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Wind Energy Poland 2012 spring edition

82 Developers 218 Wind Farms A Special Publication of


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Wind Energy Poland

ISSN 1643-4692

Spring Edition

Table of Contents Community Relations 4 Publisher: BiznesPolska Media Sp.z o.o. ul. Długa 44/50, bud. D, lok 704, 00-241 Warszawa tel./fax: 022 831 7062 Research Director: Magdalena Adamczyk madamczyk@biznespolska.pl Marketing Executive: Wiktor Gliński wglinski@biznespolska.pl President: Thom Barnhardt barnhardt@biznespolska.pl

Margonin as case-study for communities contemplating wind projects

Market Overview 6

Wind energy market in Poland in 2011 and its perspectives to 2020

Finance 8

Non-traditional financing options become the “new normal” in wind finance

Prices and Regulations 12

The new renewable energy support system – and how it will affect the wind industry

Laws and Regulations 14

RES Act 2.0

List 16–31 Developers of Wind Energy in Poland

Wind Energy Poland 2012 spring edition

Map 18–19 Map of Wind Farms in Poland

Infrastructure 32

Entities applying for connection sources to the National Transmission Network

Wind Energy News 33

IKEA leads manufacturers to wind energy

Offshore Wind Energy 82 Developers

34

First Offshore windfarms given approval – total capacity 4.5 GW

218 Wind Farms A Special Publication of

Graphic Design/DTP: Sławek Parfianowicz sparfianowicz.wordpress.com

Next Edition – in Polish – November 2012

Następne Wydanie – po polsku – listopad 2012


Community Relations

Margonin as case-study for communities contemplating wind projects

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

“Where is Margonin? It’s not on your map”, said Janusz Piechocki, mayor of Margonin, after just two minutes into our meeting.

Not on the map, indeed. I fumbled and stumbled and explained why our wind farm map had failed to distinguish Margonin, home to the Poland’s highest-concentration of wind turbines per citizen. I had taken the 5-hour trip from Warsaw to visit Margonin, to hear about the impact of its 60 turbines on this town of 3200 people. Margonin is home to the largest wind farm in Poland, owned by EDP, with each of its turbines capable of generating 2MW of electric energy. As I entered the gmina, I could see nearly all of the turbines, which were spinning smoothly and consistently. While some Polish communities have been hesitant to accept wind farm projects, others such as Margonin and neighboring Golacz (being developed by EDP) are embracing wind as a local resource, a source of income and renewal for small, over-looked communities. “We were a poor gmina”, said Marek, born and raised in Margonin, “and no one noticed us. Now people come from all over Poland – and even Europe – to see our wind farms”. To Margonin, its wind farms are a source of civic pride. “Thanks to our wind farms, Margonin is known all over the world”, said Burmistrz Janusz Piechocki. “Some have coal, or gas – we have wind, naturally.” Mr. Piechocki invited me to stay for their Wiatralia festival on the weekend. The town hosts the now-annual festival, sponsored by EDP, which brings in international music stars, from as far away as America, and attracts visitors from Poznan and Bydgoszcz. Margonin is building its brand around wind – clean, green and renewable energy. “We’d like to have more farms” said the burmistrz. And the numbers aren’t bad either. With zero investment, the gmina of Margonin now receives nearly 5 million pln per year (20% of its total revenues) from property taxes on the wind farms. (Wind farm

4

Janusz Piechocki, burmistrz of Margonin

owners pay an annual 2% on the book value of their wind farm’s value, which excludes the value of the spinning turbines, but includes such components as the base and tower.) Margonin has also benefited from infrastructure investments in roads, as well as bicycle paths, a new hockey rink, schools and even renovation of the old clock on the local church in the main square. EDP, as the

owner of the wind farms, continues to fund educational activities like stipends for students and new computers for schools. “We have the lowest taxes in the region”, and Mr. Piechocki, “and the lowest agricultural taxes also.” A local power station has been installed to harness the wind energy, and the power source led directly to the set-up of a new


Hockey rink funded by EDP

light manufacturing plant, which produces toilet paper, and would not have been built in Margonin without this new source of power. About 55 local land owners – mostly farmers – now receive about 20,000pln each per year per turbine for the long-term lease of their land – which is home to the turbines. Before the wind farms, the farmers earned about 20pln per month from the same land. While the economic impact of the wind farms has been unequivocally positive for the gmina, its benefits are not necessarily evenly distributed. One local gentleman I spoke with said that, while the farmers who have lease deals are pleased, other farmers

– sometimes with adjacent yet empty land – are jealous. And while I feasted on a spicy pepperoni pizza – “the best pizza in town”, said my waiter, he complained that the wind farms mean nothing to him. “After awhile, people don’t really pay attention to the wind farms”, said burmistrz Piechocki. Yet Margonin has become a case-study for other communities in Poland, who are carefully calculating and weighing the benefits and tradeoffs of welcoming wind farms to their communities. Turn to page 18, Mr. Mayor, and you’ll see Margonin marked clearly on the map of ■ wind farms in Poland.

Local citizens are getting more and more aware of Wind Turbine Generators (WTG) producing noise. The acceptable noise level at the outside façade of residential building – in a residential area - is generally 50 decibels during the day and 40 decibels at night. Although the EU directive 2002/49/EU does not introduce this level directly, most member states implemented the level into national law. Common WTGs in Poland, as the Vestas 90, emit a guaranteed noise level of 104 decibels at 12 m/s, which leads to a noise level 40 decibels in a distance of more than 400 meters from the WTG depending on other noise sources and landscape. As the period from initial planning to building permit lasts a few years, there is a potential risk that after micro-siting new residential buildings have been erected close to the WTG in the meantime, or buildings with other use have been qualified as residential buildings. How to react to this? An easement seems to be a proper way to burden the residential property. As the burden is a passive easement for the owner of a property, a transmission easement does not qualify as the right legal tool, but a land easement, which has a broader scope, should be taken in mind. A land easement burdens the subservient property in favor of the dominant property, where the WTG will be located.

Wind Energy in Poland

What to do in case of noise in a developing residential area?

Spring 2012

Community Relations

5


Market Overview

Wind energy market in Poland in 2011 and its perspectives to 2020 According to URE data at the end of 2011, around 1616 MW of wind power capacity was installed in Poland. Most capacity is installed in 49 of the biggest wind farms located mainly in the northern part of Poland.

the wind power industry taking place in the overall EU. Additionally, for the first time since 2005, annual installations in 2011 were lower than in the preceding year. The main reason of that was the regulatory and political risks, related to expected changes in

cluding 9 projects, which intends to connect to transmission grid; for 6 of them connection is planned before 2013; the biggest development announced in Poland is 250 MW planned near Darłowo to be constructed by 2012.

hydro 1MW–10MW (2.2%) hydro >10MW (5.4%)

hydro <1MW (1.5%) biogas (31.5%)

PV (0.01%)

Katarzyna Michałowska-Knap

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

Institute for Renewable Energy (IEO)

6

Since 2005 the share of wind energy in the total energy production from RES has been increasing steadily – it is expected that in 2011 it will be over 20%. However, development of the wind sector is not as fast as hoped, and in 2011 wind energy produced just 1,6% of the total electricity consumption in Poland - with only a small part of its technical potential utilized. The majority of renewable electricity (50%) is still delivered by large co-firing plants. The biggest wind farm in Poland, completed in 2011, is EDP’s 70 MW wind farm in Korsze, located in warminsko-mazurskie voivodeship. Also the first big developments in southern Poland were completed (like Lipniki in opolskie). Before year-end 2013 it is also expected that an additional 20 projects of total capacity 330 MW will be in operation, which will obtain grants from EU cohesion funds. In addition to the above-mentioned projects which typically employ 2MW turbines, smaller turbines, used for smaller projects are quite popular in Poland – these are mostly “second-hand” from repowering. Small and locally-owned enterprises or private persons are usually operators in such cases, although the share of electricity produced by such wind turbines in Poland is not significant. The average annual growth rate of wind power capacity was very high from 2000 to 2011, however the low initial level of installations and high (due to various and unpredictable factors) fluctuations of growth rates during this period have to be noted. Therefore, despite the high growth rate and relatively large amount of newly-built installations, the existing power capacities of wind energy are not impressive in comparison with the dynamic development of

wind onshore (40.6%)

solid biomas (31.5%)

small wind turbines (1.7%)

wind offshore (4.6%)

The predicted structure of renewable electricity generation in 2020 (National Renewable Energy Action Plan)

regulations and introduction of the new Renewable Energy Act, which draft was finally presented only at the end of December 2011. In the first 3 months of 2012 installed capacity of wind energy has grown to the level of 1968 MW. Also, significant growth has been noted in the regions, where the market development was rather slow in previous years, like dolnoslaskie. The high density of wind farm concepts on some areas is resulting in growing problems blocking the development of many (even well prepared) projects. This concerns mainly the lack of further possibilities of grid connection of the wind farms. According to TSO (PSE Operator) and DSO’s : Grid connection terms are currently issued for 17000 GW of wind projects; 6369 MW is corresponding to the connection terms issued by TSO, for 34 wind farms, mainly large portfolio (over 200 MW), owned by development companies. approx. 7000 MW of wind projects currently signed connection contracts, which should be completed before 2015, it is in-

According to data collected by the Institute for Renewable Energy, around 17 GW of wind farms are developed, mostly in northern and western Poland. In some regions, like zachodniopomorskie and wielkopolskie there are around 4000 GW under development. Also several projects are in development in regions where the market has developed slowly up to now, like southern Poland (dolnoslaskie and podkarpackie). However the prospects for completing projects located there are unclear, because of several barriers, mostly related to environmental limitations and weak grid. Over 100 entities are actively operating on the Polish wind energy market in 2011. The majority of these companies use an “operation” model, which is known on the German market as develop and sell – the project is developed to certain stage (usually building permit) and then sold (as a whole or certain part) to final investor (sometimes to larger developer). Thus, during the last years the project trading market was very active. The concentration of wind farm con-


Market Overview

Turbine manufacturers Poland is becoming a promising market for all of the major wind turbine manufacturers. At the end of 2011, Vestas was the leader in Poland with 34% market share, though the significance of other suppliers is increasing steadily. There are especially big opportunities for manufacturers offering wind turbines for lower wind speeds. GE and Nordex, for example, are strengthening their positions, offering this type of product, and are considered for many new developments, especially in central and southern Poland, where wind speeds are lower. The future of the wind power sector in Poland after 2011 will depend mainly on final decisions about the way the EU Climate Package will be implemented in Poland, including new directive 2009/28/EC about the promotion of the use of renewable energy sources. In December 2010 the Ministry of Economy submitted to the European Commission the National Renewable Energy Action Plan to 2020 (NREAP), required by the directive and including the range of commitments for electric power generation from renewable sources. The Polish target for 2020 is 15% of RES share in final energy consumption. 26% of that (32,4 TWh) is expected to be generated from renewable electricity. The official scenario assumes that in 2020 there will be 5600 MW of wind turbines installed onshore, 500 MW offshore and 550 MW of small wind turbines. This capacity is expect-

Wind energy potential in Poland, estimated by IEO

Theoretical potential Technical potential Technical potential reduced by environmental limitations Economic potential Market potential 2020

Offshore Capacity Energy (GW) (TWh)

3100 1400

6830 3600

130 130

380 380

600 82 11,5

1500 210 28

20 7,5 1,5

60 22,5 4,5

ed to deliver 47% of renewable electricity. The scenario proposed by government was rather disappointing for the Polish wind industry, because it is not very ambitious given the high wind potential Poland has onshore and offshore. The other problem is that NREAP does not provide details of actions to be taken to implement the plans - especially the support system for RES for 2010-2020 is unclear. Only some general announcements on changes were presented in NREAP, including intention of introduction of technology specific support system (diversification of certificate value for technologies). However final actions will be included in so-called “Renewable Energy Act”. Unfortunately until now only the draft Act is known, published at the end of 2011, and still discussed, before sending to Parliament. The perception of the draft by wind energy market actors was very negative, especially towards the lowering of the support for wind energy (~0.75 of current value of green certificate for large scale wind farms). The crucial issues mentioned, which might have significant impact on the market were: • Lack of guarantee of purchase of electricity from RES at a predefined price • Modification of the support scheme without transitory provisions and introduction of decreased support levels • Lack of ensured stability of the support scheme • Insufficient support period (15 years) and variability of support level (value of the certificate) during the green certificates acquisition period According to the feedback from the Ministry of Economy, at least some of the critical remarks will be taken into account in new version of Renewable Energy Act, which will be published at the end of may 2012. Offshore The substantial potential of offshore wind energy in Poland has been much discussed. This area of wind power development is one of the priorities in many EU countries. Several companies have announced plans of building offshore wind farms on the Polish Baltic Sea. At the moment, 59 applications, for projects of total value 407,5 billion PLN,

has been submitted to the Ministry of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy. The first one (Kulczyk Investments) obtained the permit in April 2012. However, experiences of other countries demonstrates that in such cases the development and investment process is significantly longer than onshore. Also current legal conditions in Poland are not adapted to the needs of wind energy investments. According to analyses made in the OffshoreGrid project, 500 MW offshore wind farms can be constructed in Poland by 2020, and total power capacity could reach up to 5.300 MW in 2030. Small wind turbines Poland is one of few countries in EU which included small wind turbines (<100 kW) in Renewable Energy Action Plans. According to official scenario 550 MW of such turbines should be installed until 2020, which is the most ambitious target in the EU. According to the World Wind Energy Association, at the end of 2010, the installed capacity of small wind turbines in Poland was the 7th in the world. Institute for Renewable Energy estimates that at the end of 2011 approx. 8.2 MW of small wind turbines was installed. Only 1,7 MW of them were grid connected, the rest is used by individual owners, mostly for water heating or electricity generation in households. On the Polish market 150 entities are present, dealing with small wind turbines, mostly distributors and installers. There are 6 domestic manufacturers, however most of them in the start-up phase, so the majority of turbines sold in Poland are imported, mostly from China. The small wind turbines sector has a big potential in Poland, not only because of governmental plans, but also because of growing bottom-up interest of endusers, especially farmers and SME’s, which is related with growing energy prices. However the use of that potential depends on further actions of the government. For the moment there are significant barriers blocking development of the market. Most important are: lack of specific support system for small wind turbines, complex and long lasting building and grid connection procedures, and lack of ■ social awareness about wind energy.

Spring 2012

Onshore Capacity Energy (GW) (TWh)

Wind Energy in Poland

cepts in some areas is resulting in growing problems. In many areas, particularly in northern Poland, all the connection capacity is currently blocked by large amount of wind farms, which have already been issued grid connection terms. Also numerous other barriers for wind power development are reported by developers. The large concentration of wind farm concepts in some areas raises the issue of the possible negative impact on the environment, as well as frequently leads to greater social conflicts. Over 200 protests against wind developments has been reported by the end of 2011, some of them leading to serious problems in the permitting procedures (in some cases up to rejection of applications or cancellation of permits). Wind energy projects have usually been met with enthusiasm by municipal authorities, because of the higher expected tax income to the local budget. The legal regulations created an opportunity to impose on the owner of the wind farm a property tax of 2% of the value of the building part of the investment, which would be very significant income to the municipality budget. However, in many cases the impact of wind farms on the landscape and perceived potential negative impact on tourism has become a political and economic issue.

7


Finance

Non-traditional financing options become the “new normal” in wind finance

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

In the capital-intensive wind gen business, accessing financing is perhaps as important as getting the wind studies done correctly.

8

Some say there is no money available for financing wind farm projects in Poland. But those who are developing projects and actually doing deals are using a combination of creative options to finance their wind farms. With fears of imminent doom in the Euro zone, massive write-downs by Spanish banks and sticks and stones on the streets of Athens, bank financing – the least costly option for the investor – is hard to come by. Successful developers are fighting strong headwinds, including the inconclusiveness

Q1 2012 clean energy investment squeezed by uncertainty After clocking up a worldwide record in 2011, clean energy investment fell sharply in the first quarter of 2012. New financial investment was down 28% from Q4 2011 to just $27bn; it was 22% lower than the equivalent figure in the first quarter of last year. New financial investment includes venture capital, private equity, public markets and asset finance, but excludes small-scale projects and corporate and government RD&D. The first quarter 2012 new financial investment total included $24.2bn in asset finance of utility-scale renewable energy projects, such as wind farms and solar parks, plus $1.9bn of venture capital and private equity investment in specialist clean energy companies. Just $601m was raised on the public markets by quoted companies during the period. Michael Liebreich, chief executive of Bloomberg New Energy Finance, said: “A $27bn quarterly figure is not a disaster, but it is the weakest since the dismal $20bn seen in the first quarter of 2009, when the financial crisis was at its worst”. “The weak Q1 2012 number reflects the destabilising uncertainty over future clean energy support in both the European Union – driven by the financial crisis – and the US – driven by the expiry of stimulus programmes and the electoral cycle. There is no sign of a rapid turnaround in either of

of Polish RES regulations, European banks’ liquidity problems, tremendous uncertainty surrounding the future of the Euro currency, and risks related to the long-term ability of the EU to subsidize green energy. “The last few months have been destructive to the market”, given increasing problems with banks, and risks to the Euro, said Radoslaw Nowak of GeoRenewables. Nevertheless, deals are getting done. So on the following pages we summarize some of the options that being used in Poland to finance wind farm developments. Bank financing Although the list of banks theoretically interested to provide bank financing to the wind sector is long, “only 2-3 banks can do financing”, said one banker. The hesitancy of banks is understandable - since their debt financing is the lowest-risk tranche in the financing structure, bankers need greater cer-

these regions in the next 12 months. Clean energy technologies, particularly solar photovoltaics and onshore wind, continue to fall in price and approach competitiveness with fossil-fuel power – but politicians in many countries appear to be ducking the decisions that would ensure that the sector maintains its growth trajectory. We are seeing growth in some of the non-core markets around the world, but they will have a tough job replacing weakening demand in the developed world.” In Europe, governments in key countries such as Spain, Italy, Germany, Poland and the UK have announced cuts in incentives for renewable power projects, in some cases leaving investors guessing about their likely future returns. Looking at the different categories of investment in Q1, asset finance of $24.2bn was 30% down from the fourth quarter and 13% below that in the first quarter of 2011. Public market investment in clean energy of $601m was down 12% from the fourth quarter, and 87% from the first quarter of 2011 – a plunge that was not surprising, given the poor performance of sector shares in the last year. The WilderHill New Energy Global Innovation Index, or NEX, which tracks the movements of 97 clean energy shares worldwide, fell 40% in 2011 and clawed back just 7% in the first quarter of 2012 as world stock markets rebounded. (Source: DeBenedetti Majewski Szcześniak)

tainty of long-term, stable cash flows. And until Poland passes the RES Act, bankers will largely stay on the sidelines. Wind developers said they expect bank financing to return in 2013 after new regulations and price support mechanisms are locked-down and become law. In the meantime, much of the bank financing that is done will be for very high-quality clients with very high-quality projects and some level of parent company guaranties or financial support. One banker said that “most debt financing is only 40% to 50% of the overall value; but this should improve after passage of the RES act.” The following is an incomplete and our subjective list of banks involved in Poland’s wind development sector: BZ-WBK, La Caixa, BRE Bank, PKO BP, BOS, BGZ, EBRD and EIB, Raiffeisen, DnB Nord, Nordea, Unicredit/Pekao, and Nordic Investment Bank. For example, BZ-WBK is currently financing 3 projects of 250 MW – all in consortia, according to Grzegorz Linowski, a banker at BZ-WBK with substantial experience in financing Polish wind farms. “Next year financing will be easier to obtain, but margins will be lower”, said Nowak, referring to the lower coefficient factor for wind power, which will likely decrease from 1.0 to as low as 0.6 to 0.75% in the final version of the renewable energy law. The lower coefficient will not apply to projects that have been started before year-end 2012 and have started operations by year-end 2013. “Winners are those who can construct the farms as soon as possible”, said Nowak, “because every day of lost revenues is more precious than you can imagine”. While the RES law will reduce the coefficient to approximately 0.75%, on the upside, it will provide for stable 15 year periods for power-purchase agreements (PPA). Project finance “This year is totally lost to project finance”, said Nowak of GeoRenewables, referring to the lack of legal regulations that have not been put in place. Project finance, which is usually non-recourse financing for a specific venture, does not rely on parent company support, and therefore will have virtually no role in financing projects in Poland until the legal regulations are finalized. Equity financing According to another wind farm developer, “lots of smaller investors are waiting to start after the new RES law is passed.” The large


