Page 1

VICTORIANEWS VICTORIA Tears and truths

Cats oh, so close

Truth and Reconciliation Commission offers residential school survivors a platform. News, Page A3

Victoria Cougars were 70 seconds away from becoming provincial junior B champs. Sports, Page A20

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Japanese Restaurant Newly Renovated

Serving Brown Rice Sushi 1619 Store St. 250-386-9121

Proudly serving Esquimalt & Victoria

www.vicnews.com

Play ball During opening ceremonies for Beacon Hill Little League at Hollywood Park, miniminor teammates Harrison Robilliard, 4, near right, and Beatrice Brockmann, 5, try to fashion a new style of cap. Recalling days on the slowpitch field, Mayor Dean Fortin, far right, lobs in the ceremonial opening pitch. The action took place Sunday, on a day when National Little League, whose park is at Hillside Avenue and Cook Street, also held its opening ceremonies. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Esquimalt to shine through photo contest Showing off Esquimalt in all its glory is as easy as picking up a camera and snapping a few pictures. In honour of the township’s centennial year, Victoria News invites amateur photographers to snap pictures of Esquimalt for a “Show Us Your Esquimalt� photo contest, now underway. Winning photos will be displayed at the Esquimalt Recreation Centre, May 15 to 18, and will appear in a special section of the Victoria News to be published May 16. Contest categories include parks and recreation, historic Esquimalt, about town and people and activities. Mail or drop off your entries by April 27 to Black Press at 818 Broughton St., or at Esquimalt’s municipal hall, 1229 Esquimalt Rd. For details, email promo@vicnews.com. editor@vicnews.com

Civilian workers brace for job cuts Unions hope attrition, staffing redistribution cushion blow at CFB Esquimalt Erin McCracken News staff

At least 51 full-time civilian defence jobs at CFB Esquimalt will be eliminated by spring 2015. Of those, 29 positions will be terminated at the Fleet Maintenance Facility, whose workers maintain five Royal Canadian Navy warships and the submarine, HMCS Victoria. Another 22 full-time positions filled by members of the Public Service Alliance of Canada’s Union of National Defence Employees will be eliminated. The union represents 1,200 operational, technical services and office administration work-

ers at the base, the Rocky Point ammunition depot, a supply depot in Colwood and 443 Maritime Helicopter Squadron. “I think it’s a significant impact to the affected members, of course,� said Mark Miller, B.C. vice-president of the Union of National Defence Employees. “But when you compare the hit that (our union’s workers in) B.C. took in relation to the rest of the country, no, we got off (lightly).� The elimination of jobs comes on the heels of the federal government’s 2012 budget, announced March 29. About two weeks ago, CFB Esquimalt officials began informing workers at the Fleet Maintenance Facility that they may be potentially impacted.

Many members of Miller’s union also have not yet been told which positions are being terminated, a point which is impacting morale, he said. Secrecy around the department’s strategic review and deficit reduction action plan, launched in recent years to identify cost savings, adds to the worry, he said. “(It causes) uncertainty and confusion, but it also keeps the Canadian population in the dark, because no one really understands what the big hit is. I think it’s political spin-doctoring and population manipulation.� PLEASE SEE: Job losses coming at base, Page A13

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www.vicnews.com • A3

A call to witness residential school legacy TRUTH TELLING: Part 3 in a series looking at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Roszan Holmen News staff

One of the first to take the microphone, Mary Vickars faced a crowd of several hundred as she spoke about the stick her mother often had waiting for her after school. The “swarms of hits” were frequent, but one day it got worse. With a determined but quivering voice, Vickars told of the morning her mother lunged at her, out of the blue, with a machete. “I saw myself with my six brothers running down the street to save my life,” she said. “I couldn’t comprehend how a mother could do that to her only daughter.” Vickars is an intergenerational survivor of residential schools, the daughter of a woman who attended St. Michael’s school in Alert Bay near the northern tip of Vancouver Island, between the ages of three and 16. On Friday at the Victoria Conference Centre, she joined dozens of others from across Vancouver Island who volunteered to speak about their experiences of residential school at the national Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s event in Victoria, April 13 and 14. They spoke for the record, for personal healing and for cross-cultural understanding. “Seeing all the drinking and the infidelity of our people was outrageous,” Vickars said, her face projected onto Over two days, the commission gathered statements a large screen for all to see clearly in the darkened from survivors and their families. From these, common conference room. “It was dysfunctional, but to us it felt themes emerged of harsh punishments at school, e whole community langu so normal, because the languages lost, broken families and intergenerational negle and abuse. Memories of specific incidents, was doing it.” neglect howe The goal of the however, brought home these large-scale traumas. On woman told of hearing the screams of children commission One th day a dentist came to her school and pulled out is to create a on the national memory teeth without freezing. On man told of secretly caring for a puppy, feeding around residential One b schools for future him bread stolen from the kitchen. When he was caugh a priest instructed him to drown the dog in a generations, chair caught, gunny sack. “He said don’t take your eyes off it until the Murray Sinclair told e bubb stop.” more than 1,000 people bubbles ng W gathered at the opening William Jones chose to speak in the more intimate sett ceremonies Friday at setting of a sharing circle. H Crystal Garden. Holding the eagle feather, he sat with other su “We never want it to be survivors while witnesses listened from outside the ci said in this country at any circle and mental health supporters, dressed in w time in the future that this white, stood by with tissues. never happened.” “I beat my wife like any other drunken d The event also aimed Indian,” said Jones. staff Roszan Holmen/News sta to set the groundwork for It’s taken all these years to understand the ed A message of hop hope source of his problems. reconciliation, he added. written on a board next The relationship between “I likely would have succeeded had I not to other sentiments, by been destructuralized.” Aboriginal Peoples and nonYvonne Joseph. aboriginals has been damaged, When the man who molested him and other he said. “The tension that goes boys at Alberni residential school was tried in on in this society is significant … and the relationship court, Jones didn’t have the courage to participate. will have to be addressed for future generations, so that “I could never admit to myself what that man had future Canadians will be able to mutually exist without done to me,” he said. that tension.” After 30 years of sobriety and 20 years of work with

Members of the Esquimalt Nation drumming and dancing group, including Shawn Bryce, 15, left, and August Thomas Sr., performed during Friday’s opening ceremonies for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission events at the Crystal Garden. Roszan Holmen/ News staff

Roszan Holmen/News staff

William Jones holds an eagle feather while he gives his statement in a sharing circle. “How can you reconcile with anyone who tried to wipe you out?” he asked. psychiatrists and psychologists, that changed. “It was time for me to say something and maybe put it in someone else’s lap,” he said. PLEASE SEE: Call to action, Page A4

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A4 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Call to action the next step in survivors’ healing process Continued from Page A1

Roszan Holmen/News staff

People prepare to gather statements in a sharing circle during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s regional event in Victoria last weekend.

Many other people shared stories of healing and success, despite a childhood of abuse. A Pacheedaht man spoke proudly of being the owner of a restaurant. Perry Omeasoo spoke of rising to the position of president of the Vancouver Native Health Society. “I like the person I’ve become,” he said. Vickars found a way to forgive her stick-wielding mother. “I couldn’t comprehend being three years old, with your siblings, and being taken away,” Vickars said, sobbing. “What I went through was (nothing in comparison).” Her experience influenced how she parented her own kids. “There are numerous of us, in my generation, that never got a child-

hood and when my children came I made sure that they had everything.” More than truth telling, the Truth and Reconciliation event served as a call to action. “We need to figure out how we move forward,” said commissioner Marie Wilson, addressing both the survivors and all the people of Canada. “We are all part of that obligation.” She called on everyone in the audience to be witnesses at the event and to continue the conversation into the future. “We need helpers… who will help us turn the word ‘witness’ into an active verb,” said Wilson. “We are actually asking you to join a movement.” rholmen@vicnews.com

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almost all cases of cervical cancer. It’s estimated the vaccine can prevent up to 70 per cent of these cancers, as well as a number of precancerous changes to the cervix that require treatment. The vaccine will be available to eligible women starting mid-April through pharmacists, physicians, sexual health and youth clinics, public health units and post-secondary health services. It is administered in three doses over a six-month period. For more information, visit www. immunizebc.ca. rholmen@vicnews.com

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www.vicnews.com • A5

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

The

regrets of the dying:

Natalie North News staff

Those who care for people dying in towns across the province are now able to pick up the phone and call for support around the clock. On April 10, the Ministry of Health revealed plans to expand the After-Hours Palliative Nursing Service. By calling HealthLinkBC, those eligible to receive palliative nursing services are connected to a registered nurse. If needed, they can also talk with a palliative response nurse from the Fraser Health Authority, which has provided a call-in service since 2005. Though families receiving palliative care in Greater Victoria will not see any change in services – Victoria Hospice Society already provides those supports – Dr. Kelli Stajduhar, an expert in end-of-life

care and researcher at the University of Victoria’s Centre on Aging, is applauding the decision. Much of Stajduhar’s work exposes her to life’s most common last regrets – a topic that went viral after Bronnie Ware, an Australian palliative care nurse, blogged about her experiences this winter. Stajduhar weighs in on Ware’s post (summarized in box at right): “I wish I would have done what I wanted to do; I wish I wouldn’t have spent all that time in the office and spent more time with my family and played with my kids more and lived my life the way that I wanted to live my life,” Stajduhar said. “These are very common things that people talk about.” One theme from the UVic researcher’s experience not covered by Ware, however, was the

“Not all people who are dying are wonderful and nice people. … We often focus on providing the best support for the people who are dying, but we forget their families are providing care to them and they’re not all that nice to their families.” – Dr. Kellie Stadjuhar regret for having let anger get in the way of maintaining quality family relationships. Letting go of anger is a lesson often learned not by those on their deathbeds, but also by their caregivers, as the disconnected often return to the family and offer support – despite the quality of the

UVic palliative care expert weighs in on end-of-life ruminations relationship in the past. Stajduhar recalls meeting a woman who was supporting her husband through what appeared to be the final days of a solid, loving relationship. It wasn’t until speaking with the woman later, once her husband had died, that Stajduhar learned the couple’s marriage had been one fraught with abuse and dishonesty. “Not all people who are dying are wonderful and nice people,” she says. “We often focus on providing the best support for the people who are dying, but we forget their families are providing care to them and they’re not all that nice to their families.” A little appreciation from the person dying can go a long way, she adds. nnorth@saanichnews.com

Did you know? The top five deathbed regrets as recorded by Bronnie Ware, an Australian palliative care nurse (Bronnieware.com/news). ■ 1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected. ■ 2. I wish I didn’t work so hard. ■ 3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings. ■ 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. ■ 5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.

LOCAL NEWS IN BRIEF

E&N bridges to be studied The good news came last week, now train lovers can immerse themselves in the details. Read the full report based on an assessment for the E&N rail line’s bridges and trestles at www.th.gov.bc.ca/publications/reports_and_

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A6 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

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Navy sonar all but ruled out as cause of orca’s death Investigation continues, test results may not provide conclusive evidence Erin McCracken News staff

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This orca, identified as L112, washed up on the shore in Washington state in February, days after HMCS Ottawa used sonar in an exercise in Canadian waters.

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The Royal Canadian Navy is likely off the hook in connection with the death of an orca that washed up on a Washington state beach in February, say U.S. officials. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration continues to investigate why the three-year-old killer whale, known as L112, was found battered and bruised in Long Beach, Wash. on Feb. 11. The orca had lived with a pod of 86 endangered southern resident killer whales. Environmentalists immediately pointed fingers at the Royal Canadian Navy’s HMCS Ottawa, which used sonar and detonated two underwater charges during anti-submarine training in the Strait of Juan de Fuca off Vancouver Island, Feb. 6. Marine biologists say certain sonar frequencies can interrupt whales’ navigation and communication. Though all possible causes of death, including sonar, can’t be ruled out at this stage in the investigation, U.S. officials say the animal, which likely died between Feb. 7 and 9, washed up near the mouth of the Columbia River, about 322 kilometres from Canadian waters – a great distance from where the frigate was sailing. “It is unlikely in the extreme it died in Canadian waters and drifted south,” said Brian Gorman, the

administration’s spokesperson. “The prevailing winds and currents are all from the south to the north, and it’s virtually impossible it could have died north of Long Beach and drifted south.” In a statement, Rear Admiral Nigel Greenwood, commander of Maritime Forces Pacific, said, “HMCS Ottawa followed the (navy’s) Marine Mammal Mitigation Policy prior to and during the period when they were using ships’ sonar, and prior to deploying the small charges. There were no reports, nor indications of marine mammals in the area.” Testing on tissue samples taken from L112 is now underway. The first wave of results are expected in the next three weeks. However, testing doesn’t always pinpoint cause of death, Gorman cautioned. “It is not uncommon, even with a fresh carcass and a thorough investigation and a thorough necropsy, for (investigators) to not make a definitive conclusion. This isn’t like television,” he said. “We may never know why this animal died.” To help further its investigation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration contacted the Royal Canadian Navy through the U.S. Navy, seeking details about its activities. “When you start an investigation like this you don’t shut off any avenues,” Gorman said. “It might have been sonar, it might have been some kind of explosion, (the orca) might have been struck by a fishing boat, it might have been caught in a net. There are dozens of different possibilities and you can’t dismiss any of those until you have reason to dismiss one or more of them.” emccracken@vicnews.com

POLICE NEWS IN BRIEF

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Arrest quickly follows alleged stabbing incident A Saanich man walked into Victoria police headquarters Saturday just before 11 a.m. with facial injuries and stab wounds to the back of his head. Officers applied first aid and the 20-year-old was then rushed to hospital. Police reported that he had been struck with a blunt instrument.

An investigation led to the arrest later the same day of a 47-yearold Victoria man inside a suite in the 700-block of Fisgard St. where police say the attack took place. The suspect was expected to appear in court Monday (April 16) to face charges of assault with a weapon and assault causing bodily harm. He also is wanted on two arrest warrants issued in Cranbrook. emccracken@vicnews.com


www.vicnews.com • A7

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Seasonal migration underway Surge in subleases, as post-secondary students leave town Kyle Slavin News staff

If you find your street a little quieter in the coming weeks, don’t panic – it’s not the plague. The university students have all just gone home. But the reality facing many students who’ve lived off campus for the last eight months is many signed a one-year lease last September, leaving them on the hook to pay rent through the summer. Rebecca Koch pays $550 a month to live in a four-bedroom house just steps from the University of Victoria on the Gordon Head-Cadboro Bay border. The 20-year-old who is studying business is banking on finding a summer student to sublet her room for the remainder of the lease. Koch is going home to the Lower Mainland in May and won’t be

Tips for subleasing Make sure your subtenant: ■ knows when they must move out; ■ knows what the rental unit comes with (Are utilities included? Is the room furnished?); ■ knows how to contact you and your landlord; ■ provides you with a security deposit (no more than half a month’s rent); ■ knows your expectations (date and time, cleanliness) for when they are to move out.

