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A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Dear Friends: San Francisco Firefighters IAFF Local 798 is honored to represent the more than 1,700 Firefighters, Paramedics, and Emergency Medical Technicians of the San Francisco Fire Department (SFFD). The men and women of the SFFD go above and beyond the call of duty to provide exceptional service while risking their own health and safety. Highlighted within the pages of this publication, you’ll see how First Responders are asked to do more than ever in dangerous and difficult conditions. In 2019, San Francisco Firefighters responded to nearly 154,000 emergency calls for service – the busiest year in the history of our Department. In 2020, COVID-19 has impacted every aspect of our lives, including our work and how we go about protecting ourselves, our families, and the people of San Francisco. This global pandemic has also underscored the need to reach and maintain full funding to support the work of our Firefighters serving on the front lines. As City leaders deliberate the budget for Fiscal Years 2020-21 and 2021-22, it is critical to continue providing first-class service and unparalleled patient care. The SFFD must secure adequate funding to: • • • •

Increase Emergency Medical Service Resources Replace Aging Front Line Equipment & Infrastructure Restore Incident Support Specialists Designate a Dedicated Marine Unit

With our Local 798 Mission and Vision Statements in mind, we continue to be active stewards of the City we serve and most recently helped lead the effort to pass Proposition B, the earthquake safety and emergency response bond to ensure that San Francisco can rebound and rebuild after a major earthquake. During the hardest hit weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, our Firefighters were quick to spread the word about the importance of social distancing and avoiding large crowds with messages encouraging folks to stay home. This sense of community is also why members of Local 798 commit countless hours of their own time giving back through the San Francisco Firefighters Local 798 Toy Program, the San Francisco Firefighters Cancer Prevention Foundation, and dozens of charitable efforts to benefit all individuals and families in our City. As a proud SFFD Firefighter and lifelong San Franciscan, I am honored and privileged to serve as the President of the finest Firefighters and Paramedics in our nation. On behalf of the Executive Board and our dedicated members, I thank you for your support of our SFFD Firefighters.

MISSION Advocate for our members to maintain and improve benefits, wages, and working conditions through collective bargaining to advance fairness and equality in the workplace for the betterment of the laboring class.

VISION Achieve solidarity within our membership through education, engagement, and succession planning and solidify our brand by fostering

Sincerely,

community and political partnerships through public outreach.

Shon Buford President San Francisco Firefighters International Association of Fire Fighters Local 798


INDEX 2019 BY THE NUMBERS

3

FUTURE CHALLENGES

6

CRITICAL NEEDS

8

EMS Resources

8

Fleet & Infrastructure

10

Incident Support Specialists

14

Marine Unit

18

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

25

SUPPORTING OUR COMMUNITY

28

EXECUTIVE BOARD

32

Established in 1866, the San Francisco Fire Department serves an estimated 1.5 million people, providing fire suppression and emergency medical services to the residents, visitors, and commuters within 49 square miles. Community Fire Stations are staffed by 1,704 sworn Firefighters and Paramedics who respond to an average of more than 421 emergency calls for service on a daily basis.

FIRE STATION LOCATIONS

SFFD PIO


2019 BY THE NUMBERS

SAN FRANCISCO POPULATION 900,002

910,000

870,000

830,000

790,000

750,000 2000

2010

2012

2013

2014

2016

2015

2018

2017

2019

CALLS FOR SERVICE 153,982

155,000 145,000 135,000 125,000 115,000 105,000 95,000 01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

STAFFING LEVELS

1,900

1,800

1,704

1,700

1,600

1,500

1,400 03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19


2019 BY THE NUMBERS

INCIDENTS BY CALL TYPE Alarms Structure Fire Citizen Assist/Service Call Outside Fire Other Electrical Hazard Elevator Rescue Gas Leak Smoke Investigation Vehicle Fire Fuel Spill Odor Water Rescue Hazmat Explosion Confined Space Watercraft In Distress Mutual Aid High Angle Rescue Hazmat Exposure Train/Rail Incident Marine Fire Suspicious Package

12,536 4,794 3,460 2,841 2,744 1,523 1,045 873 522 446 196 183 174 53 28 10 7 5 5 3 2 2 1

SFFD PIO

Michael Victor


Total Injuries

29

Total Fatalities

3

CALLS EMS

50,513

Fire

29,105

Fire/EMS

74,364

Total Incident Calls

153,982


FUTURE CHALLENGES: COVID-19

Dawn Rosales

THE SPREAD OF COVID-19: 2020 TIMELINE January 21

February 25

March 5

March 19

The first confirmed case of coronavirus in the United States is a man in his 30s who had recently traveled to Wuhan, China.

