Philanthropy 2021

Page 1

BIV MAGAZINE

PHILANTHROPY THE

NOVEMBER 2021

INDIGENOUS INVESTMENT CHANGING THE NARRATIVE

ISSUE

DONORADVISED FUNDS THEIR PROS, CONS AND VALUE

STEAM MENTORSHIP NON-PROFIT-DRIVEN CONNECTION

INSIDE

A win-win for charities and the planet WCPD’S PETER NICHOLSON ON THE VALUE OF CRITICAL MINERALS AND FLOW-THROUGH SHARES

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 1

2021-10-27 9:22 AM


SPONSORED CONTENT

Invest in your community with donor advised funds WHAT WE DO

Y

ear-end is a time when British Columbians consider how to give back to community. If you want to take your giving to the next level, a donor advised fund is your best choice. How Donor Advised Funds Work When you establish a donor advised fund, you are issued a tax receipt right away for the amount you give – a minimum $10,000 contribution at Vancouver Foundation. The money is then invested, with all gains tax-sheltered. You guide where grants from your fund go. Over your lifetime, a donor advised fund ends up granting more to community than its capital. For example, we have a fund that started in 1951 with an initial contribution of $4,000, which has granted out more than $2.5 million as of today. Why a Donor Advised Fund Aside from the instant tax benefit, you may start a donor advised fund to: r 4VQQPSU FNQMPZFF HJWJOH r 1BTT PO UIF WBMVFT PG QIJMBOUISPQZ UP ZPVS family r .FNPSJBMJ[F B MPWFE POF .PTU JOWFTUNFOU ñSNT BOE CBOLT DBO offer a donor advised fund, but consider choosing your local community foundation for our unique benefits: r -POH UFSN XBZ UP HJWF CBDL

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 2

Above: President & CEO Kevin McCort. People with donor advised funds helped Vancouver Foundation grant out almost $115 million in 2020.

r -PXFS GFFT TP NPSF PG ZPVS NPOFZ HPFT to community r -PXFS NJOJNVN DPOUSJCVUJPO PG to get started A Community of Philanthropists At Vancouver Foundation, our community of philanthropists helped meet the spike in community need during the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2020, donor advised funds helped us grant almost $115 million. i1FPQMF EVH JO BOE XFOU CFZPOE &WFO though the pandemic forced people into

isolation, so many people were able to still help their community,” says Kevin .D$PSU 1SFTJEFOU BOE $&0 PG 7BODPVWFS Foundation. As BC charts its post-pandemic SFDPWFSZ .D$PSU BEET UIBU OPX JT B time of opportunity to make long-term investments into our community’s future.

Start a donor advised fund today with Vancouver Foundation. Tel: 604.688.2204 | Email: info@ vancouverfoundation.ca | Learn more: vancouverfoundation.ca/give

2021-10-27 3:43 PM


Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 3

2021-10-27 9:22 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

4 | BIV MAGAZINE: PHILANTHROPY ISSUE 2021 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

CONTENTS

6

BIV MAGAZINE

PHILANTHROPY THE

NOVEMBER 2021

INDIGENOUS INVESTMENT CHANGING THE NARRATIVE

ISSUE

DONORADVISED FUNDS THEIR PROS, CONS AND VALUE

STEAM MENTORSHIP NON-PROFIT-DRIVEN CONNECTION

INSIDE

A win-win for charities and the planet WCPD’S PETER NICHOLSON ON THE VALUE OF CRITICAL MINERALS AND FLOW-THROUGH SHARES

PRESIDENT: Alvin Brouwer EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER; VICE-PRESIDENT, GLACIER MEDIA: Kirk LaPointe EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Hayley Woodin DESIGN: Petra Kaksonen PRODUCTION: Rob Benac DIRECTOR, SALES AND MARKETING : Pia Huynh SALES MANAGER: Laura Torrance ADVERTISING SALES: Blair Johnston, Corinne Tkachuk, Chris Wilson ADMINISTRATOR: Katherine Butler Philanthropy is published by BIV Magazines, a division of BIV Media Group, 303 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C. V5Y 1J6, 604-688-2398, fax 604-688-1963, biv.com. Copyright 2021 Business in Vancouver Magazines. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or incorporated into any information retrieval system without permission of BIV Magazines. The publishers are not responsible in whole or in part for any errors or omissions in this publication. ISSN 1205-5662