– Residential Tenancy Branch

Downtown hi-rise fire causes $100K damage A ninth-floor apartment fire in View Towers forced the relocation of two residents and caused an estimated $100,000 damage Saturday morning. With no sprinkler system in the 18-storey building, all 19 on-duty Victoria firefighters rushed to the scene at 1147 Quadra St. They brought three engines, two ladder

returning. But finding a replacement tenant is proving tougher than she thought. So tough, in fact, she’s decided to rent for cheaper than what she pays. “I’m completely willing to go down $100 a month, as long as someone takes over my lease,” Koch said, acknowledging she’d rather pay the difference than the full rate for an empty bedroom. “It’s hard because there’s so many students (in the same situation I am), and so little demand for any of the houses.” It’s the same story for Sarah Hein, who, along with her four other roommates, is looking to sublet all five rooms in their rented house for the summer. They, too, are trying to get their place rented in the short-term by offering a $125 per month discount per person on rent. “What actually has been a big problem is people want the place for longer. They want it for next year, too,” said the 20-year-old Hein, a third-year applied linguistics student. According to numbers from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Victoria’s rental vacancy rate typically goes up in April. “There’s many factors that influence movement in and out of the rental market, and you would expect that students moving out of rental units, that would free up some spots,” said Carol Frketich, B.C. regional economist with CMHC. Seventy per cent of UVic’s population

– or 16,199 students – aren’t originally from Greater Victoria, while Camosun College sees 17 per cent of its students (2,210) come from outside of the Capital Region. Both postsecondary institutions are now in their final exam periods, which means an exodus of students from now until the end of April. A spokesperson with the Residential Tenancy Branch said students should do their homework before accepting a subtenant. “Be sure that your tenancy agreement allows you to sublet,” the spokesperson said first and foremost, and get your landlord’s permission in writing. Other suggestions include asking prospective subtenants for references – and checking them out. “Is the tenant who they say they are? Is the tenant able to pay the rent? Is the tenant reliable? How likely is the tenant to be noisy or to disturb other occupants of the building?” Write up a subletting agreement, and conduct a move-in inspection with the subtenant you choose. “Be clear about when rent is due, and who it should be paid to. Have a contingency plan in case the subtenant doesn’t pay on time,” the spokesperson said. “Find out what the tenant plans to do when the sublet is over. Is the tenant likely to leave when you (want them to)?” kslavin@saanichnews.com

May 1 till A ugust 30

VICTORIA FIRE NEWS IN BRIEF trucks, a rescue vehicle and a command car. A Saanich Fire Department engine also responded, but was called off before it arrived, due to Victoria crews getting the fire under control. The fire was reported around 10:20 a.m. and upon reaching the scene, fire-

fighters found black smoke coming from a balcony area. Inside, the hallway where the burning suite was located was filled with smoke. An aggressive attack by firefighters managed to contain the blaze to the one apartment. Flames mainly damaged the bedroom and

hallway areas, but the rest of the suite had extensive heat, smoke and water damage. The two occupants of the apartment escaped unharmed and have been relocated courtesy of the City of Victoria’s evacuee assistance program, with their suite being rendered uninhabitable. No other residents were harmed or were forced to stay elsewhere. editor@vicnews.com

CELEBR AT ING SK ILLED VOLUN T EER S IN YOUR COMMUNI T Y

Hitting All the Right Notes When Tom Siemens lends his time, talent and skill-set to an organization, given his 30-years of banking experience at RBC, he invariably becomes the treasurer. And so it was when he decided to volunteer for Pacific Opera Victoria (POV) he took on the role of Treasurer on their Board of Directors. Through his experience with POV, Tom has developed an even deeper understanding of the role Arts and Culture play in our society, and the importance of supporting

Are you an Executive Director or Board Member interested to learn how your community organization can thrive by mindfully engaging passionate citizens? Visit www.thevantagepoint.ca

these organizations and individuals. Although funding has been a challenge in the past few years, Tom and the POV Board have strived for economic dignity for the artists through a strong and stable opera company. His favourite historical anecdote is a quote from Sir Winston Churchill who was asked during World War II why he maintained funding for the Arts. Churchill replied, “Isn’t that what we are fighting for?”

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Eye hazards in the backyard Some day soon the rain will stop, and we will venture outdoors to do dour bit in making Victoria “the Garden City”. Before setting out to tame your own personal wilderness, stop and think about your eyes (and other body parts). Pruning and trimming can be hazardous. A branch snapping back and hitting the eye can cause mechanical damage and possibly toxic reaction or infection. A projectile, from a weedeater or lawnmower, can also cause serious damage to your body. Perhaps you use an arsenal or herbicides and pesticides to help control your garden? Or you have a pool which requires chlorine? These chemicals aren’t eye-friendly either. If you do splash a chemical in the eye, flush the eye immediately with vast, huge, enormous quantities of clean cold water; then go to Emergency if necessary. The good news is that eye protection is simple and inexpensive. Safety glasses and goggles that fit over prescription glasses are all that is required, and you can find them in your local hardware store. Our local eye surgeons would rather spend their weekends with their families than treating ocular injuries that are easily prevented. Have a happy and safe spring and summer.

250-361-4478


A8 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

Artists unite for the planet

Open Houses

Brittany Lee News staff

Please come out to view a revised design for the CARSA parkade.

Give green a chance. That’s the message being spread by volunteers of the Creatively United for the Planet Festival. The inaugural festival, taking place April 20 to 22 in and around St. Matthias Church in Victoria as part of Earth Week, aims to bring together creative people and environmentalbased charities for a fun, family-friendly weekend, while also raising awareness for change. “Our goal is to inspire environmental awareness and build community through creativity,” said Frances Litman, festival cofounder and noted Victoria photographer. Artists have always been the leaders in change, bringing issues forward to the public, she added. Litman started working on the festival plans about two years ago because she felt not enough was being done to help environmental charities. The goal was to reach people who say they are either too busy or too intimidated to help. “It’s easy to preach to the converted about why the environment is important,” Litman said. “I thought if I create something that’s really fun, where (people) can bring their families and it’s free, what a great way for them to be able to make a difference.” Creatively United was first

As part of an enhanced consultation UVic will host a series of four open houses where you can provide feedback on a revised CARSA parkade design. The open houses are interactive and drop-in. Come at the time and date that suits you and stay as long as you like. Saturday April 28, 2012 St. Aidan’s United Church 3703 St. Aidan’s Street 12:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

Tuesday May 1, 2012 UVic Student Union Building Michele Pujol Room University of Victoria 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

Monday April 30, 2012 Mt. Douglas Secondary 3970 Gordon Head Rd. 5:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Wednesday May 2, 2012 Cadboro Bay United Church 2625 Arbutus Rd. 4:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Project team members will be available to answer questions and gather public input. On April 28th you will be able to view a revised parkade design and provide your feedback online at www.uvic.ca/carsa

Volunteer EiraShay BarkerHart, left, festival founder Frances Litman, festival cartoonist Nelson Dewey and volunteer Cleo Reuben-Morcos gathered together to promote the Creatively United For The Planet Festival, running April 20 to 22. Don Denton/News staff

started as a website to help raise funds for local environmental charities. Litman hopes the Earth Week fundraiser will be the start of an annual event to raise money and profile for these causes. The festival offers a wide selection of mostly free, indoor and outdoor activities, including concerts, art-making, music, displays and lectures, for people of all ages. A free disco-mardi gras-themed dance party kicks off the celebration Friday (April 20) at 7 p.m. On Saturday night there will be a funky fashion show featuring local designers. The show runs from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. and is followed by a funk, soul and R&B dance with the Soul Shakers.

CARSA

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Renowned artist Robert Bateman will speak on Sunday at 3 p.m., followed by a John Lennon tribute concert. There will also be a limited edition print signed by Bateman for auction. The events which require advanced ticket purchases are the fashion show and dance, a performance by Ann Mortifee and Paul Horn, and the finale with Robert Bateman and the John Lennon tribute. All other events are free or by donation. Tickets range from $30 to $35. The Festival takes place at St. Matthias Anglican Church, 600 Richmond Ave. To purchase tickets or for a full schedule of events, visit creativelyunitedfortheplanet.com. editor@vicnews.com

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www.vicnews.com • A9

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

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Parents get busy at one of the participating locations during last year’s Great Cloth Diaper Challenge. Parents can bring their babies to S.J. Willis school for this year’s event.

Diaper change record sought Great Diaper Change busts misconceptions about cloth Roszan Holmen News staff

On April 19, parents will gather – babies in tow – with a goal to establish a new world record. Each will pick a quadrant taped on a school room floor, and when the whistle blows, all will change their babies into cloth diapers in unison. “At the end, everyone lifts up their child to show that the diaper is on,” said Charlotte KingHarris, one of the organizers of

the Great Cloth Diaper Change. No need to wait for a dirty diaper to participate, she assured. “That would be a very poopy room.” The count has to be handled in an official way to ensure witnesses can make an accurate count of diapers changed, KingHarris said. Data will be submitted to Guinness World Records with the hope of beating last year’s mark of 5,026 cloth diapers changed simultaneously. This year, 262 sites from 15 countries will host changing stations. The challenge is a fun way to promote cloth diapers. It’s a subject King-Harris feels strongly about. Disposables are piling up

Mark your calendar ■ At 9 a.m. April 19, bring your baby to S.J. Willis school (923 Topaz Ave.). Cloth diapers will be provided for parents who don’t own them. ■ Old cloth diapers in good condition will be accepted for Cloth for a Cause, which refurbishes diapers for families in need. For more information, contact victoriaclothdiaperchange@gmail.com or visit www.GreatClothDiaperChange.com.

in the landfill, she said. “You feel so guilty knowing that none of it is going to break down.” With the introduction of flushable liners, cloth diapers “are so simple, they’re so easy,” she said. “There is this misconception that it involves safety pins, and scrubbing poop with your bare hands.” In May, her co-organizer, Rachel Aube, will be making a pitch to the Capital Regional District to provide $100 reimbursements to parents for choosing cloth diapers to help offset their start-up costs. She predicts the program would save money due to the savings accrued through reduced demands on the landfill. rholmen@vicnews.com

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this role in the community," says Jennifer, an Assistant Branch Manager at RBC. "Inspiring and motivating teams is a big part of what I do—both on the job and in my volunteer role!" Saira, also in management at RBC, brings event management & organizational skills plus a creative mindset to the team. "Getting involved has become contagiousone small decision is now making a big impact," she adds.


A10 • www.vicnews.com

VICTORIANEWS

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Victoria News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-381-3484 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

Charter deserves to be cherished It’s just three decades old, but Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms has done a remarkable job of elucidating the noble ideas that form the framework of this country. By failing to celebrate the charter this week, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has shown a pettiness that belies his attempts to serve as a statesman. Harper shrugged off Tuesday’s milestone by trying to tactically draw attention to previous Conservative efforts at enshrining Canadians’ rights. The fact it was the Liberals – and Pierre Trudeau, to boot – who succeeded in repatriating the constitution must truly irritate the governing Conservatives. For sure, the charter isn’t loved by everyone. Some say it allows people to “work the system,” either by dragging out court cases or challenging those in positions of authority. They might be right, but the critics are also pointing out one of the strengths of having a legal document that enshrines our rights. Freedom and democracy and only truly exist in a somewhat messy state. The very nature of rights means that their definition must be open for challenge. If the courts struggle with interpreting those definitions, it probably means there is room for clarification. The government also has a built-in mechanism for dealing with any difference in opinion. However, there is also a price to pay for enacting the notwithstanding clause. Governments, so far, have realized they need to be judicious or else risk the wrath of the electorate. The charter is not convenient for a government that wants to do what it pleases. It’s also not necessarily a pleasant document for the nation’s judges, who can find themselves put on the spot by charter challenges. The people who have truly benefited from the charter are those most in need of its protection. Canada has made huge strides as a tolerant society because minorities have been allowed to step into the mainstream. Our evolution hasn’t gone unnoticed, either, as the charter is used by countries around the world as a model constitution. That’s not to say the charter is perfect. One outstanding issue remains: getting Quebec to sign on. But, for 30 years, the majority of Canadians have benefited from having an insightful declaration of the freedoms we cherish. As more decades pass, the advantages that come with our Charter of Rights will only become more cherished. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Victoria News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2009 WINNER

Environmentalism for dummies David Suzuki has resigned as a ignore facts that weaken the drama, director of his namesake foundation play to people’s emotions. And he so it won’t be the target of federal expects to be subsidized by the government “attacks.” CBC and charitable tax This news is conveyed exemptions as well? to me in a Globe and Mail This news comes as report that is typically I finish reading Patrick tilted in deference to Moore’s book, Confessions “Canada’s most famous of a Greenpeace Dropout. environmentalist.” I was one of many young The usual assumptions fans who cheered as are woven in: Suzuki Moore, Bob Hunter is a saint. His every and the other 1970s utterance is treated as Greenpeace pioneers set scientific fact, even when out from Vancouver to Tom Fletcher disrupt Soviet nuclear it’s a left-wing political B.C. Views rant. The Conservative testing, and then turned government is a front for to the regime’s slaughter Big Oil that has “attacked” of whales. environmental groups by reminding In 1986, Moore split with them that political activities are Greenpeace and worked to set not eligible for charitable tax up a family chinook salmon farm. exemptions. He said Greenpeace opposed In recent years, the David Suzuki aquaculture because it destroys Foundation’s campaign focus has tropical mangrove swamps. been noticeably in step with the Tropical prawn farms have no large U.S. foundations that fund rational connection with B.C., but most of B.C.’s enviro-scare industry: a global organization needs simple first salmon farming and now ideas that sell. the Alberta “tar sands” in all its This approach was seen in an exaggerated horror. earlier 1980s campaign against Suzuki’s personal activities aren’t chlorine in pulp mills. Greenpeace easily distinguished from those of protests against dioxins and the his foundation, as was illustrated herbicide 2,4,5-T were eventually with his recent CBC documentary dumbed down to opposing the that demonized the “tar sands.” use of chlorine in all industries, Diseased fish were displayed, including production of PVC plastic. but natural contamination of the Pulp mills developed a way to Athabasca River was glossed eliminate trace dioxins from their over. Aboriginal objections were production, but that didn’t matter highlighted, while local support and once Greenpeace had a global economic benefits were overlooked. campaign going. They still used This isn’t science or charity. It’s chlorine, so they’re bad. tabloid journalism. Sensationalize, Speaking of chlorine, PCBs

are polychlorinated biphenyls, a persistent background toxin. Tests found levels three to five times higher in some wild salmon compared to farmed. But the wild salmon results were ignored in a 2004 study, used by Suzuki to depict farmed salmon as poisonous. His foundation’s salmon farm campaign quietly disappeared down the memory hole after its PCB claims were debunked. Moore highlighted another bit of greenwashing in a visit to Victoria last year. The vaunted “LEED” certification for green building standards gives you points if your concrete is locally sourced, but no points for using wood instead. That’s because the long campaign by major environmental groups has devolved to “logging is bad.” Here’s the latest example. Greenpeace, ForestEthics and the Sierra Club were bankrolled by U.S. foundations to negotiate with the B.C. government, Aboriginal Peoples and forest companies for the 2006 “Great Bear Rainforest” agreement on the B.C. coast. Economic opportunity was delicately balanced against preservation, and First Nations gained new control of forests. Now the big enviros have begun campaigning against their own deal. As much as 50 per cent could still be logged, they say. It seems this particular green peace is bad for their business. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Ignore facts that weaken the drama, play to people’s emotions.’