San Francisco Mayor London Breed declares a State of Emergency even before the City has a confirmed case of the fast spreading virus.

San Francisco reports its first two cases of coronavirus.

Governor Gavin Newsom issues Executive Order N-33-20, directing nearly 40 million residents to stay at home unless employed by a recognized, essential business as part of the State’s critical infrastructure.

March 13 Mayor Breed announces a ban of gatherings of 100 or more people.

March 22 San Francisco confirmed case count passes 100.

January 27

March 4

March 17

March 24

San Francisco City officials activate the City’s Emergency Operations Center to coordinate the response to the novel coronavirus.

California reports its first death related to the coronavirus, an elderly man in Placer County. Officials would later discover that two residents of Santa Clara County died of the coronavirus in early February, making them the first known victims of the pandemic in the United States.

Mayor Breed issues a shelter-in-place order, legally prohibiting residents from leaving their homes except to meet basic needs, including visiting the doctor or buying groceries.

San Francisco reports its first death related to the coronavirus, a man in his 40s with significant, underlying health conditions.

March 21 NBC Bay Area reports six members of the SFFD are quarantined as a precaution and do not show any symptoms of the virus.


SFFD PIO

SFFD PIO

A GLOBAL PANDEMIC CREATES UNCERTAINTY In the first few months of 2020, COVID-19 (2019 Novel Coronavirus) quickly spread and developed into a global pandemic, drastically transforming daily life in the Bay Area and throughout the world. Despite the dangers of the deadly virus, San Francisco Firefighters continued to respond to emergency calls for service.

March 31

April 7

April 11

April 18

NBC Bay Area reports that the SFFD has secured 100 thermometers to test members three times a day (when they come to work, during their shift, and when they go home).

San Francisco Firefighters and the Toy Program surprise a 10-year-old boy with a special visit after his birthday trip to Legoland in Southern California was canceled because of the novel coronavirus outbreak.

The United States reports the most coronavirus deaths in the world with more than 20,000.

San Francisco Firefighters virtually commemorate the 114th Anniversary of the 1906 earthquake. The fire hydrant at 20th and Church Streets, which Firefighters continuously pumped water through for three straight days to save the Mission District, is given a new coat of gold paint.

April 15 San Francisco surpasses 1,000 cases of coronavirus.

?

April 2

April 9

April 10

April 17

May 14

San Francisco’s first confirmed homeless case of COVID-19 was announced in the Division Circle Navigation Center.

The San Francisco Firefighters Toy Program mobilizes to help struggling families during the shelter in place orders, distributing gift bags with arts-and-crafts, games, and puzzles and making grocery deliveries to those in need.

A coronavirus outbreak of 68 residents is reported at the City’s largest homeless shelter, MSC South on 5th Street. Within weeks, the number of confirmed cases would surpass 100, with more than 90 residents and 10 staff members testing positive.

San Francisco announces that anyone in the City who travels outside their place of residence is required to wear a face covering at businesses, in public facilities, on transit, and while performing

The SF Fire Credit Union funds UCSF antibody study.

essential work.

June 1 San Francisco County has a reported total of 2,570 confirmed cases and 43 deaths due to the virus.


CRITICAL NEEDS: EMS

INCREASE EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE RESOURCES For the past several years, the increase in emergency calls for service has put a strain on the SFFD’s ability to meet its mission and perform at the highest levels of safety, reliability, and functionality. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel work 10 and 12-hour shifts on ambulances and provide first response and medical transport at the Advanced Life Support (ALS) level to over 1.5 million residents and visitors. In many parts of the City, EMS personnel are short-staffed and unable to effectively respond to the more than 150,000 emergency calls we receive each year.

IAFF REPORTS In a June 2019 Report on Emergency Response in San Francisco, the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) concluded that the EMS workload and current staffing deployment by the SFFD requires additional resources to respond to emergencies in the City effectively. Without adding more ambulances, the Department “will not be able to provide adequate emergency response causing an increase in the number of calls where there are no available ambulances to respond. SFFD needs additional resources to provide the City of San Francisco with a safe and high-quality emergency response system.” A second report released in February of 2020 by the IAFF also demonstrated that the SFFD “does not staff the necessary ambulances to provide effective response to medical emergencies in the City of San Francisco.” Even though the City has an agreement with two separate private ambulance providers that cover approximately 20% of calls during peak hours, the Department is still deficient by approximately 12-16 people every day. The IAFF recommends a minimum of 30 ambulances during non-peak hours ( 11 PM to 9 AM ) and up to 60 ambulances during peak demand hours (9AM to 11PM), which would also dramatically decrease response times and workload for SFFD Firefighters. In high incident areas such as District 3, as well as outer portions of the City (Districts 1, 4, 10, and 11) where there can be no coverage of ambulances in the event of an emergency, this will have a significant impact on our ability to save lives. Image courtesy of IAFF