CONTENT

22

5

EMBEDDING PHILANTHROPY IN BUSINESS Deborah Harford on the Legible Foundation

6 RECONCILING INDIGENOUS INVESTMENT Changing the narrative and having impact 9 QUELLING FUNDRAISING FEARS Advice for raising funds during COVID-19 18 FLOW-THROUGH SHARES WCPD’s Peter Nicholson on their value

Publications Mail Agreement No.: 40069240. Registration No.: 8876. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Circulation Department: 303 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C. V5Y 1J6 Email: subscribe@biv.com Cover photo: Angelina Bambina/Getty Images

21 STEAM MENTORSHIP CRITICAL Connection can help diversity challenges 22 DONOR-ADVISED FUNDS Why DAFs are popular and what to know 26 INFLUENTIAL INDUSTRY LEADERS Recognizing non-profit leadership

23

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 4

2021-10-27 9:22 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

| 5

EMBEDDING PHILANTHROPY IN BUSINESS DNA Vancouver startup launches philanthropic foundation as core part of its business

DEBORAH HARFORD

The need to invest in a sustainable, just future for all has never been more urgent. COVID-19 and environmental crises are disproportionately impacting those suffering the injustices of racialization, colonization, poverty and other systemic issues. Corporate commitment to philanthropic action has a crucial role to play. Vancouver-based startup Legible.com has risen to the challenge by embedding philanthropy into its DNA. The first company to make a browser-based reading and publishing platform accessible to anyone anywhere with an internet-enabled device, Legible’s goal is to “democratize, decentralize, decolonize and decarbonize” the publishing industry. The proactive establishment of its foundation will support achievement of this ambitious goal, and will leverage Legible’s specialization in rich media and online publishing to support literacy initiatives and the amplification of marginalized voices. As CEO of the Legible Foundation, I bring years of experience in sustainable resilience-building to this inspiring project. Over the coming months, we will develop a strategy for launch in 2022 based on five pillars: youth; women and girls; biodiversity; climate resilience; and JEDI (justice, equity, diversity and inclusion). We will implement activities in two streams spanning global to local: Literacy Plus, designed to make information available by and for those who most need it; and community-led approaches addressing pressing societal needs. For example, we hope to help people in rural and remote areas develop resources that support climate resilience, and support Indigenous publishers to create stunning digital content featuring their languages. The foundation’s first action, in support of truth and reconciliation under our JEDI pillar, was to become a

member of the Indigenous-led Circle on Philanthropy, which educates on Indigenous approaches to philanthropy and mentors development of reciprocal funding approaches. This is particularly important as past philanthropic approaches have sometimes proven ineffective. Those who most need help have often not had the capacity to fulfill requirements to access support, and the sustained multi-year funding based on respectful relationships that is crucial for genuine impact has been hard to find. Our work to build the foundation is also informing Legible’s internal practices, including development of key performance indicators that reflect the concepts within Doughnut Economics, and support the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Investing in doing good is a win-win. Research shows that, in 2020-2021, more consumers cared about companies’ support of people during COVID-19 (56%) than whether products were high quality (49%), and 41% cared about companies’ support of social causes. Employees increasingly want to work for organizations that reflect their values. Done right, corporate philanthropy has the potential to provide brand-positive benefits, as well as marketing opportunities that feed success while supporting a virtuous cycle that funnels profit back into doing good. Like the nurturing Mother Trees in the wood-wide web identified by Dr. Suzanne Simard, Legible aspires to continually contribute benefits to our globally networked world. Integration of philanthropy into the structure of companies holds promise as a key strategy in the 21st century. More bluntly, given the challenges we face and the influential role of corporations, it is no longer optional. É

Deborah Harford is head of philanthropy at Legible.com and CEO of the Legible Foundation.