The financials: Show me the money According to information published by CIRE.PL (relating to information provided by Enterprise Investors), investors currently calculate the following prices for project rights and projects: 1) Developers need to invest approximately 50,000-70,000 Euro per one megawatt of installed power. These developers are mainly Polish entities, generally smaller enterprises, which identify appropriate areas, and sign lease agreements with real estate owners, on which investments can be constructed. These local players prepare wind measurements for at least one year. After that, they prepare environmental impact assessment reports and obtain all administrative permits and consents. They are also responsible for signing grid connection agreements. These firms sell ready-to-build projects. Depending on wind and environmental conditions and connection costs, the estimated price range is from 130,000 to 170,000 EUR per megawatt. However, commenced projects are often not fully permitted. From market observation, it seems that projects fail mainly due to problems with the wind measurements and environmental impact assessment reports. These expenditures are covered with a discount compared to successful

lished subsidiaries in Spain, Italy, France, Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and Poland. Novenergia is constituting its portfolio in Poland, including the successful purchase of a first fully licensed wind farm planned for construction in early 2012. i) Marguerite. The 2020 European Fund for Energy, Climate Change and Infrastructure (“Marguerite”) was established with the backing of six major European financial institutions to make capital-intensive infrastructure investments. Each of the six Core Sponsors (which includes the European Investment Bank and PKO Bank Polski) has committed €100 million to the Fund. In addition, three further investors (including the European Commission) have committed an incremental €110 million to the Fund, bringing current commitments to €710 million. Fundraising with other institutional investors, both private and public, continues with a EUR 1.5 billion target fund size and a final close expected during 2012. j) Element Power (former management from Iberdrola). Element Power is a global renewable energy developer that develops, acquires, builds, owns and operates a portfolio of wind and solar power generation facilities worldwide. Present in 12

projects. The purchasers of developed projects with a ready-to-build status are often large foreign companies, which have cash available to purchase and install turbines. Increasingly, the buyers are Polish utilities. 2) The companies which build wind farms invest an average of 1,300,000 EUR per megawatt. The vast majority of costs incurred relate to the purchase of turbines. Additionally, costs of installation, transport and infrastructure construction - roads and installations. After a period of 1-2 years of wind farm construction, these projects are then sold to entities, which exploit and operate the wind farm. 3) Fully operational wind farms are valued in the range of 1,800,000 to 2,000,000 EUR per megawatt. Such wind farms are usually purchased by long-term strategic investors. Currently, large utilities are generally investing to diversify their own production portfolio. Apart from that, large energy consumers are entering the market as they want to invest in their eco-friendly image and try to provide renewable energy resources to cover their own requirements. Finally, long term financial investors are also active in this market: such investors look for profits through a 30 year period of wind farm operation. Such potential buyers are, e.g., open pension funds.

countries, with 141MW in operation, and 9500MW of projects in development; the firm has over 14,000MW of renewable energy projects operating in Europe, North and Latin America and Asia. Owned by Hudson Clean Energy Partners, a leading global private equity firm dedicated solely to investing in renewable power, alternative fuels, energy efficiency and storage. Element may be pulling out of the Polish market; yet recent claims are that they have as much as 108 MW of projects in the pipeline in Poland.

Wind Energy in Poland

capital expenditures required to start up wind farms means that most business plans incorporate substantial debt financing in the mix. So the current problems with securing debt financing are having detrimental effects on those trying to raise equity financing. Here is an incomplete list of several sources of equity financing: a) EnerCap Capital Partners – the financial investor in GeoRenewables (whose management team was previously at EDP). EnerCap specialises in private equity investments in renewable energy projects across Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, and is the manager of EnerCap Power Fund I L.P., a €98 million closed-end ten year fund. The fund is backed by the EBRD and European Investment Bank, among others. b) Taiga Mistral. Taiga Mistral, based in Madrid, has invested in wind farms in Spain, and has now three wind farm projects in Poland. c) Fusion Invest – An investment fund set up by Jarosław Pawluk, one of Poland’s wealthiest entrepreneurs. d) Enterprise Investors – a Warsaw-based private equity firm that manages multiple Enterprise Funds, has launched Wento – an investment vehicle created to manage wind firms in Poland and help the country meet EU targets for renewable energy production. Wento can draw up to EUR 40 million from PEF VI for equity financing while approaching banks for debt financing. Wento is currently in advanced negotiations and conducting due-diligence with three wind farm projects with a combined capacity of 200 MW. About a dozen projects in total are currently under review. Wento will provide initial equity funding to the approved projects and will subsequently sell the stakes to strategic or financial investors looking for stable and long-term profits. e) ICS – fund set up by entities related to Santander. f) Environmental Investment Partners - a venture capital firm that invests in clean infrastructure and renewable energy firms. It is funded by individual investors. Among its current and past investments are Continental Wind Partners. Environmental Investment Partners is managed by Adam de Sola Pool. g) Both Advent and MidEuropa are two wellestablished private equity funds that have expressed interest in wind farm projects. h) Novenergia II Fund. NovEnergia II is a European investment fund registered in Luxembourg. NovEnergia II was created and is currently managed by an international team of energy and finance experts. From its birthplace in Portugal, Novenergia has evolved into a European holding of energy companies, with estab-

Spring 2012

Finance

Non-traditional Options: Non-traditional financing options have quickly become the “new normal”, as developers look for long-term, deep-pocketed and patient investors. a) Vendor financing: Turbine manufacturers realize that their clients can not get financing as easily as in the past, so they are adjusting by extending more favorable financing terms to buyers of their turbines. It’s not an easy option, and it involves careful structuring, negotiating and legal work – and it is a more expensive financing option. But continued on page 10

9


Finance

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

continued from page 9

10

it’s being done. Both Gamesa and Vensys are reportedly open to the “vendor financing” option, as are other turbine manufacturers. b) Partner with well-capitalized, long-term players such as utilities, who are cashrich, do not need bank financing to launch a project, and are at risk of major penalties if they do not substantially increase the percentage of renewable energy in their overall energy-generation mix in the coming years. “Only big utilities can finance the construction projects right now”, said one developer. KWE’s alliance with Global Wind Energy is just one example of this strategy at work. c) Partner with manufacturer or other heavy consumer of electricity that wants to “go green”. IKEA’s purchase of two Martifer wind farms – and the forward-purchase of a third farm to be developed – is a recent example of this option. IKEA, for example, does not want to be in the business of operating wind farms, but does want to buy renewable energy and is a

cash-rich industrial/manufacturing firm. Similar firms may view wind energy as both a source of renewable energy as well

Some financial investors are looking at the market, but the problem is getting the debt financing

as good place for long-term investment. Most of these players do not want “development risk” and are comfortable paying higher prices for lower risks.

Stock market/IPOs: While the Warsaw Stock Exchange mostly doesn’t provide investors with options to invest in wind farm operators, initiatives are under way to list wind companies. (PEP SA may be an exceptional case, since the firm is mostly developing and then selling projects; and it also includes non-wind renewable energy, such as biomass, in its portfolio; consequently, PEP is not a pure-play investment option for investors seeking exposure to Poland’s wind-energy sector.) PGE’s Energia Odnawialna subsidiary recently pulled its plans to list on the Warsaw Stock Exchange, citing “market conditions”. Yet it is reasonable to assume that such a listing is likely in the coming 12-18 months, if markets permit. The firm has said that it will first expand its wind power projects portfolio and then hold its IPO. Nowa Energia S.A., a small yet ambitious wind farm developer, has announced quietly that it plans to list on the New Connect stock exchange, as early as 2012. While New Connect’s weakness is its inability to raise large amounts of capital, it may prove to be a viable option for raising development finance and equity for smaller firms. “Any port in a storm”. ■


VENSYS moves into first position worldwide for turbine installations in 2011 Using German technology and the strength of several licensees the group erected more than 2300 turbines with a total power of 3470 MW worldwide in 2011. The record-beating numbers for 2011 marked a milestone for the German wind turbine manufacturer and developer of technology for Permanent Magnet Direct Drive turbines.

In 2011: Goldwind installed 1,910 turbines – 2,883.0 MW IMPSA installed 148 turbines – 222.0 MW ReGen installed 205 turbines – 307.5 MW VENSYS added 39 turbines – 57.3 MW – from their own plant making the group number 1 worldwide in 2011.

4 turbines in operation in Rewal, very close to the Baltic Sea, where first results indicate very good wind conditions.

From research excellence to worldwide production Currently the wind energy business clearly prefers low-wear gearless drive concepts and highly-efficient permanent magnet generators. Almost all wellknown producers of wind energy converters are preparing themselves to change their strategy and to start with the very same wind turbine design concept as VENSYS has been developing since 1990 – at that time, still under the label of “Research group” at the University of Applied Sciences in Saarland, Germany. The reason is quite simple: gearboxes for wind energy converters are prone to failures and will have to be replaced or repaired, according to the statistics, at least two or three times during the lifespan of a wind turbine. Thus, it makes sense to invest more in a slowly turning, multi-pole direct driven generator. This investment will pay off over the operational period of the turbine, as there will be no extra costs for the repair or replacement of the gearbox. Since VENSYS permanent magnets do not need current for the excitation of the magnetic field, the result is higher efficiency and greater energy yield of the turbine. The VENSYS engineers’ decision to use permanent magnets has proven to be prescient - these magnets now cost just one-tenth of the price they had at the beginning of their use in wind turbines.

Outside of Europe, VENSYS licensee ReGen Powertech recently opened its second factory in India, in order to be able to meet the large demand for VENSYS turbines on the sub-continent. ReGen Powertech in total has erected 423 turbines using VENSYS technology. The Argentinean energy provider IMPSA is very successful with VENSYS technology on the Brazilian market, having commissioned already 217 turbines. Using German technology, Goldwind, on its part, is very successful on the Asian market and produces wind turbines that use the VENSYS technology in 7 large factories in China. Financing

Mr. Makis Ketonis of Ketonis Development in Cyprus used financing by China Development Bank to buy VENSYS turbines.

As Goldwind has the majority ownership interest in VENSYS, some projects can be financed by the Chinese Development Bank, as has been proven in the case of the Cyprus wind farm project. *** Up to now, more than 7,700 wind turbines have been erected and commissioned thanks to German technology combined with Chinese strength and strong international licensees, such as Spanish company Eozen, Indian group ReGen Powertech, and Brazilian Enerwind/Impsa.

VENSYS employees. About 65 employees have invested more than 650,000 EUR in “their” new turbine prototype, demonstrating a high-level of internal confidence in VENSYS´ technology.

In Poland VENSYS has 8 VENSYS turbines in operation. These turbines are supported by a service structure that is going to be expanded for the Polish market

Wind Energy in Poland

VENSYS majority shareholder Goldwind is listed No. 2 in 2011, the same year in terms of newly- installed turbines, using VENSYS technology.

Spring 2012

Examples of successfully completed projects in other European countries are further proof of the momentum building at VENSYS. The first bigger project directly realized by VENSYS of 31.5 MW in Cyprus has begu n full commercial operation. VENSYS has a permanent service base on the island achieving an availability of 99% since its start of full operation.

Thus, VENSYS is technologically leading the development of permanent magnet direct drive technology, poised to open a new chapter of sustainable energy fueled by efficient gearless wind turbines. ■

The VENSYS 2.5 MW turbine is now offered with 100 m, 109 m and 112 m rotor diameter on different hub heights, from 93.5 m up to 143 m. The long rotor/high hub height turbines are designed for inland windparks with lower wind speeds.

11


Prices and Regulations

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

The new renewable energy support system – and how it will affect the wind industry

12

April 2012 saw a major breakthrough in the works aimed at shaping the future aid system for renewable energy sources in Poland. If the law were to remain unchanged, the existing system based on uniform certificates of origin would expire in 2017, and the relatively short time that is left until that date already makes it increasingly hard to obtain capital to finance investment projects.

For over a year now, the governmental department of economy has been working on a special legal act dedicated to renewable energy sources (RES), and the first draft of that law published at the end of December 2011 gave rise to a number of concerns related to the risk of the terms of wind energy investments getting impaired to such an extent that it would put a big question mark on the development of the industry as a whole. Since then, entrepreneurs and sectorspecific organizations have taken a number of steps aimed at persuading the bill’s author

to adopt the required changes. And it seems that those initiatives have been rather effective, assuming that the April version of the bill – that is yet to be disclosed in writing but has already been discussed in detail by a representative of the Ministry of Economy – will be reflected in the final wording of the future law. So what will lay at the core of the new aid system? Contrary to speculations floating around back in 2011, there are no indications that the system will move toward the feed-in system that prevails in most of the EU countries. The new system that should come into effect as early as 2013 will continue to be based on certificates of origin; however, the key difference will be that the correction factors are to be diversified according to the technology and size of a given RES installation. Although at this point the discussions regarding the bill of law do not officially mention specific factor values for individual RES types, unofficially it is known that authors of the new regulations are considering, for example, a 0.75 factor for onshore wind energy projects, 1.3 for offshore sources, 2.0 for photovoltaics or 0.7 for biomass co-firing. In simple terms, it may be assumed that if today’s income from sale of one MWh generated by an onshore wind farm amounts to about 470 PLN, with about 270 PLN of that amount deriving from the green certificate sale, once the factor-based system is introduced that income will drop to about 400 PLN, since the proceeds from sale of the certificate will equal to 0.75 of what it brings in today.

Wojciech Sztuba, Managing Partner, TPA Horwath Polska

In other words, the total income of a wind power plant will decrease by about 15% as compared to its current level. Despite that, the new system has a potential to set up stable prospects for a dynamic growth of RES investments, with its primary advantage being a 15-year guarantee period for the aid terms granted for the installation during the first year. This particular feature is missing from the current model, and, as a result, a relatively high income from sale that may be earned in 2012 does not actually translate to the security and predictability of the investment neither in a long, nor in even short-term, perspective. That is a consequence of not only a lack of any indication as to the minimum collection price of the so-called black energy to be set by the regulatory authority for 2013 and the subsequent years, or a lack of certainty regarding green certificate prices that are affected not only by the substitution fee set annually by the Energy Regulatory Office (and also so far unknown) but also by other factors, including in particular supply of the certificates. In that context, an income flow reduction by even as much as a 15 percent does not necessarily have to stand for worse investment terms. In all likelihood, over the full lifespan of an investment the negative impact of the correction factor may neutralize to a large extent the beneficial effects of the 15-year guarantee leading to a reduced capital cost, as well as by the expected rise in black energy prices.


system must increase, in real terms, its total installed capacity by at least a dozen GW over the next 15-20 years. The existing 37 GW of the national generation system derives mainly from professional, hard and brown coal-based sources. Substantial investments exist and will continue to exist with regard to those coal-based sources; they will not, however, contribute to an absolute growth in the national power system, as their focus lies primarily in restoring the existing and severely under-capitalized coal-fired units. Given the fully-paid (from 2020) CO2 emission rights and its existing high-emission combustion technologies, the development program for the Polish power sector cannot focus on increasing the share of coal energy. Hence, in search of new power sources we will turn to gas, and nuclear energy – to some extent, but primarily to the RES. Meanwhile, given our geographical and physical conditions, onshore wind energy as well as probably offshore wind energy are and will continue to be our primary RES technology for the next several decades. Today, this understanding seems to be shared not only by the RES industry but from time to time also by the conventional power sector and by representatives of state authorities. Therefore, we can just keep waiting for the ultimate, polished draft of the RES legal act

and for the appropriate amendments in the energy law. The list of expectations that are yet to be met by the RES law includes, among others, the vacatio legis problem, and the need to define the factor values. If the effective date of the legal act is not postponed, new regulations will affect market players at a very unpredictable date, which is already causing doubts as to what to do with investment projects at advanced stages of preparation. For investors, the question of whether in a 15-years’ perspective they will be applying the old or a new aid system should constitute the most predictable parameter of investment planning, and not hit the investor and the financing bank like a bolt out of the blue. In this context, the surprise element only hinders project implementation and credit agreement negotiations, and this state of affairs will persist until the new provisions come into effect or amendments to the bill assuming introduction of a reasonable transitional period are announced. Public discussion regarding the factor values is yet to start, and by disclosing the factors unofficially, the ministry is apparently testing the waters and trying to get reactions from the market players. Wojciech Sztuba, Managing Partner, TPA Horwath Polska

Taiga Mistral with the wind at its back Taiga Mistral, the Spanish fund, supported by Polish advisors Tundra Advisory, has successfully connected its first Polish wind farm, Kobylnica, acquired its next major project 40MW (+24 MW), and plans to purchase additional 200 MW in Poland.

Tundra Advisory

Taiga Mistral together with local partner Tundra Advisory completed in 2011 its first stage of wind farm projects acquisition, totaling 190 MW, and finalized construction of Kobylnica, a 41.4 MW wind farm operating since autumn 2011 in the north of Poland. The first stage of the fund in Poland is to build a portfolio of 190 MW of wind power by 2013. Investments are financed from both the fund’s own capital and project financing from banks. “The Kobylnica 41,4 MW wind farm project has been totally successful – including its project financing, construction and commissioning” - says Mikel Garay, Managing Director of Taiga in Poland. “Right now we are preparing the construction of our second and third wind farms, however, the sooner the New Law will be approved, the

Taiga Mistral

Słomińskiego5/259 00-195 Warsaw, Poland Tel: +48 22 5309494 http://www.tundraadvisory.com/

Mikel Garay, Taiga Mistral, with part of Tundra Advisory team, Grzegorz Skarzynski, Pawel Wolczanski, Aneta Pochron and Adam Jaworski.

better our plans will be realized”, emphasized Garay. “Our last Polish acquisition was signed up in December 2011 – this is a 40 MW project with a 24 MW extension - together with a strong Polish investment group, where Taiga Mistral will own 75% of the shares” – says Garay.