SFFD PIO

HOMELESS EPIDEMIC As we continue to see an untenable homeless epidemic in our City, further strain is put on EMS resources. More Paramedics and EMTs in the field are needed to keep pace with the over 30% growth of our homeless count in the past three years to safely meet the needs of this most vulnerable constituency. Presently, the COVID-19 outbreak is our most recent signal for increased EMS resources. The newly created RC5 position that was implemented to respond to virus-related calls helped to ease the burden; however, more resources are needed to support our members who are at higher risk of exposure while trying to provide service without interruption. The reality is that we are likely to see a similar event in our future. When that time comes, we should have adequate EMS resources at our disposal so that we can respond to meet the needs of our communities and protect the public.

SFFD PIO

SFFD PIO


CRITICAL NEEDS: FLEET & INFRASTRUCTURE

Juan Gomez Piña

SFFD PIO


REPLACE AGING FRONT LINE EQUIPMENT & INFRASTRUCTURE The SFFD responds to more than 150,000 emergency calls for service each year with a fleet of vehicles that includes 44 Fire Engines, 20 Fire Trucks, and more than 50 Ambulances.

SAFETY STANDARDS The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is the leading authority to set standards and guidelines for safety in the fire service. Their recommendations are accepted as the benchmark for the way that fire departments should operate as it pertains to staffing levels, training, personal protective equipment, engine and truck safety, and so much more. According to the NFPA, all front line (primary) fire apparatus, especially those operating in a busy, urban environment like San Francisco, should be replaced every 10 years for the safety of our Firefighters and the public that we serve. Currently, the SFFD has more than a dozen front line engines that are past this 10-year recommended date of replacement. This includes Engines 22, 25, 34, and 40, all of which are at least 20-years old. Several of the 20 front line trucks are also well past the 10-year NFPA standard, including Trucks 2, 12, and 13 that were all built in 1998, and Truck 14 from 1999. Other SFFD trucks are approaching the 20-year mark, including Truck 16 in the Marina and Truck 18 in the Outer Sunset District. The SFFD has not received a new truck in six years!

AGING INFRASTRUCTURE In addition to our aging fleet, the infrastructure at our fire stations is old and crumbling. Only four of our fire stations have been built from the ground up within the last 10 years. SFFD PIO

SFFD PIO


CRITICAL NEEDS: FLEET & INFRASTRUCTURE

SFFD PIO

FLEET REPLACEMENT PLAN We need an updated Fleet Replacement Plan that can serve as a roadmap over the next decade. More urgently, action is required to replace several rigs that are more than 20-years old. They are a danger to our Firefighters and the public and they create a liability for the City. Although we realize the budget constraints that we are facing, the replacement of as many of these Trucks and Engines as possible should be a high priority for the safety of our Firefighters and the public: Truck 2 in Chinatown, Truck 10 in Laurel Heights, Truck 12 in the Haight, Truck 13 in the Financial District, Truck 19 in Stonestown, Truck 48 on Treasure Island, Engine 22 in the Sunset District, Engine 25 in the Bayview District, Engine 39 in West Portal, and the SFFD Utility Unit. It is simply unacceptable for our Firefighters to be operating SFFD Trucks and Engines that are more than 20-years old. Our Firefighters use these rigs every single day; therefore, we must have a voice in creating a realistic SFFD Fleet Replacement Plan. We know what works, where our biggest challenges are, and how we can get the most out of our apparatuses, while still maintaining safety as our top priority.


2019: BUSIEST APPARATUSES TOP TEN BUSIEST COMPANIES COMPANY ENGINE 03 ENGINE 01 ENGINE 36 TRUCK 03 ENGINE 07 ENGINE 06 ENGINE 13 ENGINE 41 ENGINE 05 BATTALION 02

SFFD PIO

TOTAL DISPATCHES

AVERAGE DISPATCHES/DAY

8,476

23

7,626

21

6,208

17

4,969

14

4,362

12

3,995

11

3,801

10

3,496

10

3,477

10

3,403

9

Fiona O’Connor


CRITICAL NEEDS: INCIDENT SUPPORT SPECIALISTS

RESTORE INCIDENT SUPPORT SPECIALISTS The Incident Support Specialist (ISS) plays a critical role in some of the most significant emergency calls for service. The ISS reports to and provides vital support to the Battalion Chief or their assigned Division. They are responsible for tracking Firefighter staffing levels and ensuring that each unit in the field is appropriately covered for the day. The ISS also manages all details related to the movement of staff between stations, training schedules, and demographic coverage, including tracking apparatus that goes out of service.

