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News Iannidinardo not flush with Cow Bay floathome situation On stage: Ballet Victoria showcases a new look at Four Seasons

page 5 page 19

For all the news of the Cowichan region as it happens, plus stories from around British Columbia, go to our website www.cowichannewsleader.com Your news leader since 1905

Friday, March 16, 2012

Andrew Leong

Residential school survivor Raymond (Tony) Charlie of the Penelakut shares his story during the statement-gathering session as the Speaking Our Truth event got underway Thursday morning at the Quw’utsun’ Cultural Centre.

Truth and reconciliation opens with tears and courage Celina Albany

News Leader Pictorial

A

s the opening prayer called for recognition of those who have gone through life coping with the results of residential schooling, the room ¿lled with solemn faces. The ¿rst day of the Truth and Reconciliation conference commenced at the Quw’utsun’ Cultural and Conference Centre yesterday morning in a room full of those confronting this unparalleled disgrace from Canada’s past. “I understand it is an injustice to condense years and years of what took place in those schools to 15 minutes,” said event speaker Chuck Seymour as he made the opening statement for the regional open house. Following Seymour, Cowichan member Betty Charlie led a traditional and sombre prayer in the Hul’qumi’num language.

Bearing witness: Cowichan-area residential school survivors begin two days of sharing their story with the community

Her words of consecration reverberated through the room, culling tears from some, while others provided retrospect on part of Canada’s tumultuous past. The crowd: Aboriginal and non-Aboriginals; elderly and young; residential school survivors; advocates for reconciliation; and those just wanting to learn more about a grave antecedent. This gathering took a different approach than previous events. It is designed to educate using the words of those brave enough to vocalize their ¿rsthand experience with the seemingly ever-ominous controlling ¿gures of their past. The general consensus was it is time to come to terms with the past and begin the healing process through sharing and understanding. “I think by sharing their deepest and darkest

experiences we will get something good out of this,” said Philomena Alphonse, three-time chief of Cowichan. “We didn’t know what to expect, but this is what I hoped for today. We invited everyone here to come and observe.” It is important for survivors to speak about their suppressed feelings and for others to listen, according to Alphonse, who is not a residential school survivor, but is a cultural advisor. “It’s not always easy to talk about or even listen to these stories,” said Chief Harvey Alphonse. “Today you will witness the true history of what happened to our people...we’re here to give a hand out to those in need.” Philomena Alphonse was in full agreement with the current chief.

“This is only the beginning. Now is the right time for this event. Cowichan is going to regroup next week to see how to make the energy more positive for everyone.” To achieve the goals laid out in planning the event, Cowichan chose to send Councillor Cindy Daniels to other territories that held regional conferences to observe and take note as their events unravelled. Everyone who spoke expressed how this event was separate from past platforms about residential school abuse. “It’s about being open with the experiences, the violence, the abuse,” said Alphonse as Raymond (Tony) Charlie gave vivid and person statements about encounters with his abusers. “Their personal journeys will help us move forward.” The second and ¿nal day of reconciliation is on March 16, 9 to 4 p.m. The provincial conference will take place next month in Victoria.

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A2 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday,y, March 16,, 2012

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Founded in 1905, the Cowichan News Leader Pictorial is located at 5380 Trans Canada Highway, Duncan B.C., V9L 6W4. It is published every Wednesday and Friday at Duncan, B.C. by Black Press. Copyright and/or property rights subsist in all display advertising and other material appearing in this issue. Advertising rates available on request. The News Leader Pictorial is a member of the B.C. and Yukon Community Newspapers’ Association and the Canadian Community Newspapers Association. Kathy Kondas

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Ladysmith’s Frank Taylor has received his Medal of Bravery from Canada’s Governor General. Taylor was among 46 people who were decorated with bravery honours by David Johnston during a ceremony at Rideau Hall on Feb. 24. The recognition stems from the

UP FRONT

Routley accuses Liberals of picking Äght with teachers

C

heroic rescue of Saltair resident Roy (Ted) Silvey, who was trapped in his home as it burned on July 22, 2008. The Medal of Bravery recipients were announced in October 2011, and officially handed out last week.

— Krista Siefken

Cop in three-car Malahat crash

BCTF dispute: MLA calls legislation an attack

mediated settlement must respect the net-zero mandate. “This is no surprise as virtually every other public sector union in the province has signed agreements Krista Siefken at net-zero, and government has News Leader Pictorial clearly and consistently stated that the BCTF’s demands for a $2-billion owichan Valley’s increase to wages and bene¿ts are MLA says teacher completely unreasonable given legislation expected the current economic reality,” said yesterday is little more Abbott. “Bill 22 sets out a fair and than the government balanced mediation process to picking a ¿ght with educators. address issues important to both “They’re going to bring the hamthe BCTF and the employer in an mer down today,” he said effort to reach a mediated on Thursday morning. settlement that follows “This is the kind of tthe lead of virtually legislation that continues every other public sector a decade-long Liberal uunion in the province by approach that completely rrespecting the net-zero disrespects teachers, parmandate. m ents, and students, and has “In the days ahead, I constantly sought to pick a hhope the BCTF will take Bill Routley: ¿ght with teachers.” a reasonable approach travesty Bill 22, which was and engage construcexpected to pass after press ttively in the mediation time yesterday, was designedd tto process that government has put force an end to months of teachers’ forward to provide students and their work-to-rule action that culminated parents with certainty.” in a three-day strike last week. Meanwhile, spokespeople for the It also imposes hefty ¿nes for valley’s two teacher associations continued job action, and will bring could not be reached for comment in a mediator to negotiate a contract on Tuesday, but New Democrat by June. If no settlement is reached Routley called the Liberal governby the end of June, a new contract ment’s legislation “quite sad.” will be imposed that extends from “The key question the public last spring to June 2013, after the needs to examine is ‘will what next provincial election. this government is doing make Education Minister George Abbott things better in the classrooms for says he won’t appoint a mediator students?’ You can reach your own until after he returns from an educa- conclusion,” he said. tion trade mission to China on “This kind of action is not going March 26. to solve problems,” he said. “This In a media statement released last government is really on the attack, week, he defended his legislation. and is trying to use this as a wedge “While the teacher’s union initially issue, which I think is a travesty, uscalled for mediation, they rejected ing our kids as a wedge issue, to try the approach set out in Bill 22 to make themselves look like tough because it makes it clear that any employers.”

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A3

Hero gets his medal for bravery

Got a comment or a story? email editor@cowichannewsleader.com phone 250-746-4471

Thursday: Occupants suffer only minor injures as collision blocks single northbound lane near Bamberton Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

O

ne lane on the Malahat Drive was closed for ¿ve hours Thursday morning after a police car collided with a Volvo station wagon and tractor-trailer. No one was seriously injured in the crash, and a police investigation is underway. What’s known is the collision occurred in the Malahat’s southbound lane one kilometre south of the Mill Bay turn-off near Bamberton. A marked Ford Crown Victoria RCMP police car, a 1999 Volvo wagon, and a tractor-trailer unit, crashed shortly after 4 a.m. “The police car, operated by a 40-year-old West Shore RCMP of¿cer, with three years of service, was travelling northbound on the highway with lights and siren activated,” an RCMP media release states. “The of¿cer was en route to back-up fellow of¿cers at a high priority call in Shawnigan Lake, involving a suicidal man.” Early indications, police say, suggest the police vehicle crossed the centre line and struck the southbound Volvo, which in turn struck the tractor-trailer unit travelling beside it. “It was raining and windy at the time of the collision,” police say. “Both the Volvo and police car sustained signi¿cant damage. The tractor-trailer unit sustained minor damage.” The Volvo’s 37-year-old driver, meanwhile, was the vehicle’s sole occupant and reported minor soft-tissue injuries. He was examined by B.C. Ambulance Service paramedics on scene and released. The driver of the tractor-trailer and the police of¿cer were not injured. One south-bound lane of the Malahat was Andrew Leong closed between 4 and 9:15 a.m. as of¿cials with Hanna Hofmann, Zohra Verduin, and Emmy Hofmann examine a jar consist of a mixture of South Island Traf¿c Services and a collision alfalfa, radish, and fenugreek from Oceanside Edibles at the 12th-annual Seedy Saturday at analyst/reconstructionist conducted a collision investigation. Cobble Hill Hall on Saturday, March 10. RBC DOMINION SECURITIES

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A4 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

Mill Bay gas station robbed at knifepoint

Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

M

ounties are investigating a knife-point robbery at the Shell gas station in Mill Bay. The theft happened at 3:14 a.m. on Wednesday. Shawnigan Lake RCMP were called to the robbery while it was in progress at the Doloume Road gas station, Sgt.

Rob Webb said. “A lone male wearing all dark clothing, a mask and gloves, entered the store and produced a knife,” he said. “The male demanded the money in the safe, which the cashier was unable to access.” The male, instead, took the cash drawer and Àed the scene on foot with an undisclosed amount of money. “The male was observed getting into the passenger side of a waiting vehicle

parked on the shoulder of the highway, by the Co-op gas station.” The male is described as a Caucasian, approximately 5’8” and of medium build. The vehicle, meanwhile, is described as a boxy, older-style station wagon, possibly a Volvo or Chevrolet, with faded red paint and rust spots. Anyone with information about the theft is asked to call the Shawnigan Lake RCMP at 850-743-5514 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

Andrew Leong

DEALING WITH PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

Membership in the Society Please consider becoming a member. Your membership counts. You have input into the Society’s planning and the election of the Board of Directors. A large membership base assists the Society to access funding. Bene¿ts for you include a once a year free lunch at our restaurant ‘Lunch on Clements’ and a free subscription to our e-newsletter ‘the Connector’. To become a member, drop by the of¿ce.

Experienced personal injury lawyers will discuss how to achieve proper compensation for personal injury claims arising from motor vehicle and other accidents. Topics will include: • How to determine what a claim is worth • Components of a personal injury claim • Dealing with negotiating strategies employed by I.C.B.C. and other insurers • Infant settlements • Uninsured/unidenti¿ed motorists • Wrongful death claims • Defences raised by I.C.B.C. and other insurers

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Board of Directors Call for Applications The Clements Centre Society is accepting applications from community members wishing to serve the interests of children and youth with special needs and adults with developmental disabilities. The Board is a governing body with the responsibility to oversee the conduct of the Society’s business and supervise management, who is responsible for the day-to-day operations. We are interested in applicants from all backgrounds,however expertise in ¿nance and marketing would round our current board. Experience working collaboratively is a plus. To explore this opportunity contact: Leslie Welin, President, by email: board@clementscentre.org.

Sundrops Centre for Child Development Programs for children and families. The child development team works with children birth to ¿ve years who are at risk for developmental delay. The Child Care Resource and Referral Program provideschild care related information to families, child care providers and community members. The Children’s Family Support Program provides after school and summer life skills development activities for children and youth with special needs. Clements Centre for Community Living Programs for adults with developmental disabilities.Residential programs include supported living, home sharing, and staffed residential homes. Supported living and home sharing are located throughout the Cowichan Valley. Staffed homes are in the Duncan area. Day programs provide life skills development, work experience, and meaningful activities and are located in Duncan and Cobble Hill. CLEMENTS CENTRE SOCIETY 5856 Clements Street Duncan, BC V9L 3W3 www.clementscentre.org

Ingrid Boblin, left, and Betty Strachan of the Cowichan Belles Red Hats enjoying the music by Beverley McKeen at the International Women’s Day Circles of Friendship at Eagles Hall on Friday March 9. Strachan celebrated her 83rd birthday.

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A5

Iannidinardo not Åush with Cowichan Bay Åoathome situation Finding accommodation: Director wants to take inventory of sewage disposal systems and make sure the bay is protected Peter W. Rusland

News Leader Pictorial

T

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he thorny subject of sewage treatment and other issues surrounding Cowichan Bay’s quaint Àoathomes is being broached by Director Lori Iannidinardo. She prescribes public meetings — including one in April — to take stock of the bay’s Àoathomes, particularly sewage-unit numbers and which Àoat homes currently pump waste into the drink — or into the system reaching treatment at Tzouhalem Road’s lagoons. “Floathomes aren’t even supposed to be there under our (Area D) bylaws,” she said. To clear the Àoathome fog, the region’s electoral area services committee passed a February motion directing staff to start amending the bay’s of¿cial community plan bylaws to regulate Àoathomes. “A certain percentage of

Through Rain, Ice or Snow, we’ve got the

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Àoathomes are the character of the bay. This process will initiate a conversation with the community about how to accommodate our Àoathome residents in a way that respects their needs, the needs of the whole community, and our wider environment,” Iannidinardo says in her newsletter. Meetings with home- and marina owners are a priority in patiently tackling not only sewage issues, but parking plus ¿re- and emergency-service accesses affecting Àoathomes. Iannidinardo also aims to meet with Transport Canada and Vancouver Island Health Authority agents concerning Àoathomes, and other pump-out questions. “I found out a while back we had roughly 20 Àoathomes in the bay, and just one is hooked to sewer going to the Joint Utilities Board lagoons,” she said. But Jim Money, owner of the bay’s Pier 66 and 67, said many more Àoathomes than one have sewage treat-

Peter W. Rusland

Cowichan Bay Director Lori Iannidinardo wants the bay’s various Åoathomes hooked to sewage treatment to keep waste out of the ocean. ment of some type. “One is legally hooked to sewer, but others are hooked to private systems probably designed by engineers,” he said, noting chemical toilets are also in use. Money realizes Iannidinardo and Cowichan Valley Regional District staff face a legacy of rumours and incorrect data about Àoathomes concerning who’s hooked to sewage

pump-outs, or private treatment. “I’m working with Lori to show her exactly what’s going on. “Our ¿rst goal is that everyone who can be hooked up, is, and that there’s nothing going into the bay. “We want to be good citizens,” said Money, whose Pier 67 owns three sewage units. Iannidinardo said 10 sew-

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sewage volume.” Money said two Àoathomes, or three liveaboard boats, can be accommodated by each sewage unit. Iannidinardo believed marina owners will likely pay to hook Àoathomes to legally recognized sewage treatment once it’s known

Watch for our

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age units are spread among Money and other marina owners. The question is, how many Àoathomes can be covered by each unit. “We wonder if one unit can handle three Àoathomes,” she said. “We have to ¿gure that out based on

which homes are properly disposing of their wastes. Meanwhile, the bay’s various stilt homes are all properly hooked to sewer, she noted. “Before my time, marina owners were given 10 sewer units in total. Now we have to sit down and ¿gure out what we’ll do and how much those units mean.” Toss in Jan. 1 federal laws ordering pump-out facilities for liveaboards, another issue in Iannidinardo’s sewage pipeline. Money noted some folks are reluctant to discuss touchy sewage-treatment issues submerged for years. “It’s a sore spot and they (CVRD) may not get straight answers.” Iannidinardo understands. “It’s really sensitive for people, and it’s also their home, so we have to manage this correctly. “If we want to eat shell¿sh from the bay, we have to do everything we can.” Money’s also committed to charting a clean, healthy home for all. “We want to be good citizens,” he said.

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A6 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

RECEIVERSHIP AUCTION

A long established wholesaler of fine Persian: Eastern imported handmade wool and silk carpets has been seized by creditors. Their assets are ordered to be sold by auction liquidations.

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An April 2010 storm may have destroyed the old Mill Bay Marina, but Monday’s weather bomb won’t slow construction of its replacement.

Mill Bay Marina construction project rides out the storm with minor damage Attenuator damaged: Developers say project still on track for a late-spring opening Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

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version will have any issues.” The marina will replace the one destroyed in a spring 2010 storm. It’s also currently the site of an archeological dig after human remains and other artifacts were uncovered above the shoreline. Shaw expects the dig to wrap-up “fairly shortly” and currently pegs the marina’s opening for some time in May or June.

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onday’s heavy winds may have taken out one of the Mill Bay Marina’s attenuator joints, but project spokesman Duane Shaw says the small-scale damage means little to the marina’s overall construction.

“It (the attenuator) is comprised of literally hundreds of connection joints, and we had one of them fail,” Shaw said on Wednesday. “To be clear, we had hurricaneforce winds here on Monday morning. The marina rode out the storm extremely well. It was under construction when this happened, so that’s important to note because we don’t want people to think the ¿nal

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A7

Morales to speak on the impact of the colonization of Vancouver Island Aboriginal Neighbours: HTG negotiator talks human rights during public event A key sticking point for the HTG is the 1884 E&N land grant of 385,000 hectares of Native land without consultation, accommodation or beneÂżt to the Hul’qumi’num people. Morales and the HTG have taken their concerns to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, which could deliver its decision as early as this month. “We know the commission is meeting at the end of this month, but we’re not sure if the decision will be ready at that point,â€? Morales said. Meanwhile, Morales says the HTG’s message is spreading. “I think it is beginning to reach people, and right now, I take the approach of one person at a time,â€? he said. “That’s all we can do. So we educate a few people, and hopefully they tell their friends, and it’ll continue to grow.â€? Saturday’s lecture — called Seeking Justice Elsewhere — suits the mandate of co-sponsor Aboriginal Friends, which is a collection of Vancouver Island churches working to build bridges and improve relation-

Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

F

irst up is the legacy of residential schools during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Cowichan visit this week. Then the impact of land seizure from First Nations peoples will be highlighted during an Aboriginal Neighbours and Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group event at the Duncan Christian Reformed Church on Saturday. The two events aren’t connected, but both are the result of colonization’s lingering legacy. For Aboriginal Neighbours’ guest speaker Robert Morales, the bottom line is basic human rights. “It’s not just about Aboriginal rights, it’s about Indigenous peoples’ human rights,� said the Hum’qumi’num Treaty Group’s chief negotiator. “I’ve been doing a number of lectures in various locations, and that has been a pretty important message for people to see and understand.�

ships with Aboriginal peoples. The group formed about 15 years ago and hosts events of this nature about once a year in various island locations. “Robert (Morales) is such a good speaker, and this is a very good opportunity to ask questions about the treaty process,� said Aboriginal Neighbours member Jenny Balme. The presentation will answer questions such as, Why are treaties necessary?; Why has the HTG found it necessary to take its search for justice outside of Canada?; What lands are the HTG claiming?; How will intended treaties affect people who live here? Your ticket What: Aboriginal Neighbours presents Robert Morales When: 1 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, March 17 Where: Duncan Christian Reformed Church on Trunk Road. Tickets: Free and open to all. To register ahead call 1-800-661-4630 or email rrweb@shaw.ca.

Peter W. Rusland/Âżle

A lecture scheduled for Saturday will talk about the impact of colonization on Vancouver Island, with a special emphasis on the seizure of land.

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5th Annual

Champion For Children

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AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

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Presented by Cowichan

Helping all children succeed

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for life.

Do you know someone who has made a difference in improving the lives of children and their families here in Cowichan? It could be a doctor, a childcare provider, a neighbour, a parent, a business or community organization. Help Success By 6 celebrate and recognize Cowichan’s “Champions for Children� by nominating them today! Awards will be presented at a special celebration on Saturday, June 2, at the Qu’wutsun Cultural Centre.

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Individual Champion Group/Organization Champion Business Champion First Nations Champion

In 200 words or less, please tell us what this nominee has done to improve the lives of a child/children under the age of 6 in the Cowichan Valley. Entry forms and judging criteria are available at www.cowichankids.ca or from our sponsors listed below. Nominations must be received by April 13, 2012 and can be mailed to Success by 6, #6080 York Road, Duncan, B.C.,V9L5G8 or to cindylsuccessby6@shaw.ca

GOOD VENTING

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ĆľĆŒĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?žĂLJŽŜůLJĹ˝Ä?Ä?ĆľĆŒÇ ĹšÄžĹśƚŚĞǀĞŜƚĹ?ĹŻÄ‚ĆšĹ?ŽŜĹ?ŜĚĞdžĹ?Ć?ÍžĹ?ŽŽĚÍ&#x;Ä¨Ĺ˝ĆŒ^Ĺ˝ĆľĆšĹšÄžĆŒĹśsÄ‚ĹśÄ?Ĺ˝ĆľÇ€ÄžĆŒ /Ć?ĹŻÄ‚ĹśÄšÍ˜dĹšĹ?Ć?Ĺ?Ć?ƚŽĆ‰ĆŒÄžÇ€ÄžĹśĆšƚŚĞĹŻĹ˝Ä?Ä‚ĹŻÄ‚Ĺ?ĆŒÄ¨ĹŻĹ˝Ç Ä¨ĆŒĹ˝ĹľÄ?Ä‚ĆľĆ?Ĺ?ĹśĹ?ƚŚĞĆ?žŽŏĞƚŽŜĞĹ?Ä‚ĆšĹ?ǀĞůLJĹ?žƉĂÄ?Ćš ƚŚĞĹśÄžÄ‚ĆŒÄ?LJƉŽƉƾůĂƚĹ?ŽŜĹ˝ĆŒÄ?Ä‚ĆľĆ?ÄžƉŽůůƾƚĹ?Ĺ˝ĹśÍ˜ POOR VENTING

dĹ˝ ĨĹ?ŜĚ ƚŚĞ sĞŜƚĹ?ĹŻÄ‚ĆšĹ?ŽŜ /ŜĚĞdž͕ Ĺ?Ĺ˝ ƚŽ ƚŚĞ DƾŜĹ?Ä?Ĺ?ƉĂůĹ?ƚLJ͛Ć? ŚŽžĞƉĂĹ?Äž Ä‚Ćš Ç Ç Ç Í˜ĹśĹ˝ĆŒĆšĹšÄ?Ĺ˝Ç Ĺ?Ä?ĹšÄ‚ĹśÍ˜Ä?Ä‚ĂŜĚÄ?ĹŻĹ?Ä?ĹŹŽŜƚŚĞYĆľĹ?Ä?ĹŹĹŻĹ?ŜŏĆ?DÄžĹśĆľÍ˜^ĞůĞÄ?ƚ͞ĂÄ?ĹŹÇ‡Ä‚ĆŒÄšĆľĆŒĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Í&#x;Í• Ä?ĹŻĹ?Ä?ĹŹŽŜƚŚĞŜǀĹ?ĆŒĹ˝ĹśĹľÄžĹśĆšĂŜĂĚĂsĞŜƚĹ?ĹśĹ?/ŜĚĞdžĹŻĹ?Ŝŏ͕ƚŚĞŜĆ?Ä?ĆŒĹ˝ĹŻĹŻÄšĹ˝Ç ĹśƚŽ^ZEsE/^>͘ dĹšĹ?Ć?Ĺ?Ć?Ç ĹšÄžĆŒÄžƚŚĞĹ?ŜĚĞdžžƾĆ?ĆšÄ?ĞůĹ?Ć?ƚĞĚÄ‚Ć?Íž'KKÍ&#x;͘KĆŒÄ?Ä‚ĹŻĹŻϭͲϴϴϴͲώϴϭͲώϾϾώÄ¨Ĺ˝ĆŒÄ‚ĆŒÄžÄ?Ĺ˝ĆŒÄšÄžÄš žĞĆ?Ć?Ä‚Ĺ?ÄžŽĨƚŚĞĚĂĹ?ůLJǀĞŜƚĹ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ?ŜĚĞdžÄ¨Ĺ˝ĆŒ^Ĺ˝ĆľĆšĹšÄžĆŒĹśsÄ‚ĹśÄ?Ĺ˝ĆľÇ€ÄžĆŒ/Ć?ĹŻÄ‚ĹśÄšÍ˜  Ć‰ÄžĆŒĆ?ŽŜ Ç ĹšĹ˝ Ä?Ĺ˝ĹśĆšĆŒÄ‚Ç€ÄžĹśÄžĆ? ƚŚĞ KƉĞŜ ĆľĆŒĹśĹ?ĹśĹ? ^žŽŏĞ Ĺ˝ĹśĆšĆŒĹ˝ĹŻ ZÄžĹ?ƾůĂƚĹ?ŽŜ Ĺ?Ć? ĹŻĹ?Ä‚Ä?ĹŻÄž ŽŜ Ä?ŽŜǀĹ?Ä?ĆšĹ?ŽŜŽĨÄ‚WĆŒĹ˝Ç€Ĺ?ĹśÄ?Ĺ?Ä‚ĹŻĨĹ?ŜĞŽĨƾƉƚŽΨώϏϏ͕ϏϏϏĂŜĚÄ‚DƾŜĹ?Ä?Ĺ?ƉĂůĨĹ?ŜĞŽĨÎ¨ĎąĎŹĎŹÍ˜ &Ĺ˝ĆŒĹľĹ˝ĆŒÄžĹ?ĹśÄ¨Ĺ˝ĆŒĹľÄ‚ĆšĹ?ŽŜ͕Ä?ŽŜƚĂÄ?ĆšƚŚĞEĹ˝ĆŒĆšĹšĹ˝Ç Ĺ?Ä?ŚĂŜDƾŜĹ?Ä?Ĺ?ƉĂů,Ä‚ĹŻĹŻÄ‚ĆšĎŽĎąĎŹÍ˛ĎłĎ°Ď˛Í˛ĎŻĎ­ĎŹĎŹÍ˜



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7030 Trans Canada Hwy Box 278, Duncan, BC V9L 3X4 Ph: 250-746-3100 Fax: 250-746-3133 www.northcowichan.ca


A8 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A9

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The construction of the Cowichan Commons mall is the most recent major injection in the economy of North Cowichan.

Andrew Leong/¿le

North Cowichan decides to scrap its economic development committee The reasons: Economic plan complete, issues will be rolled into regular council business Peter W. Rusland

News Leader Pictorial

N

orth Cowichan’s economic development committee is soon to be no more. Economic growth in North Cowichan will soon be debated in council’s committee of the whole. Mayor Jon Lefebure said business of the municipality’s EDC will be rolled into committee discussions twice monthly to allow debate and decisions by council, witnessed by citizens. “Administrator Dave Devana suggested integrating the work of different committees into the COW where all of council sits,” he said. The EDC’s plan for growing North Cowichan’s business tax base has already been accepted by council, he said.

