Issuu on Google+

SAANICHNEWS

5

Speaking the Truth Truth and Reconciliation Commission comes to Victoria. News feature, Page A3

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

REGRETS people have on their deathbeds

Palliative care We ask a UVic expert for her observations on a popular Internet list. Community, Page A26

250.889.0246

2011 Gold MLS Award www.century21.ca/alison.stoodley

Check us out on Twitter and Facebook and watch for breaking news at WWW.SAANICHNEWS.COM

Saanich to re-examine restructured golf course food service

AFTER-SCHOOL DRAMA Voluntary extracurricular activities cancelled in Saanich district, no word in Victoria until Friday

Kyle Slavin News staff

Natalie North News staff

D

orothy will soon click her ruby slippers across the Ridge Playhouse stage during Claremont secondary’s presentation of The Wizard of Oz. However, not all schools will have the opportunity to present their final productions as the threat of a province-wide removal of voluntary extracurricular activities looms. Teachers vote this week (April 17 to 19) on whether to support the B.C. Teachers’ Federation plan to ramp up job action with boycotts of voluntary services. The move is in protest of Bill 22 – legislation that removes class size and composition limits and introduces hefty fines for teachers who strike. If supported, this week’s vote will trigger a second vote on whether to support a potential walkout. Teachers in about a dozen districts across B.C., including Sooke and Saanich, are already strongly recommending that their colleagues refuse to volunteer for extracurricular activities. Sports, music and theatre programming offered outside regular school hours are generally considered extracurricular. However, The Wizard of Oz – which involves 90 students, or about 10 per cent of the school’s population – will continue since the production is part of a course that is considered curricular. “I empathize with the other teachers around the province who have put so much time in and are looking at having to cancel if the vote goes ahead with the removal of extracurricular (activities),” said Claremont drama teacher Colin Plant. “There are productions around the province that are stopping.”

Alison Stoodley

Don Denton/News staff

St. Michaels University School rugby player Jeff Nishima-Miller prepares for contact with the Gulf Islands’ Alex Graham during the Vancouver Island seven-a-side tournament at Centennial Stadium on Friday. Private schools such as SMUS won’t be affected by this week’s teachers’ vote, but public schools could soon be facing a coaching crunch. Plant, who is also the president of the Association of B.C. Drama Educators, noted the association’s annual provincial drama festival, slated to take place May 3 in New Westminster, was cancelled to mitigate financial loss if the vote passes as expected. The cancellation of theatre productions is primarily a secondary school issue, Plant said. Drama tends to be a part of exploratory programs at the elementary and middle school lev-

els, and performances are often fit into regular class times. The Saanich School District officially announced the cancellation of voluntary extracurricular activities on April 12. Parent and community involvement will allow most sporting events in high schools to continue. PLEASE SEE: Grad and school sports face drama, Page A10

The municipality is looking to bring in a third party to ensure the newly restructured food and beverage service at the Cedar Hill Golf Course is running as efficiently as possible. Saanich’s parks and recreation director, Doug Henderson, said the focus will be on such things as: “Are we doing inventory correctly? Are we doing ordering procedures correctly? Is there anything else we need to add, within the parameters of the existing service?” Henderson hopes to have a third party hired to conduct the evaluation before the end of the month. Public conversations surrounding what will happen to the second floor of the clubhouse, where the restaurant used to be, won’t be held till May at the earliest. kslavin@saanichnews.com

Related story Cedar Hill golf course reports drop in sales of annual passes. Page A5

Alex Bur rns NEW Listing

& Assoc ciates

HOT PRICE!

ACREAGE MICHIGAN WORK / LIVE

BEARHILL: 5 CAR GARAGE

WARREN: OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY 12 - 2

Spacious townhome James Bay close to downtown Victoria. Walk to the best fish & chips at Fishermans Wharf, feed the seals and enjoy ocean air. Many upgrades: new interior doors, baseboards, professionally repainted, blinds, laminate flooring & bath; top floor features large family room with skylights, 3 bed, 1 bath, + office; bright sundeck; fireplaces.

Arts & Crafts home private 1.43 Acres, ideal for recreation actives and hobbies; property fronts onto Bear Hill Park; 5 car Garage; includes a Carriage house with suite above; main level: master bed with large walk-in closet, Open Concept Kitchen has access into den/dining/ living room + office. Large patio; lower area: 3 additional bed, bath and rec-room. The siding/ flooring was sourced from the property. Heat pump/Wood Burning Stove. Close to town and shopping. For more info and photos visit www.victoriarealestate.com. ML305701

Opportunity Knocks. This 3 Bedroom + Den is located in Saanich West neighborhood close to town. The area offers good schools, parks, shopping. The 3 level split layout offers a generous sized living and dining room with FP. 3 bed up with 1 ensuite and 1 full bath. Kitchen steps down into a Den/Rec room that walks into a large storage room where you will find a 2 piece bath and Wood Burning stove. Large crawl space with tons of storage.

For more info and photos visit www.victoriarealestate.com. ML307358

RE/MAX Camosun

For more info and photos visit www.victoriarealestate.com. ML305784

Call 250.882.3335

Full details & photos at

FREE Home Evaluation within minutes!


A2 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

M E AT & P O U LTRY | F I S H & S E A F O O D Sole Fillets &RESH Skinless

1

39

Per 100 G

Chicken Thighs &RESH,ILYDALE Air Chilled Boneless Skinless

5

49 Lb

0REVIOUSLY&ROZEN

1

69

Per 100 G

2

39

&RESH"ONELESS Canadian Premium 'RAIN&ED

Lb

Chicken Breast Fillets

5

99 Lb

&RESH,ILYDALE Air Chilled Boneless Skinless

Strip Loin Grilling Steak

4

98

3 European Wieners 499 3IZZLIN3MOKIES 99 4

99 Ea

Grimm’s 300 Gram Package

Ea

Grimm’s 375 Gram Package

Grimm’s Assorted 450 Gram Package

Ea

98 Lb

Lb

Chicken Breasts

Grimm’s Assorted 450 Gram Package

2

98 Lb

Classic Frozen Dessert

s-ONTREAL Beef s0ASTRAMI

1

79

Grimm’s

1

39

Grimm’s

www.fairwaymarkets.com Photos used in this ad are for presentation purposes only. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some advertised items may not be available at some locations.

for

5

Gatorade Assorted

Chunky Soup

4

2/$ for

Campbell’s Assorted

Cereal

s+ENTUCKY Style Chicken Breast s3MOKED4URKEY With Garlic

Pink Salmon

1

99

10

s#ORN&LAKES

for

680 G

Turkey Breast s&AT&REE s3MOKED &AT&REE Lilydale

Pasta Sauce

5

4/$ for

Ragu “The Original� Assorted

s*UST2IGHT475 G Kellogg’s

Your Choice

540 mL Tin

Raisins Sun-Maid

4

49

Clover Leaf

Soft Drinks

s0EPSI1 Litre Btl s"RISK1 Litre Btl s!QUAlNA7ATER

99

¢

630-640 mL Jar

Picnic Trio

5

99

(EINZ

1 Litre Btl 591 mL Btl

Eggs Large Brown Island Gold Regular Grade A

2

99

750 Gram Package

Yogurt Drinks

4

99

s$ANACTIVE

Bread

1

49

Your Choice + Dep

Margarine sŠ3QUARES s3OFT

7

2/$ for

Imperial

Pizza Ultra Thin Crust McCain Assorted

3

99

99

¢

2

4

California No. 1 CertiďŹ ed Organic 1 Lb Clamshell

16 x 100 Gram Package

Lb

BC Grown %XTRA&ANCY

Watermelon Grown in Mexico Seedless Whole

69

¢ Lb

for

Lb

Blueberries

399

California New Crop &RESH

Ea

s'REEN $!NJOU Pears

334-360 Gram Box

Black Forest Cake

5

9

IC O R G AN

3

99

EARTH DAY

Apple Lattice Top Strudels

3

49

OR

s7HITE s"ROWN Sekka

12

15 Lb Bag

Sesame Sticky Rice Balls

3

99

1

89

"I&ENG4ANG &ROZEN

Paper Towel Enviro 100% Recycled Cascades

3

Laundry

99 Detergent Seventh Generation Liquid 2X

99¢

Ea

Sui Choy

69¢

California &RESH

Lb

Dishwasher Pacs

649

Natureclean

279

Bathroom Tissue

7

49

12’s

299

Earth’s Best

Natureclean

13

99

Dishwashing Soap ReďŹ ll Method 1064 mL Bottle

4

79

1 Portabella

99

Fish in Batter

ReďŹ ll Method M,,ITRE"OTTLE

s#ORN"RAN s,IFE s-UFFETS s3QUARES s#AP. Crunch

479

Lettuce

s2OMAINE O R GANIC s2ED'REEN,EAF CertiďŹ ed Organic California Grown

IC

Ea

CertiďŹ ed Organic BC Grown 2’s Package

3

69

IC O R G AN

1

49

299

Ea

Lb

Gorge Centre 272 Gorge Road West, Victoria Shelbourne Plaza 3651 Shelbourne St., Victoria Athlone Court 2187 Oak Bay Ave., Oak Bay Quadra Street Village 2635 Quadra St., Victoria

1521 McKenzie at Cedar Hill Rd., Victoria Westshore Town Centre 2945 Jacklin Rd., Langford Sidney-By-The-Sea 2531 Beacon Ave., Sidney Brentwood Bay Village 7108 W. Saanich Rd., Brentwood

5

99

s$ICED6EGETABLE Hashbrowns s3UPERFRIES s0URELY Potatoes s4ASTI4ATERS s"REAKFAST Potatoes

Frozen *UICE

299

5

3/$ for

s!PPLEs"LENDS s/RANGE

3

2/$ for

Organic Croutons IC O R G AN s0REMIUM#AESAR s0REMIUM3EASONED &RESH'OURMET 128 Gram Package

4

2/$ for

Nanaimo North Town Centre 4750 Rutherford Rd., Nanaimo Port Alberni Plaza 3737–10th Ave., Port Alberni

STORE HOURS All Locations: 8am–10pm except Sidney-By-The-Sea: 8am–9pm

*UICE Minute Maid Assorted

5

4/$

for ffo for oorfor rr

Old South Concentrated

454 Gram - 1 Kg Bag

5

99

Soft Drinks s0EPSI s2AINBOW Pack

7

99

24 x 355 mL Tin

s!QUAlNA Water

7

2/$ for

599

283-330 mL Tin

Tassimo 4 $ISCS

Soup Habitant Assorted

1

99

5

99

s#OFFEE110-456 G s4EA41 G s(OT Chocolate 341 G Kraft

Your Choice + Dep

500-700 Gram Package

Cereal

Handwash Soap

O R G AN

627-927 Gram Package

1199

Size 1-5’s

CertiďŹ ed Organic California Grown 3.28 Kg

CertiďŹ ed Organic US Grown 3 Lb Bag

24 x 500 mL Bottle

Diapers

Broccoli

IC

McCain &ROZEN

"READED&ILLETS Highliner Assorted &ROZEN

575 mL Bottle

Laundry Detergent Seventh Generation Liquid 4X 1.47 Litre Bottle

Liquid Dishwashing Soap

O R G AN

Mushrooms

Delissio Assorted &ROZEN

749

1.52 Kg

200 Gram Package

600 mL Bottle

s2ISING#RUST s4HIN#RUST

Natureclean 24’s

Oxygen Liquid Bleach

Rice Cooking Wine

Pizza

6 Roll Package

Seventh Generation

5

s3UGAR3NOW s3WEET3NAP

1.25 Kg Package

200 Gram Package

585 Gram

3

69

Taiwan Red Label

(with min. $50 purchase, excl. tobacco products)

1 Litre Bottle

99

Peas

Each

Heiwa &ROZEN

1.47 Litre Bottle

Earth’s Best

for

170 Gram Clamshell

1.52 Kg

Imported &RESH

Cooking Onions

99 Sanuki Udon Noodles

Eco-Friendly Fairway Shopping Bag!

APRIL 22

449

2

3/$

'ROWNIN&LORIDA

Lb LLLbLLb bbb

#ALIFORNIA&ANCY CertiďŹ ed Organic 4 Lb Bag G AN I C

950 Gram

600-615 Gram Loaf

Free!

%NVIRO2ECYCLED Cascades 12 Roll Package

Medium Grain Rice

99

600-680 Gram Bag

Per 100 Gram

Baby Wipes ReďŹ lls

2.18 Kg

Corn on the Cob

ASIAN FOODS

&RESH"AKED

Bathroom Tissue +G4UB0ACKAGE

99

¢

Each

s3TRAWBERRIES

99

Ready to Serve

Silver Hills Assorted

80’s

4 x 200 mL Bottle Danone

for

Bread

19

3 x 375-575 mL Package

s!CTIVIA Drinkables Your Choice

99

2/$

s#INNAMON Raisin s3ESAME7HITE s77 Dempster’s

Danone 8 x 93 mL

$OZEN

Silhouette Yogurt

FR E S H BAKE RY

HELP ELEVATE THE IMPORTANCE OF ENVIRONMENT ISSUES — LOVE YOUR EARTH.

s!QUAlNA0LUS

213 Gram Tin

Lb

s!MBROSIA Apples

s.AVEL/RANGES

CELEBRATE 710 mL Bottle + Dep

California No. 1 &RESH

Danone

Per 100 Gram

Per 100 Gram

3/$

F R E S H FA R M & O R G A N I C P R O D U C E

MON

3.73 Kg

1.66 Litre Carton

Lilydale

Ea

Maple Ham

3/$ for

2

6.57 Kg

Per 100 Gram

Thirst Quenchers

SUN

Ea

Ea

Grimm’s Assorted 375 Gram Package

S AT

Cauliower

Breyers Assorted

19

FRI

18 19 20 21 22 23

69

1.75 Litre Carton + Dep

4.37 Kg

D E L I C AT E S S E N

3 Pepperoni Sticks 99 5 Sausage Rings 539 s/LD&ASHIONEDs"LACK&OREST Grimm’s Sliced 175 Gram Package

1

Grown in Mexico No. 1 Tender

TH U R

BC Grown &ANCY

10.98 Kg

Ham

3

99

WED

APRIL 2 0 12

Asparagus

Tropicana

&RESH&RYING BC Grown Air Chilled

13.21 Kg

Garlic Coil Sausage

1

Chilled *UICE

5.27 Kg

Australia Beef Boneless

7.67 Lb

Shoulder Pork Steak

www.saanichnews.com • A27

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Check Out This Week’s MONEY Savers!

Canadian Premium 'RAIN&ED &RESH

12.10 Kg

6.30 Lb

Calico Scallops

Pork Butt Roast

*

NEWS

1 Litre Carton + Dep

s!MOOZA Twists 252 G s#HEESE Slices 500 G s#HEEZ Whiz 500 G Kraft

Your Choice

(ARVEST Crunch Cereal

499

fr fo for

3

99

Your Choice

Iced Tea s.ESTEA s'OOD(OST

459

Assorted

Quaker Assorted

Quaker

350-650 Gram Box

796 mL Tin

645-800 Gram Box

640 Gram-1 Kg Tin


www.saanichnews.com • A3

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

A call to witness TRUTH TELLING: Part 3 in a series looking at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Roszan Holmen News staff

O

UVic Vikes Recreation provides a variety of programs and services to the public and community groups including sports camps, lessons and drop-in leisure.

Vikes Rec offers aquatics programs for children and adults! Are you a UVic Alumnus? UVic Alumni Card holders (associate alumni excluded) are eligible for reduced rates on Vikes Recreation base memberships.

Discover the benefits of membership by visiting us at

VikesRec.ca

SPRING/SUMMERR 2012

ne of the first to take the microphone, Mary Vickars faced a crowd of several hundred as she spoke about the stick her mother often had waiting for her after school. The “swarms of hits” were frequent, but one day it got worse. With a determined but quivering voice, Vickars told of the morning her mother lunged at her, out of the blue, with a machete. “I saw myself with my six brothers running down the street to save my life,” she said. “I couldn’t comprehend how a mother could do that to her only daughter.” Vickars is an intergenerational survivor of residential schools, the daughter of a woman who attended St. Michael’s school in Alert Bay near the northern tip of Vancouver Island, between the ages of three and 16. On Friday at the Victoria Conference Centre, she joined dozens of others from across Vancouver Island who volunteered to speak about their experiences of Roszan Holmen/News staff residential school at the national Truth and Reconciliation Members of the Esquimalt Nation drumming and dancing group, including Shawn Bryce, 15, left, August Commission’s event in Victoria, April 13 and 14. Thomas Sr. and Teddy Sampson Sr. perform during Friday’s opening ceremonies for the Truth and Reconciliation They spoke for the record, for personal healing and for Commission events at the Crystal Garden. cross-cultural understanding. “Seeing all the drinking and the infidelity of our people was outrageous,” Vickars said, her face projected onto Memories of specific incidents, however, brought home for me to say something and maybe put it in someone a large screen for all to see clearly in the darkened these large-scale traumas. else’s lap,” he said. conference room. One woman told of hearing the screams of children on Many other people shared stories of healing and success, “It was dysfunctional, but to us it felt so normal, because the day a dentist came to her school and pulled out teeth despite a childhood of abuse. the whole community was doing it.” without freezing. A Pacheedaht man spoke proudly of being the owner of e The goal of the commission is to create One man told of secretly caring for a puppy, a restaurant. Perry Omeasoo spoke of rising to the position fe a national memory around residential feeding him bread stolen from the kitchen. When of president of the Vancouver Native Health Society. “I like h schools for future generations, he was caught, a priest instructed him to drown the person I’ve become,” he said. th chair Murray Sinclair told more than the dog in a gunny sack. “He said ‘Don’t take your Vickars found a way to forgive her stick-wielding mother. e 1,000 people gathered at the opening eyes off it until the bubbles stop.’” “I couldn’t comprehend being three years old, with your ceremony Friday at Crystal Garden. William Jones chose to speak in the more siblings, and being taken away,” Vickars said, sobbing. “We never want it to be said in this intimate setting of a sharing circle. “What I went through was (nothing in comparison).” country at any time in the future that thiss Holding the eagle feather, he sat with other Her experience influenced how she parented her own never happened.” survivors while witnesses listened from outside kids. The event also aimed to set the the circle and mental health supporters, “There are numerous of us, in my generation, that never groundwork for reconciliation, he added. dressed in white, stood by with tissues. got a childhood and when my children came I made sure The relationship between aboriginal “I beat my wife like any other drunken that they had everything.” peoples and non-aboriginals has been Indian,” said Jones. More than truth telling, the Truth and Reconciliation damaged, he said. “The tension that goess It’s taken all these years to realize what event served as a call to action. A message of hope on in this society is significant … and the happened to him. “I likely would have “We need to figure out how we move forward,” said comwritten by relationship will have to be addressed for succeeded had I not been destructuralized.” missioner Marie Wilson, addressing both the survivors and Yvonne Joseph. future generations, so that future Canadians When the man who molested him and all the people of Canada. “We are all part of that obligawill be able to mutually exist without that other boys at Alberni residential school tion.” tension.” was tried in court, Jones didn’t have the courage to She called on everyone in the audience to be witnesses at Over two days, the commission gathered statements participate. the event and to continue the conversation into the future. from survivors and their families. From these, common “I could never admit to myself what that man had done “We need helpers … who will help us turn the word ‘witthemes emerged of harsh punishments at school, to me,” he said. ness’ into an active verb,” said Wilson. “We are actually asklanguages lost, broken families and intergenerational After 30 years of sobriety and 20 years of work with ing you to join a movement.” neglect and abuse. psychiatrists and psychologists, that changed. “It was time rholmen@vicnews.com

vikesrec.ca


A4 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

Residents strongly favour buried UVic parkade Next series of open houses will present aesthetic design options Kyle Slavin News staff

The University of Victoria will head back into the community later this month to get more feedback on the parkade it hopes to build as part of a new sports facility on campus. After a series of open houses were held last month, where five different parkade options were presented, the university says that most residents who provided feedback indicated they want to see the parkade partially buried underground.