INTEGRATION OF PHILANTHROPY INTO THE STRUCTURE OF COMPANIES HOLDS PROMISE AS A KEY STRATEGY IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 5

2021-10-27 9:22 AM


RECONCILING INDIGENOUS INVESTMENT Social impact funds and specialized consultancies are changing the narrative of Indigenous philanthropy

TRAVELCOUPLES/GETTY IMAGES

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 6

2021-10-27 9:22 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

| 7

PARTNER CONTENT

THERE’S A MULTIPLIER EFFECT THAT HAPPENS WHEN ENTREPRENEURS FIND INVESTORS WHO ARE ALIGNED WITH THEIR VALUES j Bobbie Racette Founder Virtual Gurus

JEFF TODD

For the longest time, Bobbie Racette, an Indigenous entrepreneur, felt like nobody understood her. A fter being laid off by an oil and gas company in Alberta, she had $300 in her pocket, but big dreams – to launch a virtual assistant platform and revolutionize how businesses operate. So, like many entrepreneurs, she dove in head first and hit the pavement, seeking others that shared her vision. “I approached and was rejected by 170 investors over the first four years of the business,” says Racette, who is of Cree-Métis background. “I had to take a step back from pitching high-tech investors and re-evaluate my audience.” As a young Indigenous entrepreneur with no previous experience in the field, she soon discovered the conventional marketplace didn’t align with her circumstances and worldview. That is, until she met Raven Indigenous Capital Partners, a Vancouver-based social impact fund focused on understanding, uplifting and investing in Indigenous entrepreneurs. Using a sustainable, values-driven approach, the firm is concerned not just with profit, but also poverty reduction, community resilience and the development of an Indigenous middle class. “A lot of doors that are open to others are not open to Indigenous entrepreneurs,” explains Paul Lacerte, managing director at Raven. “Access to capital that is culturally safe, patient and fairly flexible, and comes with support, was a key step missing to help accelerate the Indigenous social economy. So we decided to take a run at setting up Canada’s first Indigenous-owned venture capital firm and act as financial intermediary and translator for people that want to lean into reconciliation.” Today, Racette’s business Virtual Gurus is booming, and boasts more than two-dozen employees. According to Lacerte, the business has increased in value six-fold since Raven’s investment. P rinciples over profit. Value beyond dollars. However you wish to put it, Racette and Raven represent a renewed, growing interest in Indigenous-led causes and organizations. The issue came into sharp focus in May of this year, when the bodies of 215 children were confirmed on the site of the Kamloops Indian Residential School. The confirmation set off an avalanche of sadness, anger and introspection across Canada, as hundreds of other unmarked graves continue to be found throughout the country. Meanwhile, Canada is fresh off its first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in September, with Canadians across the country wearing orange to reflect and remember those who died, and those who continue to be impacted by the legacy of residential schools. Many Canadians were left wondering: beyond acknowledging the past, what can I do to help? How can I make a meaningful

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 7

Bobbie Racette is the founder of the virtual assistant platform Virtual Gurus • SUBMITTED

impact? Put simply, where do I start? It was a question Lacerte and his partners asked themselves when they first started Raven. He says they had no idea how many investment-worthy projects would be out there, let alone investor appetite. R aven has now answered that question, resoundingly. On January 31, the firm closed their first Impact Investment Fund worth $25 million and offering a 6% to 8% return over a 10-year fund life. Lacerte says the investment appeals to those seeking a “blended return” of appreciation and impact in the Indigenous space. Next summer, Raven is planning a second fund in the $50 million to $100 million range. According to Lacerte, the firm has discovered a “substantial appetite” in both Canada and the United States. For investors looking to get involved, Raven provides that secret sauce of cultural understanding and business acumen. “There’s a multiplier effect that happens when entrepreneurs find investors who are aligned with their values,” Racette adds. “If we empower Indigenous entrepreneurs with capital and expertise for success, we’ll have a lasting impact on the strength of our communities.” While Raven is focused on impact through entrepreneurism, others are concerned with empowering Indigenous-led

2021-10-27 9:26 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

8 | BIV MAGAZINE: PHILANTHROPY ISSUE 2021 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