“We can always reinstate the EDC if we feel it’s needed,” the mayor said. “We felt we could make decisions as a group at COW. “We also felt it would also be a real bene¿t for the public to observe those meetings and see decision making in action, and it’ll streamline work for staff,” Lefebure said of the EDC that met just once last year. Devana’s slated to hand the COW restructuring plan to council for a vote within the next two council meetings, he added. Lefebure said economic development issues “show up in many ways” at council, said Lefebure. He cited planned revitalization of downtown Chemainus and Crofton. “We’re also talking about the (VIU) university village planning process.” Councillors are also talking with business owners, and taxpayers’ regional Economic Development Commission about business opportunities. “We have contact with businesses all the time,” said Lefebure. “I’m meeting with a business now that wants to expand in North Cowichan and wants to look at our tax-

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deferment program,” he said, declining to name that operation yet. Island Timberlands is also looking at a commercial project with housing above it on its 11 acres of the benchlands along Cheminus Road, the mayor said. “Our goal is to create the energy and draw and have businesses say, ‘This is a good place to invest.’” That could be said easier under the EDC’s seven-point economic plan the EDC developed under Councillor John Koury for “much-needed industrial diversi¿cation, commercial revitalization and residential growth.” Those seven points include: streamlining government, and “making COW do the heavy lifting on a Àattened committee structure, which will lead to faster decision making;” passing business-friendly bylaws; targeting capital investments; streamlining regulatory requirements with set competitive-approval times, giving clear expectations to developers and staff; boosting customer service, and measuring performance; proactive planning and risk analyses; and better public communication.

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A10 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

Who should I talk to?

The News Leader Pictorial is located at Unit 2, 5380 Trans-Canada Highway, Duncan B.C., V9L 6W4. Read us on-line at www.cowichannewsleader.com

For news tips and questions about coverage: Editor John McKinley Phone: 250-746-4471, ext 236 Email: editor@cowichannewsleader.com Fax: 250-746-8529

OUR TAKE

For business-related questions:

For enquiries about newspaper delivery:

Publisher: Bill Macadam Phone: 250-746-4471, ext 225 Email: publisher@cowichannewsleader.com Fax: 250-746-8529

For classiÄed advertising: call 250-310-3535

Circulation manager: Lara Stuart Phone: 250-746-4471, ext 224 Email: circulation@cowichannewsleader.com Fax: 250-746-8529 For all other advertising: call 250-746-4471

This isn’t the right year for grand gestures Budget: We can’t help but wonder if school board is cutting off its nose to spite its face

W

e’ll say this much about School District 79 budget talks — they’re never boring. They’re also rarely comfortable to watch. Remember last year? Teachers crying as they begged for more resources, and trustees losing their tempers in impotent frustration as they struggled to make ends meet? Not boring. Also not a particularly pleasant way to spend an evening. So imagine our relief when we hear that instead of having to grapple with millions of dollars in cuts to balance the books — as has been the case in recent years — trustThis year a ees simply have to ¿nd $800,000. Not grand gesture chump change, but not catastrophic, either. Of course, our relief is tempered by the is not needed almost-certain knowledge that our newly elected board will likely be ¿red, since the majority of trustees are primed to submit a de¿cit — and therefore illegal — budget in protest of shortfalls in education cash. Here’s the thing. We’re not denying the province needs to buck up and give education funding a good, hard look. The status quo in our classrooms isn’t good enough. And we support our trustees’ right to strive for something better. But we wonder how diving off the cliff on principle here is serving our kids and our community. This could have been the easiest budgeting year we’ve seen in awhile. Instead, it’s shaping up to be the most controversial in almost three decades. Just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should. And maybe this isn’t the year for what is, ultimately, a hollow gesture. There are two choices here. Find $800,000 in the budget, or, submit a de¿cit budget and welcome in a province-appointed trustee who’ll likely slash programs, close schools, and compound the problems in our classrooms. This isn’t fear mongering. This is reality.

We say:

Seeing both sides of: economic development committee The case against

The case for North Cowichan has not done a great job attracting new business and industry to the community. And now, when the community seems to need it most, it folds its economic development committee, the one body dedicated to do exactly that. This community needs to be active in developing its economy. The taxpayer won’t — can’t — tolerate less.

Mayor Jon Lefebure feels North Cowichan does not need a separate Economic Development Committee.

Act now before our abundant water goes to waste Robert Douglas

News Leader Pictorial

M

arch 22 is internationally celebrated as World Water Day. First declared by the United Nations in 1993, World Water Day is used by communities all over the world to draw attention to the critical importance of water and the need to manage it fairly and sustainably. In Cowichan, it provides us with an opportunity to examine some our own local water issues. Unlike many other parts of the world, we enjoy relatively abundant water that we use for a wide variety of household purposes. We also rely on it to support agriculture, industry, ecosystem needs, and recreational activities. There is, however, growing concern that we are not managing our water sustainably, and that pressures on our water supply will only get worse in the coming years with population growth and climate change.

A number of our major aquifers are vulnerable to contamination, and an increasingly large number have been moderately or heavily developed. Many fear we are nearing full capacity and need to reduce consumption. For example, the Cowichan Basin Water Management Plan, developed in 2007 by government, industry and First Nations, calls for immediate and signi¿cant reductions in water consumption by residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural users. It is becoming increasingly clear our patterns of growth and development are having a negative impact on our water system. Hard surfaces like asphalt and concrete do not absorb water. With each new subdivision and strip mall, we get more buildings, roads, sidewalks and parking lots — all of which prevent rainwater from soaking into the soil and recharging aquifers for drinking water. Impervious surfaces such as asphalt increase stormwater runoff, leading to water pollution, stream erosion and loss of ¿sh habitat.

North Cowichan has not done a great job attracting new business and industry to the community. This despite the presence of committee dedicated to doing exactly that. North Cowichan’s economic development committee has developed the policies that should help turn the tide. But it is council ultimately making the decisions. And now it’s time for council to put those policies into play.

COWICHAN LEADERS

Clearly we have a lot of work ahead of us if we hope to manage our water supply sustainably. It should start with how we manage our stormwater runoff. We have already begun moving in the right direction. The Cowichan Basin Water Management Plan reviewed our major supply issues and recommended steps for addressing current and future water issues. The Cowichan Watershed Board was subsequently established to implement the plan’s recommendations. I would like to see local authorities introduce the necessary policies, bylaws and incentives to encourage green infrastructure and rainwater harvesting — both of which could go a long way in dealing with some major water issues. Green infrastructure manages stormwater using engineered systems that imitate natural systems. It can include permeable pavement, rain gardens, green roofs and bioswales — all of which prevent runoff and allow rainwater to in¿ltrate the ground and recharge aquifers.

Rainwater harvesting involves capturing, storing and treating rainwater to use it for daily water needs — including drinking water, laundry, toilet Àushing and irrigation. This technique has been practised for thousands of years and is commonplace in many parts of the world. Many other municipalities in B.C. and across the world have already begun encouraging these practices and have since seen major improvements in water conservation. With World Water Day Thursday, now is as good a time as any for our regional district and municipalities to act boldly and introduce new policies for working with the water cycle and managing this vital resource sustainably.

Rob Douglas is a North Cowichan resident who writes monthly for the News Leader Pictorial. He can be reached at douglas. robert.g@gmail.com.


Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A11

Have an opinion you’d like to share? email editor@cowichannewsleader.com phone 250-746-4471

YOUR TURN

Do Canadians fully understand the legacy of Native residential schools? “Everyone understands residential schools happened, but they don’t really understand what actually happened in those schools. I don’t know if we’ll ever really know what happened.”

Gordon Pollock, North Cowichan

“I’ve read some stories about residential schools, but what we learn about it doesn’t cover enough of it.”

Dylan Jones, Duncan

What do you think? Log on to www.cowichannewsleader.com and answer our Question of the Week. Results will be published in our next edition.

You can’t keep net zero as your mandate forever

Big city productions can’t hold a candle to this

Dear editor Have enjoyed excellent productions by Brentwood, Shawnigan Lake and Queen Margaret’s over the years, ¿rst as a teenager of the ‘60s, then as a mom in the 1980s and ‘90s. I now live in Vancouver and enjoy community theatre and school productions there but they don’t hold a candle to those of the valley boarding schools. Marian Potts Hof, Vancouver

In my opinion: Government needs to start giving soon

comments submitted online at cowichannewsleader.com

A

We’re still cleaning up the mess

net zero per cent wage increase mandate is not such an unreasonable concept in this atmosphere of tough economic times. Looking at the current dispute between the province and B.C. teachers, one of the main issues has been the $2-billion gap on comments submitted online at cowichannewsleader.com compensation between what the government is prepared to pay, and what the B.C. Flag great representation of us Andrew Leong/¿le Teachers’ Federation has asked for. Dear editor A reader with experience watching live community and school theatre in Cowichan and Vancouver says the VanThe government calls the union’s I think that the City of Duncan’s Àag is really couver shows don’t hold a candle to Cowichan productions like Brentwood’s recent Les Miserables. demands “unrealistic” given the current well done. Mount Prevost in the background economic environment. of our city landmark, (city hall), is great in its After the global recession in 2008, the Being a recruiter in the retail sector, I know we put things in perspective and pay them for simplicity. The circle of our local ocean ¿sh is government brought in a net-zero mandate how education plays a vital role in building a what they do — babysit! We can get that for all-encompassing, as well as all inclusive for for all public-sector agreements expiring brighter future and long-term career success for less than minimum wage. the entire area of Cowichan. In my mind, that after Dec. 31, 2009. That’s right. Let’s give them $3 an hour and candidates. In today’s world more and more circle shows eternity as there is no beginning The result is that a salary increase can only the hours they worked; not any of that choices have come up for selecting a career. and no end, it is just there and always has been. For most getting into any of these careers, only happen if there are savings found in silly planning time, or any time they spend The colours chosen are vibrant and reÀect the education is mandatory. This doesn’t mean before or after school. That would be $19.50 a other areas of the collective agreement. nature of Duncan promoting green. The comWhen agreements expire, especially in day (7:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. with 45 minutes off for that education is essential only for building mittee did very well designing that perfect Àag up a career. Education is equally important in the public service, employees have an lunch and planning). and all of us who live here in Duncan should be shaping the person we become and making us expectation that they should see some imEach parent should pay $19.50 a day for proud of having our own Àag. We have a huge provement in their new agreement: a wage these teachers to baby-sit their children. Now accountable in life. With the help of education talent pool living right here in little ole Duncan our culture is transmitted from one generation increase, more paid time off, or that the how many students do they teach in a day — and talented people such as Sharon Jackson and many generations to come. The strength of maybe 30? So that’s $19.50 x 30 = $585 a day. employer should contribute more towards should be encouraged, not feebly criticized the employees’ cost of bene¿ts such as our nation’s economy is inextricably tied to the However, remember they only work 180 days by those who have an arti¿cial superiority extended health and dental. a year! I am not going to pay them for any vastrength of our education system. I have been complex. With net zero still being enforced, teachcations. That’s $585 x 180 = $105,300 per year. wondering about the bailouts governments in George Spong ers are in a position where they must decide (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries). many countries seem to be giving to ¿nancial Duncan what they really desire from their contract. What about those special education teachers institutions around the globe. Why doesn’t the If they want an increase in paid sick days, and the ones with master’s degrees? Well, we government bail out the educational system for example, they will need to give up a could pay them minimum wage — just to be and invest in people to ensure that all of our We need to appreciate what a good children will be given the tools and motivabene¿t of equal monetary value to make up fair, round it off to $8 an hour. That would be education can mean the difference. $8 X 6 1/2 hours x 30 children x 180 days = tion to lead successful and happy lives? The Dear editor When times are good, the government $280,800 per year. commitment on everybody’s lips right now Maeve Maguire’s March 7 column on can afford to increase Wait a minute — there’s something wrong should be to make education a top priority for teachers was fantastic! We all need to start wages and bene¿ts, here. The average teacher’s take home salary everybody’s future and a gift for life! placing a higher value on education and the Net zero, howRonnie Auton, Cowichan in B.C. is less than $50,000. That equals $1.42 but when times are people who deliver education to our students. comments submitted online at cowichannewsleader.com per hour per student. That’s a very inexpensive tough, net zero is the ever, is far from way to go. baby-sitter and they even educate your kids! Net zero, however, a sustainable What a deal!” YYou can’t get a babysitter on this is far from a sustainIan Venasse strategy able strategy and the Cobble Hill kkind of budget government has to DDear editor “Do you support organic curbside-recycling prostart looking ahead to Re: Wednesday’s letter on what teachers grams?” More letters online future negotiations. m make per hour by B. Kramski: You answered: (63 votes) Ironically, the This was something I saw on my email acAlso, read fresh stories every day and share 66 per cent YES teachers could be among the ¿rst to bene¿t ccount as of late. I thought it the perfect rebuttal: your thoughts immediately through the comfrom a non net-zero scenario. “Are you sick of highly paid teachers? Teach- ments function. To vote on the next Question of the Week, log onto the The mandate is slated to end June 30, eers’ hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they at cowichannewsleader.com web poll at www.cowichannewsleader.com opening up the potential for the teacher’s oonly work nine or10 months a year! It’s time union to avoid if it delays bargaining long enough. It could have an ‘us too’ effect on more than 100 other agreements signed by other unions since net zero was brought in. One day a settlement will be reached that Here are some tips: Keep it short — 300 words or less; Keep it local — letters raised in We want to hear your opinion on just about any matter of local interest. allows for wage increases, and the Àoodresponse to issues raised in our pages get top priority; Keep it clean — attack the issue, Here’s how to send it to us: gates will open. not the individual. • Email your thoughts to editor@cowichannewsleader.com Let’s hope the government has a plan to You must include your full name, home community and a phone number where we can • Mail your letter to Unit 2, 5380 Trans-Canada Highway, Duncan B.C., V9L 6W4 deal with upcoming agreements that lays reach you during office hours. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. • Fax it to us at 250-746-8529 Letters will be edited for clarity, grammar, length and good taste. Name-withheld letters • Log onto www.cowichannewsleader.com and use the feedback button. the groundwork for future labour peace. Dear editor Regarding the Truth and Reconciliation event, there is no doubt the federal government and churches left a big mess, with umpteen problems and no place for survivors. It’s a sad state of affairs today. Ray Tony Charlie, Chemainus

We asked you:

So you want a letter published?

will not be published. We receive more letters than we have space for. Publication is not guaranteed.

Vic News

How to reach us

For more information, call the newsroom at 250-746-4471

This ran as an editorial in our sister paper, The Victoria News.


A12 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

Police seek public’s help in pair of robberies

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gation equipment were taken from a boat on the property of a home in the 6000 block of Lakes. Police are also asking for public assistance after a Duncan home was robbed on March 2. The break-and-enter occurred in the 3000 block of Westview Street, off of Lane Street. Stolen items include gold jewelry, and centennial quarters valued at more than $300.

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A13

Terrible weather doesn’t stop epic anti-bullying walk In the pink: Boys and Girls Club crusader battles the elements in a tutu Charla Huber

Goldstream News Gazette

G

ale force winds, heavy rain and icy sleet couldn’t stop Ryan Thirlwall’s Tutu Walk for Hope as he reached the Boys & Girls Club in Victoria after walking all night from

Don Denton

Ryan Thirlwall marched along the Trans-Canada Highway on Monday and Tuesday on his way from Nanaimo to the Boys & Girls Club in downtown Victoria.

Nanaimo. Thirlwall’s 126 kilometre walk in a bright pink tutu and tights was an effort to raise money for a bullying awareness program through the Boys & Girls Club. Shortly after 7 a.m. Tuesday morning it started snowing as Thirlwall walked through the West Shore on the Trans-Canada Highway. “We have started this in conditions that

should have cancelled or delayed this walk,” he shrugged. “So it’s only ¿tting that we see snow too.” The Saanich man began his fundraising walk Monday morning in Nanaimo during a windstorm and plodded in the rain and cold through the Cowichan Valley and over the Malahat Drive. “I am so sore, I am barely able to move. I have never done anything like this before,” Thirlwall said after walking for 25 hours, covering nearly 120 kilometres, and with still an hour or two left in his journey. Tianna Metzger and Mike MacNeil, two members of Thirwall’s support crew or Team Tutu, walked the route with Thirwall. Metzger walked from Nanaimo to Duncan and then traded with MacNeil who ¿nished the route. “Since we’ve gotten off the Malahat we’ve had 300 honks,” Thirlwall said on the highway near Thetis Lake. “Since we’ve left Nanaimo, it’s

been great with lots of honks.” On hour 27 of his trek, Thirlwall and a small entourage of supporters arrived at the Boys & Girls Club Yates Street of¿ce at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, soaked and worn out. He sat down and drank a coffee. “He was right on time and his family arrived and his baby was here,” said Patti Sullivan, executive director of club services for Greater Victoria. “We we all awestruck, we are still awestruck. It was pretty awesome.” Sullivan was grateful that Thirlwall was giving back to an organization that helped the 24-yearold during his teen years. At last count, he raised $1,600 in a day for the Boys & Girls Club antibullying program. Donations for Thirwall’s Tutu Walk for Hope can be given directly to the Boys & Girls Club of Victoria either by calling 250-384-9133 or online at bgcvic.org, when donating specify the donation is for the Tutu Walk for Hope.

The Duncan Kiwanis Club congratulates

Sam Koffski

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We are proud to have you as a member of the Kiwanis Club!

These programs are funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia


A14 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A15

Cowichan Valley Arts Council encourages the Äne art of patriotism Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

I

t can be dif¿cult to express in words how you feel about your country. So it’s fortunate the Cowichan Valley Arts Council has launched its second Why I Love Canada project, which transforms Cowichanians’ feelings about their country into art. The valley’s art council is taking the question to the community, soliciting answers to the broad question — “What is it that makes Canada my home?” — in person and via email. The answers, meanwhile, will form ¿ve themes. “Local artists will then be invited to collaborate with each other and submit a proposal that interprets one of the themes,” a CVAC press release explains. “Of those groups, ¿ve will be awarded commissions valued at $400

each.” A similar project last year boasted just one prize. “It was interesting to see how people put their feelings about Canada into an artistic portrayal,” project spokesman Robert Radford said. “This year, we have placed much more emphasis on collaboration between a broad spectrum of artists,” he added in a press release. He told the News Leader Pictorial that answers to the project’s founding question have already started pouring in. Some people cite Canada’s natural beauty, or the social and cultural diversity of its people. “It’s been interesting,” said Radford. “The responses we’re getting have been varied — which is what we wanted, of course.” Comments about Canada can be emailed to whyilovecanada@gmail. com.

The Cowichan Valley Arts Council is urging all patriotic artists to get cracking. A panel of adjudicators will select ¿ve themes from the submissions, then groups of artists have until May 15 to

Andrew Leong

submit a proposal. The successful groups will be announced June 30, and they’ll then be

given $400 each to complete their project, ranging from ¿ne to performing art. Funding for the project, CVAC’s press release states, comes from an anonymous Cowichanian concerned about Canada’s place “in the present global reality.” “We are very much looking forward to the responses we receive from the community,” Radford added. “These answers will form the foundation of the project. It is certainly a large question with lots of room for artistic interpretation. We are fortunate to have so many artists and artisans in the Cowichan Valley who I am con¿dent will come together to do justice to the question.” For more information, visit PORTALS - The CVAC Centre for Arts, Culture and Heritage at 2687 James St. in Duncan, visit the Cowichan Valley Arts Council website, or call 250-7461633.

FUNDING FOR STUDENTS, NOT FOR WAGE HIKES. The BCTF is demanding a 15 per cent wage hike and other benefits that would cost $2 billion and raise taxes for BC families. Virtually all other public sector unions have settled for no wage increases. It’s unacceptable that schools are disrupted and that students and their families are inconvenienced over an unreasonable salary demand in difficult economic times. The union is making claims and demands that simply don’t add up.

BCTF CLAIMS AND DEMANDS

FACT

The union wants more paid time outside the classroom – sick leave for teachers on call, expanded bereavement and discretionary leave.

The government wants more time for teacher training and to ensure that Pro-D days really are for professional development.

The union says all teaching positions should be selected on the basis of seniority.

The government supports seniority but qualifications must also count so that math teachers teach math, and science teachers teach science.

The union says that teachers who perform poorly in evaluations will be dismissed – ‘one strike and you’re out’.

The government wants to support teacher improvement through a standardized evaluation process.

The union says that government refuses to negotiate.

There has been over a year of negotiations and 78 full bargaining sessions.

The union says that class size limits have been eliminated.

Class size limits will remain in place on all grades across BC.

The union says that BC has 700 fewer special needs teachers.

2100 new teaching assistants have been hired since 2001. And, with a new $165 million Learning Improvement Fund, we will hire more.

It’s time to focus on what matters most in education – BC’s students. That’s why we are focused on per-student funding which is at an all time high, not on wage increases. We all want to do more to make BC’s education system even better. It’s the driving force behind BC’s Education Plan that teachers, parents and students are helping to shape. Teachers care about their students. Parents care about their children’s future.

LET’S PUT STUDENTS BCEDPLAN.CA


A16 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

“Supporting Youth Sports” NORMAN JACKSON 250-746-5333

Pro Shop 250-746-5333

“Supporting Community Sports”

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Serving the Cowichan Valley since 1967

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CAPS

DARRIN ROBAK Position: Defence

8

STEVEN IACOBELLIS Position: Centre

Birthdate: November 5, 1991 Hometown: Red Deer, AB Last Team: Cowichan Valley Capitals Hockey Idol: Mike Green

Birthdate: August 20, 1993 Hometown: Burnaby, BC Last Team: Penticton Vees Favourite Childhood Book: Hockey for Dummies

5

9

go! VINCENT MUTO Position: Defence

BRANDON MISTAL Position: Forward

14

21

STEEN COOPER Position: Centre

Position: Forward

Birthdate: April 25, 1991 Hometown: Vanderhoof, BC Last Team: Salmon Arm Silverbacks Committed to: Minnesota State- Mankato

Birthdate: November 25, 1995 Hometown: Duncan, BC Last Team: South Island Thunderbirds Hockey Highlight: Winning Gold Medal at Canadian Winter Games.

17

BRETT KNOWLES

MATTHEW BROWN Position: Centre

BCHL ALL STAR

22

RICHARD VANDERHOEK Position: Forward

27

LOGAN PROULX

GM

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Birthdate: April 11, 1991 Hometown: Trail, BC Last Team: Trail Snake Eaters

33

“Home of the Caps Chapel Suppers!” 495 Beech Avenue, Duncan 250-746-3654

BRADY ROULEAU

C

Position: Goalie

DALE PURINTON Associate Coach

DUNCAN

CAPS GO

Birthdate: March 13, 1993 Hometown: Niagara Falls, NY Last Team: Trinity Pawling Academy Favourite Childhood Book: The Story of Ferdinand the Bull by Munro Leaf

Birthdate: April 1, 1992 Hometown: Kamloops, BC Last Team: Salmon Arm Silverbacks Hobbies: Guitar, music, movies

6

11

DAVID LONDON Position: Defence

Birthdate: March 7, 1993 Hometown: Kelowna, BC Last Team: Okanagan Rockets Major Midget Career Ambition: NCAA Scholarship and Pro Hockey

BRAYDEN SHERBININ Position: Defense

Birthdate: March 7, 1993 Hometown: Kelowna, BC Last Team: Westside Warriors

Birthdate: February 24, 1991 Hometown: Truro, NS Last Team: Quebec Remparts Hobbies: Fishing, hunting, 4-wheeling, X-Box, reading

18

KEYLER BRUCE Position: Right Wing

BIrthdate: January 20, 1991 Hometown: Langley, BC Last Team: Westside Warriors BCHL Career Point Total: 172

Birthdate: June 23, 1993 Hometown: Fort Macleod, ALTA Last Team: Canmore Eagles (AJHL)

24

34

TROY PATERSON Position: Defence

Birthdate: September 30, 1992 Hometown: White Rock, BC Last Team: Cowichan Valley Capitals Sportsmanship Advice: Give it your all.

Birthdate: January 30, 1992 Hometown: Magrath, AB Last Team: Cowichan Valley Capitals Hockey Idol: Rich Sutter

250-746-6670

down from the ‘stick’ in Duncan www.murrayspizzeria.ca

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GO

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A17

NEXT HOME GAMES: BCHL COASTAL CONFERENCE ROUND ONE PLAYOFFS GAME 3 vs SURREY EAGLES MON., MAR. 19 & GAME 4 TUES., MAR. 20 4

go!

Friday, March 16, 2012

DEREK DUN Position: Goalie

Birthdate: November 29, 1993 Hometown: Surrey, BC Last Team: Cowichan Valley Capitals Sportsmanship Advice: Play with respect and you will gain respect.

GAME SPONSOR MARCH 19

Auto Glass & Upholstery FAST FRIENDLY SERVICE 250-748-4466

7

KARVER EVERSON Position: Defence

Birthdate: October 12, 1993 Hometown: Comox, BC Last Team: Comox Glacier Kings Sportsmanship Advice: Work hard and have fun.

12

MIKAEL JUNG Position: Forward

Birthdate: January 1, 1992 Hometown: Nanaimo, BC Last Team: Regina Pats (WHL)

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s p a C GO!

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DEVIN GANNON Position: Forward

BCHL ALL STAR

Birthdate: October 31, 1991 Hometown: Kamloops, BC Last Team: Salmon Arm Silverbacks Hockey Highlight: Beating the Russian National U-20 team in Russia.