“We’ll take this information (we collected at the open houses) and come up with a revised design,” said Kristi Simpson, UVic’s associate vice-president of campus planning. She added, however, that there is no guarantee that the revised parkade will even be buried. “We’re still in the process (of creating the revised design).” The buried parkade option, which was favoured by 59 per cent of people who provided feedback, included five levels of parking above-ground, and two levels below. A total of 496 stalls were presented in that option. The next series of open houses will be a more scaled-back version of what the university previously hosted. Only one parkade option will be presented, but three aesthetically different ver-

sions of that one design will be shown. UVic will then vet the feedback received, finalize a design and send it to the Saanich planning department. UVic’s parkade first came before Saanich council last August, but it was sent back to the drawing board after councillors said it was “too big” and “in the wrong place.” Little had changed when the school returned to council chambers in the fall – save for a variety of ways to camouflage the same building. Councillors sent UVic away, again. They wanted UVic to seek meaningful public input. The parkade first came about as a joint application for a new Centre for Athletics, Recreation and Special Abilities sports facility, with an attached parking garage. kslavin@saanichnews.com

UVic’s original design showing a partially underground parkade.

Parkade open houses: ■ Saturday, Apr. 28 at St. Aidan’s United Church (3703 St. Aidan’s St.), 12 to 3 p.m. ■ Monday, Apr. 30 at Mt. Douglas secondary (3970 Gordon Head Rd.), 5 to 8 p.m. ■ Tuesday, May 1 in the Michele Pujol room at UVic (SUB), 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. ■ Wednesday, May 2 at Cadboro Bay United Church (2625 Arbutus Rd.), 4 to 7 p.m.

Swan Lake Christmas Hill Nature Sanctuary Spring 2012 Swan Lake christmas hill n a t u r e

LIKE US ON

FOLLOW US ON

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

THIS WEEK’S SPECIALS

Sale: 5,000 Native Plants

WEEKLY SPECALS IN EFFECT FROM THURSDAY, APRIL 19TH TO WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25TH, 2012 (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST)

Mexican

B C Grown

Ataulfo Mangoes

On The Vine Tomatoes

99¢

999

$

/ea Case of 20

/lb $2.18 kg

B C Grown

B C Grown

Greek

5 lb Bagged Apples

Red Nugget Potatoes

String Figs

2

FOR

600

$

89¢

2

/lb $1.96 kg

5 lb Bag

Native Plant Sale

Saturday and Sunday April 21 and 22 - 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. s a n c t u a r y

FOR

- over 140 species

Free Admission And....Nature Sanctuary Members receive 10% discount on plant purchases

Master Gardeners on hand to answer those tough gardening questions. Plant List available at www.swanlake.bc.ca

Proceeds support the Nature Sanctuary's education programs 3873 Swan Lake Rd. Victoria, B.C. Canada V8X 3W1 T 250 479-0211

There’s more on line - saanichnews.com

600

$

10 oz Pack

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Earthbound Organic Assorted Salads

$

Washington Grown 3 lb Yellow Onions

2

399

/ea 5 oz Clamshell

Ireland Farms Fresh

Local Free Range Chickens Now Available

FOR

B C Grown Organic c Spartan Spartt n App Apples pe ples

400

$

$ 19

1

/lb $2.62 $ $2 2 2.6 62 kg k

3 lb Bag

Red Barn’s Own

Red Barn’ r ’s Own O

Bacon Cheddar Burgers

Double Smoked Bacon

at all Red Barn Locations!

$ 29

1

7th Generation Bathroom Tissue

$

$ 29

1

/100 g

Kettle Brand Potato Chips

Boylans Alexia Soda Onion Rings & Sweet Potato Fries

869

$

/ea 12 Pack

399

/ea 340 g - 425 g

/100 g

$

599

/4 Pack $1.59 Each | All Varieties

$

299

/ea 220 g | All Varieties

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

RED BARN EVERY DAY

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Red Barn - Vanalman Red Barn - West Saanich 751 Vanalman Avenue 5550 West Saanich Road 6:30am - 8:00pm - Mon-Fri 7:00 am - 8:00 pm 8:00am - 8:00pm - Sat, Sun 7 days a week Red Barn - Latoria Walk 611 Brookside Road 6:30 am - 8:00 pm 7 days a week

Red Barn - Mattick’s Farm 129-5325 Cordova Bay Road 7:00 am - 8:00 pm 7 days a week

www.redbarnmarket.ca

Basketball Dance Girl Power Hockey Mini Vikes

Pla

(full and half day)

Registration now open!

2012 Summer Camps

Register online at

VikesCamps.com or call 250.472.4000 for more information

Multi Sport Racquet Sports Run Jump Throw Soccer Speed & Agility Swimming Swim & Sport Tennis Track & Field Vikes Adventurers Vikes Summer Fun Volleyball Youth Leadership Development Before and after care is available.

250.472.4000 · VikesCamps.com


www.saanichnews.com • A5

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Early sales slow for passes at Cedar Hill golf course Kyle Slavin News staff

The number of annual passes purchased to play at the Cedar Hill Golf Course is down by 15 per cent this year compared to last – but Saanich’s director of parks and recreation said it’s still early in the season to be concerned. So far, 232 people have bought passes since they went on sale March 20, compared to the 273 purchased by this time last year. “A lot of the time it’s weather dependant,” said parks and rec director Doug Henderson. “We’ve had past sales well into the first parts of May, so it’s not like (sales are) finished.” In 2011, a total of 338 passes were sold (162 full passes and 176 restricted passes) – a new low for the golf course. Passholder numbers have been in a steady decline for years, with more than 700 passes being sold annually a decade ago.

Call for artists for Gorge art parade Now’s your chance to participate in Saanich’s art parade along the scenic Gorge Waterway this summer. The municipality is looking for professional and emerging visual artists to display their works during the June 23 Gorge on Art event. “Gorge on Art is Saanich’s celebrated outdoor art event that encourages emerging and established artists to participate in exhibiting and selling their art during this annual community festival,” said Diane Thorpe, Saanich’s community arts specialist. Artists are encouraged to apply to participate before April 30, by downloading the application form at bit. ly/HGr8ut. For more information, contact Thorpe at 250-475-5557. kslavin@saanichnews.com

NEWS TIPS e-mail:

editor@saanichnews.com

What has gone up over the whether they’re better off buyyears, however, is the cost of ing green fees instead.” buying a pass. Since 2008, the This year, a full pass costs $68 cost of a full pass has gone up more than last year. Golfers can $418 to $1,418, while the cost of play a maximum of 90 rounds, a restricted pass compared to 120 has risen $262 rounds in 2011. “Because the passes Earlier this to $1,087. Limits have been placed went up by so much year Saanich on the number of council voted on rounds the pass- and down by so many a new fee strucholders can play rounds, we have to let ture that will see each year. the cost of a pass Val Mieras, pres- members make their increase again in ident of the Cedar own decision whether 2013 and 2014, Hill Golf Club, while the numsays because of they’re better off buying bers of rounds the changes at green fees instead.” are reduced the golf course each year. – Val Mieras this year the club “People have has changed one their reasons as of its longest-standing rules. to why they would buy and why “We have it in our club consti- they wouldn’t buy (a pass),” tution that active members must Henderson said. “All we can do buy a pass – we’ve changed is make sure they know we’re that, we had to,” Mieras said. out there, and make sure they “Because the passes went up by understand the value they get so much and down by so many (at Cedar Hill).” rounds, we have to let mem– with files from Roszan Holmen bers make their own decision kslavin@saanichnews.com

NOTICE OF FLUSHING MAIN SANITARY SEWER LINES The District of Saanich - Storm and Waste Water Section will be flushing main sanitary sewer lines between April 10, 2012 and June 30, 2012 which may result in turbulence and noise in the pipes. Areas which will be covered are Glanford Ave, Carey Rd and Mann Ave EAST up to Pat Bay Hwy and Blenkinsop Rd, Blair Ave and McKenzie Ave EAST up to Gordon Head Rd. If you notice anything of concern please call 250-475-5597 between 8:00am and 4:30pm, Monday to Friday. Your cooperation and understanding are appreciated.

There’s more online For more stories and web exclusives visit saanichnews.com THE CORPORATION OF THE DISTRICT OF SAANICH NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON ZONING BYLAWS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETING for the purpose of a PUBLIC HEARING will be held in the SAANICH MUNICIPAL HALL COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 770 Vernon Avenue, on TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2012 at 7:30 pm, to allow the public to make verbal or written representation to Council with respect to the following proposed bylaws and permit. A)

“ZONING BYLAW, 2003, AMENDMENT BYLAW, 2012, NO. 9174” PROPOSED REZONING FOR RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISION ON WILKINSON ROAD To rezone Lot A, Section 16, Victoria District, Plan 47805 (3898 WILKINSON ROAD) from Zone A-1 (Rural) to Zone RS-10 (Single Family Dwelling) for a proposed four lot residential subdivision. A COVENANT will be considered to further regulate the use of the lands and buildings.

Open Houses Please come out to view a revised design for the CARSA parkade. As part of an enhanced consultation UVic will host a series of four open houses where you can provide feedback on a revised CARSA parkade design. The open houses are interactive and drop-in. Come at the time and date that suits you and stay as long as you like. Saturday April 28, 2012 St. Aidan’s United Church 3703 St. Aidan’s Street 12:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

Tuesday May 1, 2012 UVic Student Union Building Michele Pujol Room University of Victoria 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

Monday April 30, 2012 Mt. Douglas Secondary 3970 Gordon Head Rd. 5:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

B)

“ZONING BYLAW, 2003, AMENDMENT BYLAW, 2012, NO. 9175” PROPOSED REZONING FOR APARTMENT BUILDINGS ON QUADRA STREET AND INVERNESS ROAD To rezone Lot 4, Section 63, Victoria District, Plan 1781 (3316 QUADRA STREET) and Lot 3, Section 63, Victoria District, Plan 1781 (3334 QUADRA STREET) from Zone RS-6 (Single Family Dwelling) to Zone RM-6 (Residential Mixed) and to consolidate these properties with the RM-6 zoned lands at 1016 Inverness Road and 3350 Quadra Street in order to construct three apartment buildings. A DEVELOPMENT PERMIT for the proposed construction of one six-storey and two ¿ve-storey apartment buildings on the site will be considered to require the buildings and lands to be constructed and developed in accordance with the plans submitted and allow variances for parking, building separation, setbacks, height, and levels of habitable space. A COVENANT will also be considered to further regulate the use of the lands and buildings.

Wednesday May 2, 2012 Cadboro Bay United Church 2625 Arbutus Rd. 4:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Project team members will be available to answer questions and gather public input. On April 28th you will be able to view a revised parkade design and provide your feedback online at www.uvic.ca/carsa

CARSA Centre for Athletics, Recreation and Special Abilities

A copy of the proposed bylaws, permits and relevant reports may be inspected or obtained from the Legislative Division, Saanich Municipal Hall, 770 Vernon Avenue, between the hours of 8:30 am and 4:30 pm, from April 12, 2012 to April 24, 2012 inclusive, except for weekends and statutory holidays. Correspondence may be submitted by mail to the address above or by email to clerksec@saanich.ca and must be received no later than 4:00 pm on the day of the meeting. All correspondence submitted will form part of the public record and may be published in a meeting agenda.


A6 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

OXFORD FOODS PRICES EFFECTIVE ONE FULL WEEK WED. APR. 18 to TUES. APR. 24, 2012

271 COOK ST.

FRESH BONELESS

DEEP COVE

FRESH

PORK BUTT CHICKEN ROAST DRUMSTICKS

CHUNK LIGHT IN TUNA WATER 170 g TIN

¢

77

505 kg

ALL VARIETIES

29

2

LB

397

659 kg

GREEN LABEL CLASSICS

97¢

299

LB

ALL VARIETIES

725 kg

29

3

LB

97

5

GIANT 1 KG BAG

SCHNEIDER’S ALL VARIETIES

g PKG 100% WHOLEWHEAT 375 BURTON’S BREAD RICH TEA ¢ BISCUIT 570 g 300 g PKG LOAF

97

REALEMON

PUFF’ N SOFT

BATHROOM LEMON JUICE TISSUE 945 mL BTL

97

3

ASIAN FAMILY 100% RECYCLED

ISLAND FARMS

CHINESE ICE CREAM 1.65 L TUB

97

3

5 48 2

ORIGINAL GRILL’EMS

ISLAND BAKERY

DOUBLE 12 ROLL PKG

LB

88

PEPPERONI STICKS

ORGANIC CEREALS LARGE ECO-PAK 750 - 907 g BAG

539

SCHNEIDER’S

NATURE’S PATH

CORNISH HENS

637 kg

SAFEWAY NO. 1

SLICED 500 g PKG

MAPLE LEAF

SLICED HAM 175 g PKG

ALL VARIETIES

¢ UNICO BEANS

99 99 1 49 1 49 1

540 mL TIN

125 g PKT

ALL VARIETIES

BEST GOURMET COFFEE CO.

GOURMET COFFEE GIANT 2 LB TIN ALL VAR.

DOLE CELERY

58 ¢ 58 3 ¢ 88

DOLE BANANAS 1.28 KG ..................................

FOR

EACH ....................................

LB 1.06 KG ...................................

LB

U.S. GROWN

GREEN CABBAGE 1.06 KG ................................... B.C. GROWN

LONG ENGLISH CUCUMBERS EACH

News staff

There was the potato battery, the waist size experiment and a lava lamp how-to. But the big hit at the Vancouver Island Science Fair held at the University of Victoria was a working hovercraft. Built by École Victor-Brodeur Grade 6 students Jacob Gronnestad and Maximillian Sonier, the one-metre wide duct-taped cardboard disc hooked up to a shop vac prompted a lineup of kids and adults waiting for a ride. “Red Green would be proud,” said one man watching from the sidelines as the boys showed off their project which worked very well transporting visitors three metres across the hallway floor of the Elliott building where the fair was held. It was a record year for science fair organizers, with 220 students from Vancouver Island elementary, middle and secondary schools attending the two-day event on April 14 and 15. The Society for the Advancement of Young Scientists, organizers of the fair, president Randy Enkin said in the past when there’s been a teachers’ strike, attendance has dropped below 100. “It took us five years to get back to 150,” said Enkin who’s been president for 12 years. He credits the popularity of TV shows such as Mythbusters for prompting kids’ renewed interest in science. “The science fair really gives them a place to workshop their ideas, to figure out where their interests are, and to make them young scientists so they can go further,” said Enkin,

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

University of Victoria graduate research student, Matthew Hall, left, rides on a hovercraft built by École Victor-Brodeur students 11-year-old Jacob Gronnestad and Maximillian Sonier (not pictured). whose own two sons took part in science fairs and are now studying science at university. Gronnestad and Sonier first purchased a small model of the hovercraft from a downtown science store but then decided to build a larger version with a design they found on the Internet. “We like it because it floats, it’s good transport, and it’s cool,” said Gronnestad. vmoreau@oakbaynews.com

The Brentwood Bay Rotary Club & Expert Appraisers presents

BRIE or CAMEMBERT

250 mL JAR

¢

Vivian Moreau

ROSENBORG COSTELLO

AMBROSIA APPLES 1.28 LB...................................

KIWI FRUITS

2 68 1 19 1 99 2 19 2 99 6

280 mL BTL

COCONUT MILK

LB

88

LOW SALT BACON

U.S. GROWN NO. 1

IMPORTED

289

ROBERTSON’S MARMALADES

ALL VARIETES + VANILLA 400 mL TIN

LB

SHORT RIBS

B.C. GROWN

IMPORTED NO. 1

259

571 kg

SWEET THAI CHILI SAUCE ASIAN FAMILY

LB

GR. “A” FROZEN

EXTRA VIRGIN COHO SALMON STEAKS OLIVE OIL 1189 kg

229

505 kg

CANADA GR. “AA” BEEF

WILD

497

LB

CHICKEN THIGHS

CANADA GR. “AA” BEEF

SAN REMO

1L BTL

1

FRESH

MICHELINA’S EYE OF ROUND ENTREES STEAK FROZ 255 284 g

89

417 kg

CANADA GR. “AA” BEEF

CASA di MAMA EYE OF ROUND PIZZA ROAST FROZ 395 410 g

Students converge at UVic science fair

We reserve the right to limit quantities

STORE HOURS: M-F 9-8:15, SAT. 9-5:15 SUN & HOLIDAYS 10-5:15

NEWS

......................................

¢

48 ¢ 48 ¢ 68 LB

LB

Antiques Re-Visited

Brentwood Bay Rotary turns an eye for antiques to community fundraiser

Sunday, April 22, 10am-4pm Central Saanich Seniors’ Centre, 1229 Clarke Rd, Brentwood Bay Tickets – $25 for up to three items and are Ticke available availa at following location or at the door: Central Saanich Seniors’ Centre e 9am-1pm, Mon-Fri Brentwood Bay Rotarians Discount Printing 105-2423 Beacon Ave 250-656-5325 Proceeds to Rotary-sponsored community projects including the Seniors’ Centre

Inquiries: 250 544 1120 or 250 656 3685


www.saanichnews.com • A7

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Legions want in on tax relief Roszan Holmen News staff

To the uninitiated, the Royal Canadian Legion is often seen as a club for veterans offering a members-only pub. The categorization misses the bigger picture of the Legion’s social service mandate and the misperception could be costing the charity buckets, according to David Sinclair, chair of the Legion Foundation for B.C. and the Yukon. “There has been some argument from time to time, ‘well you’re a bar,’ … but I think that’s an argument that’s ludicrous,” he said. “I don’t see any other bars in town giving money to charity or volunteer hours of work that we do.” Sinclair has been speaking to B.C. mayors, including in Victoria and Vancouver, to convince them that legions deserve exemptions from property taxes like other non-profit organizations. In Greater Victoria, legions receive a full property tax break in Esquimalt and Langford and a partial tax break in Sooke. Victoria is the only municipality that charges full property tax. There is no legion in Saanich. Exemptions are “hit and miss,” Sinclair said. “It’s all depended upon the way the various municipalities and councils across the province view us.” While some see Legion branches as private clubs, he argues otherwise. He is backed by a recent ruling by B.C. Assessment which deemed them to be legitimate charities. Legion membership is open to anyone, Sinclair said, and the aim is community service. In B.C., Legions operate 4,700 housing units for seniors. In a year, they donate $4 million to charities, $400,000 to medical research and contribute 800,000 hours of volunteer work, Sinclair said. Legions keep for themselves hall rental and bar revenue, which generate “barely enough to pay staff and taxes.”

Rogers recruits navy for chocolate bar The Royal Canadian Navy has a sweet side. During a ceremony held today (Friday) on the deck of HMCS Vancouver, Rogers’ Chocolates Ltd. CEO Larry Sullivan and Rear Admiral Nigel Greenwood, commander of the navy’s Maritime Forces Pacific, unveiled a chocolate bar wrapped in the image of a Halifax-class naval frigate. It’s not the first time the chocolate company has teamed up

with the navy. To mark the Royal Canadian Navy’s centennial in 2010, a commemorative tin, depicting HMCS Rainbow, was launched. Similar to the tin project, partial proceeds from sales of the uniquely wrapped chocolate bars will go to CFB Esquimalt’s personnel support program. Bars are available at Rogers’ Chocolates, 913 Government St. emccracken@vicnews.com

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

David Sinclair, chair of the Legion Foundation for B.C. and the Yukon, stands outside the Trafalgar Pro Patricia 292 branch on Gorge Road. Sinclair hopes to win exemptions for two legions in Victoria: the Pro Patria branch at 411 Gorge Rd. E. and the Britannia branch at 780 Summit Ave. Together they have 1,890 members. If granted, the tax exemptions could save the legions from possible closure. At the same time, however, the exemptions would end up costing taxpayers more money at a time when the city is keen to save wherever it can. It’s a perspective city council is sure to weigh heavily when Sinclair makes his pitch later this month. Victoria Mayor Dean Fortin said the request from the legion needs to be taken seriously. “In my mind, I want to see about our capacity to bring the legion in … recognizing there is a cost,” he said. “Is there a way for everyone (else receiving the exemption) to give up a little to bring them in?” rholmen@vicnews.com

NOW DOUBLE YOUR DISCOUNT AND RECEIVE

Walk-In Denture Clinic

WHY WAIT? WE CAN HELP NOW!

Happiness is a beautiful smile!

