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SUMMERLAND REVIEW THE VOICE OF OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1908

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Painting banners Artists of all ages are painting street banners which will be displayed in the community this spring and summer.

Page 12 A controlled burn has been planned for this spring in the Bald Range area west of Summerland.

Page 2 Light response Earth Hour on Saturday did not get much participation from Summerlanders.

Page 6 Looking for owls

Songwriters Two Summerland songwriters will perform with Bill Henderson and Roy Forbes at a concert later this month.

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YOUR SMILE Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.

INCLUDING

HST

by John Arendt

Controlled burn

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$1.15

Trail plan put on hold

WHAT’S INSIDE:

The western screech owl, listed as a federally endangered species, is one of several owls found in the Okanagan.

A building concept

John Arendt Summerland Review

Joe Mahovlich shows part of the plan for the proposed Wharton Street development. After a year of planning, developers have been showing the concept to the community.

Developers present Wharton Street plan A proposed development on Wharton Street will house the museum, the library, a cultural centre and housing units, although the full details have not yet been determined. Details of the plan were shown at an open house last week. Wilfred Barranoik, managing director and senior consultant with Westrand Consulting Group Inc., said the five-storey building will have a similar footprint to an earlier development proposed for the site. “The land use is very similar but there are some other chan-

ges being made,” he said. Work is also needed on Wharton Street, Kelly Avenue and Brown Street in order to provide the utilities needed, he said. Developers have been working out the concept for the development for the past 10 to 12 months and are now meeting with officials from the library, museum and the Parkdale Housing Society to determine what is needed. Barranoik said developers are hoping to begin work in August and to have it complete for the first tenants in October to December of next year.

Earlier, Kamloops-based developer Mike Rink of New Futures Development Group had been considering building a seven-storey development at the same site. Rink’s plan for the site expired on Jan. 15, 2011. The Wharton Street proposal would replace the buildings used by the Summerland Museum and Summerland Library. The library, built in 1981, is about half the size required for a community of this size and the museum has also been facing challenges because of space limitations.

A proposed trail connecting Trout Creek and Lowertown is on hold now that the provincial grant money was not approved. Don Gemmell, a proponent of the Okanagan Lakeside Multi-Use Pathway Project, said the grant funding could have covered much of the cost of the trail. In November, municipal council supported a resolution for funding to cover up to 80 per cent of the project. If that money had been received, Summerland’s share of the $860,000 project would have been $172,000. If the funding had been capped at $400,000, the community would have had to pay $460,000. The Okanagan Similkameen Parks Society had also supported the proposed pathway. “We believe such a project would enhance the health and recreational benefits for all users and contribute to tourism incentives to visit Summerland,” Bill Johnston, chair of the society’s trails and wilderness committee said in a letter to the municipality and the Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen. While the funding application was turned down, Gemmell said the plan will not be abandoned. “It’s not the end of the initiative,” he said. Mayor Janice Perrino said she has contacted MLA Bill Barisoff to ask why the funding was turned down. She said the lakeside trail would be a benefit to tourism in the area. “It’s a tremendous opportunity and we didn’t get a dime,” she said. She added that in the past, when Summerland has received grant money, the money has been used responsibly. “There was nothing we did wrong,” she said, “but we can’t do the project without the help of the province.” Gemmell said he still wants to see the trail proceed. “It’s something that could join two parts of the community,” he said. “It would be a boon to tourism.”


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Controlled burn in Bald Range If you see smoke in the mountains west of Summerland in the next six weeks, it is likely coming from a controlled burn. Prescribed burning is planned for the Bald Range area between this week and May 11, weather conditions permitting. This controlled burning will assist with ecosystem restoration and will occur in several phases during

this period. The burns will be conducted by Wildfire Management Branch crews and staff from the Okanagan Shuswap District. The Bald Range burn area covers an estimated 250 hectares, north of the Princeton-Summerland Road, approximately 11 kilometres west of Summerland. Historically, grasslands and open forests in the Okanagan

have been renewed through frequent, low-intensity ground fires, according to a news release from the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations. Such fires limit tree encroachment, rejuvenate understory plants (trees and shrubs that grow beneath the forest canopy but above ground-cover plants) and maintain open

grassland and open forests that contain large trees. The reintroduction of managed, lowintensity ground fires to these grasslands and open forests is intended to restore and maintain plant communities that are native to these areas, according to the news release. The Bald Range prescribed burn is part of an ongoing

restoration program administered by the Government of British Columbia in collaboration with local ranchers, the B.C. Grasslands Conservation Council, the Shuswap Okanagan Forest Association, the Forum for Research and Extension in Natural Resources (FORREX), the B.C. Wildlife Federation and the Nature Trust of British Columbia.

Action urged to cope with climate change Okanagan residents will be affected by global climate change, experts at the Climate Action Exchange in Kelowna said. The one-day exchange on March 29 brought together elected officials, business and community leaders and researchers from around the

region to discuss ways to address climate change in the area. Angela Reid-Nagy of The Climate Reality Project said the 10 hottest years on record worldwide have all occurred since 2000. “This is a problem we all have to solve,” she said. Trevor Murdock

of the Pacific Climate Impact Consortium said it is important to understand the longterm implications of a changing climate. The worst-case scenario calls for an average increase of four degrees in British Columbia by the end of the century. Even the most optimistic projections call for a

In appreciation of our Mothers, we will be featuring a special section in the Summerland Review to be published on Thursday, May 3, 2012. Ad sales deadline is Wednesday, April 25, 2012 Call Jo Freed or Pat Lindsay, your sales team

250-494-5406

rise of one degree. “The past is not the future,” he said. “We will likely get warmer in the Okanagan.” Anna Warwick Sears of the Okanagan Basin Water Board said the wildfires of 2003 have already served to alert Okanagan residents that the climate is changing. According to the climate models she has studied, the warming temperatures cold result in 30 more frost-free days each year. This

would affect the Okanagan’s snow-driven watershed, she said. While the growing season would be extended, summer water levels would drop. “The pattern is one of summer storage problems,” she said. She added that the region is not facing a water crisis but rather a long-term planning challenge. “We have to assume the climate will continue to change,” she said. “We’re in an era of uncertainty.”

Health Matters April is Cancer Month and a Canadian doctor is thinking “outside the box” for a way to treat aggressive cancers. He has theorized that improving the blood flow to a cancerous tumour can actually calm it down, making it less likely for the cancer to spread. He and his team have received a grant to test this theory – another example of the kind of thinking that has placed Canada at the front of cancer research. More novel cancer research is taking place in Chicago. In this case, scientists are manipulating the DNA of killer T cells, which the body uses to fight both infections and cancers. DNA is inserted into the killer T cells causing them to produce more of an activating protein. These charged-up killer T cells can now more aggressively attack enemy cells – plus, they better “remember” the enemy if faced with it again in the future. An observational study is suggesting that a class of blood pressure medications (the angiotensin II receptor blockers – or ARBs) may be behind a reduced risk of cancer. In a Taiwanese report, patients taking ARBs, including irbesartan, losartan and valsartan, had a 33% lower risk of cancer – and that percentage increased the longer the ARB was taken. Cause and effect have yet to be established, but what a beneficial side effect! With all the checks and screening tests done these days to try to catch cancer early, it’s good to hear about a positive outcome. A Swedish study is demonstrating the effectiveness of regular pap smears, used to detect cervical cancer. 92% of women diagnosed with cervical cancer via a pap smear were cured versus only a 66% cure rate for women who weren’t diagnosed until symptoms developed. Another reason to book that appointment.

POLICE REPORT Truck taken On March 28 at 4:45 p.m., police recovered a Jeep parked on Highway 97 between Summerland and Peachland. The Jeep had been stolen from Surrey. Police say the thieves are believed to have stolen another vehicle from a nearby driveway. The truck taken is a flat grey primer coloured 1984 GMC pickup. The license number is DX2291.

Fight observed On March 29 at 8:22 p.m., police were called to Pleasant View Motel for a fight in progress. An intoxicated man was found later and was arrested for being drunk in public. He was taken to cells in Penticton to sober up.

Motorist impaired On March 30 at 7 p.m., police stopped a motorist at Canyon View Road and Simpson Road. The driver had a strong odour of marijuana. He was given a 24-hour suspension for driving while impaired by drugs.

Licence suspended On April 1 at 2:15 p.m., police stopped a motorist at Solly Road and Highway 97. The driver was given a five-month driving prohibition notice.

FOR THE RECORD A story in the March 29 Summerland Review was incorrect. While the municipality is negotiating the landfill scale contract with Implicit Holdings, the contract has not yet been approved. The Review apologizes for the error.

13229 Henry Avenue

Easter Sunday • April 8th

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Traditional 3 Course Easter Dinner - $16 Soup or Salad, Ham, Scalloped Potatoes, Creamed Peas, Hot Cross Bun, Dessert

Starts at 11 am

Reservations Recommended • 250.494.7811

Open Easter Monday Is The Bible Reliable? History & Archeology say “YES” 30 minute Video + 30 minute discussion 1. The Footsteps of Abraham April 16 2. The Exodus April 23 3. David & Solomon April 30 4. The New Testament May 7 5. Luke / Acts May 14 6. Archeology 1st Century AD May 21 7. The Trial of Jesus May 28

Our pharmacists encourage you to take a pro-active role in your health care. If you have questions, don’t be afraid to ask!

Summerland Medicine Centre

#100, 13009 Rosedale Avenue Phone: 250-494-0531 Fax: 250-494-0778 HOURS: Monday to Friday 9am-8pm, Saturday 9am-2pm Sundays and Holidays 10am-2pm E-mail: slorders@relcomsys.ca / Web: www.medicinecentre.com

Summerland Pentecostal Church Monday Evenings at 7pm 9918 Julia St.


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Funding for research comes to Summerland by Barbara Manning Grimm Government spending on innovation, research and development should benefit Summerland, said Dan Albas, MP for OkanaganCoquihalla, commenting on the new federal budget. Summerland is home to the Pacific Agri-food Research Centre. “Not only are we going to be able to create new varietals, but things like new methods for storage and shipping agricultural products. This will help us move into new markets.” The budget, unveiled last Thursday by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, aims to reduce over-

Spring break project Marie Bowyer paints her banner which will go up on a street light standard for the summer.

Shakespeare festival cancelled this year The Rotary Good Will Shakespeare Festival has been cancelled for this year because of the teachers’ contract negotiation difficulties. The festival, which has been held in Summerland for the past 11

years, gave students from around British Columbia a chance to work on theatre arts with world-class professionals. The B.C. Provincial Drama Festival has already been cancelled. The Skake-

speare festival, which was to be held in May, depended on a core group of teachers who volunteered their time. Students who have already paid for the participation will get a full refund.

‘IT’S TIME’

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Dan Albas make sure we are reforming areas of government to make sure Canadian businesses will invest in their research and development. Of interest to both the senior and working populations of

Hearing Instrument Specialist

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support the retired population. Another change is flexibility about when a person can start to draw an old age pension, allowing people to work longer and collect more benefits later.

Commenting on the elimination of the penny as Canadian currency, he noted that it costs a cent and a half to manufacture one penny. “We all know pennies just end up in the bottom of the couch.” Albas said South Okanagan residents, with their proximity to the international border, will be interested in the increased travel exemption for bring goods into Canada. Canadians who are in the United States for 24 hours or more will be able to bring back $200 worth of goods free of tax or duty, up from the current $50. With a stay of of 48 hours or more, the limit will be $800, up from the current $400.

LEGALLY SPEAKING... A public service message from Bell, Jacoe & Company

Canada vs. The USA Do you believe we are becoming more and more like our American cousins? Well, in some respect their culture has been a very big influence on ours. Whether or not that is a good thing is a matter of opinion and for that matter who's opinion it is. From a legal stand point, there are many areas where the American judicial system has encountered situations years ahead of the Canadian experience and as a result has been used as a guide by the Canadian courts in dealing with that situation. One aspect of our two legal systems will never be the same however, and that is the influence that juries play in creating law and awards. In America, a jury has a relatively free reign in handing out awards in civil matters. In Canada there are strict limitations on the amounts a Judge or Jury can award. The reason for this column? An article in the Canadian Lawyer Magazine estimated the value of all monetary awards given by juries in the US in 2002. The number was $283 BILLION dollars. Something to think about.

• LAWYER

BRIAN HODGSON

Summerland are the budget’s changes to Old Age Security. Retirement age will rise from 65 to 67 starting in 2023. Albas said people are living longer and healthier, and there are fewer working people to

“Not only are we going to be able to create new varietals, but things like new methods for storage and shipping agricultural products. This will help us move into new markets.”

Patrick A. Bell

We Offer: • • • •

all spending by $5.2 billion. Albas said to focus on the budget cuts is to miss the primary focus of the plan which is job growth and long-term prosperity. “People want to

Considerate, confidential and affordable legal services for the residents of Summerland and area including:

Wills & Estates Mortgages Commercial law

Bell, Jacoe & Company Box 520, 13211 N. Victoria Rd. (250) 494-6621

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- CERTIFIED COSMETICIAN

The Buzz about BB Creams If you haven’t already heard of BB creams, you will soon. They are popping up everywhere. “BB” stands for Beauty balm. Based on a formula developed in 1968 by a German doctor, BB creams are designed to be multi-taskers. I have heard them described as the “Swiss army knife of cosmetics”. They became wildly popular in Asia after a famous Korean actress credited a BB cream for her flawless complexion. If you choose to think of it as a miracle cream, prepare to be underwhelmed. But if you think of it as a one-step makeup time saver, you will be pleased. BB creams combine skin care ingredients with moisturizer, primer, foundation and UV protection. In Asia, the typical beauty ideal is flawless, porcelain skin. In North America we generally like healthy, glowing skin, so our BB creams are more sheer, designed to give skin a radiant finish. Think: somewhere between a tinted moisturizer and a medium coverage foundation. Skin Care ingredients can vary from one brand to another, but can include hydrating ingredients such as hyaluronic acid, brightening ingredients such as vitamin c and anitoxidants, and antiwrinkle and firming ingredients. BB creams generally come in one or two shades that fit a wide variety of skin tones. They are meant to be applied sparingly on their own or under a foundation. Since they combine several products into one, they are excellent for travelling or anyone finding themselves short on time.