DUTIES During an emergency, the ISS assists the Chief by tracking all pertinent incident information, thereby allowing the Chief to focus their attention on the overall safety of our Fire Crews and the general public. Other critical duties while on scene are to monitor personnel, equipment, traffic needs from the SFFD, requests from PG&E and similar agencies, and provide radio traffic communication updates to the Dispatch Center. Battalion Operators go into the fire structure or adjoining buildings to serve as the "eyes of the Chief" from the outside. If in a high-rise building, the ISS stays in the fire control room, distributes radios, and monitors the building fire alarm panel. Their incident reports help to determine how the Chief proceeds in any given situation and/or if they will need additional resources.

REPORTING The ISS also helps to keep the Department in compliance with the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) requirements. These reports generate revenue for the Department, while an inaccurate or incomplete description can also result in a loss of funds as well as losses for civilians who could be reimbursed by their insurance company.

Bay Area Firefighter

SFFD PIO


2019 WORKING FIRE STATISTICS ALARM 1st

165

2nd

13

3rd

1

4th

1

TOTAL WORKING FIRES

SFFD PIO

COUNT

180

SFFD PIO


CRITICAL NEEDS: INCIDENT SUPPORT SPECIALISTS

BUDGET CUTS & RESTORATION In past years, the Battalion 3 ISS position was cut in an effort to assist San Francisco during a financial downturn. These critical positions were surrendered, but it was never fully intended to be permanent. However, the response area for Battalion 3 with the addition of the Mission Bay neighborhood has more than tripled in population and commercial density. South of Market and Mission Bay consist of multiple high-rise residential developments, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oracle Park, and the new Chase Center, making the restoration of the ISS position essential for public safety. This area consists of numerous terrorist targets, has experienced an increase in the number of jumpers from the Bay Bridge, and suffers from multiple-vehicle collisions. This is alarming given that the Chief currently serves as the sole source of information flow to multiple stakeholders, including Oakland Fire, the Dispatch Center, crews on the scene, BART, the U.S. Coast Guard, and the CHP. The return of an ISS to Battalion 3 would fill a significant need.

WHAT CAN GO WRONG WHEN AN ISS IS NOT AT THE SCENE OF AN EMERGENCY? The tragic June 2, 2011 fire at 133 Berkeley Way that claimed the lives of Lt. Vincent Perez and Firefighter Paramedic Anthony Valerio did not have an ISS supporting either the first arriving Battalion Chief who was assigned to interior attack nor the second Battalion Chief who was on the roof. The Safety Investigation Report noted that there was a delay in implementing the Incident Command Worksheet, which is used to track companies. Having properly staffed Battalion companies provides better communication and tracking of personnel, equipment, and property damage. Proper staffing and tracking of personnel may help reduce the incurrence of Department fines; but more importantly, will help saves lives.

2019 CALLS BY BATTALION B01

15,568 32,485

B02

27,844

B03

B04

B05

B06

15,065 10,369

B07

B08

B09

B10

10,117 6,885 11,893 10,731 12,259


2019 TOTAL PROPERTY LOSS

$44,793,700 Bay Area Firefighter

Bay Area Firefighter


CRITICAL NEEDS: MARINE UNIT

DESIGNATE DEDICATED MARINE UNIT The SFFD covers 64 miles of jurisdiction, including 25 miles of coastline within the City and County of San Francisco.

RAPID RESPONSE The SFFD is the lone Advanced Life Support (ALS) resource that is able to respond to medical emergencies on the San Francisco Bay with a Paramedic on the water. Currently, there are only two SFFD stations with watercraft capable of responding to emergencies from the coastline starting at Fort Funston all the way around the Cliff House, into the Bay, and as far south as Candlestick Park. If those Firefighters are busy fighting a fire or responding to other emergency calls on land, the SFFD watercraft goes unstaffed. Both stations have different types of boats for responses. Station 16 in the Marina District is equipped with a fast response boat as well as jet skies which are vital to emergencies off the Marina area, outside the Golden Gate Bridge, to Lands End and Ocean Beach. Station 35's fireboat is an excellent tool for fire suppression along the waterfront, but it's not designed for rapid response to water emergencies. Although there is a small skiff that can be deployed from the fireboat, Station 35 needs a faster, dedicated boat in addition to a crew of at least four more Firefighters to focus solely on water rescues in the Bay. Fire Station 35 is centrally located in the Bay and should be the site of a SFFD Dedicated Marine Response Station.

