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OAK BAYNEWS Pine beetle research

Oak Bay hoops hopes

Investigation into the epidemic still devastating B.C. forests is happening in the Capital Region. News, Page A3

Oak Bay High basketball teams finish near the top of their respective tournaments. Sports, Page A17

Local Market Expert

JIM BAILEY www.jimbailey.ca jimbailey@royallepage.ca 1933 Oak Bay Avenue 250-592-4422

Watch for breaking news at www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

News among top B.C. newspapers for 2011

50 years and counting

Community paper up for two awards Having developed a solid tradition of covering our community, the Oak Bay News has once again been selected one of the top community newspapers in B.C. Last week the News was named a general excellence finalist in its circulation category in the B.C. and Yukon Community Newspapers Association’s 2012 Ma Murray Awards. The award covers all aspects of the newspaper, from writing and photography to overall design and advertising. The News has finished third for the past four years. Oak Bay News was also named a finalist in the category of best special section, for our pullout tribute to retiring mayor Christopher Causton. Section team members included Jennifer Blyth, Tricia Stringfellow, Brian Pert, Oliver Somner and Penny Sakamoto. Black Press Greater Victoria staffers nominated for individual awards include photographers Don Denton, in the colour feature photo category, and Sharon Tiffin, for a black-andwhite feature photo. Both pictures ran in the Victoria News. Monday Magazine is nominated for seven awards, including six writing awards, tops among Black Press’ Island publications. Overall, the company captured 76 of the 132 finalist spots over all categories. The winners will be announced during the awards gala on April 14 at the River Rock Casino Resort in Richmond. editor@oakbaynews.com

Flanking an antique scale, retired pharmacist Roy Tucker and son, Tony, hold medicinal bottles Roy mixed in the 1970s. Tony currently owns and operates the Oak Bay Village Pharmasave, the continuation of the business Roy began 50 years ago this week as Newport Pharmacy near Windsor Park. See story, page A8. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

The other side of the deer problem Situation ‘critical’ for region’s food producers Ryan Flaherty News staff

One voice has risen above the others in the discussion on deer in the Capital Region. Until recently, much of the debate over what to do about increasing deer-human conflict has focused on urban areas. But several South Island farmers made it known last week they are

in a dire situation of their own, and that they feel the time for talk is over. “It’s just out of control,” said Ray Galey, owner of Galey Farms in Saanich. “There isn’t any farmer who’s not an environmentalist, but (even though) we all love Bambi, we don’t need 10,000 of them.” Deer have eaten more of his crops each year, he said, to the point where he’s “given up on the whole point of sustainability.” In addition, Galey said he’s cutting the amount of farmed acreage back by close to 30 per cent this year as a result. “You can’t

have that kind of damage and have anything left for yourself.” Last week, the Capital Regional District’s planning, transportation and protective services committee recommended that a citizens’ advisory group be formed to devise a regional deer management strategy. Committee members acknowledged the urgent need for action in rural areas. “There are agricultural and urban aspects of this problem,” said committee vice-chair Vic Derman. “But in the case of the farmers, they’re facing a critical situation.” Derman’s motion to form two

separate groups – one focusing on agricultural concerns, the other on urban deer – was defeated. Nonetheless, the advisory group will be directed to make finding a solution for farmers its top priority. Some people aren’t sure that’s enough. “I can’t see how those two issues can be dealt with under the same roof,” said Kelly Carson, a member of DeerSafe Victoria, which is calling for a non-lethal course of action. PLEASE SEE: Advisory group, Page A4

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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Understanding the invasion Forest research happening in Greater Victoria measures the pine beetle’s threat to Canadian forests

low up to his report in April, the full impact of the pine beetle’s spread into new habitat outside B.C. may not be seen until decades down the road, said Kathy Bleiker, a research scientist based out of the federal government’s Pacific Forestry Centre in Saanich. he B.C. government doesn’t have enough Bleiker measures the developmeninformation about its forest management to tal rate, survival and reproductive deal with the long-term results of widespread success of the beetle’s immigration beetle kill and fires, B.C. Auditor General John east during extended field studies in Doyle concluded in a report released Feb. 16. Grande Prairie, Alta. Doyle’s report also criticizes the province’s shift of The pine beetles are now attacking responsibility for replanting logged Crown land from Alberta’s jack pine and continue to the ministry to logging companies. chart new territory there. The insects Since 2004, logging companies have been responhave been recorded nearly as far east sible for replacement as Fort McMurray, just trees until they reach shy of the Saskatch“free growing” height, ewan border. which takes seven “It’s sort of hard to ■ The beetles have destroyed to 20 years dependpredict what’s going 726 million cubic metres, or 18.5 ing on species. The to happen right now ■ Measures about five millimemillion Interior logging trucks audit found the policy in Canada’s boreal tres in length. worth of timber during the current tends to reduce speforests,” Bleiker said. outbreak. ■ Are native to western North cies diversity. “More of the research American forests and play a role ■ One female beetle can lay as “Reforestation is a is focused on spread in the natural development of formany as 60 eggs at a time. cost to forest comin the forest and ways ests, weeding out weak trees. ■ Beetles can survive on most panies, not an investto slow it. We may not ■ Have caused less damaging species of pine, but prefer lodgement,” Doyle writes. see huge population forest disturbances, including in pole, the most common form of “In managing their explosions in Alberta, the early 1980s. pine in B.C. business, forest combut I think it’s there to During an intense beetle outbreak ■ The current beetle outbreak panies tend to take stay where it wasn’t in a timber stand, the bugs may began in the early 1990s and the least-cost, leastbefore.” attack another species of tree, is continuing to spread across risk approach to meet Speaking to reportsuch as spruce, but they won’t southeastern and northeastern reforestation regulaers, Thomson rejected continue once the surrounding B.C., especially in the Peace tions, which means the Auditor General’s pine has been killed. Region. planting lower-cost, conclusion that the faster-growing spehis ministry is falling cies.” behind in reforestation. plentiful. The conditions were set for a mountain pine Doyle also conBut he acknowledged that the current beetle population explosion. cluded that the Forestimate of 733,000 hectares “not satis“The more beetles there are, the healthier and ests Ministry has factorily restocked” is likely to increase healthier the trees they can overcome,” Bleiker said. fallen behind in a once an ongoing update of B.C. forest “It’s positive feedback and that’s why you can get runlong-standing commitinventory is complete. away growth.” ment to reforest areas The ministry’s estimate of potential Researchers believe that when the destruction damaged by natural area suitable for replanting due to pine began there were three times more mature pine on the disturbances before beetle destruction is 650,000 hectares. landscape in B.C. than 100 years ago, possibly due to 1987, when industry “We’re working through the harvestSharon Tiffin/News staff ing of the mountain pine beetle,” Thomimproved fire suppression over the last century. first became responResearch scientist Kathy Bleiker holds son said. Strong winds then pushed beetles some 400 kilomesible for replacing mountain pine beetles and larvae that she tres over the Continental Divide, where they have surharvested areas. “What we have to do is make sure dug out from trees at the Pacific Forestry that we know where areas are being vived for several years now. Opposition MLAs Centre. The photo above right shows a harvested or not harvested before we “We might not see immediate population explosions pressed Forests Minmuch-larger-than-life model of the beetle. go in and do the reforestation work, in Alberta right now, or in the next 10 years, but I think ister Steve Thomson in a recent session in because we don’t want to put resources they’re there to stay,” Bleiker said, noting the added challenge of foreseeing impacts during a time of climate the legislature. into areas that still need to be available change. “The ministry is degrading the forest,” said NDP forfor potential salvage harvesting.” “In 20 or 30 years, if conditions are favourable and ests critic Norm Macdonald. the weather is favourable, and the climate’s favourable Thomson replied that the government has invested Understanding the spread and there are host trees, you could have a problem. $236 million in its Forests for Tomorrow program since Warmer winters failed to kill beetle larvae and sum“I’m almost a little worried that if (beetle) popula2005, when it was set up in response to the pine beetle mer droughts stressed host trees. tions fall too low now and they fall off our radar, in 30 epidemic in the B.C. Interior. That program calls for The two main contributing factors in the pine beetle years, someone else is going to have a big problem.” 14.5 million seedlings to be planted in 2012-13 and epidemic also came at a time when an increased pres– with files from Tom Fletcher another 21.5 million in 2013-14. ence of the beetle’s preferred host, mature pine, was nnorth@saanichnews.com While Doyle called for immediate action and a fol-

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While she is pleased to see the CRD seeking citizen input on the issue, Carson is worried about the advisory group’s demographic distribution – area farmers will fill three of the 12 spots. “(Given) the population of Saanich, how many farmers per capita (are there) in all of Saanich, and why would one person with a small business speak for the rest of the community?” she asked. Derman hopes that every member of the group will approach the matter objectively. “We want people (chosen for) the committee almost like in a jury selection,” he said. “They haven’t made up their mind and are willing to consider the information and input from all stakeholders.” The citizens’ advisory group will include five members from the CRD’s core municipalities, four from the Saanich Peninsula and two from the West Shore, as well as a chair appointed from within. In addition, an expert resource working group will be established to advise on various biological and policy implications of any potential strategy. The group will be asked to make recommendations to the CRD board by the end of July. reporter@vicnews.com