PARTNER CONTENT

causes, and encouraging donors, foundations and companies to direct funds to where they are most needed. K ris A rch ie, CEO of T he C i rc le on Ph i l a nthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada, points out that actual dollars rarely it make directly into the hands of Indigenous-led or Indigenous-informed organizations. Measuring the Circle, a study completed in both 2 01 4 a n d 2 017, fo u n d Kris Archie leads The Circle that less than 1% of philon Philanthropy and Aboriginal anthropic dollars go toPeoples in Canada as the wa rds I nd igenous-led organizations. organization’s CEO • SUBMITTED “ We a r e w o rk i n g against broad stereotypes that issues related to Indigenous Peoples are not the problems of Canadians,” explains Archie, who lives in British Columbia and joined the national organization in July 2017. “The thinking has been: Indigenous issues are their issues, or the responsibility with them lays with federal government. So I think it is not just about the settler philanthropic sector catching up. I think it is also the Canadian narrative about Indigenous Peoples in this country is rife with stereotypes about Indigenous people always asking for another handout.” The Circle, as the name implies, includes an intimate collection of members that seek to break down these stereotypes, while promoting more giving and bridge building with Indigenous-led and Indigenous-informed groups. The organization offers learning, training and workshops for a broad range of members, from the Toronto Foundation, to Home Depot Canada, to PetSmart. The second audience is Indigenous-led and Indigenous-informed organizations. “A unique feature of The Circle is they provide us with a lot of guidance on how they want to relate with settler philanthropic institutions and our work is to facilitate those relationships,” she explains. Although listening is important, Archie isn’t interested in commissioning more studies to confirm what her organization knows – Indigenous-led and Indigenous-informed organizations desperately need funding. Support them, she says, and get out of the way. Archie believes too much weight is often placed on the need to understand

Indigenous issues and causes. In other words, the time for action is now. Archie also recommends taking the time to understand whose land and territory you are on. Next, think local: consider supporting your local Friendship Centre, for example, with 125 of them spread out among urban communities across the country. Research other local Indigenous-led or Indigenous-informed organizations in your area, such as the Ontario Indigenous Youth Partnerships Program, where all the grant decision making and programming is done by Indigenous youth. “The balance is to do your listening on your own,” she says. “And then act. And you don’t need to do all the learning in the world to act. There are undeniable issues and causes that need to be supported. You don’t need to know every piece of data and research to understand that not having drinking water is a problem. You don’t need to know how many more children’s bodies are going to be discovered beside Indian residential schools to recognize that is harmful.” Lacerte, from Raven, feels the philanthropic community – particularly the community foundations in Canada – have been “a patchwork of progressively minded individuals and surprisingly conservatively minded folks.” While acknowledging that government spending and donations will always have their place, he believes Canada needs “an avalanche of private capital into the innovation space” to replace the stereotypes and broken narratives around Indigenous communities. “We have armies of brilliant, young Indigenous people and I think all of those old paradigms – ‘Oh it is so complicated to work with the natives, we are throwing good money after bad’ – and all those broken narratives are being replaced by surprise after surprise of excellence and innovation and capacity,” Lacerte says. Regardless of the approach, Indigenous leaders of all stripes can agree – the time for real action is now. É

WE DECIDED TO TAKE A RUN AT SETTING UP CANADA’S FIRST INDIGENOUS-OWNED VENTURE CAPITAL FIRM AND ACT AS FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARY AND TRANSLATOR FOR PEOPLE THAT WANT TO LEAN INTO RECONCILIATION j Paul Lacerte Managing director, Raven Indigenous Capital Partners Raven Indigenous Capital Partners

WHERE TO START 1. DON’T JUST LISTEN – ACT Do your research and find Indigenous-led and Indigenousinformed organizations in your area. If you can, support them directly and assist with grassroots programs. 2. KNOW WHERE YOU LIVE Understand whose land and territory you are on. Seek

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 8

out and support your local Friendship Centre. There are 125 of them located in urban centres across Canada. 3. TAKE RESPONSIBILITY Indigenous issues are a shared legacy and not simply the responsibility of government. Indigenous problems are problems for all Canadians.

