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ON THE COVER 10 Avbuere, MD, Dr. Edwin Blackmon, Charles Edwards, Monte Gravely, Clinton Long-Stokes D.D.S., PA , Sharon McCa in, Tracey Oglesby, Ursula Dudley Onsei-Bonsu, George Redd, Tonya Roth, Denise Turner Page Sweatt, James Page

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19 13, 67 17 21 3, 16 20 18 14, 63 12 15 22

ELECTED OFFICIALS 26

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COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES 28

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CHURCHES 36

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PROFILE OF ACHIEVEMENT 47

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Alexa nder, Dr. Sandra Carlton Coleman, Carolyn Quilloin Green, Maurice “MO ” Osei-Bonsu, Denis e Smith, Kathleen

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SORORITIES AND FRATERNITIES

48 - 55

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Kappa Lambda Chapter Beta Iota Omega Chapter Sigma Kappa Omega Chapter Greensboro Alumnae Beta Kappa Kappa Tau Omega Chapter

49 53 55 48 52 50 – 51

FOR YOUR INFORMATION 58 The Power of Marketing Trade Show Tips Marketing Murder

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60 61 62-64

UP & COMING 68 Langford, Juan

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INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 82 Disclaimer

The specific purpose of the Black Pages is to feature and highlight minority-owned businesses. The introduction of the Black Pages concept during the past several years is timely. The current economy of the United States is increasingly focused on individual entrepreneurial efforts, self-help initiatives, and small business development. The Black Pages seeks to provide exposure to individuals and businesses at the forefront of the entrepreneurial effort. The objective of the Black Pages is to help these individuals and businesses provide positive leadership for today’s youth, as well as a realistic alternative to the traditional career/ employment opportunities of the past. While primarily highlighting minority-owned businesses, we also encourage and solicit major corporate involvement in the Black Pages. The corporations that advertise provide support and assistance to minority business development while marketing quality goods and services. The involvement of major corporations is a wise business investment and improves the entire community.


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Our Publication Black Pages USA is published and distributed in twelves cities throughtout five states along the southeastern seaboard of the United States. These directories, which highlight African-American owned businesses, are published by McCants Communications Group, Inc. An African American owned business, McCants Communications Group, Inc. strives to offer black business owners in

Our Mission

Our History

The mission of McCants Communications Group, Inc. is to encourage, support and facilitate economic empowerment of the African-American community through the development of a strategic local business network, educational initiatives and communications ventures. Through actualization of our mission, we will reach all segments of the African-American community including (but not limited to) youth, retirees, and the working class. Through employee commitment at all levels of our organization, individual and team efforts will yield value-added services to our entire client base.

The Black Pages concept started over 30 years ago. Today, Black Pages-type publications are produced in about 30 cities and metropolitan areas throughout the United States. McCants Communications Group, Inc. is a minority-owned corporation that publishes Black Pages USA in Greater Southwest Roanoke/Lynchburg (VA), Hampton RoadsRichmond(VA)-Northeastern, N.C., Raleigh/Durham/Cary (NC), Triad (NC), and the Greater Fayetteville/Wilmington/ Cape Fear/Jacksonville (NC) regions. Black Pages USA publications are also distributed in South Carolina, Florida, and Georgia.

Why We’re Here The specific purpose of the Black Pages is to feature and highlight minority-owned businesses. The introduction of the Black Pages concept during the past several years is timely. The current economy of the United States is increasingly focused on individual entrepreneurial efforts, self-help initiatives, and small business development. The Black Pages seeks to provide exposure to individuals and businesses at the forefront of the entrepreneurial effort. The objective of the Black Pages is to help these individuals and businesses provide positive leadership for today’s youth, as well as a realistic alternative to the traditional career/ employment opportunities of the past. While primarily highlighting minority-owned businesses, we also encourage and solicit major corporate involvement in the Black Pages. The corporations that advertise provide support and assistance to minority business development while marketing quality goods and services. The involvement of major corporations is a wise business investment and improves the entire community.

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GERRY McCANTS President McCants Communications Group, Inc.

Black Pages USA 301 N. Elm Street Suite 268 Greensboro, NC 27401

Call: 336-274-1709 Email: gerry@blackpagesusa.com

www.BlackPagesUSAOnline.com www.BlackExpoTour.net www.mccantscom.com

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Our Distribution Obtain Copies of the Black Pages: Distribution of the Black Pages is primarily conducted via the major churches in the area and by a number of established distribution points that have been set up in your area. Our staff will also provide copies of the Black Pages to all of our advertisers, corporate and government procurement officials, local groups and organizations, as well as at conventions, trade shows, festivals, and other community events. A copy of the Black Pages can be obtained by contacting our office at (877) 273-1709, or mailing $5.00 for postage and handling for each copy to 301 N Elm St, Ste 268, Greensboro, NC 27401.

Greensboro, NC Black Pages USA

301 North Elm Street, Suite 268 336-274-1709

City of Greensboro

MWBE Program 300 Washington Street 336-373-2674

Dr. Tanya D. Redd

2601 Oakcrest Avenue, Suite E 336-286-2400

Guilford County Schools Purchasing Department 501 West Washington Street 336-370-3238

Guilford County Schools System-MWBE 712 North Eugene Street 336-373-2674

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Guilford County Government Minority and Women Business Enterprise Program Population

Minority Businesses 16.70%

29.20% 32.5 %

Black

Black

Asian

Hisapnic

52.4%

Hisapanic

White

Women

7.1 % 3%

4.20%

The Guilford County minority and women business enterprise program is designed to provide minorities and women equal opportunity to participate in all aspects of Guilford County contracting and purchasing programs.

FY 12/13 Total Minority Expenditures

$10,374,429.96

Total County Expenditures

$92,433,389.65

Shayla Parker, Buyer/Diversity Coordinator Bonnie Stellfox, Purchasing Director Guilford County Purchasing Department 301 West Market Street – B-32 Greensboro, North Carolina 27401 336-641-3314

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ON THE

COVER Here they are! Entrepreneurs, business owners, corporate and community leaders throughout the Triad area as featured on the front cover. These individuals served as role models and examples of success and leadership in our community. They are leaders who have shown what can be accomplished through hard work, dedication, determination and perseverance. Because of the foundation they have laid, we all can now traverse those mazes a little easier.

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James Sweatt

Senior Vice President Business Executive Operations

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James Sweatt has a unique ble and managing large scale chan Six Sigma Certified Master Bl Executive for the Credit 11 Card for the development and execu


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Dr. Tanya Redd REDD Family Dentistry The mission of this office is to provide quality dental treatment in a caring atmosphere while increasing patient knowledge, education and confidence through positive reinforcement. Patient treatment hours are Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday’s 8:00 am-12:00 pm/12:30pm-3:00 pm. Wednesdays 8:00 am-12:30 pm/2:00 pm-5:00 pm. And select Fridays 8:00 am-1:00 pm. Services include cosmetic restorative dentistry, extractions, implant restoration, root canals, crowns, bridges, partial dentures, complete dentures (including implantretained), routine and deep cleanings (scaling & root planning) , take home whitening, oral hygiene instruction, and children’s dentistry. Dr. Redd and her caring staff adhere to the motto: “We inform before we perform.” The office uses digital x-rays, records a virtual tour of each patient’s mouth using an intraoral camera and offers computerized treatment plan estimates. We also file any patient’s primary insurance as a courtesy and accept payment of benefits for those carriers that will reimburse the office. A special service also provided is aromatherapy using natural essential oils to help add a more soothing atmosphere in which the patient can relax while being provided individual treatment. Dr. Tanya Redd is the daughter of Louis and Barbara Redd of Martinsville, Virginia and granddaughter of Dawson and Bessie Callaway of Fieldale, Virginia. In December, 1991, she graduated from Virginia Polytechnic University & State Institution after 3 1/2 years with a B.S. degree in Biology. Dr. Redd graduated from the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical College of Virginia in 1996. She was awarded the Outstanding Student Award by the Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons in 1996. Dr. Redd served as an officer in the Guildford County Dental Society from 2002-2008 to include as President for the 2006-2007 year. She also served as an officer from 2004-2006 in the Greensboro Medical Society. Dr. Redd opened the doors of her own private practice November 1, 2000 and in October, 2009, relocated to her current office space. REDD Family Dentistry welcomes you and thanks the community for its continued support and patronage.

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Charles Blackmon Attorney at Law Charles K. Blackmon focuses his legal practice primarily on business, whitecollar criminal defense, and sports and entertainment matters. Prior to joining Tuggle Duggins, PA, Mr. Blackmon was a member of Gray Newell Johnson & Blackmon, LLP and a founding partner with the law offices of Whitfield & Blackmon, LLP in Greensboro. He was an associate attorney with the firm of Dessen Moses & Sheinoff in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania before then, concentrating in the areas of labor and employment law. Among other civic and professional organizations, Mr. Blackmon is a member of the North Carolina and Pennsylvania State Bars, M&F Bank Piedmont Triad Advisory Board, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Board of Trustees, North Carolina Central University School of Law Board of Visitors, Greensboro Metropolitan YMCA Board of Directors, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., and Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity (the BoulĂŠ). Additionally, he lectures regularly on business and entertainment issues. His clients include: North Carolina A&T University Foundation, Inc., MidEastern Athletic Conference (MEAC), and M&F Bank. A Durham native, Mr. Blackmon obtained his B.S. in Industrial Relations from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his law degree from the North Carolina Central University School of Law. He resides in Greensboro, North Carolina with his wife, Mable Blackmon, and their daughter, Chloe.

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Dr. George Osei-Bonsu Dr. George Osei-Bonsu is a graduate of the University Of Science And Tech, School Of Medicine, Kumasi, Ghana. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at Harlem Hospital Center and the prestigious Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. In addition to serving as the medical director at Palladium Primary Care in High Point, Dr. Osei-Bonsu is medical director at Wesley Long Hospital in Greensboro. He also practices for Eagle Physicians & Associates at Moses Cone Health System. As a primary care physician, he is dedicated to diagnosing and treating illnesses that disparately affect the African-American community, including diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Dr. Osei-Bonsu is also trained to provide wellness and urgent care.

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Denise Turner Roth In Fall 2012, Denise Turner Both assumed the duties of City Manager for the City of Greensboro. In her role, Roth is responsible for guiding each of the City’s departments and leadership staff. Meanwhile, she also directly reports to City Council and is charged with carrying out policies, programs, ordinances and resolutions approved by Council and impacting City operations Roth is no stranger to governmental leadership as she served as Greensboro’s assistant city manager for community affairs and communications since 2008 where she directed the City’s public affairs, parks and recreation, human relations, and libraries and museums departments. Prior to joining the City, she served as vice president of governmental affairs for the Greensboro Partnership – an organization responsible for economic and community development within the city. She has also worked for the District of Columbia in Washington, DC, as public space manager and served on the legislative affairs staff for former DC Mayor Anthony Williams. Roth holds a bachelor’s degree in government and politics from George Mason University. She is a member of the board of visitorsat the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and holds memberships in the National Forum for Black Public Administrators and the Women’s Professional Forum.