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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Teachers’ strike looms Provincewide ‘day of action’ precedes strike vote, legislation still possible Natalie North

believes it is unlikely the B.C. Teachers’ Federation and the B.C. Public School Employers’ Association will reach a voluntary settlement. Teachers are holding a provincewide vote Tuesday and Wednesday on escalating their strike action. Results of the vote are expected sometime Thursday, and teachers could walk off the job as early as Friday – depending on Abbott’s actions over the next few days, according to Greater Victoria Teachers’ Association president Tara Ehrcke. Greater Victoria and Saanich school districts participated in a “Day of action,” Monday (Feb. 27). The “bell-to-bell” demonstration signified the period of time educators spend inside

News staff

Teachers in B.C. could walk off the job as early as Friday. The province’s 40,000 teachers are planning to ramp up pressure on the government, following an announcement that the province could legislate an end to the ongoing strike. Teachers in B.C. have been refusing administrative duties and are not including grades on students’ report cards. The job action began last September. Education Minister George Abbott announced Thursday (Feb. 23) that he intends to end the job action and impose a contract. That followed assistant deputy minister Trevor Hughes’ comment that he

schools. After the final bell of the day, teachers demonstrated outside schools and at busy intersections in an effort to share their message with the public. Some teachers also participated in a demonstration on the legislature lawn later on in the day. “It’s not a picket line, it’s just an information demonstration,” said Saanich Teachers’ Association president Sean Hayes. Ehrcke said parents have shown a lot of support for the GVTA leading up to the demonstration. “We’re asking for mediation or even arbitration as a way to get through the impasse,” she said. “We think legislation is not fair, not reasonable and not nec-

essary right now. … That they would simply use the legislative hammer without exploring those other options, I think is unreasonable.” The B.C. Federation of Labour commissioned a telephone survey that found 53 per cent of 400 people asked about the labour dispute last week were on the side of teachers, compared to 39 per cent who supported the government. The survey, conducted by Environics Research Group, also found 89 per cent of those polled felt the government should agree to arbitration if teachers stop job action and abide by an arbitrator’s ruling. – With files from Christine van Reeuwyk nnorth@saanichnews.com

Don Denton/News staff

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OAKBAYNEWS

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

EDITORIAL

BAY NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Oak Bay News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-598-4123 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.oakbaynews.com

OUR VIEW

Time for province to make a deal Next year’s provincial election could be won or lost by how the B.C. Liberal party plays its cards this week in the ongoing dispute with the province’s teachers. The teachers have been on a relatively low-key strike since September. There were concerns then about how job action would affect kids in the classroom. Fortunately, judging by the dearth of complaints, it seems most teachers have kept the drawn-out labour negotiations from inconveniencing parents or politicizing students. But this week’s vote to escalate the strike is a magnitude beyond holding back grades on report cards or piling paperwork on administrators. If teachers vote to walk off the job even for one day, you can bet the public will pay a lot more attention to this issue. Let’s hope it doesn’t come to that. Even if it does, the province will gain little by sticking to its hard-nosed strategy. Teachers spend a lot of time with our kids and play a vital role in the health of our local communities. Portraying these frontline workers as greedy or easily replaceable will do little to bolster the Liberals’ flagging support. Indeed, legislating teachers back to work instead of working harder to negotiate a deal will effectively arm the NDP with more ammo ahead of the May 14, 2013 vote. This government, under Gordon Campbell, paid a heavy political price for showing arrogance toward a labour movement that is still a powerful force in this province. Any currency the Liberals had from the public’s disdain of previous NDP regimes has long been used up.

Unless Premier Christy Clark is in a hurry to go back to her radio job, she needs to stay away from the kind of comment she recently made on her former employer’s station. Clark said she didn’t think the province could make a deal with the teachers. That’s simply not true. The time has come to appoint a mediator and agree to abide with whatever decisions he or she makes. Teachers, by their considered actions, have so far earned the public’s respect. Now is the province’s chance to do the same. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@oakbaynews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Oak Bay News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Taxing times for B.C. government Before this week’s budget debate and Ontario’s big spending is drowned out by the shouting hangover. over the teachers’ dispute, here’s NDP finance critic Bruce Ralston a look at the main points and the says Falcon’s two-per-cent spending arguments unfolding target is “unrealistic,” around them. and the whole program is The setting for Finance motivated mostly by two Minister Kevin Falcon’s by-elections this year and first budget is what he a general election next dreaded when Premier year. He said the proposal Christy Clark handed to raise general business him the job. Recovery taxes is a repeat of his is painfully slow, with effort to save the HST, and mining and petroleum it won’t happen if the B.C. growing and forest Liberals win in 2013. products struggling to B.C. Conservative Tom Fletcher leader John Cummins hold and build on gains B.C. Views made in Asia. This and made the bizarre claim the $3-billion dismantling that it’s an NDP-style of the harmonized “tax and spend” budget, sales tax moved Falcon to limit and inaccurately accused Falcon overall spending growth to an of raising taxes on small business. average of two per cent for the He also joined the NDP chorus of next three years. That means little outrage over ICBC, B.C. Hydro and or no increase to all areas except medical premium increases. health care, education and social Some other hot topics in the assistance. budget: Despite holding the line on public • Selling assets. The big one service pay and not replacing 2,000 here is B.C.’s liquor wholesaling positions over the next three years, monopoly, run out of warehouses Clark and Falcon had to postpone in Kamloops and Vancouver. Falcon the elimination of the 2.5-per-cent insists the private sector does this small business income tax to get kind of work more efficiently, and to a balanced budget by 2013. union contracts will be protected in And Falcon has again dangled a bidding process. the prospect of raising general The NDP argues that selling off corporate income tax from 10 to 11 a monopoly puts this government per cent, but not until 2014. cash cow at risk, and points to Business experts applauded the private retail stores with higher hard line on spending, noting the prices and lower wages. contrast with Alberta’s big spending The proposed sale of 100 surplus

Crown properties has raised cries of “selling the silverware to buy groceries.” But land sales are nothing new for governments, and Falcon prefers that to raising taxes. • Carbon tax. The last scheduled increase goes ahead in July, adding another penny on a litre of gasoline, followed by a freeze and review of the whole climate program. Ralston says the climate plan is “in tatters,” along with dozens of other policy areas that are also under review after 11 years of B.C. Liberal rule. NDP leader Adrian Dix vows to keep the carbon tax and its offsetting personal income tax cuts, direct carbon tax revenues to transit and rural energy-saving retrofits, and hike the general corporate tax rate from 10 to 12 per cent to pay for it. • HST. Asked what he would have done as finance minister, Ralston suggested getting rid of the HST sooner. Dix continues to misrepresent the HST as solely a transfer to big business, ignoring the small and medium-sized businesses that have a year left to take advantage of input tax credits. Simon Fraser University economist Jon Kesselman has estimated that poor people will be worse off when the HST ends, while the rest of us will see a very small net benefit. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘The NDP calls Falcon’s two-per-cent spending target ‘unrealistic.’’


OAK BAY NEWS -

www.oakbaynews.com • A7

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Letters The News welcomes opinions and comments. Letters should discuss issues and stories covered in the News and be 300 words or less. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose phone number for verification of your letter. ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Oak Bay News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 386-2624 ■ Email: editor@ oakbaynews.com

All that Jazz Jazz, an Australian Labradoodle, gets a haircut from pet stylist Kathy Banks. Jazz visits his stylist every six weeks. Sharon Tiffin/ News staff

LETTERS Time to take action, not talk about deer Enough already. Is there no one at the Capital Regional District capable of making a decision? More deer committees are a cop-out and a time waster. It is time the CRD, municipalities and the provincial government started doing what they were elected and paid to do. Continually referring issues deemed as difficult back to the electors is simply an abdication of responsibility. There is no place for wildlife as large and intrusive as deer within urban areas, especially those parts of the CRD that are far from rural and forested areas. Those who say it is simply unfortunate that flowers are being eaten grossly understate the increasingly serious issue the deer have become. Opponents to a cull simply do not give adequate consideration to the impact of deer on locallyproduced crops or the

city’s gardens, walkways or roads. Such routine damage and destruction of private property by humans would result in civil litigation, if not criminal charges. Those who identify ICBC costs underestimate, too. No one seems to mention that there is a lot more to vehicle collisions than ICBC numbers. Damage to the vehicle and animal may be fairly easy to quantify – but what about the emotional and physical trauma on the people involved, directly and indirectly? Even the ICBC figures are understated because not all drivers carry “comprehensive” insurance. The latest CRD report offers some interesting figures. In August 2011, 30 deer/ vehicle collisions were reported in Saanich alone (22 deer were killed outright). And of 389 submissions on the deer matter to the CRD, only 28 people (7.2 per cent) favoured doing nothing. We need the CRD to make a decision – now. Roberta McCarthy Oak Bay

Education plan neglects details I am concerned about the future of public education in British Columbia. The B.C. Education Plan is very short on details, but I am most concerned that narrower core competencies are to be delivered by technology, which is bound to be extremely expensive. Will funds go to buy computers for teaching and data collection instead of for teachers’ salaries and smaller classes? Technology is powerful, but the relationship between teachers and their students will always be of paramount importance in any education system. We want schools to produce creative, thoughtful, flexible, knowledgeable and self-confident young people. This can be achieved by rich, integrated, hands-on classroom experiences provided by teachers who know the backgrounds and needs of their students. It worries me that the new B.C. Education Plan makes almost no mention of art and

music, except for a short reference to these (along with sports, leadership and science) as subjects that might be taught outside the classroom. How is this to be done? Are we heading toward the privatization of teaching these subjects, for families who can afford them? These subjects are essential in a balanced, modern education. Their presence in the school is what nurtures our students’ creative sides and is the reason some give for staying in school. These subjects should not be optional; they are an important part of the curriculum. I value public education and worry that with a lack of funding and the hasty introduction of a new education plan, more parents will decide to send their children to private schools. I worry that the support of private schools by this government may hasten this change, and we will become more of a have/have not society. Linda Picciotto Oak Bay