26

JAKE CHARLES Position: Forward

Birthdate: December 10, 1992 Hometown: Vancouver, BC Last Team: Coquitlam Express Favourite Recent Book: Along Came a Spider by James Patterson

91

MATT GRANT

LIVE ON LOCATION 4–7 GAME 3

Position: Centre

QUIKSILVER

Birthdate: January 11, 1993 Hometown: Ladysmith, BC Last Team: Moose Jaw Warriors Pre-Game Ritual: Be the last one off the ice in warmup.

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A16 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

“Supporting Youth Sports” NORMAN JACKSON 250-746-5333

Pro Shop 250-746-5333

“Supporting Community Sports”

GO! CAPS GO!

Serving the Cowichan Valley since 1967

250-748-1032

CAPS

DARRIN ROBAK Position: Defence

8

STEVEN IACOBELLIS Position: Centre

Birthdate: November 5, 1991 Hometown: Red Deer, AB Last Team: Cowichan Valley Capitals Hockey Idol: Mike Green

Birthdate: August 20, 1993 Hometown: Burnaby, BC Last Team: Penticton Vees Favourite Childhood Book: Hockey for Dummies

5

9

go! VINCENT MUTO Position: Defence

BRANDON MISTAL Position: Forward

14

21

STEEN COOPER Position: Centre

Position: Forward

Birthdate: April 25, 1991 Hometown: Vanderhoof, BC Last Team: Salmon Arm Silverbacks Committed to: Minnesota State- Mankato

Birthdate: November 25, 1995 Hometown: Duncan, BC Last Team: South Island Thunderbirds Hockey Highlight: Winning Gold Medal at Canadian Winter Games.

17

BRETT KNOWLES

MATTHEW BROWN Position: Centre

BCHL ALL STAR

22

RICHARD VANDERHOEK Position: Forward

27

LOGAN PROULX

GM

Position: Defence

6300 Trans Canada Hwy., Duncan 250 746 7131

Duncan Christian School

JIM INGRAM

General Manager/Associate Coach

Birthdate: April 11, 1991 Hometown: Trail, BC Last Team: Trail Snake Eaters

33

“Home of the Caps Chapel Suppers!” 495 Beech Avenue, Duncan 250-746-3654

BRADY ROULEAU

C

Position: Goalie

DALE PURINTON Associate Coach

DUNCAN

CAPS GO

Birthdate: March 13, 1993 Hometown: Niagara Falls, NY Last Team: Trinity Pawling Academy Favourite Childhood Book: The Story of Ferdinand the Bull by Munro Leaf

Birthdate: April 1, 1992 Hometown: Kamloops, BC Last Team: Salmon Arm Silverbacks Hobbies: Guitar, music, movies

6

11

DAVID LONDON Position: Defence

Birthdate: March 7, 1993 Hometown: Kelowna, BC Last Team: Okanagan Rockets Major Midget Career Ambition: NCAA Scholarship and Pro Hockey

BRAYDEN SHERBININ Position: Defense

Birthdate: March 7, 1993 Hometown: Kelowna, BC Last Team: Westside Warriors

Birthdate: February 24, 1991 Hometown: Truro, NS Last Team: Quebec Remparts Hobbies: Fishing, hunting, 4-wheeling, X-Box, reading

18

KEYLER BRUCE Position: Right Wing

BIrthdate: January 20, 1991 Hometown: Langley, BC Last Team: Westside Warriors BCHL Career Point Total: 172

Birthdate: June 23, 1993 Hometown: Fort Macleod, ALTA Last Team: Canmore Eagles (AJHL)

24

34

TROY PATERSON Position: Defence

Birthdate: September 30, 1992 Hometown: White Rock, BC Last Team: Cowichan Valley Capitals Sportsmanship Advice: Give it your all.

Birthdate: January 30, 1992 Hometown: Magrath, AB Last Team: Cowichan Valley Capitals Hockey Idol: Rich Sutter

250-746-6670

down from the ‘stick’ in Duncan www.murrayspizzeria.ca

GO Caps GO

www.seaside.net 21 Queens Rd. 250-746-9715

GO

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A17

NEXT HOME GAMES: BCHL COASTAL CONFERENCE ROUND ONE PLAYOFFS GAME 3 vs SURREY EAGLES MON., MAR. 19 & GAME 4 TUES., MAR. 20 4

go!

Friday, March 16, 2012

DEREK DUN Position: Goalie

Birthdate: November 29, 1993 Hometown: Surrey, BC Last Team: Cowichan Valley Capitals Sportsmanship Advice: Play with respect and you will gain respect.

GAME SPONSOR MARCH 19

Auto Glass & Upholstery FAST FRIENDLY SERVICE 250-748-4466

7

KARVER EVERSON Position: Defence

Birthdate: October 12, 1993 Hometown: Comox, BC Last Team: Comox Glacier Kings Sportsmanship Advice: Work hard and have fun.

12

MIKAEL JUNG Position: Forward

Birthdate: January 1, 1992 Hometown: Nanaimo, BC Last Team: Regina Pats (WHL)

“Your Island Feed Source”

s p a C GO!

2800 Roberts Rd. (250) 746-5101

DEVIN GANNON Position: Forward

BCHL ALL STAR

Birthdate: October 31, 1991 Hometown: Kamloops, BC Last Team: Salmon Arm Silverbacks Hockey Highlight: Beating the Russian National U-20 team in Russia.

26

JAKE CHARLES Position: Forward

Birthdate: December 10, 1992 Hometown: Vancouver, BC Last Team: Coquitlam Express Favourite Recent Book: Along Came a Spider by James Patterson

91

MATT GRANT

LIVE ON LOCATION 4–7 GAME 3

Position: Centre

QUIKSILVER

Birthdate: January 11, 1993 Hometown: Ladysmith, BC Last Team: Moose Jaw Warriors Pre-Game Ritual: Be the last one off the ice in warmup.

BILLABONG GAME SPONSOR MARCH 20

s p a C GO!

GO!

GO!

LARGE OR SMALL WE FEED THEM ALL!

20

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OF THE

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MAVI

Proud Supporters of the Cowichan Capitals

EDDY’S

FORMERLY EDDY’S HOCKEY SHOP

LAKE SHORE L AUTO PARTS A

ARSON

DUNCAN

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JACKETS • SPORTSWEAR • ACCESSORIES

•Tel: (250) (250)746-5131 746-5131 • Fax: (250)746-7712

• #2 - 5803 Trans Canada Hwy. Duncan, BC V9L 4X2 • email: solitaire@shawbiz.ca

250 746 5231 33 STATION ST.


ON NOW AT YOUR BC CHEVROLET DEALERS. Chevrolet.ca 1-800-GM-DRIVE. Chevrolet is a brand of General Motors of Canada. */x/†/††/^Offers apply to the purchase of a 2012 Cruze LS (R7A), 2012 Sonic LS Sedan (R7A) equipped as described. Freight included ($1,495). License, insurance, registration, PPSA, administration fees and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Offer available to retail customers in Canada. See Dealer for details. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in the BC Chevrolet Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer order or trade may be required. GMCL, Ally Credit or TD Financing Services may modify, extend or terminate this offer in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See Chevrolet dealer for details. ††0% purchase financing offered on approved credit by Ally Financing for 72 months on new or demonstrator 2012 Cruze LS & 2012 Sonic LS Sedan. Rates from other lenders will vary. Down payment, trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $10,000 at 0% APR, the monthly payment is $138.89 for 72 months. Cost of borrowing is $0, total obligation is $10,000.00. Offer is unconditionally interest-free. Freight ($1,495) included. License, insurance, registration, PPSA, applicable taxes and fees not included. Limited time offer which may not be combined with certain other offers. ^Credit valid towards the purchase or lease of an eligible new 2011 or 2012 model year Chevrolet, GMC, Buick or Cadillac vehicle, excluding Chevrolet Volt, delivered between January 6th 2012 and April 2nd 2012. Customers must present this authorization letter at the time of purchase or lease. All products are subject to availability. See Dealer for eligibility. Only one $1,000 Bonus may be redeemed per purchase/lease vehicle. This offer may not be redeemed for cash. The credit amount is inclusive of any applicable taxes. As part of the transaction, dealer may request documentation and will contact GM to verify eligibility. The $1,000 Bonus is not compatible with the Employee New Vehicle Purchase Program or the Supplier Program New Vehicle Purchase Program. Void where prohibited by law. $1,000 offer is stackable with Cardholder’s current GM Card Earnings, subject to Vehicle Redemption Allowances. For complete GM Card Program Rules, including current Redemption Allowances, transferability of Earnings, and other applicable restrictions for all eligible GM vehicles, see your GM Dealer, call the GM Card Redemption Centre at 1-888-446-6232 or visit TheGMCard.ca. Subject to applicable law, GMCL may modify or terminate the Program in whole or in part with or without notice to you. Subject to Vehicle Redemption Allowances. For complete GM Card Program Rules, including current Redemption Allowances, transferability of Earnings, and other applicable restrictions for all eligible GM vehicles, see your GM Dealer, call the GM Card Redemption Centre at 1-888-446-6232 or visit TheGMCard.ca. Subject to applicable law, GMCL may modify or terminate the Program in whole or in part with or without notice to you. Primary GM Cardholders may transfer the $1,000 Bonus to the following eligible Immediate Family members, who reside at the Primary Cardholder’s residence: parents, partner, spouse, brother, sister, child, grandchild and grandparents including parents of spouse or partner. Proof of relationship and residency must be provided upon request. The $1,000 Bonus is not transferable to Immediate Family residing outside of the Primary Cardholders residence. ∞OnStar services require vehicle electrical system (including battery) wireless service and GPS satellite signals to be available and operating for features to function properly. OnStar acts as a link to existing emergency service providers. Subscription Service Agreement required. Call 1-888-4ONSTAR (1-888-466-7827) or visit onstar.ca for OnStar’s Terms and Conditions, Privacy Policy and details and system limitations. Additional information can be found in the OnStar Owner’s Guide. WBased on GM Testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. +For more information visit iihs.org/ratings. ++U.S. Government 5-Star Safety Ratings are a part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program.

A18 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial Friday, March 16, 2012

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A19

Ballet Victoria gives the Four Seasons a new twist Dance to Chopin, Vivaldi: Some 200 thrilled by the creativity that’s become the capital company’s trademark Peter W. Rusland

News Leader Pictorial

B Andrew Leong

Andrea Bayne and Ballet Victoria offer a tasteful contrast to classical ballet.

allet Victoria gave classical music a whole new twist during a dual Duncan debut Saturday. A sparse crowd of about 200 was thrilled by the creativity that’s become the capital company’s trademark. This time, lead choreographer/dancer Paul Destrooper and his pliable troupe forever transformed Chopin’s Preludes, and Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, into a riot of diverse motion and feeling. Sandrine Cassini designed the memorably abstract moves behind act one’s Twelve, backed by Chopin’s music performed by

island-based pianist Sarah Hagen. Pairings, groupings and the full company gave us some of the best turns a body can deliver in this gyroscope of simple black out¿ts. Fog lent a subconscious mood during modern-dance gears greased by ballet. The halting syncromesh of romance’s complexities were slyly illustrated in this playfully robotic number. Dancers rolled, twirled, bent, laid, ducked — and were even stacked — in Cassini’s splendidly different search for logic in love’s painfully addictive grip. Stuff like this has become normal for BV that always offers a tasteful contrast to purely classical fare from the National Ballet of Canada and other traditional professionals. That’s also why we accepted guys wearing snow-white skirts during act two’s multi-media masterwork Four West Coast Seasons. Aptly narrated by Linda Rogers’ haiku poems — read by B.C. Lt.-Gov. Steven Point — Destrooper and crew hung four Salish artworks above the stage. Each represented autumn (Rande Cook),

Winter (Tom Hunt), Spring (Dylan Thomas), and Summer (Cowichan’s lessLIE). The island’s deft Ensemble Diemecke quintet backed 11 dancers personifying nature’s seasonal rites, eternally guarded by the wily white and black ravens (Destrooper and Cassini). Jane Wood’s ultra-simple costumes lent colour — or lack thereof — to each season: rust, brown and orange for autumn (Tao Kerr); the vacant white of winter (Robb Beresford); dainty tulip red for spring (Andrea Bayne); and vibrant orange and red swimsuits for summer (Cobble Hill’s Christie Wood). The muscular ebb and Àow of relationships were seen during courtship, solemn ennui, arguments (ravens fencing with violin bows), and new life through the birth of summer. As usual, Ballet Victoria used a crowbar of imagination and movement to pry open senses numbed by mass media. Multi-media ballet rating: 9 emotions out of 10.


A20 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

1956: shipbuilding

DATELINE: COWICHAN

by Ann Andersen

At Bird’s Eye Cove Shipyards, five men were building a 36-foot diesel cruiser for a buyer in Vancouver, said shipyard owner Alban Taylor. Various hardwoods and cedar planking were being used on the biggest boat every built there.

1956: teachers At a meeting of the Lake Cowichan Teachers’ Association, Messrs. R. E. Coates and R. J. Walsh and Mrs. P. Kershaw were elected delegates to the B.C. teachers’ annual general meeting. Mr. A. O. Palsson would also attend.

1956: speakers Nitinat’s Ron Watson, Mr. and Mrs. Burly Bowler and Mr. and Mrs. Harold MacKay were among the graduates in the Lake Cowichan 14-week Dale Carnegie effective speaking and human relations course.

Hotel slated to join mill in Crofton Dateline 1956: Osborne Bay hotel takes shape Ann Andersen

News Leader Pictorial

T

he ill-health of the forest industry has had a chilling effect on the valley recently as we observe what is happening at Crofton’s Catalyst pulp and paper mill. How different from March 1956 when valley smiles were wide as residents anticipated completion of a British Columbia Forest Products $36-million mill that would use forestry waste to make kraft sulphate pulp. In the village of Crofton, Percy Newman, well-known Vancouver Olympic and Empire Games swimming coach, was part of a mainland and island business group ¿nancing construction of a new 30-room two-storey building. The name of the $250,000 structure would be Osborne Bay Hotel. Facing the sea, the hotel would rise on the northerly edge of 23.8 acres of land formerly owned by Mr. Fred Arscott, Duncan, who’d held the property for many years after purchasing it from Mr. Jack Williams, a former Duncan second-hand dealer. According to Norman, the hotel, being designed by Vancouver architect Douglas Miller would stand near the Crofton Road and would command a view down Chaplin Street — the connecting road to the government wharf and ferry slip. It would be on rising ground about a quarter mile west of the seafront.

Pictures of the Past

courtesy Cowichan Valley Museum and Archive

The front view of Commercial Hotel on Duncan Street sometime after 1965. It burnt in May 1990 and was torn down in August 1990. —We want your historical photos of Cowichan people and places. Email a high resolution jpeg along with your phone number and a brief explanation to editor@cowichannewsleader.com. Or drop by during regular office hours and we’ll scan it in. More heritage photos are available for viewing online at www. cowichanvalleymuseum.bc.ca.

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Custom ceremonies to suit culture, taste & budget Legacy book program Pre-planning services with free consultations Dedicated staff Family Security Benefit Plan™ Aftercare services


Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A21

Call these fine businesses and find out why they are the...

WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL

Ram Appliance R.A.M.

Pick up January 20 Page A12 APPLIANCE

CENTRE LTD. SALES - SERVICE UĂŠ ĂŠUĂŠ- ,ĂŠEĂŠ*9 ĂŠUĂŠ ĂŠ" ĂŠ- ,6 ĂŠ UĂŠ*,/-ĂŠEĂŠ- ,6 ĂŠ",ĂŠĂŠ , -ĂŠ UĂŠ -/-ĂŠEĂŠ 6 ,9

250-748-4368

LAMONT CONTRACTING DRY WALL SPECIALIST

FREE WEEK PASS! Snap Fitness

NEW HOMES u RENO’S u TEXTURED CEILINGS u QUALITY WORKMANSHIP

Pick January Pagemonthly A12 t Noup Contracts, No 20 risk—pay

CLINT LAMONT

2-361 Trans Canada Highway 250-748-0001 www.snapmtness.com/duncanbc

u

FREE

Fax 250-748-4377

ESTIMATES 250-746-9419

460 Whistler St., Duncan

Try before you buy with this t Nearby and open 24/7

For all your tire and mechanical service needs. Fountain Tire !IR#ONDITIONINGs"ATTERIESs/IL#HANGESs%LECTRICAL Pick up January 20 Page A12 (EATING#OOLINGs%XHAUSTsTrANSMISSION3ErVICES

"ALANCINGAND TirE2EPAIRSs TUNE5PSs 7HEEL !LIGNMENTS "rAkESs3HOCKS3TRUTSs(OUR3ErVICE 3EASONAL-AINTENANCE0ACKAGESs#USTOM 7HEELS

Duncan  1(*230596(+‹=0*;690( (250) 478-2217

4VU-YP!!!‹:H[\rKH`!!!

Business of the Week

Island Saw Pick up January 20 Page A12

455 Rancher Chainsaw

vivamedical aesthetics because you deserve the best More than 20,000 physicians throughout North America now offer aesthetic services like Botox, peels and photofacials – but few are true experts in aesthetics. That’s important, because skill and expertise often make the difference between results that are excellent and those that are merely acceptable or even unsatisfactory.

$449.99

Comes with FREE carry case

www.islandsawandturf.ca Open Mon-Fri 8-5 pm Sat 10-4 pm

Environmentally Friendly “Green� Cabinetry

Christy Cabinets

Christy Cabinets

A12

We specialize in Custom Cabinetry, Custom Cabinetry, and Re-Facing.

250-743-2458 home 250-701-5958 cell Wayne Christy-Owner www.christycabinets.com

Pick up January 20 Page A12

Christy Cabinets

We Have Moved 6489 Norcross Rd. (former Church Motors) 250-748-4341

s#ABINETS s#USTOM$ESIGN&INISHING s2EFACING%XISTING#ABINETS Pick up January 20 Page s&ACE&RAME+ITCHENS s#USTOM#OUNTERTOPS s%NTERTAINMENT#ENTERS-ANTLES • Pay only the 5% GST!

Element Hair and Esthetics

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With a great ad Here!

Similarly, lasers and intense pulsed Pick up November 11 light systems are complicated medical devices that can be Page A29 dangerous in the wrong hands. Without proper training, as well as a comprehensive understanding of skin structures and physiology, these systems can cause burns and scars. Selection of equipment is also important, since many low cost devices simply don’t produce as effective results.

/ 2011

Business of the Week

COMPLETE DELUXE MEALS

Glorias Food Service

‡&KRRVHIURPRXU H[WHQVLYHPHQXRI)5(6+ RUIUR]HQHQWUpH’V

‡'HOLYHUHGULJKWWR\RXUGRRU Pick up WE January 20 Page A12 CATER

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VHQLRUVHYHU\ERG\

vivamedical is one of Canada’s most respected medical spas. Over the years, we’ve helped thousands of clients improve their appearance and their lives.

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vivamedical is owned and operated by Dr. Lyn Pascoe, an aesthetic medical specialist. Dr. Pascoe personally evaluates all new products and procedures, overseeing all treatments performed.

GET BACK YOUR

NATURAL SMILE

Cobble Hill Dental Pick up January 20 Page A12

To read more about vivamedical, our technology and our facilities, please visit ~ New ts n Patieome Welc

To advertise here call Bill:

250-746-4471

#4 - 177 Fourth Street, Duncan • 250-746-6512 www.vivamedicalaesthetics.com

cowichannewsleader.com

THINK OF THE HALLIDAY POSSUMBILITIES! Halliday RooďŹ ng By Advertising in space! Inc. ROOFING Pick up January 20this Page A12 Roofs

Gutters

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UĂŠĂ•Â?Â?ĂžĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂƒĂ•Ă€i`ĂŠEĂŠĂ•>Ă€>Â˜ĂŒii` UĂŠ œ““iĂ€Vˆ>Â?ʇÊ,iĂƒÂˆ`iÂ˜ĂŒÂˆ>Â?

250-701-7682 ĂŠ ĂœĂœĂœÂ°Â…>Â?Â?ˆ`>ĂžĂ€ÂœÂœw˜}°Vœ“

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¸ YES

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We docowichannewsleader.com continuous 5â€? Gutters in 3 ProďŹ les

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A real ARTISAN BAKERY CAFE that makes everything from scratch. Serving breakfast and lunch all day with the BEST SOUP in town. Open everyday 6am - 6pm

To advertise here call Bill:

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tooth whitening systems

Discover how to look your Very Best

Using the latest technology, we can now safely rid your skin of UĂŠ,i`ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ Ă€ÂœĂœÂ˜ĂŠĂƒÂŤÂœĂŒĂƒĂŠUĂŠ1˜iĂ›iÂ˜ĂŠĂƒÂŽÂˆÂ˜ĂŠĂŒÂœÂ˜iĂŠ UĂŠ Â?ÂœĂŒVÂ…ĂžĂŠĂƒÂŽÂˆÂ˜ĂŠUĂŠ Ă€ĂžĂŠĂƒÂŽÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂ“ÂœĂ€i Try one or both procedures; together they are a powerful beauty duo

To advertise here call Bill:

Russ & Winifred McKinnon

250-746-4471 250-743-6718

• Dr. James Cornell • General & Cosmetic Dentistry 55-1400 Cowichan Bay Rd., Cobble Hill 250-743-6698 • reception@cobblehilldental.com • www.cobblhilldental.com

Beautiful Skin - that’s what we do!   sWWWUTOPIABAKERYCA A-9780 WILLOW STREET CHEMAINUS

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A22 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

Staging something? email arts@cowichannewsleader.com phone 250-746-4471

Verdi’s Ernani Live at the Met postponed

ON STAGE

Saturday’s edition of Live At The Met has been rescheduled to new date and time. May 12 at 9 a.m. is when Cowichan audiences can expect to take in the spectacle of Angela Meade (left) on centre stage as Elvira in Verdi’s thrilling early gem Ernani, set in Spain, 1519. Salvatore Licitra is her mismatched lover, Ernani, and

all-star Verdians Dmitri Hvorostovsky (Don Carlo) and Ferruccio Furlanetto (De Silva) round out the cast in this Live At The Met production broadcast in high-definition on the Cowichan Theatre’s big screen. Tickets for this Cowichan Theatre show are $26, $22 student, $24 for seniors, $15.50 children, $5 eyeGo. Call 250-748-7529.

Comedic Canadian pair promises two nights of sore stomachs Blackjack comedy: Mike Macdonald and Matt Billon bringing laughter to Duncan and Crofton Krista Siefken

News Leader Pictorial

M

ike Macdonald ¿gures suf¿cient time has passed since he last did stand-up in Cowichan. “I think it’s been long enough that all the restraining orders have run out,” he joked on the phone from the Okanagan. The Canadian comedian visits the valley next week, doing shows in Duncan and Crofton with fellow comic Matt Billon. “It’s going to be a good show from start to ¿nish,” said Billon. “You’ll have a sore stomach the next day at work.” Both Macdonald and Billon have spent years making names for themselves across North America and abroad. Billon’s been on the stand-up scene for a dozen years or so, while Macdonald’s been around for decades. “Mike pretty much paved the way for all Canadian comics,” Billon said. “He was the ¿rst to go down south to HBO and David Letterman. He’s de¿nitely a living legend.” The pair has travelled together for the Blackjack Comedy Tour four times now, and are stoked to be visiting the island next week. “If the shows we’re doing there are half as good as the shows we’ve done this week, wow, it’s gonna be great,” Macdonald promised. “We really want “Mike is so animated — one of the everyone to have mosthe’sanimated comics a good time.” in the world — so it’s great,” added Billon. “I always learn a lot from him.” Billon said the two acts complement one another. “Between the two of us we cover a lot of topics. It’s different for each tour — we always bring something new to the table — but for myself, a lot of the stuff is road stories, and I play quite a bit with the crowd.”

Billon

CAPRICE THEATRE www.capricecinemas.com 404 Duncan Street, DUNCAN 24 HR. Showline 748-0678

Matt Billon, right, calls Mike Macdonald, above, the man who paved the way for Canadian stand-up comics with his trips south of the border for HBO and the David Letterman show. The duo certainly has plenty of road tales to draw from — they tour extensively. “The best thing — and the thing studio people hate — is people like me and Matt who can afford to stay out there and not starve, and just do stand-up,” said Macdonald. Macdonald and Billon are no strangers to TV spots, but shy away from penny-pinching, over-controlling studio execs. “Fortunately, this may not be the easier life for us, but we can afford to starve a little bit more, and do the stand-up.” The tough part for Macdonald is leaving behind his wife and 17 cats, of which two are diabetic. And the journeying presents its own jokes — although not always solicited ones. “Sometimes audience members get confused and think we’re looking for jokes,” Macdonald said. “They’ll come up after a show to tell us jokes, and some of them, wow. Like, I’ve been married for 30 years and I

love my wife, and some guy will come up after a show and tell me a really ¿lthy antiwife joke.” So rest assured the comedians will come prepared with their own material. All the audience has to do is sit back, relax, and enjoy the show. “We’re both non-threatening comics. We really want everyone to have a good time,” Billon said. “I may take the odd ribbing to a crowd member, but it’s all in good fun, and from start to ¿nish it should be a great show.” Your ticket What: Blackjack Comedy Tour with Mike Macdonald and Matt Billon When/Where: Wednesday at 8 p.m. at the Duncan Garage Showroom; Thursday at 8 p.m. at the Crofton Hotel Tickets: $20 in advance/$25 door in Duncan on Wednesday; $20 in Crofton on Thursday

WE THE PAY Until H Marc ST! h 31, 2

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A23

Got an event that needs publicity? Log onto cowichannewsleader.com, scroll down to the calendar and click “add event.”