www.vicnews.com • A11

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

LETTERS Council must watch bridge project costs even more closely So we are now faced with a Johnson Street Bridge replacement that started out at $64 million and has now hit almost $93 million. And as the costs have escalated, what the citizens will get for their money has shrunk. Council had little choice but to accept the cost overruns and allow staff to send the project out to three preliminary tenders. The question is, what happens in June if the tender responses come back with still more cost increases? What happens if tenders come in at $110 million, $125 million, or worse, $150 million? Or, what happens if the bids come back with further reductions in the project? Council has been given assurances that costs won’t escalate further. However, they and the public were given these assurances in the past, only to be proven wrong time and time again – which is not a surprise, when you consider that this “iconic”

style of lift-bridge has not been built before. I maintain that council and the taxpayers, who are bearing all the risk in this project, cannot afford to be in the same predicament in June when the tenders come back. The city needs to be developing a backup plan now as a matter of foresight and prudent management. Council is exposing the citizens to just too much financial risk. Such a backup plan will cost money to develop. However, can council and the city afford not to invest the money, and risk finding itself in an intolerable situation in 90 days, once again with its back to the wall and no option but to press on regardless? And would not a backup plan also send a clear message to the project team, designers and contractors that the city will not accept any further risk – either of increased cost or of a decreased project? Paul Brown Victoria

Don Denton/News staff

Flower power Fields of small daisy-like flowers surround the pathways along Dallas Road near Clover Point, a sure sign for pedestrians and dog walkers that spring is in full swing.

Readers respond: Composting, evolution vs. creation Composting options should be considered In a unanimous vote on April 12, the Capital Regional District board voted to ban kitchen scraps in garbage destined for the Hartland Landfill by 2015. While this is indeed a good thing, area municipalities should take into consideration residents who have already been contributing for years by doing their own composting, and give them a break on garbage collection fees. In Victoria, council recently ignored the wishes of respondents to a survey on garbage collection and imposed ‘option B’, a “… biweekly collection for $183 per household.” (News, Feb. 17) This option is to provide biweekly trash and kitchen scrap collection from the backyard, but with cans returned to the curb. Compare that to the current price of $195 (soon to be $212) for weekly pickup of trash cans from the back yard, returned to the backyard. For those who do their own composting, the new service offers roughly half the service for about the same cost. This is unfair.

Like many residents, I deal with my own compostable trash. I would like to see a method established for those who compost to opt out of kitchenscrap collection and thus pay a fee of only about $100 per year for the new bi-weekly trash collection (half the cost for half the service). This would also be an excellent incentive for people to set up backyard composting facilities. Victoria already plans to offer a slightly lower rate for a smaller garbage can (80 litres versus 120 litres), thus implying that records will be kept as to who pays how much for garbage collection service. It would be easy to combine this with a record of who does not want to participate in kitchen scrap collection, to reduce the rate further. In addition, council could amend, the Garbage and Recycling Bylaw 91-236 to allow residents to opt out of all garbage collection services – my household produces so little garbage that I could amass one bag every six to eight weeks and drop that off at the city works yard for $3 (about $25 annually), far less than the current rate. I am very concerned about

increasing city utility costs (about 11 per cent per year) and I will continue to suggest any means to reduce them. Council, however, continues to spend as if the cash supply is endless. Roel Hurkens Victoria

More evidence supports evolution than creation Re: Believing in theory of evolution requires faith (Letters, April 13) This letter is so ill-conceived and ludicrous that it just begs a response. As someone who is trained in science at the University of Victoria, with courses in zoology, I have extensive knowledge in the area of evolution. I am also an Anglican Protestant, I have read the Bible and I believe in God. Science and religion are not mutually exclusive. Evolution is not a theory, it is a fact. And the evidence is overwhelming. Just pick up any book on paleontology and the fossil evidence there proves that present humans are the result of millions of years of natural selection. Homologies exist between species to show

common origins. Evolutionary processes can be induced and mimicked in labs. Evolution is indeed “measurable, observable, provable and repeatable.” However, there is absolutely no evidence for spontaneous creation or intelligent design. There is nothing that can be measured and no proof of any such divine intervention. That is what I call “anti-science.” The statement that “science cannot speak to origins” makes no logical sense when the fossil data is there to prove the time and place of origins of many animals and humans.

The biggest threat to humankind is not global warming, war, or environmental disaster. It is the loss of rational thought and the rise in superstition and conjecture. The letterwriter represents a disturbing resurgence of people who want to turn back the clock. This return to the Dark Ages will be the demise of us all. Maybe the writer would also like to suggest that Copernicus was wrong and that the planets really do revolve around the earth? Doreen Marion Gee Victoria

Letters to the Editor

The News welcomes your opinions and comments. Letters to the editor should discuss issues and stories that have been covered in the pages of the News. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to less than 300 words. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity or to discuss using your letter as a guest column. Phone numbers are not printed. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Victoria News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 386-2624 ■ Email: editor@vicnews.com


A12 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

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The Vancouver Island Out- available now. door Adventure Expo comes to The Fairmont Empress has the Pearkes Recreation Centre transformed its Kipling’s resApril 21 and 22, bringtaurant into the Ivy ing together experts, Ballroom, which will products and services open with a celebrafor the coming camptory party in early ing, canoeing, kayakMay. With a capital ing, hiking, fishing and investment of more cycling seasons. than $500,000, this Activities on-site airy space – just under include archery, a 4,500 square feet and 12-metre air gun range, with room for up to a paintball range, fish280 guests – takes its ing simulator and kids’ name from the ivy Jennifer Blyth façade of the iconic zone. Business Beat Admission is $8 for local hotel. adults, $4 for kids (five The board of govand younger free), or $20 for a ernors of Commissionaires Vicfamily (two adults, two kids). toria, the Islands and Yukon For more details, visit www. recently welcomed John Dewar ifmevents.com. as chief executive officer, replacing the retiring Stan Verran. Dewar has held a number of New & Notable senior executive positions elseCampus Acura threw open the where, and also served in the doors last week for the much- Royal Canadian Navy, where he anticipated grand opening of its commanded HMCS Chignecto, new showroom at 3347 Oak St. Miramichi and Huron. Campus Auto Group’s RichThe Canadian Home Buildard Graham, management and ers’ Association-Victoria has staff welcomed Takashi Sekigu- issued the call for entries for chi, president and CEO of Honda its 2012 Construction AchieveCanada; Jerry Chenkin, execu- ments and Renovations of Exceltive vice-president of Honda lence (CARE) Awards of VancouCanada, and invited guests to ver Island. the celebration. Following a Entry forms and criteria are ceremonial ribbon cutting and online at www.chbavictoria.com gift exchange, Campus unveiled and submissions are due by 4 the all-new Acura ILX, set to be p.m. on June 11. Entrants must released in late May or early be members of the CHBA, a regJune. Also on display was the istered non-profit organization all-new 2013 RDX Sport Utility, supporting education and train-

Calling all artists to Gorge event Now’s your chance to sign up for the annual Gorge on Art parade along the scenic Gorge Waterway. Calls have gone out for professional and emerging visual artists

ing, professionalism, consumer awareness and housing affordability.

Awards & Accolades The Vancouver Island chapter of the Canadian Association of Family Enterprise (CAFE) recently presented the McCall family of McCall Bros. Funeral Directors Ltd. with the Family Enterprise of the Year Achievement Award. The award recognizes Canadian family businesses and the considerable contribution they make to their local communities and national economy. McCall Bros. is a fourth-generation family business, serving the Victoria community since 1921.

In the Community Support women’s shelters across Canada with the annual Shelter from the Storm campaign from the Canadian Women’s Foundation, in partnership with Winners and HomeSense. Running until May 13, the campaign will see partial proceeds from the sale of specially designed products go toward helping women and children rebuild their lives after abuse, through supporting violence prevention programs and more than 450 shelters nationwide. Submit your business news to jblyth@telus.net.

COMMUNITY NEWS IN BRIEF to display their work on June 23. “Gorge on Art is Saanich’s celebrated outdoor art event that encourages emerging

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District of Saanich’s community arts specialist. Artists can apply until April 30, by downloading a form at bit.ly/HGr8ut. For more information, contact Thorpe at 250-475-5557. kslavin@saanichnews.com


www.vicnews.com • A13

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Job UVic names new dean of business losses coming at base The priority for the University of Victoria’s newly appointed dean of the Peter B. Gustavson School of Business will be helping build the school’s reputation worldwide. Saul Klein, currently the

school’s Lansdowne Professor of international business, said he wants to use UVic’s accomplishments to help its international profile. “I’m really excited about the opportunity,” he said. “I’m stepping into a business

school that the current dean (Ali Dastmalchian) has done a phenomenal job of building, and I’m looking forward to taking it to the next stage. We’ve got some really unique opportunities … that position us perfectly for the future.”

Klein’s research has spanned topics such as global strategic alliances and the competitiveness of emerging markets. His term as dean begins July 1 and ends June 30, 2017. kslavin@saanichnews.com

Saul Klein

Continued from Page A1

Des Rogers, national president of the Federal Government Dockyard Trade and Labour Council (West), agrees, saying, “There’s a lot of very nervous people out there.” His membership, which includes about 825 workers at the Fleet Maintenance Facility, 12 at the Rocky Point ammunition depot and about 15 at the Nanoose Bay test range, will suffer the deepest cuts out of about six unions at CFB Esquimalt. Maintenance facility workers have already felt the sting, Rogers said, of about 175 layoffs of term and casual workers over the past year and a half, as work wrapped up on HMCS Victoria. “(Workers are) constantly being asked to do more with less,” he said. “Everybody feels the strain.” Union leaders hope base officials will move workers whose jobs have been declared surplus into positions they say have been left vacant over the past year at the naval base. Attrition may also help ease the pain, though that option could create stress for workers nearing retirement. “Not everybody can afford to retire just because they have their time in,” Rogers said. Miller worries there may be future rounds of job cuts, though likely not as deep nationally. The defence department’s strategic review and its deficit reduction action plan speak to the need for future and recurring savings, he said. “That tells me we’re not out of the woods yet.” Calls to the Department of National Defence in Ottawa were not returned before press time. emccracken@ vicnews.com

FOR RECYCLING YOUR MILK CARTONS

Recycling your milk containers is easy. Simply give them a quick rinse and bring them with your bottles and cans on your next Return-It Depot trip. There’s no refund because you didn’t pay a deposit when you bought the milk. Last year Return-It collected over 630,000 kg of milk containers for recycling and kept them out of landfills. Help us recycle even more.

-VYTVYLPUMVYTH[PVUHUK[VÄUKHWHY[PJPWH[PUN9L[\YU0[+LWV[ULHYLZ[`V\!YL[\YUP[JHTPSRVYJHSS 


A14 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Advertising Feature

Recycling your electronics responsibly When it comes to recycling your old electronics, it’s essential to do it responsibly. The BC Electronics Stewardship Program is here to help, and now includes even more products. B.C. consumers and businesses can drop off any acceptable products at designated Collection Sites throughout the province without charge. The Electronics Stewardship Association of British Columbia (ESABC), a notfor-profit extended producer responsibility program set up by the major producers and retailers of electronics y g program p g in B.C.,, delivers a recycling to recover rregulated eggul ulat atted d electronics eelle lect c ro roni nics ni cs prodp pro rod-

ucts from consumers and recycle them in an environmentally and socially responsible manner. Encorp Pacific (Canada) manages the electronics stewardship program. The message is that those useless electronics in your basement contain valuable resources. All electronic products collected in the ESABC program are recycled by processors that meet the Recycling Qualification Program, preventing illegal export to developing countries and unnecessary landfilling of regulated electronic products. ensures recyclers use The program p sound environmental en practices – they m ust handle han the materials they receive must in an environmentally responsible DID YOU KNOW? manner m ma ann and must not allow prison Encorp Pacific (Canada) is one llabour la bo or shipping of unwanted of North America’s leading product eelectronic le scrap or products offstewardship corporations. With more sshore h to developing, non-OECD than 175 depots and mobile collectors ccountries. o across BC – and the support of Since the program’s launch in B.C. residents – 80 per cent of the 22007, 0 more than 49 million kilobeverage containers sold in the ggrams r of unwanted electronics province are recovered and have h ha a been recycled, materials recycled into something new. tthat ha didn’t end up in our landfills That’s more than one billion and were not exported illegally to an containers kept out b ecom someone else’s problem. become of our landfills! Ele Electronics collected in B.C. are

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sent to five approved primary recyclers in North America where they are broken down using various manual and mechanical processes. Products such as batteries and mercury lamps, which require special processing to recover materials, are removed. The remaining products are separated into their individual components for recovery. Through a variety of

refining and smelting processes, the materials reclaimed from unwanted electronics, such as steel, leaded glass, copper, aluminum, plastic and precious metals, can be extracted and recycled into new products. There are more than 112 convenient locations in B.C. To find a collection site or drop-off event near you, visit return-it.ca/electronics/locations

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Display Devices Desktop Computers Portable Computers Computer Peripherals (Keyboards and Mice) Computer Scanners Printers and Fax Machines Non-Cellular Phones and Answering Machines Vehicle Audio and Video Systems (Aftermarket) Home Audio and Video Recording/Playback Systems Personal or Portable Audio and Video Recording/Playback Systems

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BACK ALLEYS DON’T RECYCLE UNWANTED ELECTRONICS But we do. Find where you can recycle your electronics safely and responsibly at,

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WHERE CAN I FIND A RETURN-IT COLLECTION SITE AND WHAT KIND OF ELECTRONICS CAN I RECYCLE?