• FREE Consultation • FREE Adjustments

Conrad De Palma Denturist ((250) 595-1665 h 3581 Shelbourne Street

CONVERT TO NATURAL GAS WITH

F

Old Oil to New Gas 92% Efficiency ............. $3,995 + HST OR $100/per mo. 97% Efficiency ............. $4,895 + HST OR $110/per mo. • Fully installed • Free oil tank removal • 10 year full parts warranty • Subject to inspection

Homeglow Heat Products 250-382-0889 • www.homeglow.bc.ca Victoria Harbour

BOAT SHOW

NEW LOCATION: 3170 TILLICUM RD.

VICTORIA

LOWER LEVEL OUTSIDE OF TILLICUM CENTRE

- Ê<  ,-ÊEÊ "7Ê" Ê 69ÊUÊÓxä‡{Çx‡Çxä£

Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:30am - 9:00 pm Sat. 9:30 am - 5:30 pm Sun. 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Victoria Harbour Boat Show Experience Life on the Water

CANADA’S LARGEST IN-WATER BOAT SHOW WITH OVER 200 NEW AND PRE-OWNED BOATS FOR SALE www.bcyba.com | TIMES Thurs + Fri 11am – 6pm | Sat + Sun

April 19–22

Victoria Inner Harbour 10am – 5pm TICKETS Adult $10 | 3 day pass $25 | Students + Seniors $8 | 16 + under FREE


A8 • www.saanichnews.com

SAANICHNEWS

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Jim Zeeben Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Saanich News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-920-2090 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.saanichnews.com

OUR VIEW

Charter deserves to be cherished It’s just three decades old, but Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms has done a remarkable job of elucidating the noble ideas that form the framework of this country. By failing to celebrate the charter this week, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has shown a pettiness that belies his attempts to serve as a statesman. Harper shrugged off Tuesday’s milestone by trying to tactically draw attention to previous Conservative efforts at enshrining Canadians’ rights. The fact it was the Liberals – and Pierre Trudeau, to boot – who succeeded in repatriating the constitution must truly irritate the governing Conservatives. For sure, the charter isn’t loved by everyone. Some say it allows people to “work the system,” either by dragging out court cases or challenging those in positions of authority. They might be right, but the critics are also pointing out one of the strengths of having a legal document that enshrines our rights. Freedom and democracy and only truly exist in a somewhat messy state. The very nature of rights means that their definition must be open for challenge. If the courts struggle with interpreting those definitions, it probably means there is room for clarification. The government also has a built-in mechanism for dealing with any difference in opinion. However, there is also a price to pay for enacting the notwithstanding clause. Governments, so far, have realized they need to be judicious or else risk the wrath of the electorate. The charter is not convenient for a government that wants to do what it pleases. It’s also not necessarily a pleasant document for the nation’s judges, who can find themselves put on the spot by charter challenges. The people who have truly benefited from the charter are those most in need of its protection. Canada has made huge strides as a tolerant society because minorities have been allowed to step into the mainstream. Our evolution hasn’t gone unnoticed, either, as the charter is used by countries around the world as a model constitution. That’s not to say the charter is perfect. One outstanding issue remains: getting Quebec to sign on. But, for 30 years, the majority of Canadians have benefited from having an insightful declaration of the freedoms we cherish. As more decades pass, the advantages that come with our Charter of Rights will only become more cherished. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@saanichnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Saanich News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Environmentalism for dummies David Suzuki has resigned as a ignore facts that weaken the drama, director of his namesake foundation play to people’s emotions. And he so it won’t be the target of federal expects to be subsidized by the government “attacks.” CBC and charitable tax This news is conveyed exemptions as well? to me in a Globe and Mail This news comes as report that is typically I finish reading Patrick tilted in deference to Moore’s book, Confessions “Canada’s most famous of a Greenpeace Dropout. environmentalist.” I was one of many young The usual assumptions fans who cheered as are woven in: Suzuki Moore, Bob Hunter is a saint. His every and the other 1970s utterance is treated as Greenpeace pioneers set scientific fact, even when out from Vancouver to Tom Fletcher disrupt Soviet nuclear it’s a left-wing political B.C. Views rant. The Conservative testing, and then turned government is a front for to the regime’s slaughter Big Oil that has “attacked” of whales. environmental groups by reminding In 1986, Moore split with them that political activities are Greenpeace and worked to set not eligible for charitable tax up a family chinook salmon farm. exemptions. He said Greenpeace opposed In recent years, the David Suzuki aquaculture because it destroys Foundation’s campaign focus has tropical mangrove swamps. been noticeably in step with the Tropical prawn farms have no large U.S. foundations that fund rational connection with B.C., but most of B.C.’s enviro-scare industry: a global organization needs simple first salmon farming and now ideas that sell. the Alberta “tar sands” in all its This approach was seen in an exaggerated horror. earlier 1980s campaign against Suzuki’s personal activities aren’t chlorine in pulp mills. Greenpeace easily distinguished from those of protests against dioxins and the his foundation, as was illustrated herbicide 2,4,5-T were eventually with his recent CBC documentary dumbed down to opposing the that demonized the “tar sands.” use of chlorine in all industries, Diseased fish were displayed, including production of PVC plastic. but natural contamination of the Pulp mills developed a way to Athabasca River was glossed eliminate trace dioxins from their over. Aboriginal objections were production, but that didn’t matter highlighted, while local support and once Greenpeace had a global economic benefits were overlooked. campaign going. They still used This isn’t science or charity. It’s chlorine, so they’re bad. tabloid journalism. Sensationalize, Speaking of chlorine, PCBs

are polychlorinated biphenyls, a persistent background toxin. Tests found levels three to five times higher in some wild salmon compared to farmed. But the wild salmon results were ignored in a 2004 study, used by Suzuki to depict farmed salmon as poisonous. His foundation’s salmon farm campaign quietly disappeared down the memory hole after its PCB claims were debunked. Moore highlighted another bit of greenwashing in a visit to Victoria last year. The vaunted “LEED” certification for green building standards gives you points if your concrete is locally sourced, but no points for using wood instead. That’s because the long campaign by major environmental groups has devolved to “logging is bad.” Here’s the latest example. Greenpeace, ForestEthics and the Sierra Club were bankrolled by U.S. foundations to negotiate with the B.C. government, Aboriginal Peoples and forest companies for the 2006 “Great Bear Rainforest” agreement on the B.C. coast. Economic opportunity was delicately balanced against preservation, and First Nations gained new control of forests. Now the big enviros have begun campaigning against their own deal. As much as 50 per cent could still be logged, they say. It seems this particular green peace is bad for their business. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Ignore facts that weaken the drama, play to people’s emotions.’


www.saanichnews.com • A9

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

LETTERS Suzuki supporters need to do their homework on his claims Re: Suzuki is the complete opposite of anti science; Deniers make it hard for science, religion to co-exist (Letters, April 11) Perhaps letter-writer Taylor McLeod will be able to explain why David Suzuki, “the Canadian poster child of the fight against ignorance on the science of climate change,” fails to acknowledge the 2011 study by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) that concluded that the sun’s cosmic rays, and their role in cloud formation, rather than manmade emissions, are responsible for the Earth’s changing temperatures. The research, published with little fanfare last September in the prestigious journal, Nature, comes from one of the world’s largest centres for scientific research involving 60 countries and 8,000 scientists at more than 600 universities and national laboratories. In a pristinely clean stainless steel chamber that precisely recreated the Earth’s atmosphere, 63 CERN scientists from 17 European and American institutes demonstrated that cosmic rays promote the formation of molecules that in Earth’s atmosphere can grow and seed clouds; the cloudier it gets the cooler it will be. The sun’s magnetic field controls how many cosmic rays reach Earth’s atmosphere (the stronger the sun’s magnetic field, the more it shields Earth from incoming cosmic rays from space), thus, the sun determines the

temperature on Earth. And perhaps letter-writer Norman Swan could enlighten us on where he would draw the line on “deniers” that continue to turn a blind eye to the growing body of scientific peerreviewed research that contravenes the anthropomorphic global warming theory. To borrow from his analogy, the environmentally religious left have embraced the politicized science that two plus two equals five. Should we trust the modern-day sheepherders, like David Suzuki, to refrain from teaching our children that an environmental apocalypse is nigh unless we redistribute the world’s wealth? Robert Waters Saanich

More evidence supports evolution than creation

Re: Believing in theory of evolution requires faith (Letters, April 13) This letter is so ill-conceived and ludicrous that it just begs a response. As someone who is trained in science at the University of Victoria, with courses in zoology, I have extensive knowledge in the area of evolution. I am also an Anglican Protestant, I have read the Bible and I believe in God. Science and religion are not mutually exclusive. Evolution is not a theory, it is a fact. And the evidence is overwhelming. Just pick up any book on paleontology and the fossil evidence there proves that present humans are the result of millions of years of natural selection. Homologies exist between species to show common origins. Evolutionary processes can The News welcomes your opinions and be induced and mimicked comments. in labs. Evolution is indeed To put readers on equal footing, and to be “measurable, observable, sure that all opinions are heard, please keep provable and repeatable.” letters to less than 300 words. However, there is The News reserves the right to edit letters for absolutely no evidence style, legality, length and taste. The News will for spontaneous creation not print anonymous letters. or intelligent design. Please enclose your phone number for There is nothing that verification of your letter’s authenticity or to can be measured and no discuss using your letter as a guest column. proof of any such divine Phone numbers are not printed. intervention. That is what Send your letters to: I call “anti-science.” The ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Saanich News, statement that “science 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 cannot speak to origins” ■ Fax: 250-386-2624 makes no logical sense ■ Email: editor@saanichnews.com when the fossil data is there to prove the time and

Letters to the Editor

5 Year Special

3.25%

place of origins of many animals and humans. The biggest threat to humankind is not global warming, war, or environmental disaster. It is the loss of rational thought and the rise in superstition and conjecture. The letter-writer represents a disturbing resurgence of people who want to turn back the clock. This return to the Dark Ages will be the demise of us all. Maybe the writer would also like to suggest that Copernicus was wrong and that the planets really do revolve around the earth? Doreen Marion Gee Victoria

Example: $400,000 = $1590 per month *Some Conditions Apply/OAC/Rates Subject to Change

Available 9am to 9pm

Don't Delay… Call TODAY

250-888-8036 **Financing Also Available for Land Development Projects**

Lori Lenaghan MORTGAGE AGENT

lori.lenaghan@vericoselect.com C. 250-888-8036 F. 250-590-0736 Each VERICO broker is an independent owner.

Governments must listen to First Nations’ stories Re: There is a cost to restoring dignity (Our View, April 13) The editor wisely said: “Canadians owe it to ourselves to at least listen to these (Truth and Reconciliation) stories. We need to remember what happened but doing so, in itself, won’t make things right. It’s time to open ourselves to doing what will correct our past mistakes. We need to celebrate cultures that our authorities once tried to destroy. We need to be willing to put our money where our mouth is, whether that’s in treaty negotiations or respecting the rights of First Nations to have a stronger say on how their traditional lands are used.” Our federal authorities need to pay attention to these wise words, because at the moment, the prime minister has made statements which would suggest that respect is not being shown to the First Nations which are adamant that the Enbridge pipeline not be placed on their traditional lands, and that their way of life and culture would be destroyed by industrial activities. Residential schools were one symbol of the evil inflicted upon the First Nations. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission would be an incredible waste of effort if our provincial and federal governments continue down the path they seem determined to travel. No amount of money acquired from the raping of our lands in the name of “preserving our economy” is worth the damaged relationships and cultures of our citizens. Pay attention, Mr. Harper. Carolyn Herbert Saanich

Lana Popham

Spring is here!

... to celebrate the season – here’s one of my favorite recipes: Rhubarb crisp

Rhubarb crisp

Vision Matters Dr. Charles Simons

Healthy Eyes. Doctor Delivered.

Eye hazards in the backyard Some day soon the rain will stop, and we will venture outdoors to do dour bit in making Victoria “the Garden City”. Before setting out to tame your own personal wilderness, stop and think about your eyes (and other body parts). Pruning and trimming can be hazardous. A branch snapping back and hitting the eye can cause mechanical damage and possibly toxic reaction or infection. A projectile, from a weedeater or lawnmower, can also cause serious damage to your body. Perhaps you use an arsenal or herbicides and pesticides to help control your garden? Or you have a pool which requires chlorine? These chemicals aren’t eye-friendly either. If you do splash a chemical in the eye, flush the eye immediately with vast, huge, enormous quantities of clean cold water; then go to Emergency if necessary. The good news is that eye protection is simple and inexpensive. Safety glasses and goggles that fit over prescription glasses are all that is required, and you can find them in your local hardware store. Our local eye surgeons would rather spend their weekends with their families than treating ocular injuries that are easily prevented. Have a happy and safe spring and summer.

www.saanichoptometry.ca

Dr. Stephen Taylor* Dr. Charles Simons* Dr. Victor J. Chin*

119-3995 Quadra @ McKenzie (in Saanich Centre)

250-744-2992

*Denotes Optometric Corporation

MLA, Saanich South

2 lbs. chopped rhubarb 3/4 cup white sugar 3/4 cup flour   1/2 cup butter 1/2 cup brown sugar 1 cup rolled oats In a 9x13-inch pan, combine rhu barb, sugar, and 1/4 cup flour; set aside. In a bowl, combine 1/2 cup flour and butter. Add bro wn sugar and oats. Sprinkle over rhubarb. Bak e at 400 degrees for 45 minutes.

www.saanichsouth.ca 4085 Quadra Street, V8X 1K5 Monday-Thursday, 9:30 am–5:00 pm Phone: 250.479.4154 Fax: 250.479.4176 Email: lana.popham.mla@leg.bc.ca


A10 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

Grad and school sports face drama

Job Fair

ceremony events and appreciate that parents, administrators, teachers, support staff and student leaders are in ongoing discussions regarding grad.” Meanwhile, it’s been anything but business as usual for teachers performing regular duties in the district, said Sean Hayes, president of the Saanich Teachers’ Association. “Teachers are concerned and frustrated and worried,” said Hayes, who has spent much of the last couple of weeks visiting schools to discuss Bill 22 and the action plan with teachers. “Certainly there are people wondering what the right thing to do

Continued from Page A1

All voluntary extracurricular activities such as athletics, choir and drama will not take place at the elementary school level. At middle schools, most athletics have been cancelled and decisions regarding other special events have been made based on levels of support at each school. Arrangements have yet to be made for graduation ceremonies, which require teacher involvement. “While we expect the ceremonies to occur,” the announcement reads, “we are uncertain as to the status of other post-

Come down, meet our team and see why...

Value Village is a great fit for you! Please bring your resume and a positive attitude!

is and how to effectively oppose the direction of government and (if) this is the right way to do it.” In Greater Victoria, teachers plan to participate in voluntary extracurricular activities – except in some select cases – until the results of the BCTF vote, confirmed Tara Ehrcke, president of the Greater Victoria Teachers’ Association. Results are likely to be released Friday. To read the full announcement on voluntary extracurricular activities in the Saanich School District, visit sd63.bc.ca.

See how Rev. Allen Tysick is helping Victoria’s homeless on a 1 to 1 basis.

victoriadandelionsociety.ca

Permanent full and part time positions available: • Must be available for various day, night and weekend shifts • Positions open in retail sales and merchandise processing

NOTICE OF WATERMAIN FLUSHING

As a member of our team, you will enjoy: • Part and full time schedules • Full training • A great working environment • Great employee discounts for instore merchandise • Competitive wages

In order to maintain satisfactory water quality throughout the distribution system, water main flushing is scheduled to start January 16 to May 4, 2012. Business and other customers who wish advance notification of flushing in their immediate area are requested to call Waterworks at 250-475-5481 between 8:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday. Any discolouration is temporary and users are asked to minimize consumption if a change in water appearance is noticed. The District of Saanich accepts no liability for inconvenience or damages cause by water use during its flushing program.

1810 Store Street, Victoria

Your cooperation and understanding are appreciated.

How good is your hearing? Take the Hearing Self Check Do you have trouble hearing and understanding conversations? Do you find yourself asking others to repeat themselves? Do you have difficulty hearing while talking on the phone? Does it seem as though people are mumbling?

If you answered “YES” to any of the above questions call to book your FREE hearing test.

VICTORIA (Hillside)

Dougla

McDonald’s Restaurants

s St.

VICTORIA (Downtown) ( )

Zellers

View St.

r ste nca Do

View St.

Dr.

CIBC

www.beltone.com

nnorth@saanichnews.com

Check it out

Value Village at 1810 Store Street Saturday, April 21st 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

Registered under the College of Speech and Hearing Health Professionals of BC

NEWS

e lsid Hil

e. Av

McDonald’s

McDonald’s Shopper’s Home Shopper’s Home Health Care Health Care

250-382-3323

250-370-5199

310-1175 Douglas Street

201-1581 Hillside Ave

The Wizard of Oz, Claremont’s first musical aimed at all-ages, runs May 2 to 5, and from May 9 to 12, at 7 p.m., with an additional 2 p.m. matinee on May 12. All tickets are $12.50 and are available by calling 250-658-6672.

Call for artists goes out for Gorge art parade Annual event takes place by the waterfront Now’s your chance to participate in Saanich’s summer art parade along the scenic Gorge Waterway. The municipality is looking for professional and emerging visual artists to display their works during June 23’s Gorge on Art event. “Gorge on Art is Saanich’s celebrated outdoor art event that encourages emerging and established artists to participate in exhibiting and selling their art during this annual community festival,” said Diane Thorpe, Saanich’s community arts specialist. Artists are encouraged to apply to participate before April 30. Download the application form at bit.ly/ HGr8ut. For more information, contact Thorpe at 250-475-5557. kslavin@saanichnews.com


www.saanichnews.com • A11

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Eviction notice plays out like horror movie scene

Diaper change record sought

It might sound like a scene from a horror movie but fortunately police were able to convince an angry Saanich man to lay down his axe on Friday the 13th before anyone was hurt. The man allegedly used the axe to threaten his landlord, who called police around 8:30

Where Community & Quality Meet

Photo submitted

On April 19, parents will gather – babies in tow – with a goal to establish a new world record. Each will pick a quadrant taped on a school room floor, and when the whistle blows, all will change their babies into cloth diapers in unison. “At the end, everyone lifts up their child to show that the diaper is on,” said Charlotte King-Harris, one of the organizers of the Great Cloth Diaper Change. No need to wait for a dirty diaper to participate, she assured. “That would be a very poopy room.” The count has to be handled in an official way to ensure witnesses can make an accurate count of diapers changed, King-Harris said. Data will be submitted to Guinness World Records with the hope of beating last year’s mark of 5,026 cloth diapers changed simultaneously. This year, 262 sites from 15 countries will host changing stations.