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Glaucoma... “the sneak–thief of sight” Glaucoma is a disease that is characterized by higher than average pressures within the eye. Those higher pressures can cause optic nerve damage, which in turn may lead to vision loss. Most types of glaucoma do not have any dramatic or painful symptoms, but develop slowly and subtly over a period of time. Since peripheral vision is generally affected first, most patients never suspect they even have a problem. For that reason glaucoma is called “the sneak-thief of sight.” Although the most common type of glaucoma cannot be cured, if detected and controlled early, vision can be preserved. Early diagnosis is of paramount importance as the damage to sight can not be reversed, but its progress can be halted. Who is at risk for developing glaucoma? Risk factors include: • Family history of glaucoma • Being over the age of forty • Elevated intraocular pressure • Diabetes • High myopia (nearsighted) • Being of African descent • Smoking (another good reason to quit) Your optometrist will routinely check your eye pressure, examine the optic nerve at the point where it enters the eye and assess other risk factors. The optic nerve changes in appearance as glaucoma damages the nerve fibers. Visual field testing can be arranged by your optometrist to check the sensitivity of both your central and peripheral vision. If your optometrist suspects that you have glaucoma, you will be referred to an opthalmologist. If the diagnosis is confirmed, treatment will be initiated. Medication to decrease fluid production or increase drainage is often used to reduce intra-ocular pressure. Compliance to the medication schedule is essential for the preservation of vision. The best way to prevent damage from glaucoma is never to let it progress. You should have your eyes examined regularly to avoid this preventable loss of vision.

Dr. Neil Paterson Dr. Suzanne Sutter Optometrists

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A8 • www.oakbaynews.com

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They still disagree on retail merchandising styles and how long to hang onto old stock. But retired pharmacist Roy Tucker can’t deny that his son, Tony, has a knack for making a modern pharmacy hum. Wandering into Oak Bay Pharmasave these days, with its myriad products and multiple profit centres, gives the father, now 84, a clear indication that retailing is far different than when he opened his first drugstore 50 years ago tomorrow (March 1). On that day in 1962, he launched his business career, having made an arrangement with Howard Bewley to purchase Newport Pharmacy at the corner of Newport Avenue and Windsor Road. The selling price was $47,000. “In those days that was like a million dollars,” Roy recalls. The deal, financed by Bewley himself, allowed Roy to get his start while supporting wife, Pat, and their young family. Roy had worked whatever jobs he could find after obtaining his pharmacy degree from the University of British Columbia in 1955. “I remember being broke and going from paycheque to paycheque,” he says. “It took me 18 years to pay (the loan) off.” When Bewley handed Roy the keys to the pharmacy and walked out the door, the young pharmacist was forced to sink or swim and learn from his mistakes. As sole employee for much of the early years, he had to get creative in order to build his business. In the early days, when the Tuckers were struggling to make a go of it, any opportunity to extend their customer service was seized. Often Roy took phone orders from shut-ins who needed a prescription or some other product. He’d call up Pat,

Photo contributed

Pharmacist Roy Tucker poses with late wife, Pat, in their United Pharmacies drugstore on Oak Bay Avenue. The store later became the first Pharmasave in Greater Victoria. who was home with four kids, to come with the car and make the deliveries. Tony recalls the days when he and twin brother Jeffrey were thrust into delivery duty by their dad. “I can remember he gave us oversized bikes so we would grow into them,” Tony says. As the business grew, Roy began looking for new digs. In 1977 he struck a deal with John Weicker, who was operating a pharmacy in Oak Bay Village. Later the Tuckers joined with a group of other pharmacy owners under the United Pharmacies umbrella. In 1981, the blue banners of United were switched for the red of Pharmasave, for which the Oak Bay store was the first in Canada to convert. Tony had worked at Oak Bay Marina Restaurant as a teen, then at Food Forum on Cadboro Bay Road. The mid-80s brought crisis for the family, as Pat became ill, prompting Roy to consider selling the business to care for her. He and Tony talked about the son coming on board full-time, which he did in 1985. Pat died in 1989. The store was a good fit for

then 23-year-old Tony, who, unlike his dad, embraced the notion of learning on the job. “I like retail. I like people. I like elderly people,” he says. “This was a situation that was kind of dropped in my lap, but it took off, as far as sales go.” The introduction of cosmetics at the store was a huge boon for business, he says. Bringing in such non-pharmacy items as giftware and seasonal items has also helped keep the traffic flow consistent. “I think when people know they don’t have to go downtown to get things, it makes it easier for them,” he says. Liz Smith, president of the Oak Bay Business Improvement Association, calls Pharmasave the “heart of the Village” for the way it generates traffic for the area. And she’s constantly surprised at the stock that finds its way onto the store’s shelves. “It’s like Aladdin’s cave. There’s so much interesting merchandise in there,” she says. “I have visitors that come from the U.K. and they always want to stop in to see what’s new.” Tony’s wife, Karen, along with daughter Kayla, goes on buying trips – to New York on occasion – to find interesting items to catch people’s attention. Tony keeps the atmosphere light, chatting up customers and doing his best to make everyone feel comfortable. He’s stopped trying to make Roy comfortable with the way he runs the store, but still lets dad speak his mind about the state of the stockroom. “We sometimes disWe Specialize in: agree on whether he Hair Transplantation • Natural Advantage should put old stock Capillary Therapy • DNA Testing on sale out front,” Roy Industry Leaders for over 45 Years says. “(But) for someState of the art multi-therapeutic solutions who doesn’t have a Call Today! one Dermatologist Referred • Award winning service degree, he’s done quite well. He’s very active 1.250.385.4690 in the community and 322-1175 Cook St. Victoria I think he’ll be there for VANCOUVER • VICTORIA • CALGARY a long time.” www.dubrules.com editor@oakbaynews.com

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A10 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Hospitals foundation getting closer to its goal Jennifer Blyth

Thanks to continued support from the community, the Victoria Hospitals Foundation is 80 per cent of the way toward its goal of raising $595,000 for the purchase of 94 specialized vital

signs monitors for the Royal Jubilee’s Patient Care Centre. The new monitors display up-to-the-minute patient information such as blood pressure, pulse and respiratory rate, as

well as an electrocardiogram, a wave-form graphic of a patient’s heartbeat. Caregivers can now make immediate medical assessments right at a patient’s bed-

side, and wireless communication devices alert them when a patient’s vital signs change. To donate or for more information, please call the Victoria Hospitals Foundation at 250-

519-1750 or visit www.victoria hf.ca ■■■

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www.oakbaynews.com • A11

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, February 29, 2012

‘Sexting’ puts youth at risk: expert Cyber-bullies use explicit images to control peers

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Erin McCracken Using text messaging to relay aggressive or harmful sentiments is a method used increasingly by school-aged bullies.

News staff

Videos posted online of teens beating another youth, emailed threats, nude photos posted to an open Facebook page – today’s youth are faced with an online world rife with bullies. Darren Laur, who specializes in helping young people safely navigate that environment, has a message for parents, as the country marks national Bullying Stops Here, Pink Shirt Day today (Feb. 29). Many parents don’t know enough about the growing trend of sexting, which includes sending nude digital photos, texting sexually explicit messages, even sexcasting or webcasting a sexual act, he says. Veteran Victoria police Sgt. Laur teaches violence prevention, safety awareness and selfprotection strategies through his private company Personal

Protection Systems Inc. Studies have shown that one-third of youth, ages nine to 16, have sent a nude digital picture of themselves to someone, usually a boyfriend or girlfriend, says Laur, who has taught his strategies to 30,000 kids in schools throughout B.C. Sexting makes the photographed youth vulnerable to sextortion or extortion, he adds. In one case, a Grade 10 girl in the Capital Region sent a nude photo of herself to a boyfriend. After they broke up, he posted the picture on Facebook. Though Laur helped get the photo taken down and the male is going through the

restorative justice process, Laur says cyber-bullying victims suffer. In the last 18 months, he helped more than a dozen youth who were considering suicide because of cyberbullying or, as Laur calls it, digital peer aggression. He is constantly reminding kids today that their online actions are “public, permanent and searchable,” and “so ... what they’re doing online is now coming back to haunt them

later in life.” He also encourages youth to speak out about criminal behaviour. “If the silent majority stands up to the digital peer aggressors and says, ‘Enough is enough and if you don’t stop we’re going to tell,’ all of a sudden we now take the power away from that digital peer aggressor,” he says. “Now the bully understands that they no longer have that audience anymore.” emccracken@vicnews.com

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A12 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

MP tees off for golf courses Playing golf with clients is a legitimate business expense: Garrison

Jeff Calderwood, left, CEO of the National Golf Course Owners Association Canada, EsquimaltJuan de Fuca MP Randall Garrison and Olympic View Golf Club general manager Randy Frank hope to see golf once again be a tax write-off as a business expense.