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Dr. Sharon Long-Stokes Dr. Sharon Long-Stokes has been practicing dentistry for 19 years. She has had a passion for the dental profession since the age of five. Her legacy began with her father, Dr. Durel Gray Long. She worked with him every summer for six years while she attended middle and high school and knew this was her destiny. She graduated from Howard University with a B.S. in microbiology and a minor in chemistry and obtained her Doctor of Dental Surgery from Howard University College of Dentistry in 1993. Dr. Long-Stokes continues her education in dentistry through numerous institutes for advanced study. The office of Dr. Long-Stokes is located at 106 South Murrow Boulevard, Suite 100, Greensboro, NC 27401 and is open Monday through Friday. Call 336-275-9922 or toll-free 1-877-WeFloss, e-mail KeepSmiling@ PrettiestSmiles.com, or visit www.PrettiestSmiles.com for more information. At Dr. Long-Stokes’ office, patients are treated like family and provided gentle dental care in a relaxed atmosphere. The professional teamwork of her staff creates a friendly, caring environment. Dr. Long-Stokes utilizes state-of-the-art technology, including digital x-rays, intraoral cameras, Cerec crowns in an hour, Clear Correct invisible aligners, LumiSmile digital makeover images and laser surgery. She also offers stateof-the-art services, such as in-office and take-home teeth whitening, gum treatment, including Perio Protect, routine and periodontal cleanings, veneers, Lumineers, Snap-On-Smiles, implant restorations, root canal therapy, partial and complete dentures, and extractions.

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Monte Edwards Monte A. Edwards is Executive Vice President of Marketing and Business Development and Partner for SRS, Inc., which provides professional facility support and construction management services. Monte brings Fortune 250 executive level experience to the SRS leadership team. He spent 15 years in the wireless telecommunications industry, most recently in Vice President & General Manager positions for Alltel Corp. and GTE Wireless Corp. Monte holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Management from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY and enjoys serving the community through present/past local Board of Directorships with the United Way, Salvation Army, Chamber of Commerce, YMCA, Junior Achievement and Cornell Alumni Association. Monte is a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Cornell Admissions Ambassadors Network and The 100. SRS, Inc. takes pride in building high quality projects in the NC Triad area, including: »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering Union Hill Elementary School Summerfield Elementary School GTCC Parking Deck GTCC Donald W. Cameron Campus UNCG Jefferson Suites UNCG Spartan Village WSSU Donald Reaves Student Activity Center

»»

Center for Design and Innovation (WSSU/UNC School of the Arts/Forsyth Tech CC)

SRS, Inc. has garnered industry recognition from the Small Business Administration, Department of Homeland Security, DiversityBusiness.com, the National Association of Minority Contractors, and was listed on Inc. 500’s list of the 250 Fastest Growing Private Companies in America. SRS, Inc. employs 160 people in North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Louisiana, and Georgia.

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Ursula Dudley Oglesby Ursula Dudley Oglesby has been in the Ethnic Hair Care Industry all of her life. She is the daughter of Dudley Products Inc. Co-Founders, Drs. Joe & Eunice Dudley. As the President of Dudley Beauty Corp LLC, Ursula carries the baton to continue producing Dudley’s full line of high quality products for the textured-hair consumer and distributing products directly to professional cosmetologists, salons and beauty schools throughout the world. Her chief aim is to give women – especially African-American women – a dose of hope by enriching their lives. “I want women to truly see their beauty on the inside and outside and know in their mind that God did not take time to make a nobody!” Ursula holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from Harvard College and a Juris Doctorate from Harvard Law School. She is Vice Chairman for the American Health & Beauty Aids Institute (AHBAI) and serves on the Board of University of North Carolina Greensboro Entrepreneurship, as well as the Board of Governors for CBS Affiliate WFMY’s 2 Those Who Care Program. Additionally, Oglesby is an adjunct Business Law Professor at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University’s School of Business & Economics and previously served as the first African American woman on the Direct Selling Association’s (DSA) Board of Directors. Ursula and her husband, Mark, are the parents of two children – Mark Jr. and Elena. They are members of Providence Baptist Church in Greensboro, North Carolina. 

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Dr. Edwin Avbuere, MD Medical director, Edwin Avbuere, MD is board certified in internal Medicine. After completing medical training at Nigeria’s foremost medical scool, The University of Lagos College of Medicine in 1991, he underwent 3 years of surgical residency under the auspices of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, London, United Kingdom. Avbuere relocated to the United States to join the Internal Medical residency program at Bronx Labanon Hospital (affiliated with Albert Einstein College of Medicine) in New York City. He promptly received certification by the American Board of Internal Medicine in Aug. 2000. Dr. Avbuere has been in a group practice as attending physician in Rock Hill SC and Chester SC. Dr. Avbuere’s professional goals include: To be respected and contributing member to the health of the Greensboro community using his extensive training and experience To offer up to date and evidence-based care to his patients using available cutting edge technology and latest recommendations through attendance of continuing medical education and reading of medical journals To hold high moral and ethical standards in the delivery of health care. To be easily accessible to his patients and their families for medical care. The creation of Alpha Medical Clinics, PA in Greensboro is an attempt to achieve these objectives and your support is greatly appreciated. Dr. Avbuere is fully licensed to practice medicine in North and South Carolina and has admitting privileges at Moses Cone Health Systems. Avbuere is happily married to Dayo, a physical therapist, and they have three beautiful children, Edwina, Estelle and Eloise.

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Tracey McCain You can watch Tracey McCain every weekday morning on WFMY News 2’s The Good Morning Show and on the Noon newscast . Tracey brings her warm smile and over a decade of news journalism to the anchoring desk, but the job’s biggest thrill is the location. Tracey is incredibly happy to be home in North Carolina, broadcasting news in the community where she grew up. The University of Connecticut graduate got her start at WSHM in Springfield, MA and then later at WFSB in Hartford, CT. Tracey keeps busy volunteering for several Triad organizations and serves as a motivational speaker and role model for young people in the community. Tracey is the Vice President of Broadcast for the Triad Association of Black Journalists, a member of the National Press Photographers Association, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.

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Clinton Gravely CLINTON E. GRAVELY, AIA, ARCHITECT AND ASSOCIATES approaches each project is as if it were the only one, giving each client the personal and professional attention deserved. The firm’s ultimate objective is to design comfortable structures that their clients will enjoy for years to come. And how else would that be accomplished without getting to know their needs and desires? Clinton, along with committed associates Fred DeGraffenriedt and Frances Lewis, have led a talented team of professionals to complete more than 800 projects ranging from religious facilities to multi-family dwellings, university construction, profit/non-for-profit organizations, and private individuals. Such a diverse portfolio translates into a wealth of experience, strengthened by an appreciation for all styles of architecture from classic to contemporary and everything in between. “Our clients’ tastes and needs parallel our commitment to quality and function,” said Clinton Gravely, the firm’s Principal. The Howard University graduate—whose practice is licensed in eight states and the District of Columbia, and certified by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards—is committed to creating structures meant to be enjoyed. Clinton, an active member of Shiloh Baptist Church, believes that service to the community is important to the firm’s standing as a good corporate partner. The plethora of accolades received as a result of that philosophy serve as a testament of service and extend to his leadership to organizations such as: NCAIA/Piedmont AIA; Greensboro YMCA; Wells Fargo Bank—Greensboro Advisory Board; Greensboro YMCA & Camp Weaver YMCA Boards; North State Council of Boy Scouts of America; Greensboro Board of Building Appeals; Greensboro Redevelopment Commission; Greensboro Education and Development Corporation; Greensboro Symphony Board of Directors; National Science Board of Directors; Guilford County Bond Authority; Guilford Education and Development Corporation; Regional Advisory Council—US Department of Housing & Urban Development— Atlanta Region. He is also an active member of Omega Psi Phi fraternity. Clinton and his wife Etta are proud parents of three daughters and two granddaughters.

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James Sweatt Everyday life presents risks and challenges. James Sweatt has the knowledge and enjoys helping clients navigate and minimize risks and thereby realize their dreams. Sweatt is a State Farm Insurance Agent Owner. As a trusted risk and list manager, with a stellar track record, Sweatt and his staff of three expertly makes sound financial and coverage recommendations to clients and prospective clients to grow and protect their assets as well as manage losses and potential losses. The Sweatt office is committed to operating through transparency, recommending fair and appropriate coverage policies and staying abreast of the latest changes within the industry. From simple car, home and life insurance to complex financial services, the Sweatt team is fully qualified, competent and passionate. The office seeks to “wow� clients through exceptional customer service andSweatt offering significant cost savings. James

Senior Vice President

James Sweatt has the corporate background and pedigree necessary to successfully lead and operate his Business Executive Operations, Change Management & Customer Experience agency and work on the behalf of clients. He has worked extensively within the financial and customer service field for over 20 years. Sweatt is a registered financial representative as well as a Six Sigma Certified Master Black Belt James Sweatt has a unique of expertise in leading business operations which is a widely recognized certification within the business sector blend that signifies expertise in the complex methods and large changing scale change. He joined Bank America 2004 as a used to proactively identify and remove themanaging causes of game errors and minimize theirofeffects. His in personal Six Sigma Certified Master Black Belt and Black Belt Quality Productivity resume includes high-level positions held for Fortune 500 companies such as JP Morgan Chase New York, General Executive for the Credit Card Customer Service Centers. He was responsible Electric, Bank of America and The McGraw Hill Companies.

for the development and execution of the Quality & Productivity strategy,

In addition to all the hard workwith and focus time Sweatt puts intocustomer the exceptional work herevenue does forgrowth, his clients, on improved satisfaction, andheincreased remains committed to his family and community. When is not spending time with his lovely wife and four productivity. Hishenext role was as quality the Process Design Executive in Global children, Sweatt is involved with his local church and consistently participates in other community organizations Staffing having a key lead role in the Strategic Staffing Initiative which including the United Way, the YMCA and the American Heartand Association. Even Sweatt knows the importance centralized staffing lead role in thestill development and rollout of theof leisure and physical activity and finds the time toPlaybook. enjoy his love traveling, history, football golf. Staffing Hisofnext role was as the Tellerand Operations Business

Executive where he was responsible for Teller Services, Operations Administration, and the ATM Image Research Teams that performed Cash Reconciliation and Support Services. His next role was the Consumer Market Month/Year Executive responsible for over 30 Banking Centers in the Charlotte Market.

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Prior to joining the Corporation, Mr. Sweatt was a Six Sigma Master Black Belt at JP Morgan Chase New York for two years. In that capacity he was responsible for identifying, strategizing, and leading cross business quality initiatives, driving organizational change, and aligning process improvement activities with strategic direction. Mr. Sweatt also held various leadership assignments of increasing responsibilities at The McGraw Hill Companies and B L A C K General P A GElectric E S (GE). U S A


RUDOLPH H. CLARK, JR. CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT “Committed to becoming your partner in helping you or your business reach your financial goals.” 130 E. Fisher Ave. Greensboro, NC 27401 (336)-691-8970 Fax: (336)-691-8972 www.rudolphclarkjrcpa.com E-Mail: rudyclark@rudolphclarkjrcpa.com

Offering You the Following Services: ACCOUNTING SERVICES TAX SERVICES General Accounting Bookkeeping Payroll Services Development of Budgets, Forecasts, Projections Compiled and Reviewed Financial Statements

General Accounting Bookkeeping Payroll Services Development of Budgets, Forecasts, Projections Compiled and Reviewed Financial Statements

ADDITIONAL SERVICES Outsourced CFO/Controller Functions Management Studies to Enhance Profitability Accounting Software Consulting and Installation

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We at LSG offer: Digital Color Print-on-Demand Digital Black and White Print-on-Demand Full Mounting and Lamination Web Design Service Full Color Custom Pop Up Banners Services Vehicle Wrap Services On-Line Document Management Services High Volume Digital Print-on-Demand Large (36” wide by any length) and small format (up to 12” x 18”), in full color or black and white Digital Scan-To-File services and storage Copying from hard copy originals Bindery and fulfillment services Delivery/Shipment of finished products to anywhere in the world via UPS or FedEx Virtually unlimited choices of media RALEIGH

532 S. New Hope Road Raleigh, NC 27610 PH: 919.878.5500 • FAX: 919.878.9861

GREENSBORO

121 South Elm Street Greensboro, NC 27401 PH: 336.542.2091 • FAX: 336.542.2081

www.lsgnc.com


Finally...