The challenge is a fun way to promote cloth diapers. It’s a subject King-Harris feels strongly about. Disposables are piling up in the landfill, she said. “You feel so guilty knowing that none of it is going to break down.” With the introduction of flushable liners, cloth diapers “are so simple, they’re so easy,” she said. “There is this misconception that it involves safety pins, and scrubbing poop with your bare hands.” In May, her co-organizer, Rachel Aube, will be making a pitch to the Capital Regional District to provide $100 reimbursements to parents for choosing cloth diapers to help offset their start-up costs. She predicts the program would save money due to the savings accrued through reduced demands on the landfill. rholmen@vicnews.com

The Peninsula Singers The Long And Winding Road

Tru Value 5124 Cordova Bay Rd Management Team

Prices in effect Apr 18-24, 2012* Blackwell

Sunrise

Meat & Seafood

News staff

Angus Sirloin Steaks

Chicken Whole Fryers

1 ¢ 88

Produce d

Large Navel Oranges

2243 Beacon Ave., Sidney BC 250-656-0275 marywinspear.ca

PeninsulaSingers.ca

99

¢

Coleslaw

California

Damafro Pastures

Grimms

Freybe

Clip Top Carrots

Single Cream Brie

European Weiners

Landjaeger

100g

100g

2

$ 98

5 lb Bag

48

lb/1.06kg

California Grown

Organic Mexican

Cauliflower

Avocadoes

1

$ 48

¢

Dan-D-Pak

Nut Mix

Raw Almonds

1

$ 29

3

$ 69

100g

2

$ 79

Lily, Alstromeria Spray Mums Bunches 5 Stem

5

$ 99

4

9

$ 99

1.13kg pkg

1

$ 79

100g

Floral

4/$

Ultimate Royal

Grocery

Coke 2L

Island Farms

Dempsters

Kicking Horse

Kraft Philadelphia

Ice Cream

Bagels

Coffee

Cream Cheese

¢

All Flavours 4L Pail

Original & Sesame 6 pack

All Varieties 454g

Brick/Spreadable Assorted Flavours 250g

All Flavours

Becel

McCain International

Kellogg’s

Bicks

Margarine

Pizza

Assorted 454g

470-515g

Just Right Cereal Pickles Assorted Varieties & Raisin Bran 1L

99 $ 29 2

Island Farms

Vanilla Plus Yogurt Tickets: Adults $22 | Children $11 Available through Mary Winspear

1

$ 29

Weather dependent 100g

Deli

Made In Store

Bulk

photos by Tom Watson

1

$ 89

Spartan Apples

on

Artistic Director: Glenda Korella

Pacific Sole

Prev Frozen 100g

BC Grown

Each

Accompanist: Jeanne Campbell

4

$ 49

Fresh

lb/1.94kg lb/1.94k

ticketsow! sale n

Spotlight on Young Artist: Philip Manning Violin

5

Frozen lb/9.89kg

Lox Trim

lb/4.38kg

California Grown

Pork Back Ribs

$ 49

lb/12.10kg

$ 99

50% Cashews Salted/Unsalted 100g

Fri., April 27, 27, 7:30 pm Sat., April 28, 28, 7:30 pm Sun., April 29, 29, 2:00 pm

convinced the man to exit the home and he was subsequently arrested without further incident. Charges of uttering threats and assault with a weapon have been recommended against the 43-year-old Saanich man. kslavin@saanichnews.com

Parents get busy at one of the participating locations during last year’s Great Cloth Diaper Change.

Roszan Holmen

Profits to a Saanich Peninsul ’s on ti Hospital Founda Music Therapy Program!

p.m., April 13. The landlord told police the tenant grabbed an axe after being served an eviction notice. The landlord was able to leave and call 911 from a safe place. Police surrounded the home and made contact with the suspect by phone. Officers

Assorted 650g

4

$ 99

6 $1049

2/$

2

5

$ 99

$ 99

475-675g

7

2/$

Italpasta

Classico

Fancy Feast

Pasta

Pasta Sauce

Cat Food

All Varieties 900g

218-650 ml

Assorted 85g

2

$ 29

2

$ 99

3/$

2

$ 99

2

Cordova Bay Plaza • 5124 Cordova Bay Rd Visit us online at www.truvaluefoods.com for all other locations *Prices only valid at 5124 Cordova Bay Rd location only

3

$ 49


A12 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

Historic farm mulls its future

Slip into style during our

DRESS & SKIRT EXTRAVAGANZA

Bridge delay throws wrench into Craigflower Manor plan

Save 20%

Kyle Wells News staff

on this season’s prettiest dresses & skirts!

Fun & Flirty dresses in great prints for any occasion by Clientele, Tribal, Dolcezza, Linea Domani, Fresh FX, Papillon & more!

Selection may vary by store. Event ends April 21st.

9764 5th Street, Sidney 250.656.0096 Hillside Shopping Centre 250.598.3502 Westshore Town Centre, Colwood 250.478.3885

There’s more online For more stories and web exclusives visit saanichnews.com

dirt cheap this week

BC Grown Large Hot House

Tomato es

88

pricing in effect April 18-25 while quantities last

8:3Oam-8pm 7 days a week! locally owned & operated

Green Peppers

Baby Kale 2/$ 00

3

today’s produce c

lb

Fresh Locally Grown

Rhubarb Baby Russet $ 99 /lb Potato es 2/$ 00 Locally Grown

5

1

10 lb Bag

Fresh

B utter Lettuce ¢

Yams

¢

88

/lb

Artichokes 2/$ 00

88

1 lb Pkg.

Certified Organic

Fresh Large

3

Kyle Wells/News staff

The Land Conservancy’s Ian Fawcett is looking for input on ways to increase revenue for Craigflower Manor. Whether or not the site will now be opened for this season, or to what extent, has yet to be decided. “It makes a dramatic difference to what we potentially can or can’t do and it’s going to make even more of an impact on our bottom line,” Fawcett said, “but just exactly what that will be, at this stage I don’t know.” Renovations on the site are nearing completion. The fire, which started beneath the staircase and is believed to have been caused by a space heater, resulted in significant smoke and heat damage, and destroyed much of the staircase area. Rebuilt stairs incorporate some of the old with the new. Some charred balusters, for instance, have been reused. Melted plexiglass had to be peeled off a section of wall displaying original wallpaper. As reminders of the fire, one patch of smoke-damaged wallpaper and a candle keeled over from the heat have been left. Provincial funding and some money from the conservancy have paid for the renovations, which cost about $240,000. Closure is not an option at this point, Fawcett said. Even if the conservancy has to continue to rely on subsidies, it will keep the site open. “It’s a really fundamental underpining of how we see our community,” Fawcett said. “It’s been looked after very, very well over the years and we intend to continue that. As a building and as an icon of the community it’s very important.” news@goldstreamgazette.com

Tangelo Oranges ¢

Strawb erries 2/$ 00

88

o

Delays in replacing the Craigflower bridge are forcing The Land Conservancy to rethink plans to increase revenues at historic Craigflower Manor. With renovations resulting from a 2009 fire nearing completion and an understanding that the site would not be able to reopen this year because of the bridge work, the conservancy, which has operated the site since 2003, is mulling the manor’s future. The group is trying to come up with ways to increase revenues at the 1853 farming settlement in View Royal, as well as at the Craigflower Schoolhouse on the other side of the bridge in Saanich. Now that the start date for the bridge replacement has been pushed to January 2013 at the earliest, the conservancy is likely going to have to put a hold on developing revenue plans. Combined, both the manor and the schoolhouse cost about $150,000 per year to run when in full operation. When open, the sites make less than a third of that. Subsidies from the provincial government, which still owns the sites, make up the difference. “We would like not to have to be going back to the province with our hand out all the time,” said TLC deputy executive director Ian Fawcett. “We took on responsibility and we intend to try to find a way to make it sustainable.” The provincial government has allocated $21 million over three years to help make historic sites in the province more sustainable to operate. Fawcett doesn’t yet know how much money that will result in for Craigflower Manor but it could potentially go towards the site. There is no desire to modify the buildings themselves or change the intention of the property, but thought is being put into what can be added to bring in more revenue. Fawcett said TLC has a few ideas, such as food vending or a produce stand, in keeping with the farming history of the site, but ultimately they want to do what the community feels is appropriate. Fawcett said the Craigflower bridge delay creates a two-year impact on the site rather than one. There’s little point in starting a project when the property will likely be closed for the 2013 season.

Sweet Minneola

Sweet

5

/lb

51 lo cal itt emsunt 75 BC it 167 organicemitsem s

99¢

1/2 lb Pkg

¢

$9.99 15 LB FLAT

BC Grown Extra Large

Fresh Locally Grown

/ea

/lb

Fresh

Fresh Premium

Fennel B ulbs 3/$ 00

Broccoli Crowns ¢

5

99

/lb

Certified Organic

Portob ello Mushrooms $ 99

3

/lb

Voted

Best City

of the

Voted

1

VICTORIA NEWS

1286 McKenzie Avenue

www.therootcellar.ca

   

15th

9 % ! 2

Best City

of the

1

VICTORIA NEWS

   

16th

9 % ! 2

NEWS

250-477-9495 9

There’s more on line - saanichnews.com


www.saanichnews.com • A13

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Woman’s disappearance a ‘mystery,’ police say A Saanich woman described by her daughter as “healthy, vibrant, intelligent and active” has been missing since April 5, leaving family concerned for her safety and wellbeing. Shirley Burstall, 75, was last seen on April 5 at a gas station in Ladysmith. She’d spent the last five days on vacation in Chemainus, but no one is sure where she was headed after filling up her car. She hasn’t been seen since. “I think something happened on the afternoon of the fifth,” said her daughter Chris, 47. “Nothing that happened indicates she had any plans to go anywhere. It’s scary. It just doesn’t feel real.” Chris said she talks and texts with her mom on a daily basis. On Easter Sunday, after not hearing from her mom for a couple days, Chris attempted to make contact multiple times. “On Tuesday I texted her and said I was very worried, upset and not sleeping; if she did not respond I would be filing a missing persons report. ‘This is your 24-hour notice,’” Chris said about what she texted. Saanich police Sgt. Dean Jantzen says the family filed a missing persons report on Wednesday, April 11, nearly a week after they had last heard from her. “It’s a bit of a mystery right now. We had a helicopter up (Sunday) for five hours searching the roadways,” Jantzen said. There have been no transactions on her back account or credit card since putting gas in her car in Ladysmith. Burstall and her husband, Vic, live in Cordova Bay. They retired to Greater Victoria from Calgary in the early 2000s. Shirley Burstall is described as a Caucasian woman, 5’7” tall with a medium build and short, brown hair. She was driving a four-door 2002 silver Mazda Protege sedan with B.C. Licence Plate 287 CFG. Anyone with information on Shirley Burstall’s whereabouts can call 250-475-4321. kslavin@saanichnews.com

Cellphone and driving earns fines

Talking on his cellphone while driving, when he wasn’t supposed to be doing either, resulted in a Saanich man’s car being impounded. After seeing the 39-year-old driver talking on his cellphone, Oak Bay police pulled him over in the early afternoon on April 8 in the 1900-block of Foul Bay Rd. It was then discovered that the motorist did not have a driver’s licence.

His vehicle, a white GMC pickup, was impounded for seven days. The driver was given a promise to appear for driving while prohibited. As part of an ICBC road safety campaign, police have been staked out at intersections in April watching for drivers using cellphones. Fines of $167 can be issued for using a cellphone for calls, texting or emailing while behind the wheel.

In the same Foul Bay block, a motorist was pulled over for failing to yield just before midnight on April 3. Officers noted the driver smelled of marijuana and, when questioned, the driver fessed up that he’d just lit up before being stopped. The driver, 18, received a 24-hour prohibition notice, had his drivers licence seized and his 1998 Mercury Sable towed. vmoreau@oakbaynews.com

FOR RECYCLING YOUR MILK CARTONS

Recycling your milk containers is easy. Simply give them a quick rinse and bring them with your bottles and cans on your next Return-It Depot trip. There’s no refund because you didn’t pay a deposit when you bought the milk. Last year Return-It collected over 630,000 kg of milk containers for recycling and kept them out of landfills. Help us recycle even more.

-VYTVYLPUMVYTH[PVUHUK[VÄUKHWHY[PJPWH[PUN9L[\YU0[+LWV[ULHYLZ[`V\!YL[\YUP[JHTPSRVYJHSS 


A14 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

Advertising Feature

Recycling your electronics responsibly When it comes to recycling your old electronics, it’s essential to do it responsibly. The BC Electronics Stewardship Program is here to help, and now includes even more products. B.C. consumers and businesses can drop off any acceptable products at designated Collection Sites throughout the province without charge. The Electronics Stewardship Association of British Columbia (ESABC), a notfor-profit extended producer responsibility program set up by the major producers and retailers of electronics in B.C.,, delivers a recycling y g program p g to recover rregulated eggullatted d electronics eelle lect lect c ro roni nics ni cs prodpro prod-

ucts from consumers and recycle them in an environmentally and socially responsible manner. Encorp Pacific (Canada) manages the electronics stewardship program. The message is that those useless electronics in your basement contain valuable resources. All electronic products collected in the ESABC program are recycled by processors that meet the Recycling Qualification Program, preventing illegal export to developing countries and unnecessary landfilling of regulated electronic products. The program p ensures recyclers use sound environmental en practices – they must m ust han handle the materials they receive in an environmentally responsible DID YOU KNOW? manner m ma ann and must not allow prison Encorp Pacific (Canada) is one llabour la bo or shipping of unwanted of North America’s leading product eelectronic le scrap or products offstewardship corporations. With more sshore h to developing, non-OECD than 175 depots and mobile collectors ccountries. o across BC – and the support of Since the program’s launch in B.C. residents – 80 per cent of the 22007, 0 more than 49 million kilobeverage containers sold in the ggrams r of unwanted electronics province are recovered and have h ha a been recycled, materials recycled into something new. tthat ha didn’t end up in our landfills That’s more than one billion and were not exported illegally to an containers kept out become b ecom someone else’s problem. of our landfills! Electronics collected in B.C. are Ele

ACCEPTABLE PRODUCTS

The following items can be recycled free of charge at any Encorp Return-It Electronics™ Collection Site: • • • • • • • •

sent to five approved primary recyclers in North America where they are broken down using various manual and mechanical processes. Products such as batteries and mercury lamps, which require special processing to recover materials, are removed. The remaining products are separated into their individual components for recovery. Through a variety of

refining and smelting processes, the materials reclaimed from unwanted electronics, such as steel, leaded glass, copper, aluminum, plastic and precious metals, can be extracted and recycled into new products. There are more than 112 convenient locations in B.C. To find a collection site or drop-off event near you, visit return-it.ca/electronics/locations

• •

Display Devices Desktop Computers Portable Computers Computer Peripherals (Keyboards and Mice) Computer Scanners Printers and Fax Machines Non-Cellular Phones and Answering Machines Vehicle Audio and Video Systems (Aftermarket) Home Audio and Video Recording/Playback Systems Personal or Portable Audio and Video Recording/Playback Systems

Find a full list of acceptable products at return-it.ca/ electronics/acceptable

BACK ALLEYS DON’T RECYCLE UNWANTED ELECTRONICS But we do. Find where you can recycle your electronics safely and responsibly at,

WHAT IS THE ELECTRONICS PRODUCTS RECYCLING ASSOCIATION (EPRA) PROGRAM AND WHAT DOES IT DO?

WHERE CAN I FIND A RETURN-IT COLLECTION SITE AND WHAT KIND OF ELECTRONICS CAN I RECYCLE?

EPRA is a national not-for-profit extended producer responsibility association program that was previously run by ESABC. They have contracted Encorp Pacific to deliver the stewardship program under the Return-It™ Electronics brand in BC. Together, regulated electronics are managed and recycled in a socially and environmentally responsible manner. The program also prevents regulated electronics from ending up in landfills or being illegally shipped to developing countries.

You can find more than 125 Return-It Collection Sites at return-it.ca/electronics/locations. And for a full list of accepted electronics, visit return-it.ca/electronics/products. Get ready. New products are being added to the Return-It Electronics program on July 1st, 2012.


www.saanichnews.com • A15

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 EARTH DAY 2012 Advertising Feature

EARTH DAY EVENTS IN THE CAPITAL REGION • Creatively United for the Planet Festival, an all-ages arts/cultural and healthy living event, is at 600 Richmond Ave. at Richardson (St. Matthias) April 20 to 22. Raising funds for progressive, environmentalbased charities, enjoy a dance, funky fashion show, family activities & more. FMI: creativelyunitedfortheplanet.com

Earth Day is a great teaching opportunity Since its inception more than 40 years ago, Earth Day has inspired millions to increase their awareness of, and their appreciation for, the environment. Since the dawn of the 21st century, people have increasingly adopted eco-friendly lifestyles and attitudes, and continued to embrace environmentally friendly practices and principles. Today, children grow up learning about the environment in school and at home. For example, most households here in Victoria participate in community recycling programs, and such households are raising eco-conscious children, perhaps without even recognizing they’re doing so. While a transition to a more eco-conscious lifestyle might not be seamless, it’s far easier than many might suspect and even easier for kids who have yet to develop a lifetime of habits that might not be so eco-friendly. With Earth Day on the horizon, the following are a few ways parents can get their kids involved in activities or lifestyles that benefit the environment. • When shopping for groceries, choose organic products that weren’t grown with pesticides or harmful chemicals and explain this difference to kids. • Shop locally and explain to kids that doing so reduces reliance nce on fuel because se products pro rodu duct du ctss don’t ct don’ do n t need to be shipped d to your comcom co mmmunity, minimizing imizing ffuel uel consumption.. DID YOU KNOW? • Conservation vatio on Earth Day Canada is a national provides another oth h er environmental charity founded easy opporturtu uin 1990, providing Canadians with nity for parents nts practical knowledge and tools to instill ecoco oto lessen their impact on the friendly ideals alss environment. In 2008, EDC was in their chilil-chosen as Canada’s “Outstanding dren. ConsererrNon-profit Organization” vation is about ou ut by the Canadian Network for reducing waste, aste te, Environmental Education so conservation atio on and Communication. techniques don’t don n’t FMI: earthday.ca involve sacrifice. acrificee . Instead, they ey involve involv lvee being more responsible esponsible when whe hen n it comes to using i our resources. • Instead of keeping the faucet running while brushing your teeth, turn the faucet off and encourage kids to do the same. This teaches kids that conservation is simple and often just requires minimal effort to make a big difference. • When grocery shopping, make a list before leaving the house and explain to kids that you do this so you don’t have to make two trips to the store and waste the gas that the second trip would require. In addition, encourage kids to turn the lights off when they leave a room to better conserve energy. • Recycling is a practice that many of today’s kids grew up with, and as a result, many of them might take it for granted, failing to fully realize the positive impact they’re making whenever they recycle. One way parents can address this issue is to purchase products made from recycled materials. A host of products are made from recycled materials, from the paper you put in the printer to the toys under the tree at Christmas!

• Victoria’s Eagle Wing Tours is offering three-hour Earth Day marine wildlife tours from Fisherman’s Wharf, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. April 20 to 22, in support of The Land Conservancy’s campaign to expand Brooks Point Regional Park on South Pender Island. A portion of each fare goes to the campaign. For fares and reservations: www.eaglewingtours.com or 1-250-384-8008 • The Earth Day Walk begins with a 10:30 a.m. kick-off April 21 at the Legislature then an 11:30 a.m. walk to Centennial Square, for a festival with music, speakers, local food tasting, eco groups and more. FMI: www.earthwalkvictoria.ca

• Dedicated to an Oil-Free Coast, hosted by the SaanichGulf Islands Green Party, is at Sidney’s Mary Winspear Centre from 6 to 9 p.m. April 21. NGO trade-show, live music, presentations & more. Speakers: Humourist Arthur Black, Saanich - Gulf Islands MP Elizabeth May, the RainCoast Foundation’s Brian Falconer & artist Robert Bateman. FMI: www.greenparty. ca/events

SCOTTYTREE & Arborist Service PLANTING TREES TO REMEMBER • Hazard Tree Evaluation & Removal • Pruning • Lot Clearing • Municipal Reports • Consultations • Timber Sales • Hedges • Stump Grinding • Chipping

250-220-9298 • www.scottytree.com

New to Victoria We come to you!

All arrangements made in the comfort of your own home. All pre-arrangements are fully transferable at no cost to you. Specializing in low cost cremation and green burial. For more information visit our website or call:

Earth’s Option Cremation and Burial Service 10 Kaleigh Lane, Victoria

778.440.8500 www.earthsoption.com

Approved Provider

• 17th annual Spring Native Plant S Sale is at the Swan Lake Nature Sanctuary April 21 & 22 with m more than 5,000 plants, a an d 14 and 140 species native to souther e rn Van ern Vancouver Island, plus displ p lays & experts. plays FFMI: FM MI: www.swanlake.bc.ca • Oak Bay celebrates w with an Earth Day Picnic C e Celebration in Uplands P a April 22. Organized Park, b byy the Friends of Uplands P a and the Community Park A Ass As s Association of Oak Bay, the scche schedule includes: 7 a.m. Bird Walk at Cattle Point; – Bird 11 a.m. Earth Day Walk from Munici Hall to Uplands Park; Municipal noon – Earth Day celebration at the par park, with picnic, entertainment, activities and displays; 1 & 2:15 p.m. – Guided Nature Walks. FMI: oakbaycommunityassociation.org • The Saanich Cycling Festival 2012 runs from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. April 22 with activities for all, including the BIG Bike Ride, escorted by the Saanich Police. Choose from a 4.9km Shelbourne route and a kids’ UVic route. Stage entertainment, bike demos, interactive games and activities, information displays, bike rodeo, concessions and fun for the whole family. FMI: www.saanichcyclingfestival.ca/

BARTLETT. DISCOVER WHY WE’RE CALLED TREE EXPERTS. We’re Bartlett Tree Experts and we’ve been exceeding our customers’ expectations for over 100 years. No matter the size or scope of your tree and shrub needs, our experts bring a rare mix of local service, global resources and innovative tree care practices that makes your landscape thrive. Trees add value to our homes and our lives. And Bartlett adds value to your trees.