Wind Energy in Poland

Besides, even 15% lower, the income from 1 MWh of wind energy will still be among the highest in Europe. During the earlier stages of work on the complete set of changes regarding the RES, including amendments to the Energy Law act, a possibility was foreseen to lift the obligation of purchase of energy from renewable sources. However, it seems that the economy department has given up on that idea in favor of keeping the statutory purchase obligation and a guaranteed minimum price. It is assumed that during the first year after the new regulations come into effect the minimum price will be maintained at the level of the mean free market price for the preceding year, whereas during the subsequent years its value would be adjusted by inflation. From the point of view of a party interested in the development of the renewable energy sector, the bill of the new RES law in its currently discussed shape can without a doubt be considered as a step in the right direction. The need to create an environment conducive to fast-paced development of RES seems crucial, not only in the context of Poland’s commitments to EU with regard to achieving the 15% renewable energy share in total energy supplied to customers by 2020 but also considering a much more important fact that Polish energy generation

Spring 2012

Prices and Regulations

Camino de la Zarzuela, 15 Edificio ¨B¨- Planta 2ª 28023 Aravaca – Madrid, Spain Tel. +34 91 3576310 http://taigamistral.com/ mikel.garay@taigamistral.com

Taiga Mistral is also currently preparing its second Polish fund: Taiga Mistral Poland II. “We just want to replicate the successful experience and results from our first Polish fund. EBRD has already committed to a 20% stake. We expect to start with this second fund by autumn this year”, says Garay. ■

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Laws and Regulations

RES Act 2.0

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

More and more details of the next draft of the RES Act have been revealed. The first draft published on December 22, 2011 was criticized substantially, so the Ministry of the Economy had to react. The new draft is at the moment in consultation with other Ministries and, according to the Ministry of the Economy, one can expect its publication May 29. The following article summarizes what might be expected from RES Act 2.0, although the draft is not published yet, which still means uncertainty. According to the Ministry of the Economy the

14

Obligation to purchase More Green Certificates Being Discussed The Ministry of the Economy’s new draft regulation made changes to the minimum percentage obligation to purchase green certificates of total electric energy production. The Ministry reacted to research of IEO Instytut Energetyki Odnawialnej, which warned that in the near future the market value of Green Gertificates may fall off the cliff due to oversupply. While the UK government recently provided investors with a regulation anticipating an automatic increase of the percentage of Green Certificates energy producers have to obtain in case of such oversupply – so called headroom, the Polish government is still sticking to increased but fixed targets. The new targets will be: year

current obligation

2010 draft

current draft

2012 10.4 % 10.4 % 10.4 % 2013 10.9 % 10.9 % 12.0 % 2014 11.4 % 12.5 % 14.0 % 2015 11.9 % 12.5 % 14.0 % 2016 12.4 % 14.0 % 15.0 % 2017 12.9 % 15.4 % 16.0 % 2018 — 16.7 % 17.0 % 2019 — 18.7 % 18.0 % 2020 — — 19.0 % 2021 — — 20.0 % An increase to 19 percent in 2020 means green energy production amounting to 30 TWh compared with 11 TWh in 2010. The expected increase and prolongation of the percentage of Green Certificates energy producers have to obtain provides the market with stability. Although the Polish Government is not ready for the so-called “UK headroom” solution, the political will to stabilize the certificate market is recognizable. ■

RES Act should be filed with Parliament by June of this year, to come into force by January 1, 2013. So the RES Act has to pass the Council of Ministers soon, and no exhausting official consultation or further substantial redraft should be expected. Definitions In the new draft of the RES Act, Micro-Installations will be even more micro than already planned with installed capacity of electric power up to 20 kW and of heat power up to 35 kW. But the new law most probably introduces a new definition of small installations with installed capacity of electric power up to 2 MW and of heat power up to 5 MW. Micro-Installations are not a registered business anymore, and have to register only with official suppliers (PL: sprzedawca z urzędu), whereas small installations are a regulated registered business and have to register as well with official suppliers, but don’t need a license (PL: koncesja). The definition of an official supplier (PL: sprzedawca z urzędu) most probably returns. An official supplier is a company having a license for energy supply or gas supply for consumers, which don’t make use of their right to choose the supplier – in short words distribution grid operators. Grid connection The obligation to connect producers of renewable energy to the grid most probably returns. And renewable energy production facilities will again have a first connection right to grids. The grid operator provides technical conditions for grid connection and eventual grid modernization or extension separately. If the grid connection won’t be possible at the given moment, the operator has to provide a schedule how to connect the facility within the next five years. If the grid connection can’t be facilitated for the filed capacity, the operator has to specify which capacity can be connected to the grid. In case the grid connection needs a temporary shutdown due modernization or urgent matters, the grid operator has to specify these facts in the technical grid connection. If the grid connection doesn’t calculate for the grid operator in any case – based on the Return of Capital -, he has to present the calculation basis presenting grid connection costs and grid modernization and extension costs separately. The common practice of Energy Regulatory Office URE will therefore be introduced into the law. Purchase obligation The purchase obligation for official suppliers returns, but most probably with a slight

modification. The purchase price may be based on the average price for electric energy for the previous year published by URE, but just on the calculation basis for 2012. In future the price will be indexed just according to consumer prices, and not according to the average price for electric energy for the previous year. As the average energy price will increase most probably faster than the consumer prices – as least this is what the Ministry of Energy assumes -, on a longterm view the purchase price for renewable energy will fall below the average price for electric energy. Royalty scheme The calculation method of the compensation fee (PL: opłata zastępcza), which determines the price of certificates, will change. The compensation will amount to PLN 286 at the beginning – indexation so far not planned -, and the previous more sophisticated calculation method of PLN 470 indexed by the consumer price minus the average price for electric energy for the previous year will most probably disappear. A headroom solution in case of oversupply of certificates might be introduced. In case if through a period of two following quarters the average price for certificates at the stock exchange will amount to less than 80% of the compensation fee, the Ministry of Economy will increase the percentage obligation to purchase green energy to an appropriate value. The so called correction-coefficient for the given investment will be valid for 15 years and differs between the renewable energy sources. The new draft will state this precisely, as the last draft was less precise regarding this matter. For repowering, the correctioncoefficient will be calculated in relation to the modernization costs. For co-firing CHP and power plants, the given correction coefficient is only valid for three years. The correction coefficient will be published every three years for the following five years – the wording according to the previous draft will be most probably improved. The correction coefficient shall guarantee minimum ROI, e.g. at least at a level of a 10Y-fiscal bond. The correction coefficients for 2013 and 2014 stay at the actual level. The first correction coefficients according to the new understanding differentiating between the renewable energy sources will be most probably published as part of the new law. Although the certificate won’t have any time limit and can be sold at any time, the renewable energy so urces-guarantee, which is the document needed for issuing a certificate, has to be achieved 12 months after power production. The renewable energy sources-guarantee from other EU countries ■ can be achieved as well.


Laws and Regulations

Lack of consultation re reclassified sites makes the questioned Master Plans still valid

Duration of long-term lease agreements In May, amendments to the Polish Civil Code - impairing significantly the durability of long-term lease agreements - entered into force. According to these amendments, the purchaser of a property, which was sold at auction by a Court Bailiff, will be entitled to terminate a lease agreement even if such agreement was concluded for a definite period of time with authenticated date. In view of these changes the rights of the wind farm operator to use the land under WTGs might additionally be secured by establishing additional limited property rights (transmission easements and/or rights of use – prawo użytkowania/PL) consisting in the right to use the property within the designated scope. In case of sale of a property in enforcement proceedings, transmission easement encumbering the property (always) and right of use (under certain conditions) do not expire. ■

ment concerning a master plan necessary for the implementation of a wind farm located in the Wielkopolskie voivodship. As a result of the examination of the appeal in cassation, the NSA has overruled the judgment of the Voivodship Administrative Court in Poznań (“WSA”) declaring the said plan invalid due to above mentioned reasons and at the same time dismissed the complaint lodged against the master plan by the Voivode. The proceedings concerned the disputable issue of the lack of consent of the minister for agricultural development for assignment of agricultural areas for non-agricultural purposes. Since the Polish law does not provide for a deadline to challenge master plans by Voivodes in admin-

At an early stage of project development it is hardly possible to anticipate where exactly certain elements of grid infrastructure will be located within the area designated for a wind farm. Thus, in particular in the regions where properties are divided into very small plots, it is often difficult to decide on the type and form of agreements to be concluded in order to secure the title to the land to best fit the needs that will be defined at a later stage. This problem has become even more relevant now due to the upcoming changes in the Polish enforcement law, whereby if the property is acquired at an auction organized by a court bailiff, it will be possible for a purchaser to terminate a lease agreement. Due to this “impaired” duration of land lease agreements, establishment of additional transmission easements is definitely advisable. However, establishment of transmission easement on each minor plot seems unnecessary and often cannot be implemented at an early stage of project development. Therefore, our suggestion is to enter into a written

land lease agreement with notarially certified signatures. This land lease agreement should include covenants of the landlord, whereby a transmission easement agreement and/or annex to the land lease agreement that will adjust the scope of the contract for wind farm to meet the formal and legal documentation approved by competent authorities will be concluded at a later stage. Based on the foregoing, it would be possible to enter into a notarized transmission easement agreement at a later stage of development of the project. The obligation to conclude transmission easement agreement should be secured at least with contractual penalties. Although, from a legal point of view the covenant of a landlord to establish relevant easement referred to in the land lease agreement at a very early stage of the project development is weak (it may not be enforced in court), it secures financial interests of a developer, giving him at the same time more flexibility, in particular in terms of further com■ mercial actions.

Spring 2012

Securing title to land for grid infrastructure at an early stage of project development

Wind Energy in Poland

Under the procedure of adopting a master (zoning) plan, municipalities have to apply for approval of the Polish Ministry of Agriculture to redesignate agricultural land classes I to III to non-agricultural use if the sites to be reclassified exceed a “consistent project area” of 0.5 ha. According to the statements forming part of the planning documentation for wind farms, municipalities generally declare that a total area of agricultural land which exceeds 0.5 ha is designated for non-agricultural purposes. Yet, the area of the reclassified sites for a single WTG (Wind Turbine Generator) with accompanying infrastructure hardly ever exceeds 0.5 ha. Thus, the municipalities accepted an interpretation, whereby such a reclassification does not require the approval of the Minister of Agriculture. Hence, every site designated for a WTG, including accompanying infrastructure, was calculated individually. Such an interpretation was also followed by the Ministry of Agriculture in an individual interpretation issued in 2008. However, apparently being under the pressure of protests against wind farms – see: www.stopwiatrakom.eu - the Ministry of Agriculture has recently changed its approach and instructed Voivodes to complain against already issued master plans not approved by the Minister of Agriculture. The new interpretation provides that the whole area to be reclassified under a master plan, namely all sites designated for wind farm operation, e.g. towers, crane parking areas and access roads, has to be taken into account in calculation of the legal threshold. On April 12, 2012 the Supreme Administrative Court in Poland (“NSA”) passed a judge-

istrative courts, even currently binding master plans that were not approved, were at risk. Previous judgements of administrative courts in similar cases were not consistent and it seemed that a more rigorous interpretation is recently prevailing. In the above case, the judges have however concluded that it is not required to add each single area designated for a WTG in a master plan to calculate the reclassified area that would require the minister’s consent. It was justified by the fact that the Act on Protection of Agricultural and Forest Land of February 3, 1995 refers to “closed area of land”. Thus, the judges decided that those single areas remain dispersed and they should not be taken into consideration together in calculations made for the purpose of excluding the land from ■ agricultural use.

DMS publishes a bi-weekly newsletter in English language about Renewable Energy legal matters and business issues. DMS clients and business contacts regularly recommend the newsletter as helpful market intelligence. Please contact Christian at cschnell@ dms.net.pl, if You want to receive the newsletter on a regular basis. Dr. rer. oec. Christian Schnell, Rechtsanwalt DeBenedetti Majewski Szcześniak Kancelaria Prawnicza Sp. K. Saski Crescent, ul. Królewska 16 , 00-103 Warszawa Tel: +48 22 339 54 00 www.dms.net.pl

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Developers of Wind Energy in Poland Acciona Energy Poland Sp. z o.o.

Alpine-Energie Polska Sp. z o.o.

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Golice Wind Farm Sp. z o.o., Meltemi Sp.z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Andrzej Konarowski - Managing Director Contact data: Sienna 86/7, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 40 38 195 mliberadzka@accionaenergy.pl

Contact data: Gdynska 25, Świdnica, (Poland) tel. 74 640 97 00 office@alpine-energie.pl

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

www.acciona-energia.com

Ownership: Acciona Energia S.A. Company Profile: Acciona Energy, the energy division of the Acciona Group, is a world leader in the field of renewable energy sources. It owns renewable-based and cogeneration electricity generation assets totaling 8,2011 MW, of which 84% are in wind power, 11% hydropower and the rest in solar power (CSP, photovoltaic and termal), biomass and cogeneration, as of December 31, 2011. The company has implemented renewable installations in 14 countries (Spain, USA, Canada, Mexico, Portugal, Germany, Italy, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Australia, India, South Korea and Morocco) on five continents. It produces green energy on 285 wind farms around the world. Strategy in Poland: Construction, development and exploitation of renewable energy sources. Projects in Poland: Golice Wind Farm - 38 MW lubuskie voivodeship, Slubice municipality, Golice, Krobia Wind Farm - 32 MW under construction, Krobia municipality, poviat Gostyń Advisory Partners: Confidential Reference numbers on map: 127, 152

Ownership: Alpine-Energie Holding AG (Part of FCC SA) Company Profile: EPC-Contracting Renewable Energy (Wind, Photvoltaics, Biomass) with more than 700 MW of capacity erected all over Europe

Avallon Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Avallon Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Rafał Augustyniak - Prezes Zarządu Contact data: ul. Rubież 46 bud. C5/111, Poznań, (Poland) tel. 61 622 69 30 avallon@avallon.com.pl www.avallon.com.pl

Ownership: Avallon Sp. z o.o. Polska, private shareholders Company Profile: All aspects of wind farm development. Projects in Poland: near Piła 36 MW, Ostrów Wielkopolski 2 MW, Jarocin 2 MW Advisory Partners: Norrwind, Energotelprojekt, CGP Kancelaria Adwokatów i Radców Prawnych Other details: Recently announced co-development deal with Falck Renewables Reference numbers on map: 38, 158, 156

Baltic Wind Sp. z o.o. AES Poland Wind Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Johnny Holm - Managing Director Contact data: ul. Hryniewickiego 6, Gdynia, (Poland) tel. 59 717 60 00 www.aes.com

Company Profile: AES Poland Wind Sp. z o.o. headquartered in Gdynia is a company belonging to U.S. energy industry giant AES Corporation, which manufactures and distributes electricity in 26 countries. AES Wind Generation operates in the international energy market since 2004 and has wind farms in the United States, China and Europe. Currently, AES is in the process of wind farm projects in the north of Poland.

16

www.alpine-energie.pl

ing and building wind projects in Poland since 2007. The firm develops projects in cooperation with both domestic and foreign investors. Strategy in Poland: Baltic Wind will develop, build and manage individual projects in Poland, particularly those under 15 MW. Baltic Wind assists its partners with developing projects which are larger than 15 MW. Projects in Poland: Ciechocinek 7.5 MW (operational since 2012, Bierkowo 6 MW Advisory Partners: Nordex, Windhunter, Garrad Hassan, Windtest, DEWI, Accreo Taxand, Kancelaria Adwokacka Lukasz Krzyzanowski; Tomasz Krzyzanowski, Elbud Gdansk SA., Deloitte, Geoteko, Dr. Grzegorz Barzyk Consulting , Tensec, Vent Energy Operator, Salans Reference numbers on map: 95, 170, 105

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Eko Park I Sp. z o.o., Eko Park III Sp. z o.o. , Sagittarius Solutions Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Zbigniew Modecki - Prezes, Krzysztof Guzowski, Michal Polanowski Contact data: Nowolipki 4 m 19, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 608 802 546 chris@balticwind.com

Betpol (Grupa PBG) Contact data: ul. Inwalidów 49, Bydgoszcz, (Poland) tel. 52 518 20 00 betpol@bezpol.pl www.betpol.pl

Company Profile: Betpol, company 70% owned by PBG, has signed a contract to build a wind farm in the county Wicko Lębork (Pomeranian). The scope of works includes the execution of earthworks, foundations, and the supply, installation and commissioning of five complete wind turbines with an installed power of 2 MW each. The contract value exceeds 15.4 million euros. Strategy in Poland: Principal building the Wicko farm is a private company. Projects in Poland: Wicko (Pomorskie voivodship,county Lębork) 10 MW Reference numbers on map: 68

CEZ Polska Contact data: Emili Plater 53, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 370 11 22

www.balticwind.com

info@cezpolska.pl

Ownership: Company is owned by the management team. Company Profile: Baltic Wind is an independent wind farm developer specialized in planning, prepar-

Company Profile: Czech CEZ Group produces and distributes electricity and heat, as well as electricity trading, coal mining and trading of natural gas. It focuses in particular on the markets of Central and Southeastern Europe, where


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland

Contact data: ul. Chorągwi Pancernej 80, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 380 53 00 biuro@continentalwind.com www.continentalwind.com

Ownership: Continental Wind Poland is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Continental Wind Partners, a privately-owned company registered in the United States of America with local offices in all the countries in which it operates. Company Profile: CWP is a leading developer of wind projects in Central and Eastern Europe and Austrailia. CWP’s core business is to develop on shore wind energy projects. The company’s expertise is taking projects through all stages of the project lifecycle: securing land, conducting wind analyses, performing GIS mapping and windfarm layout optimization, securing environmental and building consents, and procuring turbines, equipment and construction works. The Fantanele wind farm in Romania, with over 380 MW currently commissioned, is an example of our construction management capabilities. Strategy in Poland: CWP has been present in Poland since 2007 and is currently completing the development of its 160 MW Duszniki project. The company has a portfolio of of approximately 300 MW of earlier stage projects in Poland and is committed to building its presence in the market through partnerships acquisitions and new investments in greenfield projects. Projects in Poland: Duszniki: 160 MW, other projects total appproximately 300 MW Advisory Partners: CWP works with all major turbine suppliers, construction firms and technical advisory firms. The company has extensive experience in technical procurement and managing all aspects of project design, development and construction. Reference numbers on map: 144

