ion Elliptical, $150, (250)490-7383 HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper? wine making equipment, 8 carboy’s plus accessories, $10 each, (250)490-0252

$99,000, 653sqft 2nd floor Condo, 1bdrm, ac, balcony, f/s, private parking & storage, transit out front, school near by, $5900 below assessment, renter in place, (250)493-2199 Owner Financing, 5 bdrm, 3 bath, 2 kitchens, on 5 1/2 acres, in Enderby, small barn & horse shelters, owner will take mobile/RV or property for down payment. Reduced to $379,000. 250-309-1506. PRIME LAKEVIEW LOTS from $140,000. Also: 1 precious 3 acre parcel, owner financing. 250-558-7888 www.orlandoprojects.co

Misc. Wanted COIN Collector looking to buy Collections, Accumulations, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins. Bulk Silver coins, bills etc. Call Chad 250-499-0251 (Local) construction trailer & tools; nail guns, compressors, etc., (250)493-4803, 250-488-4803 Wanted construction scaffold, Locke Property Management, 250-492-0346 ask for Jerry

Musical Instruments Guitars, amplifiers, drums, keyboards, band & string instruments, music books & access., music lessons, sales & rentals, Skaha Sound, 51 Nanaimo Ave. E, 250-492-4710

Real Estate Acreage for Sale $97,500 10.4 acres Lot H Arrow Lakes area 250-269-7328 Pic’s email selkirk8@telus.net Owner Financing, 5 bdrm, 3 bath, 2 kitchen, on 5 1/2 acres, in Enderby, small barn & horse shelters, owner will take mobile/RV or property for down payment. Reduced to $379,000.250-309-1506.

Apt/Condos for Sale Updated 2bdrm condo, 986sq.ft, 5-appliances. Close to shopping and bus $169,000, 250-490-0550

******* OKHomeseller.com Where smart sellers meet smart buyers! View Thompson Okanagan properties for sale.// Selling? No Commission. (250) 545-2383 or 1-877-291-7576

Mobile Homes & Parks ✰

Mr. Mobile Home Certified Factory Outlet. Spaces Available, Your location or crawlspace/basement models. Show homes 1680 Ross Rd. Kelowna 250-769-6614 www.accenthomes.ca

Open Houses OPEN HOUSE - Saturday and Sunday 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. #302 - 1701 Penticton Avenue On Penticton Creek - 2 beds/2 baths with large workshop. Secluded large back yard. Completely renovated throughout. Can sell furnished. $165,900. See pictures at Comfree.com # 336570. (250) 770-2959

Recreational

For Sale By Owner 3 bdrm, 1 bath rancher near hospital, parks and transit. Recently upgraded & wheelchair accessible. New laminate and doors, new carport and driveway, redone tiled bathroom, fresh paint & new trim. Private fenced back yard with storage shed. $279,500. Contact Nattie at 250-307-7811. Keremeos, Hwy 3, House with fruit stand on 5 acres of land, for more info, or (250)4995149 or 250-499-4066

Apt/Condo for Rent

Houses For Sale

Spacious fully serviced Lot, in gated RV Resort on Shuswap River. Swimming pool and numerous recreational facilities. $850 per month or $35. per day. 1 (250)542-1002

Rentals

Recreational/Sale

1 bdrm carriage house in Summerland. 670 sq ft, large covered deck. $800/mo plus utilities. NS NP. 250-490-7451

06 Hornet 29’, new awning, cstm spring mattress, phone & sat connection. $14900. (250)542-5815 1988 Pleasure Way travel van, ex mechanical, interior etc., $8700. obo.250-838-0663 1990 Clean 18.5’ Yukon Wilderness 5th Wheel, easy to haul. Includes Hi-jacker hitch and rails. Queen Bed, 4 burner stove. Oven, fridge, new electric/propane. Hot Water tank, flush toilet. Tub & shower, radio & TV roof antennas. Sleeps 4 adults, 2 children. $4000 (250)497-8389 1995 23ft Travel Mate Trailer, $6900, excellent cond. in/out, sleeps 6, rear bunks, couch hide-a-bed, oak cabinets, tub/shower combo, fully equipped, 2, 30 gal propane tanks, ext. shower, equalizer hitch, great floor plan, awning in good shape, (250)493-6875 1998 23ft Sportsman 5th Wheel, sleeps 6, Q bed, lots of storage, awning, well looked after, hitch included, $7800, 250-494-1396 2007 Damon Daybreak Class A Motorhome, Workhorse Chassis, Model 3276, 35ft, 2 slides, 3 TV’s, dual AC, bunks for kids or storage, sleeps 6, very low mileage, like new, $60,000, call (250)497-4600 after 6pm Salmon Arm-1998 Winnebago Brave SE, Class A,10-cyl, very clean 43K $24,000 call after 6 pm 250-832-6978 Tow Dolly , good condition, for towing behind motor home, $650 obo, (250)497-8802 Westland RV Manufacturing, from custom building to major repairs, insurance claims and renovations, free estimates, reasonable rates, seniors discounts available, for all your RV needs, call 250-493-7445