Printing without compromise!

L

SG, LLC, a 14,000 square foot facility, located in Raleigh, NC offers a variety of large and small reprographics services to meet the needs of individuals, small businesses and corporate customers.

Wayne E. Branch, owner and CEO of LSG, LLC started the business in 2001. Mr. Branch is a Franklin County, North Carolina native and graduate of Fayetteville State University. He is very knowledgeable in the printing arena having started as an employee in the copy room, followed by managerial positions and finally to owner of his company. He attributes the success of his business to a combination of determination, a solid team, strong values, cutting edge technology and the ability to establish and maintain long term relationships with customers. LSG is dedicated to printing on demand, producing high end color dittsplays and engineering drawings of the highest possible quality. All is done for a fair price and completed to meet the tightest of deadlines. Mr. Branch says “We simply want every client to experience printing without compromise.” The company’s motto:

We run LSG with the highest quality standards in mind… We operate ethically and are fair to our clients... We adhere to strong morals... We adhere to strong character... Above all else we strive to demonstrate the highest level of integrity to each and every one of our clients. Mr. Branch is very involved and believes in making himself available to give back to the community where he resides. Mr. Branch currently serves on the Foundation Board of Directors at Fayetteville State University and at James Sprunt Community College, He is also on the Board of Directors of Wake Enterprises, a Trustee at Adoram Baptist Church, as well as, a Life Member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc and a member of Thrifty Son Mason Lodge # 254. He has received numerous awards and commendations for outstanding service and leadership. LSG, LLC is a certified minority business enterprise with CMSDC of Charlotte, North Carolina; SWUC HUB Office in Raleigh, North Carolina; City of Durham; and the NC Department of Transportation.


E L E C T E D

O F F I C I A L S

Yvonne Johnson

Dianne Bellamy Small

James Key

Greensboro City Council

Greensboro City Council

Greensboro City Council

Rep. Alma Adams

Rep. Marcus Brandon

NC House of Representatives

NC House of Representatives

Senator Gladys Robinson

Amos L. Quick III

J. Carlvena Foster

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Guilford County School Board Guilford County School Board

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NC Senate

Dr. Sandra Alexander

Guilford County School Board


Deena A. Hayes

Ray Trapp

Guilford County School Board

Guilford County Board of Commissioners

Denise Adams

James Taylor

Winston-Salem City Council

Vivian H. Burke

Winston-Salem City Council

Bruce Davis

Guilford County Board of Commissioners

Derwin Montgomergy

Winston-Salem City Council

Winston-Salem City Council

John Davenport Jr.

Victor Johnson Jr.

Winston-Salem / Forsyth Board of Education

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C O L L E G E S

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U N I V E R S I T I E S

ALABAMA

Philander Smith College • www.philander.edu

Alabama A&M University • www.aamu.edu Post Office Box 908 • Normal 35762 256-851-5245

University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff • www.uapb.edu

812 W. 13th St. • Little Rock 72202 501-370-5221

1200 N. University Dr., Mail Slot #4983 Little Rock 72202 • 501-370-5221

Alabama State University • www.alasu.edu 915 S. Jackson St. • Montgomery36101 334-229-4291

Concordia College • www.higher-ed.lcms.org/selma 1804 Green St. • Selma 36701 334-874-5700

CALIFORNIA Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science www.cdrewu.edu • 1731 East 120th St. • Los Angeles 90059 • 323-563-4800

Miles College - www.miles.edu

Post Office Box 3800 • Birmingham 35208 205-929-1661

Oakwood College - www.oakwood.edu 7000 Adventist Blvd. • Huntsville 35896 800-824-5312

DELAWARE Delaware State College • www.dsc.edu

1200 N. Dupont Hwy. • Dover 19901 302-857-6353

Selma University

Dinkins Hill • Selma 36701 205-872-2533

Stillman College • www.stillman.edu 3600 Stillman Blvd. • Tuscalusa 35403 800-841-5722

Talladega College • www.talladega.edu 627 W. Battle St. • Talladega 35160 256-761-6219

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Howard University • www.howard.edu 2400 Sixth St., NW • Washington 20059 202-806-2700

University of the District of Columbia

4200 Connecticut Avenue, NW • Washington 20008

Tuskegee University • www.tusk.edu Old Administration Bldg. • Tuskegee 36088 334-727-8500

FLORIDA Bethune-Cookman College

ARKANSAS

640 Mary McLeod Bethune Blvd. • Daytona Beach 32114 • 904-255-1401

Arkansas Baptist College

Edward Waters College

1658 Kings Rd. • Jacksonville 32209 904-355-3030

1600 Bishop St. • Little Rock 72202 501-374-7856

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P A G E S

U S A


Florida A&M University • www.famu.edu Suite G-9 • Tallahassee 32307 850-599-3796

ILLINOIS Chicago State University • www.csu.edu

Florida Memorial College • www.fmc.edu

15800 NW 42nd Avenue • Miami 33054 800-822-1362

9501 South Street King Dr. • Chicago 60628 229-430-4650

KENTUCKY

GEORGIA

Kentucky State University • www.kysu.edu

Albany State College • www.asurams.edu 504 College Dr. • Albany 31705 229-430-4650

400 East Main Street • Franfort 40601 502-597-6813

Simmons University Bible College Louisville 40210 • 502-776-1443

Clark-Atlanta University • www.cau.edu 223 James P. Brawley Dr. • Atlanta 30314 404-880-8000

Fort Valley State College • www.fvsx.peachnet.edu 1005 State University Dr. • Fort Valley 31030 912-825-6307

Morehouse College • www.morehouse.edu 830 Westview Dr., SW • Atlanta 30314 404-215-2632

LOUISIANA Dillard University • www.dillard.edu 2601 Gentilly Blvd. • New Orleans 70122 504-816-4670 Grambling State University • www.gram.edu

Morris Brown College • www.morrisbrown.edu 643 Martin Luther King Dr., NW • Atlanta 30314 404-739-1560 Paine College • www.paine.edu 1235 15th Street • Augusta 30901 800-476-7703

100 Main Street • Grambling 71245 318-247-3811

Southern University and A&M College • www.subr.

edu Baton Rouge 70813 • 225-771-4500

Southern University at New Orleans • www.suno.

Savannah State University • www.scad.edu 342 Bull Street • Savannah 31404 912-356-2181

edu 6400 Press Dr. • New Orleans 70126 504-286-5000

Southern University at Shreveport • www.susbc. edu 3050 MLK, Jr. Drive • Shreveport 71107 800-458-1472

Spelman College • www.spelman.edu

350 Spelman Lane • Atlanta 30314 800-982-2411

Xavier University • www.xula.edu

One Drexel Dr. • New Orleans 70125 504-483-7388

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MARY LAND Bowie State University • www.bowiestate.edu 14000 Jericho Park Rd. • Bowie 20175 301-464-3000

Tougaloo College - www.tougaloo.edu

Coppin State College • www.coppin.umd.edu 2500 West North Avenue • Baltimore 21216 410-383-5990

Morgan State University • www.morgan.edu 1700 East Cold Spring Ln. • Baltimore 21239 800-332-6674

University of Maryland • www.umes.edu Eastern Shore • Princess Ann 21853 410-651-6410

MISSISSIPPI Alcorn State University - www.alcorn.edu

1000 ASU Dr., #300 • Lorman 39096 601-877-6147 1400 J.R. Lynch St. • Jackson 39217 601-979-2100

MISSOURI Harris-Stowe State College - www.hssc.edu 3026 Lacieside Ave. • St. Louis 63103 314-340-3366 Lincoln University - www.lincolnu.edu

80 Chestnut • Jefferson City 65102 573-681-5022

NEW YORK www.ccny.cuny.edu Convent Ave. and 138th St. • New York 10031 212-650-6977

City University of New York-York College

Mary Holmes College

Post Office Drawer 1257 • West Point 39773 601-494-6820

www.york.cuny.edu 94-20 Guy R Brewer Blvd. • Jamaica 11451 212-650-6977

Long Island University-Brooklyn • www.liunet.edu

Mississippi Industrial College

720 Northern Blvd. • Brooklyn 11201 800-548-7526

Holly Springs 38835 601-252-2440

Mississippi Valley State College - www.mvsu.edu 14000 Highway 82 W • Itta Bena 38941 662-254-3344 Rust College - www.rustcollege.edu 150 Rust Avenue • Holly Springs 38635 662-252-8000

B L A C K

500 West Country Line Rd. • Tougaloo 39174 888-424-2566

City University of New York-City College

Jackson State University - www.jsums.edu

30

Sojourner Douglas College - www.sdc.edu 500 North Carolina St. • Tougaloo 39174 888-424-2566

P A G E S

Long Island University-C.W. Post • www.liu.edu 720 Northern Blvd. • Brookville 11548 516-299-2900

U S A


Medgar Evers College • www.mec.cuny.edu

Winston-Salem State University • www.wssu.edu

NORTH CAROLINA

OHIO

Barber-Scotia College • www.barber-scotia.edu 145 Cabarrus Ave • Concord 28025 704-789-2901

Central State University • www.centralstate.edu

Bennett College • www.bennett.edu

Wilberforce University • www.wilberforce.edu

Elizabeth City State University • www.ecsu.edu

Wilberforce University • www.wilberforce.edu

1150 Carroll St. • Brooklyn 11225 718-270-6022

900 E.Washington St. • Greensboro 27420 336-370-8624

601 MLK, Jr Drive • Winston-Salem 27110 336-750-2070

1400 Rush Row Rd. • Wilberforce 45384 937-376-6348 1055 N. Bickett Rd. • Wilberforce 45384 800-376-8568

1704 Weeksville Rd. • Elizabeth City 27909 252-335-3305

1055 N. Bickett Rd. • Wilberforce 45384 800-376-8568

Fayetteville State University • www.uncfsu.edu Newbold Station • Fayetteville 28301 910-486-1371

OKLAHOMA

Johnson C. Smith University • www.jcsu.edu 100 Beatties Ford Rd. • Charlotte 28216 704-378-1011

Livingstone College • www.livingstone.edu

701 W. Monroe St. • Salisbury 28144 704-797-1000

North Carolina A&T University • www.ncat.edu 1601 East Market St. • Greensboro 27411 336-334-7946 North Carolina Central University • www.nccu.edu

Fayetteville Street • Durham 27707 919-560-6298

Langston University • www.lunet.edu P.O. Box 728 • Langston 73050 404-466-2231

PENNSYLVANIA Cheyney University of PA • www.cheyney.edu Cheyney and Creek Roads • Cheyney 19319 610-399-2275 Lincoln University (PA) • www.lincoln.edu Lincoln Hall • Lincoln University 19352 610-932-8300

Shaw University • www.shawuniversity.edu 118 E. South Street • Raleigh 27601 919-546-8275

SOUTH CAROLINA

St. Augustine’s College • www.st-aug.edu

1530 Harden St. • Columbia 29204 803-254-4165

1315 Oakwood Avenue • Raleigh 27611 919-828-4451

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Allen University

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C O L L E G E S

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U N I V E R S I T I E S

Benedict College • www.bchome.benedict.edu Harden & Blanding Street • Columbia 29204 803-253-5143