SFFD PIO SFFD PIO


SFFD PIO

Sean Bonetti


CRITICAL NEEDS: MARINE UNIT

Sean Bonetti

INCREASING SURF & CLIFF RESCUES Surf and Cliff Rescue calls have increased each year, culminating in a 400% increase over the 10 years leading up to 2018. Without changes in the way that the SFFD protects residents in and around the San Francisco Bay, the SFFD will not have the resources that are required to keep the Bay and those who use it safe.

NEW DEVELOPMENT The urgency for a dedicated Marine Unit is even greater today now that up to 40,000 new residents will be occupying the Bayview and Hunters Point redevelopment projects that will include a mix of apartments, townhomes, and condominiums with easy access to more open spaces on the water. With this influx of tens of thousands of San Franciscans returning to their old neighborhoods, they should be provided with the same level of safety and protection that is given to other residents so close to the water, such as the area surrounding Oracle Park with SFFD Fire Station 4 and the SFPD Southern Station nearby to service the local community.

GROWING DEMAND A dedicated SFFD Marine Unit will allow our Department to address the growing demand for marine rescue services in a timely, professional manner without pulling resources from other local SFFD Fire Stations. This Marine Unit would have the capability to deliver ALS on the water, allowing for the same delivery of lifesaving services on both land and sea.


Katherine Alba

SFFD PIO

SFFD PIO

John Stanfield


CRITICAL NEEDS: MARINE UNIT

“…those marine assets were absolutely instrumental in protecting the waterfront, in protecting the community during this incident. ” — Jonathan Baxter, SFFD PIO

Captain Stoy Robinson

Sean Bonetti


Tom Fogle

Water2Table Fish Co.

FOUR-ALARM FIRE ERUPTS AT PIER 45 Around 4:15AM on May 23rd, a massive fire broke out at a warehouse on Fisherman's Wharf, threatening several businesses and a World War II-era ship based at Pier 45. More than 150 Firefighters responded by land and water to battle the inferno, successfully containing the fire to a section of the pier and saving the SS Jeremiah O’Brien. Unfortunately, the blaze destroyed a processing and storage warehouse and a quarter of the pier at Fisherman's Wharf, devastating the San Francisco fishing industry. Truck 13 from the Financial District was the first on scene and the swift and aggressive actions taken by Fire Crews prevented the blaze from spreading. The St. Francis (Fireboat 3) was tasked with protecting the SS Jeremiah O'Brien, at times combatting flames greater than 100 feet in length lapping over the ship. The vessel would have been lost if it were not for the defensive fire attack waged by the St. Francis. Fireboat 1 was also critical in containing the fire, protecting the waterfront, and saving the SS Jeremiah O’Brien. Other marine assets, including Rescue Boat 1 staffed by Fire Station 16, positioned themselves around the wharf and assisted in the firefight as well. Rescue Boat 1, fireboats, and jet skis respond to water emergencies where access by land is an issue.


CRITICAL NEEDS: MARINE UNIT

Stephen Lam

Firefighters spent several hours extinguishing smoldering debris from the ground and aerial ladders, reaching containment at 11:30AM. In total, fifty pieces of firefighting apparatus were used to battle the blaze. Crews remained on scene throughout the holiday weekend to douse hot spots and prevent flare-ups. Unfortunately, one Firefighter sustained a severe injury to the hand and was treated at a local hospital. This Memorial Day weekend, four-alarm fire at Pier 45 is a bleak reminder that a dedicated marine response is essential to a city surrounded on three sides by water.

Noah Berger

Local 798


DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

NEIGHBORHOOD EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM On October 17, 1989, San Francisco experienced a magnitude 6.9 earthquake that tragically killed 67 people and caused more than $5 billion in damages. The aftermath prompted the formation of the Neighborhood Emergency Response Team Training Program (NERT), which currently provides instruction in disaster and emergency response. Since 1990, Local 798 members have dedicated time to provide engaging, quality hands-on training to residents of San Francisco. The goal is to teach as many San Franciscans as possible that with basic skills they can make a difference in the lives of their families and others when they are affected by a disaster. Since its inception, the NERT program has trained more than 24,700 residents to be self-reliant in a major disaster.