TOWN CRIER

Winning numbers

Weather forecast

March 14 6/49:

The weekend:

06 09 11 12 19 20 Bonus:47

Monday:

12 24 30 31 35 37 Bonus: 25

Midweek:

40 per cent chance of showers, H 7C, L 0C

BC/49: Extra:

60 per cent chance of rain, H 10C, L 2C

31 80 82 85

courtesy Chris Carss

Your Cowichan Valley events calendar at 9:30 a.m. There is no cost. Contact the Cowichan Women Against Violence Society 250748-7000. This week’s session is Staying or Leaving? Cowichan Spirit of Women: general meeting, 1:30 pm Lower Duncan City Hall. Enter by side door. All welcome.

Andrew Leong

Duncan Kinsmen Club president Greg Powers hands the keys to a new garage-turned-garden-base to Doug Orr of the Clements Centre in February. The Kinsmen renovated the facility for residents of a North Cowichan Community Living group home.

Friday Cherry Point Artists and Cowichan Valley Potters: spring show and sale, featuring ready-to-frame painting, cards and pottery, 10 a.m. St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 5800 Church Rd, North Cowichan. Call 250-737-1275 Retro Man: Andrew McCormack entertains on Patrick’s Day at the Chemainus Legion. Mar 17. Dinner and Dance. 5:30 p.m. Tickets: 250-2464532. St. Patrick’s Dance: Irish stew and biscuits, then dance to the music of Danny and the Seniors at The Valley Seniors, 198 Government St., Duncan, Happy Hour starts at 6 p.m. Cost is $8.Call 250-746-4433 for more. Shiatsu Workshop: Relief for people with hand, wrist, and/ or arm pain from repetitive work in a non-profit event with proceeds going to charity, 5 p.m. Island Savings Centre - Mesachie Room. Call 250589-8655.

Saturday Black Gold Composting workshop: learn how to turn your kitchen and garden waste into the ideal soil amendment, 1 to 4 p.m., Kinsmen Park, Alderlea Street, Duncan. Admission by donation. Call 250-748-8506.

8 p.m., Duncan Garage Showroom, 330 Duncan Street. Tickets are $15 advance, $18 door. Call 250-748-7246. Free Art Demonstration: join Trisha Klus of The Escape Artists Group for a demo on bookmaking and artists books, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Loft Gallery in Mill Bay.

Holding Your Own in a Relationship: drop-in educational workshops for women experiencing relationship threats, conflict, abuse and/ or violence, Tuesday mornings

DeÄning Diversity, Creating Community: A 48-minute documentary presentation with discussion to follow. The film explores diversity in a small town, sharing the stories of people as they find their place in a continuously transforming community, 7 p.m. auditorium, VIU Cowichan Campus. Admission is free. Call 250-748-3112. The Flora and Fauna of Australia: naturalists Gail and Steve Mitchell speak to the Cowichan Valley Naturalists, 7:30 pm at the Freshwater EcoCentre 1080 Wharncliffe Road in Duncan. Everyone is welcome at this free public presentation.

Sunday Noodles of the World Open Mike: Singer Joey Belanger hosts multi-talented musicians between 1 and 4 p.m. at NOW, 161 Station St., Duncan. No cover. Call 250597-0313.

Monday Beginners: Dad has cancer and a male lover in this Reel Alternatives movie presentation, 7 p.m., Cowichan Theatre. Tickets $12. Call 250-748-7529. Proceeds to Cowichan Hospice. North Cowichan budget: Mayor Jon Lefebure presents an overview of the draft budget, small group discussions will identify what’s good, what’s a problem, and what citizens don’t understand, 7 p.m., Chemainus Seniors Drop-in Centre, 9824 Willow Street, Sponsored by the Chemainus Residents Association. For information, call 250-324-3307.

St. Patrick’s Tea: entertainment by Lost Cause at The Valley Seniors, 198 Government St., Duncan, 1 p.m. Cost is $4. Call 250-746-4433 for more.

Dads Make a Difference: for men to better improve their relationship with themselves, their families, and with their community. 6 p.m., in the boardroom at Duncan Thrifty Foods. Call 250-597-2801, info@cowichanmen.org

Bluegrass Fever with Cornshed: a mini-bluegrass festival,

Tuesday

cloudy, H7 C, L -3C

Are You Aboriginal and in Need of Legal Aid? BC’S LEGAL AID provider has special services aimed at helping Aboriginal people and their families. t Have you been charged with a criminal offence? t Do you have child protection or family issues? t Do you have questions about the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, wills and estates, or Aboriginal hunting and fishing rights? t Do you want information about your Gladue rights and First Nations Court? Aboriginal people have unique legal rights, and help is available to understand and claim these rights. Advocates, legal representation, clinics, and advice are available to you both on and off reserve. For more information, see www.legalaid.bc.ca/ aboriginal.

1-866-577-2525 Legal aid in BC is provided by the Legal Services Society (LSS). LSS is committed to increasing awareness of Aboriginal legal rights and supporting the strengths of Aboriginal cultures and communities.

Piano virtuoso Anton Kuerti embraces his son Julian after Julian conducted Anton and the Victoria Symphony Orchestra through a Mar. 11 show at the Cowichan Theatre. Andrew Leong


A24 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

#OWICHANĂĽ .EWSĂĽ,EADERĂĽ 0ICTORIAL ĂĽ$EADLINES

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

IN MEMORIAM

IN MEMORIAM

COMING EVENTS

TENDERS

INFORMATION

INFORMATION

Canadian Cancer Society Daffodil Lunch, Wed. Mar 28. Eagles Hall, 11:30 am, Tickets $10.00 at ofďŹ ce 100-394 Duncan St. or call 250-746-4134

7EDNESDAYĂĽ%DITIONĂĽ 8PSE"ET-ONDAYĂĽĂĽPM %JTQMBZ"ET-ONDAYĂĽĂĽAM &RIDAYĂĽ%DITIONĂĽ 8PSE"ET4HURSĂĽĂĽAM %JTQMBZ"ET7EDĂĽĂĽAM

COWICHAN SECONDARY DRY GRAD COMMITTEE asks for your bottle/can recycling donations. Please recycle at Cowichan Valley Bottle Depot on Norcross Rd under the name Cowichan Senior Secondary Dry Grad 2012. Thank you in advance for your donations!!!

-!*/2ĂĽ#!4%'/2)%3ĂĽ ).ĂĽ/2$%2ĂĽ/&ĂĽ !00%!2!.#% &!-),9x!../5.#%-%.43 #/--5.)49x !../5.#%-%.43 42!6%, #(),$2%. %-0,/9-%.4 0%23/.!,x3%26)#%3 "53).%33x3%26)#%3x 0%43xx,)6%34/#+ -%2#(!.$)3%x&/2x3!,% 2%!,x%34!4% 2%.4!,3 !54/-/4)6% -!2).%

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS COMING EVENTS

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)Tx ISx AGREEDx BYx ANYx $ISPLAYx ORx #LASSIÙEDx !DVERTISERx REQUESTINGx SPACEx THATx THEx LIABILITYx OFx THEx PAPERx INx THEx EVENTx OFx FAILUREx TOx PUBLISHx ANx ADVERTISEMENTx SHALLx BExLIMITEDxTOxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxBYx THEx ADVERTISERx FORx THATx PORTIONx OFx THEx ADVERTISINGx OCCUPIEDx BYx THEx INCORRECTxITEMxONLYxANDxTHATxTHEREx SHALLx BEx NOx LIABILITYx INx ANYx EVENTx BEYONDxTHExAMOUNTxPAIDxFORxSUCHx ADVERTISEMENTx 4HEx PUBLISHERx SHALLx NOTx BEx LIABLEx FORx SLIGHTx CHANGESx ORx TYPOGRAPHICALx ERRORSx THATxDOxNOTxLESSENxTHExVALUExOFxANx ADVERTISEMENT

FUNERAL HOMES

Mon-Fri 8-5 Sat 9-5

Call 310.3535

Ed

Let’s get personal‌ the right person is out there somewhere! let us help you ďŹ nd them...

FUNERAL HOMES

We know there are hundreds of singles in our community. Advertise your single status seven times per week (up to 10 lines of text) for FREE! Don’t have an email address to publish in your ad? Rent one of our ďŹ le numbers for $10/month. *must be 19 years of age to participate

Cremation & Burial Centre Inc

& Afforable cremation and burial options including natural services & Bronze & granite headstones & Pre-arrangements

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251 Jubilee St. Email: hwwallace@telus.net www.hwwallacecbc.com Locally Owned & Operated

!DVERTISERSx AREx REMINDEDx THATx 0ROVINCIALx LEGISLATIONx FORBIDSx THEx PUBLICATIONxOFxANYxADVERTISEMENTx WHICHx DISCRIMINATESx AGAINSTx ANYx PERSONxBECAUSExOFxRACE xRELIGION x SEX x COLOUR x NATIONALITY x ANCESTRYx ORxPLACExOFxORIGIN xORxAGE xUNLESSx THEx CONDITIONx ISx JUSTIÙEDx BYx Ax BONAx ÙDEx REQUIREMENTx FORx THEx WORKxINVOLVED

       

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Tell the world with a classiďŹ ed ad

H.W. Wallace

$)3#2)-).!4/29 ,%')3,!4)/.

#OPYRIGHTx ANDORx PROPERTIESx SUBSISTx INx ALLx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx INx ALLx OTHERx MATERIALx APPEARINGx INx THISx EDITIONx OFx BCCLASSIÙED COMx 0ERMISSIONx TOx REPRODUCEx WHOLLYxORxINxPARTxANDxINxANYxFORMx WHATSOEVER x PARTICULARLYx BYx Ax PHOTOGRAPHICx ORx OFFSETx PROCESSx INxAxPUBLICATIONxMUSTxBExOBTAINEDx INxWRITINGxFROMxTHExxPUBLISHERx!NYx UNAUTHORIZEDxREPRODUCTIONxWILLxBEx SUBJECTxTOxRECOURSExINxLAW

WindshieldReplacement Replacement Windshield and Chip Repair and Repair

• •Auto Auto• •Home Home• •Business Business

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com

Call 310-3535

BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx CANNOTx BEx RESPONSIBLEx FORx ERRORSx AFTERx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx OFx PUBLICATIONx OFx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx.OTICExOFxERRORSxONx THEx ÙRSTx DAYx SHOULDx IMMEDIATELYx BEx CALLEDx TOx THEx ATTENTIONx OFx THEx #LASSIÙEDx $EPARTMENTx TOx BEx CORRECTEDx FORx THEx FOLLOWINGx EDITIONBCCLASSIÙEDCOMxRESERVESx THExRIGHTxTOxREVISE xEDIT xCLASSIFYxORx REJECTx ANYx ADVERTISEMENTx ANDx TOx RETAINx ANYx ANSWERSx DIRECTEDx TOx THEx BCCLASSIÙEDCOMx "OXx 2EPLYx 3ERVICEx ANDx TOx REPAYx THEx CUSTOMERxFORxTHExSUMxPAIDxFORxTHEx ADVERTISEMENTxANDxBOXxRENTAL

Members & guests Members & Guests welcome! Welcome!

ANNOUNCEMENT?

CALL FOR ENTRIES 10TH ANNUAL Kitty Coleman Woodland Art & Bloom Festival. Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show. Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting May 19,20, 21 Applications for Artisans are available at woodlandgardens.ca or phone 250-338-6901

Your Community, Your ClassiďŹ eds.

ST. PATRICKS DAY ST. PATRICKS DANCE DAY Dance Sat., March 17 Sat March 17 at Duncan Elks Local Rock Band Local Rock Band 8 pm - 11 8 pm - 11 pm DJ to follow DJ to follow

       

   % 

PERSONALS

1960’s man now retired, seeks active, educated companion with country roots for dating & musical adventures. Family man, will travel. Reply to File A970, c/o The News Leader Pictorial, #2-5380 TCH, Duncan, BC, V9L 6W4

YOUNG at heart, 47 SWM, looking for a female, 35-51, that likes the outdoors and working out. Camping, hiking, movies and the ďŹ ner things in life. If sitting at home with the ďŹ re and a glass of wine sounds like something that would interest you, please email so that we see if our interests are mutual. Please email me at gullicksonjohn35@yahoo.com.

Recognize Habits and Patterns 



                 

!"     

PERSONALS

55 YEAR SWM, non-smoking, would like to meet slim, active lady for friendship, social & outdoor activities in south & mid Island. Must like animals. Reply to PO Box 31143, Victoria, BC V8N 6J3



            

Unit 2, 5380 Trans Canada Hwy., Duncan 250-746-4471

• Grief/Loss • Addictions • Fears & Phobia • Weight Loss • Self Esteem/ConďŹ dence For Over 20 Years Assisting People in the Valley

Techniques Include: Hypnosis E.F.T. T.A.T. WHEE

     



Barbara Adelborg C.M.H., H.T. is a CertiďŹ ed Hypnotherapist

!$&#%$! !

106-225 Canada Ave., Duncan

"! 

www.barbaraadelborg.ca

746-1969

Mike

Lucas Ralph

Serving the Cowichan Valley since 1903

Justin

250-746-4824

250 746 4824 746-4642 Fax: 250 Fax: 250-746-4642 186 St.,St., Duncan Email: dobsonsglass@telus.net Steamed Thermal Pane Replacement, 186Ingram Ingram Duncan Glass, Mirrors, www.dobsonsglass.com Thermal Panes & Screens opposite Post opposite Post OfďŹ OfďŹ ce ce

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST FOOD & BEVERAGE OPPORTUNITY ISLAND SAVINGS CENTRE The Cowichan Valley Regional District is inviting expressions of interest for the provision of food and beverage services at the Island Savings Centre. Please note that an expression of interest document outlining conditions, and the expectations of respondents, is available by contacting John Elzinga, Manager, Island Savings Centre, (250)7460400, jelzinga@cvrd.bc.ca. Mr. Elzinga can also be contacted regarding any questions on this process. It is the intent of this request for expressions of interest for food and beverage services at the Island Savings Centre, that the CVRD will be able to determine community interest in this opportunity. Although it is currently permissible for user groups to cater their own functions, it is the intent of the Island Savings Centre to have one established food and beverage service provide for the public at the facility. Please submit by 2:00 local time April 30, 2012 to: JOHN ELZINGA, Manager, Island Savings Centre 2687 James Street Duncan, BC V9L 2X5 COWICHAN VALLEY Phone: (250) 746-2500 REGIONAL DISTRICT Fax: (250) 746-2513 Email: cvrd@cvrd.bc.ca 175 Ingram Street Duncan, B.C. V9L 1N8 Website: http://www.cvrd.bc.ca


Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A25

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INFORMATION

INFORMATION

LEGALS

LOST AND FOUND

Tracy Bulcock CONGRATULATES

Craig Newnham Winner of our $100 furnace oil draw. You could be a winner too. Call for details!

746-4511

Notice to Creditors Joseph Edmund Pineault, deceased, formerly of # 118, 80 Tenth Street, Nanaimo, B.C. are required to send full particulars of such claims to the undersigned executor at 15-355 Day Road, Duncan, B.C. V9L 3K4, on or before the 31st day of March 2012, after which date the estate’s assets will be distributed, having regard only to the claims that have been received. Brian Pineault, Executor

LOST- LAST seen Mar 11 male white lab husky x wearing a back pack on long leash, answers to Lucas. Needs medication. If found please (250)597-8700, 250-732-4762.

Be sure to check out Welcome Wagon’s Baby Shower and Bridal Showcase!

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Travelodge Hotel Duncan Exhibitor Displays, Fashion Shows, Giveaways, Great Prizes. FREE ADMISSION To register please visit welcomewagon.ca or call Marsha at 250-732-3315

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

HELP WANTED

Get Practical Skills That Get Jobs Vancouver Island University training for over 50 years, No simulators. Low student / instructor ratio. 1-888-920-2221 ext: 6130 www.viu.ca/ heavyequipment

HELP WANTED

TRAVEL

An earthmoving company based in Edson Alberta requires a full time Heavy Duty Mechanic for field and shop work. We require Cat Dozer/Deere excavator experience. You will work a set schedule for days on and off. Call Lloyd @ 780723-5051

GETAWAYS LONG BEACH - Ucluelet Deluxe waterfront cabin, sleeps 6, BBQ.Spring Special. 2 nights $239 / 3 nights $299. Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

Expecting a Baby or Planning a Wedding? HELP WANTED

North COWICHAN

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

FOODSAFE AT Island Savings Centre, March 31st & April 28th courses 8:30-4:30 $65. 250746-4154 www.saferfood.ca

SHERWOOD HOUSE. Casual on call housekeeper 1 day per week, plus holiday coverage. Must be experienced and love working worth seniors. Please bring resumes with references to Audrey Norman, 280 Government St., Duncan.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

MUNICIPALITY of

North Cowichan invites applicants for the position of Financial and Asset Management Accountant. Reporting to the Director of Finance, the Asset Management Accountant will have excellent analytical and organization skills, combined with a high degree of professional judgement. View full job posting details and requirements, as well as how to apply, by selecting ‘Employment Opportunities’ from ‘Quick Links’ on our website. 7030 Trans Canada Hwy Box 278, Duncan, BC V9L 3X4 Ph: 250-746-3100 Fax: 250-746-3133 www.northcowichan.ca

is seeking an eager, knowledgeable quilter who has a desire to provide excellent customer service and also work as a team player. Full time position including weekends. Please drop off resume at Fabricland, attention: Sharon Henderson.

Life-Skills for Employment is starting again soon… The Community Options Society is running its pre-employment program for youth between the ages of 15 and 30 that helps to develop skills and the confidence and tools necessary to secure employment. Learn about problem solving, feedback, stereotypes, goal setting, resume writing, job searches, networking and much more.

PERMANENT CARRIERS REQUIRED ON THE FOLLOWING ROUTES: CHEMAINUS 455850 – View St (56 papers) 455860 – 3256-3344 Cook, 10028-10042 Victoria (37 papers) 455902 – Cochrane, Maxwell, Robertson, Victoria (38 papers) 455952 – Chapman, McKay, Victoria (31 papers) 456250 – Alder, Chemainus, Cypress, Croft, Laurel, Legion, Mill, Spruce, Willow, Victoria (125 papers) COBBLE HILL 203100 – Allan, 852-1044 Hutchinson, Keeling, Ravencrest (39 papers) 203135 – Cedarwood, Cowerd (48 papers)

fil here please

Your Community

Classifieds can rev you up!

Call us today • 310-3535

COWICHAN BAY 253502 – Botwood, 1659-1846 Cowichan Bay Rd, Wessex (71 papers) CROFTON 503602 – Babine Pl/Rd, Osborne Bay Rd, Peterson (39 papers)

*all paper counts are approximates

CALL LARA NOW

250-746-4471 Extension 224

COBBLE HILL Pacific Homes-Pacific Truss is looking for Truss, Engineered Wall Systems and EWP Sales Reps for contractor and residential sales. Under direct supervision, they will represent the company providing sales and customer service at the customers site; facilitate generating sales by gathering data for technical staff related to customer needs and design specifications and act as company liaison. To apply or receive more information email: lorne.winship@pacific buildingsystems.com http://pacific-homes.net http://pacifictruss.net/ 243102 GREENSKEEPER WANTED Cowichan Golf & Country Club has a greenskeeper position available. Horticultural knowledge and experience is considered an asset. Email you resume and cover letter to Dave Purslow at: cowichangolf@telus.net

• The program runs April 10, 2012 to June 29, 2012 Mon-Fri 9 to 3pm • Participants are paid while attending • Contact Mary, Brenda or Jarred at 250-748-0232 We have a limited number of spaces available for the program. Please contact us as soon as possible so we can determine your eligibility and set up an interview. The Government of Canada has contributed funding to this initiative

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Get comfortable with your career Are you seeking a career as a mortgage specialist, or are you a current mortgage professional searching for new opportunities?

Deliver the News Leader Pictorial on Wednesdays & Fridays AND SHAPE UP

HELP WANTED

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR TRAINING

The News Leader Pictorial office is holding several sets of “found” keys”, since March 2003. Stop into the office and see if any belong to you. #2-5380 Trans Canada Hwy, Duncan, next to Buckerfields

LOST AND FOUND LOST: BLACK Manx cat, female, medium sized, short tail, Maple Bay Rd. area. Call 250597-1060.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

TD Canada Trust has everything you need. We provide new Mobile Mortgage Specialists with outstanding training from industry-leading experts committed to developing mortgage professionals and helping to grow their business. Plus, with TD Canada Trust, you’ll gain access to our network of support – ready to offer comprehensive education, technology and sales assistance. Margaret Huisman Sales Manager, Mobile Mortgage Specialists T: 250 881 2491, margaret.huisman@td.com

LIBRA TREE is looking for experienced tree workers. Climbing or lift truck exp. an asset. Must have DL, P.P.E.. Good wages and benefits. Email libra-tree@shaw.ca with resume and ref’s. Local work. MECHANIC WANTED: Cowichan Golf & Country Club is seeking a qualified mechanic for their maintenance department as soon as possible. Golf Course experience is an asset. Email your resume and cover letter to Dave Purslow at cowichangolf@telus.net PIONEER HOUSE now hiring FT/PT dishwasher. Apply with resume to Mark or Matt, 4675 TC Hwy, Duncan, B.C. or by email: pioneerhouse@shaw.ca RV Lot/Shop Assistant. Must be mature, mechanically inclined & good work ethics. Resumes & references to CountrySide RV 4831 Trans Canada Hwy, Duncan (250) 746-1699

VOLUNTEERS

Journeyman Technician Excellent opportunity for a journeyman technician in Small rural community in the Northwest. Family operated GM Dealership with excellent working conditions and quality of life. Become a key member of our service team. Re-location allowance for the right candidate. Competitive wage and bene¿t package. GM experience preferred but not required. Fax resume to: 250-847-2171 or email jobs@coastmountaingm.com

Do you ever ask yourself How can _I_ make a difference? Contact us, and together we can plant the seeds of change, because Volunteers Grow Community. 250-748-2133 www.volunteercowichan.bc.ca

WORK WANTED HUSBAND FOR HIRE. Nothing but the best. Carpenter, plumber, painter, electrician, pressure washing. Just ask my wife! Call 250-746-4493 or 250-709-1111

CONNECTING JOB SEEKERS AND EMPLOYERS

bcjobnetwork.com


A26 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

HOME CARE/SUPPORT RESIDENTIAL MANAGER Vancouver Island Community Connections Inc has an opening for a manager with previous management training & experience. Knowledge of the Community Living field and CARF accreditation process an asset. Candidate will need strong leadership skills and experience working with people with learning difficulties and behaviours that challenge. Candidate will possess excellent communication, interpersonal and organizational skills as well as strong computer skills. Duties include leading and supervising staff; this position also requires the manager to participate in an average of three residential shifts per week. Ability to plan, organize, control and evaluate the delivery of care and all aspects of daily household management. Requires valid class 5 driver’s license and reliable vehicle, driver’s abstract, clear TB test, criminal record check, OFA level 1 First Aid, Food Safe and non-violent crisis intervention training. Wage to be determined; full-time includes oncall and weekends. Fax: 250338-7134 or Email: vanislcc@yahoo.ca Attention: Carol Gjesdal

Friday, March 16, 2012 PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

FINANCIAL SERVICES

FREE ITEMS

GARAGE SALES

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

MORTGAGES

FREE: FILL, we will deliver. Mill Bay-Chemainus. Call Main Road Contracting at 250-7467510, 250-743-8931 or 1-250391-7310.

FUNDRAISER SALE, Fri March 23 & Sat March 24, 10 to 3, at the Duncan Christian School Elementary Gymn, 495 Beech Ave off Trunk Rd. Many new items, lifejackets, new music CD’s, Crayola items, scrapbooking, & more! Come join us for lunch. Proceeds for Harvest House Food Bank, and Duncan Christian School. More info call (250)246-9917

FUEL/FIREWOOD 5 CORDS of Mill ends, $295 delivered. Or you pick up, $50 pickup load. Call us at (250)416-0069. SEASONED DRY Fir/Maple, split, delivered, cut to length, $200 delivered, Ladysmith to Mill Bay. 250-597-3760 SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

GARAGE SALES HAIRSTYLISTS HAIRDRESSING in your home, Cowichan Valley area. Barb Stewart. 250-715-6568

PERSONAL SERVICES

LEGAL SERVICES

FINANCIAL SERVICES

CRIMINAL RECORD?

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

www.bcclassified.com

CHEMAINUS. Downsizing for retirement indoor sale! Sat Mar 17, 9-3, 3262 Dogwood Rd, 1.5 km north of Chemainus on Chemainus Rd. (turn toward the ocean). 3500 SXKC Honda generator, large wire dog pen, vehicle ramps, small tools, fishing, boating, camping, household, china and glass. CROFTON, ESTATE SALE: Sat., March 17th, 8-4pm. 8011 Glenhurst Ave, off Adelaide. Piano, dining room suite, china cabinet, dressers, beds, etc... DUNCAN: Duncan Community Lodge Society is having a Block Party and Inside Garage Sale! March 17th, 8am-2pm, 2244 Moose Rd. BBQ provided by 3rd Quamichan Scouts. $10/table. For table rentals call 250-732-3770 or email your_health_connection@yahoo.ca

VENDING MACHINE FOR SALE ONLY $500 * Perfect working order * 9 selections (perfect for candy bars, chips, etc.) * Programmable * Comes with manual * Accepts quarters, nickels and dimes * 2 shelves for storage * Measures 65” high, 28” deep, 26” wide Call Kim, Mon-Fri, 8:30 am to 5pm (250) 746-4451 ext. 223

PARENTS UNITE GARAGE SALE Huge event with 66 tables of children’s toys, clothing & family goods.