Summerland 9515 Main 250-494-7088 Mon - Fri 9am - 7pm Sat 9am - 5:30pm Sun & Holidays 10am - 4pm


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PUBLISHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Walker EDITOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .John Arendt OFFICE MANAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nan Cogbill WRITER/PHOTOGRAPHER . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Manning Grimm SALES MANAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jo Freed COMPOSING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Scott Lewandoski news@summerlandreview.com sports@summerlandreview.com ads@summerlandreview.com class@summerlandreview.com

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Authorized as second class mail by the Canada Post Office Dept., Ottawa and for payment postage in cash. Publications mail registration no. 0147 The Summerland Review reserves the right to refuse publication of any advertising or editorial submission at its discretion. Material submitted by columnists does not reflect the opinions of the Review or its employees.

EDITORIAL

our pick

A long trail A proposed trail which would connect Lowertown and Trout Creek is now on hold after grant funding was not approved. The grant would have provided a significant amount of money, but it would have been money well spent. The Okanagan Lakeside Multi-Use Pathway Project, valued at $860,000, has benefits which must not be ignored. It provides an important link between Trout Creek and Lowertown, allowing people to walk or cycle safely in that area. It also provides an additional tourism amenity for the community. Okanagan Lake is a draw for visitors to the valley and any initiative which takes advantage of the lake as a tourist attraction should be considered. Tourism-related projects will pay for themselves as they can generate increased business for the entire community. Proponents of the project have said they will not abandon their dream of bringing the trail to the community. However, it is important to remember the cost of this trail will increase in the future. If the full amount of funding for the grant would have been received, Summerland would have had to contribute $172,000 of the $860,000 cost. Summerland’s share is significant for a small community, but it is manageable. Without any of the funding, the project becomes much more difficult to afford. Summerland will have opportunities to apply for the grant funding again in the future, but the trail would bring immediate benefits. And, as is the nature of grant funding, there is no guarantee this project would be chosen in the future. It may be worth considering whether a communitybased fundraising initiative could be set up in order to pay for the proposed walking trail.

A proposed development on Wharton Street could bring significant benefits to the community. Such a plan provide expanded space for the museum and library. Both those facilities are crowded at present. Adding a development, especially one with residential capacity, to the downtown area would also help to bring a new vibrancy to the area and the entire community.

Gentle John Cummins? Not really VICTORIA – In an interview with one of our Vancouver Island papers before Christmas, B.C. Conservative leader John Cummins made a bold prediction that he would have party status before the general election in May 2013. That’s four seats, and it wasn’t based on an unlikely sweep of the ChilliwackHope and Port MoodyCoquitlam byelections, now set for April 19. He hinted Tom Fletcher he was getting calls from MLAs looking to join up, after a November Angus Reid poll showed a sudden surge to 18 per cent for his resurgent brand. We now know that one of those callers was Abbotsford South MLA John van Dongen. I asked Cummins on Friday if he is still confident about three more. “Hopeful, let’s put it that way,” he replied. Van Dongen’s explosive departure was arranged, with Cummins’ help, for maximum damage to Premier Christy Clark. Van Dongen notified the B.C. Liberal caucus that he was quitting. Then, in a questionable use of legislature privileges, he launched a broadside on Clark’s integrity. He cited the $6-million legal payout in the B.C. Rail sale, a decision made before Clark’s time, and the recent collapse of a deal to sell naming rights to B.C. Place. He described the

B.C. Liberals as “an organization headed for failure,” then announced he’s joined the B.C. Conservatives. Cummins then joined van Dongen at a hotel news conference across the street, as the former Gordon Campbell cabinet minister disclosed he has hired his own lawyer to dig through the roomful of paper from the B.C. Rail case once again. Auditor General John Doyle is already in court seeking access to details of the $6 million in

get, with Cummins standing beside him trying to look statesman-like. Of course van Dongen drove himself out of cabinet long before Clark returned. Chronic speeding by a public safety minister is a tough sell. I asked Cummins about the reluctance of key cabinet ministers Kevin Falcon and George Abbott to confirm they are running again. His aw-shucks friendly-grandpa modesty precludes speculation, but he did

Of course van Dongen drove himself out of cabinet long before Clark returned. lawyer bills, which the Attorney General’s ministry hasn’t provided because it doesn’t have them. These delicate matters were farmed out to yet more independent lawyers. Independent special prosecutor Bill Berardino also spent seven years and many more millions on the B.C. Rail case, including the role of Clark’s lobbyist brother, Bruce. He didn’t find the smoking gun now sought by van Dongen. This effort seems designed more for political revenge in an election year than to clarify the sorry legacy of the B.C. Rail sale that has already been examined through two provincial elections. Van Dongen was at the top of everyone’s list of disgruntled B.C. Liberals. During last year’s leadership contest, he muttered darkly about not only B.C. Rail, but also the integrity of fellow Abbotsford MLA Mike de Jong. Now Clark is van Dongen’s tar-

allow it’s “maybe a comment on the state of affairs in the Liberal caucus.” Reporters started surveying government MLAs after Falcon and Abbott kept their options open for 2013. For the record, fellow ministers Terry Lake, Shirley Bond, Pat Bell, Mary Polak, Rich Coleman and Stephanie Cadieux all said they are firmly on Clark’s election team. Independentminded backbenchers Bill Bennett and Kevin Krueger also saluted the B.C. Liberal banner. Randy Hawes allowed that he’s 65, so if he leaves it will be for the golf course. As I was talking with Cummins, B.C. Conservative advisor Randy White was assuring the Abbotsford News that more defections are coming. Cummins has people for the dirty work. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews. com. tfletcher@blackpress.ca.

bad apples We are disappointed the Rotary Good Will Shakespeare Festival has been cancelled. For the past 11 years, the festival has brought students from around B.C. in a celebration of theatre. The reason for the cancellation is because of the ongoing teachers’ contract negotiation difficulties. We need to see a quick and effective resolution to the dispute if festivals such as this one are to continue.

your views

If you wish to comment on anything you read in the newspaper, or any event or concern affecting Summerland, write a letter to the editor. Letters must be signed and must include a telephone number where the writer can be reached. Please keep letters to 300 words or less. The Review reserves the right to edit letters for length, content or taste as well as the right to refuse publication of any letter. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) for our publishing activities.


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Please clean up after your dog Dear Editor: Last weekend, my daughter and I walked to Cartwright Mountain to enjoy its beautiful view of town. All along the street, between the sidewalk and the rocky bluffs, is an areas of

Food bank support needed Dear Editor: In a country as affluent as Canada, hunger is unacceptable. Yet, close to 900,000 Canadians will visit a food bank for assistance this month alone. Of those, 38 per cent will be children or youth. Hunger is often a hidden issue, and we are working to change that fact with Hunger Awareness Week, which we’ve expanded from previous years’ Hunger Awareness Day. During Hunger Awareness Week, May 7 to 11, we encourage Canadians to Give it Up for Hunger. Challenge yourself to give up your lunches or a food staple for the week. Share your experience by going online to show your support via Facebook, Twitter or blogging, or wear a Hunger Awareness Week sticker. Donate food, funds or your time to your local food bank. Together, we can work to raise awareness of the solvable issue of hunger and find solutions to reduce hunger in communities across Canada. Visit www.hungerawareness.ca for more information. Barb Stewart Program Coordinator The Salvation Army Penticton

small white decorative rocks and newly planted trees. We were pretty horrified to see this newly developed space spoiled by large piles of dog feces continuing up the road one after another. There has been

evidence of a great awareness of the public as more people take responsibility to scoop their dog’s poop. Also, groups of people can be seen out shoveling to keep paths and trails clean.

Nevertheless, the problem continues to exist where some people seem to be unaware of the importance of taking responsibility for their pets and there have been quite a few letters in the papers recently,

bemoaning this state of affairs. Those of us with dogs sometimes struggle with the need to cater to this basic necessity but it is so easily solved by placing a plastic bag in your pocket. In addition, I

to pick up after their pets. If we don’t have to carry our bags of doodoo all over town, we might be more apt to keep Summerland clean and beautiful. Griselda Evans Summerland

Vimy Ridge remembered

THE EARLY YEARS

Hopping down the bunny trail

would like to request that the city increase the number of garbage receptacles and doggie bag dispensers. Hopefully this would be a good reminder and make it easier for people to be more inclined

Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum

In 1968, the Easter Bunny showed up in the Fall Fair Parade, accompanied by a lovely lady wearing her Easter bonnet. We’re not sure who won first and second, but the bunny apparently placed third overall. If you can identify anyone in this photo, please let the museum know. We like to keep our bunny facts straight.

Dear Editor: April 9 marks the 95th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. After failed attempts by both British and French forces, a corps of brave and determined Canadian soldiers captured this strategic ridge in France, which was of great importance to the German defence. Despite the terrible price in casualties, this battle marked not only a significant Allied victory, but also the first time Canadians had fought as an independent force and not as part of the British Army. Along with other achievements during the First World War, the Battle of Vimy Ridge helped establish Canada as a key player on the world stage, earning our country a separate signature on the Versailles Peace Treaty which ended the war. As a member of The War Amps Operation Legacy, a group of committed young people who are dedicated to preserving Canada’s military heritage, I would like to highlight this significant anniversary of a battle considered by many to mark Canada’s birth as a nation. To commemorate the anniversary, members of Oper-

ation Legacy will be donating copies of the documentaries A Vimy Veteran Remembers and In Flanders Fields to their local libraries. These productions are part of The War Amps internationally award-winning Military Heritage Series, which tells the lesser-known Canadian stories, and are available at a cost-recovery price by calling 1-800-250-3030 or visiting waramps.ca. Courtney McLaughlin Operation Legacy Member Quesnel

Share your views

If you wish to comment about anything you read in this paper or about any concern affecting Summerland, write a letter to the editor. Letters of 300 words or less are preferred. Please ensure your letter deals with a specific local issue or an issue affecting the community. Letters attacking the character or reputation of individuals or groups have no place in this newspaper. All letters must be signed and must include a telephone number.

Congratulations

to the members of the Summerland Curling Club team on their recent win of the BC Women’s Masters Curling Championships, which sent them on to represent BC at the Canadian Masters Curling Championships. Brenda Hamilton Manager

Summerland 250.494.7752

Penticton 250.492.0713

“You Rock!”

Bev Skinner, Wendy Archer, RoseMarie Fenrich and Betty Raymond


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Response light to Earth Hour initiative For most Summerlanders, Earth Hour on Saturday evening passed without incident. Throughout the province and around the world, people were urged to turn off their lights for

one hour, from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. to raise personal awareness of electrical use. Initiatives were held across the province but in Summerland, only 2.06 per cent of the population had registered.

Mayor Janice Perrino said the wet snowfall during the evening and a Vancouver Canucks game on television kept some people from participating. “People didn’t feel quite the same

enthusiasm as last year,” she said. Summerland’s participation rate was better than Penticton, were 0.47 per cent participated, and Kelowna, where the rate was 0.55 per cent. Smaller communities

in the Okanagan and Kootenay regions had much stronger showings. In Keremeos, the participation rate was 22.26 per cent and in Princeton it was 23.71 per cent. Kaslo and Crawford Bay saw

95.84 per cent participation while in Salmo, the participation rate recorded was 102.28 per cent. Nicole Bogdanovic, corporate communications specialist with FortisBC, said Salmo’s initiative was well

promoted and drew in people from the surrounding areas. While the event does not make a noticeable difference on long-term power consumption, she said it shows the importance of electricity.

Snow pack levels remain above normal The snow pack at Summerland’s reservoirs remains higher than normal, according to the latest measurements taken by water department workers. The measurements, compiled earlier this week, show a snow pack of 857 millimetres at Summerland Reservoir. This works out to the equivalent of 239 millimetres of water, or 106 per cent of the 71-year average. At Isintok Lake, the snow pack was 768 millimetres, or the equivalent of 200 millmetres of water. The snow pack at

Isintok Lake is 112 per cent of the 46-year average. Scott Lee, water operations manager for Summerland, said the numbers are encouraging. “We’re going to fill the reservoirs. There’s no question about that at all,” he said. By April 1, 95 per cent of the winter snow pack has reached the ground. While this year’s water supply is adequate, Lee said flooding could occur if the temperature rises suddenly and the creeks and reservoirs are pushed beyond capacity.

47TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Okanagan Similkameen Parks Society Discover our Ecological Reserves Presenters: Don Guild, Laurie Rockwell, Eva Durance & others

7:00 pm Friday, April 13, 2012 CENTRE STAGE THEATRE, ROSEDALE AVE., SUMMERLAND Everyone Welcome • Donations Accepted

On the trail

Image submitted

A walking trail has been proposed Okanagan Lake between Lowertown and Trout Creek. While a grant application for the trail has been turned down, proponents of the project are not abandoning their dream of a trail in the area.

Fall Fair looks for additional volunteers New members have joined the Summerland Fall Fair’s board of directors, but volunteers are still needed as the committee continues to organize this year’s event. The fair is held

on Sept. 8 and 9, the weekend following Labour Day. “We can always use help,” said Connie Davis, president of the fair. “Everyone has something to offer.” Among the pos-

BINFET RICHARDSON & COMPANY NOTARIES PUBLIC A.W. (BILL) Binfet

D.B.A., B.Sc (B.A.), C.I.T.T., R.I. (BC) N.P. Conveyancing • Wills • Attestations Powers of Attorney • Mobile Homes

104 - 13229 Henry Ave., Summerland Bus: 250-494-4044 • Fax: 250-494-4045 E-Mail: bill@binfet.ca

itions to fill are a convener for the small animals category and a convener for the homemade beer and wine category. Davis said people with computer skills are also needed for some of the preparation and recording work. “There’s a lot behind the scenes people are not aware of,” she said. The theme for this

year’s fair is Take A Bite, but Davis said there are few changes in the works for this fair. She said organizers are working to get not-for-profit groups to exhibit at the fair. While there is a charge for commercial organizations at the fair, not-forprofit groups are not charged. She is also look-

ing for sponsors for specific categories at the fair. Those interested in volunteering, sponsoring or setting up a booth at the fair are asked to contact the fair at 250-583-9178 or by e-mail at info@ summerlandfallfair. com. The Fall Fair office, at the lower level of 13228 Kelly Ave., is open Wednesdays from 1 to 4 p.m.