Tennessee State University • www.tnstate.edu 3500 John Merritt Blvd. • Nashville 37209 615-963-3101

Claflin University • www.claflin.edu

700 College Ave., NE • Orangeburg 29115 803-535-5339

TEXAS

Morris College • www.morris.edu

Concordia University at Austin • www.concordia.edu

100 West College Street • Sumter 29150 803-934-3225

3400 Interstate 35 N. • Austin 78705 512-486-1106

South Carolina State University • www.scsu.edu 300 College St., NE • Orangeburg 29117 800-260-5956

Huston-Tillotson College • www.htc.edu 900 Chicon Street • Austin 78702 512-505-3000

Voorhees College • www.voorhees.edu

Jarvis Christian College • www.jarvis.edu

P.O. Box 678 • Denmark 29042 803-703-7111

P.O. Box 1470 • Hawkins 75765 903-769-5730

TENNESSEE

Paul Quinn College • www.pqc.edu 3837 Simpson-Stewart Rd. • Dallas 75241 214-302-3648

Fisk University • www.fisk.edu

Prairie View A&M University • www.pvamu.edu

Knoxville College

Texas College • www.texascollege.edu

Lane College • www.lanecollege.edu

Texas Southern University • www.tsu.edu

Lemoyne-Owen College • www.mecca.org

Wiley College • www.wileyc.edu711

1000 17th Ave. N • Nashville 37203 615-329-8666

P.O. Box 3089 • Prairie View 77446 936-857-2626

901 College Street • Knoxville 37914 800-743-5669

2404 North Grand Avenue • Tyler 75702 800-306-6299

545 Lane Avenue • Jackson 38301 901-424-4600

3100 Cleburne Street • Houston 77004 713-313-7420

807 Walker Ave. • Memphis 38126 800-737-7778

Meharry Medical College

Wiley Avenue • Marshall 75670 903-927-3311 VIRGINIA

1005 Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Blvd. • Nashville 38126 615-327-6486

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B L A C K

P A G E S

U S A


Hampton University • www.hamptonu.edu Office of Admissions • Hampton 23668 757-727-5328 Norfolk State University • www.nsu.edu 700 Park Avenue • Norfolk 23504 757-823-8396

St. Paul’s College • www.saintpauls.edu 115 College Dr. • Lawrenceville 23868 434-848-3111

Virginia Seminary & College

Lynchburg 24501 • 703-528-5276

Virginia State University • www.vsu.edu One Hayden Street • Petersburg 23806 804-524-5000 Virginia Union University • www.vuu.edu 1500 North Lombardy St. • Richmond 23220 804-257-5881

WEST VIRGINIA Bluefield State College • www.bluefield.wvnet. edu 219 Rock Street • Bluefield,W. VA 24701 304-327-4065 West Virginia State College • www.wvsc.edu P.O. Box 1000 Campus 187 • Institute,W. VA 25112 304-766-9200

VIRGIN ISLANDS University of the Virgin Islands • www.uvi.edu

2 John Brewers Bay • St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands 00802 340-693-1150 • DIVERSITYBuilding

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C H U R C H E S

CLEMMONS

Baptist

Hickory Grove AME Zion Church

Anderson Grove Baptist Church

3791 Harper Road • 766-5142

200 Florence Street • 574-0202

Cedar Grove Baptist Church

GREENSBORO/HIGH POINT African Methodist Episcopal

702 Norwalk Street • 294-2628

Cornerstone Baptist Church 5736 Inman Road • 665-1944

Bethel AME

East White Oak Baptist Church

Bethel AME

Ebenezer Baptist Church

Mt. Zion AME

Garden of Prayer Sovereign Grace

1809 Water Street • 275-6892

200 Regan Street • 273-5268

3730 Wiley Davis Road • 292-8449

518 Spur Road • 674-8431 1422 Huffine Road • 375-3729

Baptist Church

1006 N. English Street • 292-8672

Persimmon Grove AME

5504 Summit Avenue • 621-0848

Gethsemane Baptist Church

African Methodist Episcopal Zion

3701 Heath Street • 273-5940

Godly Love Baptist Cathedral

2735 Freeman Mill Road • 273-4732

Mt Olive AME Zion Church

2123 McConnell Road • 274-0843

Good News Baptist Church

2400 McConnell Road • 272-4009

Oak Grove AME Zion Church 300 Lawrence Street • 274-3166

Gospel Light Baptist church

1412 Woodmae Drive • 272-8262

St Phillip AME Zion Church 1330 Ashe Street • 272-1301

McConnell Road Baptist Church 3911 McConnell Road • 697-8506

Swift Street AME Zion Church 4408 Swift Street • 299-5017 Trinity AME Zion Church