EPRA is a national not-for-profit extended producer responsibility association program that was previously run by ESABC. They have contracted Encorp Pacific to deliver the stewardship program under the Return-It™ Electronics brand in BC. Together, regulated electronics are managed and recycled in a socially and environmentally responsible manner. The program also prevents regulated electronics from ending up in landfills or being illegally shipped to developing countries.

You can find more than 125 Return-It Collection Sites at return-it.ca/electronics/locations. And for a full list of accepted electronics, visit return-it.ca/electronics/products. Get ready. New products are being added to the Return-It Electronics program on July 1st, 2012.


www.vicnews.com • A15

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 EARTH DAY 2012 Advertising Feature

EARTH DAY EVENTS IN THE CAPITAL REGION • Creatively United for the Planet Festival, an all-ages arts/cultural and healthy living event, is at 600 Richmond Ave. at Richardson (St. Matthias) April 20 to 22. Raising funds for progressive, environmentalbased charities, enjoy a dance, funky fashion show, family activities & more. FMI: creativelyunitedfortheplanet.com

Earth Day is a great teaching opportunity Since its inception more than 40 years ago, Earth Day has inspired millions to increase their awareness of, and their appreciation for, the environment. Since the dawn of the 21st century, people have increasingly adopted eco-friendly lifestyles and attitudes, and continued to embrace environmentally friendly practices and principles. Today, children grow up learning about the environment in school and at home. For example, most households here in Victoria participate in community recycling programs, and such households are raising eco-conscious children, perhaps without even recognizing they’re doing so. While a transition to a more eco-conscious lifestyle might not be seamless, it’s far easier than many might suspect and even easier for kids who have yet to develop a lifetime of habits that might not be so eco-friendly. With Earth Day on the horizon, the following are a few ways parents can get their kids involved in activities or lifestyles that benefit the environment. • When shopping for groceries, choose organic products that weren’t grown with pesticides or harmful chemicals and explain this difference to kids. • Shop locally and explain to kids that doing so reduces reliance nce on fuel because se products pro rodu duct du ctss don’t ct don’ do n t need to be shipped d to your comcom co mmmunity, minimizing imizing ffuel uel consumption.. DID YOU KNOW? • Conservation vatio on Earth Day Canada is a national provides another oth h er environmental charity founded easy opporturtu uin 1990, providing Canadians with nity for parents nts practical knowledge and tools to instill ecoco oto lessen their impact on the friendly ideals alss environment. In 2008, EDC was in their chilil-chosen as Canada’s “Outstanding dren. ConsererrNon-profit Organization” vation is about ou ut by the Canadian Network for reducing waste, aste te, Environmental Education so conservation atio on and Communication. techniques don’t don n’t FMI: earthday.ca involve sacrifice. acrificee . Instead, they ey involve involv lvee being more responsible esponsible when whe hen n it comes to using i our resources. • Instead of keeping the faucet running while brushing your teeth, turn the faucet off and encourage kids to do the same. This teaches kids that conservation is simple and often just requires minimal effort to make a big difference. • When grocery shopping, make a list before leaving the house and explain to kids that you do this so you don’t have to make two trips to the store and waste the gas that the second trip would require. In addition, encourage kids to turn the lights off when they leave a room to better conserve energy. • Recycling is a practice that many of today’s kids grew up with, and as a result, many of them might take it for granted, failing to fully realize the positive impact they’re making whenever they recycle. One way parents can address this issue is to purchase products made from recycled materials. A host of products are made from recycled materials, from the paper you put in the printer to the toys under the tree at Christmas!

• Victoria’s Eagle Wing Tours is offering three-hour Earth Day marine wildlife tours from Fisherman’s Wharf, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. April 20 to 22, in support of The Land Conservancy’s campaign to expand Brooks Point Regional Park on South Pender Island. A portion of each fare goes to the campaign. For fares and reservations: www.eaglewingtours.com or 1-250-384-8008 • The Earth Day Walk begins with a 10:30 a.m. kick-off April 21 at the Legislature then an 11:30 a.m. walk to Centennial Square, for a festival with music, speakers, local food tasting, eco groups and more. FMI: www.earthwalkvictoria.ca

• Dedicated to an Oil-Free Coast, hosted by the SaanichGulf Islands Green Party, is at Sidney’s Mary Winspear Centre from 6 to 9 p.m. April 21. NGO trade-show, live music, presentations & more. Speakers: Humourist Arthur Black, Saanich - Gulf Islands MP Elizabeth May, the RainCoast Foundation’s Brian Falconer & artist Robert Bateman. FMI: www.greenparty. ca/events

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• 17th annual Spring Native Plant S Sale is at the Swan Lake Nature Sanctuary April 21 & 22 with m more than 5,000 plants, a an d 14 and 140 species native to souther e rn Van ern Vancouver Island, plus displ p lays & experts. plays FFMI: FM MI: www.swanlake.bc.ca • Oak Bay celebrates w with an Earth Day Picnic C e Celebration in Uplands P a April 22. Organized Park, b byy the Friends of Uplands P a and the Community Park A Ass As s Association of Oak Bay, the scche schedule includes: 7 a.m. Bird Walk at Cattle Point; – Bird 11 a.m. Earth Day Walk from Munici Hall to Uplands Park; Municipal noon – Earth Day celebration at the par park, with picnic, entertainment, activities and displays; 1 & 2:15 p.m. – Guided Nature Walks. FMI: oakbaycommunityassociation.org • The Saanich Cycling Festival 2012 runs from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. April 22 with activities for all, including the BIG Bike Ride, escorted by the Saanich Police. Choose from a 4.9km Shelbourne route and a kids’ UVic route. Stage entertainment, bike demos, interactive games and activities, information displays, bike rodeo, concessions and fun for the whole family. FMI: www.saanichcyclingfestival.ca/

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A16 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

B.C. allows alcohol in movie theatres show movies in the same place. The new licence will allow theatres to serve drinks in the lobby, but patrons won’t be able to take drinks to their movie seat unless the room is adults-only. Coleman said unlike the stands at a hockey game or out in a well-lit lobby, it's difficult for operators to see if minors are sneaking drinks in a dark theatre. A multiplex cinema now has the option of designating one theatre for adults only and serving drinks, an approach that has caught on in other jurisdictions along with larger seats and tables. The licence would also cover an adults-only lounge adjacent to the theatre. Other theatres that have live shows will be able to take part in film festivals

Adults-only movie theatres could be an option, especially for multiplexes Tom Fletcher Black Press

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The B.C. government has created a new liquor licence that allows theatres to serve alcohol during movie showings. Rich Coleman, the cabinet minister responsible for B.C. liquor and gambling policy, says the change will get rid of red tape for theatres that could get a licence to serve alcohol for live events, but couldn't

“These changes will have a positive impact on so many levels, including increased jobs, a better guest experience and a more level playing field …” - Jeremy Bator without having to close their bar or apply for a new licence. “People are trying to save the older theatres, where it's just a single-screen operation, and trying to have two types of business in order to basically survive and make those older traditional heritage-type theatres work,” Coleman said. Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba

already have similar licences for movie theatres. Jeremy Bator, president of the Motion Picture Theatre Association of B.C., praised the move. “These changes will have a positive impact on so many levels, including increased jobs, a better guest experience and a more level playing field in the increasingly competitive landscape of entertainment in Canada,” Bator said. Matthew Gibbons, president of the Vogue Theatre in Vancouver, said his heritage theatre is now mainly a live performance venue, and the new licence will make it easier to take part in the annual Vancouver International Film Festival. editor@vicnews.com

File photo

Rich Coleman … change will reduce red tape for theatre owners.

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www.vicnews.com • A17

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

THE ARTS

Hot ticket: Q.E.D. with guests The Party on High Street play the Cambie at the Esquimalt Inn, $7

Q.E.D is a four-member rock band from Winnipeg, Man. presently promoting its third CD Sometimes a Cigar … is just a Cigar. April 21, at 10 p.m. Doors at 9 p.m. No minors.

Region’s aspiring filmmakers dominate film fest line-up Eyelens films to be screened for first time on Vancouver Island Erin McCracken

Event line-up

News staff

At just 16 years old, Hannah Kruzel doesn’t aspire to become a filmmaker. She is one. In fact, two of the Victoria resident’s films – one she did on her own and another she collaborated on with friends – are nominated for awards, and will be shown along with several other films at the 17th annual Eyelens Film and Animation Festival, April 21. Films screened at the festival were created by some of the 350 to 400 youth and adults who attended camps offered by the Gulf Islands Film and Television School, on Galiano Island last year. This year the festival will be held for the first time outside of Vancouver. Oak Bay High’s theatre was chosen as the venue due to the record

Kruzel, a Grade 10 student at his family. Victoria High, likely won’t be able “I like working with people, but to attend the event due to a prior I just thought it would be neat commitment, but she said watch- to really see how (the process) ing her films on the big screen worked – to do it by yourself,” she would be an incredsaid of the experiible experience. ence. “It was defi“I’d really like to nitely fun.” be there (and think) In creating Story ■ Admission to the ‘I can’t believe I did of the Accused, Eyelens Film and that,’” she said. especially editing Animation Festival Kruzel is leaning five hours of mateis free. towards a future rial down to six mincareer in the military utes, Kruzel gained a ■ Films will be rather than one in greater appreciation shown Saturday the film industry. Still, for professional film(April 21), from 1 to her passion for filmmakers. 5 p.m. at Oak Bay making is evident “You see how hard High’s theatre, 2151 when she speaks they work to do it,” Cranmore Rd. about the projects the teen said. she created last It’s this handsyear, including the on experience that documentary Me, attracts students which she made with two friends. from across North America to the “It’s talking about people’s inse- Gulf Islands Film and Television curities with themselves, and how School each year. it actually makes them who they “It’s not a standard school where are,” she said of the five-minute you do a lot of classroom stuff. piece. You learn how to actually make a For her second work, Kruzel movie,” Harris said. “And that’s, wrote, edited and directed Story of we find, the best way to teach how the Accused, which tells the story to make a film – you make one.” of a boy accused of murdering emccracken@vicnews.com

Don Denton/News staff

Hannah Kruzel, a Grade 10 Victoria High student, is nominated for awards for two films she created at the Gulf Islands Film and Television School last summer. number of films created by Oak Bay High students who have attended the film school over the years. The film camps are also popular with

Victoria High students. “It just seemed to make so much sense,” film school director George Harris said of the decision.

BC Arts and Culture Week and Saanich Studio Tours Celebrate BC Arts and Culture Week, April 22–28, 2012 and explore the vital contribution that arts and culture make in your community. Artists and cultural organizations create points of connection and are the core of a community’s creative vitality. A variety of cultural activities present opportunities for reinforcing diverse identities, for creating a sense of place and for motivating people to become involved. Saanich Arts, Culture and Heritage Advisory Committee invites the public to participate in special events and take the opportunity to engage with local artists. On Saturday, April 28, 11:00am–3:00pm at the Cedar Hill Recreation Centre, join “Juno Award” winning musician Norman Foote for a concert as well as a song-writing workshop. Carnival of the Arts, a free family event, features a variety of visual and performing arts activities for everyone. For more information go to www.cedarhillarts.ca May is the month to visit Saanich artists in their home studios and discover incredible treasures. For information and studio locations go to: www.gobc.ca

Saanich Parks & Recreation

of the

Saturday, April 28 11:00am-3:00pm m Arts Centre at Cedar Hill Free Admission

www.saanich.ca

Saanich Active Living Guide

Cedar Hill 250.475.7121 | Gordon Head 250.475.7100 | GR Pearkes 250.475.5400 | Commonwealth Place 250.475.7600 |


A18 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

National Volunteer Week 250-386-2269

April 15 to 21, 2012

volunteervictoria.bc.ca

Writer and producer Wes Borg illustrates the frustration of trying to write a play in three hours. Submited photo

Theatre fun times four Brittany Lee

Volunteers Grow Community

Thank You Volunteers! 1Up Victoria Single Parent Resource Ctr. AIDS Vancouver Island Artemis Place Society Arthritis Society (The) Central and Mt. Edward’s Court Care Homes BC Aviation Museum BC Cancer Agency Beacon Community Services Blue Bridge Repertory Theatre Boys & Girls Club Services of Greater Victoria Bridges for Women Society Broadmead Care Burnside Gorge Community Association Canadian Blood Services Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation Canadian Cancer Society Canadian Red Cross Society Capital City Volunteers Caring for First Nations Children Society Choir Kids Community Living Victoria Co-operative Housing Federation of BC Craigdarroch Castle Historical Society CRD Regional Parks District of Oak Bay Emergency Program Downtown Victoria Ambassador Program Esquimalt Emergency Program Esquimalt Neighbourhood House Society Fairfield Gonzales Community Association Family Caregivers’ Network Society Greater Victoria Police Victim Services Habitat Acquisition Trust Heart & Stroke Foundation Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria

Island Deaf and Hard of Hearing Centre Island Sexual Health Society James Bay Community Project James Bay Community School Society James Bay New Horizons John Howard Society of Victoria Junior Achievement of British Columbia Learning Disabilities Association Lifetime Networks Literacy Victoria Luther Court Society Military Family Resource Centre Monterey Recreation Centre Mount St. Mary Hospital MS Society of Canada, SVIC NEED2 Suicide Prevention Oak and Orca Bioregional School Oak Bay Lodge Oak Bay Volunteer Services Pacific Animal Therapy Society Pacific Centre Family Services Association Pacifica Housing Power To Be Adventure Therapy Queen Alexandra Foundation for Children Recreation Integration Victoria Rest Haven Lodge Saanich Emergency Program Saanich Parks and Recreation Saanich Police Block Watch Program Saanich Volunteer Services Society Selkirk Place Seniors Serving Seniors Shaw Ocean Discovery Centre Silver Threads Service

St. Vincent de Paul Social Concern Office Swan Lake Christmas Hill Nature Sanctuary The BC Neurofibromatosis Foundation The Cridge Centre for the Family The Kiwanis Pavilion The Prostate Centre The Salvation Army United Way of Greater Victoria UVic Alumni Association Vancouver Island Strata Owners Association Victoria Brain Injury Society Victoria Conservatory of Music Victoria Cool Aid Society Victoria Epilepsy and Parkinson’s Centre Victoria Foundation Victoria Hospice Victoria Hospitals Foundation Victoria International Red Coat Hosts Victoria Police Department Victoria Rainbow Kitchen Society Victoria Restorative Justice Society Victoria Women’s Sexual Assault Centre Victoria Women’s Transition House Society Victoria Youth Custody Services Volunteer Victoria VIHA Glengarry Hospital Mental Health & Addictions Priory Hospital Queen Alexandra Ctr. for Children’s Health Royal Jubilee & Gorge Road Hospitals Saanich Peninsula Hospital Victoria General Hospital West Coast Men’s Support Society YMCA - YWCA Greater Victoria

Volunteer Victoria recruits over 16,400 volunteers each year on behalf of our 300 non-profit member agencies. We enrich the quality of life in our community through volunteer involvement.