Support the food bank Your contributions will make a difference in our community.

Nightly Buffet Open 6 days a week Closed Tuesday Sun. - Thurs. ........ 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm Fri. - Sat. ............. 4:00 pm - 8:30 pm

• 10% Discount on pick-up orders • Fully Licensed

Beijing Famous Szechuen & Cantonese Dishes

– 7519 Prairie Valley Road –

250-494-1238


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Heard a screech owl? by Lisa Scott Special to the Review

Banner bookmarks Karan Bowyer, head of the Summerland banner project, shows some of the bookmark reproductions of banners. Her apron is made from a recycled banner. (See story page 12).

The extended winter conditions have not deterred our local owls from setting up territory and preparing for the nesting season. Some of you may have heard the familiar call of the great horned owl, a distinctive deep booming Hoo! hu-hu-hu, Hoo! Hoo! Great horned owls are one of the earliest breeding birds in North America; nesting season is in January or February, so their calls are more frequent at this time. The great horned owl is the only large owl with prominent ear tufts. The larger size, bulky shape and white chest help to differentiate it from the similarly coloured long-eared owl. In contrast with the adults, the juvenile great horned owl may not show ear

tufts and call with a “screech” reminiscent of a barn owl. Great horned owls do not build a nest of their own but utilize the nests of other birds such as the hawk, crow and heron. They may also use squirrel nests, hollows in trees, rocky caves, clumps of witches broom, abandoned buildings, or artificial platforms. The other owl species that you may have been lucky enough to hear in recent weeks is the western screech owl. Despite its name, it does not screech. This owl has two common calls: a hollow, whistled double trill, and a series of low whistles that speed up toward the end like a bouncing ball. Hooting may occur in every month, but is most frequent from February through April when they are seeking a mate. This small owl has conspicuous ear tufts

and mottled brownish-grey plumage. Western screech owls nest in natural tree cavities, especially in large mature black cottonwood trees. Loss and degradation of riparian habitat and removal of cottonwood trees have resulted in substantial declines in Western screech owl populations. As a result, this owl is listed as a federally endangered species. This owl is known to occur in riparian (creek side or lakeshore) habitats in Summerland. If you think you have heard or seen the Western screech owl, reports are appreciated. For more information or to report a screech owl, contact Lisa Scott, coordinator of the Wildlife Tree Stewardship Program in the Okanagan-Similkameen at 250-404-0115 or witsos@shaw.ca or visit wildlifetree.ca.

Penticton based band, The Daybeats, caught the judges attention to win round three of Rock The Peach battle of the bands competition held at the Barking Parrot on Thursday night. The five piece original band plays a cool mixture of funk and alternative-rock. The Daybeats say they have soulful harmonies and riffs that will move the audience and keep the dance floors bouncing. Two female and one male vocalist join

groovy slap riffs on the six-string bass with Floyd-like guitar tones and methodical rhythms. The Daybeats have opened for the Tragically Hip, Lee Aaron and Tupelo Honey. Members include Dan Bouchard (vocals/guitar), Ashley Bjorndal (vocals), Mandy Cole (vocals), Ty Surowski (bass) and Adam Levant (drums). The band will join The Malibu Knights and The Flu for the grand finale on Friday, April 6 starting at 8 p.m. at the Barking Parrot to compete against one another

SUMMERLAND BOTTLE DEPOT Open Monday - Saturday 8:30am - 4:30pm

Non-Alcohol Drink Containers Liquor Wine Import Beer Domestic Beer Bottles & Cans Milk Containers Paint Cans 9615 S. Victoria Road Summerland 250-494-0398

to find out who will be crowned the battle of the bands winner. The winner gets to play the opening

night of Rock The Peach, a three-day music festival being held this summer in Penticton.

Anyone can join! A new member joining our Any Legion during the month of April receives $10 off their A first year membership.

For info call 250-494-2301

Watching owls The western screech owl is one of several owl species found in the Okanagan. The owl is now listed as a federally endangered species.

YOUR COMMUNITY CONNECTION

Daybeats shine at band competition by Kristi Patton Black Press

Jared Hobbs Special to the Review

13211 Henry Avenue 250-494-6451 • www.summerland.ca MAYOR: Janice Perrino COUNCILLORS: Lloyd Christopherson, Robert Hacking, Bruce Hallquist, Orv Robson, Marty Van Alphen, Peter Waterman

TURN ON OF IRRIGATION COMMENCES APRIL 16TH Public Works will begin turning irrigation services on starting Monday, April 16th. If you require your irrigation to be turned on earlier for the purpose of watering new plantings, etc., an Advance Irrigation Application and non-refundable payment of $44.00 per property (cash or cheque) is required. Applications are available at Engineering and Public Works, 9215 Cedar Avenue 250-494-0431. Advance Irrigation requests are NOT for general irrigation purposes.

OPEN BURNING SEASON ENDING Open burning season ends April 15th, 2012. Open burning within the District of Summerland is only permitted on properties greater than two acres and with a valid Open Burning Permit obtained from the Summerland Fire Department. The season will re-open on October 15th, 2012. For more information call the Fire Department at 250-494-7211.

Professional Installation • Satisfaction Guaranteed

Custom Floor and Window Covering Centre The Summerland Review Easter Hours:

is proud to introduce our partnership with

Friday, April 6th ~ CLOSED Monday, April 9th ~ OPEN 9:00 am - 4:00 pm 13226 N. Victoria Road Summerland 250-494-5406

Shelley Gardiner

Design Consultations at reasonable rates. Call or stop in for an appointment Ph: 250-493-7775 or email: searsflooring@telus.net

Al Pinske

104-2695 SKAHA LAKE RD., PENTICTON


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Ecological reserves talk topic Invading ladybugs, a Barney-purple coloured lake and an array of reptiles are some of the unusual features of the South Okanagan’s ecological reserves. Local reserve wardens Eva Durance, Laurie Rockwell and Don Guild will reveal more secrets about these reserves in a presentation sponsored by the Okanagan Similkameen Parks Society on Friday, April 13, in the Centre Stage Theatre in Summerland. Ecological reserves are special areas throughout B.C. set aside to preserve ecosystems, plant and animal species, features and phenomena and for scientific research and educational purposes. Keith Baric, Okanagan region planning section head with the Ministry of Environment, will give an overview of the 14 ecological reserves in the Okanagan, four of which

High above Trout Creek

Keith Baric Special to the Review

The 75-hectare Trout Creek Ecological Reserve is one of 14 such reserves in the Okanagan Valley.

are in the South Okanagan: Mahoney Lake, Trout Creek, Haynes and Big White Mountain. The presentation follows the society’s 47th annual meeting at 7 p.m. Admission is free and donations are welcome. The Okanagan Similkameen Parks Society has a dec-

ades-long interest in protecting natural areas. Established in 1966, it was instrumental in securing provincial park status for Cathedral Mountain, Conkle Lake and Okanagan Mountain. In addition, the society purchased 700 acres (283 hectares) of winter rangeland for what is now known as the Vaseux-Big-

horn National Wildlife Area and recommended to the Ecological Reserves Committee that a 200-acre reserve (81 hectares) be placed on arid and marsh lands at the head of Osoyoos Lake. For more information call 250-494-8996 or visit okanagansimilkameenparkssociety.ca.

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Little gardens for big benefits Summerland Earth Week runs from April 15 to 22 and is filled with free earth-conscious events and activities for all ages. Kicking off the week is a Square Foot Gardening workshop at Grasslands Nursery; the week culminates on Earth Day with a planting session at Dale Meadows Sports Field. One of the themes of Summerland’s Earth Week this year is food security. The World Health Organization states: “Food security is in place when all people at all times have access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life.” Toni Boot, founder and owner of Grasslands Nursery, said, “We live in an agriculture-rich area populated with many

people who are willing to pass on their knowledge of sustainable ways to grow food. And, with the growing popularity of square foot gardening, lack of space is no longer a valid excuse not to participate.” Food gardening need not be relegated to the back 40 of your yard anymore, she said. One of the concepts of square foot gardening is to position your raised beds near your house – with ready access from your kitchen, if possible. Perhaps you have a deck or patio on which to place a square foot garden or a few containers. Or you have an unused area of lawn or other such nonproductive space you can convert to a food-growing area. If you are able to observe your garden easily, you are more likely to tend to it, harvest from it and enjoy the thrill of watching a covered seed emerge and grow into a plant that provides food for you and your family. There are many reasons to grow your own food in a sustainable way, said Boot. Eliminating the use of oil-based, toxic products such as chemical fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides means you will not be consuming them. This has a positive effect on your health as well as the health of billions of micro-organisms living in the soil in which your vegetables are growing. Additionally, there is no possibility these poisons will contaminate our groundwater. Many things we consider waste can be composted and added to the soil to increase fertility and improve soil structure. Not only does this reduce the burden on our landfill, homegrown compost is the best kind: you know what is in it and, perhaps more importantly, what isn’t.

Square foot gardening is a no-till, low maintenance and resource-conscious method of gardening. It conserves space, money (over the long-term), time and water, while creating a healthy environment for both soil organisms and plants. It can totally transform otherwise unproductive or resource-hungry areas of your yard. Converting some areas of your yard into food gardening is the perfect time to rid your yard of invasive plants, which typically have few redeeming qualities. Disturbed soils that are not planted to desirable food plants, ornamentals or native species, will quickly be overtaken by invasive plants which can be challenging to control. As well, planting native species is a good way to bring pollinators to your vegetable bed. To learn more about square foot gardening, register for the workshop being held at Grasslands Nursery on Sunday April 15 from 1 to 4 p.m. by phoning 250-4944617 or e-mail info@ grasslandsnursery.ca. To learn more about food sustainability, take in the award winning documentary film, The Future of Food, being shown at Centre Stage Theatre on Monday, April 16 at 6:30 p.m. This film delves into food security and the impact of genetic modification and industrialization on the security of our food supply. Another event to consider attending is the monthly Philosopher’s Café, held Wednesday, April 18 at 6:30 p.m. at the Summerland Art Gallery. Join host Andrea Gunner, Chair of the Food Action Society of Vernon, who will lead a discussion of Vernon’s local food sustainable policies and how local programs ensure food security for community residents.


Summerland Review Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Headlight maintenance signiÀcantly improves reaction time (NC)—You’ve probably heard the old joke: in Canada, we have so much salt on the roads through the winter that you can get high blood pressure just taking out the garbage.

A Reputation you can Ride on!

Imagine what all that salt spray and build-up can do to your car by the end of the season? The plastic surfaces of your headlights are especially vulnerable. Damaged headlights create dangerous driving situations in any weather.

Spring has sprung, so don't bounce into Summer, glide in with a smooth ride. Our trained tire technicians know the right way to make it happen! Come in for your Summer tire changeovers, and all your automotive needs.

Headlights play a major role The effects of yellowed and hazy headlights in fog has become such a concern that last year, CAA-Quebec released a study showing that damaged automobile headlight lenses (from harsh weather, abrasives and debris) become so opaque, they can reduce lighting effectiveness to half that of headlights in good condition. Tests conducted on a closed track conÀrmed: a motorist travelling 50 km/h at night will have four more seconds to react to an emergency if the headlights are in good condition and undamaged.

"Tameling family owned and operated since 1989." 9305 JUBILEE ROAD E Summerland 250-494-7471 Licensed Government Inspection Facility

p

The best way to prepare and protect yourself is to make sure headlights are clean and clear and at optimal visibility, experts say. Restoring headlights to their original crystalclear and scratch-free Ànish can help you get back those crucial four seconds to help save both human and animal lives.

Top Quality Service & Repair • Gov't approved inspection facility • Fuel injection diagnosis & repair • Maintenance and repair to all makes and models of vehicles • Tire sales and installation • Transmission flush & service • Diesel truck maintenance

Drop in and see Adrian and Staff Drop for all your your Automotive needs. Full service to all makes and models

including all your tire needs.

ADRIANS AUTOMOTIVE 9216 James Avenue

250-494-0031 “Honest Quality Service”

Service Special SAVE $25.00

• Rebuilding & Servicing

To help you determine if your headlights need restoration, examine them in daylight for one or more of these conditions:

• Clutch & Driveline • Recreational Vehicle Servicing • Free Local Towing for Major Repairs

250-494-4327

• You can’t see the bulb through the lens • The lenses are scratched or scarred Imagine the difference those four seconds could make in your life and in the lives of others on the road.

www.summerland-transmissions.com

Nationwide Warranty Available

9202 James Avenue

Quality Automotive Transmission Rebuilding & Servicing

Ce 21 ye lebrating a our c rs servin g omm unity

Do you have scrap vehicles for the Summerland Fire Dept. for training? We will pick up for free. Proceeds will be donated to SADI.

Valley West

ICBC and Private Insurance Claims

AUTOMOTIVE LTD. • Volkswagen & Import Repair Specialists • Auto Sales

VALET VALETEXPRESS EXPRESS AUTHORIZED ROAD SERVICE

Open Monday - Friday 8am - 5pm Auto Sales - Dealer #9891 9201 Alder Street Ph: 250-494-9054 Fax:Street 250-494-9014 9201 Alder Ph:alderstreetautobody@shaw.ca 494-9054 Fax : 494-9014

Ph: 250.494.1991 okanagantowing@hotmail.com • Fax 250.494.1291

10% OFF* YOURWITHNEXTTHISSERVICE AD

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(4 cylinder)

TOYOTA

• Automatic & Standard Transmissions

until April 30, 2012

How to tell

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• Computer Diagnostic Testing

• The lenses look milky, foggy or yellow

9535 Main Street 250-494-5066

- Boosts, Lock Outs, Receoveries, Deck Services, ICBC - We tow it all! - 30 Minute Service - Serving Penticton, Summerland, Peachland and West Kelowna

Spring is just around the corner!