For the life of your trees. PRUNING FERTILIZATION PEST & DISEASE MANAGEMENT REMOVAL

CALL 877 BARTLETT 877.227.8538 OR VISIT BARTLETT.COM


A16 • www.saanichnews.com

THE ARTS

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

Hot ticket: Q.E.D. with guests The Party on High Street play the Cambie at the Esquimalt Inn, $7

NEWS

Q.E.D is a four-member rock band from Winnipeg, Man. presently promoting its third CD Sometimes a Cigar … is just a Cigar. April 21, at 10 p.m. Doors at 9 p.m. No minors.

Region’s aspiring filmmakers dominate film fest line-up Eyelens films to be screened for first time on Vancouver Island Erin McCracken

Event line-up

News staff

At just 16 years old, Hannah Kruzel doesn’t aspire to become a filmmaker. She is one. In fact, two of the Victoria resident’s films – one she did on her own and another she collaborated on with friends – are nominated for awards, and will be shown along with several other films at the 17th annual Eyelens Film and Animation Festival, April 21. Films screened at the festival were created by some of the 350 to 400 youth and adults who attended camps offered by the Gulf Islands Film and Television School, on Galiano Island last year. This year the festival will be held for the first time outside of Vancouver. Oak Bay High’s theatre was chosen as the venue due to the record

Kruzel, a Grade 10 student at his family. Victoria High, likely won’t be able “I like working with people, but to attend the event due to a prior I just thought it would be neat commitment, but she said watch- to really see how (the process) ing her films on the big screen worked – to do it by yourself,” she would be an incredsaid of the experiible experience. ence. “It was defi“I’d really like to nitely fun.” be there (and think) In creating Story ■ Admission to the ‘I can’t believe I did of the Accused, Eyelens Film and that,’” she said. especially editing Animation Festival Kruzel is leaning five hours of mateis free. towards a future rial down to six mincareer in the military utes, Kruzel gained a ■ Films will be rather than one in greater appreciation shown Saturday the film industry. Still, for professional film(April 21), from 1 to her passion for filmmakers. 5 p.m. at Oak Bay making is evident “You see how hard High’s theatre, 2151 when she speaks they work to do it,” Cranmore Rd. about the projects the teen said. she created last It’s this handsyear, including the on experience that documentary Me, attracts students which she made with two friends. from across North America to the “It’s talking about people’s inse- Gulf Islands Film and Television curities with themselves, and how School each year. it actually makes them who they “It’s not a standard school where are,” she said of the five-minute you do a lot of classroom stuff. piece. You learn how to actually make a For her second work, Kruzel movie,” Harris said. “And that’s, wrote, edited and directed Story of we find, the best way to teach how the Accused, which tells the story to make a film – you make one.” of a boy accused of murdering emccracken@vicnews.com

Don Denton/News staff

Hannah Kruzel, a Grade 10 Victoria High student, is nominated for awards for two films she created at the Gulf Islands Film and Television School last summer. number of films created by Oak Bay High students who have attended the film school over the years. The film camps are also popular with

Victoria High students. “It just seemed to make so much sense,” film school director George Harris said of the decision.

BC Arts and Culture Week and Saanich Studio Tours Celebrate BC Arts and Culture Week, April 22–28, 2012 and explore the vital contribution that arts and culture make in your community. Artists and cultural organizations create points of connection and are the core of a community’s creative vitality. A variety of cultural activities present opportunities for reinforcing diverse identities, for creating a sense of place and for motivating people to become involved. Saanich Arts, Culture and Heritage Advisory Committee invites the public to participate in special events and take the opportunity to engage with local artists. On Saturday, April 28, 11:00am–3:00pm at the Cedar Hill Recreation Centre, join “Juno Award” winning musician Norman Foote for a concert as well as a song-writing workshop. Carnival of the Arts, a free family event, features a variety of visual and performing arts activities for everyone. For more information go to www.cedarhillarts.ca May is the month to visit Saanich artists in their home studios and discover incredible treasures. For information and studio locations go to: www.gobc.ca

Saanich Parks & Recreation

of the

Saturday, April 28 11:00am-3:00pm m Arts Centre at Cedar Hill Free Admission

www.saanich.ca

Saanich Active Living Guide

Cedar Hill 250.475.7121 | Gordon Head 250.475.7100 | GR Pearkes 250.475.5400 | Commonwealth Place 250.475.7600 |


www.saanichnews.com • A17

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

National Volunteer Week 250-386-2269

April 15 to 21, 2012

volunteervictoria.bc.ca

Writer and producer Wes Borg illustrates the frustration of trying to write a play in three hours. Submited photo

Theatre fun times four Brittany Lee News staff

Twelve hours, one prop and a celebrity. That’s all theatre professionals will have to produce four plays this Sunday. “The idea is to take a bunch of really talented people and push them; expect of them way more than anyone could reasonably expect and then watch them fail,” writer and producer Wes Borg said. Writers in the 4-Play fundraiser will find out their prop, the name of a Canadian celebrity and the first line of their play at 8 a.m. on the

morning of production. Writers are then given three-and-a-half hours to create their play, incorporating the three elements in some way. Each play will begin with the pre-written line, and its a free-forall from there, Borg explained. Guests can expect “a really hilariously on-the-edge evening of watching people be completely terrified,” Borg said. “The actors have the script in their hands, sets will fall down, things may catch fire, it’s the best way to do it,” he said with a laugh. After all four plays

have been performed, critics from local media will submit reviews to each director, Borg explained. The audience then helps pick award winners, such as best show and best actor. Proceeds from the 4-Play fundraiser go to the Intrepid Theatre Club the producers of UnoFest and the Victoria Fringe Festival. It takes place at the Metro Studio Theatre, 1411 Quadra St., on Sunday (April 22) at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $25 at the door or $20 if purchased in advance (ticketrocket.org or 250-590-6291). reporter@vicnews.com

Get out and paint the town Laura Lavin News staff

From Chinatown streets to the iconic Johnson Street bridge, local artists are invited to take a seat in the great outdoors on Saturday and paint what they see. Opus art supplies host its first Outdoor Painting Challenge April 21. Opus stores from Victoria to Kelowna and around the Lower Mainland will participate that day, encouraging local artists to get outside and paint. It is open to all ages and to both professional and amateur artists, however, everyone who participates will compete on the same level for prizes. Each Opus store will award prizes to three works, chosen on site by an impartial jury, including well-known artist Robert Amos at the Victoria location. The top prize in each location is a $500 Opus gift card, with second and third prizes being $250 and $100 gift cards, respectively. April weather can be unpredictable, but the event will go rain or shine, said Marsha Arbour, manager of the Victoria Opus store. “Working outdoors is akin to working with a live model,” said Arbour. “You’re right there in the present moment. In the weather, with the light, you have to work quickly because the light keeps changing. It’s very vibrant that way … it’s the experience of it really.”

Canvases will be provided, but everyone is expected to supply any other materials they require, from paints to brushes and easels. “It doesn’t have to be painting, it can be collage, painting, pen and ink, mixed media, anything to get people to make art,” Arbour said. Participants will set up around Victoria, but there will be restrictions in how far afield they can go. “It hasn’t been decided yet, the radius out from the store,” said Arbour. “We’re one block north of Chinatown, so that will definitely be part of it. Depending on how many people we get, will determine how far out we go. People can go over the blue bridge and back if they want – there’s a lot of choice.” Artists are asked to sign in by 10 a.m. and return to the store with their finished work no later than 3 p.m. Winners will be announced at 5 p.m. “I’m pretty excited about the outdoor painting challenge,” said Arbour. “You don’t have to buy anything, it’s just a community relationship event really. I like to sell things – that’s really fun too – but this is different, the more the merrier – bring a friend.” Anyone who is interested in participating in the free event is asked to call or stop by the store at 512 Herald St. to register. Visit the Opus website at opusartsupplies.com/OPChallenge for more information about the contest. llavin@vicnews.com -with Black Press files

Volunteers Grow Community

Thank You Volunteers! 1Up Victoria Single Parent Resource Ctr. AIDS Vancouver Island Artemis Place Society Arthritis Society (The) Central and Mt. Edward’s Court Care Homes BC Aviation Museum BC Cancer Agency Beacon Community Services Blue Bridge Repertory Theatre Boys & Girls Club Services of Greater Victoria Bridges for Women Society Broadmead Care Burnside Gorge Community Association Canadian Blood Services Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation Canadian Cancer Society Canadian Red Cross Society Capital City Volunteers Caring for First Nations Children Society Choir Kids Community Living Victoria Co-operative Housing Federation of BC Craigdarroch Castle Historical Society CRD Regional Parks District of Oak Bay Emergency Program Downtown Victoria Ambassador Program Esquimalt Emergency Program Esquimalt Neighbourhood House Society Fairfield Gonzales Community Association Family Caregivers’ Network Society Greater Victoria Police Victim Services Habitat Acquisition Trust Heart & Stroke Foundation Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria

Island Deaf and Hard of Hearing Centre Island Sexual Health Society James Bay Community Project James Bay Community School Society James Bay New Horizons John Howard Society of Victoria Junior Achievement of British Columbia Learning Disabilities Association Lifetime Networks Literacy Victoria Luther Court Society Military Family Resource Centre Monterey Recreation Centre Mount St. Mary Hospital MS Society of Canada, SVIC NEED2 Suicide Prevention Oak and Orca Bioregional School Oak Bay Lodge Oak Bay Volunteer Services Pacific Animal Therapy Society Pacific Centre Family Services Association Pacifica Housing Power To Be Adventure Therapy Queen Alexandra Foundation for Children Recreation Integration Victoria Rest Haven Lodge Saanich Emergency Program Saanich Parks and Recreation Saanich Police Block Watch Program Saanich Volunteer Services Society Selkirk Place Seniors Serving Seniors Shaw Ocean Discovery Centre Silver Threads Service

St. Vincent de Paul Social Concern Office Swan Lake Christmas Hill Nature Sanctuary The BC Neurofibromatosis Foundation The Cridge Centre for the Family The Kiwanis Pavilion The Prostate Centre The Salvation Army United Way of Greater Victoria UVic Alumni Association Vancouver Island Strata Owners Association Victoria Brain Injury Society Victoria Conservatory of Music Victoria Cool Aid Society Victoria Epilepsy and Parkinson’s Centre Victoria Foundation Victoria Hospice Victoria Hospitals Foundation Victoria International Red Coat Hosts Victoria Police Department Victoria Rainbow Kitchen Society Victoria Restorative Justice Society Victoria Women’s Sexual Assault Centre Victoria Women’s Transition House Society Victoria Youth Custody Services Volunteer Victoria VIHA Glengarry Hospital Mental Health & Addictions Priory Hospital Queen Alexandra Ctr. for Children’s Health Royal Jubilee & Gorge Road Hospitals Saanich Peninsula Hospital Victoria General Hospital West Coast Men’s Support Society YMCA - YWCA Greater Victoria

Volunteer Victoria recruits over 16,400 volunteers each year on behalf of our 300 non-profit member agencies. We enrich the quality of life in our community through volunteer involvement.

Go to: www.VolunteerVictoria.bc.ca to learn more.


A18 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

Happy Earth Day! Visit www.countrygrocer.com for your chance to WIN a gardening prize pack & composter. Draw ends: April 21st, 2012.

Breast C Chicken O Roast U G S $ 37 N 1 T R Whole Beef Y Strip Loins V $397 A L Baguettes U E MAY FAMILY FARMS

IN THE DELI

REAT AVINGS!

100 g

5 Varieties to Choose From

AUSTRALIAN

Cut Your Own & Save

Lb

$8.75 Kg

Limit 1

FRESH BAKED IN OUR BAKERIES

French or Sourdough

Watch for our

FLYER EVERY FRIDAY

in select Saanich News, Victoria News, Goldstream News Gazette & Peninsula News Review

$ 00 300 g

2/ 2

NEW CROP

CALIFORNIA

Asparagus

$ 97

1

Lb

$4.34 Kg

Bulk Foods

20

%

off at the Tills PUREX

Bathroom Tissue 8 Double Roll

00

$

3/ 10

Limit 3 Total

KNUDSEN

Black Cherry Juice

$ 00

2/ 6

946 ml

Limit 4 Total

COUNTRY GROCER

Natural Almonds

$ 97

6

908 g

PACIFIC

Organic Broths 3 Varieties

Limit 6 Total

$ 97

1

946 ml Limit 6 Total

Proud to be serving Victoria since 1986 Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Deposits and/or environmental fees extra where applicable. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday Apr. 18th - Saturday Apr. 21st, 2012

4420 West Saanich Rd, Royal Oak • 1153 Esquimalt Rd, Victoria Open Daily 8am - 10pm

Offers valid at Royal Oak and Esquimalt Country Grocer locations only.

NEWS


www.saanichnews.com • A19

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

How to reach us

Travis Paterson 250-381-3633 ext 255 sports@vicnews.com

SPORTS

Cougars season ends in OT Victoria Cougars fall in double overtime of provincial gold medal final News staff

One lucky bounce ended the Victoria Cougars attempt at a championship hockey season. The Cougars lost in double overtime during the Cyclone Taylor Cup gold medal final on Sunday (April 15). The host Abbotsford Pilots came back to tie the game 2-2 in the third before John Morrow winning the provincial junior Abbotsford Pilots goalie Riley Parker deflects the puck past the net as Victoria B hockey championship. “It was difficult to have Cougars captain Brody Coulter fights for position in front of the net with Pilots such a great season (end defencemen Matthew Genovese and Brett Kolins, right, during the Cyclone Taylor that way),” Cougars coach Cup championship game on Sunday (April 15). Abbotsford won 3-2 in overtime. Mark Van Helvoirt said. “It’s tough to swallow but looking back it’s (also) tough to call this including the shutout, stopping all 27 of The Cougars were stuck in defenthe Nitehawks’ shots. an unsuccessful season.” sive mode for overtime and didn’t Having clinched a spot in the final, get enough of a push going to create The Cougars cleaned up the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League, the Cougars 7-2 loss to the Delta Ice chances. clinching the Andy Hebenton Trophy as Hawks in Game 3 on Saturday was of The end came at four minutes and regular season champs months before little concern. 17 seconds into the second overtime What mattered was the gold medal period. A standard shot from the point, the season ended. In the playoffs, the Cougars lost once in nine games to take the kind defensive defenceman Garthe Brent Patterson Memorial Trophy rett Lynum likely made just to try for a “We were 70 seconds from league championship. rebound or deflection, somehow manwinning and (the shot) was The Esquimalt-based club was the aged to handcuff Roch and sneak into top ranked junior B team in B.C., and the net. one in a million.” was the favourite to win the Cyclone It set off an epic celebration for the – Mark Van Helvoirt Cup, which the Peninsula Panthers won Pilots, and an epic disappointment for last year. Instead, the Pilots will reprethe Cougars. sent B.C. at the Keystone Cup, Western final. And when it started, Bannister was Former junior A Victoria Grizzlies Canadian Championships in Saskatoon, there, once again scoring the opener in defenceman Brett Kolins, captain of the the second period. Sask., this coming weekend. Pilots, was named MVP of the tournaRiley Lamb tied it for the Pilots but ment. Bannister’s banner year Victoria captain Brody Coulter put the Had the Cougars won, the trophy Chris Bannister ended his junior Cougars up 2-1 on a power play goal, would likely have been Bannister’s, hockey career in fine fashion, leading assisted by Bannister. who played an opportunistic game and the tournament in goals with six. He The Cougars went on defensive lock- was defensively sound throughout. also scored the Cougars’ first goal in all down in the third period, not giving up “He was a force,” Van Helvoirt said. four Cyclone Cup games. any scoring chances. So when the Pilots “The development of these players, Bannister’s heroics started in the scored on a pinball of a point shot from and their growth as individuals has second period of Game 1 of the round defenceman Matthew Genovese late in been tremendous this year, and at this robin on Thursday (April 12), which the the third, it was a shocker. level that’s what it’s all about. I’m thankCougars won 3-2. He scored all three “We were 70 seconds from winning ful to the players and organization, for goals, including the game-winner in the and (the shot) was one in a million. We putting together such a good year. It third. played a textbook third period. They was a lot of hard work.” In Game 2, the Cougars defeated the didn’t have any scoring opportunities, It was Van Helvoirt’s fourth trip to the Beaver Valley Nitehawks 3-0, on goals and (the tying goal) didn’t have enough Cyclone Cup since the 2004-05 season. by Bannister, Josh Wyatt and Sam Rice. power to knock over a pop bottle.” sports@vicnews.com Evan Roch earned the first two wins, Then it got worse.

Some say the Penticton Vees are on the verge of being the greatest junior A hockey team in Canadian history. It’s high praise, and should help three players from Greater Victoria become part of the club’s folklore. The Vees are going to the RBC Cup national junior A hockey championship, May 5-13, in Humboldt, Sask. The Vees finished the regular season with 42 wins in a row and set the B.C. Hockey League record with 54 wins in 60 games. Factoring heavily in the Vees’ success is former South Island Thunderbirds midget goalie Chad Katunar.

Family geography ends city’s oldest figure skating club Skating club hangs up its skates after 86 years

Travis Paterson

Trio helps Vees to BC title

Painting

Last week, Katunar was named BCHL player of the week as the Vees completed a sweep of the Powell River Kings in the BCHL final to win the Fred Page Cup. Katunar stopped 129 of 136 shots against the Kings, a .949 save percentage. Meanwhile ex-Saanich Braves forward Wade Murphy tied for the lead in playoff scoring (nine goals, nine assists) with Vees teammate Joey Benik (eight goals). Former Victoria Cougars and Grizzlies defenceman Nick Buchanan played all 15 games, scoring once. sports@vicnews.com

many years ago and of course this has now changed,” said Ted Barton, executive director of Skate Canada’s B.C./ Yukon branch. Aside from the club’s Travis Paterson disbandment, figure skatNews staff ing is relatively healthy in Greater Victoria and Blame the changing B.C., he added. demographic of down“Our B.C. numbers town Victoria for the have maintained the demise of the Victoria 20,000 member level for Figure Skating Club. the past several years.” The 86-year-old instituOak Bay Figure Skattion boasted 750 mem- ing Club, which started bers in 1966, the econd when its rink opened in largest in Canada at the 1975, has tripled since time. But now it has the club’s current direcfolded for good following tor of skating, Jamie its AGM on March 26. McGrigor, joined eight The club was right up years ago. there with the “ We ’ re city’s other hisup over “(The end) toric sporting 210 memorganizations in has been coming bers. The terms of longest a long time due to last few running organiyears have a gradual decline been banzation. “(The end) in numbers.” ner years has been comfor us.” – Sharon Jarymy ing a long time Juan de due to a gradual Fuca Figdecline in numbers,” said ure Skating Club presipresident Sharon Jar- dent Janys Langer also ymy. “As your numbers reported growth with go down, so does fund- her club, leading to a ing and savings. We knew general consensus that we didn’t have enough the demand for youth money to continue next figure skating is lower year.” in the heart of Victoria The majority of the and Esquimalt than the club’s remaining skaters neighbouring regions. will likely move into the “Since 2009 we have Saanich Figure Skating experienced moderClub based out of Pear- ate increases in our kes rec centre behind numbers, mostly at the Tillicum Mall, Jarymy (beginner) level and said. synchro teams,” Langer “We’ve worked closely said. over the years with SaanVictoria Skating got off ich. They’ve shared ice the ground in 1926, the with us, we’ve co-hosted first in the area, based ice shows and we share a out of the Patrick Arena coach, so our skaters are in Oak Bay. It survived familiar with them.” fires to the Patrick (1929) Numbers may have and Willows (1944) arefizzled downtown and nas, before finding a perin Esquimalt, but the manent home at Memoother clubs around town rial Arena from 1949 to are doing just fine. The 2003. family-centric suburbs of Since 2004 it has operSaanich, West Shore and ated out of Save-OnOak Bay are turning out Foods Memorial Centre skaters at a more consis- and the Archie Browning tent rate. Sports Centre. In her final president’s “(The) arenas aren’t report, Jarymy cited the recreation centres, so marginal increase in Vic- we didn’t get the extra toria’s population and a walk-by traffic, which decline in Esquimalt’s. didn’t help our publicity “Victoria Skating didn’t level,” Jarymy said. have so much competisports@vicnews.com tion from other clubs


A20 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

SPORTS STATISTICS

Down and dirty

Baseball

The Victoria Eagles won the first game of their double header against the White Rock Tritons on Sunday with a walk-off RBI single by Jesse Thompson in the bottom of the ninth, 5-4. White Rock won the second game 11-2. Top left: Victoria Eagles’ R.J. Forbes catches the late throw as White Rock Tritons baserunner Jackson Temple successfully steals second base during the first inning of the second game at Lambrick Park on Sunday (April 15). Top right: Eagles first baseman Kurt Horne readies to catch a pickoff attempt from pitcher Brett Hull as Tritons baserunner Jackson Temple slides safely back into first. Bottom: baserunner Brett Walker is tagged out by Eagles catcher Alex Hendra-Brown while trying to steal home in the eighth inning of Game 1. Triton Cameron Forbes, No. 45, looks on.