Go to: www.VolunteerVictoria.bc.ca to learn more.

News staff

Twelve hours, one prop and a celebrity. That’s all theatre professionals will have to produce four plays this Sunday. “The idea is to take a bunch of really talented people and push them; expect of them way more than anyone could reasonably expect and then watch them fail,” writer and producer Wes Borg said. Writers in the 4-Play fundraiser will find out their prop, the name of a Canadian celebrity and the first line of their play at 8 a.m. on the

morning of production. Writers are then given three-and-a-half hours to create their play, incorporating the three elements in some way. Each play will begin with the pre-written line, and its a free-forall from there, Borg explained. Guests can expect “a really hilariously on-the-edge evening of watching people be completely terrified,” Borg said. “The actors have the script in their hands, sets will fall down, things may catch fire, it’s the best way to do it,” he said with a laugh. After all four plays

have been performed, critics from local media will submit reviews to each director, Borg explained. The audience then helps pick award winners, such as best show and best actor. Proceeds from the 4-Play fundraiser go to the Intrepid Theatre Club the producers of UnoFest and the Victoria Fringe Festival. It takes place at the Metro Studio Theatre, 1411 Quadra St., on Sunday (April 22) at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $25 at the door or $20 if purchased in advance (ticketrocket.org or 250-590-6291). reporter@vicnews.com

Get out and paint the town Laura Lavin News staff

From Chinatown streets to the iconic Johnson Street bridge, local artists are invited to take a seat in the great outdoors on Saturday and paint what they see. Opus art supplies host its first Outdoor Painting Challenge April 21. Opus stores from Victoria to Kelowna and around the Lower Mainland will participate that day, encouraging local artists to get outside and paint. It is open to all ages and to both professional and amateur artists, however, everyone who participates will compete on the same level for prizes. Each Opus store will award prizes to three works, chosen on site by an impartial jury, including well-known artist Robert Amos at the Victoria location. The top prize in each location is a $500 Opus gift card, with second and third prizes being $250 and $100 gift cards, respectively. April weather can be unpredictable, but the event will go rain or shine, said Marsha Arbour, manager of the Victoria Opus store. “Working outdoors is akin to working with a live model,” said Arbour. “You’re right there in the present moment. In the weather, with the light, you have to work quickly because the light keeps changing. It’s very vibrant that way … it’s the experience of it really.”

Canvases will be provided, but everyone is expected to supply any other materials they require, from paints to brushes and easels. “It doesn’t have to be painting, it can be collage, painting, pen and ink, mixed media, anything to get people to make art,” Arbour said. Participants will set up around Victoria, but there will be restrictions in how far afield they can go. “It hasn’t been decided yet, the radius out from the store,” said Arbour. “We’re one block north of Chinatown, so that will definitely be part of it. Depending on how many people we get, will determine how far out we go. People can go over the blue bridge and back if they want – there’s a lot of choice.” Artists are asked to sign in by 10 a.m. and return to the store with their finished work no later than 3 p.m. Winners will be announced at 5 p.m. “I’m pretty excited about the outdoor painting challenge,” said Arbour. “You don’t have to buy anything, it’s just a community relationship event really. I like to sell things – that’s really fun too – but this is different, the more the merrier – bring a friend.” Anyone who is interested in participating in the free event is asked to call or stop by the store at 512 Herald St. to register. Visit the Opus website at opusartsupplies.com/OPChallenge for more information about the contest. llavin@vicnews.com -with Black Press files


www.vicnews.com • A19

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Camosun College President Kathryn Laurin speaks to a group of about 30 applied communication students after they walked across the Lansdowne campus to protest the school’s decision to axe their program next year.

Camosun College plans to cut media training, radio station Applied communication program at college falls victim to budget cuts Natalie North News staff

Applied communication students at Camosun stormed the office of the college’s president on Wednesday afternoon in protest of the recent decision to suspend their program indefinitely. About 30 students and supporters held up banners touting the applied communication program. They gathered in front of a classroom green screen and marched toward Kathryn Laurin’s office in an effort to save the program from cancellation. The group hoped to invite the college’s president to attend a final showcase of their work on April 13 and to hear first-hand why the program is no longer accepting new students. “We want her to see what she’s axing,” said Carol-Lynne Michaels, a second-year applied communication student. “What we’re capable of doing is really amazing. Media generalists are very powerful people and we want to know if she’ll come see that.” News broke last week that the two-year media program and associated radio station, Village 900 AM, were under review, a result of Camosun’s $2.5-

million shortfall leading up to the 2012-13 budget. Laurin, who did not commit to attending Friday’s student showcase, called the visit “very well organized and not unexpected,” but held firm the college’s position to suspended the program indefinitely. “At this juncture, we’re looking to cancel the program,” Laurin said, adding that those details will likely be formalized over the next two months. The college has exhausted every possible option for balancing the budget, Laurin said, attributing the decision to suspend the communications program to factors such as low enrolment and higherthan-average costs to deliver to students. Camosun cut a total of 46.1 positions from the 2012-13 budget – a number which the school hopes will amount to just 20 layoffs, after early retirements and attrition are factored in. Three full-time faculty members and one parttime support staffer are currently employed through applied communication. Students who are now completing their first year of the program will return in September to complete their training as planned. “We’re trying to make cuts that have the least amount of impact to students. Of course everything we do is going to have some kind of impact,” Laurin said. nnorth@saanichnews.com

Early sales slow for golf passes Cedar Hill course attracts players from around the Capital Region Kyle Slavin News staff

The number of annual passes purchased to play at the Cedar Hill Golf Course is down by 15 per cent this year compared to last – but Saanich’s director of parks and recreation said it’s still early in the season to be concerned. So far, 232 people have bought passes since they went on sale March 20, compared to the 273 purchased by this time last year. “A lot of the time it’s weather dependant,” said parks and rec director Doug Henderson. “We’ve had past sales well into the first parts of May, so it’s not

like (sales are) finished.” In 2011, a total of 338 passes were sold (162 full passes and 176 restricted passes) – a new low for the golf course. Passholder numbers have been in a steady decline for years, with more than 700 passes being sold annually a decade ago. What has gone up over the years, however, is the cost of buying a pass. Since 2008, the cost of a full pass has gone up $418 to $1,418, while the cost of a restricted pass has risen $262 to $1,087. Limits have been placed on the number of rounds the passholders can play each year. Val Mieras, president of the Cedar Hill Golf Club, says because of the changes at the golf course this year the club has changed one of its longeststanding rules. “We have it in our club constitution that active members must buy a pass – we’ve changed that,

we had to,” Mieras said. “Because the passes went up by so much and down by so many rounds, we have to let members make their own decision whether they’re better off buying green fees instead.” This year, a full pass costs $68 more than last year. Golfers can play a maximum of 90 rounds, compared to 120 rounds in 2011. Earlier this year Saanich council voted on a new fee structure that will see the cost of a pass increase again in 2013 and 2014, while the numbers of rounds are reduced each year. “People have their reasons as to why they would buy and why they wouldn’t buy (a pass),” Henderson said. “All we can do is make sure they know we’re out there, and make sure they understand the value they get (at Cedar Hill).” – with files from Roszan Holmen kslavin@saanichnews.com

Job Fair Come down, meet our team and see why...

Value Village is a great fit for you! Please bring your resume and a positive attitude! Value Village at 1810 Store Street Saturday, April 21st 10:00 am to 2:00 pm Permanent full and part time positions available: • Must be available for various day, night and weekend shifts • Positions open in retail sales and merchandise processing

As a member of our team, you will enjoy: • Part and full time schedules • Full training • A great working environment • Great employee discounts for instore merchandise • Competitive wages

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A20 • www.vicnews.com

How to reach us

Travis Paterson 250-381-3633 ext 255 sports@vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

Victoria Cougars fall in double overtime of provincial gold medal final News staff

One lucky bounce ended the Victoria Cougars attempt at a championship hockey season. The Cougars lost in double overtime during the Cyclone Taylor Cup gold medal final on Sunday (April 15). The host Abbotsford Pilots came back to tie the game 2-2 in the third before John Morrow winning the provincial junior Abbotsford Pilots goalie Riley Parker deflects the puck past the net as Victoria B hockey championship. “It was difficult to have Cougars captain Brody Coulter fights for position in front of the net with Pilots such a great season (end defencemen Matthew Genovese and Brett Kolins, right, during the Cyclone Taylor that way),” Cougars coach Cup championship game on Sunday (April 15). Abbotsford won 3-2 in overtime. Mark Van Helvoirt said. “It’s tough to swallow but looking back it’s (also) tough to call this including the shutout, stopping all 27 of The Cougars were stuck in defenthe Nitehawks’ shots. an unsuccessful season.” sive mode for overtime and didn’t Having clinched a spot in the final, get enough of a push going to create The Cougars cleaned up the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League, the Cougars 7-2 loss to the Delta Ice chances. clinching the Andy Hebenton Trophy as Hawks in Game 3 on Saturday was of The end came at four minutes and regular season champs months before little concern. 17 seconds into the second overtime What mattered was the gold medal period. A standard shot from the point, the season ended. In the playoffs, the Cougars lost once in nine games to take the kind defensive defenceman Garthe Brent Patterson Memorial Trophy rett Lynum likely made just to try for a “We were 70 seconds from league championship. rebound or deflection, somehow manwinning and (the shot) was The Esquimalt-based club was the aged to handcuff Roch and sneak into top ranked junior B team in B.C., and the net. one in a million.” was the favourite to win the Cyclone It set off an epic celebration for the – Mark Van Helvoirt Cup, which the Peninsula Panthers won Pilots, and an epic disappointment for last year. Instead, the Pilots will reprethe Cougars. sent B.C. at the Keystone Cup, Western final. And when it started, Bannister was Former junior A Victoria Grizzlies Canadian Championships in Saskatoon, there, once again scoring the opener in defenceman Brett Kolins, captain of the the second period. Sask., this coming weekend. Pilots, was named MVP of the tournaRiley Lamb tied it for the Pilots but ment. Bannister’s banner year Victoria captain Brody Coulter put the Had the Cougars won, the trophy Chris Bannister ended his junior Cougars up 2-1 on a power play goal, would likely have been Bannister’s, hockey career in fine fashion, leading assisted by Bannister. who played an opportunistic game and the tournament in goals with six. He The Cougars went on defensive lock- was defensively sound throughout. also scored the Cougars’ first goal in all down in the third period, not giving up “He was a force,” Van Helvoirt said. four Cyclone Cup games. any scoring chances. So when the Pilots “The development of these players, Bannister’s heroics started in the scored on a pinball of a point shot from and their growth as individuals has second period of Game 1 of the round defenceman Matthew Genovese late in been tremendous this year, and at this robin on Thursday (April 12), which the the third, it was a shocker. level that’s what it’s all about. I’m thankCougars won 3-2. He scored all three “We were 70 seconds from winning ful to the players and organization, for goals, including the game-winner in the and (the shot) was one in a million. We putting together such a good year. It third. played a textbook third period. They was a lot of hard work.” In Game 2, the Cougars defeated the didn’t have any scoring opportunities, It was Van Helvoirt’s fourth trip to the Beaver Valley Nitehawks 3-0, on goals and (the tying goal) didn’t have enough Cyclone Cup since the 2004-05 season. by Bannister, Josh Wyatt and Sam Rice. power to knock over a pop bottle.” sports@vicnews.com Evan Roch earned the first two wins, Then it got worse.

Some say the Penticton Vees are on the verge of being the greatest junior A hockey team in Canadian history. It’s high praise, and should help three players from Greater Victoria become part of the club’s folklore. The Vees are going to the RBC Cup national junior A hockey championship, May 5-13, in Humboldt, Sask. The Vees finished the regular season with 42 wins in a row and set the B.C. Hockey League record with 54 wins in 60 games. Factoring heavily in the Vees’ success is former South Island Thunderbirds midget goalie Chad Katunar.