(4 cylinder)

Spark Plug Replacement

Timing Belt Replacement

Re-ignite the power with Toyota Genuine spark plugs that are designed specifically for your Toyota. Of course, they are installed and serviced by technicians who know your Toyota best. It is important to replace your spark plugs as per the Toyota recommended maintenance schedule to keep the sparks firing.

Toyota Genuine timing belts match your engine perfectly to ensure peak performance and reliability; they drive key engine components to ensure efficient engine operation. It is important to replace your timing belt as per the Toyota recommended maintenance schedule to keep your timing tuned. See your Toyota Dealer for details.

www.pentictontoyota.com

2405 SKAHA LAKE ROAD • PHONE: 250-493-1107 • TOLL FREE: 1-888-493-1107 • DEALER #6994

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter


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Thursday, April 5, 2012 Summerland Review

Summerland Review Thursday, April 5, 2012

the homeowner is looking not only for a tough, low maintenance method of waterproofing but also an attractive solution to their outdoor living space. Duradek’s leadership in weatherproof decking has placed Duradek in television’s limelight with features on the TV shows: Home Wreckers, Holmes on Homes, Dream House and Extreme Makeover: Home Edition. Simply stated… in a time when homeowners are making decking choices based on quality, cost

DURADEK

Helloooo Duradek! The homeowners answer to the old rotten, peeling, cracking and delaminating deck coatings. Duradek is the solution chosen by homeowners and contractors who prefer an attractive, waterproof method of covering their sundeck or patio. Duradek is the original creator of water proof vinyl decking and since their origin in 1974 have become a household name. In the last 38 years Duradek

has become recognized in the construction industry as the ultimate low maintenance outdoor decking. Duradek exceeds all testing, both in Canada and the United States, as a walkable roofing membrane. As a result, having Duradek on your deck surface enables you to have a sundeck over the living area on your home. Detailed installation techniques have set new standards in the industry. Waterproofing that works. Manufactured in North America Duradek sheet vinyl is designed with strength, stability, and a slip-

resistance on the sundeck surface. When applied the adhesive dries quickly and can be walked on after installation process which means fewer disruptions to your home. Even in high traffic areas and the most severe weather conditions Duradek will stand the test of time. Unlike wood, concrete and paint on products Duradek simply will not peel, chip, delaminate or crack. Duradek is so confident in the quality of its product that they provide the homeowner with an industry leading 10year warranty. Duradek also recognizes that

Summerland

NEW Summto erlan d

Round up

A cleaner community is our business A greener environment is our goal

Grass and Weed Control

Residential Yard and Garden Collection dates 2012 April 24, 25 & 26

709 ml - $7.99 ea 2 Litre - $16.99 ea 5 Litre - $33.99 ea

FOR SPRING LAWN & GARDEN SUPPLIES, HELP IS CLOSE TO HOME

May 22, 23 & 24

June 19, 20 & 21

July 17, 18 & 19

August 28, 29 & 30

September 25, 26 & 27

October 23, 24 & 25

November 6, 7, 8, 20, 21 & 22

Waste & Recycling Services

10115 Main Street • Summerland

250-494-4663

CASSIDY’S

250-493-7191

plants • eco-lawn • design • install NEW

Market Garden

fresh vegetables • fruit • eggs • cut Àowers Check our website for details

250-494-4617 3615 Gartrell Road, Summerland www.grasslandsnursery.ca

PANSY • COLD CROP VEGGIES BASKET STUFFERS • HERBS • GERANIUMS HUGE SELECTION Summerland Greenhouses Celebrating over 35 years of growing in Summerland

Open every day until 5pm Location: 6711 Canyon View Road, just over the train tracks around the bend from Summerland Sweets

Phone: 250-494-9441 David and Sheila de Boer dave@summerlandgreenhouses.com Now Accepting Interact

· Antique furniture restoration · Interior design · Dining room chair seats and upgrades · Foam cushion replacement

Windmill

Garden Centre

Organix Composted

Cattle or Sheep Manure #367-1750 Reg. 4.29 #367-1740 Reg. 4.29

❀ Basket Stuffers ❀ Caliper Shade Trees ❀ Assorted Seeds ❀ Bedding & Vegetable Plants ❀ Assorted 1 gal. ❀ Hanging & Moss Perennials Baskets

$ 99

3.

looks forward to serving you with a great selection during our 22nd season!

/20kg

NOW IN STOCK!! Seed Potatoes, Onion Sets, Garden Seeds, Fertilizer, Farm Seed, Farm Fencing/Gates

13008A Victoria Rd. North

We will be open Saturday, April 7th locally owned & operated

250-494-3063

250-494-3178

or cell: 250-490-6158

countrycornersupplies.ca

9100 Jones Flat Rd. E. Summerland

ANNUALS from A to Z

“Specializing in Customer Service”

• Ready Mix Concrete • Sand and Gravel For Jobs, Big or Small

Summerland Senior Services “...the Small Job Specialists”™

Home & Property Maintenance Services Low Cost | Integrity | Experience

CASSIDY’S SPECIALIZES IN:

250-494-8333 SRM Concrete Main Office (250) 494-9889

Gravel Pit Cell Contact (250) 486-1933

(24 hour service)

• New Construction • Renovation • Boarding Dave Khalembach Phone/Fax: 250-494-8400 Cell: 250-809-9633

• Taping • Textured Ceilings • Free Estimates Jason Khalembach 250-490-7047

Licensed and Insured

And yes, we do anything...

Quality upholstery with practical design ideas. Visit our new Sample Showroom and Design Center 13380 McClure Place, Summerland

250-494-8228

• Topless Glass • Glass • Aluminum Picket

“we probably did your neighbours”

Xeriscape Specialists

www.cassidysupholstery.com

Waterproof Decking

RAILINGS

Open 7 Days a Week 9 am - 5 pm

UPHOLSTERY & DESIGN

“DON’T WAIT UNTIL SUMMER TO FIX YOUR DECK... CALL NOW!

* *

and effectiveness… Duradek is a natural choice. Duradek products are designed with proven blends of naturally inspired colours and textures that offer the most longlasting performance the industry can offer. Duradek brings an end to leaks, unsightly decks, expensive repairs and time consuming maintenance. Compliment your sundeck with maintenance free aluminum picket or glass railings to add an attractive safe way to enjoy your sundeck.

COUNTRY CORNER SUPPLIES

Tip of the Week Goodbye leaks. Goodbye mildew. Goodbye rotting plywood and cracked concrete.

www.summerlandreview.com 11

Serving the Okanagan Since 1981

Long Weekends Mean More Garden Time! SOURCE FOR SOIL AMENDMENTS GET A JUMP Y• OUR Peat Soil ON THE • Blended Topsoil BAG BY THE ULK • Mushroom Compost SEASON OR IN B with Tunnel Cloches, Frost Blankets & Bell Cloches.

COMING SOON! “Raised Bed” Soil Mix Celebrating

EASTER BLOOMS. Visit or call our flower shop for spectacular holiday bouquets.

670 Duncan Ave. Penticton Phone 250-492-5703

www.artknapp.com


10 www.summerlandreview.com

Thursday, April 5, 2012 Summerland Review

Summerland Review Thursday, April 5, 2012

the homeowner is looking not only for a tough, low maintenance method of waterproofing but also an attractive solution to their outdoor living space. Duradek’s leadership in weatherproof decking has placed Duradek in television’s limelight with features on the TV shows: Home Wreckers, Holmes on Homes, Dream House and Extreme Makeover: Home Edition. Simply stated… in a time when homeowners are making decking choices based on quality, cost

DURADEK

Helloooo Duradek! The homeowners answer to the old rotten, peeling, cracking and delaminating deck coatings. Duradek is the solution chosen by homeowners and contractors who prefer an attractive, waterproof method of covering their sundeck or patio. Duradek is the original creator of water proof vinyl decking and since their origin in 1974 have become a household name. In the last 38 years Duradek

has become recognized in the construction industry as the ultimate low maintenance outdoor decking. Duradek exceeds all testing, both in Canada and the United States, as a walkable roofing membrane. As a result, having Duradek on your deck surface enables you to have a sundeck over the living area on your home. Detailed installation techniques have set new standards in the industry. Waterproofing that works. Manufactured in North America Duradek sheet vinyl is designed with strength, stability, and a slip-

resistance on the sundeck surface. When applied the adhesive dries quickly and can be walked on after installation process which means fewer disruptions to your home. Even in high traffic areas and the most severe weather conditions Duradek will stand the test of time. Unlike wood, concrete and paint on products Duradek simply will not peel, chip, delaminate or crack. Duradek is so confident in the quality of its product that they provide the homeowner with an industry leading 10year warranty. Duradek also recognizes that

Summerland

NEW Summto erlan d

Round up

A cleaner community is our business A greener environment is our goal

Grass and Weed Control

Residential Yard and Garden Collection dates 2012 April 24, 25 & 26

709 ml - $7.99 ea 2 Litre - $16.99 ea 5 Litre - $33.99 ea

FOR SPRING LAWN & GARDEN SUPPLIES, HELP IS CLOSE TO HOME

May 22, 23 & 24

June 19, 20 & 21

July 17, 18 & 19

August 28, 29 & 30

September 25, 26 & 27

October 23, 24 & 25

November 6, 7, 8, 20, 21 & 22

Waste & Recycling Services

10115 Main Street • Summerland

250-494-4663

CASSIDY’S

250-493-7191

plants • eco-lawn • design • install NEW

Market Garden

fresh vegetables • fruit • eggs • cut Àowers Check our website for details

250-494-4617 3615 Gartrell Road, Summerland www.grasslandsnursery.ca

PANSY • COLD CROP VEGGIES BASKET STUFFERS • HERBS • GERANIUMS HUGE SELECTION Summerland Greenhouses Celebrating over 35 years of growing in Summerland

Open every day until 5pm Location: 6711 Canyon View Road, just over the train tracks around the bend from Summerland Sweets

Phone: 250-494-9441 David and Sheila de Boer dave@summerlandgreenhouses.com Now Accepting Interact

· Antique furniture restoration · Interior design · Dining room chair seats and upgrades · Foam cushion replacement

Windmill

Garden Centre

Organix Composted

Cattle or Sheep Manure #367-1750 Reg. 4.29 #367-1740 Reg. 4.29

❀ Basket Stuffers ❀ Caliper Shade Trees ❀ Assorted Seeds ❀ Bedding & Vegetable Plants ❀ Assorted 1 gal. ❀ Hanging & Moss Perennials Baskets

$ 99

3.

looks forward to serving you with a great selection during our 22nd season!

/20kg

NOW IN STOCK!! Seed Potatoes, Onion Sets, Garden Seeds, Fertilizer, Farm Seed, Farm Fencing/Gates

13008A Victoria Rd. North

We will be open Saturday, April 7th locally owned & operated

250-494-3063

250-494-3178

or cell: 250-490-6158

countrycornersupplies.ca

9100 Jones Flat Rd. E. Summerland

ANNUALS from A to Z

“Specializing in Customer Service”

• Ready Mix Concrete • Sand and Gravel For Jobs, Big or Small

Summerland Senior Services “...the Small Job Specialists”™

Home & Property Maintenance Services Low Cost | Integrity | Experience

CASSIDY’S SPECIALIZES IN:

250-494-8333 SRM Concrete Main Office (250) 494-9889

Gravel Pit Cell Contact (250) 486-1933

(24 hour service)

• New Construction • Renovation • Boarding Dave Khalembach Phone/Fax: 250-494-8400 Cell: 250-809-9633

• Taping • Textured Ceilings • Free Estimates Jason Khalembach 250-490-7047

Licensed and Insured

And yes, we do anything...

Quality upholstery with practical design ideas. Visit our new Sample Showroom and Design Center 13380 McClure Place, Summerland

250-494-8228

• Topless Glass • Glass • Aluminum Picket

“we probably did your neighbours”

Xeriscape Specialists

www.cassidysupholstery.com

Waterproof Decking

RAILINGS

Open 7 Days a Week 9 am - 5 pm

UPHOLSTERY & DESIGN

“DON’T WAIT UNTIL SUMMER TO FIX YOUR DECK... CALL NOW!

* *

and effectiveness… Duradek is a natural choice. Duradek products are designed with proven blends of naturally inspired colours and textures that offer the most longlasting performance the industry can offer. Duradek brings an end to leaks, unsightly decks, expensive repairs and time consuming maintenance. Compliment your sundeck with maintenance free aluminum picket or glass railings to add an attractive safe way to enjoy your sundeck.

COUNTRY CORNER SUPPLIES

Tip of the Week Goodbye leaks. Goodbye mildew. Goodbye rotting plywood and cracked concrete.

www.summerlandreview.com 11

Serving the Okanagan Since 1981

Long Weekends Mean More Garden Time! SOURCE FOR SOIL AMENDMENTS GET A JUMP Y• OUR Peat Soil ON THE • Blended Topsoil BAG BY THE ULK • Mushroom Compost SEASON OR IN B with Tunnel Cloches, Frost Blankets & Bell Cloches.

COMING SOON! “Raised Bed” Soil Mix Celebrating

EASTER BLOOMS. Visit or call our flower shop for spectacular holiday bouquets.

670 Duncan Ave. Penticton Phone 250-492-5703

www.artknapp.com


12 www.summerlandreview.com

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Artists painting new banners Summerland streets will once again be decorated by brightly coloured banners painted by local artists. The banners are being painted at the Summerland Art Gallery by many of Summerland’s artists including children, seniors, amateurs and accomplished painters. The approximately 175 banners will be completed before the end of April. The designs are done first on clear sheets of acetate. The

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next stage is placing the acetate in a projector so the image appears on a blank nylon banner hung on a wall. The design is traced by hand onto the banner. After that, the banner is stretched on an easel, and the artist fills in the design with paint. When the painting is complete, the banner is photographed. The photo appears in a bid book for eventual sale of the banner, in an online gallery and on a bookmark also offered for sale.