Manasseh Baptist Church

631 East Florida Street • 274-4670

Martin Avenue Baptist Church

804 Franklin Boulevard • 235-0859

Apostolic

3711 Martin Avenue • 621-9542

Friendship Temple Apostolic Church

1301 Alamance Church Road • 273-7930

2306 Floyd Street • 379-1488

New Calvary Baptist Church 1901 Spencer Street • 274-5500

Tabernacle of Praise Deliverance 2401 E. Bessemer Avenue 370-0208

36

B L A C K

Mt Zion Baptist Church

P A G E S

U S A


Sanctuary Deliverance Church

United Methodist

Pentecostal

Bass Chapel United Methodist

Freewill Penecostal Church

Carroway United Methodist Church

3631 Summit Avenue • 375-1711

Church • 5074 Bass Chapel Road • 617-6869

1606 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive 273-2159

1301 16th Street • 621-6906

Pentecostal Church of Christ

1100 Alamance Church Road • 272-6302

Holmes Grove United Methodist Church

4004 Perth Place • 697-9652

Laughlin Memorial United Methodist Church 1417 Huffine Mill Road • 375-3267

Greensboro Deliverance Center 820 Granite Street • 275-9905

Methopolitan United Methodist Church 1701 East Market Street 275-4658

Power House of Deliverance Church 1800 Willow Road • 274-9924

St. Matthew United Methodist Church 600 East Florida Street • 272-4505

Rescue Temple Church of God in Christ • 3008 E. Bessemer Avenue 334-0123

St. Paul United Methodist Church

2900 North O’Henry Boulevard • 621-5257

Presbyterian

Union Memorial United Methodist Church 1012 East Lee Street • 273-4006

Presbyterian Church of the Cross 1810 Phillips avenue • 274-5467

Word of Faith

St. James Presbyterian Church

Word of Faith Christian Center

820 Ross Avenue • 273-6658

Seventh Day Adventist Seventh Day Adventist Church of

719 Dallard Street • 378-6008

African Methodist Episcopal

East Market Street 1804 E. Market Street • 272-2997

St. Stephens AME Zion Church

Unitarian

Turners Chapel AME

Unitarian Church of Greensboro

Baptist

United Church of Christ

Bethlehem Baptist

St. Stephen United Church of Christ

Calvary Baptist Church

1012 Leonard Avenue • 883-0414

7615 Florence School Drive • 454-3215

5603 Hilltop Street • 856-0330

1000 Gorrell Street • 273-4536

801 S. Centinial Street • 882-8543 808 Hilltop Street • 882-8543

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C H U R C H E S

New Cedar Grove Baptist Church

Catholic

New Hope Baptist Church

Mt. Pleasant Christian Disciples of Christ

New Light Baptist Church

St. Mary’s Catholic Church

New Zion Missionary Baptist Church

St. Pius Tenth Catholic Church

Pilgrim Baptist Church

Christian Methodist Episcopal

1108 Morris Street • 275-6945

1515 Britton Street • 275-7988

306 S. English Street • 274-1022

812 Duke Street • 272-8650

1105 Willow Road • 273-5579

1310 Martin Luther King Drive • 272-8441 711 Oxford Street • 272-7301

Reid Memorial CME Church

Pleasant Grove Baptist Church

1010 Bennett Street • 273-2606

3812 Groomtown Road • 299-2622

Church of God In Christ

Providence Baptist Church

1106 Tuscaloosa Street • 273-7552

Evangel Fellowship Church

of God in Christ • 2207 East Cone Boulevard • 375-3900

Rising Ebenezer Baptist Church 455 Gorrell Street • 273-6550

Evangel Fellowship Outreach Ministry House 2114 McConnell Road • 691-1545

Reynolds Chapel Baptist Church 327 Hibleer Road • 855-8928

Nu-Life Church of God in Christ 209-W. Florida Street • 275-3243

Shiloh Baptist Church

1210 Eugene Street • 272-1166

Wells Memorial Church of God in Christ 1001 W. Washington Street • 272-6564

Solid Rock Baptist Church

2910 McConnell Road • 273-9940

Church of God of Prophecy

St. James Baptist Church

536 W. Florida Street • 273-0822

Church of God of Prophecy 1935 Opal Drive • 275-9130

St. Paul Baptist Church

1309 Larkin Street • 275-4680

Episcopal

United Institutional Baptist Church

Church of the Redeemer

802 East Market Street • 272-0822

901 E. Friendly Avenue • 275-0033

Unity Baptist Church

Episcopal Church of the Holy Spirit

1205 North English Street • 274-8677

3910 Yanceyville Street • 621-7321

White Oak Grove Baptist Church

38

B L A C K

2210 N. Elm Street • 272-4681

P A G E S

U S A


Holiness

Jehovah's Witnesses

Faith, Hope and Charity Holines Church

Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses

God’s House of Deliverance 800 Silver Avenue • 373-3997

Jewish

Hayes Memorial United Holy Church

Beth David Synagogue

1515 Willow Road • 275-8356

804 Winview Drive • 294-0007

Holy Temple United Holy Church

Temple Emanuel

1907 Huffine Mill Road • 375-5089

713 N. Green Street • 275-6316

Mt. Calvary Church

Lutheran

2116 Pear Street • 275-7145

3819 West Avenue • 299-2357

2615 Liberty Road • 691-1827

Grace Lutheran Church

Mt. Zion United Church of God

1315 W. Washington Street • 272-1174

705 Banner Avenue • 274-6284

Muslim

Powerhouse of Deliverance Church 1800 Willow Road • 274-9924

Al-Ummil Ummat

2109 Martin Luther King, Jr., Drive • 574-3689

St. Mark United Holy Church 225 Gillespie Street • 274-0915

University Mosque

Shiloh Holiness Church of God in Christ

NC A & T State University Harrison Auditorium

Skeens Chapel Holiness Church

Non-Denominational

210 Lawrence Street • 273-0797

350 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive • 275-2177

Cornerstone Tabernacle

United House of Prayer for All People 101 S. Dudley Street • 574-1016

1709 E. Wendover Avenue • 273-2688

Inner Growth Ministry Outreach

Wells Memorial Church of God in Christ

643 W. Lee Street • 273-8035

1001 E. Washington Street • 272-6564

Love and Faith Christine Center Fellowship

Inter-Denominational

Church

4344 Blackberry Road • 632-0205

Greater Christian Fellowship

New Jerusalem Cathedral

118 W. Vandalia Road • 273-2597

1606 Phillips Avenue • 272-1105

New Mellennium Christian Center 424 Fisher Park Circle • 510-0440

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C H U R C H E S

First Baptist Church

Temple Memorial Baptist Church

First Emmanuel Baptist Church 831 Leonard Avenue • 882-8221

Church of Christ

First United Baptist Church

Olga Avenue Church of Christ

1409 Deer River Road • 882-6211

1316 Olga Street • 887-2017

Friendship Baptist Church

Revealed Faith Baptist Church

715 W. Willis Avenue • 882-9429

1233 Montlieu • 887-5276

Foster Grove Baptist Church

Church of God

701 East Washington Drive • 882-9229

1458 Cedrow Drive • 883-7023/7339

831 Skeet Club Road • 869-2004

Friendship Missionary Baptist Church 715 West Willis Avenue • 882-9429

St. Paul United Church of God 1212 Pearson Place • 889-9430

Cedar Street Church of God

Gethsemane Baptist church

402 Cedar Street • 887-5141

401 Wise Street • 883-2137

Miracle Temple Cogic

Greater New Hope Baptist Church

805 Fairview Street • 883-8268

906 Meredith Street • 887-6877

Christian

Living Waters Baptist Church 1300 Brentwood • 885-0915

High Point Christian Center

Mt. Olive Baptist

515 Cross Street • 882-8738

Mt. Carmel Baptist Church

Holiness

105 N. Hoskins • 882-3836 915 Old Mill Road • 869-3437

Friendship Holiness Church 1714 Brooks Avenue • 884-1189

Mt. Vernon Baptist Church

716 Leonard Avenue • 882-9216

Kings Chapel Holiness Church 500 Saunders Place • 885-0631

Mount Zion Baptist Church

51 E. Washington Drive • 887-3610

Inter-Denominational

New Bethel Baptist Church

Word of Reconciliation Ministries

1116 Montlieu Avenue • 887-1061

400 Brentwood Street • 887-7314

Oak Grove Baptist Church

Word Fellowship Ministries

1710 East Green Street • 883-2678

601 E. Washington Drive

Solid Rock Baptist Church

903 Kearns Avenue • 889-2486

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Presbyterian

THOMASVILLE Baptist

St. Paul Presbyterian

Brown New Calvary Baptist Church

Seventh Day Adventist

Emmanuel Baptist Church

Baldwin Chapel SDA Church

First Baptist Church

1200 Leonard Avenue • 889-7930

103 Church Street • 475-9632

United Methodist

Friendship Baptist Church

Memorial United Methodist

Union Baptist Church

Word of Life Tabernacle

1217 East Green Drive • 885-9318

200 Doak Street • 476-6514

309 Summit Road • 882-4310

204 Turner Street • 475-1018

106 Smith Street • 472-9361

1327 Cedrow Avenue • 889-4501

828 Mary James Avenue • 476-4948

Church of Christ

KERNERSVILLE Baptist

Cornerstone Church of Christ 1102 Short Street • 472-5175

Holiness

Pentecostal Light House Baptist 317 Jefferson Street • 692-3964

Bethel Tabernacle Holiness Church 105 Forsyth Street • 475-1027

Providence Baptist Church 319 Nelson Street • 996-6284

Zion Tabernacle FBH

710 Douglas Drive • 476-6175

LEWISVILLE African Methodist Episcopal Inter-Denominational Voice of the Word Outreach Center

New Hope AME Zion

713A Lexington Avenue • 475-9643

7000 Shallowford Road

United Methodist

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C H U R C H E S

Central United Methodist

St. John Apostolic Church

115 James Avenue 475-9658 • 472-8659

1131 21st NE • 722-3464

St Matthew Apostolic Church

Freewill Union Methodist

3640 New Walkertown Road • 724-1780

110 Carr Street • 475-2921

Baptist

WINSTON-SALEM

Antioch Baptish Church

African Methodist Episcopal

College Park Baptist Church

5061 Lansing Drive • 744-1213 1710 Polo Road NW • 768-5870

Bethania AME Zion Church

1705 Bethania-Rural Hall Road • 924-1706

Goler Metropolitan AME Zion Church 1435 E. 4th Street • 723-2325

Emmanuel Baptist Church

1075 Shalimar Drive • 788-7023

First Baptist Church East Winston 700 Highland Avenue • 722-5605

John Wesley AME Zion Church

First Calvary Baptist Church

1800 25th Street NE • 723-5453

401 North Woodland Avenue 724-2611

St. James AME Church

1501 Patterson Avenue • 724-3865

First Thessalonia Baptist Church

Union Bethel AME Church

100 East 30th Street • 661-0638

1617 N. Trade Street • 722-0010

First Waughtown Baptist Church

Apostolic

838 Moravia Street • 784-7386

Apostolic Church of Christ

Freedom Baptist Church

Christ Rescue Temple Apostolic

Friendship Baptist Church

Church of the Lord Jesus of Apostolic Church

Galilee Missionary Baptist Church

1222 East 14th Street • 722-9270

2044 Martin Luther King • 788-2539 Church • 1500 N. Dunleith Avenue • 722-9841 146 S. Graham Avenue • 725-9011

1317 N. Cherry Street • 723-6105 575 N. Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive 724-3857

Gethsemane Baptist Church 4363 Carrier Avenue • 767-6806

Heavenly Host Apostolic Church 4529 N. Cherry Street • 744-9741

Mars Hill Baptist Church

Ministries of Truth of the Apostolic Faith 145 Alice Street • 748-1239

1331 East 4th Street • 722-0675

Morning Star Baptist Church 1400 Fitch Street • 748-0216

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1909 East 25th Street • 722-7504

Morning Star Missionary Baptist 1400 Fitch Street • 748-0216

Providence Baptist Church 319 Nelson Street • 996-6284

Mt. Carmel Baptist Church

3230 Geutnab Drive • 784-7802

Second Calvary Baptist Church 1751 East 7th Street • 723-8429

Mt. Glory Baptist Church

214 N. Dunleith Avenue • 722-1507

Second New Bethel Baptist Church • 1900 New Walkertown Road • 722-0128

Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church 795 NW Crawford Place 725-9623

Shiloh Baptist Church

916 East 12th Street • 724-9263

Mt. Zion Baptist Church 950 File Street • 722-2325

Solid Rock Baptist Church

1016 North Trade Street • 724-1824

3010 Carver School Road 723-2910

New Hope Baptist Church

St. Mark Baptist Church

New Bethel Baptist Church

1100 Manly Street • 723-6396

4911 Old Rural Hall Road 767-1911

St. Stephen Baptist Church 5000 Noble Street • 744-7279

New Jerusalem Baptist Church 1212 Dunleith Avenue • 723-9743

Union Baptist Church

1200 North Trade Street • 724-9305

New Trinity Baptist Church

1240 East 22nd Street • 723-1532

Union Chapel Baptist Church 300 West 25th Street • 748-8644

New Unity Baptist Church 2946 Ivy Avenue • 721-1199

United Cornerstone Batist Church 2745 Patria Street • 785-1268

North Winston Baptist

4023 Tise Avenue • 767-8446

United Metropolitan Baptist Church 450 Metroploitan Drive • 761-1358

Phillips Chapel Baptist

1312 N. Glenn Avenue • 723-9451

White Rock Baptist Church 1233 14th Street • 723-6494

Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church 1905 N. Jackson Avenue 761-1351

Zion Memorial Baptist Church

101 North Dunleith Avenue • 725-7390

Piney Grove Baptist

North Winston Baptist Church

4715 Indiana Avenue • 767-4044

4023 Tise Avenue • 767-8446

Pitts Memorial Baptist Church 812 Aureole Street • 748-9056

Prince of Peace Baptist Church

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C H U R C H E S

Church of Christ

Mt. Nebo Holiness Church 205 N. 25th Street • 924-2790

Church of Christ 4399 Carver School Road • 767-7949

New Faith Chapel Holiness Church 1419 Waughtown Street 784-7699

Church of God

Bethlehem Holiness Apostolic

True Temple Holiness

Church of God in Christ

1217 E. 15th Street • 722-6715

Church of God 1232 Mint Street • 761-1436

Church of God Apostolic

Zion Tabernacle FBH Church 444 Dean Street • 724-3274 INTER-DENOMINATIONAL

3652 Old Lexington Road • 650-1904

First Church of God in Christ

Living Word Fellowship, Inc.

635 Ontario Street • 767-8950

2060 Bethabara Road • 924-9658 United House of Prayer 2501 Ivy Avenue • 723-3900

Mount Sinai Full Gospel

Deliverance Center 2717 Manchester Street • 722-2624

Pentecostal

Christian Cleveland Avenue Christian Church 945 Cleveland Avenue • 722-8866

Christian Methodist Episcopal Hanes Memorial CME Church 819 Highland Avenue • 723-7861

Ishi Pentecostal Temple

1319 Excelsior Street • 722-1715 Presbyterian

Grace Presbyterian Church 3901 Carver School Road 767-7530

St. James Presbyterian Church 820 Ross Avenue • 723-6658 Progressive baptist

Shouse Temple CME Church 4250 Carver Road • 744-0943

United Progressive Baptist Church

Holiness

1122-N. Jackson Avenue 725-5609

Kimberly-Park Holiness Church 417 Burton & Lime Avenue 723-8001

Mercy Seat Holy Church

145 Pine Tree Road • 661-1034

Mt. Calvary Holy Church

1615 W. 22nd Street • 748-0043

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PROUD SUPPORTER OF THE INTERNATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS CENTER & MUSEUM. WINNER OF MULTIPLE NATIONAL AWARDS FOR GRAND OPENING ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING

PRW EEK ’ S PROMOTIONAL EVENT OF THE YEAR.

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Marketing

Public Relations

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T R I A D

E D I T I O N

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P R O F I L E

O F

A C H I E V E M E N T

Denise Osei-Bonsu

Student Ambassador

Denise Osei-Bonsu plans to follow in her father’s footsteps. The Northern Guilford High School graduate began her freshman year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with enough credits to be classified as a sophomore. Named a Duke Energy Bioscience Scholar, Denise has dual majors in health policy and management and biology. She plans to attend medical school at UNC-Chapel Hill, and eventually join her father’s internal medicine practice. Despite the rigors of collegiate study, Denise serves as governor of two dormitories on the sprawling UNC campus and is responsible for providing activities and representing the 500600 residents on the Board of Governors. Denise has traveled extensively. While in high school, she participated in the People to People Student Ambassador Program, touring 16 European countries in three weeks. She was also named as a delegate by Lead America, where she was invited to the 2008 Democratic National Convention at which now President Barack Obama was named the party’s nominee. The eldest of three daughters of Dr. and Mrs. George Osei-Bonsu, Denise enjoys playing piano and lacrosse.

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Carolyn Quilloin Coleman

Guilford County Board of Commissioners Guilford County Schools

Carolyn Quilloin Coleman, a Democrat, is serving her fourth term on the Guilford County Board of Commissioners. She was elected to serve District 9 in 2002, 2006 and again in 2010. Due to redistricting, she currently serves District 7. She served as the Board’s Vice Chairwoman in 2004 and served as Chairwoman of the in Board 2006. Commissioner Coleman is a native of Savannah, Georgia, where she graduated from Savannah State College. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in history and a minor in economics and socioloigy. She has done further study at Memphis Theological Seminary and holds the Masters of Science degree in adult education from North Carolina A&T State University. Previous to her work as a Commissioner, she served as the Special Assistant to Governor James B. Hunt for eight years. In this position, she advised the Governor on policy, personnel, legislation and concerns pertinent to the minority community. Commissioner Coleman currently serves as a liaison on several Boards, including the Greensboro Convention and Visitors Bureau, Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation (PART) and Work First Planning Board. She is active in the NAACP, serving as the Secretary to the NAACP National Board of Directors and the Vice President of the North Carolina State NAACP, as well as activities with the local Greensboro Branch of the NAACP. She is involved in numerous civic and volunteer organizations including Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University Board of Visitors and is a communicant of the New Zion Baptist Church in Greensboro. Commissioner Coleman currently resides in Pleasant Garden and is the mother of one son, Carlton.