Modular Homes JUNE SPECIAL Brand New 16’ Wide Modular Homes. From $69,000.00 mark@eaglehomes.ca

Homes for Rent 2bdrm house, fenced yard, rear storage shed, backs on t park, yard work req., s/f/w/d, ns, pet neg. (no dogs), ref’s/lease req., $925+util., call Wendy at 250-496-4031 2bdrm, living room, bath, kitchen, 5appl., $700/mo., 55+ preferred, np, ns, (250)493-0461 LAKEFRONT with dock. Fintry area. Main house: 2bd, 1bath & Guest house: 1bd, 1bath. $2000/mo, long term lease. Pets ok, NS. 604-817-5129 Save 40-50% of your rent Own your own home! With as low as $0 down. Call today 250-809-5004 Charlie Brooks Royal LePage Locations West

Seasonal Acommodation Weekly rentals, Penticton, fully 2bdrm, 2ba, $1400/wk, July-Aug Ironman week (250)809-1333

Downtown furnished, May-June $1600/wk, excluded,

1 & 2 bdrm, newly reno’d suites. Secured access, util incl, near hospital, bus route and close to all amenities, n/p, n/s 250-938-7146

1000-1500sq’ of Industrial/ Commercial Space for lease compounded yard w/security cameras, overhead doors. Warren Ave. 250-765-3295

roommate wanted, $500/mo., incl. util., no pets, (250)4935205

2 MONTHS FREE RENT on 1024 sqft., 2148 sqft., 2280 commercial/whse/ office spaces avail. on Government St in Penticton FREE local use of moving truck for move-in, FREE advertising on LED road sign call 250-493-9227

1bdrm , ground level, walk out suite, private, spectacular view, w/d, ns, avail. July 1, ref’s req., $900/mo. (incl. util), 250-276-4148 2 brm, 1 bath, level entry, close to Wal-Mart, walking distance to malls, lake view, private. NS,NP, professionals only, must have references. $900/month hydro incl. (250)488-9217 HIGHLAND motel suites avail now n/pets. 1140 Burnaby Ave 250-488-2206 Kaleden, beautiful country life, large 1brm suite, NS, No dogs, $600 Util incl. 253-216-6548

Kingsview Properties

FOR RENT • 250-493-7626

ONE BEDROOM

TWO BEDROOM

Utilities Included

Utilities Included

REALTY EXECUTIVES PENTICTON APARTMENTS:

$670

Misc for Rent

Shared Accommodation

(250) 770-1948 101-3547 SKAHA LAKE RD. Skaha Pl.: 1 Bdrm, f/s, a/c, main floor. Secure Downtown: 1 bdrm/bach, F/S, A/C, decks, bldg. Pkg. $60000 incl. water incl. pkg. $55000-$60000 incl. util & cable Pent. Ave. 1 & 2 bdrm, F/S, W/D, A/C, storage, carport pkg. $65000 & $72500 incl. (250) 770-1948 water

$650

1BDRM, across from Skaha Beach on bus route, long term rental, n/s, n/p. $625/mo+util, 250-492-9692. 1BDRM apt, totally reno’d, 3 new appl, a/c, in-suite storage, NP, NS, clean, quiet, secure, on bus route, near Walmart 250-493-8500 1bdrm Exec., DT at 136 Front St., 1 block from lake & park, secure parking, $1000/mo., call Dennis at Realty Executives, (250)493-4372 1bdrm unit, parking avail. great location, $750 heat/cable incl. n/s, cat ok w/deposit, 250-488-7902 Avail. immed., large 2bdrm, quiet bldg, centrally located, f/s, ac, np, ns, call Kathy evenings, 250-462-0589 Bachelor suite w/balcony, furn’d. Immed. Starting $650 all inclusive. 250-541-0077 Bright, 2 bdrm apt in adult bldg in Penticton. Excellent location, walking distance to Skaha beach, walk-in clinic & Wal-Mart. In-suite laundry. NS NP. $870/mo includes covered parking & all appliances. Ref’s req’d. Avail July 1. Phone 250-494-7636. FURNISHED or un-furnished apt for rent in Princeton, Avail. now, need excellent ref’s & DD. No pets., rent starts at $525/mo., Call 250-295-1006 leave a message. LARGE 1 & 2bdrm apt. for rent. +40 bldg, $750 & $850 +util, ref’s req. 250-487-1136 PENT. 1bdrm, new reno 2nd flr, quiet loc, full k/b balcony lckd storage, prkg, ac elevator, $650, np, ns, 780-474-0901