Saturday, March 31st

REAL ESTATE

9:00 - 12 noon Island Savings Centre Multi-Purpose Hall Tables still available: $19. For more info call: (250)748-7529

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES

Swap Meet Cobble Hill Hall Under new management. Every Sunday, 10am-3pm. 3550 Watson Ave. 250-743-7018 JEWELS, FURS BUY, SELL, Watches, Estate Jewellery, Gold, Diamonds, Repairs, Custom designs. St. Thomas Gold & Silver, 895 Fort Street, Victoria, 250-3807698.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE CLOTHING CONSIGNMENT Store opening soon in Crofton! Women, Children & Infant wear. Please call 250-7325537 to consign your items. LARGE DRESSER, 6 small drawers, 3 lg, mirror, $40 obo. (250)743-6543, 250-710-6568

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

HERITAGE PAWN BARGAINS!! 40” Sony LCD TV, fishing gear, belly boat, 3100 and 1500 PSI pressure washers, new Delta scroll saw, quad loading ramps, North River waders, Home Theatre surround systems. 430 Whistler. 250-746-9810. heritagepawnbrokers.com

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper?

WHERE BUYERS AND SELLERS MEET

Your Community, Your Classifieds.

Call 310-3535

Service Directory 9OURCOMPLETEGUIDETO0ROFESSIONAL3ERVICESINTHE#OWICHAN6ALLEY

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

COMPUTER SERVICES

FENCING

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

LANDSCAPING

EXCEL BOOKKEEPING SERVICES. Small to medium businesses. (250)597-1313.

ABLE COMPUTER REPAIR In-home service. Seniors’ discount. Nico 250-746-6167

A1 Hauling/Delivery

Sucasa

250-510-4745

Home Improvements

DRAFTING & DESIGN

Furniture Office Equipment Appliances Tenant Leftovers Yard Waste Lumber Yard P/U Rubbish Construction Debris

Quality Landscape Construction * Stone Retaining Walls * Landscape Design

QUICKBOOKS BOOKKEEPING & training for sm business and personal records, reliable service. Lynn 250-732-3605.

CARPENTRY

DESIGN FOR PERMIT. 26 years experience. Integra Design 250-381-4123.

ELECTRICAL

COMPLETE carpentry & building service. Interior & exterior. Stairs, decks, reno’s, pressure washing, windows, gutter cleaning & repairs. Free estimates. Larry (250) 701-1362

1A ELECTRICIAN, licenced, bonded, Small Jobs Specialist, panel upgrades and renos. All work guaranteed since 1989. Rob at 250-732-PLUG (7584).

DAVID GALE Construction, for all your renovation needs. 26 yr. exp. 250-746-9956 www.davidgaleconstruction.ca

250-743-0326. ELECTRICIAN Licensed and bonded. Reasonable rates, free estimates, upgrades & renos. Call Kelly.

EXPERT JOURNEYMAN carpenter, 30 yrs exp. For all carpentry facets. 250-732-3605.

CLASSIFIEDS! 310.3535 or bcclassified.com ✔ CallCHECK

GARDENING

GARDENING

Small Moving Jobs Welcome

GARDENING EXPERIENCED GARDENER Call Raymond (250) 324-3202 email: rbruvold@shaw.ca

HANDYPERSONS

Bob’s Hauling & Free Pickup Metal, batteries, wine & liquor bottles, pop & beer tins, juice containers.

250-743-5119 250-361-7889

ALL RUBBISH removal, small renovations, deck work, carpentry, painting, plumbing, and evestrough cleaning. Seniors discount. Ian 250-743-6776.

SMALL ADS GET BIG RESULTS! Call 310.3535

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

JUNK AND RUBBISH REMOVAL

Lawncare • Planting • Design • Maintenance

250-710-0725

• Top Soil • Sea Soil • Compost • Manure • Bark Mulch • Gravel • Sand

Call Dave (250) 246-0333

www.islandpacificlandscaping.ca

(250) 701-8319

250 924 5436

Free Estimates 14 yrs. Experience

“A Yard or Two Delivery Service”

Has a noisy partner and is taking new clients.

Treating Your Home like Ours Over 25 years of Reliable Service

sucasadev@shaw.ca

WESTCOAST FOUNTAINS

HOUSEHOLD SERVICES

See your dreams become reality! Tony 250-741-6646 www.westcoastfountains.ca

READ THIS.... Classified ads get great results!

Call 310.3535

TREE SERVICES

P.M.

* Gutters * Windows * Siding * Moss treatment * Pressure washing

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

Mill Bay/Duncan 250-743-3306 Chemainus/Ladysmith 250-324-3343

ROMAX MASONRY. Exp’d & Professional. Chimneys, Brick Veneer, Rockwork, Cultured Stone, Interlocking Paving. Fully insured. Estimates. Call 250-588-9471 - 250-882-5181

CLASSIFIEDS WORK HARD! Call 310.3535

PAINTING

TREE SERVICES

PAT THE PAINTER. Small jobs ok. 25 years exp. Seniors discount. Call 250-246-0248.

MOBILE MILLING LTD.

Custom On Site Milling, Siding, Fencing, Beams, Lumber Grading, Lumber Sales, Cedar, Fir & Clears Excavator c/w Thumb Fully Insured

250-743-8284 or pmmill@telus.net

PLUMBING A SERVICE PLUMBER. Licence, Insured. Drains, HWT, Reno’s, Repairs. Senior Discounts. After Hour Service. Call Coval Plumbing, 250709-5103.

STUCCO/SIDING STUCCO - Including small jobs and refacing old stucco. Guaranteed. 250-715-5883

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassified.com


Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A27

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

APARTMENT/CONDO

APARTMENT/CONDO

APARTMENT/CONDO

APARTMENT/CONDO

HOMES FOR RENT

SENIOR ASSISTED LIVING

SUITES, UPPER

DUNCAN 1 bdrm suites Close to Beverly Corners, 4 blks to University, on bus route. Updated; new flooring, new paint & some new fixtures. $625. Heat/hot water included. NS/NP. Refs.

SHAUGHNESSY GARDENS 3251 Cowichan Lake Rd. Clean 1 and 2 bdrm units. Full size fridge, stove & dishwasher. Carpet & linoleum, window coverings, fireplace. Quiet, well maintained bldg with elevator & sauna. Close to Schools & Hospitals. To view call Dorcas

(250)748-3729 DUNCAN: 2 bdrm, 1350sqft, 3 yrs old, stand alone apt, 2nd floor above retail store (closed at 5pm and weekends). Walking distance to town, 5 appl’s, NS/NP, no parties. $1000/mo + util’s. Also has 1100sqft attached room (would be excellent for home based business) will finish to suite $800+ utils. Call (250)701-3276.

2 bdrm apt in CROFTON. Avail. mid. March. Incl 5 appls. 2nd flr above quiet Dandy mini storage on Joan Ave. $750. Ref. req. 1 pet considered. N/S pref. Call or text 250709-1379. $500/MO STARTING- weekly available, many apartment types, furnished, w/common kitchen. All utils, internet included. FREE local calls, No Credit Checks. Call Motel, 250-748-0661, (Duncan).

LOVELY 1 & 2-BDRM suites, Central Duncan, seniors oriented bldg, heat included, N/S, N/P. Please call Art at 250-746-7241.

CHEMAINUS 1 BDRM heat & h/w incld. small pet ok. $650. Leave msg (250)245-8869.

LOWER 3 bedroom suite. $1050 monthly, shared laundry, plus utilities, close to town. Shared yard, wood stove. 250-748-6080

DUNCAN in town, avail Apr 1st., quiet 2 bdrm apt. 6 appliances, $850-$900. 250-2466626 or 250-746-4016

HOMES FOR RENT

DUNCAN- (8 km north) Furnished studio apartment, on 8 acres. Laundry, satellite, heat, hydro. $575. (250)748-1310.

COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL AVAILABLE NOW 7000 sq.ft. store front with excellent exposure, overhead doors, ample parking. 250-748-9622

DUNCAN: 55+ condo, clean, bright, 2 bdrm, 5 appl’s, gas F/P, storage, secure level entry, walk to shopping, small pet ok. $795. Call (250)746-5669.

CENTRAL LOCATION, Bachelor, 1 & 2 bdrms, balcony, F/S, hot water, parking, pet considered, $525$850/mo. Call 250-748-7764.

DUNCAN: 1 & 2-bdrm, 5 appls, close to School, Hospital and bus route. $650-$800 utils. Lv msg: 250-597-4018.

APARTMENTS FURNISHED

DUNCAN- 2 bdrm ground level corner suite, 5 appls, recently reno’d, near VIU, 2 parking spaces. NS/NP. Mar. 15. Refs. $895. (250)715-8858

Ladysmith: bachelor, 1 & 2 bdrm suites from $700/mo incl. heat & hot water, ocean views, completely renovated, new management, on trolly route, small pets ok. 250-668-9086.

CROFTON- 2 bdrm, bright, in suite laundry, prking. (Immed) $750. + utils. 250-210-0756.

SMALL PET OK Adult oriented, near Cowichan Aquatic Centre. 1 bdrm, Laminate & carpet, fresh paint. Rent incls Heat & Hot Water. (250) 748-1304.

DUNCAN: 2-BDRM Condo, 2nd floor, corner unit. 5 appl’s, new laminate floors. N/S. 2524 Lewis St. Avail. immediately. $850./mo, lease. Pls call (250)477-8046,(250)883-3204.

BRIGHT 1 bdrm suite near Shawnigan Village, all util., HDTV & WiFi incl., N/S, N/P, suits quiet person(s), avail May 1st, $675. Call 250-7436754 evenings

Chemainus: Lockwood Villa, well kept bldg, 1 bdrm $625, 2 bdrm 2 balcony $750, incl. heat & hot water, sm pets welcome.Karen 250-709-2765.

(250)710-7515 250-748-3412

COTTAGES MILL BAY ------------------------1 bedroom cabin $685/mth includes hydro. 250-715-6502 SHAWNIGAN VILLAGE, 1 bdrm, newly reno’d, utilities & cable incl’d, avail immed. $750/mo. Call (250)701-5328.

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES CHEMAINUS: 1/2 duplex in town, 3-4 bdrms, 3 bath, F/P, all appls, $1200 utils incld. Avail Apr. 1. (250)246-1546. CROFTON: 3 bdrm on 2nd floor, ocean & mountain view, balcony, bright, F/S, free laundry, near school, shopping and bus. $675 mo + util’s. Call 250-246-3773.

MAPLE GROVE APTS. 3271 Cowichan Lake Rd 2 & 3 Bedroom Units _____________________

*Heat & Hot water included *Family oriented *Clean & quiet *Renovated units *Indoor Pets welcome *Onsite Laundry Facilities

CROFTON-BRIGHT and Spacious duplex. 3bed/2bath 6 appliances. $900/month. Contact Rick 250-246-1859 Duncan: 2 bdrm + den, 2 bath, $995/m. Ref. req. Avail immed. Call evenings 250748-2818

_____________________

Call (250) 710-7515 to view

HOMES FOR RENT

1 (250)748-9090

MEADES CREEK- 2 bdrm suite, large yard, prkg, on bus route, pets ok, laundry. $560. Call (250)210-0756.

Duncan Duplex, 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 5 appl., fenced yrd w/shed, near McAdam Park. N/S, ref’s req. Small pet considered. $925/m + utilities. Avail. Apr 1. (250) 746-6007

ROWAN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LTD. (Agent for the Owner) Office: 250-748-9090 rowanproperty@shaw.ca

¾ 7-7744 Mays Rd, Duncan $575 2 BR apartment w/2 apps, basic cable incl. ¾ 10122 Victoria Rd, Chemainus $795 2 BR sxs duplex w/4 apps,fenced backyard ¾ 207-1715 Pritchard Rd, Cow Bay $795 1 BR 2nd floor condo w/ 2 apps,laundry fac. ¾ 106-360 Bundock Ave, Duncan $850 1 BR + den executive suite w/ 5 apps,patio *SENIOR FRIENDLY BUILDING (55+)* ¾ 3088 Henry Rd, Chemainus $895 3 BR 2 bth lower suite w/ 5 apps, hw floors ¾ 31-941 Malone Rd, Ladysmith $900 3 BR 2.5 bth townhouse w/ 5 apps, carport ¾ 3041 Henry Rd, Chemainus $1000 3 BR home w/ 4 apps, 2 car garage ¾ 2908 Jonas Way, Chemainus $1000 3 BR 2.5 bth sxs duplex w/ 5 apps, garage ¾ 720 Park Pl, Duncan $1095 2 BR upper level home w/ 5 apps, carport ¾ 5799 Chesterfield Ave, Duncan $1195 3 BR 2 bth home w/ 4 apps, garage ¾ 1822 Deborah Drive, Duncan $1195 3 BR 1.5 bth home w/ 4 apps, workshop ¾ 1808 Stamps Rd, Duncan $1200 2BR 2bth cottage on country estate,5 apps ¾ 1620 Wilmot Ave, Shawnigan Lk $1400 3 BR 2 bth home w/5apps,shed,dbl garage ¾ 1737 Ordano Rd, Cow Bay$1500 + water 3 BR 2.5 bth home w/ 6 apps, $750 rebate ¾ 2428 Liggett Rd, Mill Bay $1600 + water 3 BR 4 bth home w/ 7 apps, in-law suite For further info please visit our website at: www.rowanproperty.ca

DUNCAN 2 bdrm duplex, near hospital, new flooring & paint, $900 mo incls utils. Avail April 1st. Call 778-422-0078.

IN TOWN, 2 bdrm duplex, F&S, hydro included $990/mo. No pets. Avail Apr 1. 250-701-1937.

LAKE COWICHAN reno’d 2 bdrm, S/S duplex, F/S, quiet rural setting, N/S, N/P, $650 + util’s. 250-749-4061 LAKE COWICHAN- spacious 2 bdrm, F/S, F/P, nice yard, carport, laundry. $825/mo. 250-748-4253, 250-715-5810.

PARKLAND PLACE 620 Dobson Road 250-748-0496 FREE Heat, hotwater & parking. Low hydro. Walking distance to: Shopping, Restaurants, Malaspina College, Pubs, Chances Casino. Quiet building with video security. Adjacent to 27 acres of parkland including playing fields, walking trails, swimming holes & fishing. Rowan Property Management Ltd. Has a large selection of homes & apartments for rent in the Cowichan Valley. Visit us at www.rowanproperty.ca or call (250)748-9090

BUYING - RENTING- SELLING www.bcclassified.com

MOBILE HOMES & PADS 4 BDRM MOBILE Home at 22-2055 Koksilah Rd. $975.+ utils. (Avail Immed). Call Mel 250-597-0617 talltimbermhp@live.com COWICHAN BAY, #31-2055 Koksilah Rd, Tall Tim MHP. 2 bdrm suite, ensuite W/D, 2 small pets ok on approval. $730 mo + utils. 250-597-0617 SHAWNIGAN LAKE: Avail immed, on private property, 2 bdrm, F/S, D/W, W/D hook-up, large deck. Pets negotiable, ref’s req’d, $950 mo. Call (250)743-9897.

HOMES FOR RENT 1-BDRM HOME, large yard. $800. inclds heat/hydro. Close to mall. (250)732-1042. 2-BDRM HOME, large yard. $1100. inclds heat/hydro. Close to mall. (250)732-1042. COBBLE HILL, cute 2bdrm home, new carpets, 4appls, fenced 1/4 acre, ns, Apr.1 Refs. $975. 250-743-7817. COBBLE HILL, quiet country living, upgraded 3 bdrms, 5 appls, N/S, pets neg, $1600 mo hydro incl’d. Avail immed. Call 250-743-3863.

DUNCAN, 2 bdrm mobile home on country acreage, 6 kms west of Duncan on bus route, F/S, W/D hookup, small pet ok, refs req’d, $750 mo. Avail April 1. 250-748-9258. DUNCAN, 3 bdrm, 2 bath. Beautiful home, NICE neighbourhood close to town, schools & hospital. Newly reno’d, natural gas, W/D, F/S, D/W, lrg private yard & deck. $1275 mo + utils. Apr. 1. N/S, N/P. Refs. Call 250-883-8100. DUNCAN 4-BDRM, new renovation, 1600 sq ft, bright, lrg yard, sxs duplex near hospital, schools. N/S. $1200.+ utils. Call 250-710-9769. DUNCAN, Available now. Smaller home for rent, W/D, F/S, woodstove, in ceiling speakers, nicely finished, private, close to the new university. N/S, Incl’s internet & cable. $800/mo 250-748-9679 DUNCAN, LARGE 2 story, 4 bdrm, 3 baths, family home w/ large living & rec room, plus den, formal dining room, 5 appls, private setting on acreage, close to town on Maple Bay Rd., Ref’s. Avail immed, $1400, (250)746-7935 DUNCAN, large bright 2 bdrm view home close to all amenities, woodstove/elec, W/D, F/S, No/S, No dogs, cat ok. Internet & cable incl. April 1st. $1200. (250)748-9679 DUNCAN- LOG house on shared acreage, 2 bdrm loft, F/S, W/D, woodstove, N/S, horse boarding facilities negotiable, ref’s. Avail April. 1, $1400 mo. Call 250-510-6726. DUNCAN, NEAR hospital, on bus route. 14 X 70, 2 bdrm mobile home in quiet adult park, pets OK. $850 mo. Call (250)246-8318. LK COWICHAN on Sunset Drive, 3 bdrm, 2 bath house w/ patio. Lake glimpses, steps to beach & use of dock. 1/2 acre lot w/garden. Outside pet ok. Avail. Apr. 1. $950/m. Rent-toown option. Ruth 1-250-8127578 N. COWICHAN, heritage home, 2nd home on 11 acres, 4 horses, 2000 sq ft, 4 bdrms, 2 baths, kitchen appls, close to schools, hospital, shopping, lease, $1500 mo, avail June. 1, call 250-748-6768. Rowan Property Management Ltd. Has a large selection of homes & apartments for rent in the Cowichan Valley. Visit us at www.rowanproperty.ca or call (250)748-9090 SHARING PARK like setting, 1.7 acres in Cobble Hill. 3 bdrm, 2 bath house. Lrg dbl garage, wood insert. $1350+ utils. Call (250)598-0624 or (250)-701-8776. SHAWNIGAN- 3 bdrms, 2 bath home on large lot, new reno, hardwood tile floors. $1400+ utils. (250)886-1953. SKUTZ FALLS: 3 bdrm rancher, on shared property, reno’d. $800 mo. (250)749-3188.

OFFICE/RETAIL COBBLE HILL Village, 1400 sq ft., reception area, kitchen, landscaped. $1,295. (incl’s hst). Call Phil (250)743-1450 DOWNTOWN DUNCAN 2500 sq.ft. 6 separate offices, reception, conference area & kitchen, 2nd floor, AC,. $1175/mo. 250-715-6880. DUNCAN, downtown 950 sq.ft. ground floor, completely reno’d, office, retail, or consulting. Reception area, 3 offices. Avail now. 604-820-8929

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SUITES, LOWER 650 SQ FT, one bdr, above ground bsmt suite in Mill Bay; in-suite laundry, utilities incl. Walking dist to bus stop. No pets; no smoking. $750/ month. 250-748-6067. BACHELOR SUITE in house on acreage, 15 mins west of Duncan. N/S, quiet. No pets. $475 inclusive. (250)749-3854 BRIGHT NEW 1 bdrm level entry, great location, 5 min to downtown Duncan. Incl’s F/S, and hydro, shared W/D. NS, NP, No partiers, Avail immed. $800/mo. 250-746-5404. DUNCAN- 2 bdrm, priv ent, grd level, small yard, close to amenities. Laundry available. $795+ utils. NS/NP, no parties. Call 250-701-3213. DUNCAN. 2-BDRM, private entrance, close to shopping, schools. 482 Chesterfield. $595./mo. Text me at (250)896-4248. DUNCAN, BRIGHT, scenic Bachelor, sep ent, grd level, N/S, N/P, incls utilities, avail immed, $700, 250-748-5015. DUNCAN: NEAR new 2 bdrm, F/S, W/D, D/W, outside smoking, responsible & quiet, near bus route, schools, shopping. Avail Now. $750/mo + 1/3 hydro. N/P. Refs req. (250)5974027 or (250)510-2105. DUNCAN, QUAINT, country, 1 bdrm, 500 sq ft, like new, laundry avail, $625, 250-510-3333 or 250-597-1092. LADYSMITH- (walk to town) new bright 1 bdrm, Priv. entr. NS/NP. Quiet, mature tenant(s). Utils incld. Parking small car. On bus route. Avail immed. $750. (250)245-4025. MILL BAY, 1/2 block from Thrifty’s, 1 bdrm, level entry, F/S & W/D, $800/m incl’s basic cable & hydro, Avail Apr 1st. 250-743-9828, 250-710-0653 MILL BAY: bright, spacious, grd level, sep. entry, 1 bdrm, F/S, shrd W/D. N/S, N/P. $700 incl utils. (250)710-2876. Modern 1 bdrm, private garden entry, safe, quiet location. Insuite laundry, F/S, small pet ok, best for 1 person. $800/m incl. utilities. (250) 746-0837 email: eveart@telus.net NEW 1 bdrm, near hospital, furnished or not. 4 pc bath, private entrance, incl’s utilities with high-speed internet and cable. $650/mo. NS, NP, no Drugs. (250) 597-7843 SHAWNIGAN/COBBLE Hill. Lrg 1 bdrm + den, lrg bathtub, all utils incl’d but phone & W/D, $750 mo. Avail immed. Call (250)514-2024.

SUITES, UPPER CHEMAINUS, LARGE 1-Bdrm upper. 5 Appl’s, Partial Ocean view. $900/mo N/P, Ref’s. Call (778)227-2704. DUNCAN- 3 bdrms, spotless executive home in prestigious neighbourhood, spectacular views, fully self-contained, sep entrance. NS/NP. Avail now. $1400 incl util. 250-748-0668. DUNCAN, as new 1 bdrm, private ent, on acreage Stamps Rd. F/S, W/D, heat, hydro, cable, A/C incl. Suit one single mature person. N/S, no parties. Cat ok. $675. 250-7465228 or 250-710-6391

DUNCAN: BACHELOR. Top floor, near town, small bldg, all utils incl’d, refs req’d. NS/NP. $465. 250-597-3756. DUNCAN, BRIGHT 2 bdrm, 900 sq ft, upper suite w/ private entrance, f/s, d/w, w/d, large deck in country setting, refs req, N/S, N/P, $1080 mo incls hydro. Avail immed. Call 250-715-7412. DUNCAN: 3 bdrm on Sherman Rd. Inclds appls, big back yard, $1100/mo. NP/NS. Available Apr. 1st. Call (250)510-5526.

TOWNHOUSES DUNCAN 2 & 3 bdrm townhouse. Large yard, parking. F/S, W/D hook-up. (Immed). $900 & $1100. 250-516-8881.

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A28 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

Great season by Cowichan U13 Gold boys produces league title

Got a sports story? email sports@cowichannewsleader.com phone 250-746-4471

THE SCORE

Cowichan Valley Soccer Association’s Under 13 Gold boys’ team is basking in the glory of being league champions in the division. The team had a superb season in the Lower Island Soccer Association, winning 11 times and

tying once in 18 games played. “This was really a team achievement and every player contributed to our success,’’ noted coach Ted Zinkan. “We had a strong defence, fast midfielders, talented forwards and strikers and an excellent ‘keeper.’’

As Lower Island champions, Cowichan now proceeds directly to the Island Invitational Cup against the Upper Island league winners May 12-13 in Nanaimo. The team also has the opportunity to advance to the U14 Island Premier League next season.

Stoochnoff runs yield four Cowichan tries High school rugby: Reynolds can’t slow down scoring surge while everyone contributes against inexperienced Isfeld

The Cowichan Swifts did indeed live up to their name by playing a fast-paced game Saturday at the Cowichan Sportsplex. Right, Kim Smith plays the role of tackler against her Lynx 2 opponent, backed up by Maddie Smith and Casey Crowley. Below, Tamara Gregus tip-toes down the sideline to keep the ball in play despite the presence of heavy pressure. The Swifts won the game by default when the Lynx used too many Div. 1 players.

Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

C

Don Bodger

Victory comes at a cost for the Lynx Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

E

ven when the Div. 2 Cowichan Swifts lost, they won. The Cowichan Ladies’ Field Hockey Association team was beaten 4-1 by the Victoria Lynx Div. 2 in an Island Ladies’ Field Hockey Association game Saturday at the Cowichan Sportsplex. But the Lynx used one more than the allowable number of three Div. 1 players and Cowichan wound up winning by default. The Swifts didn’t ¿nd out they’d won on a forfeit until later. Standout Cowichan defender Chelsey Cleemoff found out what it was like playing goal. The team’s regular goalie was away and the replacement had to leave to play for the other Cowichan Div. 2 team, the Cardinals, in Victoria so she went in for the second half.

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owichan Thunderbirds boys’ rugby is off to a Àying start. Following joint training sessions with Ladysmith and Brentwood College during the Joe McGeachy memorial tournament, the team ventured to Velox for a game against Reynolds of Victoria last Monday. Tyson Stoochnoff broke loose for four tries and kicked a convert, as Cowichan prevailed 27-17. Brandon Kirton added the other try. A rain-drenched ¿eld didn’t allow either team to play stellar rugby. Reynolds scored ¿rst, but Cowichan came back for a 15-5 halftime lead. Reynolds evened the score in the second half and then the teams exchanged unconverted tries. Stoochnoff took over from there with two impressive runs for tries off set piece plays. Kieran Lauridsen was a defensive standout. Thursday action had Cowichan hosting Mark Isfeld of Courtenay at the Cowichan Rugby Club and running away with a 36-5 victory. Scoring was spread around, with two tries and a convert from Drew McCarthy, and single submitted tries by Wyatt MacWatt, Bringing down Cam Blair-Speirs is a tough task for an inexperienced Cam Blair-Speirs, Mike Mark Isfeld team in last Thursday’s high school boys’ rugby game.