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Contino Wind Group is focused on developing wind farms in Poland, via several SPVs including The Contino Alpha Co., The Contino Bialogard, The Contino Delta, The Contino Czyżew, The Contino Poland, The Contino Suraż, The Contino Theta, The Wind Farm Bogoria, The Wind Farm Szastarka, The Wind Farm Frampol Top Management in Poland: Marcin Nawrocki - Prezes Zarządu Contact data: Liberty Corner, ul. Mysia 5, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 596 50 20 info@continowind.com www.continowind.com

Ownership: Poleol S.R.L Company Profile: The business model of Contino Wind Group includes both development on wind farms, as well as acquisitions and purchases of prepared projects and projects with obtained licenses. The main objective is to build and operate a portfolio of wind farms. Strategy in Poland: Contino Wind Group is an experienced and reliable partner with an established international position and more than 15 years experience. Concern for energy security and environmental issues assures responsible development and high-return on investment. Projects in Poland: Several hundred MW potential projects underway. Projects are of different sizes, ranging from small (5 MW) to large projects up to 90\MW. Active in these areas of Poland: zachodniopomorski, lubelski, podlaski and małopolski. Advisory Partners: CWG is involved in partnership with Von der Heyden Group, a recognized international investor and developer with strong presence in Poland. One of the biggest partners of CWG is Green Power Development, and the suppliers of wind turbines include, among others, Nordex, Siemens, Vestas. Reference numbers on map: 198, 200, 175, 205, 208, 210, 189, 120, 134

Domrel Biuro Usług Inwestycyjnych Sp. z o. o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: EW Czyżewo Sp. z o. o., EW Koźmin Sp. z o. o., Elektrownie Wiatrowe Bielice Sp. z o. o. Top Management in Poland: Roman Kierys - Prezes Zarządu, Tadeusz Kierys - Dyrektor ds. Marketingu i Rozwoju, Jan Zysk - Dyrektor ds. Inwestycji Contact data: Odzieżowa 12c/1, Szczecin, (Poland)

tel. 91 812 21 05 biuro@domrel.pl www.domrel.pl

Company Profile: Domrel Biuro Usług Inwestycyjnych Sp. z o. o. is a company with over ten years experience in the renewable energy industry. Currently focuses its activities on wind farm projects throughout Poland, specializing in “turnkey” projects for Polish and foreign investors. Strategy in Poland: In the coming years Domrel intends to pursue investments in small and medium sized wind farms, acting as both an investor and developer. Projects in Poland: Morownica 5 MW, Piaski 5 MW, Pępowo 7,5 MW, Słupca 4,8 MW, Czyżewo 6 MW Other details: Membership in PIGEO and PSEW Reference numbers on map: 146, 151, 153, 159, 21

DONG Energy Power A/S Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: DONG Energy Renewables Polska Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Ivan Christiansen - Director, Morten Frederiksen - Head of Market and Commercial Department, Joanna MackowiakPandera - Head of Market Development Department, Tadeusz S. Staszewski - Head of Technical Team, Lucyna Kwiatos - General Legal Counsel Contact data: ul. Zlota 59, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 222 33 10 www.dongenergy.com

Ownership: DONG Energy A/S Company Profile: DONG Energy is one of the leading energy groups in Northern Europe and we are headquartered in Denmark. Our long term vision is to provide reliable energy without C02 emissions. Today DONG Energy is one of the market leaders in development, construction and operation of offshore and onshore wind farms and is focused on maintaining and strengthening this position. Strategy in Poland: We have an ambitious growth strategy for the Polish market with sufficient financial ressources to pursue the attractive opportunities we see in Poland. Projects in Poland: Wind farms in operation: Jagniatkowo 30.5 MW, Karnice 30 MW, Karcino 51 MW.

Spring 2012

Continental Wind Partners LLC

Contino Wind Group

Wind Energy in Poland

it can use the experience in managing an electricity conglomerate during the liberalization of the electricity market. CEZ Group companies have offices also in Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Poland, Netherlands, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Germany, Hungary, Turkey, Serbia and Slovakia. Strategy in Poland: In Poland the CEZ Group has two coal-fired power plants, located near the border with the Czech Republic. CEZ Poland is also the owner of 67% of Eco Wind Construction.

continued on page 20

17


Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

Map of Wind Farms in Poland

18

NORTH 1 Krajnik Górny 500 MW (Enertrag Polska) 2 Widuchowa 18 MW (Enertrag Polska) 3 Marszewo 100 MW (Tauron Ekoenergia) 4 Zagórze 30 MW (Vattenfall Tauron) 5 Lake Ostrowo (Jagniątkowo) 30,6 (DONG) 6 Miłowo – (Prokon) 7 Jarszewo – (WindStrom Polska) 8 Śniatowo 30 MW (Vortex) 9 Skrobotowo 26 MW 10 Karnice 30 MW (DONG) 11 Kicko 18 MW (GDF Suez) 12 Stara Dąbrowa 30 MW (EWE) 13 Wierzbięcin 240 MW (Enertrag Polska) 14 Roby 4,25 MW (juwi Energia Odnawialna) 15 Karcino 51 MW (DONG) 16 Smolęcin 66,7 MW (GreenTech Energy Systems Polska) 17 Resko 90 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna) 18 Karwowo 66 MW (Enertrag Polska) 19 Krzęcin 6 MW (Impax Asset Management, poprzedni właściciel – Eolia) 20 Krzęcin 14 MW (RWE) 21 Czyżewo 6 MW (Domrel) 22 Strzelce Krajeńskie 48 MW 23 Kołobrzeg 51 MW 24 Stramnica 4 MW (RP Global) 25 Jarogniew-Mołtowo 20 MW (GDF Suez plan rozbudowy zakłada kolejne 4 MW) 26 Mołtowo (21 MW) – Iberdrola 27 Wartkowo 30 MW (GDF Suez) 28 Krosino 29 Kukinia 28 MW (RP Global Poland) 30 Pobłocie Małe 13,5 MW 31 Wartkowo 30 MW (Repower Systems Polska) 32 Tymień 50 MW (EEZ) 33 Karścino 69 MW (Iberdrola) 34 Parnowo 12,5 MW (GreenTech Energy Polska) 35 Dunowo 250 MW (Enertrag Polska) 36 Koszalin 58 MW (Eco-Wind) 37 Wałcz 4,5 MW (RP Global) 38 Piła 36 MW (Avallon) 39 Trzcianka 4 MW (REpower Systems Polska) 40 Osieki 12,5 MW (GreenTech Energy Systems Polska) 41 Dobiesław 42 MW (GreenTech Energy Systems Polska) 42 Darłowo 250 MW (Invenergy) 43 Cisowo 18 MW (Energia Eco) 44 Barzowice 22,5 MW (E.ON.) 45 Karwice 40 MW (DONG) 46 Polanów 160 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna) 47 Okonek 60 MW – (EWE) 48 Klukowo/Samborsko 105 MW – (GDF Suez) 49 Komarowo 60 MW (KDE Energy) 50 Margonin 120 MW (EDP Renewables) 51 Pawłowo [planned] – (EDP Renowables) 52 Tychowo 50 MW (RP Global Poland) 53 Nosalin 1,6 MW 54 Tychowo 50 MW (RWE) 55 Bierkowo 10 MW – Private capital (few investors) 56 Ustka 29,9 MW (GreenTech Energy Systems Polska) 57 “Pomorze” Ustka/Słupsk 240 MW (Green Power) 58 Wierzbięcin 240MW – (Enertrag Polska) 59 “Pomorze” Ustka/Słupsk 240 MW (Green Power) 60 Widzino 42 MW (Mitsui i J-Power) 61 Słupsk I-IV 16; 90; 18; 42,5 MW (Eco-Wind) 62 Kończewo 42 MW (Renpro) 63 Łosino 48 MW (J-Power, Mitsui) 64 Warblewo 40 MW (Fersa) 65 Poborowo – (Prokon) 66 Darżyno 6 MW (Nowa Energia SA) 67 Potęgowo 12 MW 68 Wicko 10 MW – (Betpol Grupa PBG) 69 Wicko 40 MW (Tauron Ekoenergia) 70 Wojciechowo 32,2 (GreenTech Energy Systems Polska – under construction) 71 Zwartowo 20 MW (GDF Suez) 72 Tuchola 6 MW (Nowa Energia) 73 Gniewino 300 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna) 74 Gniewino 8,4 MW (Prokon) 75 Lisewo 10,8 MW (Green Bear) 76 Pomorze offshore 99 MW (GreenTech Energy Systems Polska) 77 Łebcz 1 3,2 MW (E.ON) 78 Łebcz 2 10 MW (E.ON) 79 Połczyno 1,6 MW (Greentech Energy Polska) 80 Liniewo 34 MW – (Nowa Energia S.A.) 81 Gnieżdżewo II 8 MW 82 Gnieżdżewo I 22 MW (EWG) 83 Połczyno 1,6 MW (GreenTech Energy Systems Polska – former Wiatropol International)

76 75 77 81 82 58 69 73 85 68 74 79 86 56 57 70 7178 61 44 83 59 55 43 67 Gdańsk 42 35 84 64 66 40 45 24 36 62 62 63 23 28 34 41 155 65 96 97 9 14 15 87 32 1 36 46 33 35 25 92 98 10 88 26 30 80 99 27 31 7 8 101 89 93 4 16 5 100 102 103 28 17 6 18 13 105 52 104 106 47 11 12 94 90 48 Szczecin 37 91 Bydgoszcz 2 38 19 20 49 3 1 Toruń 39 50 Margonin 21 95 22 51 154 134 162 129 163 Gorzów Wlkp. 161 171 137 170 148 126 143 133 144 127 Poznań 164 166 138 149 159 128 139 145 17 150 165

Zielona Góra

140

140

146

155

142

151

147

130

135

152

136

131

153

132

178

179

177

180

157 158

168 160

Łódź 169

188

192 193 194

191

185 187

181 84 Kowalewo (Norvento Polska) 85 Puck 22 MW (PEP) 86 Puck 12 MW (GreenTech Energy Systems Polska) 87 Zajączkowo 48 MW (J-Power / Mitsui) 88 Swarożyn 16 MW (Prokon) 89 Pelplin 48 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna, former owner Gamesa) 90 Marusza 8 MW (Prokon) 91 Wabcz – (Prokon) 92 Subkowy 8 MW – (Nowa Energia) 93 Subkowy 10 MW (Prokon) 94 Grudziądz I-V 42,5; 28; 47,5; 47,5, 47,5 (EcoWind) 95 Ciechocinek 7,5 MW (Baltic Wind) 96 Nowy Staw (39 MW) – RWE 97 Myszkowo – (Prokon) 98 Malbork 18 MW (Iberdrola) 99 Goraj 22 MW (Starke Wind) 100 Koniecwałd 18 MW (Iberdrola) 101 Postolin 40 MW (Fersa) 102 Sztum 14,5 (Iberdrola) 103 Kisielice 18 MW (Fersa) 104 Kisielice 40,5 MW (Iberdrola) 105 Susz 5MW – (Baltic Wind) 106 Kisielice 22 MW (Iberdrola) 107 Elbląg 48; 48; 48; 48; 6; 4 MW (Eco-Wind) 108 Krasin 20 MW (Norvento Polska)

156

190

Wrocław 183 182

167

184

Opole

189

186

Katowice 109 Żuromin 1 i 2 60 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna) 110 Olsztyn I i II 34; 96 (Eco-Wind) 111 Szydłowo – (Prokon) 112 Czernice Borowe – (Prokon) 113 Korsze 70MW (EDP) 114 Piecki 32 MW (RWE) 115 Wąsewo – (Prokon) 116 Gołdap 69 MW (Starke Wind) 117 Gołdap/Wronki 48 MW (Vortex Energy) 118 Kowale Oleckie 100 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna) 119 Taciewo 30 (RWE) 120 Podlaskie I 48 MW (Contino Wind Group) 121 Wysokie Mazowieckie 28 MW– (Renovatio Power)

Krak

122 Szepietowo 117 MW (Green Bear) 123 Suwałki I-III 47,5; 47,5; 160 MW (Eco-Wind) 124 Suwałki 41,4 (RWE) 125 Babiki 38 MW – (Martifer)


116 113

7

119 123 124

118

107

117

108

01 03

140 Piątkowo 48 MW (Norvento Polska) 141 Uście 40 MW – WindPower Poland 142 Sława 82 MW (Starke Wind) 143 Pniewy 70 MW 144 Duszniki 160 MW – (Continental Wind Partners) 145 Kąkolewo 18 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna) 146 Morownica 5 MW (Domrel) 147 Wschowa 80 MW (Starke Wind) 148 Oborniki 8 MW (Martifer) 149 Kleszczewo – (Prokon) 150 Wielkopolskie 52,5 MW 151 Piaski 5 MW (Domrel) 152 Krobia 32 MW – (Acciona) 153 Pępowo 7,5 MW (Domrel) 154 Kaczkowo 44 MW 155 Gizałki 36 MW – (Martifer) 156 Jarocin 2 MW (Avallon) 157 Ostrów Wielkopolski 1,6 MW 158 Ostrów Wielkopolski 2 MW (Avallon) 159 Słupca 4,8 MW (Domrel) 160 Wysocko Wielkie 2,4 MW 161 Mogilno 34 MW (Vortex) 162 Ludkowo 1,8 MW 163 Inowrocław 32 MW (Vortex) 164 Kleczew 1 i 2 75 MW (KWE) 165-Kazimierz Biskupi 45 MW (KWE) 166 Lubstów 30 MW – (KWE) 167 Przykona 40 MW – Energa SA 168 Łyszkowice 20MW – Falck Renewables 169 Szadek 8 MW – (Terna Energy) 170 Włocławek 6MW (Baltic Wind) 171 Dobrzyń 34 MW (Vortex) 172 Krzyżanów 20 MW (Terna Energy przez spółkę Eolos Polska) 173 Czarnocin – (Prokon) 174 Ścieki 22 MW (EnerCap) 175 Mazowieckie I 45 MW (Contino Wind Group) 176 Andrzejewo – (Prokon)

133 Bledzew 21 MW – (EWE) 134 Zachodniopomorskie 60 MW (Contino Wind Group) 135 Stypułów 28 MW (Starke Wind) 136 Stypułów 4,5 MW (juwi Energia Odnawialna) 137 Nowa Niedrzwica 50 MW (Starke Wind) 138 Myszęcin 22 MW (Starke Wind) 139 Szczaniec 70 MW (Starke Wind)

114

110 105 106

120 125

Białystok 111

ń

109

112

121 115

122 176

171

Warszawa 172

ź

174 175

173 199

205

209

3 194 195

Lublin

208

216 217

210 197 212

Kielce 200

218

213 196 198

201

Rzeszów

211 214

Kraków

203 202

204 206

207

215

SOUTH 177 Zgorzelec 70 MW (GEO Renewables) 178 Nowogrodziec 48 MW (GEO Renewables) 179 Modlikowice 24 MW (PEP) 180 Łukaszów 34 MW (PEP) 181 Wałbrzych 6 MW 182 Piersno 18 MW (Martifer) 183 Udanin 57,5 MW – Eolfi 184 Ciepłowody 40 MW (Fersa) 185 Turów 150 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna) 186 Lipniki 30,7 MW (Tauron Ekoenergia) 187 Jędrzychowice 70 MW (Fornax) 188 Pągów 51 MW (Erbud / GDF Suez) 189 Śląskie 18 MW (Contino Wind Group) 190 Czarnożyły 16 MW (Terna Energy) 191 Działoszyn 2x2 MW (Erbud) 192 Rusiec – (Prokon) 193 Rząśnia 5,85 MW – Erbud 194 Kamieńsk 30 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna) 195 Gorzkowice 12 MW (Terna Energy przez spółkę Eolos Polska) 196 Poręba Górna ok. 18 MW – (juwi Energia Odnawialna) 197 Kielce 35 MW (Eco-Wind) 198 Małopolskie I 75 MW (Contino Wind Group) 199 Kobylany 30 MW (Gamar GHL) 200 Świętokrzyskie I 30 MW (Contino Wind Group) 201 Biały Bór 166 MW – Ibereolica 202 Łęki Dukielskie 10 MW (IKEA Group) 203 Jawornik 10 MW (Martifer) 204 Rymanów 26 MW – IKEA Group / Martifer 205 Lubelskie I 90 MW (Contino Wind Group) 206 Orzechowa I 36 MW, Orzechowa II 10 MW (Martifer) 207 Bukowsko 18 MW (IKEA Group) 208 Lubelskie II 30 MW (Contino Wind Group) 209 Lublin I i II 48; 48 (Eco-Wind) 210 Lubelskie III 45 MW (Contino Wind Group) 211 Markowa 20 MW (Martifer) 212 Łada 44 MW – (Martifer) 213 Biszcza – (Relight) 214 Hnatkowice – Orzechowce (12 MW) – Iberdrola 215 Żurawica 12 MW (Iberdrola) 216 Chełm 12,5 MW (PGE Energia Odnawialna) 217 Leśniowice – E.ON 218 Tomaszów Lubelski [planned]– (EDP Renowables)

Wind Energy in Poland

CENTRAL 126 Górzyca 28 MW (Starke Wind) 127 Golice 38 MW (Acciona) 128 Rzepin 58 MW (Starke Wind) 129 Bogdaniec 30 MW (Starke Wind) 130 Budziechów 6 MW– (Gewind) 131 Grabik 6 MW– (Gewind) 132 Kartowice 1,5 MW (juwi Energia Odnawialna)

Spring 2012

Map of Wind Farms in Poland

19


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland continued from page 17

Moreover, DONG Energy has a very large development pipeline in Poland. Advisory Partners: All equity finance from mother company DONG Energy A/S Reference numbers on map: 10, 15, 5, 45

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

E.ON Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: E.ON Energie Odnawialne Sp. z o.o, E.ON daugther company responsible for the Polish wind business of E.ON and located in Szczecin Top Management in Poland: Rüdiger Rittner, Sebastian Mertens Contact data: Plac Rodła 8, lok.1205, Szczecin , (Poland) tel. 91 359 42 81 info.szczecin@eon.com www.eon.com/renewables

Ownership: Korporacja E.ON Company Profile: E.ON is one of the largest investors in the energy sector. It employs more than 85000 people around the world. E.ON focuses on the production of green energy, has 3600 MW of installed capacity and plans for further investments of 2.6 billion € in 2013. Strategy in Poland: With investments of over € 200 million over the past six years E.ON is one of the five largest players in the Polish wind sector. Currently operates four wind farms with installed capacity of 86.5 MW that supply 80000 Polish households with clean wind energy. Projects in Poland: Łebcz 1 and 2: 18 MW, commissioned in 2007/08, region Szczecina Morze Bałtyckie, Wielkopolska: 52,5MW, Barzowice: 20,7MW, and other regions. Reference numbers on map: 44, 77, 78, 217

Eco-Wind Construction S.A. (majority-owned by CEZ) Top Management in Poland: Piotr Beaupre - Prezes Zarządu, Jan Mališ - Board Member, Jaromír Pečonka - Board Member Contact data: ul. Marynarska 11, Warsaw, (Polska) tel. 22 444 08 81 biuro@ecowind.pl