B.C. Midget Premier Baseball League Standings Nanaimo Pirates Coquitlam Reds Okanagan A’s Victoria Mariners Langley Blaze Victoria Eagles Parksville Royals Abbotsford Cards North Delta Van. Cannons White Rock North Shore Whalley Chiefs

W 5 4 6 3 4 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1

L 1 1 2 1 3 3 2 3 3 4 4 4 5

Pct. GB 0.833 0.800 .5 0.750 0.750 1 0.571 1.5 0.500 2 0.500 2 0.400 2.5 0.400 2.5 0.333 3 0.200 3.5 0.200 3.5 0.167 4

B.C. Junior Premier Baseball League Standings Vancouver Coquitlam Redlegs White Rock North Shore Twins Nanaimo Pirates Langley Blaze Whalley Chiefs North Delta Victoria Eagles Victoria Mariners Abbotsford Okanagan

W 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0

L 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0

Pct. GB 1.000 1.000 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.500 1 0.000 2 0.000 2 0.000 2

Gymnastics Lion’s Pride Gymnastics results from the B.C. Championships in North Vancouver, April 13-15 Provincial Level 3 Keerstin Arden: Vault – 10th place, Bars – 8th place, Beam – 9th place, Floor – 15th place. All-around– 8th place. Paris Leigh: Vault – 21st, Bars – 18th, Beam – 12th, Floor – 13th. All-around– 16th. Provincial Level 4 Natalie Louis: Vault – 14th, Bars – 15th, Beam – 6th, Floor – 1st. All-around– 7th.

Travis Paterson/News staff

Provincial Level 5 Brianne Kerr: Vault – 8th, Bars – 5th, Beam – 5th, Floor – 6th. All-around– 6th. Nicola Horwood: Vault – 2nd, Bars – 11th, Beam – 11th, Floor – 3rd. All-around – 9th. National Open Maya Rahn: Vault – 1st, Bars – 6th, Beam – 8th, Floor – 5th. Allaround– 4th.

Rugby B.C. Rugby Union Canadian Direct Insurance Premier League Standings GP W L T BP Pts James Bay 12 11 1 0 8 52 Cast. Wand. 12 8 3 1 10 44 Capilano 12 9 3 0 7 43 Burnaby Lake 12 7 5 0 7 35 Meraloma 12 6 5 1 7 33 UBCOB Ravens 12 4 8 0 3 19 UVic Vikes 12 1 11 0 7 11 Abbotsford 12 1 11 0 2 6 Recent results James Bay 57 Abbotsford 10 Meraloma 14 Burnaby Lake 6 Capilano 51 UVic Vikes 21 Cast. Wand. 35 UBCOB Ravens 13 Ceili’s Cup League (Div. 1) James Bay 26 Abbotsford 26 Capilano 42 UVic Vikes 32 Cast. Wand. 50 UBCOB Ravens 14 Province Wide Third Division Playoff semifinals Castaway Wanderers 10 Velox Valhallians 70 Cowichan 16 Comox Kickers 12 Women’s Adidas Premiership Standings GP W L T BP Pts Velox Valkyries 8 8 0 0 8 40 Burnaby Lake 8 7 1 0 5 33 United 7 6 1 0 6 30 Bayside 9 5 4 0 5 25 Capilano 8 2 6 0 4 12 Meraloma 8 2 6 0 3 11 UVic Vikes 7 1 6 0 1 5 SFU Rugby 9 1 8 0 1 5 Recent results UVic Vikes 0 Velox Valkyries 41

Give them power. Give them confidence Give them control.

LOWEST PRICES OF THE SEASON! 50% OFF EYEGLASSES FRAMES, LENSES & OPTIONS Complete pair purchase required. Select designer frames only. Offer ends May 6, 2012 .

BONUS $20 GIFT CARD WITH YOUR 50% OFF PURCHASE

GIVE THEM A PAPER ROUTE!

Must present this offer to receive the $20 gift card. Gift card will be delivered via post mail 4-6 weeks after mail in redemption form. May only be used with the 50% off eyeglasses offer, ends May 6, 2012.

CALL TODAY FOR AN EYE EXAM Vancouver Downtown Park Royal Metropolis at Metrotown Willowbrook Mall Guildford Mayfair Shopping Centre Victoria Bay Centre

(604) 689-2321 (604) 925-1411 x3450 (604) 436-1196 x450 (604) 530-8434 x450 (604) 588-2111 x450 (250) 386-3322 x343 (250) 385-1311 x256

There’s more online For more stories and web exclusives visit saanichnews.com

It’s so easy to get started… call

250-360-0817 circulation@vicnews.com www.vicnews.com


www.saanichnews.com • A21

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMING EVENTS

LOST AND FOUND

BC ARTS And Culture Week is here! From April 22-28, arts councils & schools in your community are hosting activities of all sorts as part of the celebration. www.bcartsweek.org

FOUND: CASE with 2 hearing aids on Lands End Rd. Call 250-656-5765.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

LOST: 1 gold hoop earring, Sidney area. Call 250-6551070.

BOTTLE DRIVE Gorge Masters Soccer Team

Fundraiser for World Cup Masters over 30’s Turin Italy in 2013 Join us April 21st at Hampton Park and drop off your bottles 10 am -1 pm Thank you for your support!

CALL FOR ENTRIES 10TH ANNUAL Kitty Coleman Woodland Art & Bloom Festival. Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show. Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting May 19,20, 21 Applications for Artisans are available at woodlandgardens.ca or phone 250-338-6901

INFORMATION PATIENTS - NEED a Medical Marijuana Doctor? Growers want to be a Designated Grower? Info at: www.greenlineacademy.com or 1-250-860-8611. SUPERB 24TH Annual Auction. Horse drawn carriages & sleighs. Plus incredible offering horse era antiques. Sunday, May 6, 12 noon, Al Oeming Park; Bodnarus Auctioneering. Phone 306-227-9505. Canada’s Best. www.aloemingauctions.com.

LEGALS NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Re: Estate of MARJORIE IRENE BESLEY, Deceased Date of Death: April 2, 2012 Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of Marjorie Irene Besley, late of 4360 Gordon Head Road, Victoria, BC, are hereby required to send particulars of their claims to the Executor at 402 – 1321 Blanshard Street, PO Box 8043, Victoria, BC, V8W 3R7, on or before May 22, 2012, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the Executor has notice.

LOST: NECKLACE, Sun., Apr. 7, on Beacon Ave. between the Park & Fifth St. in Sidney. It is a heavy brass necklace more than 1 inch in circumference. Sentimental value. Call 250-544-8022.

$294+ DAILY Mailing Postcards! Easy! Guaranteed Legit Work! www.ThePostcardGuru.com $20-$60/Hr Using Your Computer! www.FreeJobPosition.com Overnight Cash To Your Doorstep! www.CashGiftingBucks.com More Amazing Opportunities Visit: www.LegitCashJobs.com

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 copies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition! Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335 or hunt@blackpress.ca HOME BASED BUSINESSWe need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com LOOKING FOR Avon Reps. Be your own boss. Earn extra money, work from home. Call 250-386-0070 to learn more.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1(877)818-0783. APPLY NOW: Pennywise Scholarship For Women to attend Journalism certificate course at Langara College in Vancouver. Deadline May 30, 2012. More information: www.bccommunitynews.com

PERSONALS HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 250220-3334 or 800-777-8000. www.interactivemale.com

HELP WANTED ARCTIC CO-OPERATIVES Limited is recruiting Line Cooks and Guest Services positions for Inns North hotels in Nunavut. E-mail your resume: humanresources@arcticco-op.com

or fax: 204-632-8575.

CREW WANTED talented individual needed to work on 75’ power boat, May 1 to Aug 31. Must have previous deep water experience and a valid passport for this period. Send resume to: iyw.michael@shaw.ca DATA ENTRY Operators. elan Data Makers. Minimum 60WPM. Good numeric keyboarding speed. Include keyboarding speeds in resume. Email resumes to: judym@elandatamakers.com DAVE LANDON FORD requires a licensed auto tech or skilled 2-4 yr apprentice to join our team. Industry wages and benefits package available. Please send resume to dlsales@telus.net. EXPERIENCED SERVICE Provider for Chrysler dealership in Salmon Arm. Strong customer satisfaction skills. Able to work in a fast paced environment. Excellent wage/ benefit package. Fax resume 1-250-832-4545. E-mail: pat@brabymotors.com FOOD COUNTER Attendant full time/shift work, nights, over night, early mornings and weekends. $10.60/hr + benefits. Apply at store or fax 250477-9344. JEM Restaurants Ltd. doing business as Tim Horton’s, 3990 Shelbourne St., Saanich, V8N 3E2. HAIRSTYLIST WANTED Full time/part time for First Choice Hair Cutters. Guaranteed $11/ hour, 25% profit sharing, plus benfits, plus paid birthday, plus annual advanced training and advancement opportunities. Call 250-360-1923 today for an interview. HOST FAMILIES NEEDED! Host an International student from Japan May 10-13, 2012. Compensation provided. Contact Kerry Williams at 250-3884077. kwilliams@mliesl.com

The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company, Executor By its solicitors: Jones Emery Hargreaves Swan

SALES

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

NOW - NEW 8 week courses covering snowmobile or quad or marine outboard repair. Take one course or all - fit your interest and your timeline. GPRC Fairview Campus, Fairview, Alberta. Affordable residences. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

T-MAR INDUSTRIES located in Campbell River is hiring for the position of Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanic. Position comes with a competitive benefit package and applicant must possess a valid driver’s license. Contact Tyson Lambert. Mail: 5791 Duncan Bay Road, Campbell River BC V9H 1N6 Fax: 250-286-9502 Email: tysonlambert@t-mar.com

PERSONAL SERVICES

TRADES, TECHNICAL

HEALTH PRODUCTS

FINANCIAL SERVICES

MORLEY MULDOON Transport is seeking qualified Heavy Duty Mechanics or Heavy Equipment Technicians, Dispatcher, HR/Safety Supervisor. Fax resume to 780-8426511 or email to: dispatch.mmt@telus.net.

GET PAID to lose weight. $5,000 for your success story. Personal image TV Show. Call to qualify: 416-730-5684 ext 2243. Joanna@mertontv.ca. www.mertontv.ca.

NEED HELP MANAGING YOUR DEBT?

HELP WANTED WANTED: Servers, bartenders, barrista’s & cooks @ Telegraph Cove Resorts Ltd. Send resume to Box 1, Telegraph Cove, BC V0N 3J0. Fax: 250-928-3105 or email: tcrltd@island.net. Attn: Taso.

FOUND. SILVER ring, parking lot of Liquor Depot, 3510 Blanshard on Apr.4 (250)595-0952

PERSONAL SERVICES

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Manager: We are looking for a dynamic and creative team member with extensive skills to create new markets and opportunities for the sale of new products and services. Check out our website for a full job description and how to apply for this challenging role: http://www.ethoscmg.com/opportunities.html

SERVICE MANAGER - Hanna Chrysler Ltd. (Hanna, Alberta). Opportunity in a perfect family environment. Strong team, competitive wages, benefits, growth potential. Fax resume: 403-854-2845. Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

Licensed, Government Approved, Canadian Company.

EDUCATION/TUTORING

Volunteers Needed! Join us as we greet cruise ships and direct passengers to the wonderful sites of Victoria. Volunteers are in period costumes much to the delight of the visitors. Lots of fun, free parking. Pick your own shifts. More info at: victoriaam.com or email

TRADES, TECHNICAL

HELP WANTED

www.debtgone.ca

HERBAL MAGIC Limited time offer - Save 50%!! Lose weight and keep it off. Results guaranteed! Don’t delay call now. 1-800-854-5176.

VOLUNTEERS

TELEPHONE SALES persons required for a local fund raiser. Sales experience is an asset. Evenings Mon-Fri 5pm-9pm. $11/hr+ incentives. Please call 250-384-4427, leave detailed message.

CONCRETE FINISHERS and Form Setters. Edmonton based company seeks experienced concrete finishers and form setters for work in Edmonton and northern Alberta. Subsistence and accommodations provided for out of town work; john@raidersconcrete.com. Cell 780-660-8130. Fax 780-444-7103.

Need STRESS relief? One easy payment makes that possible!

Call FREE 1-877-220-3328

victoriaam@shaw.ca or call 250-381-1611.

bcjobnetwork.com

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161.

DROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll Free 1 877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS AND EMPLOYERS

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Creative Services

Creative Services

Graphic Designer

Graphic Designer

The Victoria News is looking for a skilled advertising designer to join our community newspaper’s production department.

The Victoria News is looking for a skilled advertising designer to join our community newspaper’s production department.

This full time position requires the successful applicant to be proficient in AdobeCS3: InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator and Acrobat on a Mac platform. Experience in web design would be an asset. The position may require shift and weekend work. Creative design experience in graphic arts is preferred, and a portfolio is required. You are a self-starter, team player and are comfortable working in a fast-paced, deadline driven environment.

This part-time position is for approximately 20 hrs per week and requires the successful applicant to be proficient in AdobeCS3: InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator and Acrobat on a Mac platform. Experience in web design would be an asset. The position may require shift and weekend work. Creative design experience in graphic arts is preferred, and a portfolio is required. You are a self-starter, team player and are comfortable working in a fast-paced, deadline driven environment.

We are a well-established, nationallyrecognized community newspaper group with more than 150 community, daily and urban papers located in B.C., Alberta, Washington State, Hawaii and Ohio. Those interested in applying should submit their resumé by Monday, April 23, 2012 to: Janice Marshall, Production Manager 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC V8W 1E4 E-mail: creative@vicnews.com Fax: (250) 386-2624 All inquiries and applications will be held in the strictest confidence. We would like to thank in advance all who apply, however only those chosen for an interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.

www.blackpress.ca

We are a well-established, nationallyrecognized community newspaper group with more than 150 community, daily and urban papers located in B.C., Alberta, Washington State, Hawaii and Ohio. Those interested in applying should submit their resumé by Monday, April 23, 2012 to: Janice Marshall, Production Manager 818 Broughton St., Victoria, BC V8W 1E4 E-mail: creative@vicnews.com Fax: (250) 386-2624 All inquiries and applications will be held in the strictest confidence. We would like to thank in advance all who apply, however only those chosen for an interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.

www.blackpress.ca


A22 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

PERSONAL SERVICES TRADES, TECHNICAL

TRADES, TECHNICAL

TRADES, TECHNICAL

Come grow with us. At Catalyst Paper, the opportunities are endless. We challenge and reward you to stretch your abilities, improve your personal and career prospects and get ahead. We're a leading producer of paper and pulp, and the largest producer of specialty printing papers and newsprint in western North America. Join us, for a strong future together. Our Vancouver Island mills are now accepting résumés for:

Instrument Mechanics OElectricians OMachinists OMillwrights OPipefitters OHeavy Duty Mechanics OPower Engineers O

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

STUDY.WORK. S U .

SUCCEED. TRAIN TO BE A PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS MANAGER TODAY! Professional business managers plan, organize, direct & control the activities of the branch or department for which they are responsible or the business they operate. Train locally for the skills necessary in this competitive career field.

SprottSha w

COMMUNITY COLLEGE S i n c e 1 9 0 3

250.384.8121 www.sprottshaw.com CALL VICTORIA:

APARTMENT/CONDO

AUTO FINANCING

FUEL/FIREWOOD

LEGAL SERVICES

FURNITURE

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

MOVING SALE- chair & couch, $350. Dining room suite, $1500. Loveseat, desk, rocking chair, closet, Hoover shampooer, patio set, weed blower/eater, misc clothing etc. All in excellent condition. Call (250)652-0127.

CRIMINAL RECORD?

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

Auto Financing 1.800.910.6402

2008 FORD F-150 truck canopy. Thomas Cincade lighted picture. New, thermal patio sliding door (6’ x 6.8’). T Zone vibration technology exerciser, 23 model cars. 250-382-1399.

DIY STEEL Building deals! Many sizes and models. Make an offer on clearance buildings today and save thousands of dollars. Free brochure - 1-800668-5111 ext. 170. **HOME PHONE Reconnect** Call 1-866-287-1348. Prepaid long distance specials! Feature package specials! Referral program! Don’t be without a home phone! Call to connect! 1-866-287-1348.

DIGITAL PHOTO retouch, editing, add/remove objects/people. Tribute posters, home movies to CD/DVD. 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MATTRESSES, FURNITURE, TOOLS! New & Used, Stock Reduction Sale! BUY & SAVE, 9818 4th St., Sidney. buyandsave.ca Visa, M/C SAWMILLS FROM only $3997 - Make money and save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info & DVD: 1-800566-6899 Ext:400OT. www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT

BUILDING SUPPLIES METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

FREE ITEMS FREE: CHINA cabinet with lights, good condition. Call 250-595-5734. FREE: DOUBLE sized mattress and box spring, good condition. Call 250-383-6776. PALE GREEN double bed frame w/ shelving headboardno mattress. 250-656-5150.

STEEL BUILDING- Blowout sale! 20x26 $5,199. 25x28 $5,799. 30x42 $8,390. 32x56 $11,700. 40x50 $14,480. 47x76 $20,325. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

REAL ESTATE

FRIENDLY FRANK

FOR SALE BY OWNER

1940 PLUTO pattern; 1930 McCall’s cross stitched, solid wood shelf, 4’x32”x14”, $10 each. Call 250-508-9008.

LION’S COVE condo: 55+, beautiful 2 bdrm, 2 bath. $224,500. Todd 250-478-4844

2 PAIRS of drapes, excellent condition, $40 a pair. Call 250595-5734. 4 METAL folding chairs, padded seat, contour back, never used, nice, $50 (all). Call 250656-8720. COFFEE MAKER, $10. 3 seat sofa, light colour, $59. Call 250-881-8133.

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES

Call: 1-250-616-9053 RENTALS

TWO LEVEL Plate glass coffee table with matching side tables. $60. (250)727-3064.

HOMES FOR RENT

FUEL/FIREWOOD

GORGE/TILLICUM, 3 bdrm upper, huge house, $70,000 in renos, fenced yard, N/S, N/P $1700, May. 1. 250-479-9715

CUT, SPILT, DELIVERED. Guaranteed cord. Reliable, outstanding reputation, over 12 years. Custom orders available upon request. Call (250)538-0022.

MALAHAT 1 & 2 BdrmsPanoramic views. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250-478-9231.

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES SIDNEY- 3 bdrm sxs duplex, 1 bath, no steps. NS/NP. $1375+.Lease.(250)656-4003.

SENIOR ASSISTED LIVING OPEN HOUSE- Sat & Sun, 2pm-4pm, Apr 7 & 8 and Apr 14 & 15. James Bay Seniors rental 202-455 Kingston Street, Services include daily meals, housekeeping, 24 hr staff+ more. Privately owned come to the Camelot. Call Luella at 250-519-0550.

SHARED ACCOMMODATION C. SAANICH, room for rent (ASAP). Quiet, garden area. 778-426-2294 after 8:30pm.