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Saline and Noah Dobson. Pat Large and Gregor Grantham each had single conversions. Mark Isfeld is a relatively inexperienced team, but played extremely physical and was full value for being in a 5-5 tie at halftime. Cowichan brought out the fresh legs while Isfeld had to rely on the same 15 players. Direct hard running by Blair-Speirs and Dobson paid dividends for Cowichan. That created other gaps in the Isfeld defence exploited by the Cowichan backs. Large was sensational on defence and orchestrated the attack masterfully. Next game for the Thunderbirds is at Ladysmith March 27 after the spring break.

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A29

Raiders help coach at Duncan football camp Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

Nine players from the Vancouver Island Raiders served as guest

coaches for the Cowichan Valley Football Association’s spring camp. Cowichan product Elliot Jones was among those leading the kids through the drills.

C

apsule

Peanuts are a healthy snack. They are nutritionally sound, containing vitamin B and E, minerals, protein, fibre and the amino acid, arginine, which is touted to be beneficial to blood pressure. Peanuts are legumes, a member of the pea family not the nut family. One to two ounces per day is a good dose of peanuts. Seniors go to hospital emergency departments for various reasons. Often it is due to an adverse drug reaction. Two classes of drugs that cause almost two-thirds of these visits are anticoagulants (“blood thinners”) and diabetic medications including insulin. The reason is that constant testing needs to be done to ensure proper dosing. Our pharmacists can help you understand the importance of testing.

Andrew Leong

Stop sign is put out by Mike Thorne of Cowichan Eagles No. 2 during Cowichan Indoor Soccer League action Friday night at the Si’em Lelum gym. Curtis Williams of Songhees Falcons and his teammates were unimpressed and romped to a 21-2 victory. Playoffs for the eight teams in the league take place March 31.

There is no health advantage to being an early riser. The important thing is to get enough sleep. If you don’t get enough sleep, your reaction times mentally and physically can be impaired and your immune system

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Young Bulldogs learned skills needed for the game from veteran junior players. The regular season starts for Cowichan teams on March 31.

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A30 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

Piggies calm in storm

Merriam rink tops

Weather men: Conditions change by the minute, but Cowichan Thirds forge ahead to claim a victory over Castaways

Don Bodger

Don Bodger

A Kerry Park team landed the combined 70+ seniors-masters provincial curling championship shields at Kimberley. Skip Cliff Merriam, third Ray Blackwell, second Jim Bowdige and lead John Hollands, with ¿fth Tom Craig, became the ¿rst island team to win the combined championship after posting a record of ¿ve wins, a loss and a tie. Duncan’s Paul Kondal, Garry Franklyn, Ken Percival, Bruce Ovans and Ray Holman had a record of 3-3-1 in 60+.

T

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News Leader Pictorial

News Leader Pictorial

Don Bodger

It’s a whole bunch against one, as Cowichan’s Bruce Moss leads the tackling on Gord Kehoe of the Castaways, who formerly played for Cowichan, during a Div. 3 men’s rugby game Sunday. Joining Moss in the pursuit of Kehoe from left are: Owen Wood, Iain Cox and Chris Sutherland.

hrough sunshine, a strong, cold wind and even snow, the Cowichan Rugby Club’s Third XV Piggies prevailed. Weather conditions were indeed all over the map, as the Cowichan Thirds recovered from a loss to Velox the previous weekend to defeat the Castaways Wanderers 24-17 Sunday at the Herd Road Grounds. Castaways brought a mix of youth and castoffs of experience and scored at will in the early stages for a 17-5 lead. With the wind at their backs in the second half, the local lads came on strong. Tries were scored by converted hockey player Trevor Gicas, Jarrod Arnasson,

Bruce Moss and speed demon Mike Fransen. Owen Wood slotted two dif¿cult conversions. Lewkas Quast and Mike Flanders exhibited solid tackling and commitment throughout the game. The team heads to Powell River this weekend for its ¿nal road match of the season. Both the Cowichan Div. 1 men and women had weekend byes. There’s a doubleheader at the Cowichan Rugby Club Saturday, with overlapping games. The Cowichan women get things started in Big Kahuna Div. 1 against Kelowna at 1 p.m. The Div. 1 men take on Bayside on the adjacent ¿eld at the Herd Road Grounds, beginning at 1:45.

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial A31

Got a sports story? email sports@cowichannewsleader.com phone 250-746-4471

ATHLETICS

Vegas event not a gamble Heating up: There’s no better way for Duncan fastpitch girls to prepare Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

D

uncan Red Hots warmed up for the switch to Midget A girls’ fastpitch this season with a tournament in Las Vegas. Twenty-two teams were registered in the Under 18 Gold draw and the Red Hots played against some tough competition. They lost all ¿ve of their games but gained valuable experience. “There were three games that we had opportunities to win,’’ noted coach Brian Bull. “We were at a bit of a disadvantage going down having not played any games against teams who have been playing since September but I believe we did well. “Our pitchers did well. They got to face really good batting and can now see the adjustments they will have to make. Our batting showed promise. Some hit better than others and we have to make some adjustments defensively playing at the speed of the game down there.’’ Six other Canadian teams that competed there were in the same boat. “It will make us all better in the end,’’ reasoned Bull. “As I said to the kids, ‘if we were not down there playing, we would still be in the gym. This was a far better experience and we learned a lot as players and coaches.’’’ The ¿rst game at the four-¿eld Lorenzi Park complex was against the Southern California Magic, a team that placed third in the state last year. Southern Cal, with 25 games under its belt already, won 12-0. It didn’t get any easier for the Red Hots in their second game of the day against the Las Vegas Bulldogs, one of the top teams in Nevada. The Red Hots started out great by scoring six runs, but the Bulldogs stormed back with nine. On a large ¿eld and with the ground so hard, the ball got between the ¿elders and rolled to the fences many times, according to Bull. The game went six innings and the Bulldogs prevailed 22-11. Megan Sakuma hit a home run and a double. Darrian Gerard went two-for-two with a double and a single in

Wrestling camp teaches technique, skill development The Cowichan Valley Wrestling Club and its national athletes will be hosting a spring break wrestling camp for boys and girls in Grades 4 to 12. No previous experience is necessary.

The camp takes place Monday, March 19 and Tuesday, March 20 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day at Queen of Angels School. The cost is $45 per child and wrestlers need to bring a lunch each day.

Participants are required to bring registration forms, shorts, T-shirt, wrestling boots or indoor shoes and a water bottle. To register, contact Nick Zuback at nzuback@ hotmail.com.

Hawks in Änal for Ärst time Mill Bay rec hockey: Big line holds the key to team’s success Don Bodger

News Leader Pictorial

H

awks and Titans are into the Mill Bay Rec Hockey League’s playoff ¿nal. submitted The best-of-¿ve series began Duncan Red Hots enjoy their moments in the Las Vegas heat, taking on some tough Under 18 girls’ fastpitch teams from south of the Wednesday night at Kerry border. Below, Ärst baseman Katie Lawless makes a snag. Park Arena, with game two on Sunday. The third game is a game that wasn’t exactly a defensive struggle. next Wednesday and could be Back at it for a third game in the same day, the Red ¿nished then if there’s a sweep Hots took on the Spokane Diamonds. for either team. “This was the best pitcher we faced all weekend,’’ If not, it continues the follownoted Bull. ing Sunday and again WednesSpokane scored one in the ¿rst inning and added day, if necessary. another in the third. Allie Pellizzaro pitched a great “It’s the ¿rst time the Hawks game for the Red Hots with seven strikeouts in four have been in the championship innings but her teammates couldn’t generate anything series,’’ said league president Al offensively and a couple of mistakes proved costly in a Johnson. 2-0 defeat. The Hawks went to ¿ve The fourth game the next morning was against OC games to beat the Bruins in the Elite from California at the West Flamingo ¿elds. semi¿nals. They made a huge “The ball park was a sharp contrast from where we comeback after dropping the had played the previous day — again, open fences but ¿rst two games. this time with trees and a skateboard park which were The Titans beat the Buccain play in the out¿eld,’’ Bull indicated. neers in four games in the other The game went four innings and the Red Hots put up. Pellizzaro hit a sharp ball towards second and the semi¿nal. their share of runners on base, but the OC bats were too Crush received a break while trying to turn the double The Hawks and Bruins had a hot in a 15-2 victory. play, as the shortstop never touched the bag, according great battle in game ¿ve of their The ¿fth game started immediately afterward against to Bull, but was given the out. series, going to overtime. G.V. Crush of Colorado, a big team of only nine playKatie Lawless then hit a line shot at the pitcher for Eric Philp scored the winner at ers. the second out, Morgan Rogers walked and Jolene Bull 6:41 of overtime. He was in on The Crush went up four in the ¿rst. The Red Hots ripped another shot at the pitcher that spun her around all four goals in the 4-3 Hawks’ came back in the third with a three-run homer by but she recovered in time to make the ¿nal out in a 7-3 triumph with three goals and an Sakuma, only to be countered in the fourth with three Crush triumph. assist. from the Crush. The girls also enjoyed some head-turning moments Linemate Tanner Wiersma, the The Red Hots put Carrysa Kinnear on ¿rst with none during their free time with such things as a spin on the league’s leading scorer during out in their last at-bat and the top of the order coming roller coaster at New York, New York. the regular season, tallied a goal and two assists. The Hawks took a 2-0 lead on a shorthanded marker by Philp, only to have the Bruins cut the margin to one again on the same power play. Bruins’ Tyler Branzsen tied it early in the ¿nal period and they went ahead a minute and a half later on a goal by John Dewar. But Wiersma scored with 3:39 left to send the game into overtime and set the stage for Philp’s heroics. In game four, the Hawks won 4-2 with an empty-netter. All the goals came from the line of Wiersma, Blair Wallace and Philp. The Titans won game four of their series against the Bucs 3-2 Andrew Leong despite a pair of goals in vain Making a break for it, Duncan Stingrays’ Malia Prystupa, above, Sydney Rhoades, right, and Laura from former Cowichan Valley Kissack, far right, all swim in the 200-metre I.M. in their respective age groups during the Stingrays’ Capitals’ sniper Jordan Grant. Spring Break Invitational meet at the Cowichan Aquatic Centre.


A32 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial

Friday, March 16, 2012

Y X A GAL S R O T O M 0424

N A C DUN

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EVERY ERY RY DAY

2011 Mitsubishi Outlander err 2009 Dodge Journey "   7Very seater, 4x4, loaded!  Nice! Loaded! Stk. T13477 Was $19,995 Stk. 13182 Was $27,995

7 passenger 4x4. Super per clean. Great deal! Stk. 13022A1 Was $7,995

$

sale

4,980

2005$ 6*: Ford 6*: Mustang $(< A5  C-4E

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2010 GMC Savanna anna 3/4 to ton tonne onne 2500 Series

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22,8002010 Toyota Matrix

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2008 Dodge Nitro 7 passenger, loaded, Low kms, loaded, sale sale low kms call today. Stk. 13477AWasWas $11,995 $$ Stk 13361. $20,995

9,800 18,888

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16,888 224,888 4,88 ,888 88 18,888

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sale

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1999 Ford Expedition Exped on

sale sale ssale ale 25,888 sale sale $$18,888 24,800 $24,800 24,800

4X4 4X4 4X4 4X4

Don Reed Duncan Sales

Dusan Zoric Duncan Sales

  

sale

14,888 Peter Jost $

Duncan Sales

John Barger Jason Moody ==AB;57A=C6>;?;B;@?877@8 ?6F7  Duncan Sales

Duncan Sales

250-597-0424 $ &4 ( 

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ALL YOUR PLUMBING NEEDS UNDER ONE ROOF 2 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


good life

A guide to your best years in Cowichan

inside

Welcome to the Good Life — your local guide to the second half of living. You are the Baby Boomers of the Warm Land. Your kids are gone, or at least are in the process of leaving the nest. Your goals have shifted, or are shifting. Your body doesn’t necessarily work the way it once did. And life has served up a whole new set of challenges and opportunities. These stories are for you.

a place for the elders

a home for helping each other

p4

selling the family home it doesn’t have to be hard

p8

See page 33 for your Seniors Resource Directory

who’s the Bossi? soccer keeps him young

p10

the 65-year-old question old-age security changes cause concern

p13

helping your elderly hoarder how to recognize it — and deal with it

p16

it’s the dirt that matters

helping your elderly hoarder

p16

ten things you didn’t know about valley wine p20

boning up on bone health osteoporosis and CDH

p26

never to old to sing music festival’s not just for the kids

p28

p36

tattoo you boomers are getting inked

a voice for the aging

p30

seniors resource directory cowichan seniors community foundation

p33

a voice for the aging MP jean crowder speaks out for seniors

p36

you’ve got to taste this don bodger stirs it up

p38

on a brighter note with lori welbourne Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Produced by: The Cowichan News Leader Pictorial Editor: John McKinley Publisher: Bill Macadam Designer: Eric Morten

p39

Published by the Cowichan News Leader Pictorial, Unit 2, 5380 Trans Canada Highway, Duncan B.C., V9L 6W4 Phone: (250) 746-4471 Fax: (250) 746-8529 E-mail: editor@cowichannewsleader.com Web site: www.cowichannewsleader.com

Spring 2012 Wednesday, March 16, 2012

Cowichan Good Life Magazine 3


Cowichan elder and former chief Philomena Alphonse has applied to be one of the first residents of the new Ts’i’ts’iwatul’ Lelum assisted living residence now under construction at the former Mound site adjacent downtown Duncan.

A Home for Helping Each Other sprouts at the site of the old Mound

A place for the

Elders

by Ann Andersen They’ll be in brand-new apartments on their own land in a supported new life close to friends and family; with plenty of cultural supports. These are some of the benefits the first 50 to 60 residents can look forward to later this year when they step over the threshold of Ts’i’ts’iwatul’ Lelum assisted living residence now under construction on the old Mound. “It’s been seven years since we set the vision,” says elder Philomena Alphonse, who has applied to be one of the first residents. “I was still on (Tribes) council then,” adds the 77-year-old former Cowichan chief and councillor. 4 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

“We always wanted to build something like this — a common place for people who need help.” And elder liaison to the project Stella Johnny is enthusiastic. “This is quite the venture for the elders,” she smiles. Some of the people who’ll be moving into the new four-storey assisted living residence now live alone; some with children; others with children and grandchildren. Alphonse, for example, currently lives with her son Paul and his wife. She doesn’t drive any more and recognizes that living at the more central Ts’i’ts’iwatul’ Lelum will offer more independence for her. “Living here will make a big difference in all their lives,” Johnny says. “This means empowerment for them. They will be in their own place with daily living and cultural supports in

place,” she enthuses. “The residents will have independence with supports as they age.” And with a Cowichan Tribes manager and Aboriginal cook already hired, both Alphonse and Johnny are optimistic the cultural goals of the building will be met. “This demonstrates recognition of a strong value in our culture,” smiles Johnny. The 52,000-square-foot building across from Cowichan Tribes office is currently scheduled to be open for elders and people with disability on July 1, says M’akola Housing Society executive director Kevin Albers. Ts’i’ts’iwatul’ Lelum (prounounced Ts-ee-tsu-wa-tul Lay-lum, Hul’qumi’num for Home for Helping Each Other), has been years in the planning and several years in the building. And, confirms Albers, building of the mammoth project is coming in on its original budget of $15 million. “Everything we wanted in the building and in services provided to the residents is there,” he said. story continued on page 6 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


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Cowichan Good Life Magazine 5


continued from page 4 “We haven’t had to cut anything.” This is a unique project for B.C. — funded by provincial dollars and on First Nations land. It will be operated on a day-to-day basis by VIHA. During construction, the building has been pegged as a resource for the whole community. Says Alphonse, who with elder Dora Wilson has taken a key part in discussion with M’akola on the structural aspects of the buildings: “We continue to recommend that the residence be open to relatives of (Tribe) members no matter where they live, as well as the whole community.” The first residents will all be Aboriginal, says Johnny. VIHA will decide who goes in. In terms of health, the assistedliving residence will provide residents with light-housekeeping and meals. This is different from other care homes, like complex-care or residential care, Albers explains. People living in those residences require more help and care. The first thing residents and visitors will see when they enter the building is a towering totem pole carved by Cowichan carver and elder Harold Joe (see sidebar) that tells a story that is uniquely Cowichan: the story of the thunderbird and the killer whale. Once inside, the residents can retire to their fully-equipped suites — 46 one-bedroom and four two-bedroom — or take in the two dining rooms,

6 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

craft room, exercise room and theatre room lounge. Outside will be a traditional gathering area. “We asked that the inside colours be pastel,” Alphonse explains, “and that the landscaping reflect our culture.” The private, lockable self-contained suits each have a full bathroom with shower; kitchen and fridge and stove; cable and telephone hookups. Each floor has its own laundry, and is accessible by two elevators. Included in their rent, residents will be entitled to two meals per day and a recreation program. They can enjoy assisted bathing, and towels and sheets will be changed weekly. Basic utilities–heat, hot water, garbage and recycling are also included. They’ll also get any personal care services approved by VIHA. As well, every resident will have a medical alert pendant operational in and around the vicinity of the 52,000-square-foot building. The vision for Ts’i’ts’iwatul’ Lelum is straightforward and supportive: the supports we need as we age will extend our independence in a healthy and safe way. “Ts’i’ts’uwatul’ Lelum is designed with these life changes and corresponding supports in mind,” says the website. “The project will provide culturally responsible supports to elders with on-site professionals and Aboriginal culturally trained qualified staff to provide many services and personal care supports.”

Complex is home to a pole with a story The 40-foot totem pole now in place in the foyer of the building tells the story of a story. The pole’s carver Harold Joe explains that in the story, told to Joe by his father, a huge killer whale in Cowichan Bay was stopping salmon from entering the river to spawn and preventing the community from harvesting salmon for the winter feed. After warning the killer whale about its actions, a medicine man was transformed by the Creator into a massive thunderbird. He looked into the water and saw feathered horns on the side of his head. When he opened his eyes it symbolized lightning, and when he opened his mouth it symbolized thunder. Thunderbird then scooped up the killer whale and dropped it on top of a frog — Mount Tzouhalem. Joe explains that the top of the totem symbolizes guidance to the Spirit World after we finish our walk on Mother Earth; the middle figure of any totem symbolizes heart; and the bottom of the totem symbolizes grounding. “We learn to be our self, respect other Elder voices to your heart and mind. Because the voice is the Spirit from the Soul when you lose someone special you lose part of your Soul too. That’s why the Elder voices are special to keep you grounded and be with loved ones,” Joe explains.

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


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saying goodbye to the family home It can be one of the hardest times in your life — but it doesn’t have to be But that doesn’t have to be the case, Hunt said. “There are wonderful housing options out there, where a senior can actually be far more independent because they Home is where the heart is, we often hear. But when you’ve lived in a house for years — decades, even have more support systems,” she explained. — it begins to feel like home is where you’ve raised your “There are excellent options and supports that many 80children, where countless memories have been made. In and 90-year-olds aren’t even aware of. We need to look at these things at a time when we can be intelligent and emshort: where your life is irrevocably rooted. So when the time comes to leave, it’s not surprising that few pathetic toward a senior’s fear. “It’s about education, and exploring, and helping seniors accept the change gladly. understand they’re not necessarily going “It is, without a doubt, one of the biggest to lose their independence — and in fact, challenges that faces any family, because It is, without a doubt, one of it can be greatly enhanced.” there’s huge resistance, and there isn’t an The alternative, Hunt points out, can be easy answer to when it’s time to move,” the biggest challenges that devastating. explained Carol Hunt, executive direcfaces any family, because “One of the issues we observe when our tor at the Cowichan Seniors Community there’s huge resistance, and senior or elder stays at home because Foundation. “And generally, what we know is that althere isn’t an easy answer to that’s what they know and they’re used to and they’re terrified of letting go and most without exception, people wait too when it’s time to move making a change — which is a legitimate long. Everyone wants to stay in their own fear, the fear of the unknown — is more home, and everyone thinks that’s where their independence is. They think if they go into another often than not, the senior is going to be extremely isolated and very lonely, because they don’t have a peer group, living environment, they’ll lose their independence.” by Krista Siefken

8 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


they’re not being socialized, and this is where dementia and depression raises its ugly head,” she said. Instead, Hunt suggested talking about options before they’re even necessary, rather than forcing someone into doing something they’re uncomfortable with when choice is no longer an option. “What we’re saying is plan ahead,” Hunt said. “Talk about it. Discuss options. Our lives move so fast these days, and there are wait-lists for residences and the other excellent options and supports that are out there.” Seniors still living in the old family home may not even realize how isolation and loneliness have crept into their lives, Hunt added. “They may discover that it’s actually pretty cool having friends around, and not having to worry about what could happen in the night if there’s a problem,” she said. “(Leaving the family home) is traumatic. There’s a lot of fear and a lot of worry about it,” Hunt summed. “So we need to talk about it early on.”

To move or not to move?

According to the Senior Living Magazine guide To Move Or Not To Move?, seniors and families should “begin the process of determining what type of housing and care you require by seriously thinking about your personal situation.” — considering housing, care and financial requirements.

Options, meanwhile, include remaining in your own home (perhaps with care), accessory housing, senior-oriented apartments, retirement communities, independent living facilities, assisted living facilities, complex care facilities, campus of care facilities, shared housing by seniors, shared housing in exchange for rent or services, shared housing offered by home owners, and co-habiting with a family member.

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Who’s the

Bossi? Valley man finds soccer is a great remedy for the pangs of aging by Don Bodger Max Bossi’s attitude about aging and the affects of athletics is admirable. Bossi said he’s never felt better in his life at the age of 67, shattering the myths that we’re all supposed to be going downhill at a certain point. “I suffered 20 years from heavy back pain,’’ he said. “There wasn’t really anything that fixed it because you had to keep working. I loved to work. The alternative would be to be hurting and

depressed at the same time because you couldn’t work.’’ Bossi discovered soccer and a positive attitude pulled him through difficult situations. “I’m not unique,’’ he said. “This is the capability of many people who say, ‘no, I won’t accept being down and out.’’’ Bossi only took up soccer seven years ago, but has been going full steam ahead ever since. There are opportunities for him to play several times a

week indoors and outdoors — depending on the season — and he takes full advantage. Bossi went to the B.C. Seniors Games in Richmond in 2009 and Castlegar in 2010 with a Victoria group. Even though it took a long time to put his soccer skills into practice, it’s always been a passion. Bossi grew up in Switzerland and his mother came from Italian descent. story continued on page 12

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continued from page 10 He spent more than 20 years in Manitoba before coming to the valley in 1991. At age 60, “I had bought a pair of soccer shoes at Sports Traders,’’ Bossi said. “Two years they sat in the cupboard.’’ He finally pulled them out and got going. “I never looked back,’’ Bossi said. “For health and quality of life, it’s hard to beat.’’ He went to Lacey, Washington last year with the Vancouver Island Golden Eagles 65-plus team that included Terry Whitney and Tommy Johansen from Cowichan for an international tournament. The rest of the players were from Campbell River, Nanaimo and Victoria and the team won the championship. The schedule consisted of five 90-minute games in five days and the Golden Oldies beat teams from Tokyo, Japan as well as Seattle, California and Oregon. A 4-1 victory over the Japanese team left a lasting impression on Bossi. “When you think about it and put it into perspective, they’ve got 75 million people,’’ he said. “They looked formidable. “I was going to turn back and go home. I’m sort of big; I’m 240 (pounds). There would be like three of them hanging from me like grapes.’’ The results of the U.S. National/International Cup in the 65 and older category not only landed Bossi and his teammates a gold medal but $25. “I am now a paid soccer player,’’ he joked. “We glory in the achievement of our young people and so we should,’’ Bossi added. “They dominate the media. “I think, however, that doing what we do at our age is not only precious but also inspiring to others.’’ Bossi plays in Ladysmith and Victoria, friendship games with the Cowichan Classics Over 50s and Masters Over 40s plus Juan de Fuca drop-in and Over 60s in Victoria. Training for a trip with a Cowichan group that left for Costa Rica on Feb. 25 was his latest goal. And the same international tournament, being held in Bellingham, Washington is on Bossi’s agenda with the 65-plus group this summer. Whenever Bossi reflects on some of his health concerns of the past, he’s glad it’s all behind him. “There are a lot of people that draw attention to their aches and pains,’’ he said. “Probably my reflexes are faster than they were in my 30s and 40s.’’ 12 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

Max Bossi gets his kicks from playing soccer with many different teams in many different situations and tournaments, including the 2011 B.C. Seniors Games in Castlegar and 2009 games in Richmond. photo: Don Bodger

get your kicks The B.C. Seniors Games is a great way for those 55 and older to work toward a goal in a chosen sport or activity. The 2012 edition of the games is being held in Burnaby from Aug. 21 to 25. Subsequent hosts are Kamloops for 2013 and Langley for 2014. There’s keen competition available in sports such as soccer, swimming, tennis and ice hockey but also activities such as cribbage, bridge, darts — even one-act plays — for those who aren’t as athletically inclined. Either way, it’s a great way to meet new people and have fun. Complete information is available at www.bcseniorsgames.org.

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


the 65-year-old question

65

Cowichan boomers and seniors voice support, concerns about potential pension eligibility changes by Ann Andersen

Old age security at 67 instead of 65? Cowichan’s reaction ranges from nonchalance to fear, and from acceptance to denial and even anger. Everyone has an opinion. Speculation and discussion the Conservative government will push back the qualifying age for OAS to 67 from 65 has locals talking. As people are living longer, it’s really stretching the (pension) system, says senior Catherine Leger who lives in Duncan’s Wedgwood House. “The money has to be spread among an increasing number of people.” Muriel Toombs, 89, thinks it would be unfair on younger people, as they compete for jobs with seniors who’ll be forced to work past Canada’s traditional retirement age of 65. “There’s so much debt among younger people now,” she muses. “They will probably have to work longer to pay their debts.” She, Leger and Wedgwood manager Linda Fonck all agree on one point: for the most part the generation now in their 70s and 80s didn’t buy items they didn’t have the money for and didn’t go into debt if they could avoid it. A recent Ipsos Reid survey for Sun Life Financial seems to agree that people will work longer: less than onethird of Canadians expect to be fully retired at 66. The survey also confirmed that some people believe they’ll have to work longer so they’ll be able to pay for basic living expenses and deal with their debts. “We will need the income whether we are still working part time or not,” Kate Schneider, 52, says of herself and husband Dean, the parents of three children aged 18, 14 and 11.