SUMMERLAND. seniors 55+, retire with us! Bright spacious 2-bdrm townhome wonderfully updated in quiet area of town, walking distance to everything you need. Huge balcony, private yard. $860/mo includes garden/ lawn care and lots of parking. On-site owner, N/S, N/P, references, credit check. 250-404-0327 or 490-1739.

2001 Yamaha Road Star 1600, completely custom show bike, custom paint, wheels, raked, 250 rear tire, Avon tires, Bob pipes, Dakota speedo/tach, over $30,000 invested, $9900, 250-490-6046 $AVE. NEW Electric Scooters Pre-order Sales starting at $895 You save $$ pre-ordering! scoot4u.com 1-866-203-0906/250-863-1123

Apt/Condo for Rent

Property Management

$625

TOWNHOUSES 296 & 298 Maple St. 3 or 4 bdrm - 2½ bath 250-490-1215 250-490-1700

Skaha Place, 1 bdrm grd flr, coin op laundry, fridge, stove, walk to beach. Avail. NOW (A355) Grd flr, large bach, insuite laundry hook up, f, s, large patio, sec’d parking. Avail. NOW (CD105) Near dwntwn, and OK Beach, 1 bdrm apt, 3rd flr walk up, incl. cable and free laundry. Avail. NOW (ITA303) 55+ 1 bdrm apt near downtown, hardwood floors, f, s, a/c, includes heat, hot water & cable. Extra Storage. Avail. NOW (WT)

HOUSES: $800

2 BDRM small house, by OK Beach, f,s, w.d, fenced back yard, pet ok, no smoking. Avail. June 15 (H739) $1100 3 bdrm lower duplex, 1 bath, 5appl, laminate flrs, recently updated. Avail. NOW (H721-1) Prospective tenants must complete an application form at:

280 MAIN STREET, PENTICTON, B.C. V2A 5B2 PHONE: 250-493-4372 - www.rentalspenticton.com Only qualified applicants will be contacted.

3659sqft., suitable for warehouse, gym, contractor, 16ft oh door, office, 2 washrooms, access to fenced yard, also, 1156sqft, suitable for offices, dance studio, etc., M1 Zoning, allows for multiple industrial uses, plus fitness/recreational, $750/sqft, triple net, Syd 250493-5909 Commercial building for lease, 1500sqft, downtown Penticton, suitable for office or salon, $1200/mo., 250-460-2499 PRIME Commercial Spaces 2300st., & 752sf in busy Plaza, ample parking, could combine into 1 larger rental, also avail., 770sf for food related retail, call Barb 250-492-6319 Shop rental, Industrial area, 800 & 1200 sqft, priced to rent, (250)492-8324, 250-809-0728

Townhouses 3bd, 1.5ba, clean, painted, laminate, electric FP, ns, np, 5appl., $1000, (250)493-7791 FOR RENT Multi-family Units 2 & 3 bdrms, some w/basements Near school. No pets. LOCKE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LTD. 528 Main St. Penticton BC 250-492-0346

Auto Financing

OK SALES & SERVICE 0 DOWN

CALL NOW! 250.493.1966

Auto Accessories/Parts Used Tires, Huge Selection of used tires and wheels in stock. We might have what you need. Prices vary according to size and quality. Starting at $25.00. Call us or drop in to Larsens Excel 555 Okanagan Ave East 250-492-5630 Penticton

Auto Financing

Suites, Lower

Auto Financing

UBad Credit UDivorce URepossession USeparated *Plans Available

Motorcycles

PENT. 1/2 Duplex 563 Burns St. 3 Bdrm 1 Bath 5-appl, 1200sqft $1200/month Avail. July 1st 250492-2070

Commercial/ Industrial

RENTALS

$600

13611 Bloomfield in Summerland 3 bdrm, basement suite, f/s, s/d, $1000.00 incl. utilities

2002 Mercedes Benz Komprssor only 40K, neve winter driven Must see auto, sun-roofcustom-rims, 2dr. $13,900. Mint! 250-454-9993, 215-0661

URefused by bank USlow Payer UFirst Time Buyer UBankruptcy O.A.C.