The banners will be hung on lamp poles downtown and in Lower Summerland. The banner project is in its 14th year. The Municipality of Summerland provides a grant of $1,600 for the nylon banners. Other expenses are brushes, palettes, professional quality paints and preservatives. Other grants are occasionally available for the project, and money is raised through auctioning of the banners for a minimum price of $50 each. These

sources of funding ensure the project remains free to participants. Karan Bowyer of the Summerland Community Arts Council is overseeing the project for the fourth year. This year’s co-ordinator is Andrea Sanders. The banner project theme this year is Fun in the Sun. It will be fun to see how Summerland’s artists interpret the theme using subjects such as sports, scenery, people, arts and fruit.

WOMEN BUSINESS

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Painting begins Claire Bowyer starts filling in the outlined design on her street banner. She was one of the students working on banners during spring break. STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUC PRO DUCTS TS STORES STO RES FLYERS FLY ERS DEALS DEALS COUPO COUPONS NS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS STORES FLYERS DEALS COUPONS BROCHURES CATALOGUES CONTESTS PRODUCTS STORES STO RES FLYERS FLY ERS DEALS DEALS COUPO COUPONS NS BROCHU BRO CHURES RES CATALO CAT ALOGUE ALO GUES GUE S CONT CONT ONTEST ESTS EST S PR PRODU ODUCTS ODU CTS STORE STORE ORES S FLY FLYERS ERS DEALS DEA LS COU COUPON PONS PON S BROC BROC ROCHUR HURES HUR ES CAT CATALO ALOGU ALO GU

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The all inclusive Retirement Community. Call Sharon at 250.404.4304 for information or to schedule a tour. 12803 Atkinson Road summerlandseniorsvillage.com

Tracing design Jessica Lewis traces a projected design onto a banner. Later the outline will be filled in with paint.


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Summerland Review Thursday, April 5, 2012

What’s up

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SUMMERLAND and region

Cribbage tournament at the Seniors Drop-In Centre is held monthly every fourth Saturday at 1 p.m. Everyone welcome. South Summerland Legion Ladies Auxiliary members are serving breakfast the first Saturday of the month until summer at Summerland Legion Branch 22 on Rosedale Avenue. Proceeds go to the Summerland Legion Ladies Auxiliary.

Thursday

Sunday

Al-Anon offers help to families and friends of alcoholics. Summerland Serenity Group meets Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. in the United Church hall. Call 250-490-9272. Beavers, Cubs, Scouts and Venturers meet at the Harold Simpson Memorial Youth Centre on Thursday evenings. Beavers meet from 6 to 7 p.m. Cubs meet from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Scouts meet from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Venturers meet from 7:30 to 9 p.m. For details call DeeDee at 250-404-0406. Euchre every second and fourth Thursday at 1:30 p.m. at the Seniors Dropin Centre, 9710 Brown St. Seniors’ coffee is held at the Seniors Drop-In Centre, 9710 Brown St., every Thursday from 9 to 10 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Coffee and raisin toast available. Summerland Lions Club meets on the first and third Thursdays of the month at 6:30 p.m. at the Harold Simpson Youth Centre, 9111 Peach Orchard Rd. For more information call Gladys Schmidt at 250-494-4933. Summerland Material Girls Quilt Guild meets the second and fourth Thursday of the month from September to May at 9 a.m. in the Harold Simpson Memorial Youth Centre, 9111 Peach Orchard Rd. For more information call Doris Flynn at 250-4947262. The Rug Hooking Circle meets every second and fourth Thursday of the month from noon to 3 p.m. at Leir House Arts and Cultural Centre, 220 Manor Park Ave., Penticton. Practice a traditional Canadian art form in a group setting. Host is certified teacher, fibre artist and published contributor Angela Possak. 250-767-0206 or online rughookingteacher.ca. The Summerland Arts Centre is the location every Thursday afternoon between 1 and 4 p.m. for the Traditional Rug Artists. Drop in and see how the rug hooking of your grandmother’s era is handled in a modern way. The Summerland Multiple Sclerosis Coffee Group meets the last Thursday of every month at Santorini’s Restaurant at 10:30 a.m. Everyone is welcome. For more information call Sandy at 250-493-6564. The Thursday Night Jazz Big Band is performing a benefit concert April 5 at 7:30 p.m. at Centre Stage Theatre in Summerland. The concert proceeds will benefit the Summerland Middle School Grade 8 band trip to Edmonton this June. TOPS BC #725 Summerland meets every Thursday in the lower level of the Seniors’ Drop-in Centre, 9710 Brown St. Weigh-in is from 5:30 to 6 p.m. and is followed by a meeting. For more information call Louise at 778-516-3070.

DivorceCare is for all who are suffering from the difficulties resulting from separation or divorce. The group meets at Summerland Baptist Church just inside the Victoria Road South entrance on Sundays from 5 to 7 p.m. Vintage Car Club, South Okanagan Chapter, meets the last Sunday of every month at 2 p.m. in the Youth Centre on Peach Orchard Road. Anyone who owns or is interested in vintage cars (25 years or older) is invited to attend. For more information phone 250-494-5473.

Friday Bridge is every Friday at 1 p.m. at the Seniors’ Drop-In Centre, 9710 Brown St. Phone 250-494-8164. Cribbage is played every Friday at 1:30 p.m. at the Seniors’ Drop-in Centre, 9710 Brown St. Summerland Pleasure Painters meet Fridays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the basement level of the Summerland branch of Okanagan Regional Library. New members welcome. Tai Chi is Fridays at 10:30 a.m. and Tuesdays at 10 a.m. at the Seniors’ Drop-in Centre, 9710 Brown St. Beginners welcome. Phone Nancy at 250-494-8902.

Monday Dabber Bingo is at the Senior Dropin Centre, 9710 Brown St., every Monday at 1:30 p.m. 16 regular games, Lucky 7, Odd/Even, Bonanza. Everyone is welcome. License #832873. Pickleball, a tennis-like game, fun for all ages, is held at Summerland Baptist Church, Victoria Road entrance, Mondays from 3 to 5 p.m. Paddles provided. Wear comfortable clothes and gym shoes. Drop-in fee is $1. The South Okanagan Orchid Society meets the third Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at Okanagan College in Penticton. The group meets September to June. For more information, contact Joan at 250-494-4293.

Tuesday Bridge games at St. Stephen’s Church Hall on Tuesdays beginning at 1 p.m. New players are always welcome. For information call 250-494-6116 or 250-494-5363. Kiwanis Club of Summerland meeting times are the first and third Tuesdays of each month from noon to 1 p.m. If interested phone John Tamblyn at 250-494-2151. NeighbourLink’s Lunch Social is held the second Tuesday of every month at the Seniors’ Drop-In Centre, 9710 Brown St. Everyone welcome. Should you require transportation, please phone 250-4044673 at least 24 hours in advance. Penticton Concert Band practices Tuesdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. New members welcome. Intermediate to advanced players. Call Gerald at 250-809-2087. Quest Society of Summerland meets on the third Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. in the meeting room at 9700 Brown St. (Parkdale Place.) There’s nothing that keen Summerland women can’t do when they are brought together in the name of community service. For more information phone 250494-9066 or 250-494-9106 or visit questsociety.shawwebspace.ca. South Okanagan Genealogical Society meets every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Penticton Public Library/Museum, 875 Main St., Penticton. For further information, call Nola Reid at 250492-0751.

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Summerland Caregiver Support Group meets on the first and third Tuesday of every month from 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the Summerland Health Centre. For more information, call Cindy at 250-404-8072. Whist is played on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at 7 p.m. at the Seniors’ Drop-in Centre, 9710 Brown St. Everyone is welcome.

Wednesday Religious education for kindergarten to Grade 7 children every Wednesday evening 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Holy Child Catholic Church. Call 250-494-3110 with questions. Summerland Air Cadets parade Wednesday nights, 1815-2130 hours at Harold Simpson Memorial Youth Centre, 9111 Peach Orchard Rd. All youth aged 12 to 18 welcome. For more information call Air Cadet office at 250- 494-7988. Summerland ATV Club meets on the first Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Summerland Library lower level. The club promotes responsible ridership including registration, insurance, safety certification and scheduled pleasure rides. Membership includes orchardists, farmers, ranchers and fun seekers of all ages including those with disabilities.

Upcoming Annual general meeting of the Agur Lake Camp Society Tuesday, April 17 at 7 p.m. at the Ramada Inn atrium, 1050 Eckhardt Ave. W., Penticton. New members welcome. Nominations for the board must be received two weeks prior to the meeting. References are required. Mothers’ Day at the Summerland Museum Saturday, May 12 from 1 to 4 p.m. Visit the museum that day and enjoy the newest and very popular exhibit Young at Heart, featuring toys from days gone by. All mothers

will receive a gift and everyone who visits can enjoy Grandma Stone’s famous ginger cookies and milk. Sorry, we are closed on Sundays. Okanagan Similkameen Parks Society will hold its annual meeting at 7 p.m. Friday April 13 at Centre Stage Theatre at Main Street and Rosedale Avenue in Summerland. Special guest presenters will be ecological preserve wardens Don Guild, Laurie Rockwell, Eva Durance and others. All are welcome. Donations will be accepted. Summerland VIP (visually impaired) Club meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 1:30 p.m. in the Parkdale Housing banquet room on Brown Street. Newcomers and friends are welcome. Remember the next date is Tuesday, April 10 at 1:30 p.m. The Rotary Okanagan International Children’s Festival will be on May 24 to 26 at Okanagan Lake Park in Penticton. We need volunteers for all areas of the festival including children’s activities and workshops, box office, traffic control, site set up and take down. To volunteer, or to find more information, visit the web site at www.okchildrensfest.com or call Chuck at 250-490-3652. The Summerland Bluegrass Group is hosting bluegrass jams on Saturday, April 21 and Saturday, May 19 at the Peachland United Church from 6:30 to 10 p.m. Bring your acoustic instrument or just come and enjoy the music. A minimal admission cost at the door to cover expenses is included. The Summerland Horseshoe Club is looking for new members. Practices are held in Memorial Park on Tuesday and Thursday evenings at 6 p.m. Call Laura Williams at 250-494-3094.

SUMMERLAND

Ministerial Association

Church Page

HOLY CHILD CATHOLIC CHURCH

ST STEPHEN’S ANGLICAN 9311 Prairie Valley Rd. (Stone Church in Summerland)

Rosedale & Quinpool

Sunday Services - 8:30 am & 10 am Office Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday - 9 am - 1 pm

MASSES: Saturdays 6:00 pm & Sundays 10:00 am Tuesday-Friday 9:00 am

250-494-3466 The Reverend Canon Rick Paulin

Father Ferdinan Nalitan

250-494-2266

Inviting you to

SUMMERLAND'S LAKESIDE CHURCH

www.summeranglican.ca modern clean banquet facility available

SUMMERLAND BAPTIST The Church on the Hill

Come, belong, believe and become It can start for you, or your family, at 11:00 a.m. Sundays www.lakesidepresbyterian.ca On Butler off Lakeshore Drive 250-462-1870

10318 Elliott Street Worship Services 9:15 AM & 11:00 AM SBC Kids @ 9:15 AM

ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN

SUMMERLAND PENTECOSTAL

“Leading people to live by God’s grace and Christ’s teachings”

9918 Julia Street

N. Victoria & Blair Sts. 250-494-9309 Family Worship - 10:00 am with Children’s Learning Time / Nursery-Grade 6 Pastor: Michael Colbeck

SUMMERLAND ALLIANCE

Real Life... Right Now!

14820 Victoria Road North Morning Worship: 10:00 am Children's Church & Nursery

Senior Pastor: Rev. Rick Gay Worship & Youth: Brandon Dykstra Church Office: 250-494-9975

Lead Pastor: Larry Schram Associate Pastor: Del Riemer For info or help call 250-494-3881 www.summerlandbaptist.ca

Worship with us, Sunday at 10:30 am Loving God, Loving People Lead Pastor: Rev. Jack McNeil

250-494-8248 UNITED CHURCH OF CANADA

Henry Avenue 10:00 am Morning Worship

250-494-1514 (250-494-6181 Church Office) Ministers: The Whole People of God


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Symphony topic at Philosphers’ Café The next Philosophers’ Café features Rosemary Thomson, Director Okanagan Symphony Orchestra speaking on MusicVoice of the Human

Experience on Wednesday, April 11. Doors open at 6:30 p.m Discussion begins at 7 p.m. at the Summerland Arts Centre, 9533 Main St.

Are you a local non-profit organization? Are you planning a fundraiser this year? We will let you use our hall at no charge! For info call 250-494-2301 Royal Canadian Legion Br.22 14205 Rosedale Ave., Summerland

This Spring...

Rosemary Thomson is the music director of the Okanagan Symphony Orchestra, was chorus master and resident conductor of the Calgary Philharmonic and assistant conductor for the Canadian Opera Company. She made her professional debut as resident conductor of the Winnipeg Symphony working with Bramwell Tovey. She is quoted as saying “Music gives voice to the richness of the human experience, that which we feel most deeply; joy and sorrow, love and agony, hope and

despair, victory and defeat.” Her talk will focus on how the symphony can be a leader in building and sustaining healthy communities.

Films shown There will be two films shown at Centre Stage Theatre during Earth Week. The first will be the documentary Film: “The Future of Food” being shown on Monday, April 16 at 6:30 p.m. The second will be The Silent Invasion being shown Thursday, April 19 at 6:30 p.m. These two films

are part of the Earth Week events being coordinated by the Community Cultural Development Committee. More details can be found on the Summerland Community Arts Council’s online Events Calendar and on the Chamber’s website under Upcoming Community Events.

At the gallery Nature In Motion, a study of the magical interplay between colour, movement and the natural environment is currently on display at the Summerland Art Gallery.

This show featuring photographs by Penticton resident Stephen Hancock, seeks to convey the mystery and motion of plants, trees and water through careful panning or zoom-

by John Arendt

“Everywhere you are this Spring”

407 Main St. * Penticton, B.C. * 250-493-1513 www.urbanaclothing.ca

Easter Holiday Hours Closed April 6, 7 & 8th

Open - April 9th Wishing you an Eggs-tra special Easter!

www.sdcu.com 250-494-7181

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David Finnis

Summerland songwriters to perform

All your favorite colors in one place.