20

www.ecowind.pl

EGL AG

Ownership: Majority shareholder is CEZ Poland Distribution B.V. Company Profile: Eco-Wind Construction SA undertakes projects in the wind energy industry, such as the acquisition of interesting locations for wind farms, the further development of the project until the administrative licenses and building permits and the implementation of the total investment including financing and turnkey construction organization. In addition, the company offers services related to the operation and management of wind farm complex in the Wind Farm Operation Center for their own use and for customers interested in these services. Reference numbers on map: 209, 36, 61, 94, 107, 110, 123, 197

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: – Top Management in Poland: Michael Waldner - Head of Energy Ventures 41 44 749 43 05 (michael.waldner@egl.eu), Luca Pedretti - Senior Manager Energy Ventures 41 44 749 45 08 (luca.pedretti@egl.eu), Zbigniew Olszewski - Prezes Zarządu EGL Polska Sp. z o.o. 48 22 529 79 45 (zbigniew. olszewski@egl.eu) Contact data: Al. Jerozolimskie 123, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 529 79 45 biuro.pl@egl.eu

EDP Renewables Polska Sp z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Joao Paulo Costeira - Board member, Luis Adao da Fonseca - Board member, Rui Teixeira - Board member, Grzegorz Szymczak - Country Manager (grzegorz.szymczak@ edpr.com) Contact data: ul. Postępu 17b, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 331 01 88 office@edprenovaveis.com www.edpr.com

Ownership: EDP Renewables Europe S.L. Company Profile: EDP Renewables (Euronext: EDPR), is a world leader in the renewable energy sector, designs, develops, manages and operates power plants that generate electricity from renewable energy sources. The majority shareholder of the company is Energias de Portugal. Strategy in Poland: To establish the leadership position in the renewable energy sector in Poland. Projects in Poland: Two farms totalling 190 MW. Margonin 120 MW, Korsze 70 MW. Active pipeline of projects. Reference numbers on map: 50, 113, 218, 51

EEZ Contact data: ul. Gotarda 9 , Warszawa, (Poland) tel. 22 548 48 12 eez@eez.pl Reference numbers on map: 32

www.egl.eu

Ownership: EGL AG Company Profile: EGL has their own assets trading in energy and other products such as gas, oil, coal, certificates of origin and CO2 emission allowances. Owned by AXPO Group - the largest energy provider in Switzerland. It is present in all major European markets, where he uses this experience in energy trading and energy risk management for creating and structuring of products and services tailored to individual customer needs. EGL is a member of all major European energy exchanges, has branches and subsidiaries in many countries. In Poland, the EGL is one of the leading companies offering contracts to purchase electricity and certificates. Strategy in Poland: EGL has extensive experience in energy trading and successfully operates on the Polish energy market for over 10 years. We offer personalized solutions and hedge contracts for off-take for the existing and planned wind power plants, enabling optimum revenues from energy production. The solutions offered by us provide you with greater security of funding for your project and will take full advantage of the financial capacity of the wind farm.

EnerCap Contact data: Burzovní palác, Rybná 14 , Praha 1, (Czech Republic) tel. 42 022 731 6222 Company Profile: EnerCap Capital Partners specialises in private equity investments in renewable energy projects across Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe. The EnerCap Power Fund I L.P. was created to capture the exponential growth in renewable energy projects expected in the region. Reference numbers on map: 174


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland

enerco@enerco.pl

Company Profile: The company has completed construction of two wind farms: in Cisowo and the largest in Central Europe – Parku Wiatrowego in Tymien.

Company Profile: Eneria builds wind farms. So far Eneria owns and helps in the operation of the projects with a total capacity exceeding 300 MW. Eneria wind farms in Poland are about 90 MW. Additionally Eneria is building grids and obtains energy from biomass gasification. The company has participated in development of:Strzelce Krajeńskie 48 MW, Kaczkowo 44 MW, Krosino,Wałbrzych 6 MW, Pniewy 70 MW Reference numbers on map: 22, 154, 28, 181, 143

tel. 22 458 85 00 www.ei.com.pl info@ei.com.pl

Company Profile: Enterprise Investors (EI) is a private equity and venture capital firm operating in Poland and Central and Eastern Europe. EI plans to build wind farms in Poland, via a new subsidiary Wento, and has allocated about 40 million euro. In the next few years, the company wants to build wind power of several hundred megawatts.

ENERGA Elektrownie Wiatrowe Sp. z o.o.

Enertrag Polska Sp. z o.o.

Environmental Investment Partners III

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Energa Elektrownie Słupsk Top Management in Poland: Mirosław Bieliński, Roman Szyszko Contact data: ul. Rybacka 4a, Słupsk, (Poland) tel. 59 841 69 00 sekretariat@energawiatr.pl

Top Management in Poland: Werner Diwald - Chairman of the board, Christoph Sowa-Proxy, Joanna ZienkiewiczProxy Contact data: Al. Papieża Jana Pawła II 15/4, Szczecin, (Poland) tel. 91 488 64 00 christoph.sowa@enertrag.com

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Environmental Investment Partners III Top Management in Poland: Adam de Sola Pool - CEO Contact data: Piaskowa 12 C, Konstancin-Chylice, (Poland) tel. 22 756 32 32 pool@eip.com.pl

www.energawind.pl

www.enertrag.com

www.eip.com.pl

Company Profile: Production, sale and distribution of energy mainly from renewable sources. Strategy in Poland: The company buys ready-made wind farms, and develops its own projects. Reference numbers on map: 167

Ownership: Enertrag Aktiengesellschaft Company Profile: Enertrag Polska belongs to the German group Enertrag - a highly specialized company in the renewable energy industry. Enertrag Group for almost 20 years has been producing electricity from renewable sources and is engaged in wind turbine service, development of wind farm projects and biogas plants and the development of new technologies (hybrid power plant, power grids dedicated to renewable energy sources, lighting systems for wind turbines). Enertrag Poland is developing wind farm projects in Poland, basing on the experience gained by the group during the implementation of over 450 wind turbines in Germany, Bulgaria, France and Great Britain. Strategy in Poland: Development and construction of wind farms based on own dedicated grid 110 kV/ MV, to be connected directly to national grid. Projects in Poland: Wind farms in preparation: Krajnik 500 MW, Dunowo 250 MW, Wierzbięcin 240 MW, Karwowo 66 MW and Widuchowa 18 MW. Reference numbers on map: 1, 2, 13, 18, 35, 58

Ownership: American investment fund specialized in early stage environmental investments in Central Europe Company Profile: The fund invests in development companies such as solar, wind, waste water, solid & liquid wastes, sustainable energy and recycling, and companies operating sustainably in all sectors of the economy (clean technology). Since 1998 the fund has invested in developers of many wind parks (over 5000 MW under development), biogas and PV. Strategy in Poland: EIP seeks to provide equity to experienced renewables (wind) developers seeking capital to expand their scope of operations: new regions, new technologies, new projects. Projects in Poland: EIP is a shareholder of the companies developing wind projects in Poland such as Continental Wind Partners and Greenfield Wind. Advisory Partners: No preferencies, willing to work with all parties.

Energia Eco Contact data: ul. Gotarda 9, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 548 48 45 energiaeco@energiaeco.pl www.energiaeco.pl

Strategy in Poland: Energia - Eco in December 2001 launched in Poland the first large-scale wind park consisting of nine wind turbines, with a total installed capacity of 18 MW. Projects in Poland: Cisowo 18 MW Reference numbers on map: 43

Eneria Top Management in Poland: Leszek Nicgorski - Dyrektor Generalny Contact data: Izabelin Dziekanówek 6 Łomianki, (Poland) tel. 22 201 36 50 elektrownie_wiatrowe@eneria.pl www.eneria.pl

Ownership: Eneria S.A. France, Grup Bergerat Monnoyeur

Enterprise Investors Top Management in Poland: Jacek Siwicki - Prezes Contact data: ul. Emilii Plater 53, Warsaw, (Poland)

Spring 2012

Contact data: ul. Gotarda 9, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 548 48 12 www.enerco.pl

Wind Energy in Poland

Enerco

Eolfi Polska Sp. z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: FW1, FW2, FW3 FW4, FW5, FW6, FW7, FW8, FW9, FW13, FW14, Wind Energy Polska, Wind Energy Polska II, SPV10, SPV12, SPV15, SPV16, SPV17, SPV18, FW19, FW20, FW21, FW22 Top Management in Poland: Andrzej Gromadziński - General Director and Board member, Radosław Sałaciński Development Director

21


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland Contact data: ul. Sienna 39, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 595 14 70 biuro@eolfi.pl

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

www.eolfi.pl

Ownership: Eolfi Francja S.A. Company Profile: Eolfi Poland belongs to the group Veolia Environnement, a world leader in environmental services in sectors: water, transport, waste management and energy. Founded in 2004, Eolfi is now one of the leading investors in the renewable energy industry and operator of wind farms and solar parks in Europe and the United States. Eolfi also manages investment funds for the acquisition, financing and construction of renewable energy sources. Scope of activities includes the preparation, construction, financing and operation of wind farms and solar. Strategy in Poland: Firma Eolfi operates in Poland since 2007, employs 18 people, and services 18 projects totaling 1016,6 MW. Projects in Poland: Dolnośląskie, pomorskie, łódzkie, podlaskie, lubelskie, wielkopolskie Advisory Partners: Technical and turbines providers: Nordex, Windhunter, GE, Gamesa Repower. Advisors and financial partners: KPMG, City Handlowy, Raiffeissen Bank Polska, Millenium, West LB, Lacaixa, Societe Generale, BZWBK, Mariusz Prus - tax adviser. Legal advisers: BCH Bartosiewicz Chabocka Kancelaria Radców Prawnych, Rak Wierzbicki i Wspólnicy, Babiaczyk Skrocki i Wspólnicy, Robaczewska & Płoszka. Reference numbers on map: 183

EPA Wind Sp. z o.o. spółka komandytowa Top Management in Poland: Wojciech Głoćko - Prezes, Anna Pasławska Misztal - Wiceprezes Zarządu, Paweł Włoch - Wiceprezes Zarządu Contact data: ul. Wojska Polskiego 154, Szczecin, (Poland) tel. 91 424 84 00 info@epawind.pl www.epawind.pl

Ownership: EPA Sp. z o.o. Company Profile: The largest company projects were built for market leaders such as DONG Energy, Polish Energy Partners and GDF Suez. Strategy in Poland: The company provides all services related to construction and preparation of wind

22

farms from site selection and delivery to a building permit to the planning, and all the necessary measurements and construction. Projects in Poland: Finished projects: about 160 MW, projects completed with partners: 103 MW, Projects prepared for other parties about 150 MW. Firm plans to build about 15 projects in Woj. wielkopolskim, dolnośląskim, warmińskomazurskim, kujawsko-pomorskie.

Erbud S.A. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Przedsiębiorstwo Budownictwa DrogowoInżynieryjnego S.A. Top Management in Poland: Dariusz Grzeszczak – Board member, Józef Adam Zubelewicz – Board member Contact data: Puławska 300 A, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 548 70 00 info@erbud.pl www.erbud.pl

Ownership: Wolff & Müller Baubeteiligungen GmbH & Co. KG of which Wolff & Müller Holding GmbH & Co. KG - 32,84 %, Juladal Investment Limited - 22,29 %, AVIVA - 9,36 %, ING OFE - 10,04 %, Dariusz Grzeszczak - 5,93 % , Józef Zubelewicz - 1,98 %, Free float - 17,56% Company Profile: Erbud is a Polish construction groups, providing services in the commercial sector, utilities, energy, housing and road-engineering, in Poland and other European countries, including Germany, Belgium, France, Luxembourg and the Netherlands. Strategy in Poland: In the future Erbud intends to continue the ongoing development activities relating to strengthening its competitive position in renewable energy. Projects in Poland: Pągów 17 x 3 MW, Działoszyn 2 x 2 MW, Rząśnia 5,85 MW Reference numbers on map: 188, 191, 193

EWE Polska Sp.z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: EWE Zielona Energia sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Markus Rapp - Prezes Zarządu and Dariusz Brzozowski - Prezes Zarządu Contact data: ul. Małe Garbary 9 , Poznań, (Poland) tel. 61 885 72 60 zielonaenergia@ewe.pl www.ewe.pl

Ownership: EWE AG Company Profile: Multiservice firm Strategy in Poland: Development and exploitation of firm’s own portfolio of projects Projects in Poland: Three projects with total power of 111 MW in the areas of wielkopolskie, lubuskie and zachodniopomorskie (Okonek 60 MW - wielkopolskie., 30 MW Stara Dąbrowa - zachodniopomorskie, Bledzew 21 MW Lubuskie) Advisory Partners: Cooperation with external developers, including: WindStrom Polska Energia Innowacyjna Sp. z o.o. Project finance, including from firm’s own capital. Reference numbers on map: 47, 12, 133

EWG Elektrownie Wiatrowe Contact data: ul. Okrzei 17 , Legnica, (Poland) tel. 76 852 28 10 info@windfarm.pl www.windfarm.pl

Reference numbers on map: 82

Falck Renewables Wind Limited Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Bonwind Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Grzegorz Cieślak 22 332 58 55, Mob 601 331 203 (GCieslak@falckrenewables.com), Łukasz Hudyka 22 332 58 53, Mob 502 294 499 (lukasz.hudyka@falckgroup.eu) Contact data: Bonifraterska 17, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 332 58 55 www.falckrenewables.eu

Ownership: Falck Group SPA Company Profile: Falck Renewables, listed on the Italian stock market, is backed by the experience of the Falck Group which has been an important industrial company in Italy for over 100 years. Falck Renewables generates energy from wind, solar, biomass and waste. It ranks second on the Italian stock exchange for the production of renewable energy and fourth among the European players. Falck Renewables operates in Europe with more than 680 MW of installed capacity (end of 2011) and is well positioned for continued strong growth. Strategy in Poland: Falck Renewables develops, designs, constructs and manages energy production plants. We established successful cooperation with strong local Partners in Poland with whom wind farm


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Eolica Kisielice Sp. z o.o., Eolica Postolin Sp. z o.o., Eolica Warblewo Sp. z o.o., Eolica Cieplowody Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Karol Wypijewski - Project Manager - Polska Contact data: Travessera de Gràcia 30, 5th floor. 08021 - Barcelona, Barcelona, (Spain) tel. 34 93 240 53 06

Gamar GHL Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Jarosław Pasek - Managing Director, (j.pasek@gamarghl.pl), Tiago Gomes - Project Director (t.gomes@gamarghl.pl) Contact data: Plac Wolności 19, Rybnik, (Poland) tel. 32 440 73 15 gamarghl@gamarghl.pl www.reh-plc.com

Ownership: Renewable Energy Holdings PLC Company Profile: Wind farm developer Projects in Poland: Kobylany Wind Farm - 30 MW (podkarpackie, south of Krosno) Approximate Location: http://tinyurl.com/d2u9tb8 Reference numbers on map: 199

Fusion Invest Polska SA Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: JP Trading, Wind 27-JP Trading GbR Top Management in Poland: Jarosław Pawluk - Prezes Zarządu, Katarzyna Pawluk - Wiceprezes Zarządu, Krzysztof Niemiec - Wiceprezes Zarządu,

Gamesa Energia Polska Sp. z o.o. Contact data: ul. Krucza 16/22, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 434 26 44 islocinska@gamesacorp.com www.gamesacorp.com

Ownership: Gamesa Energia SA Company Profile: Production of wind turbines and development of wind farms Strategy in Poland: To develop wind energy. Advisory Partners: Gamesa Eolica, Gamesa Wind, Corporacja Gamesa

GDF Suez Energia Polska

fersa@fersa.es www.fersa.es

Ownership: Fersa Energías Renovables, S.A. owns 100% of Polish subsidiaries Company Profile: Fersa Energías Renovables, S.A. was founded in 2000 and its corporate purpose is to generate electricity by using renewable sources, mainly wind energy. Fersa focus its activities in promotion, development and ownership of wind energy projects.

Marek Nowakowski - Wiceprezes Zarządu, Maciej Lipowczan - Członek Zarządu Contact data: Rondo ONZ 1, Budynek Rondo 1 - 26 Piętro, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 544 91 11 info@fusion-invest.eu www.fusion-invest.eu

Company Profile: Investments in projects related to renewable energy, either directly or through partners.

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Beta Sp. z o.o., Gamma Sp. z o.o., GDF Suez Zielona Energia Top Management in Poland: Grzegorz Górski – Prezes Zarządu, Jerzy Kak - Wiceprezes Zarządu, Bogdan Pilch - Wiceprezes Zarządu, Alfreda Świtek dyrektor Finansowy oraz Członek Zarządu, Robert Zadora - Wiceprezes Zarządu Contact data: Zawada 26, Połaniec, (Poland) tel. 15 865 66 01 sekretariat@gdfsuez.pl

Spring 2012

FERSA Energías Renovables S.A.

Fersa has currently 259 MW in operation and a pipeline of 1230 MW under development, 890 MW of them already authorized. Fersa is a truly multinational player in the renewable energy sector owning companies and subsidiaries in more than 10 countries. FERSA is on the Spanish Stock Market since 2003. Projects in Poland: Fersa has currently 24 MW under operation and 18 MW under construction expecting to be fully operational in 2012. Fersa has a 108 MW pipeline in Poland through its 4 subsidiaries. Advisory Partners: Fersa works with Polish local companies depending on the area and necessities for each project. Reference numbers on map: 64, 101, 184, 103

Wind Energy in Poland

projects are being co - developed. With the aim to grow, Falck is looking for opportunities to enter wind farm projects at various stages of development. We would like to also encourage landowners to approach us in order to achieve experience partner with 680 MW of operating assets. Projects in Poland: Łyszkowice Commune, Łyszkowice Wind Farm, 20MW Other details: Recently announced plan to work with Avallon to develop next wind farm. Reference numbers on map: 168

www.gdfsuez-energia.pl

Ownership: GDF SUEZ Energia Polska S.A. Company Profile: The company in addition to conventional energy sources, the company also generates power from renewable sources - wind and biomass. Strategy in Poland: By 2015, the company plans to achieve 300 MW of wind projects.