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DELTA SIGMA THETA Greensboro Alumnae Chapter

The GREENSBORO ALUMNAE CHAPTER of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. was chartered as BETA MU SIGMA on May 24, 1942. In 1963, Grand Chapter renamed BETA MU SIGMA to GREENSBORO ALUMNAE CHAPTER. The chapter will celebrates its 70th Anniversary later in 2012. The members of Greensboro Alumnae have continued to involve themselves in projects reflecting our national programmatic thrusts through local service projects that have been extremely meaningful to the Greater Greensboro area. The GREENSBORO ALUMNAE CHAPTER’s public service initiatives are; Social Action’s “Get Out the Vote”, The

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Jabberwock Scholarship Pageant and The Arts & Letters’ “Visual and Performing Arts Program” which showcases our high school students’ artistic talent. The chapter also hosts, in conjunction with the Alpha Mu, Omicron Delta and Omicron Eta collegiate chapters, the National Programs: Delta Academy (6th-8th grade females), Delta G.E.M.S. (9th-12th grade females), Project S.E.E.(5th grade) and most recently, EMBODI (8th-11th grade males) and Domestic Violence Awareness. Please visit www.dstgreensboroalumnae.org for more information.

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ALPHA PHI ALPHA Kappa Lamda Chapter

The Kappa Lambda Chapter of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated became the 10th Alumni Chapter on June 9, 1923.

Brothers in Kappa Lambda serve in various capacities in this professional and fraternal lives. This can be best revealed by the election of Bro.

Founded in Greensboro, North Carolina, the Kappa Lambda Chapter became the 110th Satellite Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha. The Chapter was established by Brother Stansback of Wilson, North Carolina. The charter members were Brothers F.L. Merry, President; F.D. Bluford, Vice President; J.B. Matthews, Secretary; D.K. Cherry, Chaplain, and Brothers Davis, Lanier and Giles.

Laurence Aikens in 2007 as District Director for the Association of North Carolina Alphamen. Bro. Aikens represents the District and Kappa Lambda well at the District and Regional levels. Other brothers in the chapter have severed on the District and Regional levels of the fraternity as well by working with the Southern Region and holding various positions on the district level.

Over the years the Brothers of Kappa Lambda have earned several awards and recognitions as a chapter and as individuals. In 2005, Kappa Lambda was named the Outstanding Alumni Chapter of the Year for the entire fraternity. Winning this recognition came on the heels of winning Chapter of the Year for the Association of North Carolina Alphamen and claiming the title as well at the Regional Convention in 2005. At the same time, Bro. Jarvis T. Harris was name the 2005 Outstanding Alumni Brother of the Year.

The Brothers of today’s Kappa Lambda Chapter continue to serve and lead the Greensboro community faithfully. Led by Brother Orlanda Carter, the Brothers of Kappa Lambda continue to uphold the principles of manly deeds, scholarship and love for all mankind.

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Please visit www.KL1923.org.org for more information.

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OMEGA PSI PHI Beta Kappa Kappa Chapter

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ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA Beta Iota Omega Chapter

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated is the first Greek-letter organization established by black college women. Founded on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C., in January 1908, the sorority has provided service to all mankind through a nucleus of over 170,000 members throughout the world. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority members contribute to the community by means of volunteer service while cultivating high scholastic and ethical standards. The Beta Iota Omega Chapter, was founded February 12, 1934 in Greensboro, North Carolina. The Beta Iota Omega Chapter is currently the largest graduate chapter in the Triad area, with membership of over 200 women. The chapter provides “Global Leadership Through Timeless Service� via national program initiatives such as Emerging Young Leaders (EYL). This signature program provides leadership skills, character building and civic engagement to girls in grades six through eight. Other programs include the Health Initiative, Economic Security, Social Justice, Global Poverty and Internal Leadership for External Service. The Beta Iota Omega Chapter is the supervising chapter of Zeta Xi Chapter at Bennett College for Women; Alpha Phi Chapter at North Carolina A&T State University; and Nu Rho Chapter at The University of North Carolina- Greensboro.

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KAPPA ALPHA PSI Greensboro NC Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc

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ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY, INCORPORATED SIGMA KAPPA OMEGA CHAPTER GREENSBORO, NC Serving the Greensboro Community Since 1990

Karla Lewis, Chapter President Marvette Artis*^

Tonya Currie

Ashley Jones

Audrey Ray

Shelly Barnes

Pamela Daye^

Doris Jones^

Kimberly Robertson

Latricia Barrett-Crawford

Lavaura DuBose

Pamela Jones

Tanya Robinson-Caldwell^

Fannie Bratcher^

Karen Dyer

Laquanda Leaven

Deborah Scales*^

Regina Breeze

Tikela Evans

Deidre Lewis

Candace Scott

Linda Brown*^

Tiffany Faison

Marilyn Lewis

Marilyn Gerry Shoffner^

Willie Jean Brown*

Allison Ford

Deborah Love

Roslyn Smith

Shea Burns

Audrey Franklin^

Keisha Martin

Dawn Tafari

Virginia Bynum

Shenise Goldsby

Brenda McEachern

Juliaette Thomas*

Kimberly Cheek

Sheila Gothard

Jessica McLean

Adrienne Turner

Carolyn Clarke

Yvonne Hankins

Leslie McLean

Sandra Wallington

Tonisha Coburn

Sabrenna Hayes

Norma Noble

Mozell Weston*^

Deena Currie

Kinshasa Hill

Becky Jo Peterson-Buie Sondra Wright

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MAURICE "MO" GREEN

Superintendent Guilford County Schools

Superintendent Maurice “Mo” Green was named Guilford County Schools’ third permanent superintendent when the Board of Education voted to approve his appointment on July 24, 2008. Guilford County Schools is the third largest district in North Carolina. The district has more than 71,000 students, almost 10,200 full- and part-time employees and a budget of more than $642 million. GCS has 120 schools located in urban, suburban and rural areas with 67 elementary schools, 22 middle schools, 26 high schools, two special education schools, and two sites which provide an alternative to long-term suspensions. Upon Green’s arrival in September 2008, he embarked on a “Listening and Learning Tour” of Guilford County to garner input from hundreds of GCS parents, students, teachers, principals and community members through town hall forums and other meetings. During this time, Green stressed excellence as the expectation for the district. Immediately, employees, students and the community began to work toward the goal of achieving education excellence. This is seen in the notable gains made in student achievement and increased numbers in volunteer hours and in-kind donations. The 2008-09 school year saw

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significant gains in Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), the No Child Left Behind federal legislation. Almost 70 percent of the district’s schools met AYP, the highest number for GCS since the measure was established in 2003. The state’s ABC accountability program showed that 10 Guilford County schools were named 2009 Honor Schools of Excellence, compared to only one the year before. These schools made AYP, made at least expected growth with its schools and had 90 percent or more of its students score at the proficient level. Prior to joining Guilford County Schools, Green held several positions with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (CMS). He joined the district in 2001 as its General Counsel, and in 2006, he was named chief operating officer. Upon his departure, he held the additional title of deputy superintendent. His duties included running the day-to-day operations of the district, which boasted 135,000 students, nearly 18,000 employees and a $1.17 billion budget. Green holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and economics and a law degree, both from Duke University. include “Top 40 Under 40” from the Charlotte Business Journal and the Black Women’s Caucus of Charlotte’s Trailblazer award. He served on numerous nonprofit boards in Charlotte, including the YMCA, the Arts and Science Council and the Crisis Assistance Ministry. He also is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Green and his wife, Stephanie, a school psychologist, are the proud parents of two children, Brianna, 13, and Isaiah, 9.

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Dr. Sandra Carlton Alexander Board of Education At Large Guilford County Schools Dr. Sandra Alexander is a retired university professor and administrator, a business owner, a community activist, an elected official, a published author, a wife, a mother and a grandmother. For over thirty years, she served as an English professor and an administrator at North Carolina A & T State University before retiring from that position.. Soon thereafter, she realized her dream of opening her own business. For 12 years she has operated Greensboro Scenic Tours, the only locally owned sightseeing tour business in the Piedmont Triad. Dr. Alexander sits on many non-profit boards. A long time supporter of the arts, she has served on the Board of Directors of Triad Stage, the United Arts Council and the North Carolina Writers Network. Some of her leadership positions include being President of the Greensboro YWCA and founding President of the local Negro Business and Professional Women’s Club, Inc. Dr. Alexander has always regarded education as a priority of the highest order. In 2003, she received the Board of Governor’s Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award, and in 2008, she was elected to the Guilford County Board of Education where she serves in an At large position representing parents and students from throughout the county. She is a fiction writer. In 1992, her volume of short stories, Black Butterflies: Stories of the South in Transition, won her the North Carolina Arts Council Writers’ Fellowship. A graduate of North Carolina A & T, Dr. Alexander a masters degree from Harvard University and a Ph. d. from the Univ. of Pittsburgh. She is married to Rondal Alexander. They have two adult children, Tonya and Derrick, and she is the proud grandmother of a four month old grandson, Dylan, who is the joy of her life.

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Kathleen Hoskins Smith Economic Development & Business Support City of Greensboro The City’s new Economic Development and Business Support (EDBS) office is now open and ready for business. The office is conveniently located inside the 300 W. Washington St. entrance to the Melvin Municipal Office Building. EDBS’ goal is to create economic development opportunities with an emphasis on helping businesses create jobs, grow, and succeed, while offering great customer service. The focus is on small business creation and retention by coordinating activities and initiatives with local and regional organizations. As part of the EDBS office, the City promotes inclusive bidding through the M/WBE program, using its economic power of purchasing to extend contract opportunities to all interested companies. Encouraging minority-and-women-owned companies to bid on City contracts increases competition, stimulates the local economy, and helps ensure diligent use of public funds. Kathleen Hoskins Smith leads the city’s outreach and advocacy efforts to assist minority and women owned companies. Call 336-373-2674.

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The Power of Marketing Identify your Target Audience Define your Mission Statement Develop “30 Second Elevator Speech”

• Always be prepared to convey your message clearly and convincingly

Set your Marketing Goal(s) • Short term • Long Term

Establish Realistic Marketing Budget Develop a Marketing Strategy

• Establish Timeline for Promotions: Special Events, Holidays, Customer Appreciation, Birthdays, Anniversaries, etc. • Research and determine advertising type(s) of media (print, television, radio, social, etc.) that will provide best return on investment • Track and document customers received from all advertising • Evaluate and analyze results

Keep Your Marketing & Advertising Fresh

• Invigorate Your Business, Product and or Service with Innovative Ideas often • Keep your product and/or service message in the public eye and ear constantly

Remain Energetic, Empowered, Excited, Self-Motivated • It is important to present a positive image and attitude at all timesYOU are your Businesses’ Greatest asset! • Volunteer and Give Back through Community Service

Your Ultimate Marketing Goal: Build Your Brand & Brand Your Business Marvette L. Artis, Marketing/Branding Specialist Brandyou247@gmail.com

www.blackpagesusaonline.com


Trade Show Tips Planning • • • • • •

Confirm Date and Set-up Time(s) of Trade Show Incorporate Show Signage provided for booths with Your Business Signage Dedicate notebook/briefcase for Trade Show documents and contact information Develop a timeline prior and leading up to trade show date List all Products, Services, Decor to be displayed Decide on Product(s), Service(s) that will be given away at the Trade Show, prepare giveaway registration forms (name, address, phone, email) and pens • Draw and set up a mock diagram/layout of booth and include product placement • Provide a bowl filled with “Good Candy” i.e. Hershey kisses, mini snickers, etc. • Purchase items needed for booth décor and layout • Allow ample time to set-up/decorate booth prior to opening of Trade Show doors (If possible, begin initial set-up the night before trade show) • Provide Trade Show announcements to assigned trade show personnel prior to deadline

Implementation

• Arrive early for booth set-up

• Complete booth set-up 30minutes prior to Trade Show start time • Make your trade show booth inviting, use vibrant colors • Prominently display your logo • Set “Candy Bowl” on display table

• Dressed neat and appropriately • Trained on product and service (script if necessary to insure the same information is given to show attendees visiting your booth) • Positive, Friendly, Excited and Engaging

• Have knowledgeable personnel working your booth. Personnel should be:

• Display Product/Service Giveaway(s) and registration forms with ATTRACTIVE signage in prominent location • Initiate Greeting and engage every customer that passes by your booth, using the opportunity to introduce YOUR Product and/or Service.