COMMUNITY OUTREACH In 2019, training was delivered in English, Cantonese, and Spanish. NERT was expanded to include Spanish language training, LISTOS, with the recognition that our city has many monolingual Spanish speakers that we were not reaching through traditional channels. Trusted community partners have also become trainers in this family-friendly preparedness class and jointly deliver the instruction to bridge the immigrant community's fear of uniformed personnel.

COVID-19 RESPONSE Additionally, since the start of the disaster declaration for COVID-19, volunteers trained in NERT have fulfilled over 700 assignments supporting community education, physical distancing messaging at Parks and Recreation sites, and food bank operations for the increased need. The NERT deployment was recognized by FEMA for their outstanding efforts in Individual and Community Preparedness. Local 798 members who are committed to this program demonstrate their love of community and help develop a strong partnership between our neighbors and the City we serve so we can all be disaster ready.


DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

PROPOSITION B

SAN FRANCISCO VOTERS PASSED $628 MILLION EARTHQUAKE SAFETY AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE BOND

In March of 2020, San Francisco voters overwhelmingly passed Proposition B, a $628.5 million bond measure that will allow the City to finance seismic renovations to police and fire stations, expand the city’s 911 call center to accommodate more dispatchers and other disaster-response facilities, and fund an expansion of the emergency firefighting water system. With the City’s Firefighters leading the charge, the measure passed with 81% approval, needing a two-thirds supermajority. The Earthquake Safety and Emergency Response (ESER) Bond will continue the important work of the 2010 and 2014 safety bonds to fund the essential improvements and upgrades to our emergency response systems that will help First Responders reduce casualties, injuries, and the critical infrastructure damage from an earthquake or emergency. This bond ensures our 911 dispatchers have the updated technology and training they need to connect gravely injured people with emergency responders as fast as possible. San Francisco’s 911 Dispatch Center is already one of the top 25 busiest 911 centers in the United States and receives an average of 3,700 calls each day. Improvements and upgrades are needed to ensure functionality during and after large-scale disasters so the needs of the critically injured are met. The bond will also provide for essential upgrades to the Emergency Firefighting Water System so our Firefighters can access an adequate water supply to fight fires in an emergency. The Emergency Firefighting Water System is used as the secondary defense against large, multiple-alarm fires, specifically those that can occur after a large earthquake when the domestic water system may be impacted. If the City’s domestic water system is damaged as a result of an earthquake – as had happened previously – sufficient water from the domestic water system will not be available to suppress the flames. We must upgrade this system to safeguard our community from devastating fires.

KNOW THE FACTS Scientists say there is a 72% chance that the bay area will be hit with an earthquake of six point seven magnitude or greater sometime in the near future.

Current estimates for building damage from a major earthquake due to shaking and fire are as high as $28 billion to $66 billion.

In the 1906 earthquake, it was the devastating fire that followed that caused most of the loss of life and destruction of homes.


voters of San Francisco know the importance “ofThebeing prepared, and Proposition B ensures our great city is resilient for future generations.” — Shon Buford, President of SF Firefighters Local 798

1139 Mission St. San Francisco, CA 94103 (union bug)

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

TRADE LITHO

It happened before... 1906. It

wasn’t the earthquake, it was the fire that caused the casualties and destroyed the most homes, buildings and businesses.

PROPB_5

1989. When

the Emergency Firefighting Water System went down, fires broke out in the Marina — and history repeated itself.

...then it happened again... DO WHAT’S BEST. PLAN FOR THE WORST. YES ON B BECAUSE SAN FRANCISCO CAN’T WAIT.

In the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, the City’s century-old emergency firefighting water system was knocked out as massive fires broke out in the Marina.

Fire damage would account for 20 to 50 percent of total earthquake damage. This would severely impact the Bay Area’s economy, devastate families, and greatly hinder San Francisco’s capacity to recover.

It’s vital First Responders have the necessary tools to reduce injuries and deaths from such a disaster, and to reduce the economic impact to our communities.


SUPPORTING OUR COMMUNITY

SAN FRANCISCO FIREFIGHTERS CANCER PREVENTION FOUNDATION The San Francisco Firefighters Cancer Prevention Foundation (SFFCPF), founded in 2006 by Tony Stefani, is committed to the prevention and early detection of cancer and providing access to cutting edge care for active and retired members of the San Francisco Fire Department and their families. The goals of the Foundation are based on scientific research, education, cancer screenings, and health navigation. Through this research and advocacy, the SFFCPF aims to improve public health and end the threat of job-related cancer in the firefighting profession. Firefighters are at a significantly greater risk than the general public of developing certain cancers and more than 300 San Francisco Firefighters have died from various types of this disease since the SFFCPF was founded. This volunteer-based nonprofit has grown to become a leading organization for the early detection, treatment, and support for Firefighters with cancer. The Foundation educates Firefighters on cancer risks they face, provides free cancer screenings, and assists families in the first steps post diagnosis. The SFFCPF has also been directly involved in legislation and advocacy efforts, including implementing Cancer Presumption legislation, overhauling the Toxic Substances Control Act, and banning flame retardant chemicals.