2021-10-27 9:22 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

| 9

OVERCOMING COVID-19 FUNDRAISING FEARS Every dollar counts as pandemic continues to impact communities and people in need

ROWENA VEYLAN

Many people fear asking for money. For the past 18 years, I have introduced myself as a professional fundraiser, and I’m usually met with something like, “Oh my, how could you ask for money?” or “That must be so hard!” I do my best to change their minds. Fundraising isn’t about asking for money, it’s about giving someone the opportunity to make a difference in his or her community. Changing how people feel about fundraising is now more important than ever. My heart breaks over what I have seen in the last year and a half and how the non-profit industry has suffered in relative silence. Every non-profit contributes to the health and well-being of our communities and those that live within them. I can’t help but think about the meal that is not served and the person that will go hungry, the researcher that is not funded who may have found a breakthrough, and the place that no longer has an open door to offer a safe haven. At times it can all feel so overwhelming, and many of us do not even know where to start. I am asked a lot about this and have a few suggestions. If you are able to, please continue to support your charities of choice. Touch base with them if you can and see how they are doing. Many people think that there is

no point in making a smaller donation, but every dollar counts and each one matters, trust me. Offer your services as a volunteer in any capacity possible. Volunteers are truly the backbone of these organizations and every position is vital, from stuffing envelopes to serving on a committee or creating social media content. Fundraise on behalf of your organization. There are so many ways to raise money to support your charities of choice, and they can be a fun and engaging way to create a sense of community and bring important awareness to your cause. The sky is the limit on your creativity for these fundraising events, and it is important to choose something that makes sense for you. Are you a marathon runner, garage sale expert or maybe more of the private dinner type? Raising money can give us hope when we feel powerless, it rallies our communities, and truly brings out the best in people. It is a wonderful opportunity that we are given, and at the end of the day, we can look in the mirror and know that we made the world just a little bit better. É Rowena Veylan (rowena@nsof.ca) is the founder and lead instructor of the New School of Fundraising and has been working within the non-profit industry since 2003.

Originally published in Business in Vancouver.

RAISING MONEY CAN GIVE US HOPE WHEN WE FEEL POWERLESS, IT RALLIES OUR COMMUNITIES, AND TRULY BRINGS OUT THE BEST IN PEOPLE

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 9

2021-10-27 9:22 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

10 | BIV MAGAZINE: PHILANTHROPY ISSUE 2021 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

BRIEF

BOSTON PIZZA CO-FOUNDER AND WIFE DONATE $8 MILLION TO BUSINESS SCHOOL Kwantlen Polytechnic University renames business school in recognition of gift

The co-founder of Boston Pizza International Inc. and his wife have donated $8 million to Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU). The gift from George Melville, who served as KPU’s chancellor from 2014 to 2020, and Sylvia Melville, will establish a $3 million advanced teaching and learning technology fund, which will help give KPU students access to industry-leading technology and equipment. The university’s business school has been named the Melville School of Business to recognize the historic donation. “Sylvia and I are very proud to be able to make this investment in the future of the KPU School of Business,” Melville said in a news release. “Our hope is that the advanced teaching and learning fund will enhance the educational experience for students for many years to come. There are also funds for scholarships and bursaries, which will make KPU’s excellent business program more accessible to students than ever before.” The donation includes $2 million to establish the Melville School of Business endowed scholarship fund, which will provide $100,000 in scholarships annually for undergraduate business students. Two separate $1 million endowed bursary funds will provide $50,000 annually in bursaries to undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students, respectively. The funds will also establish an incubator fund, which will provide seed funding to launch and support the Melville School of Business venture fund. “This very generous gift will create tremendous opportunities for students and faculty and will significantly enhance the reputation of both the business school and KPU,” says Alan Davis, president and vice-chancellor of

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 10

KPU. “George Melville’s sterling reputation as a business leader, philanthropist and community builder will be a tremendous asset as we continue to shape exceptional entrepreneurs who graduate ready to work, willing to learn and poised to lead.” Melville is chairman and owner of Melville Global Investments Inc., a diversified investment portfolio which includes ownership in Mr. Lube, Naramata Benchland Properties and Bamboo World Kitchen, along with other public and private investments. George Melville • He co-founded Boston Pizza International Inc. with business partner Jim Treliving, SUBMITTED and together they turned it into the T&M Group of Companies, which has operations throughout North America and sales of over $1 billion per year. In 1990, they founded what became the Boston Pizza Foundation Future Prospects, which has raised and donated more than $18 million to Canadian charities. The Melvilles previously donated $500,000 to create the Melville Centre for Dialogue at KPU’s Richmond campus. They have donated millions to organizations in British Columbia, including the Union Gospel Mission, Surrey Memorial Hospital, Peace Arch Hospital, St. Paul’s IBD Centre, Covenant House and the Rick Hansen Foundation. É