Evaluation

• Contact all leads within 3-5 days of Trade Show • Assess Show Participation and Return On Investment • Prepare for NEXT Scheduled Event Marvette L. Artis, Marketing/Branding Specialist Brandyou247@gmail.com www.blackpagesusaonline.com

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Dr. Deborah H. Barnes

Marketing Murder The Commerce of Lynching In 1893, the stalwart citizens of Paris, Texas tortured Henry Smith, “a negro fiend incarnate” and burned him at the stake for allegedly “ravishing” and murdering three-year old, Myrtle Vance, the youngest child of a local policeman. After the fact, a chronicle of the crime, its lethal retribution, and the nation’s response to the grisly affair was commercially published as The Facts in the Case of the Horrible Murder of Little Myrtle Vance and Its Fearful Expiation at Paris, Texas, February 1, 1893. The 200 page, illustrated, eyewitness account (written from the lynchers’ point of view) not only was designed to defend the politics of vigilantism but also to generate income for the grieving family. The sheer pageantry of the public murder the narrative describes must have required financial backing, since the intricate coordination of a large cast of characters, the preparation of various “staging areas,” and the use of numerous technological resources and special effects would ordinarily come at a price. That is, it seems unlikely that so sophisticated a plan could have been so spontaneously orchestrated without the administration of a “lynching impresario”—someone who would plan and expedite a “lynching extravaganza” for a fee (though one is not identified.) Hence, this lynching narrative1 not only preserves the important details involved in hosting America’s first “spectacle lynching,”2 it also lays bare a virtually unexplored aspect of racism’s summary justice: the commerce of lynching. The Facts in the Case alludes to the financial profits that Smith’s capture and murder could generate for corporate, commercial, and entrepreneurial concerns. The narrative notes, for example, that the Texas and Pacific Railroad delivered spectators to Paris by specially chartered excursion trains, after local and regional newspapers and national wire services announced the town’s intention to punish Smith for his crime.3 Accordingly, posses were deputized to apprehend the “criminal” with many of its

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less affluent members being “armed and mounted” via municipal funds. Dog-handlers and their blood-hounds were similarly retained for the search. The promise of instant celebrity and a (privately-raised) $500 reward further incentivized trackers to apprehend the fugitive.4 Following his capture near Hope, Arkansas and his return to Paris –also by special train—Smith was chained atop a custom-made “float” and paraded around the town square where he was mocked and condemned by the angry mob. Afterwards he was delivered to a ten foot high wooden scaffold, emblazoned with the word “Justice,” where his torture was to be staged. Erected specifically to make his execution visible to the mob, the platform was conveniently located on the prairie near the railroad tracks. Before Smith’s almost hour-long excruciation began, his coat and shirt were stripped away, torn into pieces, and distributed for souvenirs among the 15,000 spectators who had come to witness his retribution. Beginning with the soles of his feet, the toddler’s father, her fifteen year-old brother, and two uncles alternated their efforts to sear every inch of Smith’s body with burning brands, before they burned out his eyes and forced the blazing iron down his throat, burning away his tongue. After their vengeance was fully sated, his persecutors “converted his body to ashes” by saturating Smith in fuel oil and setting aflame “combustibles,” which had been placed below the scaffold, rendering it a pyre. Smith’s immolation was no less spectacular than his punishment: after burning for more than ten minutes, he leaped, ablaze, from the burning scaffold, rolling out of the fire three times before his tormentors found a way to fasten him securely in the inferno. When Smith’s cremation was completed, the mob scoured the site for mementos (e.g. bits of bone, splinters from the scaffold, pieces of charred rope. etc.)5 Professional photographers,

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lynching spectacle as a market niche compelled promoters to innovate and enhance Lynch Law’s deadly choreography in order to draw and maintain the interests of increasingly large crowds of spectators.

who had arrived early to secure unobstructed views of the event, documented the atrocious affair for posterity and for profit by quickly producing souvenir postcards for lynching enthusiasts and prints for newspapers. Though the spectacle of Smith’s lynching was unprecedented, his murder by mob was all too common. Leon F. Litwack has noted that between 1890 and 1917, two to three Black southerners were hanged, shot, burned at the stake, or quietly murdered every week to enforce the submission to whites that Jim Crow racism demanded. Just as many if not more Blacks became the victims of “legal lynchings”—that is, quick trials and summary executions—“nigger hunts,” and private violence at the hands of whites. 6 For many decades, lynching had served as a means of extralegal justice in the West and most of the victims had been white. But in the 1890s, the apex of the lynching era, lynching and sadistic torture rapidly became predominantly a southern phenomenon, with black men, women, and children as its principal victims. Vicious white mobs became dissatisfied with simply killing their victims; they executed Blacks by means of extraordinary torture and barbaric mutilation, often destroying what remained of their lifeless bodies in a mania of overkill. By the end of the nineteenth century, the mob murder of a black man, woman, or family had evolved into a popular form of public amusement that spectators were willing to travel great distances to witness. Emergence of the

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Once it’s economic and entertainment value had been fully realized and exploited, lynching as commerce help to shape lynching culture. Tens of thousands of white southerners witnessed and participated in “lynching bees,” “lynching carnivals,” “nigger barbecues,” or “picnics” as they were commonly known. Most Americans—white and black, north and south—learned about these ghastly matters through various forms of media: widely circulated news coverage, pamphlets, radio announcements, and to a lesser degree, books. Souvenir photographs of smiling and preening mobs of white men, women, and children coupled with grisly mementos from the event—such as amputated and preserved body parts, artifacts made from “tanned” human skin, scrota, bone fragments, pyre ashes, splinters from the nullifying tree or scaffold, and segments of chain or bits of rope—opened another, macabre, yet lucrative, market. By the mid-1890s, wire services, telephone companies, car and truck dealers, newspaper publishers, restaurants, hardware stores, reporters, and photographers had already claimed a stake in lynching commerce. After all, mobbists drove cars, spectators used cameras, lynchers needed guns, rope, fuel oil, and lumber; out-of-town spectators arrived on specially chartered trains and bought food and liquor at their destinations; newspapers and wire services reported the horrifying events locally and nationally, while telegraph offices and radio stations announced times and locations of the upcoming carnage. Those who could not (or would not) attend the lynching itself could purchase lynching narratives, like The Facts in the Case, which provided sensational, voyeuristic accounts of the ritualized mob torture and murder of a “notorious fiend.” After a fifty year lull, the end of the 20th Century witnessed a revival of “lynching commerce”— this time, in the form of academic and popular

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publications.7 The emergence of new scholarship on lynching culture bracketed the unveiling, in 2000, of Without Sanctuary,8 James Allen’s controversial traveling exhibit of lynching memorabilia. Though many exhibitgoers balked at the timeworn images of predatory mobs humiliating, torturing, and creatively murdering their human prey, the exhibit drew vast crowds of spectators

as had the spectacle lynchings captured in many of the photographs. Hence, notwithstanding the subject’s gruesomeness, contemporary interests in lynching photographs, postcards, letters, pamphlets, books, and ephemera underscore the endurance of lynching commerce today.

I coined this term to identify published accounts of lynching that are written by a participant, spectator, sympathizer, apologist or victim.

1

This term is coined by Grace Elizabeth Hale. She describes spectacle lynching as a blatantly public, actively promoted lynching of a southern black by a large crowd of southern whites. For a full discussion of this phenomenon see: “Deadly Amusements: Spectacle Lynchings and the Contradictions of Segregation as Culture.” Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890 – 1940. (NY: Pantheon, 1998) 199 – 240.

2

After the Smith lynching, railroad companies could be depended upon to transport lynchers and spectators to previously arranged sites, according to Hale. Some of these trains were even advertised in local papers.

3

Governor J. S. Hogg posted a $250 reward for the felon’s capture, which many Parisians considered insultingly paltry. 5 These kinds of relics would be sold rather than given away after subsequent lynchings.

4

For an excellent analysis of lynching within the context of southern culture, see: Trouble in Mind: Southerners in the Age of Jim Crow. Leon F. Litwack. (NY: Knopf, 1998).

6

For further reading on spectacle lynchings (in addition to Litwack and Hale) see also: At the Hands of Persons Unknown: the Lynching of Black America, Phillip Dray, (NY: Random House, 2002); Lynching and Spectacle: Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1890-1940. Amy Louise Wood. (Chapel Hill: University of NC Press, 2009)

7

Selected photographs from Allen’s collection are available online at http://withoutsanctuary.org/; Collected photographs are also available in book form: Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in American. James Allen. (Santa Fe, NM: Twin Palms, 2000).

8

Dr. Deborah H. Barnes Adjunct Associate Professor of English North Carolina A&T State University Deborah H. Barnes, Ph.D. is an Adjunct Associate Professor of English at North Carolina A&T State University. She has published and lectured widely on authors Toni Morrison, Richard Wright, Langston Hughes, and Arthur P. Davis and on topics of lynching and Indian boarding schools. She edited a two-volume textbook--I’m Buildin’ Me a Home: An Interdisciplinary Reader and Workbook for African American Experience, (Littleton, MA: Tapestry, 2009) She is currently editing an anthology of lynching narratives: Written in Blood: Lynching Narratives 1850 - 1900. 64

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HECTOR MCEACHERN THE M CEACHERN GROUP

Hector McEachern is an accomplished human resources professional who has served as an executive coach to Fortune 500 CEOs and corporate executives throughout his career. He drives tangible results by integrating leadership development practices and intuitive insights with business acumen. Before starting The McEachern Group, for more than 30 years, Hector served in senior leadership positions for Wachovia Bank. His leadership and vision helped guide the company through strategic mergers with First Union, SouthTrust, GoldenWest and A.G. Edwards. Hector was Director of Human Resources Business Partners and oversaw more than 200 employees responsible for all aspects of human resources ranging from organizational effectiveness to diversity integration and international human resources management. He counseled senior leaders in the bank’s Finance, Risk Management, Operations and Technology, Marketing and Legal Services divisions. Executives from across the country and industries seek Hector’s counsel based on his personal approach and insights to developing leaders at all levels of a company. Executives note his integrity and courage as unwavering attributes. In addition, Hector is a great communicator and has the ability to be a systemswide thinker without losing sight of the importance of one-to-one relationships. His coaching and consulting style is built on the tenet of leading by listening. Hector is passionate about ensuring tomorrow’s leaders are equipped to face the challenges of the 21st century. He has served on several college and university boards of trustees and advisory committees including LeMoyne-Owens College, Fayetteville State University and Wake Forest University. Hector is currently a member of the Board of Trustees for Guilford College. In support of his alma mater, Fayetteville State University, he served as chair of the Board of Trustees and led an intensive selection process for the university’s chancellor. During the summer of 2009, Hector was invited to join students from Salem University for an exchange program with Oxford University in England. His community service work also includes being a lifetime member of the Board of Advisors for The Children’s Home Society of North Carolina. Hector’s involvement with young adults provides valuable insights into the motivations and aspirations of the next generation of business, political and community leaders.