Charla Huber News staff

Charla Huber/News staff

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Non-golfer Randall Garrison wants a day on the links to be a business write-off. Last week the NDP MP from Esquimalt-Juan de Fuca introduced a private members’ bill that adds golf to the list of activities that can be written off on one’s taxes. Bowling and attending NHL games are allowable, he says, so golfing should be, too. “There are 10 golf courses in my riding. More than 1,000 people are employed by golf courses here,” Garrison said, adding that more than onethird of them are students. In the past, golf was an allowable business expense, but it was removed with yachting and hunting. “At that time it was only something the rich would do,” Garrison said. Times have changed, however. Since 1998, more Canadians over 15 play golf than any other sport. “I think this is excellent. If passed it will really help the golf industry,” said Randy Frank, general manager of Olympic View Golf Club. Golf is ideal for making business connections, he added. “You’re out there for four hours in a peaceful environment with no interruptions.” Jeff Calderwood, CEO of the National Golf Course Owners Association Canada, is thrilled by the proposed bill. Not being able to write off a round with a client has hurt his industry, he said. “If you are a business person, you don’t want to take a client to a place that you can’t write off. The Income Tax Act is not supposed to be penalizing any industry.” While private members’ bills rarely become legislation as they are introduced, Garrison holds out hope that his proposal will move quickly through Parliament. reporter@goldstreamgazette.com

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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

www.oakbaynews.com • A13

Forty years of hometown tourists celebrated Laura Lavin News Staff

Only two of the original “Big Six� tourist attractions that started Be a Tourist in Your own Hometown 40 years ago will be welcoming visitors this year. Pacific Undersea Gardens and Miniature World are founding members of the venture, which invites locals to visit and get a tourist’s-eye view of the city. The other four, Sealand of the Pacific, the Classic Car Museum, Fable Cottage and most recently, the Royal London Wax Museum, have all closed their doors over the last four decades. The wax museum was a difficult loss, said Be a Tourist in Your Own Hometown organizer Krista Larsen of the Victoria Attractions Association. However, there are more than a dozen new attractions waiting to show Victorians their stuff. “This year is all somewhat new because we are celebrating the 40th anniversary of Be A Tourist in Your own Home-

a $10 passport allows visitors admission to such local attractions as Butchart Gardens, Maritime Museum of British Columbia, Victoria Butterfly Gardens and Fort Rodd Hill. Other freebies include city tours by ITT Wilsons/ Wilsons Transportation, harbour tours by Victoria Harbour Ferries and dozens of other discounts that can be downloaded online to go along with the free admissions. “It’s so phenomenal. Be a Tourist has been entertaining three generations of Victorians,� said Larsen. Don Descoteau/News staff “Our ambassadors Visitors who take part in Tourist in Your Own Hometown this meet people who say they week can check out sights like this cod, one of many species came with their grandliving at Pacific Undersea Gardens in the Inner Harbour. mother when they were children and now they’re town and we’ve returned the at what had happened to our bringing their own children or event to its original format progression.� They looked at grandchildren.� where most of the attractions the long-term sustainability Be a Tourist in Your Own are free,� said Larsen. of the event and community Hometown runs tomorrow In recent years many attrac- interest. (March 1) through Sunday. tions provided a discounted “We did some door-knockTickets are available at Tourvisit during the Be a Tourist in ing, some hand-holding and ism Victoria’s Visitor InformaYour Own Hometown event, had our hand-out. Everyone tion Centre, Thrifty Foods and but in its 40th year, Larsen hears about the deals and are a variety of other locations. said it was important to give impressed that these attracFor more information go to new life to the old occasion. tions agreed to free admis- attractionsvictoria.com. The “It was a concerted effort,� sions,� she said. website also features more she said. “We began postBesides Pacific Undersea discounts. 2011 Be a Tourist and looked Gardens and Miniature World, llavin@vicnews.com

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A14 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

THE ARTS

Hot ticket: Strike Force 4 at the Royal Theatre on March 4, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets $16.

BAY NEWS

Victoria Symphony’s Concerts For Kids, an exciting program of music from Beethoven to African drumming, demonstrates all the noises people make and the rhythms people dance to around the world.

Vic High’s improv team takes regional title Team fundraising to compete at nationals in Ottawa

team’s ability to thrive under the pressure and come out strong in every game. Part of their winning perJoin Vic High Improv formance included a charin the school’s theatre acter event, a game where (1260 Grant St.) teams are asked to develop on March 8 from 7 characters based on inanito 9:30 p.m. for an mate objects suggested by evening of student the audience. Building off performances, as the suggestion of a barbewell as entertainment cue, the students created a by Dave Morris and big, strong, fiery character – Aleisha Kalina. The a piece that had their vetevent includes a silent eran improvisor of a coach auction. Admission is impressed. by donation. “I wish I was as clever, but I’m not,” said Penty. “Their level of commitment is amazing. I would send them out on stage with a senior improviser.” While Penty practises with his students year-round, he says anyone can pick up the first rule of improv instantly. “Don’t say ‘no,’” Penty said. “Say ‘yes, and …’” It’s advice that can be applied to more than just the stage. “Improv helps me be more comfortable with the way that I am because once you’ve been as ridiculous as you are in improv, you’re less self-conscious during the regular day,” Taddei said. “I’m way less aware of how crazy I’m being.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

Support the team

Natalie North News staff

Each time before Colleen Maguire steps on stage with her improv team, it’s one of the happiest moments of her life. “We say to each other, ‘We’re going to have fun’ and ‘I love you,’” the Grade 12 Victoria High School student gushes. “It’s in the spirit of love and competition and I try to impart that to the other students as much as possible.” It should come as no surprise that Maguire’s enthusiasm for improv earned her a Spirit of the Games award at the Vancouver Island regional championships, held Feb. 4 and 5 at Vic High. She was one of nine students from Vic High Improv who became the first Victoria students to place No. 1 in the region and qualify for the Canadian Improv Games since the Island joined the competition 10 years ago. “It was such a surreal moment,” Maguire said. “I bawled my eyes out and I’m not a screamer, but I definitely squealed. I didn’t even think about the audience or the judges or the scores at that point. We were hugging and there were trophies and it was overwhelming.” “I don’t think I’ve cried that much publicly in a long time,” added teammate Kathryn Taddei, also in Grade 12. “It’s probably one of the only times I’ve cried out of sheer joy. … The whole team was (exuding) a mixture of disbelief and joy, but now we just need to make it happen.” To make it happen – a.k.a get to Ottawa for the finals April

Submitted photo

The Vic High Improv team is raising money to be able to compete at the national level in Ottawa. 3 through 7 – the group needs to fundraise $12,000 to cover the cost of their travel and accommodations. The team, along with coach and veteran improvisor Alan Penty, are hosting an evening of entertainment on March 8 to follow through with what has so far been a monumental experience for all those involved. “If I were a religious man, I’d say it’s a miracle (we won regionals),” he said. “We’ve never even come close to that before.” Penty, a regular on Sin City improv, was impressed by the

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OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, February 29, 2012

www.oakbaynews.com • A15

Telus backs miracle show The David Foster Foundation announced that Telus is now the marquee sponsor of the foundation’s May 25 to 27 Miracle Concert and Gala Weekend in Victoria as the foundation celebrates its 25th anniversary. “I am so excited to be coming back home to Victoria – my hometown,” said Foster. “To be able to celebrate our 25th anniversary with the Victoria community who supported the foundation from the very beginning is a thrill for me.” Foster announced Josh Groban, Kenny G and American Idol winner Ruben Studdard to the growing list of entertainers who will join him May 26 for the Miracle Concert at Save on Foods Memorial Centre. In August 2011, the Canadian Tenors were named as the first act on board for the once-in-a-lifetime show. Ticket sales for the concert and gala go on sale tomorrow (March 1) at noon. “Telus is pleased to support the exceptional work being done by the David Foster Foundation and we are proud of their tireless efforts to assist organ recipient families at a time when it is needed most,” said Mel Cooper, Chair of the Telus Victoria Community Board. “For 25 years, the David Foster Foundation has helped more than 700 families across Canada. Together, we will continue to support transplant recipients and their families and raise awareness of the importance

David Foster of organ donation in Canada.” Tickets will be available through Select Your Tickets at the Save on Foods Memorial Centre box office, by phone at 250-220-7777, or online at www.selectyourtickets.com. Ticket prices range from $75, $125, and a limited number of $250 VIP seats and are subject to applicable taxes and service charges. The David Foster Foundation is dedicated to providing financial support to Canadian families with children in need of life-saving organ transplants. In addition to helping families with their non-medical expenses, the foundation strives to increase organ donor registration through public awareness campaigns in Canada and the United States. For more information, visit www.davidfosterfoundation.com. llavin@vicnews.com

Sharing some stories An afternoon of sharing stories about growing up Jewish with painter and author Phyllis Serota is on March 4. “Many of us in Victoria know very little about each other’s early lives. Some of us grew up in Toronto, Calgary, New York, Israel and even Vancouver,” said Serota. “Let’s get together and learn about each other’s history.” Serota will facilitate by reading the chapter Being Jewish on the West Side from her recent memoir entitled Painting My Life, A Memoir of Love, Art and Transformation. The book will be available at the event on Sunday, March 4 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Congregation Emanu-El Adult Educational Centre, 1461 Blanshard St. Tea, coffee and light refreshments will be served. llavin@vicnews.com

Integrated Solid Waste and Resource Management Plan

We plan to make the most of a valuable resource. JOIN OUR ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND BE A PART OF THE PROCESS AND PROGRESS OF THIS IMPORTANT PROJECT. The Ministry of Environment has requested the CRD to appoint a Public and Technical Advisory Committee (PTAC) to help facilitate the development of a new Integrated Solid Waste and Resource Management Plan. To form the committee, we are seeking representation from a wide range of stakeholder groups, including private sector waste management service providers, non-profit organizations, businesses focused on waste diversion, the environmental community and the general public. Participation is voluntary. Members will be asked to commit to meet for up to three years. The deadline for applying is March 12, 2012. For the complete committee composition list and application, visit crd.bc.ca/ptac.