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Developers of Wind Energy in Poland Projects in Poland: Jarogniew-Mołtowo 20 MW - planned expansion of 4 MW, Wartkowo - 30 MW, Pągów - 51 MW, Zwartowo 20 MW Advisory Partners: Tebodin, Tractabel Engineering, Salans Reference numbers on map: 188, 11, 25, 27, 71, 48

GEO Renewables S.A. Top Management in Poland: Radek Nowak - Member of the Board, Evan Gibb - Member of the Board, Zbynek Dvorak - Member of the Board Contact data: Marynarska 15, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 378 29 00 geor@georenewables.pl

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

www.georenewables.pl

Ownership: GEO LTD Company Profile: We manage projects focused on developing, constructing and operating wind parks in Poland. Projects in Poland: Pipeline of over 1500 MW in various locations in Poland, including Nowogrodziec 48 MW, Zgorzelec 70 MW Advisory Partners: EnerCap Capital Partners, Gamesa, Iberdrola, Chadbourne & Park, Enerpark, Mott MacDonald Limited, GL Garrad Hassan, Dewey & LeBoeuf, Lahmeyer International GmbH, Weil, Gotshal & Manges, Norton Rose Piotr Strawa and Partners, Clifford Chance, KPMG, Ernst&Young Reference numbers on map: 177, 178

Gestamp Wind Poland Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Riberas Mera Juan Maria - Prezes Zarządu, Riberas Mera Francisco Jose - Board member, Sulgostowski Piotr - Board member, Fernandez Auray Dionisio Angel - Board member Contact data: ul. Racławicka 130, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 646 02 11 www.gestampeolica.com.pl

Ownership: Corporacion Gestamp Strategy in Poland: Goal of Gestamp Wind is to have a working wind farms world-wide with capacity of over 2000 MW by 2015; in the same year, the company also wants to have another 400 MW under construction.

Gewind Sp z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Porwind sp z o.o., Gewind Grabik sp z o.o., Gewind Budziechów sp z o.o., Popielawy sp z o.o.

24

Top Management in Poland: Paulo Albuquerque Contact data: ul. Poznańska 62/68, Poznań, (Poland) gewind@gewind.pl

Projects in Poland: Develop wind farms of 175 MW via spv KWE Sp. z o.o. Cooperation with Kopalnią Węgla Brunatnego “Konin” w Kleczewie S.A. Developing 2 projects of 40 MW each.

www.gewind.pl

Ownership: Gesfinu, S.A. (www.gesfinu.pt) Company Profile: Gewind is the Polish holding company, representing the first move of the Gesfinu group in diversifying the holding’s investment portfolio to Poland, using its acquired know-how in the green-energy sector for the polish market, especially in the Wind energy sector. Gewind is constituted by a group of experienced professionals that together with several outsourced specialists and auditors in various technical fields develop wind parks in Poland, in order to later operate and manage those wind parks. Strategy in Poland: The strategy consists in acquiring medium sized projects in several stages from greenfield up to “Building Permit” and to build them for future operation. After obtaining building permission we consider the opportunity of allowing partner(s) to participate/share the projects with us. Corporate Goal is to operate a portfolio of up to 200 MW in Poland. Projects in Poland: 1 Wind Park (WP) in Łodzkie with 20 MW, developed by 2014; 2 WP in Lubuskie with 12 MW, developed by 2013; 1 WP in Dolnoslaskie with 15 MW to be developed by 2015 and 1 WP in Podkarpackie with 50 MW to be developed by 2015. Other projects are still in greenfield stage under initial evaluation. Wind farm Grabik, Budziechów. Advisory Partners: Kancelaria Radcy Prawnego Jacek Kus, Megajoule Polska, Energotel Projekt, Wojtech; Ekoventus Reference numbers on map: 131, 130

Global Wind Energy Poland Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Reuven Sharon, Bartłomiej Karbowy Contact data: Wilcza 66/68, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 622 32 21 info@globalwindenergy.pl www.globalwindenergy.pl

Ownership: Global Wind Energy Ltd. (Ampal, Clal Industries & Investment) Israel Company Profile: Building, developing and later servicing of wind farms from greenfield stage. Strategy in Poland: Develop our own projects, and seek opportunities for acquisition of wind farm projects in advanced stages of development.

Green Bear Corporation Poland Sp. z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: More than 10 projects. Top Management in Poland: Jean-Claude Moustacakis - CEO Contact data: ul. Wilcza 46, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 212 61 01 poland@greenbearcorp.com www.greenbearcorp.com

Ownership: Green Bear S.A. Company Profile: Green Bear is a player in the renewable energy market with a core business of acquiring, developing & operating wind energy projects in Poland. Green Bear was established in January 2007. It is registered in Luxembourg, while the Company’s operational headquarter is located in Warsaw. Green Bear’s shareholders are private investors from various European countries (Luxembourg, Switzerland and France). In September 2007 Green Bear completed the acquisition of its first operating wind farm in Poland - Lisewo, with a capacity of 10.8 MW. Lisewo was sold after a successful renegotiations of the project finance debt and main commercial agreements. The wind farm is still operated and managed by Green Bear. Another technical, commercial and operating agreement for a wind farm has been concluded in April 2012. Green Bear is developing a portfolio of more than 600 MW of wind farm projects and is currently starting new greenfield projects to increase its portfolio to more than 1000 MW.  The company expects to obtain building permits for 85 MW by end of 2012 or early 2013 and is completing the construction of 48 MW wind farm in the North Central Poland that was sold to a strategic investor in 2010.  Green Bear is reinforcing its position of leading firm in development, construction and operation. Strategy in Poland: Development of wind farm projects, its operation, production of electricity. Projects in Poland: 600 MW + planned (Szepietowo 117 MW) Advisory Partners: GFKK, Tebodin, Energotelprojekt CDM, Wind Prospect, Garrad Hassan, Vestas Reference numbers on map: 122, 75


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland Top Management in Poland: Peter Hogren Contact data: M. Kopernika 11/23, Warsaw, (Poland) karol@greenfieldwind.com

Green Power Development Sp. z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: GP Alfa Sp. z o.o., GP Beta Sp. z o.o., FW Gamma Sp. z o.o., FW Delta Sp. z o.o., FW Sigma Sp. z o.o., FWAn Sp. z o.o., FWBo Sp. z o.o., FWBe Sp. z o.o., FWFr Sp. z o.o., FWSz Sp. z o.o., FWWo Sp. z o.o., FWZa Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Sławomir Spórna - Prezes Zarządu, Zbigniew Kosiński - Wiceprezes ds. Technicznych, Adam Królikowski - Wiceprezes ds. Realizacji Projektów Contact data: Zaleskiego 8/1, Krakow, (Poland) tel. 12 410 14 40 office@green-power.com.pl

www.greenfieldwind.com

Ownership: Peter Hogren and Karol Nagórka Company Profile: Swedish wind power developer. Wind farm projects are located in the region of Poland and developed in cooperation with international clients. Strategy in Poland: By the end of 2012 projects of total capacity 1000 MW are expected to be ready for partnering. 300 MW should be at advanced level of development. Projects in Poland: In the project portfolio company currently has 500 MW of projects on early stage of development. 200 MW of it is developed with our partner. Advisory Partners: Greendfield Wind partners are Relight CEE, Environmental Investment & Partners, Swedish Trade Council.

www.green-power.com.pl

Company Profile: Green Power Development Sp. z o.o. offers comprehensive design work for wind farms and individual turbines. We assist in choosing the right location, we obtain all required permits and supervise the investment of time to run. During our work we focus on working closely with landowners, local and regional administration, and power plants, making the investment process runs smoothly and without disruption. Strategy in Poland: Mission of Green Power Development is the development of wind power including care of environmental and social interests. In carrying out the projects we care also about maximizing the positive impact on the environment and fully identify ourselves with the idea of socially responsible business. Our strategy is to establish harmonious relations with the community and local government, power companies and environmental organizations. Projects in Poland: 13 projects completed in these voivods: lubelskie, świętokrzyskie, małopolskie, podkarpackie and mazowieckie of total capacity more than 400 MW. Advisory Partners: Development partner- Contino Wind Partners Sp. z o.o. Reference numbers on map: 57, 59, 200, 205, 210, 208, 198, 175, 189, 120, 134

Greentech Energy Systems Polska Sp. z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Wiatropol Ustka Sp. z o.o., Wiatropol Smolęcin Sp. z o.o., Wiatropol Parnowo Sp. z o.o., Wiatropol Puck Sp. z o.o., Eolica Połczyno Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Sławomir Sikorski - Prezes Zarządu Contact data: Jaśkowa Dolina 81, Gdańsk, (Poland) tel. 58 661 22 60 biuro@greentech.dk www.greentech.com.pl

Ownership: Greentech Energy Systems A/S Company Profile: Investment in wind energy sector. Construction and operation of wind farms. Strategy in Poland: Increasing the amount of energy produced from renewable energy sources in Poland. Projects in Poland: Parnowo 12,5 MW, Smolęcin 66,7 MW, Osieki 12,5 MW, Farma Wiatrowa w Połczynie 1,6 MW, Porzecze-Dobiesław 42 MW, Ustka 29,9 MW, Wojciechowo 32,2 MW, PomorzeOffshore, Puck 12 MW Advisory Partners: Turbines suppliers: Nordex, Vestas, Enercon Other details: Previous name was Wiatropol International Sp. z o.o. Reference numbers on map: 16, 34, 40, 41, 56, 70, 76, 79, 83, 86

Iberdrola Engineering and Construction Poland Sp.z o.o Top Management in Poland: Jacobo Alvarez - Member of the Board 22 322 72 07, Marianelly Hernandez - Northern Europe Business Development Manager 22 322 72 07 Contact data: Al. Niepodległości 69, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 322 72 07 www.iberdrolaingenieria.com

Ownership: 100 % Subsidiary of Iberdrola Ingeneria y Construccion S.A.U. Company Profile: Iberdrola Engineering and Construction Sp. z o.o. as polish subsidiary of a Spanish construction company Iberdrola Ingenieria y Constrccion S.A.U. has wide experience in execution of various international projects such as construction of transmission lines, substations, power plants as well as experience in successful monitoring and completion of wind farms. The company is capable of providing integrated solutions for the whole areas of the energy business. Iberdrola Group today has installed power capacity of 45,000 MW within a highly diversified mix (Thermal, Hydro, Wind, Nuclear). Projects have been carried out in more than 30 countries. Strategy in Poland: By now in Poland Iberdrola Engineering and Construction has built wind projects with the total capacity of around 352.5 MW (plus 106 MW under construction right now). Projects in Poland: Iberdrola Engineering and Construction Poland has participated as a general contractor (EPC or BoP) in the following wind projects in Poland: Bystra (24 MW), Kisielice (40,5 MW), Malbork (18 MW), Karscino (69 MW), Hnatkowice – Orzechowce (12 MW), Mołtowo (21 MW), Margonin I (20 MW), Margonin II (100 MW), Legowo (2 MW), Korsze ( 70 MW), Marszewo - under construction (82 MW) Reference numbers on map: 98, 100, 102, 104, 106, 214, 26, 33, 215

Spring 2012

Greenfield Wind Sp. z o.o.

Contact data: Al. Jerozolimskie 125/127, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 699 71 60 Company Profile: GES is the world’s most experienced independent services provider of wind farm installation and maintenance (over 12,500 MW installed, 7,500 MW turnkey and the maintenance of 10,100 MW).

Wind Energy in Poland

Green Energy Solutions

Ibereolica Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Ignacio Huarte - Prezes Zarządu , Xavier Canals - Dyrektor, Rafał Siwiec - Operations Director Contact data: Chmielna 101/102, Gdańsk, (Poland) tel. 58 301 61 60 office@ibereolica.com www.urielinversiones.com, www.ibereolica.com

Ownership: Ibereolica is a subsidiary of Iniciativas Energeticas SA, dedicated to the construc-

25


Spring 2012

Developers of Wind Energy in Poland tion and operation of power generation from renewable sources in Poland. Holding company is owned by Uriel Inversiones SA. Company Profile: Uriel Inversioness SA began operations in 1927. The main area of action is renewable energy. The company has hydroelectric power plants with total capacity of 14.2 MW, wind farms with total capacity of 268.4 MW. Moreover, the group currently operates in the following sectors: biofuels, processing and disposal of waste, production of components for automotive engines, agro-breeding industry, food industry and real estate. Strategy in Poland: Now the company is not in possession of any projects. Intends to focus on northern area of Poland, with plans for 422 MW. Biały Bór 166 MW near Gdańsk Advisory Partners: Kancelaria Domański Zakrzewski Palinka, KPMG, Deloitte, Global Energy Services, Garrad Hassan, Proeko Reference numbers on map: 201

IKEA Group Contact data: Ol. Szwedzki 3, Janki, Warsaw, Raszyn, (Poland) tel. 22 711 22 00 prpl@ikea.com

Wind Energy in Poland

www.IKEA.pl

Company Profile: In September 2011 IKEA Retail acquired two operational wind farms from the group Martifer (28MW) and committed to purchase a third wind farm to be built (26MW). This investment will enable the production of energy demand of 16 IKEA stores and is a continuation of earlier investments in roof solar panels, cogeneration of heat and electricity in our industry groups and other measures to improve energy efficiency in Poland. Reference numbers on map: 202, 207, 204

resource locations. Infusion is currently developing projects in several geographies across Europe, namely Portugal, Poland, Romania and Czech Republic. Infusion started operating its first wind farm (located in Portugal) in 2011. Strategy in Poland: Site assessment and selection, environmental, technical and economic feasibility studies, completion of licensing procedures, construction and operation of projects Projects in Poland: Wind farm project development is financed through shareholders’ equity. Construction will be financed on a project finance basis. Advisory Partners: DZP - legal advisors, CDM - environmental consultants, Megajoule - wind resource consultants, Tebodin - technical design

Invenergy LLC Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Invenergy Systems Polska Top Management: Michael Polsky - President and CEO, Jim Murphy - Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer, Chief Financial Officer Contact data: One South Wacker Drive, Suite 1900, Chicago, tel. (312) 224-1400 Poland - 22 548 48 50 Company Profile: Invenergy is the largest independent developer of wind farms in the United States. Strategy in Poland: Owned companies are projects with a total capacity of more than 2200 MW in US and Europe. In construction and plans are projects with total capacity of 1500 MW, whose implementation is planned for the end of 2013. Projects in Poland: Darłowo 250 MW Other details: Paul Domanski (top exec for Poland)

J-Power / EPDC Infusion Polska Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Miguel Peres - Country Manager Contact data: Al. Solidarnosci 117, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. www.infusion.pt polska@infusion.pt 22 440 5891

Ownership: Infusion SGPS - Portugal Company Profile: Infusion is a Portuguese renewable energy company that was incorporated in 2005 with the aim of developing and operating wind energy projects in prime wind

26

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Zajaczkowo Windfarm Sp. z o.o. Contact data: 15-1, Ginza 6-chome. Chuo-ku, Tokyo, (Japan) tel. 81 335 46 2211 artur_grybek@jpower.com.pl www.jpower.co.jp

Company Profile: J-Power is a manufacturer and distributor of wholesale electricity. It was founded in 1952 by the Japanese government and fully privatized in 2004. As a market leader in conventional and renewable energy in Japan , the firm is specialized in construction, operation and maintenance of power plants and transmis-

sion lines. Our power of 17 GW in Japan and 9 GW abroad generates electricity from coal, gas, geothermal, water, waste and wind. Strategy in Poland: J-Power for a few years (along with Mitsui) is active in the Polish wind energy market. We are in the process of building a portfolio of new projects and investments in renewable energy market in Poland and abroad. We work with developers and industry consultants. Projects in Poland: Wind farms in Zajączkow0 (gm. Kobylnica) of 48 MW, Widzino 42 MW, Łosino 48 MW Reference numbers on map: 60, 63, 87

juwi Energia Odnawialna Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Michael Boehm - Prezes Zarządu Contact data: ul. Opolska 100, Cracow, (Poland) tel. 12 299 88 00 info@juwi.com.pl www.juwi.com.pl

Company Profile: Juwi’s vision is to achieve 100% renewable energy. Juwi involved at the wind development stage of consulting and planning through design, financing, implementation and operation of the resulting farm. Strategy in Poland: Juwi works with stakeholders from the beginning of the project, to develop a strategy for how to integrate and combine different interests to mutual benefit. Projects in Poland: Currently juwi Energia Odnawialna is developing several projects totaling 300 MW, located in different regions of Poland. Reference numbers on map: 136, 132, 14, 196


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland

www.kde-energy.com

Ownership: KDE Energy Europe Company Profile: KDE Energy develops, builds and operates wind parks. Strategy in Poland: KDE Energy develops, builds and operates wind parks in north-west and south-west Poland (Komarowo wind farm + Zachodniopomorskie I, Zachodniopomorskie II, Zachodniopomorskie III, Zachodniopomorskie IV) Reference numbers on map: 49

Contact data: Kurniki 4, Cracow, (Poland) info@martifer.com www.martifer.pt

Ownership: Martifer Renewables SA belongs to Martifer Group, an industrial portuguese company. Company Profile: In late 2011, sold 3 wind farms to IKEA Group. Projects in Poland: Gizałki 36 MW, Oborniki 8 MW, Piersno 18 MW, Rymanów 26 MW, Markowa 20 MW, Orzechowa II 10 MW, Orzechowa I 36 MW, Jawornik 10 MW, Lada 44 MW, Babiki 38 MW Reference numbers on map: 204, 155, 148, 182, 211, 206, 203, 212, 125

Megawat Kanin Top Management in Poland: Adam Ofek - Członek Zarządu, Jerzy Zimmermann - Członek Zarządu Contact data: Świętojańska 15, Natolin , Łódź, (Poland)

KWE Sp. z o.o.

Mitsui

Top Management in Poland: Reuven Sharon - Prezes, Bartłomiej Karbowy i Grzegorz Frąckowiak - Członkowie Zarządu Contact data: 600-lecia 9, Kleczew, (Poland) tel. 63 247 55 55 biuro@kwe.konin.pl

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Mitsui & Co Japan Contact data: 24 King William Street, London, (United Kingdom) tel. 44 (0) 207 822 0321

www.kwe.konin.pl

Ownership: Kopalnia Węgla Brunatnego “Konin” w Kleczewie S.A. I Global Wind Energy Poland Sp. z o.o. Company Profile: Professional development of wind farms from the greenfield stage. Projects in Poland: Wind farm developments of 175 MW in the area of Koniń. KWE projects: Kazimierz Biskupi - 45 MW, gm. Kazimierz Biskupi, powiat koniński, woj .wielkopolskie; Kleczew 1- 45 MW, gm. Kleczew, powiat koniński, woj. wielkopolskie; Kleczew 2 - 30 MW, gm. Kleczew, powiat koniński, woj. wielkopolskie, Lubstów - 30 MW, gm. Sompolno, powiat koniński, woj. wielkopolskie Other details: See us at facebook.com - www.facebook. com/pages/KWE-Sp-z-oo/247828238580378 Reference numbers on map: 164, 165, 166

Martifer Group Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Martifer Renewables SA Top Management in Poland: Antonio Castro, Artur Violante, Izabela Jakubiec

energy arm of Kulczyk Investments. The company focuses on promoting the use of renewable energy sources in Poland. Strategy in Poland: Investing in offshore wind farms. Projects in Poland: Four offshore wind farm projects are planned in the area of Baltic Sea.