Family geography ends city’s oldest figure skating club Skating club hangs up its skates after 86 years

Travis Paterson

Trio helps Vees to BC title

Painting

SPORTS

Cougars season ends in OT

Last week, Katunar was named BCHL player of the week as the Vees completed a sweep of the Powell River Kings in the BCHL final to win the Fred Page Cup. Katunar stopped 129 of 136 shots against the Kings, a .949 save percentage. Meanwhile ex-Saanich Braves forward Wade Murphy tied for the lead in playoff scoring (nine goals, nine assists) with Vees teammate Joey Benik (eight goals). Former Victoria Cougars and Grizzlies defenceman Nick Buchanan played all 15 games, scoring once. sports@vicnews.com

NEWS

many years ago and of course this has now changed,” said Ted Barton, executive director of Skate Canada’s B.C./ Yukon branch. Aside from the club’s Travis Paterson disbandment, figure skatNews staff ing is relatively healthy in Greater Victoria and Blame the changing B.C., he added. demographic of down“Our B.C. numbers town Victoria for the have maintained the demise of the Victoria 20,000 member level for Figure Skating Club. the past several years.” The 86-year-old instituOak Bay Figure Skattion boasted 750 mem- ing Club, which started bers in 1966, the econd when its rink opened in largest in Canada at the 1975, has tripled since time. But now it has the club’s current direcfolded for good following tor of skating, Jamie its AGM on March 26. McGrigor, joined eight The club was right up years ago. there with the “ We ’ re city’s other hisup over “(The end) toric sporting 210 memorganizations in has been coming bers. The terms of longest a long time due to last few running organiyears have a gradual decline been banzation. “(The end) in numbers.” ner years has been comfor us.” – Sharon Jarymy ing a long time Juan de due to a gradual Fuca Figdecline in numbers,” said ure Skating Club presipresident Sharon Jar- dent Janys Langer also ymy. “As your numbers reported growth with go down, so does fund- her club, leading to a ing and savings. We knew general consensus that we didn’t have enough the demand for youth money to continue next figure skating is lower year.” in the heart of Victoria The majority of the and Esquimalt than the club’s remaining skaters neighbouring regions. will likely move into the “Since 2009 we have Saanich Figure Skating experienced moderClub based out of Pear- ate increases in our kes rec centre behind numbers, mostly at the Tillicum Mall, Jarymy (beginner) level and said. synchro teams,” Langer “We’ve worked closely said. over the years with SaanVictoria Skating got off ich. They’ve shared ice the ground in 1926, the with us, we’ve co-hosted first in the area, based ice shows and we share a out of the Patrick Arena coach, so our skaters are in Oak Bay. It survived familiar with them.” fires to the Patrick (1929) Numbers may have and Willows (1944) arefizzled downtown and nas, before finding a perin Esquimalt, but the manent home at Memoother clubs around town rial Arena from 1949 to are doing just fine. The 2003. family-centric suburbs of Since 2004 it has operSaanich, West Shore and ated out of Save-OnOak Bay are turning out Foods Memorial Centre skaters at a more consis- and the Archie Browning tent rate. Sports Centre. In her final president’s “(The) arenas aren’t report, Jarymy cited the recreation centres, so marginal increase in Vic- we didn’t get the extra toria’s population and a walk-by traffic, which decline in Esquimalt’s. didn’t help our publicity “Victoria Skating didn’t level,” Jarymy said. have so much competisports@vicnews.com tion from other clubs


www.vicnews.com • A21

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

SPORTS STATISTICS

Down and dirty

B.C. Midget Premier Baseball League Standings Nanaimo Pirates Coquitlam Reds Okanagan A’s Victoria Mariners Langley Blaze Victoria Eagles Parksville Royals Abbotsford Cards North Delta Van. Cannons White Rock North Shore Whalley Chiefs

W 5 4 6 3 4 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1

L 1 1 2 1 3 3 2 3 3 4 4 4 5

Pct. GB 0.833 0.800 .5 0.750 0.750 1 0.571 1.5 0.500 2 0.500 2 0.400 2.5 0.400 2.5 0.333 3 0.200 3.5 0.200 3.5 0.167 4

Standings Vancouver Coquitlam Redlegs White Rock North Shore Twins Nanaimo Pirates Langley Blaze Whalley Chiefs North Delta Victoria Eagles Victoria Mariners Abbotsford Okanagan

W 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0

L 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0

Pct. GB 1.000 1.000 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.000 2 0.000 2 0.000 2

Lion’s Pride Gymnastics results from the B.C. Championships in North Vancouver, April 13-15 Provincial Level 3 Keerstin Arden: Vault – 10th place, Bars – 8th place, Beam – 9th place, Floor – 15th place. All-around– 8th place. Paris Leigh: Vault – 21st, Bars – 18th, Beam – 12th, Floor – 13th. All-around– 16th. Provincial Level 4 Natalie Louis: Vault – 14th, Bars – 15th, Beam – 6th, Floor – 1st. All-around– 7th.

C O N T E S T and

Published in our Special Section May 16

Rugby B.C. Rugby Union Canadian Direct Insurance Premier League

Women’s Adidas Premiership Standings GP W L T BP Pts Velox Valkyries 8 8 0 0 8 40 Burnaby Lake 8 7 1 0 5 33 United 7 6 1 0 6 30 Bayside 9 5 4 0 5 25 Capilano 8 2 6 0 4 12 Meraloma 8 2 6 0 3 11 UVic Vikes 7 1 6 0 1 5 SFU Rugby 9 1 8 0 1 5 Recent results UVic Vikes 0 Velox Valkyries 41

Deadline: Friday, April 27

your

Entries displayed at the Atrium at Esquimalt Rec Centre May 15-28

National Open Maya Rahn: Vault – 1st, Bars – 6th, Beam – 8th, Floor – 5th. Allaround– 4th.

Ceili’s Cup League (Div. 1) James Bay 26 Abbotsford 26 Capilano 42 UVic Vikes 32 Cast. Wand. 50 UBCOB Ravens 14 Province Wide Third Division Playoff semifinals Castaway Wanderers 10 Velox Valhallians 70 Cowichan 16 Comox Kickers 12

Gymnastics

SHOW US Esquimalt

Nicola Horwood: Vault – 2nd, Bars – 11th, Beam – 11th, Floor – 3rd. All-around – 9th.

Standings GP W L T BP Pts James Bay 12 11 1 0 8 52 Cast. Wand. 12 8 3 1 10 44 Capilano 12 9 3 0 7 43 Burnaby Lake 12 7 5 0 7 35 Meraloma 12 6 5 1 7 33 UBCOB Ravens 12 4 8 0 3 19 UVic Vikes 12 1 11 0 7 11 Abbotsford 12 1 11 0 2 6 Recent results James Bay 57 Abbotsford 10 Meraloma 14 Burnaby Lake 6 Capilano 51 UVic Vikes 21 Cast. Wand. 35 UBCOB Ravens 13

B.C. Junior Premier Baseball League

Travis Paterson/News staff

P H OTO

Provincial Level 5 Brianne Kerr: Vault – 8th, Bars – 5th, Beam – 5th, Floor – 6th. All-around– 6th.

Baseball

The Victoria Eagles won the first game of their double header against the White Rock Tritons on Sunday with a walk-off RBI single by Jesse Thompson in the bottom of the ninth, 5-4. White Rock won the second game 11-2. Top left: Victoria Eagles’ R.J. Forbes catches the late throw as White Rock Tritons baserunner Jackson Temple successfully steals second base during the first inning of the second game at Lambrick Park on Sunday (April 15). Top right: Eagles first baseman Kurt Horne readies to catch a pickoff attempt from pitcher Brett Hull as Tritons baserunner Jackson Temple slides safely back into first. Bottom: baserunner Brett Walker is tagged out by Eagles catcher Alex Hendra-Brown while trying to steal home in the eighth inning of Game 1. Triton Cameron Forbes, No. 45, looks on.

dom n a R for w a r D es! z i r P

ENTER IN THESE CATEGORIES: • Parks and Recreation • Historic Esquimalt • About Town • People and Activities

✃ Name: ____________________________________ Address: __________________________________

OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM

Daytime Phone:______________________________ Email: ____________________________________

Category: __________________________________ Title (optional): ______________________________

Entry Guidelines:

• Affix entry form to the BACK of the photo. Do not put any identifying information on the front of entry. • OK to enter more than one category.

Deadline: Friday, April 27, 2012 Sponsors:

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Mail or deliver entries to:

Photo Contest, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC V8W 1E4 OR Esquimalt Municipal Hall 1229 Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt, BC V9L 3P1 OR Email: promo@vicnews.com

VICTORIA NEWS AND THE TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGED OR LOST PHOTOS. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REASSIGN CATEGORIES.

This contest is limited to amateur photographers.


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Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

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PERSONAL SERVICES

COMING EVENTS

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

TRADES, TECHNICAL

HEALTH PRODUCTS

BC ARTS And Culture Week is here! From April 22-28, arts councils & schools in your community are hosting activities of all sorts as part of the celebration. www.bcartsweek.org

$294+ DAILY Mailing Postcards! Easy! Guaranteed Legit Work! www.ThePostcardGuru.com $20-$60/Hr Using Your Computer! www.FreeJobPosition.com Overnight Cash To Your Doorstep! www.CashGiftingBucks.com More Amazing Opportunities Visit: www.LegitCashJobs.com

DATA ENTRY Operators. elan Data Makers. Minimum 60WPM. Good numeric keyboarding speed. Include keyboarding speeds in resume. Email resumes to: judym@elandatamakers.com

T-MAR INDUSTRIES located in Campbell River is hiring for the position of Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanic. Position comes with a competitive beneďŹ t package and applicant must possess a valid driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license. Contact Tyson Lambert. Mail: 5791 Duncan Bay Road, Campbell River BC V9H 1N6 Fax: 250-286-9502 Email: tysonlambert@t-mar.com

CONCRETE FINISHERS and Form Setters. Edmonton based company seeks experienced concrete ďŹ nishers and form setters for work in Edmonton and northern Alberta. Subsistence and accommodations provided for out of town work; john@raidersconcrete.com. Cell 780-660-8130. Fax 780-444-7103.

GET PAID to lose weight. $5,000 for your success story. Personal image TV Show. Call to qualify: 416-730-5684 ext 2243. Joanna@mertontv.ca. www.mertontv.ca.

-!*/2ĂĽ#!4%'/2)%3ĂĽ ).ĂĽ/2$%2ĂĽ/&ĂĽ !00%!2!.#% &!-),9x!../5.#%-%.43 #/--5.)49x !../5.#%-%.43 42!6%, #(),$2%. %-0,/9-%.4 0%23/.!,x3%26)#%3 "53).%33x3%26)#%3x 0%43xx,)6%34/#+ -%2#(!.$)3%x&/2x3!,% 2%!,x%34!4% 2%.4!,3 !54/-/4)6% -!2).%

NEWS

BOTTLE DRIVE Gorge Masters Soccer Team

Fundraiser for World Cup Masters over 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Turin Italy in 2013 Join us April 21st at Hampton Park and drop off your bottles 10 am -1 pm Thank you for your support!

HOME BASED BUSINESSWe need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com LOOKING FOR Avon Reps. Be your own boss. Earn extra money, work from home. Call 250-386-0070 to learn more.

INFORMATION

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

PATIENTS - NEED a Medical Marijuana Doctor? Growers want to be a Designated Grower? Info at: www.greenlineacademy.com or 1-250-860-8611.

AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualiďŹ ed- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1(877)818-0783.

SUPERB 24TH Annual Auction. Horse drawn carriages & sleighs. Plus incredible offering horse era antiques. Sunday, May 6, 12 noon, Al Oeming Park; Bodnarus Auctioneering. Phone 306-227-9505. Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best. www.aloemingauctions.com.

APPLY NOW: Pennywise Scholarship For Women to attend Journalism certiďŹ cate course at Langara College in Vancouver. Deadline May 30, 2012. More information: www.bccommunitynews.com

DAVE LANDON FORD requires a licensed auto tech or skilled 2-4 yr apprentice to join our team. Industry wages and beneďŹ ts package available. Please send resume to dlsales@telus.net.

WANTED: Servers, bartenders, barristaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & cooks @ Telegraph Cove Resorts Ltd. Send resume to Box 1, Telegraph Cove, BC V0N 3J0. Fax: 250-928-3105 or email: tcrltd@island.net. Attn: Taso.

EXPERIENCED SERVICE Provider for Chrysler dealership in Salmon Arm. Strong customer satisfaction skills. Able to work in a fast paced environment. Excellent wage/ beneďŹ t package. Fax resume 1-250-832-4545. E-mail: pat@brabymotors.com HAIRSTYLIST WANTED Full time/part time for First Choice Hair Cutters. Guaranteed $11/ hour, 25% proďŹ t sharing, plus benďŹ ts, plus paid birthday, plus annual advanced training and advancement opportunities. Call 250-360-1923 today for an interview. PERM P/T Position available at busy self storage ďŹ rm. As well as good knowledge of computers, dedication to customer service and team work a must. Please apply in person with resume to HUB Storage, 754E Fairview Rd, Esquimalt.

SALES BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Manager: We are looking for a dynamic and creative team member with extensive skills to create new markets and opportunities for the sale of new products and services. Check out our website for a full job description and how to apply for this challenging role: http://www.ethoscmg.com/opportunities.html

LEGALS

Looking for a NEW job? www.bcjobnetwork.com

TELEPHONE SALES persons required for a local fund raiser. Sales experience is an asset. Evenings Mon-Fri 5pm-9pm. $11/hr+ incentives. Please call 250-384-4427, leave detailed message.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others, having claims against the Estate of Charles Cecil Trumbley, also known as Cecil Charles Trumbley, Deceased, Formerly of The Wellesley, #213-2800 Blanshard Street, Victoria, BC, are hereby required to send the particulars thereof to the Executor Derrek Hutchings, c/o Brock T. Emberton Law Corporation, #317-877 Goldstream Avenue, Victoria, BC, V9B 2X8 on or before May 15, 2012, after which date the estateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been received.

NOW - NEW 8 week courses covering snowmobile or quad or marine outboard repair. Take one course or all - ďŹ t your interest and your timeline. GPRC Fairview Campus, Fairview, Alberta. Affordable residences. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

PERSONALS

LOST AND FOUND

FOUND. SILVER ring, parking lot of Liquor Depot, 3510 Blanshard on Apr.4 (250)595-0952

LOST: NECKLACE, Sun., Apr. 7, on Beacon Ave. between the Park & Fifth St. in Sidney. It is a heavy brass necklace more than 1 inch in circumference. Sentimental value. Call 250-544-8022.

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE ON THE WEB

HELP WANTED ARCTIC CO-OPERATIVES Limited is recruiting Line Cooks and Guest Services positions for Inns North hotels in Nunavut. E-mail your resume: humanresources@arcticco-op.com

or fax: 204-632-8575.

VOLUNTEERS Volunteers Needed! Join us as we greet cruise ships and direct passengers to the wonderful sites of Victoria. Volunteers are in period costumes much to the delight of the visitors. Lots of fun, free parking. Pick your own shifts. More info at: victoriaam.com or email

FINANCIAL SERVICES

victoriaam@shaw.ca or call 250-381-1611.

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Graphic Designer

Graphic Designer

The Victoria News is looking for a skilled advertising designer to join our community newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production department.

The Victoria News is looking for a skilled advertising designer to join our community newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production department.

This full time position requires the successful applicant to be proďŹ cient in AdobeCS3: InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator and Acrobat on a Mac platform. Experience in web design would be an asset. The position may require shift and weekend work. Creative design experience in graphic arts is preferred, and a portfolio is required. You are a self-starter, team player and are comfortable working in a fast-paced, deadline driven environment.

This part-time position is for approximately 20 hrs per week and requires the successful applicant to be proďŹ cient in AdobeCS3: InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator and Acrobat on a Mac platform. Experience in web design would be an asset. The position may require shift and weekend work. Creative design experience in graphic arts is preferred, and a portfolio is required. You are a self-starter, team player and are comfortable working in a fast-paced, deadline driven environment.