2021-10-27 9:22 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

| 11

SPONSORED CONTENT

THE NON-PROFIT SECTOR IS DEPENDENT ON STRONG LEADERSHIP SOFIA JANMOHAMED

Strong, dynamic leadership has always been a necessity for organizations to thrive across all industries. The COVID-19 pandemic has, however, thrust leaders into different kinds of challenges – or opportunities – depending on their ability to adapt quickly to a constantly changing environment where the impacts can be completely unknown. This is especially true in the non-profit sector. From my own experience, it has been very clear where the significant areas of impact that the most savvy, effective non-profit leaders have focused their energy and time during the last 20 months have been. CAREFUL EVALUATION OF CURRENT OPERATIONS AND RETURN ON INVESTMENT

The pandemic required an unusually swift review of operations, revenue models, high-risk obligations, and sadly, in some cases significant cuts to both people and programming to survive. Throughout this time, tough and sometimes devasting decisions have needed to be made. In real terms, this means that the people and communities who are most in need are also the most negatively impacted. GROWING AND ENHANCING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND A FOCUS ON INNOVATION

At the same time, the abrupt discontinuation of face-to-face operations has spurred a wild and rapid investment in technology and forced investments and innovation across organizations that may not have taken place for years to come. Dynamic leaders have encouraged new ideas or ways of delivering services in order to serve their constituents or have piloted different programs in order to serve their communities. INVESTMENT IN PEOPLE

The best leaders know that the backbone of their operations are the people they employ and the culture of collaboration that is fostered at their organizations. Even if their organizations were forced into temporary or permanent staff reductions, the most effective leaders made investments in human resources. At the same time, they encouraged an increased level of open dialogue to address the physical, emotional, and mental challenges encountered by their people. These investments were needed not only for stabilization, but for the continued growth of their organizations. EVOLUTION OF DAY-TO-DAY WORK

One of the most common questions raised now, in media, through associations like AFP and in casual conversation is “do you really need to be in an office to do quality work?” Many have now had the opportunity to embrace no commute, increased flexibility between personal and professional commitments, and

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 11

a new sense of control over how they get the job done. Thriving organizations have leaders who have realized that being open to embracing flexibility around operations, and where and how staff work will not be going away. Moreover, there is opportunity to examine what further benefits may result from hybrid models of working. For example, many organizations have been able to reduce their physical space commitments (and resulting overhead costs), while still meeting – and even exceeding – revenue targets. The net result will be better for the donors who fund these operations with their generous gifts, and most importantly, could enable non-profits to better serve their constituents and their communities in new ways. I’ve learned a lot as a leader through the pandemic, but my biggest take-aways have been to embrace uncertainty, act with courage and lead through change. É Sofia Janmohamed (she/her), MBA, CFRE is the Vice President, Leadership Giving & Stewardship at Canadian Cancer Society and the President of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) Greater Vancouver Chapter.

THRIVING ORGANIZATIONS HAVE LEADERS WHO HAVE REALIZED THAT BEING OPEN TO EMBRACING FLEXIBILITY AROUND OPERATIONS, AND WHERE AND HOW STAFF WORK WILL NOT BE GOING AWAY

2021-10-27 11:52 AM


SPONSORED CONTENT

Meeting the pandemic head-on – one organization’s response WHAT WE DO

C

OVID-19 has impacted thousands of individuals and families across our province. And even though we may be on the road-to-recovery, the impact is still being felt. More people than ever continue to worry about making rent or mortgage payments, putting food on the table and clothes on their children’s backs. The pandemic has created a ‘new normal’ but there is nothing normal about this. Across the province, many continue to struggle, and the term ‘vulnerable population’ has taken on a whole new meaning. Mike Leland, spokesperson for The Salvation Army in British Columbia, shares that at one location, “the food lines have never been so long, and shelter space has never been needed more”