STORAGE SHIPPING CONTAINERS 20’ or 40’. Buy or Rent. Safe and secure. Easymove Container Services. Serving Vancouver Island. 1-(888)331-3279

SUITES, LOWER BRENTWOOD, BACH, Lrg, furn’d, ground level. Priv. entrance, parking, close to bus. NS/NP. $700. (250)652-9454. ESQUIMALT, 1 bdrm + den, bright, very quiet, shared W/D, fenced yard, all utils incl’d, $800. 250-744-3180 before 7.

LANGFORD Sm 2BR grnd, priv patio, 5 appls, NS, NP, $1050 incl hydro 250-6343212 refs.

www.webuyhomesbc.com

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

Auto Loans or

Fraser Tolmie Apts 1701 Cedar Hill X Rd 1-877-659-4069 1 and 2 bdrms 1-877-659-4069 www.frasertolmime.ca 1 & 2 Bedrooms 1701 Cedar Hill X Road www.frasertolmime.ca for pics

HOUSES FOR SALE

SIZE 3-4 Grad dress, fuchsia/grey chiffon overlay, new, $40. Call 250-478-4703. $60. $39.

GUARANTEED

CORDOVA BAY. $609,900. 3 bdrm, 3bath. Motivated. Priced below appraisal 250-818-5397

ROCK BAND Guitar Hero; 5 games & 6 controllers, $45. Call (250)391-1698.

TABLE & CHAIRS, Camera older model, 250-477-8753.

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557

GORGE AREA, large 1bdrm, main level suite, N/P, N/S, $800 + 1/3 hydro (approx $50 mo) Call Rob 250-727-2843.

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

LARGE IVORY lace table cloth, 64”x90”, $40. Call 250721-2386.

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-9815991.

NEW, ELECTRIC fireplace insert, $99 obo. Call 250-3821399.

JOIN US ON:

TRANSPORTATION

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

RENTALS

FINANCIAL SERVICES

For more information on these roles or to apply online, please visit: www.catalystpaper.com/careers.

www.catalystpaper.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

NEWS

SMALL 3-BDRM house. Newly updated. Large yard, storage shed, W/D. $1450.+ utils. Text or call (250)858-2763. VIEW ROYAL, Portage Inlet, 3 bdrms, garage, deck, W/D, $1350 + utils. 250-479-4856.

SAANICH, GRD level 2 bdrm, newly reno’d, close to all amens, NS/NP, $900,(Immed), call 250-704-6613. SIDNEY: 1-BDRM, avail. May 1st. NS/NP, W/D, cable, $800. Call (250)656-9874.

SUITES, UPPER SIDNEY, BRIGHT, upper level 2 bdrm, full bath, yard, storage, new patio, parking, W/D, N/S, N/P, ref’s, 1 year lease, a May. 1, $1150. 778-426-4556.

TRANSPORTATION AIRPLANES

We Will Pay You $1000

All Makes, All Models. New & Used Inventory. 1-888-229-0744 or apply on line at: www.kiawest.com (click credit approval) Must be employed w/ $1800/mo. income w/ drivers license. DL #30526

AUTO SERVICES $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

CASH PAID

FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427 Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

CARS 2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

2008 HONDA CIVIC LX 4 door, auto, top of the line & fully loaded including rare power sunroof option. Babied by 1 owner, garage kept, hwy commuter (76k). Dealer maintained. Burgundy with factory 5 spoke alloy wheels & a set of winters tires on steel rims. Full power-train warranty until Dec. 20 2012. $14,250 o.b.o. 250-466-4156

$50-$1000 CASH For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

858-5865 OFF-ROAD VEHICLES NOW - NEW 8 week courses covering snowmobile or quad or marine outboard repair. Take one course or all - fit your interest and your timeline. GPRC Fairview Campus, Fairview, Alberta. Affordable residences. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview. RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

2000 KUSTOM KOACH 26’ 5th Wheel Ready to roll, in great shape. Has slide room, big awning, oak cabinets, tons of storage, big fridge & stove, ducted heat & A/C. High quality unit with rubber roof & fiberglass body. $10,995 OBO, 250 466 4156 Bill

CESSNA 180 1976 on 3000 Caps for lease. DeHavilland DHC-2 1957 on 4930 Floats for lease. Van. Is. E-mail; rleroy@telus.net

2003, 33’, 3 slide Citation Supreme, exc. shape, $27,000. 250-888-3391, 778-430-4479.

AUTO FINANCING

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in April, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. 1-888-593-6095 www.creditdrivers.ca

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

BUYING OR SELLING? www.bcclassified.com


www.saanichnews.com • A23

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

ON TWO WHEELS? See our Auto Section

INMOTION

IN YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER EVERY FRIDAY

TRANSPORTATION

MARINE

TRUCKS & VANS

BOATS

$0-$1000 CASH

1998 BAYLINER 2452 Ciera Express, 2009 5.7L Merc cruiser FWC, 280 HP w/136 hours, Alpha Drive w/ SS Prop. 2002 EZ Loader trailer, 2010 Yamaha 9.9 High Thrust. Full cabin features, $21,000. (250)474-1939 (250)727-5947

For Junk Cars/Trucks Will tow away any car or truck in 45 mins. FREE!

TowPimp.com 250-588-7172

toll free 1-888-588-7172

- BUYING - RENTING - SELLING bcclassified.com

SERVICE DIRECTORY #OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

DRAFTING & DESIGN

GARDENING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

IRRIGATION/SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

DESIGN FOR PERMIT. w w w. i n t e gra d e s i g n i n c . c o m Call Steven (250) 381-4123.

SUMMIT IRRIGATION Services. Certified sprinkler systems. Property maintenance, more. Call James at 250-883-1041.

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376. FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544. KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601 COMPLETE BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Fast, friendly and efficient. Kathy 250-882-8194. PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

BUSINESS SERVICES DENIED CANADA Pension plan disability benefits? The Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help. Call Allison Schmidt at 1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca

CARPENTRY BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748. CUSTOM PLANER- (Fir, cedar) baseboards, casings, crown molding (any shape). Call (250)588-5920. McGREGOR HOME Repair & Renos. Decks to doors. Small jobs OK. WCB. (250)655-4518

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES CARING BONDABLE work since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. Call (250)385-5869 MALTA HOUSECLEANING. BBB. Best rates. Residential/Comm. 250-388-0278 SPOTLESS HOME Cleaning. Affordable, Experienced, Reliable, Efficient. (250)508-1018

COMPUTER SERVICES COMPUDOC MOBILE Computer Services. Repairs, tuneups, tutoring, web sites and more. Call 250-886-8053.

CONTRACTORS BATHROOM REMODELING. “Gemini Baths” Plumb, Elec. Tile, Cabinets. 250-896-9302. CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877 J.D. SHIELDS Construction Custom Carpentry, New Construction, Reno’s, Home repairs. Quality workmanship for 35 years. Call 250-665-6943 Email: jds1956@telus.net

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassified.com

DRYWALL AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525. BEAT MY Price! Best workmanship. 38 years experience. Call Mike, 250-475-0542. MUD on the RUN. Small drywall repairs, textures & renovations. Ross, (250)812-4879.

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Expert in new homes & renos. References. #22779 AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Call 250-478-8858.

FENCING ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637. QUALITY CEDAR fencing, decks and installation, pressure washing. For better prices & quotes call Westcoast Fencing. 250-588-5920. STEPS, DECKS, Fence, new repairs, rot, mould, interior/exterior concrete. 250-588-3744.

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca BETTER LAWNS & GARDENS Lawns, hedges, cleanups & maintenance. Reliable service. 250-721-2555 DPM SERVICES: lawn/gard, cleanups, pruning, hedges, landscapes, irrigation, pwr washing, gutters 15yrs. 250883-8141. FREE MULCH on all Landscaping we install for you. Visit our Nursery and pick your plants! Call 250-391-9366. GARDEN DESIGN or redesign You install or we do, Huge Discount at our Nursery. Call 250-391-9366. GARDEN OVERGROWN? Weeding, lawn cuts, cleanups, pruning. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236. I DO GARDENING etc. $15/hr. Your tools. Reliable. (250)383-3995. LANDSCAPE & TREE care hedges/pruning/shaping. Lawn & garden. Maint. 18 yrs exp. WCB. Andrew, (250)893-3465. PRO SCAPE- Lawn & garden. Tree & hedge, power washing. Free estimates. Senior’s discount 15%. Call 250-813-0141 RUSTY’S LAWN SERVICE. Reliable UVic Student. Free estimates. (250)858-6614. RUSTY’S SOIL, Mulch & Garden loam delivery. Free estimates. (250)858-6614.

HAULING & 250-889-5794.

RECYCLING.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning, Guards, windows, powerwashing, roof de-moss, repairs. Insured. Call (250)507-6543.

CBS MASONRY BBB A+ Accredited Business. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Patios, Sidewalk Repair. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. Call (250)294-9942 or 250-589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778.

HANDYPERSONS AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. BEETLES RESIDENTIAL Renovations Ltd. Bathrooms, decks, painting, landscaping and handyman services. Fully insured and guaranteed. Free estimates. Call 250-889-4245. BIG BEAR Handyman & Painting Services. No job too small. Free Estimates. Senior discounts. Barry 250-896-6071 RENO MEN. Ref’s. Senior’s Discount. BBB. Free Estimates. Call 250-885-9487. Photos: renomen.biz HIRE-A-HUSBAND, 250-5144829. Specialize in bath/ kitchen reno’s & accessibility. Serving Victoria for 23yrs.

✭BUBBA’’S HAULING✭ Honest & on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service.(250)478-8858. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774 SMART GUYS Hauling. Garden waste, junk removal, clean-ups, etc. Reliable, courteous service. 250-544-0611 or 250-889-1051.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com SENIOR HANDYMAN. Household repairs. Will assist do-it-yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

#1 JUNK Removal & Hauling. Free estimates. Cheapest in town. Same day emergency removal. Call 250-818-4335. lalondejeff62@yahoo.ca $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164.

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

GARDENING

by a Professionally Designed Renovation of your dated home or condo. Contractor/ Developer/ Investor Island Pro Construction Ltd since ‘94. Call Dennis (250)858-6218 M&S OXFORD Home/Commercial Reno’s & Painting. Patio’s, Decks, Sheds, Hardwood and Trim. 25 yrs exp. Quality Guar. 250-213-5204.

PRESSURE WASHING

SANDSTONE AVAILABLE in different shades of brown, gray & blue. Orders upon request. Speciality items in stock, top quality material. Call (250)538-0022.

A&R ROOFING Ltd. Residential & Commercial. New & reroofing expert. Torch-on, cedar shakes, roof repairs, gutter cleaning. WCB covered. Free estimates. Mike 250-516-3944

MOVING & STORAGE

RUBBISH REMOVAL

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. COLOURS & IDEAS. Exterior/ Interior Painting. All work waranteed. Call (250)208-8383. DRYWALL REPAIRS & HOUSE PAINTING. Free estimates. If you, your family or friends need any of the above give Joseph Bronson a call 250-686-0663. Reasonable rates in a tight economy. I take pride in the end results.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178. RE-STUCCO & HARDY Plank/Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

TREE SERVICES LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

WINDOW CLEANING

OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

BOB’S WINDOW Cleaning Licensed 25 years. Cell 250-884-7066, 381-7127 msg DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss. Free estimate. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB. NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-590-2929, 250-812-3213.

HOME REPAIRS

ST PAINTING free est, written guarantee and full ref’s. WCB ins. Call Kaleb (250)884-2597.

WINDOWS

HIRE-A-HUSBAND, 250-5144829. Specialize in bath/ kitchen reno’s & accessibility. Serving Victoria for 23yrs.

YOUR PERSONAL Interior Painter. No Job too Big or Too Small. Call Gilbert today for free quote. (250)886-6446.

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.

WEST HARBOUR Const. Ext/Int. Reno’s; Finishing carpentry, windows, doors, drywall, decks, painting, hardwood & laminate floor installation. Res/comm. 250419-3598, westharb@telus.net

GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323.

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

PAINTING

MAKE 20-100K

PLASTERING

ROMAX MASONRY. Exp’d & Professional. Chimneys, Brick Veneer, Rockwork, Cultured Stone, Interlocking Paving. Fully insured. Estimates. Call 250-588-9471 - 250-882-5181

MALTA MOVING. Best Rates. BBB Member. Residential/ Commercial. (250)388-0278.

QUALITY WORK. All Renos & Repairs. Decks, Suites, Drywall, Painting. 250-818-7977.

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

CBS MASONRY BBB A+. Chimney, Fireplaces, Rock, Flagstone, Concrete, Pavers, Repair, Rebuild, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee.” Free Competitive Est’s. Call (250) 294-9942/589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton. Prices starting at $85/hr. Call 250-220-0734.

HAULING AND SALVAGE

FURNITURE REFINISHING

J&L GARDENING Specialty yard clean-up and maintenance. Master gardeners. John or Louise (250)891-8677 250-208-8535 WOODCHUCK: Neglected garden? Spring clean-ups, hedges, power raking, aerating, weed/moss stump, blackberry & ivy removal. 24yrs exp. WCB. ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualified, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com AURICLE Lawns- cln up lawn garden hedge pruning soil tests, rototill. (250)882-3129

250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates.

LADY PAINTER Serving the Peninsula for over 20 yrs. Interior/exterior. Call Bernice, 250-655-1127.


A24 â&#x20AC;˘ www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

Outdoor experts heading to Pearkes rec centre this weekend The Vancouver Island Outdoor Adventure Expo comes to the Pearkes Recreation Centre April 21 and 22, bringing together experts, products and services for the coming camping, canoeing, kayaking, hiking, fishing and cycling seasons. Activities Jennifer Blyth on-site include Business Beat archery, a

12-metre air gun range, a paintball range, fishing simulator and kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; zone. Admission is $8 for adults, $4 for kids (five and younger free), or $20 for a family (two adults, two kids). For more details, visit www. ifmevents.com.

New & Notable Campus Acura threw open the doors last week for the much-anticipated grand opening of its new showroom at 3347 Oak St. Campus Auto Groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Richard Graham, management and staff welcomed Takashi Sekiguchi,

SPRING SALE AND CONTEST (VALID UNTIL MAY 31, 2012)

president and CEO of Honda Canada; Jerry Chenkin, executive vicepresident of Honda Canada, and invited guests to the celebration. Following a ceremonial ribbon cutting and gift exchange, Campus unveiled the all-new Acura ILX, set to be released in late May or early June. Also on display was the allnew 2013 RDX Sport Utility, available now. The Fairmont Empress has transformed its Kiplingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant into the Ivy Ballroom, which will open with a celebratory party in early May. With a capital investment of more than $500,000, this airy space â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just under 4,500 square feet and with room for up to 280 guests â&#x20AC;&#x201C; takes its name from the ivy façade of the iconic local hotel. The board of governors of

Commissionaires Victoria, the Islands and Yukon recently welcomed John Dewar as chief executive officer, replacing the retiring Stan Verran. Dewar has held a number of senior executive positions elsewhere, and also served in the Royal Canadian Navy, where he commanded HMCS Chignecto, Miramichi and Huron. The Canadian Home Buildersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association-Victoria has issued a call for entries for its 2012 Construction Achievements and Renovations of Excellence (CARE) Awards of Vancouver Island. Entry forms and criteria are online at www.chbavictoria.com and submissions are due by 4 p.m. on June 11. Entrants must be members of the CHBA, a registered non-profit organization sup-

Sunday Buffet Brunch Every Sunday

Kubotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BX25TLB All Purpose Sub Compact Tractor, Loader, Backhoe

250-746-1755

Gutter Cleaning, Repair & Installation Prompt Service

Sooke to Sidney Since 1969

380-2662

CONCRETE â&#x20AC;˘ ROOFING â&#x20AC;˘ MASONRY SEALANTS

1520 McKenzie Ave. (corner of Cedar Hill & McKenzie)

(250) 721-2188

H

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more on line - saanichnews.com

Looking for work? We can help.

Courtenay

Island Tractor & Supply

$ 1384

Sittings at 11am and 1pm. Reservations suggested

&& www.islandtractors.com Duncan

The Vancouver Island chapter of the Canadian Association of Family Enterprise (CAFE) recently presented the McCall family of McCall Bros. Funeral Directors Ltd. with the Family Enterprise of the Year Achievement Award. The award recognizes Canadian family businesses and the considerable contribution they make to their local communities and national economy. McCall Bros. is a fourthgeneration family business, serving the Victoria community since 1921. Submit your business news to jblyth@telus.net.

North Island Tractor 250-334-0801

Get the training and support you need to find and keep a job in B.C. Job search resources â&#x20AC;˘ Personal employment planning â&#x20AC;˘ Workshops and training â&#x20AC;˘ Specialized services

459

$

Anaheim

Plus $100 taxes - Air from Victoria Holiday Inn Anaheim (3 star) May 31 - June 5

/pp

495

$

Las Vegas

/pp

Plus $102 taxes - Air from Victoria Monte Carlo (4 star) June 3-6

Palm Springs

1059

$

/pp

Plus $126 taxes - Air from Victoria Embassy Suites La Quinta (4 star) Oct 8-15

Oahu, Hawaii

1765

$

/pp

Plus $41 taxes - Air from Bellingham Aulani, a Disney Resort & Spa (5 star) Oct 8-15

OPEN SATURDAYS 10-4 PM Visit us at our Mt Doug location at 4089A Shelbourne St. - Torquay Village

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES CENTRES Locations across B.C. Visit one near you. WorkBCCentres.ca 250.387.6121 TDD: 1.800.661.8773

250 477 4877 or 1 866 477 4898 mtdoug@cruiseshipcenters.com

GUTTER REPAIR â&#x20AC;˘ GUTTER PROTECTION

Total prize value exceeds $9,000

CARPET CLEANING â&#x20AC;˘ ROOF DE-MOSSING

FREE DRAW

Kubotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RTV400Ci Utility Vehicle

0% for 48 mo. OAC = $385/mo

Awards & Accolades

GUTTER CLEANING â&#x20AC;˘ WINDOW CLEANING â&#x20AC;˘ POWER WASHING

ENTER TO WIN A Kubota Toy Pedal Tractor AND an RTV400Ci

porting education and training, professionalism, consumer awareness and housing affordability.

BC Reg # 27574

*Conditions apply. Pricing is based on double occupancy. Flights depart daily and are based on availability at time of booking. Fares are not guaranteed until paid in full. Deposit varies based on package.

The Employment Program of British Columbia is funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia.


www.saanichnews.com • A25

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

sceneandheard

P H O T O

F E A T U R E

Photos by Gunnar Freyr Steinsson To book events call 250-381-3484 or e-mail adminassist@vicnews.com

■ Tru Value Foods Grand Opening - Cordova Bay Plaza ■ Wednesday, April 11

Cordova Bay welcomes its brand new Tru Value grocery store Tru Value, Cordova Bay’s brand new, full-service grocery store, welcomed the community last week for its grand opening in the Cordova Bay shopping plaza. Saanich Mayor Frank Leonard was on hand for the opening, along with Tru Value founder Jerry Reiner, the store’s management team, staff and customers. The 9,500-squarefoot store offers a full-service floral centre, meat and seafood department and deli counter, plus a commitment to traditional values of customer service and quality, says part owner and general manager Phil Greenhalgh. With a philosophy of “where community and quality meet,” Tru Value believes in giving back to the community. In addition to the wide selection of locally grown and produced items, shoppers can support local groups and organizations through the Tru Value Spirit Board, where one per cent of sales goes to the customer’s participating non-profit community group of choice. Store manager Rob Clarke brings a wealth of experience in the grocery business, and with his dedicated team of friendly, knowledgeable staff members, looks forward to welcoming the community into the new store!

Staff members Shawn Whitecross and Owen Clarke make sure the meat and fish are stocked and ready.

(From left) Owner Jerry Reiner, owner and financial manager Brett Clarke, Saanich Mayor Frank Leonard, store manager Rob Clarke, and part owner and general manager Phil Greenhalgh officially open the new store.

Derrick Greenhalgh puts up some last minute signage before the opening.

Sheila and Gerry Woloshyn are excited to have Tru Value Foods in the neighbourhood.

Tara and Oliver Daley enjoy the shopping at Tru Value Foods.

Tru Value Foods customers Kathleen Hammick and Nick Campbell.