Nordex Top Management in Poland: Patrick Lefebvre, Managing Director NORDEX Poland & NORDEX Romania; Area Managing Director EMEA East Europe Contact data: ul. Pulawska 182, Warsaw 02-670 , (Poland) tel. +48 (22) 20 30 141 PLefebvre@nordex-online.com www.nordex-online.com

Company Profile: With the serial produced multi-megawatt wind turbines Nordex N90, N100 and N117, Nordex is able to offer high-efficiency wind turbines for onshore use. For the rapidly developing chinese market and the asianpacific region we offer the powerful megawatt turbines Nordex N77, N90, N100 and N82. As developers and manufacturers of wind turbines, we concentrate on our core competencies.

Spring 2012

Top Management in Poland: Frank Hoiting - Managing Director, Jakob Jacobus Wolters - President of the Board Contact data: Stefana Batorego 5/19, Szczecin, (Poland) tel. 91 813 67 08 info-polska@kde-energy.com

www.mitsui.com

Company Profile: In 2007, Mitsui was established in the European market. Projects in Poland: Zajączkowo 48 MW, Widzino 42 MW, Łosino 48 MW Advisory Partners: Cooperation with J-Power Reference numbers on map: 60, 63, 87

Natural Power Association Sp. z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Bałtyk Środkowy I Sp. z o.o., Bałtyk Środkowy II Sp. z o.o., Bałtyk Środkowy III Sp. z o.o., Baltex-Power S.A. Top Management in Poland: Artur Zdybicki - Member of the Board, 22 522 39 01 (artur.zdybicki@polenergia.pl), Michał Michalski - Member of the Board, 22 522 31 10, (michal.michalski@kulczykinvestments.com) Contact data: Krucza 24/26, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 522 39 00 www.polenergia.pl

Company Profile: Natural Power Association Sp. z o.o. is a part of KI Energy, which is the power

Norvento Polska Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Wojciech P. Cetnarski – Member of the Board Contact data: Emilii Plater Str. 53, WFC , Warsaw , (Poland ) tel. 22 370 61 80 wcetnarski@norvento.com www.norvento.com

Ownership: Norvento Group, Spain - private equity Company Profile: Investments in wind energy facilities Strategy in Poland: Project acquisition at the early stage of its completion, than development, construction, and long-term ownership Projects in Poland: Krasin Farm, and Kowalewo Farm, northern Poland Reference numbers on map: 84, 108, 140

Wind Energy in Poland

KDE Energy Polska

Novenergia II Top Management in Poland: Richard Mathieu - Prezes Zarządu Contact data: Al. Jerozolimskie 56C, Warsaw, (Poland)

27


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland Company Profile: Novenergia has established recently two new subsidiaries in Romania and Poland, and is studying projects in other countries. Novenergia is constituting its portfolio in Poland, including the successful purchase of a first fully licensed wind farm planned for construction in early 2012.

Nowa Energia SA Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: 3E Sp. z o.o., JM Energia Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Marek Trepka - Prezes Zarządu, Dariusz Rutkowski - Wiceprezes Zarządu, Marcin Bagiński - Projects Coordinator Contact data: Wiczlińska 4, Gdynia, (Poland) tel. Tel/fax 58 624 80 09 biuro@nowaenergiasa.pl

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

www.nowaenergiasa.pl

Company Profile: Company provides a complete investment process including: the design of wind farms from choice of location to obtain a building permit, construction of wind farms, commissioning and operating wind farm management. Building on the experience, competence and creativity of a team of several dozen people, we care about the constant and uniform analysis of the locational options, environmental, social, technological and infrastructural projects of wind farms. Strategy in Poland: In the coming years, the company plans to build individually-owned and operate wind parks with a total installed capacity of over 500 MW, and build and sell ready-made wind parks with a total capacity of over 500 MW. Projects in Poland: Now the company is preparing to build wind farms with a building permit with a total capacity of more than 100 MW, which should be realized in 2012-2013. (Wałdowo 1,1 MW, Darżyno 6 MW, Wicko 10 MW, Subkowy 8 MW, Liniewo 34 MW) Advisory Partners: Cooperation with leading European manufacturers of wind turbines, professional experts in the field of construction, supervision and operation of wind farms, as well as experienced legal and audit offices Other details: Plans to have IPO debut on NewConnect in 2012. Reference numbers on map: 72, 68, 92, 80, 66

PGE Energia Odnawialna Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: EW Kamieńsk, EW Resko, EW Gniewino, EO Baltica, EW Turów

28

Top Management in Poland: Bogdan Pilch- Prezes Zarządu, Norbert Sadek - Wiceprezes Zarządu, Michał Prażyński - Wiceprezes Zarządu Contact data: ul. Ogrodowa 59a , Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 433 13 00, 22 433 13 01 sekretariat@pgeeo.pl

PKN Orlen Contact data: ul. Chemików 7, Płock, (Poland) tel. 22 778 00 00 zarzad@orlen.pl Company Profile: PKN Orlen is targeting 1,000 MW in offshore wind farm projects.

www.pgeeo.pl

Ownership: PGE Polska Grupa Energetyczna S.A. Company Profile: Total installed capacity of generating units belonging to the Group (hydro and wind power) is approximately 391 MW, which translates to about 17.1% market share in the Polish power generation from renewable sources. PGE including Group companies created in 2010, about 1005 GWh of electricity in 2009 - 924 GWh in 2008 - 889 GWh In addition, in 2010, the Group sold the property rights arising from certificates of origin with a total value equivalent to approximately 475 GWh of production. Strategy in Poland: By 2015, the Group assumes power increase of approximately 1,000 MW, of which the vast majority is an increase of wind energy. Projects in Poland: Resko 90 MW, Gniewino 300 MW, Kąkolewo 18 MW, Turów 150 MW, Kowale Oleckie 100 MW, Polanów 160 MW, Chełm 12,5 MW. Firm plans 3 offshore farms of power 1000 MW Reference numbers on map: 73, 89, 109, 118, 145, 185, 194, 216, 17, 46

Polish Energy Partners Top Management in Poland: Zbigniew Prokopowicz - Prezes Zarządu, Michał Kozłowski - Wiceprezes Zarządu, Anna Kwarcińska - Wiceprezes Zarządu Contact data: ul. Wiertnicza 169, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 390 81 00 info@pepsa.com.pl www.pepsa.com.pl

Company Profile: The company specializes in developing, implementing and managing projects in the field of electricity and heat energy and fuel production. Projects orginally managed by the company produce more than 8% of the country’s renewable energy from wind and biomass combustion. Strategy in Poland: In 2012, PEP Group plans to start building two more wind farms with a total capacity of about 80 MW. Projects in Poland: Łukaszów 34 MW, Modlikowice 24 MW, Puck 22 MW Reference numbers on map: 85, 179, 180


Prokon New Energy Poland Sp. z o.o.

Renovatio Power Polska Sp. z o.o.

RWE Renewables Polska Sp. z o.o.

Top Management in Poland: Rodbertus Carsten Wilhelm - Prezes Zarządu, Mau Henning - Wiceprezes, Dohmann Ralf - Wiceprezes Contact data: ul. Budowlanych 64D, Gdańsk, (Poland) info@prokon-pl.net

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Hydro Inwestycje Sp. z o.o., Elektrownie Wiatrowe Leżajsk Sp. z o.o., Podkarpacie Wind Farms Sp.z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Michael Moczkowski - Member of the Board Contact data: Plac Trzech Krzyży 18, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 508 008 361 poland@renovatiopower.com

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: RWE Renewables Polska Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Robert Macias - Prezes RWE Renewables Polska Contact data: ul. Wybrzeże Kościuszkowskie 41, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 821 31 11 info@rwe.pl

www.rnvgroup.com

www.rwe.pl

Ownership: R.G. Renovatio Group Limited Company Profile: Development of wind farm projects and photovoltaic panels. Strategy in Poland: Currently we are developing wind farms of a total capacity of 200 MW whose end of construction is planned for 2015. In the next 3 years we are planning to commence other projects of a total capacity of 200 MW. Reference numbers on map: 121

Ownership: RWE Innogy GmbH Company Profile: RWE Renewables Polska is part of the RWE Poland group. Strategy in Poland: RWE Renewables Polska plans til 2015 to build wind farms of capacity 300 MW. Projects in Poland: In 2009 RWE built its first wind farm in Poland. First investment was Park Wiatrowy Suwałki – with 18 turbin, with each of 2,3 MW. In 2011 RWE activated next wind farms: Pieckach (16 x 2 MW) i Tychowie (15 x 2,3 MW). Reference numbers on map: 54, 114, 119, 124, 20, 96

Ownership: Prokon Holding GmbH & Co. Verwaltings Company Profile: The company invests in green energy, wind power and biogas extraction for more than 15 years, and owns more than 30 wind farms in Germany and some in Poland. Projects in Poland: Gniewino 8,4 MW, Swarożyn 16 MW, Subkowy 10 MW, Marusza 8 MW Reference numbers on map: 74, 88, 93, 90, 112, 111, 176, 149, 173, 192, 115, 65, 91, 97, 6

Relight CEE Sp. z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Relight CEE Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Marcello Deplano 724 868 114 (marcello.deplano@relight.it) Contact data: ul. Wilcza 22/1, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 724 868 114 info@relightcee.eu www.relightcee.eu

Ownership: Relight Energie S.r.l. Company Profile: Relight CEE is the creation of Relight Group with its headquarters in Milan, Italy. A leading operator on the Italian renewable energy market, Relight also gained extensive experience in International markets such as Turkey, USA, Kazakhstan. Relight CEE will benefit from the support of headquarters and will make large use of local Polish expertise in order to bring to realisation its pipeline of 800 MW. Strategy in Poland: Relight CEE is managing a wind pipeline of about 800 MW. Out of this total, circa 280 MW are in advanced development with construction expected to start in 2014. Additionally, Relight CEE is also building up a pipeline in mini-hydro for about 10 MW and is also looking into opportunities in biomass. Biszcza wind farm. Projects in Poland: Relight CEE’s pipeline is made of 20 projects with a size of 30 to 50 MW each Reference numbers on map: 213

RP Global Poland Sp. z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Wiatrowa Baltica Sp. z o.o., Megawatt Baltica Sp. z o.o., AWK Sp. z o.o., Megawind Polska Sp. z o.o. Top Management in Poland: Tomasz Zelek - Country Manager Contact data: Al. Wojska Polskiego 70, Szczecin, (Poland) tel. 91 432 25 80 hq.szczecin@rp-global.com www.rp-global.com

Ownership: RP Poland Development SLU Company Profile: RP Global is an Austrian company with 30 years experience in the field of renewable energy. It deals with hydroelectric projects and wind, from investment phase, ending with the finished project management. Currently, RP Global has hydro and wind power plants which are at various stages of development in many countries around the world, including Austria, Portugal, Spain, France, Croatia and Chile. Strategy in Poland: In Poland, the company has been present since 2005. Currently, RP Global plans wind farms with a total capacity of 600 MW; in the next five years will be realized mainly in Pomerania. Projects in Poland: In operation: Projekt Tychowo 50 MW, Projekt Wałcz 4,5 MW, Projekt Stramnica 4 MW. Planned: Kukinia 28 MW Reference numbers on map: 24, 29, 37, 52

Sevivon Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Windfarm Polska I, Windfarm Polska II, Windfarm Polska III, Windfarm Polska IV, Windfarm Polska V, Windfarm Polska VI, Windfarm Polska VII, ZOMAR Contact data: ul. Wojska Polskiego 24-26, Koszalin, (Poland) tel. Tel./Fax: 94 342 54 51 info@sevivon.pl www.sevivon.pl

Company Profile: WKN AG engaged in designing, financing, building and operating wind farms since 1991. Wind farms with a total capacity exceeding 1000 megawatts by WKN been realized in Germany and abroad. In addition to headquarters - the House of Future Energies in Husum, WKN also has subsidiaries and joint ventures in many countries of Europe and the USA.

Wind Energy in Poland

www.prokon-pl.net

Spring 2012

Developers of Wind Energy in Poland

Siłownie Wiatrowe S.A. Top Management in Poland: Wojciech Romaniszyn - Attorney-in-Fact (wrom@e-wind.eu), Wawrzyniec Romaniszyn - Business Manager (wawa@e-wind.eu) Contact data: Słowiańska, Ustka, (Poland) tel. 59 810 91 00

29


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland info@silowniewiatrowe.com www.e-wind.eu

Ownership: Wojciech Romaniszyn - the main shareholder Company Profile: Wind power and PV development and investment Strategy in Poland: mostly remote turbines with medium voltage grid connection, all projects as turn-key Projects in Poland: 300 MW located in Central and Southern Poland Advisory Partners: Iustitia - Kancelaria Prawno-Gospodarcza Co Ltd, Energy Invest Group Co. Ltd

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

Starke Wind Polska Sp. z o.o.

30

Top Management in Poland: Jan Starke - Prezes, Alicja Chilińska - Dyrektor, Peter Buchta - Prokurent Contact data: ul. Kosynierów Gdyńskich 51, Gorzów Wlkp., (Poland) tel. 95 737 06 66 biuro@starkewind.pl

Liga Ochrony Przyrody Zarząd Okręgu w Zielonej Górze. Reference numbers on map: 99, 116, 126, 128, 129, 137, 138, 139, 135, 142, 147

www.starkewind.pl

Ownership: Jan Starke - Prezes Company Profile: Preparing the concept of wind farm projects, the choice of location, perform all necessary studies and construction projects, obtaining the necessary permits, selection of a strategic investor, investment protection. Strategy in Poland: The objectives of the company Starke Wind: continuous improvement and modernization of methods and techniques, ongoing monitoring and analysis of market development of renewable energy, the active response in the market for renewable energy changes, Projects in Poland: Completed wind farms in Poland: Golice 38MW. Wind Farm projects with a final and binding building permit prepared by acting on the Polish market since 2000: Golice wind farm developed with Acciona Energy SA. Planned wind farms: Phase I - Rzepin - 68MW; Górzyca - 34MW. Phase II - Goraj - 22MW; Nowa Nied - 50MW, Sława - 82MW. Faza III - Bogdaniec - 30MW. Myszęcin - 22MW. Stypułów - 28MW. Szczaniec - 70MW. Wschowa - 80MW. Advisory Partners: Kancelaria Wardyńscy & Wspólnicy, Energoporjekt - Poznań S.A., Energoprojekt - Kraków S.A., Biuro Inżynierskie “WINDTEL”, Windhunter S.C., Autorskie Biuro Projektów M&G, Wind & Regen, Intergeo S.C., Zakład Ochrony Środowiska Dr Wołoszyn,

Taiga Mistral Top Management in Poland: Mikel Garay - Dyrektor Zarządzający Contact data: Słomińskiego 5/259, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 530 94 94 mikel.garay@taigamistral.com www.taigamistral.com

Ownership: Spanish banks and private investors. Management entity is Taiga Mistral Gestión SGECR, SA Company Profile: Private Equity fund investing in wind energy in Poland. Strategy in Poland: Buying well-prepared and executed wind farm projects from local developers. Then the completion of next phases of developments, acquisition financing, construction and operation of owned wind farms. Projects in Poland: 41,4 MW in operational phase in northern Poland. Investment goal: building 200 MW in years 2011 - 2013. Advisory Partners: Tundra Advisory Sp. z o.o. as the main and exclusive agent in Poland. Also the best consulting firms and law firms dealing with wind energy. Other details: The company is interested in buying wind projects 10 - 50 MW in an advanced stage or with a building permit.

Tauron Ekoenergia Top Management in Poland: Małgorzata Wójcik-Stasiak – Prezes Zarządu, Ryszard Turek – Wiceprezes Zarządu Contact data: ul. Obrońców Pokoju 2B, Jelenia Góra, (Poland) www.tauron-ekoenergia.pl

Ownership: Tauron Polska Energia Company Profile: Tauron Group has a second position on the Polish market in terms of energy production and sales for corporate clients and individuals. Projects in Poland: Wicko 40 MW, Marszewo 100 MW Reference numbers on map: 3, 69, 186

Terna Energy (Eolos Polska) Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Eolos Polska Top Management in Poland: Spyrou Georgios - Prezes Contact data: ul. Szpitalna 1, Warsaw, (Poland) Company Profile: The company is active in the renewable energy sector. Particularly relevant branch of activity is the construction of wind farms, small hydro, waste treatment and energy generation from biomass. Projects in Poland: Gorzkowice 12 MW, Krzyżanów 20 MW Reference numbers on map: 172, 195, 169, 190


Developers of Wind Energy in Poland

www.tundraadvisory.com

Company Profile: We are an official adviser to a Spanish investment fund, which has a potential 300 million euro investment intended only for investment in renewable energy sector in Poland. Currently, we advise the implementation of wind projects with a total capacity of over 120 MW. Advisory Partners: Taiga Mistral

Projects in Poland: At the present moment Vortex Windcon Sp. z o.o. Sp.k. (general contractor) is building three wind farms in Poland, but the company, which owns the farms is not included in Vortex Energy Group. Advisory Partners: Vestas, HSH Nordbank, White & Case, Clifford Chance Reference numbers on map: 163, 161, 171, 8, 117

Top Management in Poland: Mary Czulowski, Duarte Costa, Marek Kot Contact data: ul. Gorki 7, Poznań, (Poland) tel. 61 866 77 46 duarte.costa@westcoastenergy.pl www.westcoastenergy.co.uk

Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Vattenfall Poland Contact data: ul. Złota 59, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 587 50 00 sekretariat@vattenfall.pl

Ownership: Geraint Jewson Company Profile: West Coast Energy Polska is the polish subsidiary of the leading independent wind energy developer West Coast Energy Ltd based in Mold, North Wales. West Coast Energy Ltd is presently involved in developing hundreds of megawatts of wind power generation in the Polish and UK market where they have secured planning permission for a range of onshore and offshore wind farms totalling in excess of 670 MW. Strategy in Poland: Development of green field projects as well as other opportunities for joint venture cooperation with local partners through acquisition. Projects in Poland: A total of 21 projects with an installed capacity of about 550 MW currently in diferent stages of development. Advisory Partners: Atmos Consulting, Double-K Consulting, Hałabura Góżdż & Partnerzy, CMS Cameron Mckenna, Ernest & Young, EM&CA, Metropolia Satini.

Strategy in Poland: Vattenfall’s assets gradually taken over by Tauron. Projects in Poland: Zagórze 30 MW Reference numbers on map: 4

Vortex Polska Management Sp. z o.o. Vortex Polska Sp.k. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: Windpark Sniatowo Management GmbH EW Śniatowo Sp.k., Goldap 2007 Management GmbH EW Gołdap Sp.k., Windpark Ino 1 Management GmbH INO 1 Sp.k., Windpark Dobrzyn 2008 Management GmbH EW Dobrzyń Sp.k., Vortex Windcon Sp. z o.o. Sp.k. - General constructor Top Management in Poland: Till Jeske, Adam Pantkowski Contact data: ul. Malczewskiego 26, Szczecin, (Poland) tel. 91 431 53 80 info@vortex-energy.de www.vortex-energy.de

Ownership: Vortex Polska Management Sp. z o.o. Company Profile: The area of our activity is planning, financing, implementation and management of projects related to wind energy. Strategy in Poland: The main objective of the companies belonging to Vortex Energy Group is the ecological, safe and economical production of electric energy.