Summerland Financial Services and McBain Insurance

ARTS PALETTE

ing of the camera to produce a blending of colours and textures. Gallery hours are Tuesday to Friday from 1 to 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ❏❏❏ If you know of an event you feel should be included in the Arts Palette or on the Arts Council’s online calendar, please email: dfinnis@telus. net or call 250-4948994. summerlandarts.com and twitter. com/artspalette David Finnis is President of the Summerland Community Arts Council.

Making music

Summerland Review file photo

Roy Forbes, left, and Bill Henderson will perform at the Songwriters’ Showcase Concert at Centre Stage. The two B.C. musicians will be joined by several Okanagan songwriters, including two from Summerland.

2 for 1

ICE CREAM CONE! Coupon expires on August 31/2012

Open 7 Days a Week Mon. to Fri. 9:30 am to 5 pm ~ Sat. 10 am to 5 pm ~ Sun. 11 am to 5 pm Purchase one ice cream cone at regular price and receive the second free! 6206 Canyon View Road • 250-494-0377 • www.summerlandsweets.com

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS!

Two Summerland songwriters will join music legends Bill Henderson and Roy Forbes at the Songwriters’ Showcase Concert at Centre Stage later this month. The concert, on Friday, April 20 at 8 p.m., will feature several of the participants in the weekend’s songwriting workshop. Tanya Graham and Julie Blagborne will perform at the concert. Two other Okanagan performers, David Federici of Kelowna and Carolyn Anele of Vernon, will also perform at the concert. The four are among the participants in the 17th annual songwriters’ workshop, which will be held at the George Ryga Centre on April 21 and 22. Henderson said songwriting is the least visible element of music, often overlooked as audiences notice showmanship, the skill of the musicians and the production quality. “You’re not always aware of what the songwriter is doing,” he said. “Musicians develop skills with the instrument, sometimes to a very high degree, but they don’t always understand what a song is.” He added that a good song will remain with the listener long after the

performance. He urges songwriters to play their songs for those who are not musicians, to see how the songs are received. Hearing another perspective on a song can help the songwriter to create a stronger piece of music. Occasionally, the song will emerge exactly as the songwriter had initially imagined it, but more often, hearing feedback from others will enhance the piece, Henderson said. “Often, it’s the blending that brings the energy.” This is the 17th year Henderson and Forbes have held the songwriting workshop and while they have seen songwriters hone their skills, they have not seen their participants break onto the national or international music scene. “My interest is not in creating stars,” Henderson said. “My interest is in helping people plumb the depths of songwriting. We’re focussing on the craft of songwriting.” In the end, he said the best songwriters are those who learn the craft and then continue to write songs every day. Tickets for the Songwriters’ Showcase Concert are available at Martin’s Flowers in Summerland, 250-494-5432 and at The Dragon’s Den in Penticton.


Summerland Review Thursday, April 5, 2012

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Budget reaction Cowboy poet shares a gift all over the map Budget 2012 represents the first time as a newly elected MP that I will have been part of our nation’s budget process and that includes listening to the reaction of the budget from Okanagan-Coquihalla taxpayers. The comments I have heard thus far have been very diverse and range from anger that more drastic spending cuts were not implemented to the other end of the spectrum where some feel that spending reductions that are called for will destroy the social fabric of our nation. I have also heard from those citizens who are supportive of the budget overall and from those who have raised very specific objections and at times offered constructive suggestions. This input is very helpful to me and is part of what I share in discussions with our government caucus in Ottawa. However what is unusual is that there was a small segment of the population who rejected the budget before even knowing what the contents would be, some even going as far as to organizing a protest in advance of budget day. Although the Economic Action Plan 2012 reference guide is close to 500 pages in size there are some issues that have been on the minds of many taxpayers. For those that would like to view the document it can be accessed online at www.budget.gc.ca. Proposed changes to the Old Age Security (OAS) are a topic of frequent discussion. Budget 2012 proposes to increase the age of eligibility for OAS from age 65 to age 67. These changes would not begin to take effect until the year 2023 and be gradually phased over six years leading up to 2029. There are also two new measures being proposed for OAS that were not widely reported on, the first

OTTAWA REPORT

Dan Albas change is that starting in January of 2013, eligible seniors will be automatically enrolled for both GIS and OAS benefits without having to go through the form application process. The second change is that for those who wish to continue working, as of July 2013 there will be an option to delay receiving the OAS benefit for up to five years. For every month an individual delays receiving OAS, their monthly payment will be increased for the remainder of their retirement. Aside from the penny being phased out, the other area I have heard significant feedback is that Budget 2012 does not go far enough in reducing spending. For the record, Budget 2012 proposes savings measures of $5.2 billion over the next three years. While this threeyear budgetary plan does provide a return to balanced budgets some would like to see this process accelerated further. While we have seen marginal improvement in the U.S. economy and signs that some European Union countries are taking steps in handling their debt crisis issues, we certainly must acknowledge that we must

continue to follow a solid fiscal track to balanced budgets. We are leading the G-7 in terms of growth and job creation. The challenge is that accelerated reductions in government spending can also have a detrimental impact on economic activity if not done at a measured pace, no different than inaction on spending reductions that can also create an adverse economic impact as well. One very important aspect of Budget 2012 is an increased investment in innovation working with private sector partnerships. I have already witnessed firsthand the importance of government investments in innovation in communities like Okanagan Falls and Summerland as examples and how that creates well paying full time jobs. Here in OkanaganCoquihalla we are very fortunate to have two federal research facilities as well as strategic investments into facilities such as Okanagan College and the new Center for Excellence Campus. Budget 2012 is an important direction for our country that will continue to create jobs and address challenging demographic changes in our future. Canada as a nation was not built on handouts and reckless spending but on principles of hard work and living within our means. Budget 2012 continues to support the principles that built this great nation. Dan Albas is the MP for Okanagan Coquihalla.

Cowboy poet Grant Stone shares his cowboy poetry with an audience at the Summerland Seniors Drop-in Centre.

Grant Stone, a 30-year resident of Summerland, read cowboy poetry to a crowd of seniors gathered at the Summerland Seniors Drop-In Centre for a potluck dinner last week. Stone, whose day job is driving the local HandiDart bus, reads and writes poetry as a hobby. He defines cowboy poetry as verbal images of hired hands gathered around a campfire sharing their experiences. When asked why he chooses to entertain people with his poetry readings he quoted a friend who said this of him: “Grant has gift and he is willing to share it.” Stone recited Robert Service’s poem Dangerous Dan McGrew from memory in response to an audience request. He went on to point out that another of Service’s poems, The Cremation of Sam McGee was based on a man who had lived three years in Summerland. Service never met McGee, but chose his name from a bank deposit slip he found. There is a street near the Summerland golf course that is named after Sam McGee.

Looking for work? We can help. Get the training and support you need to find and keep a job in B.C. Job search resources • Personal employment planning • Workshops and training • Specialized services

Let us know If you would like a reporter or photographer to cover a special event, please contact the newsroom at least one full business day in advance. We will try our best to accommodate you, but we are not always able to attend all events. If this is the case, we will do our best to help you find another solution. The telephone number is 250-494-5406.

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES CENTRES Locations across B.C. Visit one near you. WorkBCCentres.ca 1.800.663.7867 TDD: 1.800.661.8773

The Employment Program of British Columbia is funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia.


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New composters tackle tough jobs The District of Summerland, in conjunction with the Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen, has a variety of composting units available for purchase. The various units are designed to handle yard waste, food waste and pet waste. Some operate as worm composters, and one uses a fermenting process. Prices range from $25 to $117.50. Prepaid purchases must be made by April 17 by completing an order form and paying at the Municipal Hall, 1211 Henry Ave. Composting units will be available for pickup starting May 14 at the Engineering and Public Works office at 9215 Cedar Ave.

Two of the composting units available take care of cooked food, meats and pet waste, all unsuitable for ordinary composting units. Most backyard compost bins can help compost yard waste and uncooked fruits and vegetables. They are not designed to breakdown stinky or dangerous waste such as cooked foods, meat or dog feces. These items can create powerful odors, attract pests and potentially spread diseases. Bokashicycle uses microbial action to convert all food waste or pet waste into nutrient-rich soil in weeks, eliminating pathogens and odours. The system creates a concentrated

Practice road safety Watch for pedestrians at crosswalks and around playground zones.

14th Annual

PENTICTON GUN & ANTIQUE SHOW & SALE PENTICTON CURLING CLUB - 505 RAILWAY (Highway 97 Penticton)

Admission $5.00 Seniors $3.00 (Gold Card) Accompanied Children Under 12 Years Free Show Times: Saturday 9 am - 5 pm • Sunday 9 am - 3 pm

April 14 & 15, 2012

FOR SHOW OR TABLE INFORMATION CALL Kevin or Brenda: (250) 494-4356 • email: collector0003@gmail.com

COME PLAY WITH US

25

BC Seniors Games Anniversary

Your 55 + Games

Aug. 21 to 25, 2012

BURNABY Over 3500 BC 55+ Seniors Expected! Go to our website and click on “Zones” to find someone in your area who can help you become part of our

25th Anniversary Celebration! http://bcseniorsgames.org

AArchery h Athletics Badminton Bocce Bridge Carpet Bowling Cribbage Cycling Darts Dragon Boats Five Pin Bowling Floor Curling Golf Horseshoes Ice Curling Ice Hockey Lawn Bowling One-Act Plays Pickleball Slo-Pitch Snooker Soccer Swimming Table Tennis Tennis Whist

liquid fertilizer and a fermented material shown to promote plant growth when buried in gardens. Visit www.bokashicycle.com for details. The Green Cone takes all kinds of food waste and dog feces, and breaks it down naturally into a liquid that is absorbed into the earth. After installation, you just dump organic waste in every day. The Green Cone does the rest. The soil around it is enriched with the nutrients that come from the process. Visit www.greencone. ca for details. More information is available on the municipal website at summerland.ca and at the Regional District of OkanaganSimilkameen at 250490-4129.

Composting system The Bokashcycle system can be used for pet waste, cooked food and meat, besides ordinary kitchen waste including uncooked fruts and vegetables.

One year to go before return to PST and dropping writ for next election Roughly one year from this week British Columbia will transition back to the former provincial sales tax taxation system. With the official change date of April 1, 2013 there will be many changes in how provincial taxation is charged on a variety of different goods and services. When the PST taxation system was first created more than 50 years ago, the B.C. economy was based largely on the sale of goods with a far smaller service industry. Over the past decades the service industry has grown significantly. It was not until the implementation of the harmonized sales tax that the extent of taxation being largely exempt on services became much more apparent. Obviously from the perspective of the provincial government this also resulted in revenue exceeding original forcasts. Going back to the former PST system will in most cases ensure that businesses who provide services will be largely PST

VICTORIA VIEWS

Bill Barisoff exempt as opposed to those business who sell goods that will remain subject to the PST. While the GST will continue to treat all business equally for those registrants currently collecting HST it will be important to be aware of pending changes and reporting requirements. It is also important to remember that any HST rebates that were put in place to offset the HST will no longer apply. Further information can be found on the www. hstinbc.ca website. For potential new home purchasers looking to take advantage of the B.C. first time new home buyers program the deadline for this program is April 1, 2013. For more informa-

tion on the new home buyer’s credit visit http://www.hstinbc. ca/buying_goods/ new-home-purchasegrant. Another event scheduled to occur in roughly one year will be the dropping of the writ for the next British Columbia provincial general election occurring on May 14, 2013. There are currently many demands facing B.C. taxpayers as cost pressures continue to rise as do expectations for increased services. Many taxpayers have spoken clearly against increases in taxation and at the same time some interest groups who also oppose taxation increases are in turn seeking support for increased government spending on a variety of different demands and services. I encourage taxpayers to research British Columbia’s fiscal situation over the next 12 months and also to be aware of increased spending for key government services such as healthcare and education that continue to outpace other service areas of government. On a different topic I would also like to

take a moment to thank many of the mayors, councillors, school trustees and regional district directors throughout our Okanagan valley region. I have worked

agree; however, it is not fair to make personal attacks. We have much to be thankful for in this region and many of the completed projects that help enhance our quality of life are

“While being the target of criticism is a regular part of the job in public office, recently I have noted a trend where some comments towards mayors and councillors have become increasingly personal.” with many different mayors and councils over the years including different regional district directors. Often this work involves partnership efforts on behalf of important projects that move our region forward. While being the target of criticism is a regular part of the job in public office, recently I have noted a trend where some comments towards mayors and councillors have become increasingly personal. It is fair to offer criticism and to dis-

a result of the collaborative efforts of elected officials at all levels of government working together. There are projects that at times present challenges and there can be different opinions as to what are costs and benefits. That said, if we can keep our tone and our criticisms respectful and constructive we can maintain an atmosphere that encourages people to run for public office to make a difference in our various communities. Bill Barisoff is MLA for Penticton.


Summerland Review Thursday, April 5, 2012

www.summerlandreview.com 17

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.494.5406 fax 250.494.5453 email class@summerlandreview.com

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS TRAVEL CHILDREN EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SERVICES PETS & LIVESTOCK MERCHANDISE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE RENTALS AUTOMOTIVE MARINE

AGREEMENT

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. bcclassified.com cannot be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. bcclassified.com reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisment and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassified.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisment and box rental.

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION

Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, color, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassified.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

ON THE WEB:

Announcements

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Funeral Homes

Business Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

Home Care/Support

$294+ DAILY Mailing Postcards! Easy! Guaranteed Legit Work! www.ThePostcardGuru.com $20-$60/Hr Using Your Computer! www.FreeJobPosition.com Overnight Cash To Your Doorstep! www.CashGiftingBucks.com More Amazing Opportunities Visit: www.LegitCashJobs.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1(877)818-0783.

A BUSINESS BOOMING Our expanding Kelowna company needs TEAM players for F/T work. NO experience necessary. Great opportunity for those willing to grow with our company.

24 hr. Live-In Support Required (Kamloops, B.C.)