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A16 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

P H O T O

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BAY NEWS

F E A T U R E

Photos by Orange Frog Studios Inc. To book events call 250-381-3484 or e-mail adminassist@vicnews.com

■ Victoria Leadership Awards ■ Tuesday, Feb. 21 ■ Fairmont Empress Hotel

And the award goes to: 2012 Victoria Leadership Awards honour local heroes The annual Victoria Leadership Awards showcase the distinguished accomplishments of local heroes – our city’s very own Academy Awards for community volunteerism, dedication and achievement. Victoria’s inspiring community leaders were honoured on Feb. 21 at the eighth annual VLA gala at the Fairmont Empress. Led by Leadership Victoria, the awards are a partnership between Leadership Victoria, the University of Victoria, the Rotary Clubs of Greater Victoria, the Victoria Foundation and the United Way of Greater Victoria. In all, 29 distinguished nominees were celebrated at the 2012 ceremony. This year’s award recipients are:

Lifetime award recipient Naz Rayani, his son Rasool and granddaughter Aniqa with Il Terrazzo’s Michael Gudgeon.

Emcee Bruce Williams from CTV Vancouver Island is one of this year’s recipients of the Rotary Community Leadership Award.

Vancity Youth Award winner Leanna Hill with Leadership Victoria Alumnus Chris Tilden from Vancity.

Jeannette Hughes, recipient of the Leadership Victoria alumni with Layla Cochrane and Leadership Victoria President Mitchell Temkin.

Sherry LeBlanc receives the Royal Roads University Award from Vice President Cyndi McLeod.

Mary Ellen Purkis, one of the recipients of the University of Victoria Community Leadership Award with Dr. Valerie Kuehne and Dean Bertram from Grand & Toy.

United Way of Greater Victoria CEO Linda Hughes with award recipient Kathy Stinson, Executive Director, Victoria Cool Aid Society

Dr. Andrew Weaver, one of two recipients of the University of Victoria Community Leadership Award.

The Leadership Victoria Lifetime Achievement Award – Naz Rayani University of Victoria Community Leadership Awards – Mary Ellen Purkis and Andrew Weaver Rotary Community Leadership Awards – Bruce Williams and Christopher M. Causton Vancity Youth Award – Leanna Hill Leadership Victoria Alumni Award – Jeannette Hughes Victoria Foundation Community Leadership Award – Pacific Centre Family Services Association United Way of Greater Victoria Award for Collaboration and Partnership – Kathy Stinson Royal Roads University Leadership Excellence through Coaching and Mentoring Award – Sherry LeBlanc For more information, visit www.leadershipvictoria.ca

More photos available online at; http://gallery.pictopia.com/bclocalnews/gallery/97246

The 29 distinguished nominees for the Victoria Leadership Awards. The VLAs honour community leaders in 8 categories.

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www.oakbaynews.com • A17

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Royals spark stretch run Having swept two big wins from the Prince George Cougars, the Victoria Royals host the Spokane Chiefs at 7 p.m. tonight (Feb. 29), and the Vancouver Giants Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m.

SPORTS

Small Appliances… We’ve got it.

Four straight for Spartans Oak Bay runners up in girls’ Islands, boys’ city championships Travis Paterson News staff

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Claremont Spartans’ Melissa van Dyk goes up for two guarded by Oak Bay Breakers’ Emily Frame and Emma Thomson (partially hidden) in the Island final.

With four straight Island basketball championships, the Claremont Spartans shouldn’t be surprising anybody. But that’s just what the girls AAA team has done this year. The latest addition to the Spartans’ “tradition of success” came on Saturday night (Feb. 25), with a 63-53 win against the Oak Bay Breakers in the Island final at Mount Douglas secondary. Host Mount Doug Rams finished third, beating the Dover Bay Dolphins 78-55, earning the right to play Terry Fox Ravens on Tuesday for a spot at provincials (see Saanichnews.com for results). “Claremont has been in so many big games and they know how to win,” coach Kim Graves said. “I don’t think anyone expected a lot out of us because we lost big names (from last year). But half this team was in the 2011 provincial final and half of them won the (2011) provincial (high school) soccer championship. These girls work hard because they believe in themselves, and are doing things nobody thought they could.” Versatile Spartans guard Nikki Turner was named the tournament MVP, and tied Sam Lee for the team lead with 14 points in the final. Jill Coo-

per led the Breakers with 18 points. Going into the Lower Island AAA girls championships Feb. 16 to 18, the Breakers were the favourite, ranked No. 4 among AAA teams in B.C. But Claremont, which was ranked an honourable mention, defeated the Breakers in the Lower Island final -the first of two championship wins over Oak Bay in the span of seven days. Still, Graves said she wouldn’t be surprised to see Oak Bay in the topfour at provincials, and relishes the opportunity to have three Island teams in the top-four. “Oak Bay’s got all the parts to win at provincials, are well coached and work hard.”

Blue Jags win AA Islands For the first time in three years, the St. Michaels University Blue Jags have qualified for the AA boys’ basketball provincials without panic. The past two seasons, the Blue Jags squeaked in with comebacks and close wins. But on Saturday (Feb. 25) they hosted and won the AA Islands, bettering Brentwood College 57-38. “We played our most complete game of the season,” Blue Jags coach Reagan Daly said. “To hold them to 38 points, we relied on some tough defensive assignments and our guys were amazing.” Liam McLure earned the tournament MVP award for his defensive game, part of a standout effort by the Jags’ Grade 12 core with Derek HydeLay, Joe Erlic and Dave Lafleur.

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Oak Bay’s Jill Cooper and Claremont’s Madison Walsh fight for a loose ball in the Island final. “This time we had the type of final you hope to have. We played a great game, and our Grade 12s were awesome.” Lambrick Park beat Ladysmith in the third place game and will join St. Mikes and Brentwood at the AA boys’ provincials in Kamloops, March 7- 10.

Rams top AAA cities The Mount Douglas Rams beat the Oak Bay Bays 83-79 in the Lower Island boys’ AAA final at Oak Bay High on Saturday (Feb. 25). Those teams, as well as the Belmont Bulldogs and Claremont Spartans will represent the south at the AAA Islands in Duncan this weekend, March 1 to 3. Full stories, plus AA girls and A basketball updates online at Vicnews. com. sports@vicnews.com

Braves battle to OT win

Buzzer beater sends Vikes to final four

Travis Paterson News staff

The UVic Vikes needed a buzzer-beating basket to defeat the Calgary Dinos in men’s playoff basketball action, Sunday afternoon in Victoria. Terrell Evans grabbed the rebound from Ryan MacKinnon’s shot and threw it up and into the hoop to make it 90-88 with no time left. The late basket sparked a roar of jubilation from the 1,340 fans at Ken and Kathy Shields Court. With the win, the Vikes will face the Fraser Valley Cascades in the Canada West semifinal, Friday March 2 at the University of Saskatchewan. MacKinnon led the Vikes with 33 points, three assists and eight rebounds to help the Vikes capture the best-of-three Canada West quarterfinal series. “Once I knew Terrell’s (shot) was good, I was ecstatic,” MacKinnon said. “I could not control my emotions… I kind of went and tackled Terrell to the ground and threw a couple of punches at him. It’s an unbelievable feeling.” The Vikes lost 73-68 in Game 1 on Friday, but bounced back to win 68-61 on Saturday. Fans can view the live feed of the Vikes and Cascades, 4:15 p.m. on Canada West TV. The Huskies will host the Alberta Golden Bears in the other semifinal, later that night. sports@vicnews.com

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Keenan Milburn of the Calgary Dinos, right, fouls Michael Acheampong of the UVic Vikes at McKinnon Gym during Game 2 of the Canada West quarterfinal on Saturday. UVic won 68-61.

The Saanich Braves won Game 3 of their first-round playoff series the hard way, a 6-5 shootout settled in overtime against the Campbell River Storm on Sunday. But the important thing is they did it, said coach Brad Cook. The Braves and Storm played Game 4 in Campbell River on Tuesday, with the Braves up 2-1 in the series. The teams split 4-1 wins on Feb. 22 and 24. Game 5 is Wednesday (Feb. 29), 7:30 p.m. at Pearkes arena. Cook found lots of positives from Sunday’s game, despite having to win in overtime on a goal by 21-year-old James Kellington (his hat trick goal) after giving up a 3-1 lead late in the second period.

“It’s a pretty im important step for o young guys. our You could see they were struggling with decisions in the first overtime, and our team was average, but we outplayed the Storm in the second OT. And now the young guys will be (that much more) ready (the next time),” Cook said. Unfortunately for the Braves, defenceman Liam Sproule was injured Sunday and is unlikely to return for the playoffs. As of Monday the Peninsula Panthers were up 3-0 in their series over the Oceanside Generals, and the Kerry Park Islanders led the Comox Valley Glacier Kings 2-1. Both latter series played Monday and Tuesday. Full story and playoff updates at Saanichnews. com. sports@vicnews.com


A18 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

Co-op fuels women’s soccer Peninsula Co-op steps up for Highlanders women’s team Travis Paterson News staff

Travis Paterson/News staff

Part-owner Alex Campbell, coach Dave Dew and player Mariel Solsberg wear the red Peninsula Co-op colours at the press conference last week, unveiling the W-League team’s new sponsor and name.