WindPower Poland Contact data: Dąbrowskiego 7, Poznań, (Poland) Reference numbers on map: 141

West Coast Energy Polska Sp. z o.o.

Vattenfall (Tauron)

www.vattenfall.pl

Company Profile: Australia-based Wind Prospect is one of the most successful independent renewable energy developers in the world, and has played a major role in the development of wind energy onshore and offshore internationally.

WindStrom Polska Energia Innowacyjna Sp.z o.o. Subsidiary firms specializing in Wind Energy: WindStrom Unternehmensgruppe Top Management in Poland: Joachim Mrotzek - Prezes Zarządu, Wilfried Glander - Board member, Steffen Warneboldt - Board member Contact data: Garbary 95/C71, Poznań, (Poland) tel. 61 824 51 15 info@windstrom.pl www.windstrom.pl

Ownership: WindStrom Unternehmensgruppe Company Profile: Development of wind farms. Strategy in Poland: Companies that belong to Group WindStrom design, build and operate wind farms since the early 90’s in Germany and Europe - including WindStrom France, Italy, Poland and Bulgaria. Its area covers the technical and commercial management. Reference numbers on map: 7

Spring 2012

Top Management in Poland: Grzegorz Skarżyński - Dyrektor Inwestycyjny, Aneta Pochroń - Dyrektor Techniczny Contact data: ul. Słomińskiego 5/259, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 530 94 94 tundra@tundraadvisory.com

Wind Energy in Poland

Tundra Advisory

Wind Prospect Polska Top Management in Poland: Bruce Allan - Construction & Operations Director, Richard Barker - Group Director, John Brereton - Dyrektor Contact data: ul. Miła 6, Warsaw, (Poland) tel. 22 498 17 70 biuro@windprospect.com www.pl.windprospect.com

Ownership: Wind Prospect Group

31


Infrastructure

Entities applying for connection sources to the National Transmission Network

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

#

Location

MW

Applicant

Date of the connection agreement

Date of the assessment

1

Dargoleza

240

Megawatt Polska Sp. z o.o.

2004-12-24

2007-07-18

2012

2

Żarnowiec

90

Elektrownia Wiatrowa Gniewino Sp. z o.o.

2007-07-04

2010-03-10

2013-01-31

3

Piła Krzewina

120

Megawatt NW Sp. z o.o.

2007-10-30

2010-03-08

2014-01-30

4

Gdańsk Błonia

190

WIND Sp. z o.o.

2008-04-28

2011-06-20

2014-06-30

5

Słupsk Wierzbięcino

320

EWG Słupsk Sp. z o.o.

2008-07-04

2010-08-20

2014-04-20

6

Dunowo

250

Wind Invest Sp. z o.o.

2008-08-07

2010-06-14

2013-12-31

7

Siekierki

480

PGNiG TERMIKA S.A.

2008-09-17

2009-11-20

2016

8

Kozienice

1000

Elektrownia Kozienice S.A.

2008-10-06

2008-12-23

2015-07-01

9

Dunowo

160

EWG Energia Sp. z o.o.

2008-11-26

2011-05-16

2014

10

Słupsk Wierzbięcino

240

Green Power Polska Sp. z o.o.

2008-11-26

2010-08-20

2014-04-20

11

Żarnowiec

111

WINDCOM Sp. z o.o.

2009-03-30

2010-05-05

2013-04-30

12

Krajnik

260

Wiatromill Sp. z o.o.

2009-04-16

2011-10-25

2014-12-31

13

Puławy

830

Zakłady Azotowe Puławy S.A.

2009-06-05

2012-01-12

2018-06-30

14

Ostrołęka

1000

ENERGA Elektrownie Ostrołęka S.A.

2009-06-29

2010-02-02

2016-06-30

15

Dunowo

250

ENERTRAG A.G.

2009-07-27

16

Krajnik

500

ENERTRAG A.G.

2009-07-27

17

Żarnowiec

45

Stigma Sp. z o.o.

2009-07-27

2011-08-18

2016-12-31

18

Skawina

420

Elektrownia Skawina S.A.

2009-08-10

2011-09-28

2016-09-30

19

Włocławek Azoty

500

Polski Koncern Naftowy ORLEN S.A.

2009-09-04

2010-03-09

2014-08-01

20

Dobrzeń

1800

PGE Górnictwo i Energetyka Konwencjonalna S.A.

2009-10-01

2010-03-30

2016

21

Groszowice

150

Elektrownie Wiatrowe Nysa Sp. z o.o.

2009-10-08

2012-01-04

2015-12-31

22

Słupsk Wierzbięcino

100

EVIVA LĘBORK Sp. z o.o.

2009-10-08

2012-01-03

2013-12-31

23

Stalowa Wola

422

Elektrocieplownia Stalowa Wola S.A.

2009-10-26

2011-06-17

2014-09-30

24

Czarna

330

EKO-PLAN Gustaw Brzyszcz & Wojciech Romaniszyn Sp. J.

2010-01-13

25

Olsztyn Mętki

96

ECO-WIND CONSTRUCTION S.A.

2010-01-13

2011-12-22

2016-09-30

26

Płock

912

Elektrownia Połaniec S.A. - Grupa GDF SUEZ Energia Polska

2010-01-13

2012-04-12

2016-12-31

27

Mikułowa

300

GEO Mikułowa I Sp. z o.o.

2010-02-22

2012-03-27

2017-12-30

28

Mikułowa

150

GEO Mikułowa I Sp. z o.o.

2010-02-22

2012-03-27

2017-12-30

29

Elektrownia Łęczna

766

Elektrownia Połaniec S.A. - Grupa GDF SUEZ Energia Polska

2010-02-23

30

Włocławek Azoty

456

Elektrownia Połaniec S.A. - Grupa GDF SUEZ Energia Polska

2010-02-23

31

Blachownia

250

Elektrownie Wiatrowe Lubrza Sp. z o.o.

2010-03-08

32

Byczyna

910

TAURON Wytwarzanie S.A.

2010-03-08

2012-04-12

2016-12-31

33

Gdańsk Błonia

132

Windfarm Polska III Sp. z o.o.

2010-03-08

2012-03-27

2015-10-15

34

Mikułowa

480

PGE Górnictwo i Energetyka Konwencjonalna S.A.

2010-03-08

2012-03-30

2017-10-30

35

Ostrów

250

DOMREL BUI Sp. z o.o.

2010-03-08

2012-03-29

2018-01-31

36

Pelplin

2000

Elektrownia Północ Sp. z o.o.

2010-03-08

2012-02-03

2018-11-30

37

Wielopole

910

Elektrownia Rybnik S.A.

2010-03-08

2012-02-16

2017-10-30

38

Ząbkowice

160

Elektrownie Wiatrowe Wilamowa Sp. z o.o.

2010-03-08

39

Pelplin

80

Radan Nordwind Sp. z o.o.

2010-03-09

40

Gdańsk Błonia

900

Elektrociepłownie Wybrzeże S.A.

2010-03-10

2012-04-26

2020-07-31

41

Kromolice

250

Wind Field Wielkopolska Sp. z o.o.

2010-03-10

2012-03-09

2019-01-30

42

Mikułowa

330

Mikułowa Windfarm Sp. z o.o.

2010-03-10

43

Stanisławów

250

Wind Field Korytnica Sp. z o.o.

2010-03-10

44

Mikułowa

50

AGRO&EKOPLAN mgr inż. Gustaw Brzyszcz

2010-11-25

45

Grudziądz Węgrowo

874

ENERGA INVEST S.A.

2010-11-25

46

Piła Krzewina

105

Alfa Sp. z o.o.

2010-12-27

2011-10-10

2015-04-01

47

Świebodzice

108,1

EWG Udanin Sp. z o.o.

2010-12-30

48

Połaniec

205

Elektrownia Połaniec S.A. - Grupa GDF SUEZ Energia Polska

2011-01-10

2012-04-03

2012-10-31

49

Dobrzeń

150

Altiplano Sp. z o.o.

2011-01-28

2012-03-01

2014-10-31

50

Żydowo

166

Biały Bór Farma Wiatrowa Sp. z o.o.

2011-02-01

51

Gdańsk Błonia

456

ENERGA INVEST S.A.

2011-07-04

52

Olsztyn Mętki

50,6

Polskie Farmy Wiatrowe Sp. z o.o.

2011-08-19

53

Krajnik

864

PGE Górnictwo i Energetyka Konwencjonalna S.A.

2011-10-03

54

Pasikurowice

425

FORTUM Power And Heat Polska Sp. z o.o.

2011-12-23

55

Płock

600

Polski Koncern Naftowy ORLEN S.A.

2012-01-23

56

Olsztyn Mętki

120

Nowa Energia Olsztyn Mętki Sp. z o.o.

2012-04-16

57

Piła Krzewina

15 *

Relax Wind Park I Sp. z o.o.

2012-04-30

Type of instalation: OZE – Renewable Energy Source, KJW - Conventional Energy Source; * Power increased; PSE Operator S.A. – according to law – updates listing every quarter.

32

Connection deadline (acc. to application)


Wind Energy News

IKEA leads manufacturers to wind energy “We are not specialists in wind”, said Kadnar. “Wind farms are a great opportunity for IKEA to reduce our carbon dioxide footprint, and Poland has good potential for more wind energy development.” The purchase was paid for from IKEA’s financial resources and involved no bank or debt financing, offering further evidence that

“I’m sure that this is not our last wind farm deal in Poland”, said Walter Kadnar, Retail Manager IKEA Poland. The previously-announced deal represents a major commitment by IKEA to wind energy in Poland – the firm paid 87 million euro to Martifer for the three wind farms. Martifer sold two existing wind farms (Bukowsko and Łęki Dukielskie), in southeast Poland with capacity of 28 MW, and agreed to sell a third wind farm in Rymanów (26 MW). The sale of the Rymanow project will be concluded after the park is built and connected to the grid in 2013. Yet Kadnar is quick to point out that IKEA intends to generate 100% of its electricity needs from a broad range of renewable energy sources, not only wind. “Our main strategy is to “furnish the world” in a sustainable way”, he said. The investment in the two operational wind farms will enable the production of electricity approximately equivalent to the needs of 16 IKEA stores, and follows on earlier investments in solar panels on roof space, co-generation of heat and electricity and other energy efficiency measures in Poland.

IKEA has made similar wind farm investments in Germany, Sweden, France, and Great Britain. The three wind farms will generate electricity corresponding to about 50% of IKEA group electricity use in Poland. “The purchasing of wind farms in Poland is the next step toward the realization of one of our long-term environmental objectives to use renewable electricity, only”, said Kadnar. In addition to the wind farms the company is also investing in photovoltaic, solar panels. Currently three IKEA stores in Poland – in Łódź, Gdańsk and Kraków, benefit from the solar panels on their roofs to heat the water. In addition the IKEA store in Łódź and distribution centre in Jarosty use ground heat exchangers in combination with heating pumps for air condition. In the industry group investments are made into co-generation of heat and electricity to reduce the need for electricity from the grid and optimize energy efficiency in general. Thanks to these investments IKEA Group reduces carbon dioxide emission caused by its activities. IKEA is relying on the technical knowledge of Martifer to operate the wind farms.

wind farm buyers are increasingly well-capitalized firms and utilities, with a long-term perspective and without the need to rely on ■ debt financing to consummate a deal.

IKEA: “Martifer wanted to sell, and we wanted to buy” “Martifer’s strategic plan points to a reduction of assets in the area of wind energy generation,” Chief Financial Officer Mario Couto said. Martifer’s capacity in operating wind energy parks is 33.6 megawatts and it has 68 megawatts under construction in Romania, he said. “With the slowdown in growth in the wind sector, this business has become only a segment of our metal construction business,” Couto said. “In terms of renewable energy, Martifer is focused on the solar photovoltaic sector.” Martifer plans to cut debt to about 240 million euros in 2013 from 401 million euros at the end of the first half of 2011. It’s seeking growth in areas other than wind energy, including contracts for work on soccer stadiums in Brazil.

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

The purchase by IKEA of three wind farms in late 2011 may signal a growing trend by Polish manufacturers and heavy consumers of energy to get more of their energy from renewable sources, and the emergence of new competition for buyers of wind farms.

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Offshore Wind Energy

First Offshore windfarms given approval – total capacity 4.5 GW

Wind Energy in Poland

Spring 2012

In April, the Ministry of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy granted five permits for offshore wind projects after it received 59 applications.

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Offshore Wind Investments hampered by Ministry of Environment So far 59 applications for Offshore Investments to construct platforms according to the Sea Area Act have been filed with the Ministry of Infrastructure. According to law, the applications have to be consulted with other Ministries, e.g. the Ministry for Environment. So far, the Ministry of Environment has issued a positive opinion in only four cases. According to the research maps issued by the State owned Polish Geological Institute PGI in the areas in question – mainly around the Slupsk Bank and the Middle Bank - there might be resources of oil, (shale) gas and composite, so the construction of platforms may handicap the future exploitation. However, many oil and gas fields have not yet been mapped and undertaking reliable seismic research for them in the presence of offshore wind farms will make that generally difficult. On the other hand, there is still enough time to undertake proper research until the first offshore wind farms expected to be built. While in certain ways wind parks and oil and gas production operations may get in each other’s way, there is much potential synergy in the various interested parties working together. The creation of an offshore electricity network will offer opportunities to the oil and gas industry, for instance by the generation of electricity with gas from fields, the pressure of which is now so low that it is no longer profitable to compress and transport it to land. The electricity generated would then simply be delivered to the North Sea electricity grid. If there is no wind, then residual gas could come to the rescue. Finally, the possibility of extracting and transporting gas from low pressure fields with the help of electrical compressors is also on the agenda. The necessary electricity would be supplied by wind farms. Thanks to offshore wind energy, offshore gas installations could produce gas in an optimally environmentally friendly manner. (Source: Debenedetti Szczesniak)

Unofficially, the wind industry believes only four licenses for offshore wind farms are likely to be given the go-ahead from the infrastructure ministry once it has taken the environment ministry’s views into account. These licenses are likely to go to PGE EO, PKN Orlen SA and Kulczyk Investment - the first two state controlled. Power company PGE won permits to build three wind farm projects on the Baltic Sea with a combined potential capacity of 3.45 GW, which would put PGE in the lead in the development of Poland’s offshore wind industry. PGE believes it can build as much as 1GW of capacity in its zones, and is understood to be in discussions with Areva regarding a partnership on the projects. The Ministry declined to reveal the names of the other two companies that won the permits, although speculation is that one includes EDP. Investors will have six years, with an option to extend by two, to build wind farms. Building one megawatt of offshore capacity is estimated to cost 3 million euros, which is is about double the price of coalfired energy generation. Further concessions ran into resistance from the Ministry of Environment, which is opposed to most offshore wind farm locations because it says they interfere with future shale gas exploitation. Despite a recent analysis that radically reduced Poland’s estimated reserves, the government is reportedly forestalling any further offshore projects until it better understands its shale-gas potential. For almost a year the infrastructure ministry has been reviewing applications from 59 investors that are competing for 40 projects in the Polish Baltic Sea. The investors, with a potential 20GW pipeline of work, now face a serious threat from the potential of shale gas. According to the environment ministry and the State Geological Institute most of the area is rich in shale gas and reserves of aggregates and it says the area should therefore be excluded from offshore wind activity. Bogdan Gutkowski, the president of the Polish Offshore Wind Energy Society confirmed the problem was serious.

Bilfinger to make Offshore foundations with Polish partners Bilfinger Berger, a German builder, has started a 50 million-euro joint venture with two Polish companies to make foundations for offshore wind turbines as demand in the North and Baltic Seas grows. Bilfinger Berger will make steel support structures for 80 turbines a year from 2014 at the Gryfia production site in the Polish port of Szczecin. It will work with Crist SA, a Gdansk-based steel construction company, and MARS, a stateowned investment fund. The Gryfia facility will employ more than 400 people and process 80,000 metric tons of steel a year, according to the statement. Bilfinger Berger owns a 62.5 percent share in the venture, Crist has 25 percent and MARS the remainder.

“Currently we are considering what steps to take to solve it,” he said. The shale gas and aggregates problem occurred unexpectedly. Two months ago the environment ministry said it had no objections to the locations of the proposed offshore wind farms, but the State Geological Institute’s findings changed all that. The Institute has concluded that the Polish Baltic shelf contains between 14.8 billion to 371 billion cubic metres of shale gas. It is thought that some of the companies applying for offshore wind permits, upset with the government’s change of view, are planning to issue a formal complaint to the European Commission. Investors have some hope that the environment ministry’s opinion is not binding on the infrastructure ministry. Mikolaj Karpinski, a spokesman for the infrastructure ministry, said: “It is possible to designate areas for wind farms where no conflict will occur.” What is also clear is that the Polish government had not planned for such a big expansion of offshore wind farms in the Baltic Sea and the necessary grid investments to support them. Conspiracy theorists note that the concessions so far have been awarded only to Polish firms (of which two are indeed majority-owned by the government), and that the unwritten government strategy is to force foreign companies with offshore experience to team up with Polish utilities to build out major offshore wind farms. Given the government’s current objectives to privatize both PKN Orlen and PGE, the strategy would also provide a financial ■ boost in the privatization process.


Offshore Wind Energy

Spring 2012

Układ współrzędnych: WGS-84 Odwzorowanie: PUWG 1992 źródła danych: BalticGisPortal, BHMW, Ministerstwo Środowiska, Ministerstwo Infrastruktury, www.lotos.pl/korporacyjny/grupa_kapitalowa/petrobaltic/strona/7041, Urząd Marszałkowski Woj. Pomorskiego, Generalna Dyrekcja Ochrony Środowiska, materiały Instytutu Morskiego w Gdańsku

Wind Energy in Poland

Legenda Wyłączna Strefa Ekonomiczna strefa sporna !

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granica morza terytorialnego morska granica województw granice urzędów morskich izobaty (co 10 m) strefa rozgraniczenia ruchu

Instalacje techniczne !! !! !! !!

kabel energetyczny kabel telekomunikacyjny (nieczynny) planowany kabel telekomunikacyjny kabel telekomunikacyjny rurociąg obszar ochrony platform bufor dla instalacji technicznych (1 km)

Obszary górnicze obszar wydobycia ropy i gazu planowane obszary wydobycia ropy i gazu planowane rurociągi

Obszary koncesji koncesje na wydobycie ropy naftowej i współwystępującego gazu koncesje na poszukiwanie i rozpoznanie kopalin

Obszary chronione NATURA 2000 (siedliska) 55 5

NATURA 2000 (ptaki) redy, kotwicowiska trasy nawigacyjne wysypiska akweny militarne

SLU-01

potencjalne lokalizacje morskich farm wiatrowych

Batymetria [m] -120

-90

-60

-30

0m

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Wind Energy Poland  

Directory of all wind farms and wind developers in Poland, as well as articles about legal changes, market trends, industry leaders and full...