Apply online oksalesandservice.com

Scrap Car Removal

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557

GUARANTEED

Auto Loans or

1AA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Min $60 cash for full size vehicles, any cond. 250-899-0460 CARS too good to crush! Free pick up & clean up, NO papers needed, cash for some, anything from Pinto’s to Cadillac’s, stock piling cars for movie productions & videos. Don’t crush that car, make it a movie star! Call Dale @ (778)515-0533 Scrap car removal, will pay up to $120.We are licensed & insured, more weight, more money,250-328-8697, Pent.

Sport Utility Vehicle

We Will Pay You $1000

All Makes, All Models. New & Used Inventory.

1-888-229-0744 or apply at: www.greatcanadianautocredit.com Must be employed w/ $1800/mo. income w/ drivers license. DL #30526

Cars - Domestic 1994 Mazda Miata, $5950, only 160000km, 5-speed, red, ex. cond. (250)540-7307 2002 Chevy Tahoe LT. Full load, leather, dvd, exc shape. $9000 obo. 250-260-0533 2003 Chrysler Voncord LXI, 91K, leather, loaded, 1 owner exc cond $5000 250-545-7849 2004 Chev Epica, 4dr, V6 auto, loaded, only 76,000 km, like new $4950. 250-545-9120

Cars - Sports & Imports 1992 Mazda Miata Convertible, red, 150K, Sony MP3, $5500. 250-545-7849

2006 BMW X5 Executive Edition

Transportation

Trucks & Vans 1999 Dodge Grand Caravan. 3.3L V6. Runs well, in good shape. AM/FM CD, a/c, cruise, power windows/locks/mirrors, passenger airbag. Tinted rear windows, 3rd row seating, 235,000 kms. $1388.00 OBO. 250-493-8925 2000 F150 4 wheel drive, auto, V8, club cab XLT, short box, 236,000kms, $4800, (250)494-1771 2006 Ford Range Sport. 4x4, low mileage, new topper, 4 new ground grips $15,000 obo 1-778-473-0088 96 Ford 350 crew 4x4, no rust, new fuel pump, glow plugs, shocks & windshield. Reliable. $6900 (250)542-5815.

Trucks - Logging 1987 International Tandem Dump Truck, certified, ready to work. $16,000. 250-260-0714

Boats 12’ Aluminum boat w/wheels. 7.5 merc engine, 5 galleon gas tank. $1200. 778-475-4041 12 ft, Aluminum 6HP Yamaha 3HP Johnson Oars/ 1 padded swivel seat. $1000 (778)4762474 17’ Bayliner Shorlander Tr 140 IB. Incl life jackets etc. $3700. 250-545-5006 2007 Searay ski boat, 185 Sport, 4.3 Merc, w/wakeboard tower,ext swim platform, 1 year warranty, 112 hours. $19,900 obo. 250-545-5998. 9ft Skiff fibreglass Columbia, good condition, comes with oars, $215, 250-493-5361 BOATING SEASON IS HERE FINALLY! WANNA HAVE SOME FUN WITH YOUR FAMILY & FRIENDS THIS SUMMER!!

Your Cabin on the Lake The Kootenay Queen

• • • • • • • • •

1976 30ft cabin cruiser with a 185 merc Full galley (fridge, stove, sink, furnace, toilet) Fold down table for a queen sized bed Fold up bunk beds VHF radio Hull is sound, galley is dated. Low draft 200 hrs on new engine A great boat that needs some TLC. $12,000.00 invested, will take offers starting at $9000 Call 250-362-7681 or email frdfntn@yahoo.ca for more information

wanted, 7.5 Evinrude motor, working or not, (250)488-1464

Adult Escorts BEACH BUNNIES Be Spoiled At Kelowna’s Only 5 Star Men’s Spa #32-2789 Hwy 97 Blue Heights www.beachbunnies.ca 250-448-8854 MALE 4 Male Erotic Massage $95, waxing, intimate grooming & skin care for the face & back. Winfield, 9-9 Daily 250-766-2048 VERNON’S BEST ESCORTS. In/Out calls. Gina 45, tall blonde, busty, Brooke 22, petite,brunette, Savanna 26, tall slim blonde, Jessica 30 B.B.W. Real G.F.E. Upscale. private. 250-307-8174. Hiring.