For the players on Victoria’s W-League soccer team, swapping names from Highlanders to the Peninsula Co-op Women’s team is as easy as slipping into a brand new jersey. After all, it was one year ago the Highlanders FC team debuted in the W-League. But when a team travels for 15 road games from Vancouver to Los Angeles, the associated

Look in today’s paper* or online for

1 2

February 29, 201 S GAZETTE • DSTREAM NEW NICH NEWS • GOL BAY NEWS • SAA OAK • S NEW VICTORIA

costs can add up. So starting in 2012, both the women’s W-League and under-20 squads, formerly known as the Highlanders, will now share the name Peninsula Co-op Women’s Soccer. “If not for Peninsula Co-op, we couldn’t afford the costs associated with a W-League team,” said Highlanders part-owner Alex Campbell. “I don’t understand why people go crazy for the national women’s team but don’t support the W-League, which is the last stop for players before they go on to the national level.” The Highlanders’ founder was candid, for the most part, during the unveiling of Peninsula Co-op’s sponsorship at the Sticky Wicket last week. “This women’s team only averaged about 200 fans per home game last year, though I’m positive it can average 1,000 at Royal Athletic Park in 2012,” Campbell said. Exactly how much

Sports stats Basketball AA Boys’ Island Basketball Championships at St. Michaels University School, Feb. 23 to 25

2

FEBRUARY 201

Final standings 1st St. Michaels University School 2nd Brentwood College 3rd Lambrick Park 4th Ladysmith Mark Isfeld; Highland; Gulf Islands; Wellington

“The W-League is the last stop for players before they go on to the national level.” – Alex Campbell With men’s and women’s teams in the United Soccer League system, the clubs are not in business to make a profit. Rather, the goal is to bring the highest level of soccer to Victoria. To help make that happen, the women’s team will swap jersey colours from black and gold to red and white. The front of the jersey now bears the same branding as Peninsula Co-op’s retail stores. With 13 gas stations across Greater Victoria, the brand is a familiar one. This isn’t the first time a sports teams in Victoria was named Tournament All-Stars (local) Mark Yorath (SMUS); Brendan Somers (Lambrick Park); Jordan Charles (Brentwood); Derek HydeLay (SMUS); Joe Erlic (SMUS); Dawit Workie (SMUS); Lucas Dellabough (Lambrick Park) Tournament MVP Liam MacLure (SMUS) AAA Girls’ Island Basketball Championship at Mount Douglas secondary, Feb. 23 to 25 Final standings 1st Claremont 2nd Oak Bay

for a gas station sponsor. From 1982 to 1994, the Victoria Shamrocks played as Victoria Payless, named for Payless Gas, and won the Mann Cup in 1983. Bringing on a “presenting partner” is the latest boost of community support for the Highlanders, who are also selling ownership shares with each season ticket, entitling holders to a vote in the team’s decision making. The Highlanders’ unique ownership structure makes its debut this season. The goal is for 30-per-cent ownership through annual season ticket sales, and 30 per cent from local soccer organizations. Lakehill, Gorge and Prospect Lake have agreed in principle with the idea. This year, both the men’s and women’s teams will play out of Royal Athletic Park. Peninsula Co-op Women’s Soccer open the season on May 13, while the Highlanders men’s team starts May 23 at RAP. sports@vicnews.com 3rd Mt. Doug 4th Dover Bay Alberni; G. P. Vanier; Spectrum; Stelly’s Tournament MVP Nikki Turner (Claremont) Best Defensive Player Chloe Mead (Mount Doug) 1st team All-Stars: Sam Lee (Claremont); Caitlin Anderson (Claremont); Ella Macquisten (Oak Bay); Jill Cooper (Oak Bay); Julia Murray (Mount Doug) 2nd team All-Stars: Haley Cabral (Claremont); Emma Koloska (Oak Bay); Carly Sangha (Mount Doug); Emily Shires (Dover Bay)

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the team cost to run, Campbell wouldn’t divulge, though he is quick to explain the Highlanders’ organization.

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PUBLIC AUCTION 2 PM • VIEW FROM 1 PM

Masterpieces of wealth caliber LARGE WOOL AND SILK • PERSIAN & ORIENTAL RUGS

Plus many more from other corporate contracts: Turkoman, Large Silk Tabriz, Kashan, Shiraz Gashgai, Antique Sirjan, Saroug, Meimehi, Chobi, Fine Nain, Qum, Tribal Balouch, Moud, One Of A Kind Village Rugs, Runners, Oversized And Many Large Dining, Living Room Sizes.

MARY WINSPEAR CENTRE 2243 BEACON AVENUE, SIDNEY

goldstreamgazette.com

Terms: Cash, Visa, MC, Amex, and certified cheques. 15% Buyers premium plus HST in effect. Some items in advertisement are subject to prior sales/error/omissions. All sales are final. For more info call 1.604.808.6808. Licensed auctioneers.


www.oakbaynews.com â&#x20AC;˘ A19

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, February 29, 2012

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

$EADLINES

COMING EVENTS

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CALL FOR ENTRIES 10TH ANNUAL Kitty Coleman Woodland Art & Bloom Festival. Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show. Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting May 19,20, 21 Applications for Artisans are available at woodlandgardens.ca or phone 250-338-6901 COME AND learn more about Eaton Arrowsmith School... the only school in Victoria that focuses on the potential of children with learning disabilities to beneďŹ t from the brainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to change itself in order to improve cognitive functioning for life. Strengthening learning capacities instead of accommodating for learning weaknesses. Join us for our next information session! Thursday, March 1st, 12:30-2:30pm @ EAS #2003200 Shelbourne St, Victoria, BC

INFORMATION

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS LOST AND FOUND

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

LOST: 1 small black/brown stuffed toy dog w/ (ty.com) on the side (Clover Pt./O.B. area). Sentimental. 604-853-7157.

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL. Locations in Alberta & BC. Hands on real world training. Full sized equipment. Job placement assist. Funding Avail. www.iheschool.com 1-866-399-3853

TRAVEL GETAWAYS LONG BEACH - Ucluelet Deluxe waterfront cabin, sleeps 6, BBQ.Storm watchers 2 nights $239 / 3 nights $299. Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

TIMESHARE CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No Risk Program. Stop mortgage & maintenance payments today. 100% Money back guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

TRAVEL BRING THE family! Sizzling specials at Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best beach! New Smyrna Beach, Florida. See it all at: www.nsbďŹ&#x201A;a.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166.

WANTED a parent volunteer with students in Grade 11 or 12 in Saanich or Sooke School Districts to challenge the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policy of charging fees for all the courses and the Necessary learning resource materials and supplies leading to graduation. The BC Advocacy Institute, Inc., will provide free legal advice and pay all court and legal costs to a parent who will legally challenge, in the BC Supreme Court, any board policies that required a parent to pay fees for the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s required learning program and materials leading to graduation. BC Advocacy Institute Inc. Fax 250-385-0434.

LEGALS WAREHOUSEMANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIEN ACT Notice is hereby given that Kustom Towing, (2009) Ltd, 3297 Douglas St, Victoria, BC, V8Z 3K9 will be selling: 1995 NISSAN MAXIMA JN1CA21D6ST055113 Owner S. Faulkner 1996 HONDA ACCORD 1HGCD5631TA814643 Owner S. Lupkoski Will be sold on March 14, 2012. At 647B Dupplin Rd, Victoria, BC between 10am-2pm

PERSONALS DATING SERVICE. LongTerm/Short-Term Relationships, Free to try!!! 1-877-2979883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #7878 or 1-888-5346984. Live adult 1on1. Call: 1866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877804-5381. (18+). GET PAID To Lose weight. $5,000 for your success story. Personal image TV Show. Call to Qualify: 416-730-5684 ext 2243. Joanna@mertontv.ca. www.mertontv.ca. HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 250220-3334 or 800-777-8000. www.interactivemale.com

HAWAII ON The mainland, where healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured Community, Costa Rica â&#x20AC;&#x153;the most friendly country on earthâ&#x20AC;?! 1-780-952-0709; www.CanTico.ca

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS to Every Hunter in BC! Advertise in The BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis 2012-2014 publication. Increased circulation 250,000 copies! Tremendous Reach, Two Year Edition! Contact Annemarie at 1 800 661 6335 or hunt@blackpress.ca Be Your Own Boss! Attention Locals! People req. to work from home online. Earn $500$4500+ P/T or F/T. Toll Free 1.877.880.8843 leave mess. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T MISS this opportunity. 30 year manufacture expanding across Canada. Fencing, decks and docks. Expanding your business or start new. 1800-465-9968. Email: info@friendlyearth.com www.friendlyearth.com. MAKE A FORTUNE with $3000, we know how. Free info pack. Call (250)590-9634.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS AIRLINES ARE Hiring- Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualiďŹ ed- Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783. Become a Psychiatric Nurse - train locally via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements and some regional classroom delivery. Wages start at $30.79/hr to $40.42/hr. This 23 month program is recognized by the CRPNBC. Govâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t funding may be available. Toll-free 1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com

TRAIN TO be an Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 31 years of success! Government certiďŹ ed. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Fort McMurray

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WORK FROM Home. Largest Medical Transcriptionist employer in Canada looks to CanScribe for 100 more Mtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. We need more students! Enroll today! 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com admissions@canscribe.com

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DISTRIBUTORS EMCO Corporation, a leading National Plumbing, and Heating wholesale supplier is currently searching for a career minded, enthusiastic, and dynamic individual to ďŹ ll the position of counter sales at our busy Victoria location. The primary responsibility is to deliver an exceptional level of customer service. Duties include order taking and expediting, in person and on the phones, pricing and stock inquiries. You must be team oriented, and able to work closely with others. We offer competitive salary, based on experience, and an excellent bonus and beneďŹ ts program If you are interested in being rewarded for your performance, please send your resumes to Adam Barron EMCO Corporation 550 Culduthel Road Victoria BC V8Z 1G1 Fax 475-6282 EMail adbarron@emcoltd.com