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 12

Despite the challenges of the pandemic, The Salvation Army has been able to respond consistently for the past 18 months. “We’ve been here from the beginning,” says Leland. “Our staff never waivered and they continue to work around-the-clock, serving the most vulnerable in our communities. We’re providing food, shelter and safety to those who need it most … and we’ll continue to be here until this thing is over.” While The Salvation Army is doing work on the frontlines, Leland stresses that they don’t do this alone. The outpouring of support from individuals, government, community and corporate partners has come in the form of advice, supplies, volunteers and of course generous cash donations. “More than ever, we’ve seen a coming together of people to support one

another and it is inspiring,” says Leland. But as B.C. approaches the winter months and the holiday season, The Salvation Army is worried. People who are without homes, people struggling with mental health and addiction, families living at or below the poverty line, they are all extremely vulnerable and because of the pandemic they are all in an especially vulnerable spot. “In the next months, we’ll need one another more than ever,” Leland says. But he is also optimistic about what can happen. “We have come together in ways I’ve rarely seen, and I believe this will continue … we have faith in our province – we have faith in people.”

For more information on how you can support your community, visit salvationarmy.ca

2021-10-27 12:24 PM


SPONSORED CONTENT

Family Services of Greater Vancouver supports children, youth, and families in crisis

N

o one is immune to life’s challenges – those unexpected crises that can uproot us and prevent people from achieving their dreams. Many individuals overcome the hard bits of life through the help of a support network, one that includes a community of positive and empathetic people, financial, housing, and food security, and access to mental health resources. For most, this network acts as a physical and emotional backstop when we face adversity in our lives. When someone doesn’t have access to the tools or resources to build that network, Family Services of Greater Vancouver (FSGV) is here to help. People who depend on FSGV often access our programs and services on short notice, in an acute moment of need. We provide

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 13

the support individuals and families need now, from trauma counselling and victim services, to financial coaching and safe spaces for homeless youth. We deliver more than 50 non-profit programs and services across Greater Vancouver, meeting clients where they’re at and helping them build a network of support. Most importantly, FSGV’s expert staff are compassionate and non-judgmental, committed to providing a continuum of care that benefits people long after their moment of crisis. With your help, they empower individuals and families to make more informed choices and build the lives they so want to live. Helping the community since 1928 As a non-profit, FSGV has been bolstered by a generous community of supporters

since 1928 – people like you who believe in making a positive difference in the lives of those around us. The COVID-19 pandemic has been no different; together, we increased access to critical resources, ensured essential in-person supports were sustained, and found new ways to deliver programs and services online – all with limited or no delay of service. With your support, we can ensure no one feels alone in crisis as we build a more resilient community for all. Together, we can give those in need a chance at a better tomorrow.

Learn More Amanda Sayfy Director, Fund Development 604 731 4951 x 5004 | asayfy@fsgv.ca fsgv.ca

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


SPONSORED CONTENT

KPU Foundation supports education opportunities for future leaders WHAT WE DO

L

ast year, many students were severely impacted by the pandemic and found themselves in greater financial need than ever before. Thankfully, the KPU Foundation’s generous donors established a COVID-19 emergency bursary program, which delivered hundreds of thousands of dollars to KPU students and provided assurance that their education would go uninterrupted. We are so grateful for this support as the skills and knowledge of KPU graduates and alumni are vital to the workforce in our communities. The KPU Foundation was established in 2000 to assist in raising funds that create quality, life-long learning opportunities for KPU students. Led by a volunteer

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 14

board of community and business leaders representing the South Fraser region, the KPU Foundation oversees and stewards donor investments that have been entrusted to support student scholarships, bursaries, awards, technology, equipment and applied research. The KPU Foundation endowment has grown to $40 million, which provides more than $1 million per year to support students as they pursue their educational, career and life goals. As KPU celebrates its 40th year, we can reflect on three different identities: Kwantlen College, Kwantlen University College, and as we exist today, Kwantlen Polytechnic University – Canada’s only Polytechnic University. With 20,000 students studying on five campuses in three cities, KPU has become one of the

largest universities in British Columbia in one of the fastest growing regions in the country. Thank you to all of the donors to the KPU Foundation for helping KPU students accomplish incredible things in our communities today, tomorrow and in the future. Your investment in the KPU Foundation is an investment in our students, which in turn is an investment in our future and in society. Supporting students will unlock the potential for future leaders and this will be key to a successful economic recovery, post pandemic.