FUNDRAISING & AWARENESS EVENTS THE ART OF FIRE GALA

FIRE VELO "FIRE SERVICE CANCER AWARENESS" RIDE

Thanks to generous sponsors and supporters, the Art of Fire Gala honors community leaders and raises awareness along with much needed funds to benefit the SFFCPF. Proceeds from the Gala support the Foundation’s science-based studies and ongoing efforts to provide medically approved cancer screenings for the early detection of cancer in active and retired Firefighters.

Every year, cyclists complete a weeklong journey from San Francisco to Los Angeles with a purpose - to raise awareness and funds to fight cancer in the fire service. The riders, some of whom are also cancer survivors, are active duty or retired Firefighters from several fire departments across California.

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and throughout this time, United Fire Service Women helps raise awareness and funds through t-shirt sales to fight breast cancer. All of the proceeds raised are donated to charity, including the San Francisco Firefighters Cancer Prevention Foundation and Bay Area Young Survivors. Approximately 16% of the Department’s Firefighters being women. Of that number, 15% of female Firefighters between ages 40 and 50 years old have been diagnosed with breast cancer, which is six times the national average.

Over the past 13 years, the SF to LA Ride has raised more than $350,000 to support cancer prevention efforts and organizations including: • Fire Family Foundation • San Francisco Firefighters Cancer Prevention Foundation • Firefighter Cancer Support Network • Retired Professional Fire Fighters Cancer Fund The 2019 ride was dedicated in memory of five Firefighters who lost their lives to job-related cancer, including Frank Dunphy, Matthew Plescia, and David Lavelle from the San Francisco Fire Department and Mark Tolbert and John Walsh from the Los Angeles County Fire Department.


SFFCPF FUNDED RESEARCH AND COLLABORATIONS 2010 The San Francisco Fire Department accepts an invitation to participate in the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) Firefighter Cohort Study in its most comprehensive study ever of cancer among US Firefighters. The study results were released in 2016.

2012 The Women Firefighters Biomonitoring Collaborative, led by Silent Spring Institute and UC Berkeley researchers, evolved when SFFCPF approached the United Fire Service Women and environmental health advocates with concerns about multiple cases of breast cancer among their ranks. This was the first study of women firefighters to assess chemical exposures, including exposure to chemicals linked to breast cancer.

2013 SFFCPF funded Flame Retardant Study with Dr. Susan Shaw. This was the first study to measure PBDD/Fs in blood of firefighters.

2015 SFFCPF funded a pilot study at UCSF evaluating the Key FlameRetardant Compound Effect In Human Cell Models Of Cancer.

2017 SFFCPF funded the Northern California Firefighter Study (aka the Tubbs Fire Study) in response to the devastating October 2017 Tubbs wildfire. This study is looking at various levels of toxic chemicals through blood and urine analysis of 180 firefighters. Firefighter Samples were taken four weeks following deployment.

RESEARCH IN PROGRESS 2018 SFFCPF funded the Camp Fire Study following the Paradise, CA Wildland Fire. 80 Firefighters responding from regional departments were sampled immediately post-deployment. Samples are being analyzed for heavy metals, flame retardants, PAH’s and PFAS. Chemical Body Burden Levels will be released to each firefighter participant as information becomes available.

2020 SFFCPF partnered with Stanford University’s Study of Retired San Francisco Firefighters investigating short-term and longterm health impacts of exposure to California wildfire smoke.


SUPPORTING OUR COMMUNITY

SAN FRANCISCO FIREFIGHTERS TOY PROGRAM Founded in 1949 by a handful of Firefighters, the San Francisco Firefighters Toy Program is a 501(c)(3) non-profit that has evolved into the City's largest and the nation's oldest year-round toy program of its kind. Driven by Local 798 Firefighters, Toy Program volunteers, and businesses that donate their time and resources, each year the Toy Program distributes over 200,000 toys to disadvantaged Bay Area children. In addition to helping individual families in need, the Toy Program serves many community organizations, including shelters for abused women and children, inner-city schools, children’s cancer wards, and pediatric AIDS units. The Toy Program also responds on a year-round basis to displaced families who become victims of fires, floods, and other life-changing disasters. Local 798 thanks all of the amazing staff and volunteers who dedicate countless hours and continue to make the Toy Program a resounding success, including SF Firefighters Toy Chairperson Sally Casazza, Special Events Coordinator Jill Peeler, Toy Barrel Distributions Coordinator Dee Dee Jacobs, and Local 798 Vice President Danny Gracia.