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR NEW STORE ! Thrifty Foods would like to thank Tru Value Foods for their continued support of our Independent Wholesale Division. Since your first store opening in 1991, we have built a close working relationship which continues to prosper to this day. In support of your group of stores, we will continue striving to offer the best service possible. On behalf of all of us, thank you for your business - we look forward to serving you for many years to come! With thanks, Sturdee Arden, Director

Independent Wholesale Division Thrifty Foods Ph: 250 483 1792 ¦ Cell: 250 881 2166

INDEPENDENT SERVICES Wholesale Division Serving Independents Grocery, Frozen Foods & Fresh Produce.


A26 • www.saanichnews.com

The

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

regrets of the dying:

Natalie North

UVic palliative care expert weighs in on end-of-life ruminations

researcher at the University of Victoria’s Centre on Aging, applauds the province’s decision. Those who care for people Much of Stajduhar’s work exposes dying in towns across the provher to life’s most common last regrets ■ 1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a ince are now able to pick up – a topic that went viral after Bronlife true to myself, not the life others the phone and call for support nie Ware, an Australian palliative care expected. around the clock. nurse, blogged about her experiences ■ 2. I wish I didn’t work so hard. On April 10, the Ministry this winter. ■ 3. I wish I’d had the courage to express of Health revealed plans to Stajduhar weighs in on Ware’s post my feelings. expand the After-Hours Pallia(summarized at left), featured in the ■ 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with tive Nursing Service. Guardian newspaper and shared widely my friends. By calling HealthLinkBC, on social media websites. those eligible to receive pallia“I wish I would have done what I ■ 5. I wish that I had let myself be happier. tive nursing services are conwanted to do; I wish I wouldn’t have nected to a registered nurse. If spent all that time in the office and needed, they can also talk with spent more time with my family and a palliative response nurse from the Fraser Health Author- played with my kids more and lived my life the way that ity, which has provided a call-in service since 2005. I wanted to live my life,” Stajduhar said. “These are very Dr. Kelli Stajduhar, an expert in end-of-life care and a common things that people talk about.” News staff

TOP FIVE DEATHBED REGRETS as recorded by Bronnie Ware, an Australian palliative care nurse (Bronnieware.com/news).

NEWS

One theme from Stajduhar’s experience not covered by Ware, however, was the regret for having let anger get in the way of maintaining quality family relationships. Letting go of anger is a lesson often learned not by those on their deathbeds, but also by their caregivers, as the disconnected often return to the family and offer support – despite the quality of the relationship in the past. Stajduhar recalls meeting a woman who was supporting her husband through what appeared to be the final days of a solid, loving relationship. It wasn’t until speaking with the woman later, once her husband had died, that Stajduhar learned the couple’s marriage had been one fraught with abuse and dishonesty. “Not all people who are dying are wonderful and nice people. … We often focus on providing the best support for the people who are dying, but we forget their families are providing care to them and they’re not all that nice to their families.” A little appreciation from the person dying can go a long way, she added. nnorth@saanichnews.com STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PR S BR S ST S ® CA S DE S BR S ST S CA S

Enter for a chance to WIN an XBOX 360 Special Edition 4GB KINECT Family Bundle + Games

PUT IN LESS. GET MORE OUT. WITH CANADA’S MOST FUEL-EFFICIENT LUXURY VEHICLE. ESRB Rating: EVERYONE to TEEN

© 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Kinect, Xbox, Xbox 360, the Xbox logos and the Xbox Authentic Product logo are trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies.

CT

Not a Facebook user? Scan this code to enter the contest

Visit our facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/flyerland.ca

Save time, save money.

Visit our other Black Press sites

zUpgraded Package Shown.

LUXURY MOTORCOACH TOURS 7 DAY RENO

† Well Equipped From: $Includes 32,945 freight/PDI

CT

2012 CT 200h

Lease for

$

*

298

MTH Down payment: $7,400* Security deposit waived

Lease or finance rate for up to 48 months

EVENT.

6 DAY WENDOVER

3.8%***

16-inch aluminum alloy wheels • Drive mode select with Sport mode

LEXUS. THE MOMENT IS NOW

CALL FO R DETAILS !

Departs June 2, 2012 Wendover Tour includes: $21 Free Slot Play, Free Drinks, Lucky Bucks & more. Valued at over $60 per day. LAST CHANCE!

Lowest Rates and Highest Cash Purchase Incentives of the Year.'

& 8 DAY RENO ANNIVERSARY TOURS DEPARTS APRIL 28, 2012

CALL TODAY!

4 DAY OREGON COAST DEPARTS JUNE 4, 2012 Accommodation at the Chinook Winds Casino Resort in Lincoln City

11 DAY COACH & CRUISE DEPARTS SEPT. 23, 2012

metrolexusvictoria.com METRO LEXUS 625 Frances Avenue, Victoria (250) 386-3516 'On most new 2012 models. Fuel efficiency estimates were determined using approved Transport Canada Test Methods. Actual results may vary. Estimates based on Luxury Low segment. 4.5/4.8/4.6 L/100km city/hwy/combined. †MSRP is $32,945 for a new Lexus 2012 CT 200h Sfx ‘A’. z Upgraded CT 200h package shown: $41,345. MSRP includes freight and PDI ($1,995). Taxes, license, registration (if applicable) and insurance are extra.*Lease and finance offers provided through Lexus Financial Services, on approved credit. Limited time offers valid on a new Lexus 2012 CT 200h Sfx 'A'. *Lease example based on a 48 month term at an annual rate of 3.8% and MSRP of $32,945. Monthly payment is $298 with $7,400 down payment or equivalent trade in, $0 security deposit and first monthly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $23,676. Taxes, license, registration (if applicable) and insurance are extra. 80,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.20/km for excess kilometres. **Finance example includes taxes and is based on a 48 month term at annual rate of 3.8% and MSRP of $32,945 (excluding taxes). Monthly payment is $830. Cost of borrowing is $2,934 for a total obligation of $39,832. License, registration (if applicable) and insurance are extra. Lexus Dealers are free to set their own prices. Limited time offers only apply to retail customers at participating Lexus dealers. Dealer order/trade may be required. Offers are subject to change without notice. Offers expire at month’s end unless extended or revised. See your Lexus dealer for complete details.

Onboard the Golden Princess for a 3 night cruise, then onto Laughlin, Las Vegas, Reno all for two nights each.

3 DAY TULALIP RESORT DEPARTS OCT. 15, 2012 Includes accommodation at the luxurious Tulalip Resort, meal vouchers, casino fun book, premium outlet VIP coupon book & more.

INTERNATIONAL COACH TOURS

1-800-667-2778

Visit our website www.icttours.com


A2 â&#x20AC;˘ www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

M E AT & P O U LTRY | F I S H & S E A F O O D Sole Fillets &RESH Skinless

1

39

Per 100 G

Chicken Thighs &RESH,ILYDALE Air Chilled Boneless Skinless

5

49 Lb

0REVIOUSLY&ROZEN

1

69

Per 100 G

2

39

&RESH"ONELESS Canadian Premium 'RAIN&ED

Lb

Chicken Breast Fillets

5

99 Lb

&RESH,ILYDALE Air Chilled Boneless Skinless

Strip Loin Grilling Steak

4

98

3 European Wieners 499 3IZZLIN3MOKIES 99 4

99 Ea

Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 300 Gram Package

Ea

Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 375 Gram Package

Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Assorted 450 Gram Package

Ea

98 Lb

Lb

Chicken Breasts

Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Assorted 450 Gram Package

2

98 Lb

Classic Frozen Dessert

s-ONTREAL Beef s0ASTRAMI

1

79

Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

1

39

Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

www.fairwaymarkets.com Photos used in this ad are for presentation purposes only. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some advertised items may not be available at some locations.

for

5

Gatorade Assorted

Chunky Soup

4

2/$ for

Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Assorted

Cereal

s+ENTUCKY Style Chicken Breast s3MOKED4URKEY With Garlic

Pink Salmon

1

99

10

s#ORN&LAKES

for

680 G

Turkey Breast s&AT&REE s3MOKED &AT&REE Lilydale

Pasta Sauce

5

4/$ for

Ragu â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Originalâ&#x20AC;? Assorted

s*UST2IGHT475 G Kelloggâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Your Choice

540 mL Tin

Raisins Sun-Maid

4

49

Clover Leaf

Soft Drinks

s0EPSI1 Litre Btl s"RISK1 Litre Btl s!QUAlNA7ATER

99

¢

630-640 mL Jar

Picnic Trio

5

99

(EINZ

1 Litre Btl 591 mL Btl

Eggs Large Brown Island Gold Regular Grade A

2

99

750 Gram Package

Yogurt Drinks

4

99

s$ANACTIVE

Bread

1

49

Your Choice + Dep

Margarine sŠ3QUARES s3OFT

7

2/$ for

Imperial

Pizza Ultra Thin Crust McCain Assorted

3

99

99

¢

2

4

California No. 1 CertiďŹ ed Organic 1 Lb Clamshell

16 x 100 Gram Package

Lb

BC Grown %XTRA&ANCY

Watermelon Grown in Mexico Seedless Whole

69

¢ Lb

for

Lb

Blueberries

399

California New Crop &RESH

Ea

s'REEN $!NJOU Pears

334-360 Gram Box

Black Forest Cake

5

9

IC O R G AN

3

99

EARTH DAY

Apple Lattice Top Strudels

3

49

OR

s7HITE s"ROWN Sekka

12

15 Lb Bag

Sesame Sticky Rice Balls

3

99

1

89

"I&ENG4ANG &ROZEN

Paper Towel Enviro 100% Recycled Cascades

3

Laundry

99 Detergent Seventh Generation Liquid 2X

99¢

Ea

Sui Choy

69¢

California &RESH

Lb

Dishwasher Pacs

649

Natureclean

279

Bathroom Tissue

7

49

12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

299

Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best

Natureclean

13

99

Dishwashing Soap ReďŹ ll Method 1064 mL Bottle

4

79

1 Portabella

99

Fish in Batter

ReďŹ ll Method M,,ITRE"OTTLE

s#ORN"RAN s,IFE s-UFFETS s3QUARES s#AP. Crunch

479

Lettuce

s2OMAINE O R GANIC s2ED'REEN,EAF CertiďŹ ed Organic California Grown

IC

Ea

CertiďŹ ed Organic BC Grown 2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Package

3

69

IC O R G AN

1

49

299

Ea

Lb

Gorge Centre 272 Gorge Road West, Victoria Shelbourne Plaza 3651 Shelbourne St., Victoria Athlone Court 2187 Oak Bay Ave., Oak Bay Quadra Street Village 2635 Quadra St., Victoria

1521 McKenzie at Cedar Hill Rd., Victoria Westshore Town Centre 2945 Jacklin Rd., Langford Sidney-By-The-Sea 2531 Beacon Ave., Sidney Brentwood Bay Village 7108 W. Saanich Rd., Brentwood

5

99

s$ICED6EGETABLE Hashbrowns s3UPERFRIES s0URELY Potatoes s4ASTI4ATERS s"REAKFAST Potatoes

Frozen *UICE

299

5

3/$ for

s!PPLEs"LENDS s/RANGE

3

2/$ for

Organic Croutons IC O R G AN s0REMIUM#AESAR s0REMIUM3EASONED &RESH'OURMET 128 Gram Package

4

2/$ for

Nanaimo North Town Centre 4750 Rutherford Rd., Nanaimo Port Alberni Plaza 3737â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10th Ave., Port Alberni

STORE HOURS All Locations: 8amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm except Sidney-By-The-Sea: 8amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm

*UICE Minute Maid Assorted

5

4/$

for ffo for oorfor rr

Old South Concentrated

454 Gram - 1 Kg Bag

5

99

Soft Drinks s0EPSI s2AINBOW Pack

7

99

24 x 355 mL Tin

s!QUAlNA Water

7

2/$ for

599

283-330 mL Tin

Tassimo 4 $ISCS

Soup Habitant Assorted

1

99

5

99

s#OFFEE110-456 G s4EA41 G s(OT Chocolate 341 G Kraft

Your Choice + Dep

500-700 Gram Package

Cereal

Handwash Soap

O R G AN

627-927 Gram Package

1199

Size 1-5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

CertiďŹ ed Organic California Grown 3.28 Kg

CertiďŹ ed Organic US Grown 3 Lb Bag

24 x 500 mL Bottle

Diapers

Broccoli

IC

McCain &ROZEN

"READED&ILLETS Highliner Assorted &ROZEN

575 mL Bottle

Laundry Detergent Seventh Generation Liquid 4X 1.47 Litre Bottle

Liquid Dishwashing Soap

O R G AN

Mushrooms

Delissio Assorted &ROZEN

749

1.52 Kg

200 Gram Package

600 mL Bottle

s2ISING#RUST s4HIN#RUST

Natureclean 24â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Oxygen Liquid Bleach

Rice Cooking Wine

Pizza

6 Roll Package

Seventh Generation

5

s3UGAR3NOW s3WEET3NAP

1.25 Kg Package

200 Gram Package

585 Gram

3

69

Taiwan Red Label

(with min. $50 purchase, excl. tobacco products)

1 Litre Bottle

99

Peas

Each

Heiwa &ROZEN

1.47 Litre Bottle

Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best

for

170 Gram Clamshell

1.52 Kg

Imported &RESH

Cooking Onions

99 Sanuki Udon Noodles

Eco-Friendly Fairway Shopping Bag!

APRIL 22

449

2

3/$

'ROWNIN&LORIDA

Lb LLLbLLb bbb

#ALIFORNIA&ANCY CertiďŹ ed Organic 4 Lb Bag G AN I C

950 Gram

600-615 Gram Loaf

Free!

%NVIRO2ECYCLED Cascades 12 Roll Package

Medium Grain Rice

99

600-680 Gram Bag

Per 100 Gram

Baby Wipes ReďŹ lls

2.18 Kg

Corn on the Cob

ASIAN FOODS

&RESH"AKED

Bathroom Tissue +G4UB0ACKAGE

99

¢

Each

s3TRAWBERRIES

99

Ready to Serve

Silver Hills Assorted

80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

4 x 200 mL Bottle Danone

for

Bread

19

3 x 375-575 mL Package

s!CTIVIA Drinkables Your Choice

99

2/$

s#INNAMON Raisin s3ESAME7HITE s77 Dempsterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Danone 8 x 93 mL

$OZEN

Silhouette Yogurt

FR E S H BAKE RY

HELP ELEVATE THE IMPORTANCE OF ENVIRONMENT ISSUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; LOVE YOUR EARTH.

s!QUAlNA0LUS

213 Gram Tin

Lb

s!MBROSIA Apples

s.AVEL/RANGES

CELEBRATE 710 mL Bottle + Dep

California No. 1 &RESH

Danone

Per 100 Gram

Per 100 Gram

3/$

F R E S H FA R M & O R G A N I C P R O D U C E

MON

3.73 Kg

1.66 Litre Carton

Lilydale

Ea

Maple Ham

3/$ for

2

6.57 Kg

Per 100 Gram

Thirst Quenchers

SUN

Ea

Ea

Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Assorted 375 Gram Package

S AT

CauliďŹ&#x201A;ower

Breyers Assorted

19

FRI

18 19 20 21 22 23

69

1.75 Litre Carton + Dep

4.37 Kg

D E L I C AT E S S E N

3 Pepperoni Sticks 99 5 Sausage Rings 539 s/LD&ASHIONEDs"LACK&OREST Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sliced 175 Gram Package

1

Grown in Mexico No. 1 Tender

TH U R

BC Grown &ANCY

10.98 Kg

Ham

3

99

WED

APRIL 2 0 12

Asparagus

Tropicana

&RESH&RYING BC Grown Air Chilled

13.21 Kg

Garlic Coil Sausage

1

Chilled *UICE

5.27 Kg

Australia Beef Boneless

7.67 Lb

Shoulder Pork Steak

www.saanichnews.com â&#x20AC;˘ A27

SAANICH NEWS - Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Check Out This Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MONEY Savers!

Canadian Premium 'RAIN&ED &RESH

12.10 Kg

6.30 Lb

Calico Scallops

Pork Butt Roast

*

NEWS

1 Litre Carton + Dep

s!MOOZA Twists 252 G s#HEESE Slices 500 G s#HEEZ Whiz 500 G Kraft

Your Choice

(ARVEST Crunch Cereal

499

fr fo for

3

99

Your Choice

Iced Tea s.ESTEA s'OOD(OST

459

Assorted

Quaker Assorted

Quaker

350-650 Gram Box

796 mL Tin

645-800 Gram Box

640 Gram-1 Kg Tin


A28 • www.saanichnews.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - SAANICH

NEWS

Celebrate Earth Day! SUNDAY APRIL 22, 2012

2-$100 Pepper’s Gift Cards

ENTER OUR IN-STORE DRAW 2 Winners Every Month

www.earthday.ca

www.peppers-foods.com

Sponsored by Portofino Bakery and Island Islland F Farms a

Prices in effect April 17-23

PRODUCE

Juices 96

500

2/

LOCAL

Yogurt

White Mushrooms 86 per lb

Navel Oranges ¢ per lb

6.31 kg

2.12 kg

2

96

¢

66

Feta Cheese

Yogurt

Paté

96

5

25

400 g

Asst.

296

236

46

IND WE GRWN! OUR O

Whole Frying Chicken

236

per lb 5.20 kg

per 100 g

Ground Beef per lb 7.85 kg

4

9.39 kg

BAKERY COUNTRY HARVEST

Peasant Buns

Sunflower Flax & 12 Grain Bread

2

96 6 Pack

ay Same Dry Delive 250-477-6513 Mon-Fri Excluding Holidays

ea.

2

496

Organic Sparkling Beverage

220 g

MCCORMICK

1.65 L

International Sauces & Gravy Mixes Asst.

136

Kamut Pasta

Salad Dressing

454 gg 680-900

Asst.

296

276

475 ml

2.8 L

Asst. Var.

66

¢

76

96 675 g

Tea’s Organic & Regular

Gourmet Cat Food

Bleach

85 g

Tortilla Chips

3

Asst. 156 g

20’s BLUE SKY

LOCAL HAPPY PLANET

Natural Soda

Organic Juices

26

2

+ dep. 4x311 ml

TRADITIONAL MEDICINALS

FANCY FEAST

CLOROX

2

NATURAL & ORGANIC N

KRAFT

246

96

30-56 g

ARTESIAN ACRES

Asst. Var.

Asst.

Potato Chips

FOOD SHOULD TASTE GOOD

PORTOFINO BAKERY

Reg. & Multi

396

200 g

SANTA CRUZ

500

1 kg

Vanilla Plus Ice Cream

Ground Turkey 26 per lb

No Skin

326

OLD DUTCH

2/

LOCAL ISLAND FARMS

Vanilla & Chocolate Asst.

LEAN

356

per lb 8.73 kg

650 g

Asst. Flavours

per 100 g

GROCERIES ER

Hashbrowns

IND WE GRWN! OUR O

FRESH

Sourdough Boule

Big Block Cheese

3

396

96¢

600 g 10 Pack

FREYBE

Halibut Fillets

Chuck Steak

356

YOPLAIT SOURCE

MCCAIN

TA ALBER D BONELESS RAISE

Wraps

Pasta Primavera or Tuscan Whole Wheat Pasta

APETINA DOFO

FRESH

Skin On Boneless

ARBUTUS RIDGE FARMS

Asst. Flavours

% OFF

per 100 g

GRIMMS

PEPPER’S

Random Cuts 175 g Asst.

56

1

Gluten Free With Natural Ingredients

CALIFORNIA LARGE

MEAT AT

ISLANDD RAISE

each

DAIRY

ISLAND FARMS

2% Asst.

Cooked Chicken Breast

96

1 lb

BC JUMBO

+ dep 946 ml Bottle

MAY FAMILY FARM

Head Lettuce ¢

Strawberries

Assorted Flavours

LOCAL

CALIFORNIA CELLO

CALIFORNIA

BOLTHOUSE

3

FULL SERVICE DELI

Asst.

2

250-477-6513 • 3829 Cadboro Bay Rd. www.peppers-foods.com

We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some restrictions may apply on certain promotions.

26

+ dep. 946 ml Asst.

326

+ dep. 6x354 ml

Hours Mon-Fri: 8 am–9 pm Sat: 8 am–7:30 pm Sun: 8 am–7:30 pm


Saanich News, April 18, 2012