HELP WANTED An earthmoving company based in Edson Alberta requires a full time Heavy Duty Mechanic for ďŹ eld and shop work. We require Cat Dozer/Deere excavator experience. You will work a set schedule for days on and off. Call Lloyd @ 780723-5051

ASPHALT PAVING Personnel required: Paving contractor in Kamloops area requires Foreman and personnel for Asphalt Lay-down. Applicants should have minimum 1 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience in commercial and residential paving, although candidates with construction experience will be considered. Training and beneďŹ ts will be available to the successful applicants. Please forward resume to: paverswanted@yahoo.ca. ASPHALT PAVING Personnel Required: Paving contractor in the beautiful BC Interior requires paving personnel for all aspects of Asphalt Lay-down. Applicants should have minimum 1 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience in Highway, commercial and residential paving, although candidates with construction experience will be considered for training. Please forward resume to: paverswanted@yahoo.ca. DIRECT SALES REPRESENTATIVES. Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere home automation and Security Company is NOW hiring AprilAugust. No experience necessary. Travel Required. E-mail resume: kkurtze@vivint.com Visit: www.vivint.ca SERVICE MANAGER - Hanna Chrysler Ltd. (Hanna, Alberta). Opportunity in a perfect family environment. Strong team, competitive wages, beneďŹ ts, growth potential. Fax resume: 403-854-2845. Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

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EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

GIFT SUCCEED. STUDY.WORK. S U . O

THE

OF EDUCATION

Register for any Sprott-Shaw Community College program between Dec. 1, 2011 - Feb. 29, 2012 and receive up to $1000* towards tuition. Learn more at sprottshaw.com/gift *Some conditions apply

TRAIN TO BE A HEALTHCARE ASSISTANT IN VICTORIA TODAY! Healthcare Assistants are prepared to work in both healthcare facilities and community agencies. HCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s provide & maintain the health, safety, independence, comfort & well-being of individuals & families. Train locally for the skills necessary in this rewarding career Ă&#x20AC;eld.

SproUStt-S ha w JOIN ON:

COMMUNITY COLLEGE S i n c e 1 9 0 3

250.384.8121 www.sprottshaw.com

CALL VICTORIA:


A20 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

PERSONAL SERVICES

PERSONAL SERVICES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

HOUSES FOR SALE

APARTMENT/CONDO

INCOME OPPORTUNITY

TRADES, TECHNICAL

HEALTH PRODUCTS

FINANCIAL SERVICES

FRIENDLY FRANK

EARN EXTRA Cash! - P/T, F/T Immediate openings for men & women. Easy computer work, others positions are available. Can be done from home. No experience needed. www.HWC-BC.com

Required Immediately! Journeyman RV Technician for Kamloops largest RV Dealership. Jubilee RV Centre offers excellent wage compensation, medical & dental benefits, ongoing industry training and year round employment. Come join our team in sunny and warm Kamloops, where you will be appreciated, love our climate and enjoy all our outdoor activities! Please forward your resume to service@jubileerv.com Attention Steve Joyce - Service Manager

HERBAL MAGIC - With Herbal Magic lose up to 20 pounds in just 8 weeks and keep it off. Results Guaranteed! Start today call 1-800854-5176.

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

RING/WATCH, $10. Murchie tins, $20. Snow chains, $20. HK plate, $30.(250)508-9008.

SALES THE ENSUITE Bath & Kitchen Showroom. We are looking for a dynamic individual to fill the full time position of Sales Consultant at our Langford Ensuite Showroom location. The primary responsibility is to deliver an exceptional level of customer service to the retail public and wholesale trades. Duties will include sales, quotations, order entry and expediting. The successful candidate must have strong communication skills, attention to detail, high customer service standards, and a team attitude. We offer a competitive salary, based on experience, and excellent benefits and bonus program. If you are interested in this opportunity, please forward your resume in confidence to: Paul Stevenson pstevenson@emcoltd.com fax: 250-475-6282 www.theensuite.com

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

FINANCIAL SERVICES

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161. M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

WEBCO LEDUC - division of Sun Media, requires Full-time Heatset/Coldset Journeyman Pressman. 15 unit Goss Community. Competitive rates and benefits. Email resume: et@webcoleduc.com. WEBCO LEDUC - division of Sun Media, requires Full-time Heatset/Coldset 1st & 2nd Pressmen. 15 unit Goss Community. Competitive rates and benefits. Email resume: et@webcoleduc.com.

HEALTH PRODUCTS #1 RATED advanced nutrition for anti-aging & weight loss. Call for free sample. Elaine (250)217-9660.

DROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation. Toll-free 1-877-5563500 www.mydebtsolution.com

www.bcclassified.com EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

REWARDING CAREERS ARE NEVER HANDED TO YOU. AT CDI COLLEGE, WE’LL HELP YOU EARN ONE. CDI College has been helping people like you launch successful careers for more than four decades. Choose from over 50 market-driven programs in Business, Art & Design, Technology and Health Care. A new career can be in the palm of your hand. Call CDI College today!

Health

Car waitlist e Assistan

t

t twitter.com/CDICollege

- No s to st - Earn art you in just r diploma 27 wee ks!

MEDICAL SUPPLIES CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-9815991

CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO DIGITAL PHOTO retouch, editing, add/remove objects/people. Tribute posters, home movies to CD/DVD. 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS REV_CDI_BlackPress_runs.indd 3

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

f facebook.com/CDICollege

Canada’s Leading Career Training Provider.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE LAZY-BOY Recliners $149; 5 Pc Dinettes $139.; Dressers, Chests, Night Tables, Headboards from $29.; Futons; 39” Sleigh-Bed $99.; Box & Mattress sets from $99., QueenSize Mattress, as new $99.; Bunk-Beds $299.; TV Stands, Cabinets, Wall-Units, Corner Stands, Lots Cheap! No HST on All Like New & Good Furniture, Mattresses & All TOOLS! BUY & SAVE, 9818 4th St., Sidney. buyandsave.ca ROYAL BLUE sofa & chair, exc cond, $600 obo. 4 Birch chairs & cushions, $200 obo. Ladies X country skis, boots, poles, $350 obo.250-665-6546 SAWMILLS FROM only $3997 - Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info & DVD 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO

www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT

BUILDING SUPPLIES METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106. Must Sell (Ltd.) Will deal. 24x36, 39x57, 60x100. 40 yr paint (Steel Bldgs). Pro-Rated freight to site. Erection Avail. Source# 1OC 866-609-4321

FREE ITEMS FREE infant car seat, expires end of 2012, matching stroller, good shape. Call 250-3836407.

FRIENDLY FRANK 2 BLANKETS- 2 feather pillows, 2 sheets, $99. (250)652-2012. AIRCAST BOOTS, medical, like new, 1 sz fits all male & female, $89. obo. (250)3802858 before 9pm. BEAUTIFUL GRAD dress, mermaid style, black/white, sz 3/4, $95. (250)893-2502

To get started today, visit experience.cdicollege.ca or call 1.888.897.3871

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com 1-877-902-WOOD.

HOME MAKER/ companion cooking, cleaning, laundry and errands. Call Wendy (250)4798555.

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind and a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

PERSONAL SERVICES

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

HOME CARE SUPPORT

LEGAL SERVICES

Y youtube.com/CDICareerCollege

HOME BASED Business. We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com

BAY NEWS

CABINET WITH doors, 60” high x 31.5” wide x 15.5” deep, $35 obo. (250)477-7335 DOUBLE BLOW up air bed, (black), like new, $50 firm. Call 250-665-6546. ELECTRIC HOSPITAL excellent condition, (250)642-4295.

bed, $99.

LAZY-BOY SWIVEL Rocker, green, corduroy, $99. Call (250)384-4019. NEW ENCHANTRESS pantyhose tall, trouser socks, 15 packages (all), $35. Call (250)383-4578.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

STEEL BUILDINGS for all uses! Spring Deals! Make an offer on sell-off models at factory and save thousands Now! Call for Free Brochure - 1-800-6685111 ext. 170.

COTTAGES

STEEL OF a deal - building sale! 20X24 $4798. 25X30 $5998. 30X42 $8458. 32X58 $12,960. 40X60 $15,915. 47X80 $20,645. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca.

SIDNEY CHARMING garden cottage, sea view & beach access on bus route to Sidney & Victoria, near ferries & airport. Totally reno’d, with beautiful fir floors, 1 bdrm (fits queen or smaller), 1 bath (shower, no tub), open kitchen/dining & living area, 4 appliances, off street prkg. $1000. NP/NS. Opportunity to garden. Long term preferred. 250-656-3003.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

APARTMENTS FURNISHED

REAL ESTATE

SIDNEY: FURNISHED Deluxe suite, newer. Walk to ocean & town. All incl. 250-656-8080.