ETHNIC DOLL DRIVE The Toy Program believes that every child should have a doll that is reflective of their culture, values, and that inspires them to believe in themselves. In 2012, the Toy Program started a major campaign to ensure that dolls given to the community were reflective of the diverse population that the Firefighters serve throughout the City. In 2019, the Toy Program purchased doll clothing that represented occupations such as firefighters, police officers, doctors, and astronauts to inspire children to reach their highest potential. The Toy Program strives to ensure that everyone is included and represented in the toys and books that are available for distribution. ZOO MENTORING DAY Over 100 First Responders and Toy Program volunteers paired up with children from underserved areas of San Francisco to provide them with a fun day full of activities at the 6th Annual Zoo Mentoring Day. The goal is to raise self-esteem and cultural awareness, as well as inspire children to believe in themselves. This past year, over 120 children were taught a hula dance by SFFD Captain Julie Mau and her brothers and sisters from Nā Lei Hulu I Ka Wēkiu. SF Firefighter Tiffany Sippel also taught the children a very fun hip-hop dance. Lunch was provided by SF Firefighters and the parents were treated to a performance featuring their children. Thank you to the SF Zoo which donates the space for Mentoring Day and gives all of the families free admission. CHILDREN’S TOY & BOOK FESTIVAL Every December, the Toy Program teams up with the SF Department of Child Support Services & the Mayor’s Office to present the annual Children’s Toy & Book Festival. Over 1,200 local school children visit San Francisco City Hall to receive a new, unwrapped toy along with a book and take photos with San Francisco Firefighters and Santa Claus. ANNUAL BICYCLE GIVEAWAY Each year, the Toy Program holds a letter-writing contest and receives several hundred heartfelt letters and hand drawn pictures from local children. The letters explain to Local 798 Firefighters why they should “Make Their Day.” The winners are picked at a Letter Reading Party, hosted by the Toy Program and United Fire Service Women. Volunteers read and sort through all of the correspondence and choose hundreds of lucky recipients who are gifted with a brand-new helmet and bike. Most of the bicycles are generously donated by the San Francisco Bar Pilots Association, the St. Francis Yacht Club, San Francisco Laborers International Union Local 261, and other many other wonderful supporters. DISASTER RESPONSE: COVID-19 TOY DRIVE & FIRE VICTIM TOY DISTRIBUTIONS Always willing to rise to the occasion and respond to the immediate needs of Bay Area families, the Toy Program mobilized to assist those who have been negatively impacted by the Coronavirus crisis. Dozens of volunteers distributed gift bags and groceries to struggling families in a special Toy Drive. Practicing safe social distancing guidelines, families from the Toy Program’s Christmas List lined up in their cars to receive donations as Firefighters and volunteers wearing masks and gloves lined the block holding signs with supportive messages. The bags contained arts and crafts, puzzles, and other toys to help keep kids entertained and occupied while their parents work from home or offer a little comfort to those who were laid off. The Toy Drive event was part of a larger campaign in which volunteers also delivered items directly to the homes of families in need. Last year, Toy Program volunteers dropped off toys at 10 shelters in Santa Rosa where families and children were displaced by fires. A Toy Program Santa also visited a school in Paradise where every child’s home had burned down the previous year to give out hundreds of toys. Local 798 Firefighters and Toy Program volunteers make sure that children are not forgotten during times of disaster.


EXECUTIVE BOARD

San Francisco Firefighters International Association of Fire Fighters Local 798 Executive Board Shon Buford Danny Gracia

PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT

Floyd Rollins II

SECRETARY

Tom Fogle

TREASURER

Dan Casey

DIRECTOR

Stephen Giacalone

DIRECTOR

Adrienne Sims

DIRECTOR

Tim Finch

DIRECTOR

Huck Ramsay

DIRECTOR


Profile for Blackman Public Affairs

The Future of The SFFD: We Are In This Together  

San Francisco Firefighters Local 798 is honored to present “The Future of the SFFD: We Are in This Together.” In 2019, San Francisco Firefig...

The Future of The SFFD: We Are In This Together  

San Francisco Firefighters Local 798 is honored to present “The Future of the SFFD: We Are in This Together.” In 2019, San Francisco Firefig...

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