3.0i , fully loaded with only 60,000kms. Immaculate condition. A Must See! $26,000. (250) 392-5764.

Trucks & Vans 1985 Blue Chevy G20 van, very low kms on original engine, very clean, new radiator, good tires, runs well, built in boxes for tools, camping, excellent vehicle for handyman, final sale, $2000 (250)7708063 or 250-493-5370 to view

2250 Camrose St., Penticton

250-492-0444


Penticton Western News Friday, June 8, 2012

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

27

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0%8 †

FOR 24 MONT THS

INCLUDES $2,764 FACTORY TO DEALER CREDIT†. TUCSON L 6 SPEED. DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED.

2013 ELANTRA SAVE TOURING GL 20

199 694 6944

17 995

,

+

0

$

LIMITED EDITION SHOWN

STARTING FROM

197 3.49 $13,199

$

%

AT

204 0% BIWEEKLY

+

AT

APR/60 MOS.

$0

373 6.2% $24,899* AT

ANNUAL LEASE RATE FOR 60 MOS. $0 DOWN PAYMENT

170 1.9 BIWEEKLY AT

%

APR/84 MOS.

$

OR LEASE FROM

+

UNTIL 2013

$0

DOWN PAYMENT STARTING FROM

449 4.49 $29,249 AT

0% †

FOR F O 24 MONT

STARTING TING FROM

ANNUAL LEASE RATE FOR 60 MOS. $0 DOWN PAYMENT

2012 ACCENT SAVE 5 DR L 20

UNTIL 2013

86 0.9% + $0 BIWEEKLY $

AT

OR LEASE FROM

DOWN PAYMENT STARTING FROM

174 0 $13,599*

%

ANNUAL LEASE RATE FOR 60 MOS. $0 DOWN PAYMENT

164 29,995 CASH DOWN BIWEEKLY $0

$

EXCLUSIVELY AT PENTICTON HYUNDAI ASK HOW WE CAN PAY OFF YOUR CREDIT CARDS AT NO INTEREST AND DRIVE HOME A NEW VEHICLE TODAY!!!

STARTING TARTING FROM

2012 SONATA SAVE 2.0T 20

+

186 0 $15,949*

$

$

DOWN PAYMENT

OR LEASE FROM

LIMITED EDITION SHOWN

,

%

AT

ANNUAL LEASE RATE FOR 60 MOS. $0 DOWN PAYMENT

6 SPEED MANUAL

$

DOWN PAYMENT

%

AT

APR/84 MOS.

AJAC's Best new small car under $21K

2013 GENESIS COUPE 2.0

$

APR/84 MOS.

OR LEASE FROM

$

$

*

ANNUAL LEASE RATE FOR 60 MOS. $0 DOWN PAYMENT

$

218 39,995 CASH DOWN BIWEEKLY $0

2013 GENESIS COUPE NAV

DOWN PAYMENT

OR LEASE FROM

29 995

$ NOW

,

BIWEEKLY

FOR 24 MONT THS

UNTIL 2012 ACCENT 2013 SAVE 4DR L 20 % $ + AT 0.9 $0 APR/84 MOS.

3525 35 2599

103

%8 †

INCLUDES $1,699 FACTORY TO DEALER CREDIT†. ELANTRA TOURING GL 5 SPEED. DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED.

84 BIWEEKLY

$ WAS

LIMITED EDITION SHOWN

$ NOW

,

LIMITED MODEL SHOWN

UNTIL 2013 ELANTRA 2013 SAVE L 20 $ AT 1.9% + $0

LIMITED MODEL SHOWN

$ WAS

UNTIL 2013

INCLUDES $5,264 FACTORY TO DEALER CREDIT†. VERA CRUZ GL FWD. DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED.

2012 VERACRUZ LTD NAV

UNTIL 2013

2012 VERACRUZ SAVE 40 GL FWD

*

NO CREDIT APPLICATION REFUSED! CALL FOR IMMEDIATE APPROVAL!

2012 SONATA SAVE GL 20

134 0% BIWEEKLY

$

AT

APR/84 MOS.