“We had children late in life, and it is very difficult to save when raising children and giving them opportunities for sport and education let alone good nutrition,” Schneider says. “People are living longer, but kids don’t leave home at 18 either. “I’m not sure that full retirement for me will ever be an option,” she says. “It feels as though yet another contract is being broken between the people of this nation and the government who continue to erode what was once an adequate social safety net.”

or “It’s a blip on the radar and the Conservatives are using it to frighten younger people into supporting it by saying it’s not sustainable.”

eliminated when a pensioner’s net income is $112,772 or above. Crowder has been quick to point out that decreasing income for seniors raises the spectre of increased poverty for some seniors and reduction in employment for boomers. “There’ll be a very significant increase in poverty for persons aged 65 to 67 unless they’re able to find an alternative source of income,” Crowder said in Ottawa’s House of Commons last month. “This is not an immediate problem and obviously not going to affect anyone for about 10 years,” said accountant Woody Hayes of Duncan’s Hayes Stewart Little & Co. In Crofton, Patsy Irving recalls that it wasn’t too long ago that people nearing senior age were asking for the mandatory retirement age to be moved to 67 or deleted altogether. “The people who are fast approaching OAS are of a generation that for the most part has enjoyed relative prosperity and long term employment and have therefore steadily contributed to OAS 30 to 40 years or more,” she said. “I have worked my life with the expectation that I would be able to claim OAS at 65,” says Mary-Lynne Weberg, 54. “The thought of delaying OAS to 67 fills me with fear and anger. “Before they play with OAS they need to make amendments to the MP pension plan. That would be fair.” Fifty-two year old Patty McNamara agrees and says the fact that people are living longer shouldn’t be used against them. “For people like me who won’t have other pensions to rely on, this move is life-altering. I can’t imagine getting to 65 in a workforce that doesn’t value older workers.” story continued on page 14

67?

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Says Rhoda Taylor, 56: “OAS is primarily a transfer of people from provincial payments to federal payments, from welfare or disability to OAS.” Raising the age qualification  would simply download payments — now made to people between the ages of 65 and 67 by the federal OAS — back to the provinces, says Nanaimo-Cowichan MP Jean Crowder. For every person on welfare or disability, the province would have to fork out another two years’ payment. Taylor has another solution: decrease the dollar eligibility level, but don’t change the starting age. She is talking about the clawback level for receiving OAS. Pensioners with an individual net income above $69,562 must repay all or part of the maximum OAS pension amount. The whole OAS pension is

Cowichan Good Life Magazine 13


continued from page 13 “The effects of this change on women who are married to older men are that we will have two fewer golden years together to enjoy the fruits of our labour and our grandkids.” McNamara says the “grey tsunami” is not going to go on forever. “It’s blip on the radar and the Conservatives are using it to frighten younger people into supporting it by saying it’s not sustainable.” Doyle Childs, 50, says he’s fine with the age being raised as people’s lifespans are longer. “If people are expecting to collect OAS for 20 years or more, the government needs to do something about it,” he said. “If we think of 60 being the new 50, people healthier than they used to be and lasting longer, it’s not inappropriate to extend the time before people become eligible for the old age security net,” says Hayes. According to Hayes, with the baby boomers now entering the arena,

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Canadians have to look at what’s affordable and what taxpayers can afford. “I don’t believe the change (of eligibility) from 65 to 67 is an attack on seniors. It’s a very narrow window,” he explained. “If people are in dire straits there will be a safety net for them.” Crowder meanwhile stressed that when you’re talking about income seniors receive, you’re talking about their health and well-being as well. “Therefore, that’s why it’s really important that we not delay income for seniors by two years, as the trial balloon that was floated by the Prime Minister would,” she said. Crowder told the House seniors who are just getting old age security and GIS are already living below the low-income cutoff. “If they start pushing those numbers up, what are those seniors between the ages of 65 and 67 going to do? These are seniors who qualify and many of them are at the low end,” she said.

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your piece of the pie... The Old Age Security pension is a monthly payment available to most Canadians aged 65 or older. You must apply to receive benefits. If you meet the eligibility requirements explained below, you may be entitled to receive OAS even if you are still working or have never worked. Eligibility is determined by three factors: your age, your legal status, and the number of years you have lived in Canada. For people living in Canada, you must be 65 years of age or older. You must live in Canada and be a Canadian citizen or a legal resident at the time your pension application is approved. You must have lived in Canada for at least 10 years after turning 18. You should apply for the OAS pension six months before you turn 65, or when you receive an Old Age Security Application form. Normally, you must apply on your own behalf. To get an application kit, you can pick one up at a Service Canada Centre near you, or you can print one from servicecanada.gc.ca OAS is like a large “pie” that is divided into 40 equal portions. If you qualify for the “full pension,” you are entitled to receive all 40 portions of the pie each month. If you qualify for a “partial pension”, you will receive some, but not all, of the 40 portions each month. Whether you qualify for a full or partial pension will depend on how long you’ve lived in Canada after the age of 18.

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helping your elderly hoarder Do you know a senior who has a problem with hoarding? You’re not alone by Krista Siefken One person’s trash may be another’s treasure, but when stuff starts to accumulate in countless piles around someone’s house, it becomes little more than a trove of health and safety hazards. “It’s not a laziness issue, it’s a mental wellness issue,” says Cowichan seniors advocate Jacquie Smith. “There are some really good reasons people hoard, and very good reasons why we need to work through some of those issues — because it’s more than an issue. It’s a huge problem.” While executive director at the Seniors Resource and Support Society, Smith saw many cases of hoarding. Landlords would call the office, reluctant to evict a senior but ordered to have an over-stuffed apartment cleared due to the resulting fire hazard. Families would come in and dismiss 16 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

a 25-year-old collection as crap as the senior hoarder listened in shock and horror. “We’ve gone in on a case-by-case basis to assist a senior, but it’s not been anything close to what it looks like on the (hoarding) television shows,” Smith said. “Hoarding comes in probably five different levels, but our teams only go as far as a level two, where someone feels incapacitated but generally doesn’t have a lifetime of hoarding behind them. Anything beyond that is a health hazard for our senior volunteers — and we don’t have many of them because it is hard work.” Smith explained a past trauma or tragedy has frequently been the catalyst for hoarding behaviour. Another contributor among elderly hoarders is a common history of going without, and subconsciously stockpiling because of that. “It’s been noted that it’s generational, but it can also be learned behaviour,” Smith said. And, she stressed, there is help available. “Certainly talk to the senior outreach team. Seek counselling. Talk to Cowichan Family Life,” she advised. Dr. Crosbie Watler, chief of psychiatry at Cowichan District Hospital, says hoarding is not currently recognized as a discrete psychiatric disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual

of Mental Disorders, but there is proposed criteria for “Hoarding Disorder” (see sidebar). “The treatment focus would be to identify and treat the primary underlying condition,” Watler explained, noting hoarding is not restricted to the senior population. “I see this profile only rarely in my practice, and only when they come to attention due to safety or broader mental health concerns,” Watler added. “At this junction, hoarding has usually been present for some time and there is commonly an underlying independent psychiatric or cognitive disorder. Among seniors, hoarding is commonly associated with cognitive decline/dementia, but not invariably so.” The first step for families, Watler said, is to obtain a complete medical/psychiatric evaluation. “This will clarify the presence of an underlying psychiatric/cognitive disorder,” he said. “Hoarding is much like a fever — it is commonly a symptom of another primary condition. The focus should be on identifying and treating the underlying condition, while addressing the immediate safety and public health concerns given the person’s physical environment.” Smith, meanwhile, had some suggestions for families broaching the topic with an elderly hoarder. story continued on page 18 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


A case of

positive hoarding Of course, not all cases of “hoarding” are necessarily negative. Just look at Longevity John Falkner. The man behind the Duncan Garage Showroom has a farreaching reputation for his collection of unique items. Falkner says he’s been collecting cool stuff since the age of six, when he bought an old desk with 10,000 pennies and started stashing neat things inside of it. “Since then, I’ve been finding things — never brandnew things,” he says, calling himself a curator. During cross-country journeys, Falkner would stop at second-hand stores and garage sales to pick over other people’s junk. “I look for stories,” he explains. “And if it hasn’t got a story, I make one up.” The fruits of Falkner’s findings are on display at the Showroom, where everything from a mechanical eggflipper and a silent wind-chime to 97 different nickelplated, brass duck banks can be found. “It’s like winning the lottery every day,” Falkner said of cool finds. “That’s the fun of collecting. I don’t hoard as much as I search.”

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Duncan music promoter Longevity John Falkner has been collecting oddities since he was a child photo: Andrew Leong

Cowichan Good Life Magazine 17


continued from page 16 “Certainly language is very important because the things they’ve hoarded have been important to them,” she said. “Do be aware the person knows it’s a lot of stuff. Do be aware they know it looks like a mess. Do be aware they probably don’t want to live like that, either. They’re just caught in a cycle.”

Very often, Smith added, bringing in grandchildren to assist in handling the hoard can help. “Children of hoarders are often very embarrassed, or they don’t have patience with their parent — and, to be honest, a lot of parents don’t have patience with their kids, either,” she said. “But putting it a generation apart, it can even be a summer project for the

grand kids. They can bring in a camera, take pictures of the items, and write the stories.” Families can also stress the importance of helping the community — donating furniture for young families, clothes to the homeless, games to the hospital, antiques to museums. “Take them through it step by step. Don’t be condescending. Never devalue

what’s there, even an old piece of paper — it had value at one time,” Smith said. “Hoarding is a bigger problem than people think, and I would suggest it’s going to get bigger if we don’t do something about it. “And if you don’t think it’s your problem, that this is just a seniors’ issue, well, you’re either a senior or a senior-in-training.”

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A. Persistent difficulty discarding or parting with possessions, regardless of the value others may attribute to these possessions. B. This difficulty is due to strong urges to save items and/ or distress associated with discarding. C. The symptoms result in the accumulation of a large number of possessions that fill up and clutter active living areas of the home or workplace to the extent that their intended use is no longer possible. If all living areas are uncluttered, it is only because of the interventions of third parties (family members, cleaners, authorities). D. The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. E. The hoarding symptoms are not due to a general medical condition (brain injury, etc). F. The hoarding symptoms are not restricted to the symptoms of another mental disorder (eg. hoarding due to obsessions in obsessivecompulsive disorder, etc). Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


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it’s the dirt

that matters

10

things you didn’t know about Cowichan’s wine industry by Peter W. Rusland

Everybody in Cowichan knows that our wine industry has exploded in the past 20 years to become one of our signature attractions. And virtually every local culture lover has their favourite anecdote about Cowichan’s grape success, or better yet, their favourite vintage. But for those who haven’t been here since day one, there are a few things that may have been overlooked or taken for granted in the hype. Here are 10 things you may not have known about Cowichan’s wine industry: story continued on page 23 20 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Cowichan Good Life Magazine 21


it’s the dirt

that matters

10

things you didn’t know about Cowichan’s wine industry by Peter W. Rusland

Everybody in Cowichan knows that our wine industry has exploded in the past 20 years to become one of our signature attractions. And virtually every local culture lover has their favourite anecdote about Cowichan’s grape success, or better yet, their favourite vintage. But for those who haven’t been here since day one, there are a few things that may have been overlooked or taken for granted in the hype. Here are 10 things you may not have known about Cowichan’s wine industry: story continued on page 23 20 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Cowichan Good Life Magazine 21


22 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


continued from page 21 1. Cowichan’s oldest winery is Zanatta Vineyards. Dennis Zanatta arrived in 1958 and quickly planted vines to make wine for himself. In the 1980s the B.C. government funded a one-acre pilot project where he experimented with a number of vines. The results inspired Zanatta to establish his winery in 1989 and release his first vintage in 1992. 2. There are currently 15 wineries in the valley plus Merridale Ciderworks. Many local wineries, bistros and chefs participate in the annual Cowichan Wine & Culinary Festival. 3. Beside a barrel of different grapes grown in Cowichan’s various micro-climates, award-winning blackberry wines are made at Cherry Point Vineyards and Rocky Creek Winery. “Enough wild blackberries are bought from the locals to make 11,000 bottles of dessert wine,” said Cherry Point co-owner Xavier Bonilla who, with wife Maria Clara, bought Cherry Point from Cowichan Tribes in 2009. “Cherry Point started the blackberry tradition in Cowichan,” Bonilla said of his 21-acre winery producing some 4,000 cases of product annually. 4. The largest volume of wine annually produced in Cowichan is some 7,000 cases from 30 acres planted by Averill Creek Vineyards on Mount Prevost, according to owner Andy Johnston. 5. Cowichan’s cool-climate geography, not its sunshine, helps us yield some excellent grapes. “We make some of the best pinot noirs in Canada, and Averill Creek has been invited to be a feature winery at the International Pinot Noir Conference in Oregon,” said Johnston. “We have enough heat units for the cool-climate varieties like

ortega, and baccus — Germanic varieties do well on the island. “But you can’t grow cabernet sauvignon, auxerois, or any grape that needs lots of sunshine.” Bonilla agreed. “There’s a big misconception that sunshine makes good wine,” he said, noting Costa Rica and the Amazon aren’t big wine regions. “Dry air makes good wine. The Cowichan Valley is very humid all year, but in the summer we have four months of dry air and that’s what makes our wine very unique — it’s The Warm Land but dry.” story continued on page 24

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Cowichan Good Life Magazine 23


continued from page 23 6. Valley grapes don’t make wine, Cowichan’s soil does, noted Bonilla, adding top wines are blends of varieties. “It’s the earth that makes the wine, and that puts you in a different boat. “People think single grape varieties are more elegant. No — that only works for whiskey, like single-malt scotch. “The best wines in the world are blends,” he said of Cherry Point’s 12odd different grapes — including the rare Austrian grape called zwiegelt — used to make some nine wines a year. “We taste weaknesses and strengths of each grape and every year is different. Even in bad years we can make beautiful wine because we have a little of this and a little of that. “Our wines are never really the same each year.” 7. Pests raiding Cowichan’s vines could eat every grape if precautions weren’t taken. “We probably have the most netting because we have the biggest vineyard,” said overhead-net fan Johnston. “I don’t like side netting because you

still lose 25 per cent of your fruit.” Winged culprits are robins, starlings and flickers. “You’d lose 100 per cent of your crop without netting — cannons don’t work.” Bears and raccoons are also vineyard freeloaders. “We do our best to patrol the vineyard

grape times Cowichan’s 15 wineries include Zanatta, Averill Creek, Blue Grouse, Venturi-Schultze, Alderlea, Godfrey-Brownell, Glenterra, Unsworth, Silverside, Rocky Creek, Cherry Point, Demali, Deoll, Enrico, 22 Oaks, plus Merridale Ciderworks.

and scare bears away,” said Johnston. “Racoons will also do major damage, but you can trap them.” 8. Merridale Ciderworks was B.C.’s first estate cidery. It features prominently in Cowichan’s winefest and

other foodie events. The island’s only other cidery is Saanich Peninsula’s Sea Cider, said Merridale co-owner Janet Docherty. Merridale, near Shawnigan Lake, comprises about 20 acres holding some 3,500 cider apple trees yielding seven types of cider. 9. Cowichan’s only vodka, called Frizz, comes from Merridale. Frizz is just being released. “It’s made from five different types of fruit, each fermented separately, distilled separately twice, then blended and carbonated,” Docherty said. “But it’s not sweet; it’s a vodka.” 10. The island’s only brandy — called Cowichan Brandy — is also made at Merridale, as are its other unique liquors. “Our brandy hasn’t been released — it’s still in barrels,” Docherty said of her calvados-style brandy made from cider, not eating, apples. Merridale’s distilled apple and blackberry Oh! de vie is twinned by its Pomme Oh!, and Mure Oh! Both are “fruitified products that are a combination of fermentation and distillation,” Docherty said.

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New equipment at Cowichan hospital helping locals detect and treat osteoporosis by Don Bodger Incidents of osteoporosis are being detected far more readily since the introduction of a new service at Cowichan District Hospital. Valley residents have taken full advantage of the convenience of Bone Mineral Densitometry examinations available at the hospital for diagnosing the disease since February 2010. They might not have otherwise traveled outside the region for testing and diagnosis of the disease that affects bone mass and tissue. And they may not have had the appropriate remedies taken Initial contributions of $150,000 from the Cowichan District Hospital Foundation and the Ministry of Health through the Vancouver Island Health Authority for $115,000 in renovations, installation costs and staff training made the service start-up possible. Testing to measure BMD is called Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry. The non-invasive procedure only takes a few minutes to complete on an outpatient basis. A very low-dose X-Ray uses far less radiation than a standard chest X-Ray and takes measurements at the spine, hip and forearm. “DEXA is considered the gold standard for diagnosing osteoporosis and also for monitoring the effects of osteoporosis therapy,’’ noted CDH’s Medical Imaging Manager Carol Petrie after the service was introduced. The service was previously only available to valley residents by going to either Nanaimo, Campbell River or Victoria. Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Low bone mass and deterioration of bone tissue are the main characterics of osteoporosis disease. Increased bone fragility can lead to the risk of broken bones, particularly the hip, spine and wrist. Bone loss often occurs without symptoms. Because of the similar names, osteoporosis is frequently confused with osteoarthritis, a disease of the joints and surrounding tissue. Treating osteoporosis and fractures caused by it comes at a huge cost, estimated at $1.9 billion each year in Canada. The majority of the costs are incurred from long term, hospital and chronic care. It’s estimated at least one in three women and one in five men will suffer fractures resulting from osteoporosis in their lifetimes. Disfigurement, decreased self esteem, reduction or loss of mobility and limited independence are some of the quality of life factors that result from osteoporosis. — source: osteoporosis.ca.

The numbers show it’s been a great addition to the community for the detection of osteoporosis. It has now been two years since access to the BMD started for valley residents. A total of 1,772 patients have been tested. “That is a lot of people who were able to have screening done in their own community,’’ noted Anya Nimmon of VIHA communications for the Central Island. “Bookings for the test come through physician referral and must meet Medical Service Plan criteria which is currently that the test would not have to be repeated for three years.’’ Osteoporosis does not develop overnight. Bone mass can be lost steadily without a person experiencing any

symptoms or signs of the disease until a fracture occurs. For that reason, early detection of bone loss is critical in the prevention of fractures. Once a fracture occurs, osteoporosis is already advanced. BMD tests are recommended for all men and women 65 years and older. For postmenopausal women and men 50 to 64, risk factors include: fragility fracture after age 40, a parental hip fracture, low bone mass identified on X-Ray, high alcohol intake, smoking, low body weight, weight loss greater than 10 per cent since age 25, high risk medication use and rheumatoid arthritis. Men and women younger than 50 with a disease or condition associated with low bone mass or bone loss are also at risk. Cowichan Good Life Magazine 27


never too old to

sing Cowichan’s annual music festival isn’t limited to the young as boomers and seniors hit the stage to tout their talent by Peter W. Rusland Young performers may be the mainstay of the venerable Cowichan Music Festival. But some of those 4,000some thespians — spanning dancers, vocalists, pianists, choirs, instrumentalists and speech artists — range in age from baby boomers to seniors. Leslie Sjoberg, head of the CMF in its 63rd year, applauded current adult performers and support from past competitors. “They’re all just marvelous,” Sjoberg said, as she prepared for the March 7 Highlights Concert at the Cowichan Theatre. “Most of them that aren’t performing are great supporters.” One perennial booster is Jean Davis. Now involved with CMF speech arts and more, Davis found herself on the festival’s stage as an adult performer in the ‘70s doing what she now calls her 28 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

“party piece” from which she sometimes quotes during private functions. “I just thought I’d give it a try,” she said of the piece called Castles In The Air based on the daydreams of a scullery maid. In about 1981, Davies and pal Peg Smith did a duologue scene from Separate Tables. Davies’ dad, Gwilym Morris, was the unsuspecting adjudicator of the two-hander. “He had no idea he’d be adjudicating our duologue.” Davis cheered other mature players, such as Dr. Graham Brockley who sung Bring Him Home from Les Misérables in CMF 2011, and Music Of The Night from Phantom Of The Opera during this year’s competitions. Tenor and local actor Denny Beaveridge, 76, last competed in the festival about a dozen years ago, but had fond memories of his stage experience. “I went in the festival regularly. It’s good exposure and a chance to perform serious

Maureen Gallacher sings Bel Piacere by Handel during 63rd-annual Cowichan Music Festival at the Duncan United Church on Feb. 13. photo: Andrew Leong

music. “There’s always a chance to play around with pop music, plus opera and operetta,” said Beaveridge, who participated during his vocal studies. “The festival can be very beneficial, particularly for those studying voice — you get to hear adjudication of yourself and others. “Adjudication is a very valuable thing to give you focus on things you’re doing wrong, or doing right as a confidence booster.” Lyric soprano Maureen Gallacher agreed. “It’s a very forgiving audience, and the adjudicator is usually very encouraging,” the local senior said after singing four times in CMF ‘12. “It just about killed me — it’s hard work,” she said of preparing for the festival, then appearing in it. “It’s very scary standing up there all alone with an adjudicator poised with a pencil, and an accompanist waiting. “The accompanist goes on whether you make a mis-

take not.” Still, Gallacher praised her supportive teacher, Meredythe Broadway. “I’ve been to a lot of festivals and always think I’m getting too old, but I get lots of encouragement from people running the festival, and from Meredythe.” The festival hooks some performers, hinted Gallacher, a 10-year CMF veteran. “The more you do it, the more is expected of you. “This year did a Handel Italian piece, a Canadian piece, an old Scottish classical-folk song, and an English art song.” The payoff is self-satisfaction. Singing gives me a lot of joy,” said Gallacher who hoped young performers share that thrill. “The festival lets the young people see what they can do, and adjudicators say it’s great older folks do go on. “The festival’s a whole package — you’ve got to be prepared, and hope you don’t muff the whole thing up.” Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


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Cowichan Good Life Magazine 29


Baby boomers embracing the oncetaboo concept of turning their bodies into a temple of art

Linda Baldwin, who sports a rainforest on her left arm, says tattoos are no longer associated with the coarser things in life. photo: Andrew Leong

tattoo

you

30 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


Duncan Lions

• Just moved to the Valley? • Used to be a Lion? • Want to give time to the community?

We are looking for you! Be a Lion! by Krista Siefken Linda Baldwin has a bumper sticker that really sums up the new attitude on body art. “Tattoos — not just for sailors and whores anymore.” And that’s a growing consensus — even among the 50s-and-older crowd. In fact, more and more baby boomers are viewing their bodies as an art canvas. They’re ready and willing to try a bold new hair colour or style — think a purple streak, or a daring cut — or finally get that tattoo they’ve always wanted. “It’s definitely changing,” says Richard Hickey, owner and tattoo artist at Primal Urge Body Art. “There’s been a shift in people’s attitudes toward ink. What I’m hearing is that it was, at one time, taboo. Only ‘trashy women,’ sailors and gang members got tattoos.” But now, it’s an accepted art form. “Some of the most amazing artists are doing ink,” says Hickey. “It’s bringing it to the forefront of society. Instead of trashy, it’s moving, modern art.” It helps that the science behind tattoos has evolved. Inks are brighter, more vivid and last longer than ever before (which means less worrying about what it’ll look like when skin starts — or has already started — to wrinkle). “Now I’m inking baby boomers who’re saying, ‘Secretly, I’ve always wanted one,’ — and now it’s acceptable,” says Hickey. story continued on page 32

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Cowichan Good Life Magazine 31


continued from page 31 He’s even tattooed a pair of seniors — somewhere between 85 and 90 years old — with a couple of tarantulas. “It was totally killer,” Hickey remembers with a grin. Another man embraced his balding hair by having Hickey ink a lawnmower on his head. “If you’ve always wanted one, there’s a reason why, and if it’s important to you, remember: it’s your body, it’s your temple, so if you want it, get it,” he says. “There’s no limitation now. The sky is the limit. The only thing that can stop it is your own imagination.” Baldwin’s imagination has gained her

an entire rainforest, all from the comfort of her left arm. The 52-year-old has eight tattoos including the colourful sleeve. “We’re more into freedom of expression now,” she says. “Tattoos are no longer associated with the coarser side of life. It’s a medium to express yourself, express your individuality. They can symbolize something close to your heart, and society is more open about it — it’s not nearly as judgmental.” And nothing in five decades has made Baldwin reconsider her stance. “I’ve never, for even one moment, regretted any of my tattoos.” Hickey also credits a modern global

society with helping spread ideas and trends for boomers’ more youthful approach to appearances. Paris McIvor at the Paris Styling Group salon on Station Street is a baby boomer herself, and agrees modern media makes it easier for people — of all ages — to embrace new trends. “People are seeing that women our age can look absolutely incredible, and it’s not that we’re trying to necessarily look younger, but we’re young-at-heart and portraying that,” she says. “We’ve realized we have so much more to offer, and we want to keep ourselves young-at-heart, and healthy and beautiful.”