Janice Marshall, Production Manager 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC V8W 1E4 E-mail: creative@vicnews.com Fax: (250) 386-2624

LOST: 1 gold hoop earring, Sidney area. Call 250-6551070.

SERVICE MANAGER - Hanna Chrysler Ltd. (Hanna, Alberta). Opportunity in a perfect family environment. Strong team, competitive wages, beneďŹ ts, growth potential. Fax resume: 403-854-2845. Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

Creative Services

Those interested in applying should submit their resumĂŠ by Monday, April 23, 2012 to:

FOUND: CASE with 2 hearing aids on Lands End Rd. Call 250-656-5765.

EDUCATION/TUTORING

Creative Services

We are a well-established, nationallyrecognized community newspaper group with more than 150 community, daily and urban papers located in B.C., Alberta, Washington State, Hawaii and Ohio.

HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 250220-3334 or 800-777-8000. www.interactivemale.com

MORLEY MULDOON Transport is seeking qualiďŹ ed Heavy Duty Mechanics or Heavy Equipment Technicians, Dispatcher, HR/Safety Supervisor. Fax resume to 780-8426511 or email to: dispatch.mmt@telus.net.

HERBAL MAGIC Limited time offer - Save 50%!! Lose weight and keep it off. Results guaranteed! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t delay call now. 1-800-854-5176.

All inquiries and applications will be held in the strictest conďŹ dence. We would like to thank in advance all who apply, however only those chosen for an interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.

www.blackpress.ca

We are a well-established, nationallyrecognized community newspaper group with more than 150 community, daily and urban papers located in B.C., Alberta, Washington State, Hawaii and Ohio. Those interested in applying should submit their resumĂŠ by Monday, April 23, 2012 to: Janice Marshall, Production Manager 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC V8W 1E4 E-mail: creative@vicnews.com Fax: (250) 386-2624 All inquiries and applications will be held in the strictest conďŹ dence. We would like to thank in advance all who apply, however only those chosen for an interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.

www.blackpress.ca


www.vicnews.com • A23

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

TRADES, TECHNICAL

TRADES, TECHNICAL

TRADES, TECHNICAL

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

FINANCIAL SERVICES

FRIENDLY FRANK

HOMES WANTED

HOMES FOR RENT

NEED HELP MANAGING YOUR DEBT?

1940 PLUTO pattern; 1930 McCall’s cross stitched, solid wood shelf, 4’x32”x14”, $10 each. Call 250-508-9008.

WE BUY HOUSES

GORGE/TILLICUM, 3 bdrm upper, huge house, $70,000 in renos, fenced yard, N/S, N/P $1700, May. 1. 250-479-9715

Need STRESS relief? One easy payment makes that possible!

Call FREE 1-877-220-3328

www.debtgone.ca

Come grow with us. At Catalyst Paper, the opportunities are endless. We challenge and reward you to stretch your abilities, improve your personal and career prospects and get ahead. We're a leading producer of paper and pulp, and the largest producer of specialty printing papers and newsprint in western North America. Join us, for a strong future together.

Licensed, Government Approved, Canadian Company.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

STUDY.WORK. S U .

SUCCEED. TRAIN TO BE A PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS MANAGER TODAY!

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

Professional business managers plan, organize, direct & control the activities of the branch or department for which they are responsible or the business they operate. Train locally for the skills necessary in this competitive career field.

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

ESQUIMALT

Unique Building Must see

FUEL/FIREWOOD

2 Bdrm. Very quiet, ocean views, Clean, well maintained. Adult oriented. Laundry, Sauna, Elevator, Hot Water, Heat. (250) 388-9384

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391. SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

C. SAANICH, room for rent (ASAP). Quiet, garden area. 778-426-2294 after 8:30pm. ESQUIMALT: WILL share with NS/NP working lady or student $475. 250-386-1730.

STORAGE SHIPPING CONTAINERS 20’ or 40’. Buy or Rent. Safe and secure. Easymove Container Services. Serving Vancouver Island. 1-(888)331-3279

SUITES, LOWER BEAR MTN area- suite in new house, 2 bdrms, ground floor. Laundry. $1100. inclds utils. Great views. 250-886-7755.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 2008 FORD F-150 truck canopy. Thomas Cincade lighted picture. New, thermal patio sliding door (6’ x 6.8’). T Zone vibration technology exerciser, 23 model cars. 250-382-1399.

BRENTWOOD, BACH, Lrg, furn’d, ground level. Priv. entrance, parking, close to bus. NS/NP. $700. (250)652-9454. ESQUIMALT, 1 bdrm + den, bright, very quiet, shared W/D, fenced yard, all utils incl’d, $800. 250-744-3180 before 7.

CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-9815991.

GORGE AREA, large 1bdrm, main level suite, N/P, N/S, $800 + 1/3 hydro (approx $50 mo) Call Rob 250-727-2843.

DIY STEEL Building deals! Many sizes and models. Make an offer on clearance buildings today and save thousands of dollars. Free brochure - 1-800668-5111 ext. 170.

LANGFORD Sm 2BR grnd, priv patio, 5 appls, NS, NP, $1050 incl hydro 250-6343212 refs. Fraser Tolmie Apts 1701 Cedar Hill X Rd 1-877-659-4069 1 and 2 bdrms 1-877-659-4069 www.frasertolmime.ca 1 & 2 Bedrooms 1701 Cedar Hill X Road www.frasertolmime.ca for pics

GRANT MANOR, APARMENTS 6921 Grant Rd. Sooke Bachelor and 1 bdrm. apts. Some newly renovated For further information and to view call

250-642-1900

SAANICH, GRD level 2 bdrm, newly reno’d, close to all amens, NS/NP, $900,(Immed), call 250-704-6613. SIDNEY: 1-BDRM, avail. May 1st. NS/NP, W/D, cable, $800. Call (250)656-9874.

SUITES, UPPER SIDNEY, BRIGHT, upper level 2 bdrm, full bath, yard, storage, new patio, parking, W/D, N/S, N/P, ref’s, 1 year lease, a May. 1, $1150. 778-426-4556.

TRANSPORTATION

www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE BUILDING SUPPLIES METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

FREE ITEMS

COMMUNITY COLLEGE S i n c e 1 9 0 3

FREE: CHINA cabinet with lights, good condition. Call 250-595-5734.

CALL VICTORIA:

FREE: DOUBLE sized mattress and box spring, good condition. Call 250-383-6776.

250.384.8121 www.sprottshaw.com

FAIRFIELD- FULLY furn rm in lrg 1/2 duplex, close to bus, shopping, ocean, village, quiet person. Refs. $550 mo Avail May 1. (250)388-7600.

OPEN HOUSE- Sat & Sun, 2pm-4pm, Apr 7 & 8 and Apr 14 & 15. James Bay Seniors rental 202-455 Kingston Street, Services include daily meals, housekeeping, 24 hr staff+ more. Privately owned come to the Camelot. Call Luella at 250-519-0550.

TWO LEVEL Plate glass coffee table with matching side tables. $60. (250)727-3064.

**HOME PHONE Reconnect** Call 1-866-287-1348. Prepaid long distance specials! Feature package specials! Referral program! Don’t be without a home phone! Call to connect! 1-866-287-1348.

ROOMS FOR RENT

SENIOR ASSISTED LIVING

SAWMILLS FROM only $3997 - Make money and save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info & DVD: 1-800566-6899 Ext:400OT.

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

SprottSha w

APARTMENT/CONDO

$60. $39.

MATTRESSES, FURNITURE, TOOLS! New & Used, Stock Reduction Sale! BUY & SAVE, 9818 4th St., Sidney. buyandsave.ca Visa, M/C

DIGITAL PHOTO retouch, editing, add/remove objects/people. Tribute posters, home movies to CD/DVD. 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

JOIN US ON:

RENTALS

SIZE 3-4 Grad dress, fuchsia/grey chiffon overlay, new, $40. Call 250-478-4703.

DROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll Free 1 877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com

VIEW ROYAL, Portage Inlet, 3 bdrms, garage, deck, W/D, $1350 + utils. 250-479-4856.

Call: 1-250-616-9053

ROCK BAND Guitar Hero; 5 games & 6 controllers, $45. Call (250)391-1698.

TABLE & CHAIRS, Camera older model, 250-477-8753.

SMALL 3-BDRM house. Newly updated. Large yard, storage shed, W/D. $1450.+ utils. Text or call (250)858-2763.

www.webuyhomesbc.com

NEW, ELECTRIC fireplace insert, $99 obo. Call 250-3821399.

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

www.catalystpaper.com

4 METAL folding chairs, padded seat, contour back, never used, nice, $50 (all). Call 250656-8720.

LARGE IVORY lace table cloth, 64”x90”, $40. Call 250721-2386.

O

For more information on these roles or to apply online, please visit: www.catalystpaper.com/careers.

2 PAIRS of drapes, excellent condition, $40 a pair. Call 250595-5734.

COFFEE MAKER, $10. 3 seat sofa, light colour, $59. Call 250-881-8133.

Our Vancouver Island mills are now accepting résumés for:

Instrument Mechanics OElectricians OMachinists OMillwrights OPipefitters OHeavy Duty Mechanics OPower Engineers

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

PALE GREEN double bed frame w/ shelving headboardno mattress. 250-656-5150.

STEEL BUILDING- Blowout sale! 20x26 $5,199. 25x28 $5,799. 30x42 $8,390. 32x56 $11,700. 40x50 $14,480. 47x76 $20,325. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

AIRPLANES

MALAHAT 1 & 2 BdrmsPanoramic views. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250-478-9231.

CESSNA 180 1976 on 3000 Caps for lease. DeHavilland DHC-2 1957 on 4930 Floats for lease. Van. Is. E-mail; rleroy@telus.net

AUTO FINANCING

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER LION’S COVE condo: 55+, beautiful 2 bdrm, 2 bath. $224,500. Todd 250-478-4844

HOUSES FOR SALE CORDOVA BAY. $609,900. 3 bdrm, 3bath. Motivated. Priced below appraisal 250-818-5397

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassified.com

SIDNEY- 3 bdrm sxs duplex, 1 bath, no steps. NS/NP. $1375+.Lease.(250)656-4003.

Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557


A24 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

AUTO FINANCING

AUTO SERVICES

CARS

CARS

OFF-ROAD VEHICLES

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

TRUCKS & VANS

GUARANTEED

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

2008 HONDA CIVIC LX

Auto Loans or We Will Pay You $1000

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in

$50-$1000 CASH

NOW - NEW 8 week courses covering snowmobile or quad or marine outboard repair. Take one course or all - fit your interest and your timeline. GPRC Fairview Campus, Fairview, Alberta. Affordable residences. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

2003, 33’, 3 slide Citation Supreme, exc. shape, $27,000. 250-888-3391, 778-430-4479.

all conditions in all locations

All Makes, All Models. New & Used Inventory. 1-888-229-0744 or apply on line at: www.kiawest.com (click credit approval)

250-885-1427 Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

Must be employed w/ $1800/mo. income w/ drivers license. DL #30526

WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in April, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. 1-888-593-6095 www.creditdrivers.ca

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassified.com

4 door, auto, top of the line & fully loaded including rare power sunroof option. Babied by 1 owner, garage kept, hwy commuter (76k). Dealer maintained. Burgundy with factory 5 spoke alloy wheels & a set of winters tires on steel rims. Full power-train warranty until Dec. 20 2012. $14,250 o.b.o. 250-466-4156

For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

858-5865

CARS 2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

- BUYING - RENTING - SELLING bcclassified.com

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

2000 KUSTOM KOACH 26’ 5th Wheel Ready to roll, in great shape. Has slide room, big awning, oak cabinets, tons of storage, big fridge & stove, ducted heat & A/C. High quality unit with rubber roof & fiberglass body. $10,995 OBO, 250 466 4156 Bill

$0-$1000 CASH For Junk Cars/Trucks Will tow away any car or truck in 45 mins. FREE!

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

TowPimp.com

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

WE’RE ON THE WEB Thousands of ads online updated daily Call 310.3535

250-588-7172

toll free 1-888-588-7172

MARINE BOATS 1998 BAYLINER 2452 Ciera Express, 2009 5.7L Merc cruiser FWC, 280 HP w/136 hours, Alpha Drive w/ SS Prop. 2002 EZ Loader trailer, 2010 Yamaha 9.9 High Thrust. Full cabin features, $21,000. (250)474-1939 (250)727-5947

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

DRYWALL

GARDENING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

IRRIGATION/SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualified, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com AURICLE Lawns- cln up lawn garden hedge pruning soil tests, rototill. (250)882-3129 DPM SERVICES: lawn/gard, cleanups, pruning, hedges, landscapes, irrigation, pwr washing, gutters 15yrs. 250883-8141. GARDEN DESIGN or redesign You install or we do, Huge Discount at our Nursery. Call 250-391-9366. GARDEN OVERGROWN? Weeding, lawn cuts, cleanups, pruning. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236. I DO GARDENING etc. $15/hr. Your tools. Reliable. (250)383-3995. LANDSCAPE & TREE care hedges/pruning/shaping. Lawn & garden. Maint. 18 yrs exp. WCB. Andrew, (250)893-3465. PRO SCAPE- Lawn & garden. Tree & hedge, power washing. Free estimates. Senior’s discount 15%. Call 250-813-0141

AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, Guards, windows, powerwashing, roof de-moss, repairs. Insured. Call (250)507-6543. GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778.

SUMMIT IRRIGATION Services. Certified sprinkler systems. Property maintenance, more. Call James at 250-883-1041.

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601 PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

BUSINESS SERVICES DENIED CANADA Pension plan disability benefits? The Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help. Call Allison Schmidt at 1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca

CARPENTRY BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748. CUSTOM PLANER- (Fir, cedar) baseboards, casings, crown molding (any shape). Call (250)588-5920.

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES CARING BONDABLE work since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. Call (250)385-5869 MALTA HOUSECLEANING. BBB. Best rates. Residential/Comm. 250-388-0278 NEED HELP cleaning your house? Call Dorothy at (250)478-8940. SPOTLESS HOME Cleaning. Affordable, Experienced, Reliable, Efficient. (250)508-1018

COMPUTER SERVICES COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites and more. Call 250-886-8053.

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Expert in new homes & renos. References. #22779 AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Call 250-478-8858.

FENCING ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637. QUALITY CEDAR fencing, decks and installation, pressure washing. For better prices & quotes call Westcoast Fencing. 250-588-5920.