OR LEASE FROM

+

AJAC's Best new small car under $21K

UNTIL 2013

$0

DOWN PAYMENT STA ARTING FROM

295 0 $22,699*

$

%

AT

ANNUAL LEASE RATE FOR 60 MOS. $0 DOWN PAYMENT

2012 SONATA SAVE HYBRID 20

UNTIL 2013

LIMITED EDITION SHOWN

OWN IT FOR ONLY

1.9% $28,999* STARTING FROM

FINANCING FOR 72 MOS.

The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogan are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada corp. finance offers available OAC from Hyundai Financial Services based on new 2012 Tucson L 5-speed Manual/2012 Veracruz GL FWD auto/2012 Elantra Touring GL 5-speed Manual/2013 Elantra L Manual/2012 Accent 4Dr L Manual/2012 Accent 5 Dr L Manual/2012 Genesis Coupe 2.0T 6-speed Manual/2012 Sonata GL 6-Speed Manual/2012 Soata 2.0T Auto/2012 Sonata Hybrid. Cost of borrowins is $0 no down payment required. Cost of borrowing on other vehicles not 0% dependant on interest rate. Delivery and destination charges include freight PDE dealer admin fees and full tank of gas. Financing examp 2012 Genesis Coupe 2.0T for $26464.00 at 0% per annum equals $204.00 bi weekly for 60 months for a total obligation fo $26464.00 all payments are plus applicable taxes and fees. See dealer for details. Free warranty available on selected models 7/120000km warranty. All factory to dealer credits apply before applicable taxes. This is a limited time offer and may end without notice.

PEN PE ENTI TIC ICTO TON ON HYUNDAI www.pentictonhyundai.com 448 Duncan Avenue West

DL. 61052 VSA 30744

TOLL FREE: 1-877-392-0205 The Sentes Auto Group www.sentes.com


28

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Friday, June 8, 2012 Penticton Western News

NEW MODEL

2012

W V H W W R +

SAVE

2.7" LCD, 16.1 Mpx, 4.0x optical zoom

QV R L W F H O H 6 XFWV G R U 3  H 3ULF

Waterproof up to 5 meters (16.4 feet) q Shockproof up to 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) q Freezeproof up to Â&#x160;& q Dustproof q 16.1 megapixel q 4.0x optical zoom q 8x intelligent zoom q Ultra-wide 25 mm LUMIX '& VARIO OHQVq,QWHOOLJHQW/&' .SLxels)

22888

$

DMC-TS20

STARTING

J U N E 8 TH

SAVE

$600

129888

$

50PM6700

$38.97

for 48 months

LED

2012

Plasma TV q ' Smart TV q Full HD 1080p q Resolution 1920 x 1080 q THX ' Display q 2 Side, 2 Rear HDMI 1.4a In q RGB In (DVXESLQ r3&LQSXW

50p

p

N NEW EW W M MODEL OD L ODE

50" & 60" Class 3D 1080P Plasma TV with Smart TV

PRICE PACKAGE

$21

PRICE RICE P PACKAGE ACKA KAGE 60p 0p

SAVE A

NEW MODEL

$400

2012

169 16 1698 6988888 698 69

$

60PM6700 60PM67 00

$50.97 50.97

SAVE

forr 4 48 8 mon month months ths

$70

42888

$

p9,(5$/('WHOHYLVLRQ

IPS LED /&' panel q Wide viewing angle q Media player q SD photo gallery q Game mode q HDMI terminals [  q86%WHUPLQDOq3&LQSXWWHUPLQDO

TCL32X5

Home Solutions Home Audio Installations TV Mounting Residential Commercial Pre-Wiring Home Automation Home Delivery * additional charges may apply

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¢PHVVDJHFKDUJHZLOODSSO\IRUHDFKWH[WPHVVDJHRUDWWDFKPHQWVHQWWRFOLHQWVRXWVLGHRI&DQDGDDQGWKH86$QDGGLWLRQDO¢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Â&#x152;7(/86

NOW OPEN

KELOWNA

WEST KELOWNA

2153 Springfield Road (250) 860-2600

#200 - 2180 Elk Rd. (250) 707-2600

PENTICTON

VERNON

1001-2601 Skaha Lake Rd. 200-3107 - 48th Ave. (250) 493-3800 (250) 542-3000

ANDRES WIRELESS Cherry Lane Mall (250) 493-4566

Penticton Western News, June 08, 2012  

June 08, 2012 edition of the Penticton Western News

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