Professional/ Management

Credible Cremation Services Ltd. Basic Cremation $990 +tax Sensible prices for practical people

250-493-3912

24 hrs “No Hidden Costs” Pre-Pay & Save www.crediblecremation.com 559 Ellis Street, Penticton, BC

Coming Events HOST AN Event for BC Annual Arts and Culture Week! April 22-28, arts councils & schools across BC are hosting inspiring arts events. www.bcartsweek.org

Information

NOTICE

CHECK YOUR AD! Notice of error must be given in time for correction before the second insertion of any advertisement. The publisher will not be responsible for omissions or for more than one incorrect insertion, or for damages or costs beyond the cost of the space actually occupied by the error. DABBER BINGO, Seniors Centre, 9710 Brown. Every Monday, 1:30PM. 16 regular games, Lucky 7, Odd/Even, Bonanza. Everyone welcome. License #832873. MORE MONTH THAN MONEY? DON’T GO HUNGRY. Help is available at the Summerland Food Bank. Phone 250-488-2099 before noon Tuesdays to arrange for your pick up time.

VENDORS WANTED Creston Valley Home & Garden Show “The Best Trade Show in the Kootenays” April 20 & 21, 2012 1-866-528-4342 info@crestonvalleychamber.com

Sports & Recreation GOLF launch monitor club fittings. Get your clubs properly fit to your swing @ OGS. Call Paul @ 250-494-8178

Obituaries

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS

APPLY NOW: Pennywise Scholarship For Women to attend Journalism certificate course at Langara College in Vancouver. Deadline May 30, 2012. More information: www.bccommunitynews.com

to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 copies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition! Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335 or hunt@blackpress.ca

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST - Vernon SolidWorks, AutoCAD & CNC programming. Marine Industry Knowledge. Creativity and technical skills. Effective communication. Manage projects to completion. See www.harbercraft.com for details.

Students Welcome.

250-860-3590 Bell, Jacoe & Company is seeking a permanent, parttime legal assistant. The successful candidate will have a certificate from a legal assistant program & some litigation experience would be considered an asset, but is not required. Please apply in confidence by email to Shelly@belljacoe.com or by mail to PO Box 520, Summerland BC V0H 1Z0. (Entry level, part-time, 20 hours per week.)

HOME BASED BUSINESSWe need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com LIKE DECORATING, cooking or entertaining? Need extra money? Become a Consultant and turn your passion into extra earnings! Canadian company expanding in this area! Visit www.everydaystyle.com for free information.

Career Opportunities

2,500+/mo to start!

$

CITY OF Yellowknife. Lifeguard/Instructor. We are seeking an experienced individual to be a Lifeguard/Instructor. Refer to: www.yellowknife.ca for the required qualifications. Submit resumes by April 13, 2012, quoting competition 602-106U to: Human Resources Division, City of Yellowknife, P.O. Box 580, YK, NT, X1A 2N4. Fax to: (867) 6693471. Email: hr@yellowknife.ca

Farm Workers ADVENTURE + Agriculture = Agriventure! Live & work on European, United Kingdom, Australian, New Zealand or Japanese agricultural/horticultural operations. Depart in spring, summer or fall for 4-12 months or more. 1-888-5984415. www.agriventure.com

MARDEN AUTO HAULING LTD. a Salmon Arm based small trucking company. Seeking Heavy Duty Mechanic Welding, hydraulic exp necessary Own tools. Competitive wages, Class1 driver, towing carrier, exp. an asset. Resume/abstract. fax 250-8040680, email: patlabr@telus.net

Obituaries

Obituaries

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking DRIVERS WANTED:

John Wayne Sebastian passed away comfortably in Surrey Memorial on March 29. He was diagnosed in 2000 with the chronic auto-immune disease Relapsing Polychondritis and succumbed to one of it’s many complications. Wayne was born Oct. 14, 1946 in Grande Prairie, AB and spent his youth in Lacombe, AB. He lived his young adult life in Northern B.C. and moved to the Lower Mainland in 1982. Wayne will be remembered as an honest guy that always spoke his mind whether you liked it or not. As his health deteriorated, he became rather cantankerous, but never lost his sense of humour or the joy of an NFL Sunday with his faithful dog Bennie at his side. He will be sadly missed by his wife Sylvia, daughter Samantha and grandson Darcy of Nanoose Bay, son Guy and grandsons Calvin and Brandon of Prince George, parents Jim and Naomi of Summerland, sister Dawn Besse (Doug) of Gibson’s and various nieces and nephews. In keeping with Wayne’s wishes there will be no service or memorial and please, no flowers.

Housing & Utilities incls. w/ a Remarkable Compensation Package. Please forward resume to Kristine Toebosch at ktoebosch@ dengarry.bc.ca or fax to 1-250-377-4581 or mail Attn: Kristine PO Box 892 Kamloops BC V2C-5M8

Trades, Technical CONCRETE FINISHERS and Form Setters. Edmonton based company seeks experienced concrete finishers and form setters for work in Edmonton and northern Alberta. Subsistence and accommodations provided for out of town work;

john@raidersconcrete.com

EARN EXTRA Cash! - P/T, F/T Immediate openings. Easy computer work, others positions are available. Can be done from home. No experience needed. www.hwc-bc.com

Cell 780-660-8130. Fax 780444-7103. PROJECT BIOLOGIST - Terrace/Smithers McELHANNEY seeks Prof. Biologist or Biology Tech with 5+ yrs field exp in fish and fish habitat sampling and assessment, hydrologic & water quality monitoring, and terrestrial habitat assessments. For more info & to apply, visit: www.mcelhanney.com

Home Care/Support

Home Care/Support

1-800-222-TIPS Income Opportunity

Mary Barkwill Home (250) 494-0226 • Cell: (250) 212-7579

Home care and assistance to help make your life more pleasant and manageable • Chores/Cleaning • Driving to appointments • Other services as needed

• Errands/Shopping • Dog walking

Serving Summerland and Penticton

Terrific career opportunity outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects. No Experience Needed!! Extensive paid travel, meal allowance, 4 wks. vacation & benefits pkg. Skills Needed - Ability to travel 3 months at a time Valid License with air brake endorsement. High School Diploma or GED. Apply at www.sperryrail.com under careers, keyword Driver DO NOT FILL IN CITY or STATE

Obituaries

Dengarry Professional Services Ltd. is seeking experienced individuals or couples for contract to provide live in 24 hr. support for short term stabilization to adults with mental & physical disabilities in Kamloops. Applicant must have education and exp. either in behavioral and/or medical supports. Applicant will undergo extensive screening including reference checks, Crim Check and drivers abstract.

WKM, a mechanical contractor located in Trail, BC, is looking for a CONTROLLER. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to; managing the day to day accounting operations, accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, ccra remittances and monthly reporting of the financial statements to the owner. Please email your resume: wkm@shawcable.com  

Obituaries

Elizabeth Madeleine Tavender October 28, 1919 - March 20, 2012 Elizabeth died peacefully with her daughter Kathleen by her side at Penticton Regional Hospital. She was born in Sakule, Yugoslavia and emigrated to Canada with her parents Sigmund and Anna Wolfe, eventually settling in Summerland. It was here that she met her husband Wes and together they raised their four children on the Tavender property, which dates back to 1908. Elizabeth had a long and healthy life, enriched by many good friendships. She was predeceased by her husband Wes, daughter Maureen, and brother Louis Wolfe. She will be fondly remembered by her sister Nellie Taylor, daughter Elspeth (Bill) McAuley, daughter Kathleen (Ron) Jackson and son Jeffrey Tavender; by her grandchildren Michael (Kim) McAuley, Jennifer (Cory) McAuley, Ann-Marie (Camilo) Jackson and Daniel Jackson; as well as her great grandchildren Abigail, Sophie and Isaac; nephews and nieces. No service by request. Condolences may be directed to the family through providencefuneralhomes.com.

Obituaries

HAMILTON, James Marvin Passed away March 23, 2012, in Penticton, BC, after a lengthy illness, at the age of 64. Born September 30, 1947 in Vancouver, BC, Jim was a resident of Summerland, BC. He had a great love of thoroughbred horses with his parents, Marvin & Virginia. He later became a builder and developer. Jim was a quiet man but once you got to know him, he was a very kind soul. He raised 3 beautiful children; Matt, James (Paula) and Lizzie. He met his soul mate Angie in 1997 and ¿nally married her in 2008 adding 2 more children; Stacie and Kimberly (Guy) and 2 grandchildren; Ennosh and Shyel. Later, James and Paula added 2 more grandchildren; Kinsley and Jim’s “surprise”, the new addition, Greyson James. Jim was predeceased by his parents, Marvin and Virginia. A private family service was held. Donations in memory of Jim to the Children’s Hospital would be greatly appreciated. Messages of condolence may be sent to the family c/o hansonsfuneral.com Arrangements entrusted to the care of

Providence Funeral Homes

“Summerland’s Rosedale Chapel”

250-494-7752

250-494-3202


18 www.summerlandreview.com

Employment Trades, Technical

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Garage Sales

Employment

Thursday, April 5, 2012 Summerland Review

Employment

Services

Services

Merchandise for Sale

Real Estate Houses For Sale

Trades, Technical

Trades, Technical

Health Products

Repairs

Flea Markets

DL Baker Construction Canada is looking for Structural Steel/Precast Erectors in Kitimat, BC, Canada. Red Seal preferred. Erectors must be capable of erecting, installing of temporary braces, splice plates and welding required for the erection of precast panels. Must have the ability to read shop drawing and provide basic layout of precast. Must have the ability to correctly rig and hoist material. Provide proper crane signals to fly material in place. Project Terms is Project Based Wages are in accordance with Project Labour Agreement between Kitimat Modernization Employer Association and Coalition of

DL Baker Construction Canada is looking for Cement Mason/Finishers in Kitimat, BC, Canada. Red Seal preferred. Finishers must possess competency in finishing high tolerance floors. Knowledge & experience in using all finishing hand tools, walk behind, and riding trowels. Must have experience in floor hardeners, shake and the ability to establish grade. Project Terms is Project Based Wages are in accordance with Project Labour Agreement between Kitimat Modernization Employer Association and Coalition of

HERBAL MAGIC - With Herbal Magic lose up to 20 pounds in just 8 weeks and keep it off. Results Guaranteed! Start today call 1-800854-5176.

Brad’s Small Engine Repair since 1994. Lawn mowers, trimmers, ATV’s, outboards, dirtbikes (pickup/delivery). 250-494-4202.

Financial Services

Tiling

Gigantic Community Yard Sale in the Legion Parking Lot on May 5th, 8am to 2pm. Table rentals $5 Donations of sellable items are also greatly appreciated! For info call 250-494-2301

British Columbia Building Trades

for the Kitimat Modernization Project. Approximate Journeyman Structural Steel Rate $36.27 This work will start 6/15/12. Please respond to this ad by 4/20/12. Please respond via email by placing Structural Steel Erector in the subject line to: patton@bakerconcrete.com DL Baker Construction Canada is looking for Rodbusters in Kitimat, BC, Canada. Red Seal preferred. Rodbusters must be competent in rigging, shaking out & installing (tying) all types of reinforcement used in concrete. Must have basic knowledge of reading and understanding cut sheets and drawings for the reinforcing. Must be capable of signaling and rigging loads for cranes. Project Terms is Project Based Wages are in accordance with Project Labour Agreement between Kitimat Modernization Employer Association and the Coalition of British Columbia Building Trades for the Kitimat Modernization Project. Approximate Journeyman Rodbuster $36.27 This work will start 5/1/12. Please respond to this ad by 4/20/12 Please respond via email by placing Rodbuster in the subject line to patton@bakerconcrete.com

British Columbia Building Trades

for the Kitimat Modernization Project. Approximate Journeyman Cement Mason $31.82 This work will start 6/1/12. Please respond to this ad by 4/20/12. Please respond via email by placing Cement Mason/Finisher in the subject line to patton@bakerconcrete.com

HHDI RECRUITING is hiring on behalf of Baker Hughes Baker Hughes Alberta based oilfield services company is currently hiring;

DRIVER EQUIPMENT OPERATORS & SERVICE SUPERVISORS Class 1 or 3 License required.

Drivers

HD MECHANICS 3rd or 4th apprentice or Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanics with their Red Seal and CVIP License to work in Whitecourt and Hinton, AB. Please call 250-718-3330 or Fax: 1-888-679-0759

Small ads, BIG deals!

For more information or send your resume & current drivers abstract to: driverclass1@shaw.ca

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

FREE GARAGE/YARD SALE POSTERS Be sure to pick up your complimentary poster when you advertise your garage or yard sale in the Summerland Review. For weekend garage sales please have your ads in by Monday, 3:00 pm PRIOR

Phone 250-494-5406

Place a classified word ad and...

IT WILL GO ON LINE!

DROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll Free 1 877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161. M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

Legal Services CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

Business/Office Service DENIED CANADA Pensioplan disability benefits? The Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help. Call Allison Schmidt at 1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca

Ceramic Tile Kitchen Backsplash, Subway style. Any kitchen, any size. Three colour choices. One price $299.00 including installation. 250-490-6903

Pets & Livestock

Boarding Horse boarding on Wildhorse Mountain Ranch, Summerland Pasture, big paddocks, shelter or stable, riding ring, bordered to crown land. 250-494-0506

Pets Havanese & Bichon Pups available, good disposition, family oriented, first shots, dewormed, micro chipped for Identification. For more info and pricing call 250-832-4923 or email: rleech@telus.net

Merchandise for Sale

Appliances NEW & REBUILT APPLIANCES

HUGE SELECTION - LOWEST PRICES Rebuilt Appliances with Full Warranties

WASHERS from $299 WASHER/DRYER sets from $449 FRIDGES from $299 RANGES Ask about our from $299 6 month buyback

Handypersons Bill’s Handyman Service. “No Job Too Small” Fencing, Decks, Landscaping, Cleanup & Removal, Small Moves Bill, 250-494-7267 Summerland

HANDYMAN4HIRE exp. honest prompt service. 250-4999897 discounts www.job4james.com

Landscaping EMERALD CEDAR EDGING Buy Direct From Grower, 6ft.-10 for $240, Planting + Delivery available. Call Budget Nurseries 250-498-2189

Painting & Decorating

493-3011

492-7236

#180-1652 Fairview Rd

(across from Home Hardware)

Auctions HUGE RANCH & Farm Equipment Auction. Saturday April 14, 11am for Allan Smashnuk at 6188 Vla Road, Chase BC, Tractors, Haying Equipment, Livestock Equipment, Welding Equipment, etc. Phone: BC Livestock (250)573-3939

Fertilizers

Residential painting. Small jobs welcome. Heather Ross 250-494-7697

Aged horse manure for sale. No straw, no sawdust. 1 truckload delivered $45, load by yourself $15, we load $25 or fill your own bag $2.50 Call 250-494-0506

Appraisals/ Inspections

Appraisals/ Inspections

Real Estate Appraisals E.W. (Wayne) SUNDBO, CRA 250-494-5353

Houses For Sale

Houses For Sale RE/MAX Orchard Country 10124 Main St. 250-494-8881

- Mobile home $39,900 reduced, immediate possession available, move right in, low pad rent, surprisingly affordable with all appliances and a private deck in well established Summerland Park. Patrick Murphy 250-486-2529 RE/MAX Orchard Country Summerland www.youroklife.com - Choice of two lakeview investor houses starting at just over $300,000, big lots, solid houses! Patrick Murphy 250-486-2529 RE/MAX Orchard Country Summerland www.youroklife.com - Foreclosure bare land zoned for potential subdivision! Patrick Murphy 250-486-2529 RE/MAX Orchard Country Summerland www.youroklife.com

Firewood/Fuel WANTED Applewood, will buy as rounds/logs, or can remove trees for wood. 604-970-4041

Garage Sales Summerland WorkZone Office Closing Out Sale April 12, 9am-4pm. Everything Must Go! Cash and Carry.

Heavy Duty Machinery A- STEEL SHIPPING STORAGE CONTAINERS / Bridges / Equipment Wheel loaders JD 644E & 544A / 63’ & 90’ Stiff boom 5th wheel crane trucks/Excavators EX200-5 & 892D-LC / Small forklifts / F350 C/C “Cabs”20’40’45’53’ New/ Used/ Damaged /Containers Semi Trailers for Hiway & StorageCall 24 Hrs 1-866-528-7108 Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

Misc. for Sale CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-9815991. DIY STEEL Building deals! Many sizes and models. Make an offer on clearance buildings today and save thousands of dollars. Free brochure - 1-800668-5111 ext. 170. FAST RELIEF the First Night!! Restless leg Syndrome and leg cramps gone. Sleep soundly, safe with medication, Proven results. 1-800-7658660. www.allcalm.com **HOME PHONE Reconnect** Call 1-866-287-1348. Prepaid long distance specials! Feature package specials! Referral program! Don’t be without a home phone! Call to Connect! 1-866-287-1348. HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper? SAWMILLS FROM only $3997 - Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info & DVD: 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT

Other Areas NOVA SCOTIA Rural water front lots for sale. Country living at its best. Three bedroom apartments for rent. 45 miles to university town. 1-902-5222343 www.sawmilllanding.com waterfront@bellaliant.net

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent Summerland: Large 1 bdrm apt for rent. F/S. Ref’s req’d. NP, NS, ND. More info call 250-498-4370.

Summerland Renovated 1 bdrm apt. 600 sq ft. Centrally located on Kelly Ave. W/D, F/S, outside deck, private entrance. $650/mo + utilities. Call Len 250-490-5889

Duplex / 4 Plex SUMMERLAND, near town, 2bdrm, 1bath, ns, np, $800+ util., (250)494-9331

Mobile Homes & Pads

www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT

Misc. Wanted LOCAL Coin Collector, looking to buy collections, Mint & Proof sets, Accumulations, Olympic, Gold, Silver Coins Etc. Any amount. Please Call Chad at 250-863-3082.

Real Estate For Sale By Owner TROUT CREEK frontage 2 lots 5 miles West of town. Each lot .67 acre. One with older trailer. On Kettle Valley Railway. $320,000 for both 250-499-5568 or 499-8917.

$600/MO Olalla 1/2 hr south of Penticton, 2 bdrm, w/d, s/f, NS Woodstove or heaters, large fenced yard, Pets Nogotiable, 250-499-8913

Homes for Rent 3 BDRM, 2.5 bath, 2800 sq.ft. ranch house on the Similkameen River, 10 kms east of Princeton. $1400/month utilities included, pets on approval, references required. Farm chores required as part of rent. Available

immediately. Call Raymond at 604-671-3282

Information

New to Summerland? - New Baby?

We’re proud to Welcome You Contact: Tracy Wardley 250-494-1874

&


Summerland Review Thursday, April 5, 2012

www.summerlandreview.com 19

Rentals

Rentals

Transportation

Transportation

Transportation

Homes for Rent

Suites, Lower

Auto Financing

Auto Financing

Recreational/Sale

HOUSE $800/mo, Olalla 1/2 hr south of Penticton. 2 Bdrm, W/D, F/S, NS, Covered deck for smoking outside. Wood Stove or Gas heat, Large fenced yard, Pets negotiable, 250-499-8913

Summerland 2 bdrm, lg family room, spacious kitchen, close to downtown and school. $850/mo incl util. NS NP. Avail Apr 16. Call 250-486-0278 or 250-404-0515 after 4:30 pm

GUARANTEED

94 Okanagan 25.5 ft 5th wheel. New tires, brakes & fridge. Good shape. $3200. 250-494-7474

RENOVATED 2100 sq ft 4-bdrm, 2bath house. New appliances. In-law suite, which includes private laundry. Close to schools and shopping. 2-car garage and large private yard. Avail immed. $1500/month. 250494-3055.

All Makes, All Models. New & Used Inventory. 1-888-229-0744 or apply on line at: www.kiawest.com (click credit approval)

Suites, Upper Summerland 2 bdrm suite available May 1. $1,100/mo includes util, cable & internet. 250-486-1612

Storage

Transportation

NEED Storage? We have 8x10’’s & 8x20’’s. Also RV & car parking available. Call ALCar Storage 250462-0065

Auto Financing

Must be employed w/ $1800/mo. income w/ drivers license. DL #30526

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: Joanne Dawn Desjarlais

www.PreApproval.cc DL# 7557 SHIFT AUTO FINANCE Get Approved Today! CREDIT DOESN’T MATTER.. For The Best Interest Rate Call: 1.877.941.4421 www.ShiftAutoFinance.com

COMPLETELY reno’d, 3 bdrm main flr house. New appliances, in suite laundry, & private patio & yard. Close to shopping and schools. $1250 per month incl util. Avail immediately. 250-494-3055

Houses For Sale

Houses For Sale

TAMMY ANTROBUS

PROFESSIONAL PERSONAL SERVICE tammya@remax.net Call Direct (250) 488-0804 S R E S

ENIOR EAL STATE PECIALIST®

TAKE NOTICE THAT an application will be made by Peter Michael Yurkewich on May 22, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at the Wetaskiwin Law Courts, 4605 - 51st Street, Wetaskiwin AB T9A 1K7 before a Justice in Family Chambers This application is made against you. You are a respondent. You have the right to state your side of this matter before the judge. To do so, you must be in Court when the application is heard as shown above: The applicant SEEKS THE FOLLOWING orders :

ORCHARD COUNTRY

1.

Box 878, 10124 Main St. Summerland, BC V0H 1Z0 Toll Free: 1-888-494-8881

2.

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

MLS® Listings Marketed by Tammy d te da Up

LIS NEW TIN G

3. 4. 5.

A place to call home. Enjoy a warm comfortable decor in this lovely updated 2 bedroom 1½ bath townhome in downtown Summerland. Great his and hers spaces. $177,900

SUITED FAMILY HOME

QUALITY RETIREMENT

Ground floor 2 bdrm suite in Allen Place, Summerland. Great living space & convenient location. $154,900

55+ BARELAND STRATA DEVELOPMENT

GREAT FAMILY HOME 4 bdrms, 2 baths. Great sized yard, walking distance to schools, close to game fields. $289,000

FULLY SERVICED LOT

2900 sq. ft., 5 bdrms, den, 4 baths, 2 kitchens, 3 living rooms, garage, carport & 3 separate entrances. $469,000

La Caseta is in a great location for enjoying your retirement years. It offers a quiet friendly community and low strata fees. There is approximately 1200 sq. ft. plus full unfinished basement at only $274,900

Build your dream home in an energy efficient environment. Enjoy mountain & valley views. Close to all amenities. $127,000

LOCATION • VALUE • QUALITY OF LIFE

201-740 WINNIPEG ST., PENTICTON

Over 2,800 sq. ft. of gorgeous living. Enjoy a fantastic floorplan with a level entry rancher with full finished basement. Bonus room is partially suited plus great views. Value Priced at $430,000

Fantastic location close to all Completely updated 2 bedroom, 2 amenities. Move-in condition. bath apartment. In suite laundry, Nothing to do except enjoy covered parking, extra storage & a life to the fullest in the great location. Well run strata - 55+, Okanagan. $159,000 no pets & no rentals. $194,900

6. 7.

An Order directing the Respondent to pay the Applicant, child support arrears to August 30, 2011, in the amount of $7744.00. An Order directing the Respondent to pay child support in relation to the child, Tyson Lewis Yurkewich, born April 30, 1994, pursuant to the Federal Child Support Guidelines, in the amount of $226.00 per month; An order dispensing with service of notice of this application and supporting affidavit ; In the alternative, an order deeming service of the notice of motion and supporting affidavit material good and sufficient; An order abridging the time for service of the notice of motion and supporting affidavit material ; Such further and other relief as counsel may advise in this Hon. Court deems appropriate; Costs;

WARNING If you do not come to Court either in person or by your lawyer, the Court may give the applicant(s) what they want in your absence. You will be bound by any order that the Court makes. If you want to take part in this application, you or your lawyer must attend in Court on the date and at the time shown at the beginning of the form. If you intend to rely on an affidavit or other evidence when the application is heard or considered, you must reply by giving reasonable notice of the material to the applicant

THIS IS A GREAT FLIP PROJECT

ONLY 2 SUITES LEFT

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A HOME WITH POTENTIAL?

Sydney A. Sabine Sabine & Webb LLP Box 6518 Drayton Valley AB T7A 1R9 Phone: 780-514-3334 Fax: 780-514-3316

Re du ce d!

Have you been considering Victoria This home is move in ready, has a Place? Now is the time to jump right in. 2 great floor plan but could be dynamic. bedroom, 2 bath west facing suites right It offers 4+ bedrooms, 2 full baths & across from shopping and close to all other a great neighbourhood. Call today. amenities. Now offered at $249,000 $374,900

Legal Notices

NOTICE OF INTENT RE: LIQUOR CONTROL AND LICENSING ACT APPLICATION FOR CHANGES TO THE WINERY LOUNGE ENDORSEMENT AREA CAPACITY AND LIQUOR SERVICE HOURS Two applications have been received by the Liquor Control and Licensing Branch from Dirty Laundry Vineyards Ltd. located at 7311 Fiske Street in Summerland. The Winery Lounge area is currently licensed from 10 AM to 6 PM. The requested change is from 10 AM to 11 PM. The Winery Lounge patio capacity is currently 30 patrons. The proposed patio expansion will accommodate 98 persons. The proposed addition is to add an upstairs lounge area for 60 persons. Residents and owners of businesses located within a 0.5 mile (0.8 km) radius of the proposed site may comment on this proposal by 1) writing to THE GENERAL MANAGER C/O Licensing Analyst LIQUOR CONTROL AND LICENSING BRANCH PO BOX 9292 Victoria, BC V8W 9J8 2) by email: lclb.lclb@gov.bc.ca PETITIONS AND FORM LETTERS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED To ensure the consideration of your views, your comments, name and address must be received on or before April 28, 2012. Please note that your comments may be made available to the applicant or local government officials where disclosure is necessary to administer the licensing process.

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And further take notice that by Order of the Honourable Justice J.A. Gross JCQB granted 27 March 2012 at the Court of Queen’s of Wetaskiwin, AB: The Applicant may substitutionally serve this Application returnable on May 22. 2012 and Affidavit of Peter Yurkewich by publishing the notice provisions of the Application and of this Order in the Summerland Review, on two consecutive weeks, prior to April 12, 2012 and substitutional service effected in the manner specified in paragraph 1 shall be good and sufficient service of the Application and Affidavit upon the Respondent. ADDRESS FOR SERVICE AND CONTACT INFORMATION OF PARTY FILING THIS DOCUMENT

An affordable investment property with loads of potential. .24 of an acre, 3 bedrooms & 2 baths. Many upgrades already done. Call for details $299,000

1AA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Min $60 cash for full size vehicles, any cond. 250-899-0460 Scrap Batteries Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars & trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Call Toll Free 1.877.334.2288

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1bdrm lg, priv. ent., shared laund, DW, prkg, utilities,cable NS/NP. Avail Apr 1. $675/mo Ref’s req’d. 250-494-5042

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Legal Notices

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On a fantastic lot with a fantastic view at a fantastic price. $116,900

An excellent opportunity to get into the market at an affordable price level. New 2 bdrm, 2 bath. Suites in a great location. Prices starting at $199,900

FAMILY OR RETIREMENT HOME An affordable level entry rancher with walk-out basement. Low utility costs. Lots of space. Wheelchair accessible. $399,900

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Return all your empty beverage containers to a Return-It Depot for recycling. Find locations at encorp.ca/locations


20 www.summerlandreview.com

Thursday, April 5, 2012 Summerland Review

E AS T ER SA L E frozen young utility turkey

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Prices are in effect until Sunday, April 8, 2012 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2012 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

©MasterCard & PayPass are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Back a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial banking services are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC. PC points loyalty program is provided by President’s Choice Services Inc. ©PC, President’s Choice, President’s Choice Financial and Fresh Financial Thinking are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. Trademarks use under licence.

Summerland Review, April 05, 2012  

April 05, 2012 edition of the Summerland Review

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