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

DRAFTING & DESIGN DESIGN FOR PERMIT. w w w. i n t e gra d e s i g n i n c . c o m Call Steven (250) 381-4123.

#1 JUNK Removal & Hauling. Free estimates. Cheapest in town. Same day emergency removal. Call 250-818-4335. lalondejeff62@yahoo.ca $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

GARDENING

CONTRACTORS BATHROOM REMODELING. “Gemini Baths” Plumb, Elec. Tile, Cabinets. 250-896-9302.

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca FREE MULCH on all Landscaping we install for you. Visit our Nursery and pick your plants! Call 250-391-9366.

HANDYPERSONS AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BIG BEAR Handyman & Painting Services. No job too small. Free Estimates. Senior discounts. Barry 250-896-6071 RENO MEN. Ref’s. Senior’s Discount. BBB. Free Estimates. Call 250-885-9487. Photos: renomen.biz HIRE-A-HUSBAND, 250-5144829. Specialize in bath/ kitchen reno’s & accessibility. Serving Victoria for 23yrs. IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

✭BUBBA’’S HAULING✭ Honest & on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service.(250)478-8858.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734. MALTA MOVING. Best Rates. BBB Member. Residential/ Commercial. (250)388-0278.

MAKE 20-100K by a Professionally Designed Renovation of your dated home or condo. Contractor/ Developer/ Investor Island Pro Construction Ltd since ‘94. Call Dennis (250)858-6218

QUALITY WORK. All Renos & Repairs. Decks, Suites, Drywall, Painting. 250-818-7977. WEST HARBOUR Const. Ext/Int. Reno’s; Finishing carpentry, windows, doors, drywall, decks, painting, hardwood & laminate floor installation. Res/comm. 250419-3598, westharb@telus.net

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS 250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates. GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323.

ROMAX MASONRY. Exp’d & Professional. Chimneys, Brick Veneer, Rockwork, Cultured Stone, Interlocking Paving. Fully insured. Estimates. Call 250-588-9471 - 250-882-5181

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

M&S OXFORD Home/Commercial Reno’s & Painting. Patio’s, Decks, Sheds, Hardwood and Trim. 25 yrs exp. Quality Guar. 250-213-5204.

YARD ART. Pruning-Trees, Ornamentals, Fruit Trees, Hedges. Landscape Renovation. Call Doug 250-888-3224.

CBS MASONRY BBB A+. Chimney, Fireplaces, Rock, Flagstone, Concrete, Pavers, Repair, Rebuild, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee.” Free Competitive Est’s. Call (250) 294-9942/589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

MOVING & STORAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

FURNITURE REFINISHING

J&L GARDENING Specialty yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. John or Louise (250)891-8677 250-208-8535 WOODCHUCK: Neglected garden? Spring clean-ups, hedges, power raking, aerating, weed/moss stump, blackberry & ivy removal. 24yrs exp. WCB.

CBS MASONRY BBB A+ Accredited Business. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Patios, Sidewalk Repair. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. Call (250)294-9942 or 250-589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

PAINTING ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. COLOURS & IDEAS. Exterior/ Interior Painting. All work waranteed. Call (250)208-8383. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187. ST PAINTING free est, written guarantee and full ref’s. WCB ins. Call Kaleb (250)884-2597. YOUR PERSONAL Interior Painter. No Job too Big or Too Small. Call Gilbert today for free quote. (250)886-6446.

PLUMBING HAULING & RECYCLING. 250-889-5794. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

HOME REPAIRS HIRE-A-HUSBAND, 250-5144829. Specialize in bath/ kitchen reno’s & accessibility. Serving Victoria for 23yrs.

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

PLASTERING PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178. RE-STUCCO & HARDY Plank/Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

TREE SERVICES LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

WINDOW CLEANING BOB’S WINDOW Cleaning Licensed 25 years. Cell 250-884-7066, 381-7127 msg DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB. NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-590-2929, 250-812-3213.

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.


www.vicnews.com • A25

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Science fair puts cool back into learning Annual athering attracts record number of students to demonstrate experiments Vivian Moreau

Society for the Advancement of Young Scientists, which organized the fair, said the last time There was the potato battery, there was a teachers’ labour the waist-size experiment and a dispute the fair’s attendance lava lamp how-to. dropped below 100. But the big hit at the Vancou“It took us five years to get ver Island Science Fair held at back to 150,” said Enkin, who’s the University of Vicbeen president for toria last weekend 12 years. “The science was a working hovHe credits the popercraft. ularity of TV shows fair gives them a Built by École Vicsuch as Mythbusters tor-Brodeur Grade 6 pace to workshop for prompting kids’ students Jacob Gron- their ideas …” renewed interest in nestad and Maximilscience. – Randy Enkin lian Sonier, the one“The science fair metre wide ductreally gives them a taped cardboard disc, hooked up place to workshop their ideas, to to a Shop-Vac, prompted a lineup figure out where their interests of kids and adults waiting for a are, and to make them young sciride. entists so they can go further,” “Red Green would be proud,” he said. said one man watching from the Enkin’s two sons took part in sidelines, as the boys showed off science fairs and are now studytheir project. ing science at university. It worked very well to transGronnestad and Sonier first port visitors three metres across purchased a small model of the the hallway floor of the Elliott hovercraft from a downtown building at UVic. science store, but then decided It was a record year for the sci- to build a larger version with a ence fair, with 220 students from design they found on the InterVancouver Island elementary, net. middle and secondary schools “We like it because it floats, attending the event last Saturday it’s good transport and it’s cool,” and Sunday. Gronnestad said. Randy Enkin, president of the vmoreau@oakbaynews.com News staff

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

University of Victoria graduate research student, Matthew Hall, centre, rides on a hovercraft built by École Victor-Brodeur students 11-year-old Jacob Gronnestad, right, and Maximillian Sonier, left. The young scientists drew a crowd of people hoping for a ride on the vacuum-powered vehicle.

Take Us With You! Read your Community Newspaper cover to cover — anywhere! Now available in an easy to read, downloadable and printable format.

GO TO: vicnews.com oakbaynews.com saanichnews.com goldstreamgazette.com peninsulanewsreview.com Click on Link (on the right) or Scroll down to the bottom Instant access to our complete paper! Click on eEdition (paper icon) Editorial, Ads, Classifieds, Photos INCLUDES Archive of Past Issues & Special Supplements

eEdition

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ON-LINE


A26 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

Elvis and Roy Orbison!!

KidStart fundraiser run to span the length of Vancouver Island

April 28, 2012 Royal Canadian Legion Branch #172 622 Admiral Road, Esquimalt, B.C.

Victoria-based program seeks runners, mentors

April 28, 2012 7:30 pm

Back by popular demand...

3-12ESQ SE20

Steve Elliot’s Tribute to

TICKETS only: $20/PP SHOWTIME: 7:30PM

Call 250-385-0213 for tickets in advance!

www.elviselite.com for more information

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Give them power. Give them confidence Give them control.

6 DAY WENDOVER Departs June 2, 2012 Wendover Tour includes: $21 Free Slot Play, Free Drinks, Lucky Bucks & more. Valued at over $60 per day. LAST CHANCE!

& 8 DAY RENO ANNIVERSARY TOURS DEPARTS APRIL 28, 2012

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4 DAY OREGON COAST DEPARTS JUNE 4, 2012 Accommodation at the Chinook Winds Casino Resort in Lincoln City

11 DAY COACH & CRUISE DEPARTS SEPT. 23, 2012 Onboard the Golden Princess for a 3 night cruise, then onto Laughlin, Las Vegas, Reno all for two nights each.

3 DAY TULALIP RESORT DEPARTS OCT. 15, 2012 Includes accommodation at the luxurious Tulalip Resort, meal vouchers, casino fun book, premium outlet VIP coupon book & more.

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GIVE THEM A PAPER ROUTE! 250-360-0817

Local news. Local shopping. Your local paper. Read the Victoria News every Wednesday and Friday Victoria Harbour

BOAT SHOW

NEWS

Natalie North News staff

A Campbell River man is spending the month of April running the length of Vancouver Island for at-risk youth. Sixty-five-year-old Terry Kratzmann set off April 11 on his 600kilometre, tip-to-tip journey from Cape Scott Provincial Park to Mile Zero. The run is in support of KidStart – a program administered by the John Howard Society that connects vulnerable kids with positive adult mentors in three locations across the Island, including Greater Victoria. Kratzmann spent three years as a mentor, showing the teen he was matched with a different way of experiencing life, he said. The highlight of Kratzmann’s time with KidStart came when he accompanied his mentee to meet then-Toronto Blue Jays third baseman Scott Rolen. “He just couldn’t believe that he was that important that Scott Rolen would take the time for him,” Kratzmann said. “It was incredible.” His mentee is now too old for the program but he’s remained a good friend of Kratzmann’s. Kratzmann’s run will finish in Victoria on April 28 with a final 5K loop, open to runners and walkers of all abilities, starting at 9 a.m. at Mile Zero. Proceeds from the Victoria leg, led by local running legend Jim Finlayson, will benefit KidStart Victoria.

Trycinda Hartling photo

Terry Kratzmann is running the length of Vancouver Island in support of the KidStart mentoring program. The Greater Victoria branch has made more than 100 mentor matches with kids aged 6 to 17 since the program began in the region five years ago. KidStart is constantly accepting applicants to the program. For information on becoming a mentor, contact

Laurie Chesworth, co-ordinator of volunteers at 250-386-3428 or laurie@johnhoward.victoria. bc.ca. To register for the KidStart run, or to donate to the effort, visit bit.ly/Hlwz32. nnorth@saanichnews.com

Massive marine garage sale set for Saturday After moving to Victoria, Doug Bell realized he was getting too old for sailboarding. He used to enjoy the sport on the dams near wind farms in Alberta, but has now switched to a less demanding sport: dinghy sailing. A maritime history fan, Bell decided to donate his sailboard to the annual Massive Marine Outdoor Garage Sale, hosted this weekend by the Maritime Museum of B.C. and the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority.

“I’m enthusiastic that the museum is trying to move ahead,” Bell said of its plans to relocate from Bastion Square to a location on the water. The sale is an important fundraiser for the museum and an opportunity for boat lovers to buy and sell marine, sports and outdoor items. Organizer Ann Jones said donations are coming in, but she’s hoping for more. So far, she’s received a variety of items,

such as life jackets, nautical books, and wet gear. Special donations include a model of a ship and a Whitehall rowing boat built in 1890. It needs some work, but is likely a collectors’ item, Jones said. The sale takes place on Saturday (April 21) from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the warehouse building on Pier A at Ogden Point terminal. Entrance fee is $5, children under 12 free. rholmen@vicnews.com

Victoria Harbour Boat Show Experience Life on the Water

CANADA’S LARGEST IN-WATER BOAT SHOW WITH OVER 200 NEW AND PRE-OWNED BOATS FOR SALE www.bcyba.com | TIMES Thurs + Fri 11am – 6pm | Sat + Sun

April 19–22

Victoria Inner Harbour 10am – 5pm TICKETS Adult $10 | 3 day pass $25 | Students + Seniors $8 | 16 + under FREE


A2 â&#x20AC;˘ www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

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F R E S H FA R M & O R G A N I C P R O D U C E

MON

3.73 Kg

1.66 Litre Carton

Lilydale

Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Chunky Soup

SUN

Ea

Maple Ham

3/$ for

2

6.57 Kg

Per 100 Gram

Thirst Quenchers

S AT

CauliďŹ&#x201A;ower

Breyers Assorted

19

Ea

Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Assorted 375 Gram Package

1

Grown in Mexico No. 1 Tender

FRI

18 19 20 21 22 23

69

1.75 Litre Carton + Dep

4.37 Kg

D E L I C AT E S S E N

3 Pepperoni Sticks 99 5 Sausage Rings 539 s/LD&ASHIONEDs"LACK&OREST Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sliced 175 Gram Package

3

99

TH U R

BC Grown &ANCY

10.98 Kg

Ham

Asparagus

Tropicana

&RESH&RYING BC Grown Air Chilled

13.21 Kg

Garlic Coil Sausage

1

Chilled *UICE

5.27 Kg

Australia Beef Boneless

7.67 Lb

Shoulder Pork Steak

WED

APRIL 2 0 12

Check Out This Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MONEY Savers!

Canadian Premium 'RAIN&ED &RESH

12.10 Kg

6.30 Lb

Calico Scallops

Pork Butt Roast

*

www.vicnews.com â&#x20AC;˘ A27

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

NEWS

3

99

Your Choice

Iced Tea s.ESTEA s'OOD(OST

459

Assorted

Quaker Assorted

Quaker

350-650 Gram Box

796 mL Tin

645-800 Gram Box

640 Gram-1 Kg Tin


A28 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - VICTORIA

Happy Earth Day! Visit www.countrygrocer.com for your chance to WIN a gardening prize pack & composter. Draw ends: April 21st, 2012.

Breast C Chicken O Roast U G S $ 37 N 1 T R Whole Beef Y Strip Loins V $397 A L Baguettes U E MAY FAMILY FARMS

IN THE DELI

REAT AVINGS!

100 g

5 Varieties to Choose From

AUSTRALIAN

Cut Your Own & Save

Lb

$8.75 Kg

Limit 1

FRESH BAKED IN OUR BAKERIES

French or Sourdough

Watch for our

FLYER EVERY FRIDAY

in select Saanich News, Victoria News, Goldstream News Gazette & Peninsula News Review

$ 00 300 g

2/ 2

NEW CROP

CALIFORNIA

Asparagus

$ 97

1

Lb

$4.34 Kg

Bulk Foods

20

%

off at the Tills PUREX

Bathroom Tissue 8 Double Roll

00

$

3/ 10

Limit 3 Total

KNUDSEN

Black Cherry Juice

$ 00

2/ 6

946 ml

Limit 4 Total

COUNTRY GROCER

Natural Almonds

$ 97

6

908 g

PACIFIC

Organic Broths 3 Varieties

Limit 6 Total

$ 97

1

946 ml Limit 6 Total

Proud to be serving Victoria since 1986 Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Deposits and/or environmental fees extra where applicable. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday Apr. 18th - Saturday Apr. 21st, 2012

4420 West Saanich Rd, Royal Oak • 1153 Esquimalt Rd, Victoria Open Daily 8am - 10pm

Offers valid at Royal Oak and Esquimalt Country Grocer locations only.

NEWS

Victoria News, April 18, 2012  

April 18, 2012 edition of the Victoria News

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