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

Call: 1-250-616-9053 www.webuyhomesbc.com

LAVENDER CO-OP accepting applications for a 1 bdrm, $574/mo. Quiet area, sm pet ok, W/D hook up, insuite storage, lrg bright kitchen. Gross income $25,000.+ share purchase is $2,500. Applications available in the glass case outside the Community Hall at 10A-620 Judah St. OAK BAY, sunny, 1 bdrm, balcony, quiet, mature, N/P, N/S, steps to ocean, $840 mo incls H & H/W, 250-598-9632

- BUYING - RENTING - SELLING bcclassified.com EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

HOMES FOR RENT COLWOOD, 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath. 2 level home with an exceptional view. Mins to elem & sec schools. On bus route. Walk to beach & Royal Roads. N/S. Pets neg. $1900 mo + utils. Call 250-478-8146. GORDON HEAD. Large 3bdrm, 1.5 bath, deck + 2-bdrm in-law suite, workshop. 2 F/P NS/NP. $2200. (250)477-6541 VICTORIA DOWNTOWN: Near Cook St. village, new 2 bdrm house stainless 5 apls prvt fenced yard pet ok N/S Mar 1st $1400. 250-383-8800

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

2/14/2012 3:41:50 PM

Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other financing options available to qualified applicants.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


www.oakbaynews.com • A21

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, February 29, 2012 RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

InMotion

ROOMS FOR RENT

SUITES, LOWER

AUTO FINANCING

CARS

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

OAK BAY/VICTORIA, $475 all inclusive, semi priv bath, W/D, on bus route, avail March. 1 or 15, 250-595-7610.

Driver Ed Tips Every Friday

SAANICH: FURNISHED large 1 bdrm suite. NP/NS. Avail Now. Refs req’d. $900/mo inclusive. Call 250-721-0281, 250-858-0807.

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

SUITES, LOWER

SIDNEY WATERFRONT- 1 bdrm. $1000 inclusive. Refs. NP/NS. (250)656-4003.

NEED A Vehicle? Easy finance!! Low Payments! $99 Delivers 24 Hour Approval. We Deliver! 3,000 Vehicles to choose. Call Now! Marty 1888-414-8042. Big Discounts! www.eagleridgegmc.com.

SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

2008 HONDA CIVIC LX 4 door, auto, top of the line & fully loaded including rare power sunroof option. Babied by 1 owner, garage kept, hwy commuter (76k). Dealer maintained. Burgundy with factory 5 spoke alloy wheels & a set of winters tires on steel rims. Full power-train warranty until Dec. 20 2012. $15,750 o.b.o. 250-466-4156

TRUCKS & VANS

TO G IN

? DRIVE

CORDOVA BAY- 2 bdrms, W/D, hydro incld. Avail Mar 1. $920/mo. (250)658-4760. ESQ/GORGE, BRIGHT spacious, 2 bdrm grd level, on bus route, laundry, lrg fenced yard, N/S. $1100 mo incls all utils. Avail now. Call 250-384-5466. GORGE. 2-BDRM. Bright, spacious, quiet. 5 appliances, cat ok. Avail now. $1100. inclusive. (250)884-5245.

KIDS

LE

AR N

Watch for our Auto Section

KEATING- 1 bdrm, W/D. $800 inclds hydro+ H/W. Avail Now. (250)652-1612.

In your community newspaper 250-381-3484 • inmotion@blackpress.ca

LANGFORD (Costco). Bus, shops, school. 2 Bdrm suite, yard, 4 appls, water incl, shared laundry, $1100 + utils. NS/NP. Mar 1. (250)881-2283 UPTOWN, 1 bdrm 820 sq ft, 3 storage rooms, patio, yard, parking, own ent., NS/NP, $860 inclusive, 250-886-5896.

TOWNHOUSES SIDNEY: NEW, 3 bdrm + den, laundry, NS/NP, $1700. Avail Apr. 1. Call 250-217-4060.

TRANSPORTATION

WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in March, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888593-6095.

AUTO SERVICES

AUTO FINANCING

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HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

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ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CONTRACTORS

GARDENING

HANDYPERSONS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877 QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

ANOTHER LAWN SEASON! Replace it with a beautiful Garden or Patio. 30 yrs exp. web.me.com/rodkeays Call 250-858-3564.

Aroundthehouse.ca ALL, Repairs & Renovations Ben 250-884-6603

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX 250-477-4601

DRAFTING & DESIGN

PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

DESIGN FOR PERMIT. w w w. i n t e gra d e s i g n i n c . c o m Call Steven (250) 381-4123.

BUSINESS SERVICES DENIED CANADA Pension plan disability benefits? The Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help. Call Allison Schmidt at 1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca

CARPENTRY CUSTOM PLANER- (Fir, cedar) baseboards, casings, crown molding (any shape). Call (250)588-5920. QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

CLEANING SERVICES #1 CAREBEAR CLEANING. Earth friendly products. House, office & rental. Senior discount. $25hr. 250-217-5507

DRYWALL AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Reno’s plus. Visa accepted. Small jobs ok. #22779 AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. WATTS ON ELECTRIC, Residential, Commercial, Renovations. #100213. 250-418-1611.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

ABSOLUTELY CLEAN. Husband & wife team. Power Washing. (778)440-6611.

BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Call 250-478-8858.

APARTMENT & CONDO cleaner. $10./ hour for first 3 hours, then price negotiable. Carol Kenney (778)433-4299.

FENCING

CARING BONDABLE work since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. Call (250)385-5869 SPOTLESS HOME Cleaning. Affordable, Experienced, Reliable, Efficient. (250)508-1018 WE LOVE DIRTY KITCHENS! House cleaning regularly or one time. 250-532-6858. welovedirtykitchens.com

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

GARDENING COMPUTER SERVICES A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Des, 250-6569363, 250-727-5519.

AURICLE Lawns- cln up lawn garden hedge pruning soil tests & fertilize. (250)882-3129 250-208-8535 WOODCHUCK: Spring cleanup, tree & hedge pruning. 23yrs exp. WCB.

ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualified, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com Blooms For All Seasons Garden & flower design Garden bed maintenance Pruning Real Estate staging Container design Seasonal clean-ups Lucia Salazar, LHT Fully insured Tel: (250) 382-9565 http://passionforgardening .blogspot.com DPM SERVICES: lawn/gard, cleanups, pruning, hedges, landscapes, irrigation, pwr washing, gutters 15yrs. 250883-8141. Pruning, Garden Clean-Ups. Google Darryl’s Garden & Yard. Insured. 250-383-9532.

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397.

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

QUALITY WORK. All Renos & Repairs. Decks, Suites, Drywall, Painting. 250-818-7977.

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

SAVE $ Hire-A-Husband, 250514-4829. Specialize in bath/ kitchen reno’s & accessibility. Serving Victoria for 23yrs.

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SENIOR HANDYMANHousehold repairs. Will assist do-it yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

SAVE $ Hire-A-Husband, 250514-4829. Specialize in bath/ kitchen reno’s & accessibility. Serving Victoria for 23yrs.

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

#1 JUNK Removal & Hauling. Free estimates. Cheapest in town. Same day emergency removal. Call 250-818-4335. lalondejeff62@yahoo.ca

CBS MASONRY BBB A+ Accredited Business. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Patios, Sidewalk Repair. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. Call (250)294-9942 or 250-589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

$20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

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GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS 250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss, Pwr Wash. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB. GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323. GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter cleaning, repairs, upgrades & maintenance. WCB, Free est. 250-881-2440.

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CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463. ✭BUBBA’’S HAULING✭ Honest & on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service.(250)478-8858. SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

HOME IMPROVEMENTS M&S OXFORD Home/Commercial Reno’s & Painting. Patio’s, Decks, Sheds, Hardwood and Trim. 25 yrs exp. Quality Guar. 250-213-5204.

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663. PRICED BY the job. No surprises. Guaranteed. 25 yrs, 2nd generation Master Plumber. 778-922-0334 Visa/MC.

PLASTERING PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS SHORELINE ROOFING. Reroofing specialist. WCB/BBB member. Quality & satisfaction guaranteed. 250-413-7967. shorelineroofing@shaw.ca

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton, 5 ton. Prices starting at $75/hr. 250-220-0734.

PROF & custom installs of floor & wall tiles. Heated flooring, Custom Showers. Reno’s, new constr. Bob 250-812-7448

PAINTING

WINDOW CLEANING

A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190.

NORM’S PAINTING- 15% offQuality work. Reliable. Refs. 25 yr exp. 250-478-0347. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss, Pwr Wash. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB. NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-590-2929, 250-812-3213.


A22 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

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A2 â&#x20AC;˘ www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

M E AT & P O U LTRY | F I S H & S E A F O O D PaciďŹ c Snapper Fillets

12

69 399

LGb Per 100Lb

&RESH3KINLESS

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169

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1

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Pot Roast Cross Rib .ORTHRIDGE&ARMS Premium AAA Beef Boneless

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3 Luncheon Meat 169 Cooked Ham 419

&LETCHERS$OUBLE3MOKED 375 Gram Package

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149

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199

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199

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299

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99 Fried Dace

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99

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300 Gram Box

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2/$ for

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Chicken Breast

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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

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A24 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - OAK

BAY NEWS

50th Anniversary

Try your luck and spin the wheel in our Cosmetic department for great prizes!

You are invited to celebrate with us Tomorrow Thursday, March 1st at 1pm Pharmasave

Pharmasave

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8

$ 99 460 ml

3

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WellQuest Melatonin

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$ 99 100 Caplets

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Extra Strength Muscle & Back Pain Relief

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6

$ 99 18 Caplets

WE OFFER: Free RX Delivery • Blister Packing Service • A Postal Outlet • Full Service Cosmetics • Bus Passes • Toiletries & Novelty Items

Sale from Mar 1st–8th • Serving Oak Bay for 50 Years at 2200 Oak Bay Avenue


Oak Bay News, February 29, 2012