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79 Station St., Duncan BC Telephone: 250-597-1428 Hours: Tuesday to Friday 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Saturdays 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Donations of gently used items are always appreciated. The main goal of the store is to purchase equipment for patient care & comfort. Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


Cowichan Seniors Resource Directory The Cowichan News Leader Pictorial would like to thank and acknowledge the efforts of the Cowichan Seniors Community Foundation and its volunteers for compiling this resource directory. It has been edited for space limitations by the Cowichan News Leader Pictorial and in no way is meant to be considered comprehensive. Content inquiries should be sent to: publisher@cowichannewsleader.com A more comprehensive directory is available at: www.cowichanseniors.ca

Pam’s Part-time Passion Pam Phone: 250-748-3116

Home Support – Private About Time Homecare & Nursing Services Jennifer Lally, Manager 3297 Renita Ridge Rd. Duncan, BC Phone: 250-748-0513 Angel Helping Hands Homecare & Companionship #6-1040 Trunk Rd., Duncan Phone: 250-746-9946

Aboriginal Health

Compassionate Care

Ts’ewulten Health Centre 5768 Allenby Rd., Duncan Phone: 250-746-6184

Compassionate Connections Lorraine Demers Phone: 250-748-1317

Adult Day Programs

Crisis Line Support

Chemainus Health Care Centre Adult Day Program Phone: 250-246-3291

Vancouver Island Crisis Line 1–888–494–3888 Emotional support and access to Island-wide community resources. The crisis line operates 24/7/365.

In Good Hands Home Care Sharon Klewchuk, Walt Deelman Phone; 250-701-3936

Grandparents Support

Northgate Support Services Laila Pera, Owner, CSA Phone: 250-743-8288

Providence Farm Gloria Bond, SAGC Program Coordinator 1843 Tzouhalem Rd., Duncan Phone: 250-746-9668 Waldon House Day Program 2041 Tzouhalem Rd., Duncan use entrace off Maple Bay Rd. Phone: 250-737-2037

Community Policing Cowichan Community Policing Advisory Society Suzanne Jensen, President, 2009/10 6060 Canada Ave., Duncan Phone: c/o 250-701-9146 Duncan Community Policing Office Carol-Ann Rolls, Volunteer Prog. & Services 3-149 Canada Ave. Duncan Phone: 250-701-9145 Chemainus Community Policing Office 9847 Willow St. Chemainus, BC Phone: 250-246-4382 Cowichan Bay Community Policing Office 1721 E Cowichan Bay Rd., Cowichan Bay Phone: 250-701-1961 Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Parent Support Services Society of BC Sandi Halvorsen, Program Coordinator Phone: 1-877-345-9777

Home Adaptations & Repairs Ease-Ability Renovations & Construction Ltd. Dan Nugent Phone: 250-743-1955 Handy Mum Home Improvements & Garden Services Dominique Daviau 970 Shawnigan Mill Bay Rd. Phone: 250-510-3552

Home Garden & Yard Care The Barwicks Keith and Katherine Barwick Phone: 250–743–3363 Lush Eco Lawns John Close 3054 Biscay Rd. Duncan, BC Phone: 250-597-0408

Harmony Health Care Ltd. John McAlorum, RN, Dir. of Operations Unit 2A–2753 Charlotte Rd. Duncan, Phone: 250-701-9990

Nurse Next Door Home Healthcare Chris Wilkinson, Director Phone: 250-748-4357 Pacific Live-in Caregivers Robin Smith, Owner Box 1771, Ladysmith, BC V9G 1B3 Phone: 250-616-2346 We Care Home Health Services 205-149 Ingram St. Duncan, BC Phone: 250-746-9224

Home Support – Vancouver Island Health Authority Duncan Home and Community Care 121 Ingram St. Duncan Phone: 250-737-2004

Housing – Non-Profit, Low Cost Abbeyfield Houses Society of Duncan Kathleen Skovgaard 5905 Indian Rd. Duncan Phone: 250-597-0677

Duncan Housing Society Manager 280 First St. Duncan, BC Phone: 250-748-0521 Duncan Kiwanis Village Society 355 Day Rd. Duncan Phone: 250-748-4135 King George Seniors Affordable Housing Society Marg Belvesy Phone: 250- 749-0190 Ladysmith Senior Housing Society Ted Walker 250- 245-7916

Housing – Private Acacia Ty Mawr Joan Taylor 2655 Shawnigan Lake Rd. Phone: 250-743-2124 ext 106 Alpenrose Laura & Bill Loftus 2267 Lochsyde Drive, Duncan Phone: 250-748-3803 Deertrail Cottage Inc. Laurie Gillis, Owner/Manager 1711 Escarpment Way Duncan Phone: 250-746-9641 Dovehill House Marguerite Moskalyk 3292 Ash Rd Chemainus Phone: 250-416-0332 Golden Acres Care Donna van der vlugt, Owner/ Operator Phone: 250-749-4367 Heritage Manor Care Home Tanya Mosure, Owner 1051 College St. Duncan, Phone: 250-748-3488 Lynn’s Senior Care Lynn Scott, RCA 5085 Jones Rd. Ladysmith Phone: 250-245-3391 Nana’s Guest House Sandy Baker, Owner 57 Park Rd., Lake Cowichan BC V0R 2G0 Phone: 250–749–3326

Cowichan Good Life Magazine 33


Cowichan Seniors Resource Directory Housing – Private Pioneer House Bed & Breakfast Alberta Schneider, Owner 6470 Burnett Place, Duncan BC V9L 5R7 Phone: 250–746–8280 Sherwood House Audrey Norman, Manager 280 Government St. Duncan Phone: 250-710-8882

Housing – Private Wedgwood House Linda Fonck, Manager 256 Government St. Duncan Phone: 250-746-9808 Villa del Sol Carol Reid, RN 647 Frayne Rd. Mill Bay Phone: 250-743-7061

International Health Care International Health Care Providers T. Rand Collins, PhD, MD Phone: 250-732-6603

Meals and Nutrition Gloria’s Food Service Gloria Ramsey Phone: 250-748-9216 Meals on Wheels c/o Cowichan Home Support 20-127 Ingram St. Duncan Phone: 250-737-2004

Mental Health Support Duncan Mental Health and Seniors Cindy Patrick 3088 Gibbins Rd. Duncan Phone: 250-709-3040

Moving & Downsizing Duncan Moving & Storage Joyce Bennett 2-2913 Allenby Rd, Duncan 250-746-5103 Every Detail Jane Sheppard 2093 Calais Rd. Duncan Phone: 250-748-3626 34 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

Moving Made Easy Donna Walker Phone: 250-701-1886

Non Profit Societies – Senior Services Cowichan Family Caregivers Support Society Ranjana Basu, Coordinator Shawnigan Lake Phone: 250-743-7621 Cowichan Intercultural Society Deborah Connor, Executive Director 205-394 Duncan St. Duncan Phone: 250-748-3112 Cowichan Valley Hospice Society Shelley Kuecks, Client Intake Coordinator 3122 Gibbins Rd. Duncan Phone: 250-701-4242 Toll-free 1-888-701-4242 Senior Resource and Support Society Jacquie Smith-Executive Director 1 Kenneth Place Duncan Phone: 250-748-2133 St. John Ambulance Lori McNeil, Branch Manager 205-169 Craig St. Duncan Phone: 250-746-4058 Volunteer Cowichan 1 Kenneth Place Duncan Phone: 250-748-2133

Seniors Groups Chemainus Seniors Drop In Centre Society Frank Gibbins, President 9824 Willow Street, Chemainus Phone: 250-246-2111 Crofton Seniors Society Pat McMicken, President 1507 Joan Street, Crofton Phone: 250-246-2455 Elder College Jennifer Carmichael, Recreation Programmer 2687 James Street, Duncan Phone: 250-746-0414 or 250-748-7529 to register Ladysmith Seniors Centre Society Cora Maier, President Phone: 250-245-8885

Lake Cowichan Seniors Centre Greg McCallum, President 55 Coronation Street, Lake Cowichan Phone: 250-749-6121 South End Seniors Stuart Calder, President Kerry Park Rec. Centre 1035 Shawnigan-Mill Bay Rd. Valley Seniors Organization of Duncan George Capella, President 198 Government Street, Duncan Phone: 250-746-4433

Service BC and Service Canada Service BC Programs Byron Johnston 5785 Duncan St. Duncan, BC Phone: 250-746-1226 Service Canada Centre Linda Granger 211 Jubilee St. Duncan Phone: 1-800-622-6232

Service Clubs Arbutus Travel Club c/o Corry Salmen Phone: 250-701-0965 Chemainus Masonic Lodge #114 Pat Fyffe, Secretary 3052 Hawthorne St., Chemainus Phone: 250-246-3579 Cowichan Toastmaster’s Club #950 Zoe Nash, Public Relations Phone: 250-732-3915 Duncan Kiwanis Club Ron Colter 355 Day Rd., Duncan Phone: 748-4135 Duncan Lion’s Club P.O. Box 52, Duncan, BC V9L 3X1 Duncan Masonic Lodge #33 Bob Crawford, Secretary 5700 Menzies Rd., Duncan Phone: 250-748-1028 Elks Club of Duncan Sylvia Lucas, Bar Manager Albert Scholtens, Exalted Ruler Phone: 250-746-6812

Fraternal Order of Eagles, Chemainus-Crofton #4400 Merv Brown / Bill Yearly, Sec P.O. Box 45, Chemainus, BC V0R 1K0 Phone: 250-246-3401 Fraternal Order of Eagles, Duncan #2546 Tracy Norman, Secretary 2965 Jacob Road, Duncan Phone: 250-746-7100 Fraternal Order of Eagles, Ladysmith #2101 P.O. Box 640, Ladysmith, BC V9G 1A5 Phone: 250-245-3183 Kinettes Club of Duncan Kelly Waywitka, Deputy Governor 5823 Brier Ave. Duncan Phone: 250-748-7208 Kinsmen Club of Duncan Jason Czettisch, Past President 5990 Indian Rd., Duncan Phone: 250-746-1940 Ladysmith Kinsmen Club Duck Patterson, Life Member P.O. Box 324, Ladysmith, BC V9G 1A3 Phone: 250-245-2263 Ladysmith Masonic Lodge #21 Joel Chiri, Secretary P.O. Box 261, Ladysmith, BC V9G 1A2 Phone: 250-245-4797 Lion’s Club of Duncan Housing Society P.O. Box 52, Duncan, BC V9L 3X1 Phone: 250-748-1044 Lion’s Club of Ladysmith Jim Masyk, Secretary P.O. Box 2293, Ladysmith, BC V9G 1B8 Phone: 250-245-4049 Mill Bay Masonic Lodge #107 Stuart Calder, Treasurer 2231 Benko Rd., Mill Bay Phone: 250-743-5339 Rotary Club, Chemainus Mike Beggs, President P.O. Box 297, Chemainus, BC V0R 1K0 Phone: 250-245-4549

Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


Cowichan Seniors Resource Directory Service Clubs Rotary Club, Duncan Roger Hart, Secretary P.O. Box 473, Duncan, BC V9L 3X8 Phone: 250-715-3039 Rotary, Duncan Daybreak Alana Elliott, President Phone: 250-715-1481 Rotary Club, Ladysmith Michael Furlot, Secretary P.O. Box 875, Ladysmith, BC V9G 1A6 Phone: 250-245-5771 or 250-2452052 Rotary Club, South Cowichan Shirley Walker P.O. Box 241, Cobble Hill, BC V0R 1L0 Phone: 250-743-6727 Royal Canadian Legion, Chemainus Branch #191 Beverly Olsen, Office Manager P.O. Box 423, Chemainus, BC V0R 1K0 Phone: 250-246-3133 Royal Canadian Legion, Cowichan Branch #53 Allan Waddy, President Kenneth St., Duncan, BC V9L 1N3 Phone: 250-746-5013 Royal Canadian Legion, Ladysmith Branch #171 Georgina Lorette, Secretary P.O. Box 219, Ladysmith, BC V9G 1A2 Phone: 250-245-3031 or 250-2452273 Royal Canadian Legion, Lake Cowichan Branch #210 Sam Jones, Bar Manager P.O. Box 603, Lake Cowichan, BC V0R 2G0 Phone: 250-749-6041 Royal Canadian Legion, Shawnigan Lake Branch #134 1625 Shawnigan-MillBay Rd Phone: 250-743-4621 Women of the Moose P.O. Box 371, Duncan, BC V9L 3X5 Phone: 250-746-7382

Young Seniors Action Group Society Royal Canadian Legion, 1625 Shawnigan-MillBay Rd Phone: 250-743-5178 or 250-7438344

Support Societies, Disease Related

Therapy Dog Visits Therapy Dog Visitation Program, St. John Ambulance Judy Wood, Unit Facilitator Phone: 250-715-0949 Lynn James, Community Service Coordinator Phone: 250-246-2938

Alzheimer Society of BC Jane Hope Phone:1-800-462-2833

St. John Ambulance 205-169 Craig St. Duncan Phone: 250-746-4058

Canadian Cancer Society Maureen Hyde 100-394 Duncan St., Duncan Phone: 250-746-4134

Transportation

Canadian Red Cross Help Program Jack Faber 2-5855 York St., Duncan Phone: 250-748-2111 Cowichan Valley Arthritis Society Jan Norwood Box 942, Duncan, BC V9L 3Y8 Phone: 250-748-2481

Wellness Coaching

Care-A-Van Services Rosalind Wilson Owner/Operator 1851 Sandra Place, Duncan Phone: 250-701-5751

Rejuvenations - Wellness Coaching Services Valerie Childs, MSc. Phone: 250-246-9452

Cowichan Valley Regional Transit #3-5280 Polkey Rd., Duncan Phone: 250-746-9899 Web: www.busonline.ca Executive Travel & Tourism Bob Lord, President Phone: 250-897-3881

Diabetes Education Program Kathy Park 121 Ingram St., Duncan Phone: 250-737-2004 Duncan Mental Health and Seniors Cindy Patrick 3088 Gibbins Rd., Duncan Phone: 250-709-3040 Heart and Stroke Foundation Janice Krall, 401-495 Dunsmuir St., Nanaimo Phone: 1-888-754-5274

For more details and updates go to:

www.cowichanseniors.ca

Kidney Foundation 200-4940 Canada Way, Burnaby, BC V5G 4K6 Phone: 1-800-567-8112 Stroke Recovery Assoc.Cowichan Valley Branch Patty PO Box 394 Duncan, B.C. V9L 3X5 Phone: 250-748-6587 Support Group for Low Vision Seniors Karen McClinchey Phone: 250-746-6041

Cowichan Independent Living Medical Equipment Loans, Sales & Consignments Visit us to see the full range of medical equipment available, including batteries. Consider donating equipment no longer needed! As a registered non profit, charitable organization, a tax receipt can be issued for medical equipment donations. Medical Equipment Division Cowichan

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Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

handyDart Contact Person: Amber 1 Kenneth Place, Duncan Phone: 250-748-1230 Wheels for Wellness Society 1894 Bolt Ave. Comox Phone: 250-338-0196 Wheels for Wellness Society 1894 Bolt Avenue, Comox Phone: 250-338-0196

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Partial funding for this program is received from Cowichan United Way

Cowichan Good Life Magazine 35


A voice for the

aging Cowichan’s MP actively advocating for people entering retirement and the issues they face

Jean Crowder speaks during a recent seniors forum in Chemainus — one of five she scheduled throughout the region this winter.

by Ann Andersen We’re sitting chatting in her comfortable office when MP Jean Crowder springs a surprise. “I’ll be 60 this year,” she smiles. This irony is not lost on either of us as Crowder begins to talk about the challenges seniors are facing in the Cowichan Valley; the roadblocks to finding solutions to those challenges; how Crowder is helping through local forums and Parliament; and what we can do to help. “The issues facing seniors have grown because the cost of everything has gone up, but pensions haven’t kept up,” she says. In the Cowichan Valley, the most pressing issues are seniors’ incomes and housing, she explains. In Cowichan, the move away from the forestry industry means lower wage jobs for many people. People can’t save at the same rate, so more and more seniors have to work part-time. “Seniors haven’t been able to save; only one-third of people put money into RRSPs; only about one-third have private sector pensions,” Crowder adds. And income obviously has an impact on the second issue — housing. “For younger seniors who have houses as assets, they can run into trouble pay36 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

photo: Andrew Leong

ing property taxes, upkeep and maintenance,” Crowder says. For older seniors, age-appropriate care  — like home support and suitable residential care — is the issue. Crowder says the challenge with the supply of age-appropriate housing is that housing is multi-jurisdictional. “The feds give money to the provinces, but there’s no accountability back to the feds; the BC Housing Authority sets priorities, but seniors are not one of them; the municipalities are responsible for property taxes and zoning,” she expands. Crowder describes a developer who was in her office recently. “He wanted to construct an age-appropriate building right here in the valley, then found out he couldn’t do it because of the rules. “There is no overall strategy. We need one.” Affordability of long-term age-appropriate care is another issue in the mix, she says. She describes health care challenges for seniors: drug affordability and accessibility; and people trapped in acute care who shouldn’t be there because they need less care. But there’s nowhere else for them to go. “We also hear that while the univer-

sities are training plenty of people in pediatrics, there’s a shortage of health workers for the geriatric age group,” she says. Although transportation is a provincial concern, it has its effect here. Crowder describes a lady who had to travel to Victoria for her driving test, and couldn’t find a way to get there. “A volunteer driving program is great, but it mustn’t take away the requirement for an effective local transportation system that meets the needs of seniors,” she says. “What we discovered from recent work and seniors forums is that not all sidewalks in Lake Cowichan are wheelchair accessible; we should have automatic doors on buses; and stop lights aren’t long enough because seniors need more time to cross the road,” she said. “These are simple things, but important. Every community needs an agefriendly check list.” Elder abuse — physical, emotional, financial — is a real problem, she says. “There is insufficient protection for people, especially when a person can’t speak for themselves.” In some banks, she says, if a person comes in that the bank personnel recognize as vulnerable and is with someCowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


one wanting them to sign over or cosign for money, it raises a red flag, and the bank insists on independent counsel. She speaks of a recent event when a senior was discharged from hospital in slippers with no money to get home. So, is there a solution? And if there is, how can it be reached? “We must first raise the level of awareness in communities — involve organizations, caregivers, businesses, governments,” Crowder says. Twenty-five people turned out for a recent seniors’ forum in Lake Cowichan she hosted. Follow-ups are slated in Chemainus, Shawnigan and in Duncan on March 20. “I really believe that each local community has to put together a working group to develop strategies,” she says, handing me Metchosin’s Age-Friendly Community Report that came before Metchosin council late last year. The report contains several ideas that could be implemented here, Crowder says. “It’s got lots of options and is a good example of what to do locally, a good starting point.” Lake Cowichan people are now pulling together in a

group, she says. “If I can bring people together, that’s a great start.” As well, Crowder is feeding the information she gets at the forums to Opposition seniors critic Irene Mathyssen in Ottawa. “We want to develop a national strategy — it will be released in about two months,” she said. Crowder has also introduced a bill in Ottawa that would enact a National Poverty Strategy, which she says would have positive effects for seniors as well.

Locally, people can contact Social Planning Cowichan encouraging them to put together a strategy or contact their municipalities. Another good contact is the Seniors Resource and Support Society Cowichan. Crowder leans forward to emphasize her next comments: “It’s shocking that we are now past the first wave of baby boomers, so the reality that seniors’ issues are worsening should not be a surprise. We just haven’t done anything about it,” she says.

“The federal government must take leadership on this so the communities can do the work that’s needed,” she emphasizes. She says it’s also important to note that seniors are far more active and engaged than they used to be. Her mother, 81-year-old Bobbie McCormack, is a good example, she laughs. “Among other pursuits, she knits for the local Red Cross, plays darts and three days a week does reading math with kids in school,” Crowder smiles.

Help is out there

Cowichan has many resources for seniors to turn to when

they need questions answered or help with an issue. Organizations offer help ranging from where to place your pet if you’re hospitalized to visiting or transporting isolated seniors. These include non-profit societies: Cowichan Seniors Community Foundation’s mission is to identify emerging issues affecting seniors through dialogue with businesses, non-profits and valley residents. They offer a door-to-door volunteer driving program for seniors. Phone: 250-715-6481 Web: www.cowichanseniors.ca Seniors Resource and Support Society offers financial assistance, social clubs, prevention of elder abuse, widow/ers support group, senior peer counselling, subsidized housing, legal resources, grocery delivery by phone. Phone: 250–748–2133 Email: srss@shaw.ca

For more, see our seniors resource directory, starting on page 33

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stirring the pot Baan-Do’s offers a wide range of healthy stir fry selections

Baan-Do’s Stir Fry delivers help for the Wongs. There exactly what it advertises. are now nine employees, inBilled as The Healthy cluding themselves, and just Choice, the restaurant at two part-timers plus another 2680 James Street in Dun- five for Baan-Do’s Too that’s can, has a wide variety of stir been going for two years fry selections to satisfy any next door. taste. “Stir fries are big things in the cities,’’ said Ber- You’ve got nard Wong, 54, the own- to taste er-manager of the establishment along with wife Ann. “When we moved with here, we saw there wasn’t Don any restaurants of this Bodger type. We decided to give it a try.’’ That was back in May of Repeat business has been a 2006 and Baan-Do’s has godsend for the Wongs and been going strong ever a sure sign of customer satsince. isfaction. “We started out with 750 “That’s what keeps us gosquare feet,’’ said Bernard ing,’’ he said. “We’re still Wong. doing well. Expansion increased the “It’s a very mixed clientele floor space to 1,600 square from students to seniors. We feet. even have a large group com“We started out in a good ing in from the Cowichan time,’’ said Wong. “The Tribes, which surprised economy was picking up at me. At the beginning, they that time. I’d say we picked walked by.’’ a good time to start.’’ Interestingly, Wong has Wong was raised in Edmon- found people on the island ton and lived in Toronto are really into spicy food. for 10 years before opening “Back in Edmonton and ToBaan-Do’s just a few months ronto, nobody cares for spicy after coming to the valley. food,’’ he said. “Back here, “The mountains, the ocean it’s 50 per cent.’’ and nice weather,’’ Wong I’ve dined and ordered takesaid, were the attractions out at Baan-Do’s many times that drew him here. and just love all the fresh “We were told we have to ingredients. My personal create our own jobs,’’ he favourite is the Teriyaki recalled after arriving here. chicken stir fry with either “Actually, now we’re creat- rice or noodles. ing jobs.’’ The vegetables are delivBaan-Do’s started with a ered fresh daily from the lomodest staff of part-time cal farmers’ market and the

this

38 Cowichan Good Life Magazine

Ann and Bernard Wong are nearing six years of operation at Baan-Do’s Stir Fry photo: Don Bodger

tiger prawns that come from a Richmond supplier are outstanding. They’re large even after being cooked and very flavourful. I also recently tried the Wor Wonton and it’s very good because of the prawns and large chunks of vegetables that make it far better than a traditional wonton. “That has become very, very popular,’’ said Wong. The menu offers a variety of sauces and stir fry styles with chicken, beef, tiger prawns, garlic tiger prawns, salmon — even breaded pork chops. Under the Hot and Spicy stir fry category, the Singapore chili ranks as a best seller. The freshness of each order is guaranteed because you can watch the chefs preparing the meals in the open kitchen concept.

The Baan-Do’s Too side caters to customers who prefer burgers, fries, unique cold drinks and other items. “Totally opposite, actually,’’ said Wong. “We saw the opportunity with an empty space next door.’’ Baan-Do’s style of food has many more followers in the valley now. “There’s a lot more competition now from six years ago,’’ said Wong. “There’s two more Japanese restaurants opened. “We’re still doing very well. I think we’ll be doing well here as long as we keep the quality and get on top of things.’’ By the way, the answer to the most frequently asked question at the restaurant is Baan-Do means Vancouver Island in Japanese. Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012


If I could turn back time

High school reunion an interesting place to get a fresh take on yourself When my husband and I first arrived at his 30th high school reunion he was greeted by hundreds of familiar faces, though most names escaped him. “I’m glad they gave us name tags,” Paul said to me. “I just wish they were ten times bigger.” As old classmates and friends navigated the room recognizing long lost pals and ex-flames, I noticed my husband wasn’t the only one who had forgotten his reading glasses. “Oh, I remember you now!” one woman exclaimed after peering closely at the grad picture and name of a man she was talking to. Not wearing a nametag, I was still asked countless times during the night who I was, and often pitied for attending a function where I wouldn’t know a soul. And then there was the guy who felt sorry for my husband. “Why bring a sandwich to a deli?” he asked with surprise when he found out I was dragged along. Good question, I thought, realizing there weren’t as many spouses as I expected. Cowichan News Leader Pictorial March 2012

Lori Welborne

On a Brighter Note

It never occurred to me that Paul might have more fun reminiscing on his own without worry of entertaining me at the same time. I wouldn’t have minded staying home that night, but I’m glad I went. I met some fantastic people and heard some hilarious stories of my husband’s adolescence. I also got to ask the question: “If you could turn back time and knew everything you know now, what would you tell your graduating self?” Before I became a mother, I used to ask myself questions like that all the time. But after having a baby, a funny thing happened with my list of regrets: they

vanished the day I held our firstborn child. From then on I imagined that even the slightest change to my past could have led me to a life without him, and I couldn’t bear the thought. The arrival of our daughter a few years later only reinforced my feelings. Reliving the past is something I still like to do for fun, to help me learn from my mistakes and figure out how I might do things differently the next time a similar situation arises. I now have very few regrets, choosing instead to view them as characterbuilding life lessons. So, just for fun, I’ll rephrase that question I was asking the Graduating Class of ’81 to this: “If you could turn back time and knew everything you know now — but would be guaranteed to have the exact same children — what would you tell your graduating self?” I would tell myself to stop being shy, dream big and believe that anything is possible. At the age of 17 I might not have been ready to understand advice like that, but after living another 26 years, I finally do. Cowichan Good Life Magazine 39


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Cowichan News Leader Pictorial, March 16, 2012