D. Hector McEachern

“He drives tangible results by integrating leadership development practices and intuitive insights with business acumen.”

3601 Stonebrook Farms Ct. | Greensboro, NC 27406 | 336 . 287 . 1988 | dhmceachern@TheMcEachernGroup.com www.TheMcEachernGroup.com


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Leaders who create [SVOIRZMVSRQIRXWXLEX connect employees to the long- and short-term goals of an organization.

We See Beyond Today

;I[SVO[MXLERSVKERM^EXMSR´W PIEHIVWLMTXIEQXSHI½RIMHIRXMJ] and nurture talented individuals. Our focus is to drive the organization to new levels of success and achieve a stronger connection to employees.

Leadership-driven relationships that evolve into powerful RIX[SVOWXLEXEVIWIPJHMVIGXIH and results oriented. Personal leadership style that is relationship-centric RSXXEWOHVMZIR

%LYQERVIWSYVGIWJVEQI[SVOXLEX ensures pipeline talent is nurtured and ready to lead and the right employees are in the right jobs. Focus is placed on the capacity of your teams to produce, change and innovate to ensure the organization remains competitive.

3601 Stonebrook Farms Ct. | Greensboro, NC 27406 | 336 . 287 . 1988 | dhmceachern@TheMcEachernGroup.com www.TheMcEachernGroup.com


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Juan Langford Coming from a family of business owners, Juan Langford knows firsthand the safeguards necessary to protect your business. As a Small Business/Group Benefit Specialist with LegalShield, Juan and his partner, Alan Leak, offer small business owners access to a team of attorneys and a plethora of consultants throughout the nation. The Greensboro-based partners have a combined 17-year history with LegalShield. Juan, who holds a B.S. degree in technology education from Elizabeth City State University and a master’s in Adult Training from Old Dominion, joined LegalShield 10 years ago, after a decade on the collegiate football coaching staffs of several institutions, including North Carolina A & T State University. Alan, who earned a B.S. in psychology from North Carolina A & T State University, was a former NFL player with the Indianapolis Colts and Carolina Panthers. He also worked in the telecommunications industry before joining LegalShield more than seven years ago.

Hello, neighbor! James Sweatt, Agent 668 Hanes Mall Blvd Winston Salem, NC 27103 Bus: 336-765-4080 james.sweatt.tz4k@statefarm.com

Please stop by and say, “Hi!” I’m looking forward to serving your needs for insurance and financial services. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL ME TODAY.

1001013.1

68

®

State Farm, Home Office, Bloomington, IL

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We Work as hard for your business as you do. charles Blackmon focuses his practice primarily on corporate business, sports and entertainment matters. He has full range of experience in representing closely held businesses and nonprofits, including employment, compliance, and dissolution issues. in addition to his business practice, Blackmon represents clients in the entertainment industry and sports related fields. He is well versed in contract drafting and negotiation. He has also tried cases in the state and federal courts of North carolina and Pennsylvania as well as handled client administrative matters before various governmental agencies in both jurisdictions. Blackmon is actively involved in numerous professional and civic organizations and holds leadership positions with several. He maintains business and professional relationships in the Northeast having practiced in Philadelphia for a number of years. a Durham native, Blackmon obtained his B.s. in industrial Relations from the University of North carolina at chapel Hill in 1983 and his law degree from the North carolina central University school of Law in 1988. He is admitted to practice in North carolina and Pennsylvania.

tuggle Duggins is a multi-specialty, multi-disciplinary law firm focused on the needs of closely held businesses and business owners. We provide representation in legal matters ranging from conventional personal and business issues to complex legal matters. Offices: 100 N. Greene street, suite 600 Greensboro, Nc 27401 (Lincoln financial Building)

cONtact Us: (336) 378-1431 (telephone) (336) 274-6590 (facsimile) www.tuggleduggins.com WWW.BLACKPAG ESU SAO NLINE . COM

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E D I T I O N

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m i n l i gton W a n i U ni l versity of North Caro

Embracing Diversity

Educating

Tomorrowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leaders

Enriching

North Carolina

Welcome to one of the Southâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top public universities.

www.uncw.edu


â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Want to Live Where We Wantâ&#x20AC;? Housing Discrimination is Against the Law!

It is illegal to discriminate in housing against any person because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, familial status, or disability. Contact the Greensboro Human Relations Department Fair Housing Division by mail, telephone, or email below for more information. City of Greensboro Human Relations Department P. O. Box 3136, Greensboro, NC 27402-3136 336-373-2038 www.greensboro-nc.gov/departments/Relations/fairhousing/


You don't have to le ave your officeto deposit checks Wells Fargo Desktop Deposit® service lets you scan checks in your officeand send images directly to your bank account — se cure ly and e le ctronically. So there’s no rushing to the bank. And minimal te chnology re source s are re quire d to imple me nt or maintain the system. Call, click or stop by and talk with a Wells Fargo banker today to learn about our Desktop Deposit service.

wellsfargo.com

© 2012 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. 127237 04/12

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Guilford County Schools is deeply committed to involving minority and womenowned businesses in school construction and renovations through the 2008 School Bond as well as other services. 2008 School Bond MWBE Participation Construction and design total

$72.8 million

Design awarded to MWBE

28.04%

Construction awarded to MWBE

28.69%

Qualified School Construction Bond MWBE Participation Projects total Minority and Women-Owned Business Enterprise (MWBE) Office Tammie Hall, MWBE coordinator 712 N. Eugene St., Greensboro, NC 27401 t 336-335-3297 e hallt6@gcsnc.com f 336-370-8306 www.gcsnc.com/mwbe

$6.2 million

Design awarded to MWBE

69.3%

Construction awarded to MWBE

32.82%

GCS BY THE NUMBERS 2011-2012 Student Enrollment 72,196 x Full- and Part-Time Employees 10,393 Number of Schools 122 Student Data: American Indian 0.57% x Asian 5.67% Black 40.80% x Hispanic 11.21% x Multi-Racial 3.71% Pacific Islander 0.16% x White 37.89%

Maurice â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moâ&#x20AC;? Green Superintendent

100

56.58%

Countries Represented

Free/Reduced Lunch

123

13,111

10,134

Languages/Dialects

Advanced Learners

Special Education

2 0 1 3

T R I A D

E D I T I O N

75


2 0 1 3

T R I A D

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BLACK PAGeS

bUild yoUr bUsiness with black pages Usa

PleaSe PhotoCoPY

hit Your target!

have your business displayed in the triad Black Pages. reach 160,000 Consumers. As an African-Amercican business owner or professional in the Triad Area, the Black Pages can work for your maximum visibility at reasonable rates 365 days a year. Have your business listed and displayed in the next annual editiona of the Triad Black Pages. Please photocopy, fill out this form and send it to our office today: 301 N. Elm Street, Suite 264, 266, gerry@blackpagesusa.com Greensboro, NC 27401, fax to 336-274-1711 or email triad.blackpagesusa@gmail.com.

COMPANY NAME ____________________________________________________________ CONTACT PERSON __________________________ TITLE _________________________ TYPE OF BUSINESS __________________________________________________________ ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________ CITY __________________________________ STATE _________ ZIP ________________ PHONE # _________________ EMAIL ___________________________________________ WEBSITE ___________________________________________________________________

A DIVISION OF MCCANTS COMMUNICATIONS GROUP, INC.

Building A Better AmericA By Building Stronger communitieS. 8

BL A C K PA G E S US A T R I A D E D I T I ON 2 0 1 0


New Book Presents…

Solutions for Religion, Education and Families in the Black Community

“What We Blacks Need to Do” Author: James J. Hankins

The First Book in a 3 Book Series… An examination of the three most important areas affecting the Black community:

1. Family 2. Education 3. Religion Like the three sides of a triangle, these aspects of society are strong when they support each other. When there is a disconnection, the whole triangle could fall apart. For more information contact

jhan606@gmail.com & visit www.jhankins.com.


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A D V E R T I S E R S

Guilford County

Accountant Clark, CPA , Rudolph

23

Guilford County Schools Guilford County Government

Architect Gravely, C linto n A I A A rc h i te c t & As s o c i ate s

Insurance

21, 72

State Farm- James Sweatt MetLife

Attorney Blackmon, Charles

Author

The McEachern Group

Alpha Medical

Bank

Onsei-Bonsu, George

Beauty & Hair

Large & Small Graphics

Security Double D Security

Human Relations Department Minority & Women Business Enterprise Roth, Denise Turner

71 69 15

Colleges & Universities

28 - 33

UNC Wilmington

70

Legal Shield

17, 68 Back Cover

2, 16 Inside Cover, 12 74

Elected Officials

26 - 27

Electrician 82

B L A C K

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Kappa Lambda Chapter Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Beta Iota Omega Chapter Sigma Kappa Omega Chapter Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Greensboro Alumnae Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Beta Kappa Kappa Tau Omega Chapter

49 53 54 48 52 50 - 51

Tax Preparation Jackson Hewitt â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lacy & Glenda Tinnen

80

Television

75

P A G E S

66, 74

Sororities & Fraternities

L ong-Stokes D.D.S., PA , Sharon Redd, Tonya Vincent D.D.S., Drewer y

Electric One

74

Small Business Benefits

Construction Management

Dentists

24 - 25

- 44

City of Greensboro

SRS, Inc. United Maintenance Group, LLP

14, 63

Printing

18, 54

Churches 33

19, 78

Physician

72

Dudley Beauty Corp, LLC

64 - 65

Medical Clinic

76

Wells Fargo

22, 66 83

Leadership Development

13, 67

Hankins, James

73 9

WFMY-TV2

U S A

20


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As a financial industry leader, MetLife

A D V E R T I S E R S

has been addressing the concerns of businesses in the community for over 140 years.

As a business professional, you have a significant amount of time, money and effort invested into your business. Business Planning creates a tax-efficient strategy for you to accumulate wealth and protect yourself and your business. At MetLife, we understand your concerns and can help design customized strategies that will enable you to protect your business and reach your own personal financial goals.  Qualified Retirement Plan Design & Execution  Executive Benefits  Business Succession Planning  Planning for Family-Owned Businesses  Key Person Protection Plans  Retirement Income Strategies  Life Insurance  Disability Income Insurance  Group Benefit Packages

Insert Rep Picture

1801 Stanley Road, Suite 425, Greensboro, NC 27407 Phone 336-292-1441 Chris Stanley Financial Advisor Financial Services Representative Registered Representative Investment Advisor Representative Special Needs Planner cstanley@metlife.com

James C. Byers, II Financial Advisor Financial Services Representative Registered Representative Investment Advisor Representative Special Needs Planner

Insert Rep Picture

jcbyers@metlife.com

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (MLIC), New York, NY 10166. Securities offered through MetLife Securities Inc. (MSI)(member FINRA/SIPC). Some health insurance products offered by unaffiliated insurers through Enterprise General Agency (EGA), Somerset, NJ 08873. MLIC, MSI and the EGA are MetLife Inc. 1 3 T Rprovide I A taxD or legal E Dadvice. I T Please I O consult N 83 companies. Neither MetLife nor any of its affiliates, employees,2or 0 representatives your tax advisor or attorney for such guidance. L0813338726[exp1015][FL,GA,NC,SC,TN,VA]


Black Pages USA - Triad Edition - 2013  

The 2013 Triad Edition of the Black Pages.

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