To learn more about how you can make a difference in the lives of students, visit give.kpu.ca.

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

| 15

SPONSORED CONTENT

GIVING HEARTS AWARDS The Association of Fundraising Professionals Greater Vancouver Chapter is the professional association representing individuals and organizations that generate philanthropic support for a wide variety of charitable institutions in our community. As part of National Philanthropy Day on November 15, we celebrate and recognize inspiring individuals and businesses that make a positive impact in the lives of others, their community and the world through their incredible contributions and spirit of

philanthropy. We are proud to present the 2020 and 2021 Giving Hearts Awards nominees. Join us at 12pm on November 15 as we present the Giving Hearts Awards through a virtual presentation. Register at afpvancouver.org

2020 AND 2021 GIVING HEARTS AWARDS NOMINEES COMMUNITY PANDEMIC RESPONSE INDIVIDUAL AWARD ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

HOWARD BLANK CHRISTMAS BUREAU VOLUNTEER LEAD GROUP THE CONCONI FAMILY REV. DR. THOMAS COOPER MANJIT LIT KRYSTAL PARABOO LINDA WONG DR. YOSEF WOSK JONATHAN “BEAR” YEUNG AND LANDON BROWN

COMMUNITY PANDEMIC RESPONSE BUSINESS AWARD ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

■ ■

UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER VALLEY STAFF AND FACULTY WORLD FINANCIAL GROUP

OUTSTANDING PHILANTHROPIST AWARD ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

DENNIS & PHYLLIS WASHINGTON FOUNDATION THE GRECZMIEL FAMILY DR. RUDY & MRS. PATRICIA NORTH ARNOLD & ANITA SILBER DELIA VISSCHER

OUTSTANDING CORPORATION AWARD

BIG FEET HEALTH GROUP BLUE ARCK PRIVATE EQUITY BURNABY FIREFIGHTERS COAST CAPITAL SAVINGS CONCORD PACIFIC DARWIN PROPERTIES INLAND AND CASE CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT LYFT PROMETHEUS PRIVATE ADVISORY GROUP STIGMA-FREE SOCIETY TELUS TELUS FRIENDLY FUTURE FOUNDATION

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

THE CAPILANO GROUP COWELL AUTO GROUP E.B. HORSMAN & SON GLOTMAN SIMPSON CONSULTING ENGINEERS GROSVENOR AMERICAS NEPTUNE TERMINALS NICOLA WEALTH ODLUM BROWN LIMITED OTTER CO-OP PACIFIC BLUE CROSS RLC PARK SERVICES SOUTHERN RAILWAY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (SRY) WHITE SPOT

OUTSTANDING LEGACY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CAGP GREATER VANCOUVER CHAPTER ■ ■ ■ ■

THE MCCARTHY FAMILY DR. JOHN MCNEILL DR. A.H. SOMJEE ANDY & CHERYL SZOCS

OUTSTANDING SMALL BUSINESS AWARD ■ ■

INTEGRA SMART WIRELESS

OUTSTANDING VOLUNTEER FUNDRAISER AWARD ■ ■ ■ ■

MATT AUGUST DR. GENIEVE BURLEY VICKI & KERRY KUNZLI MEL ZAJAC

OUTSTANDING YOUTH PHILANTHROPIST AWARD ■ ■ ■ ■

JASON GUO RAISA JOSE SOPHIA LADHA CASEY WRIGHT

2021 NATIONAL PHILANTHROPY DAY SPONSORS PRESENTING SPONSOR

KEYNOTE SPEAKER SPONSOR

OUTSTANDING LEGACY PHILANTHROPIST AWARD CO-PARTNER

GIVING HEARTS AWARDS SPONSORS

VIRTUAL EVENT SPONSORS

SPIRIT OF PHILANTHROPY SPONSORS

MEDIA

>Whl[o CYA_dded 7iieY_Wj[i >[cbeYa >Whb_d] CW_b#E#CWj_Y IjhWjYec J^[ D[m IY^eeb e\ <kdZhW_i_d]

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 15

2021-10-27 12:14 PM


PHILANTHROPY BY THE NUMBERS Prior to the pandemic, B.C.’s 86,000-person non-profit sector could be expected to contribute $6.4 billion to the province’s gross domestic product. But 2020 – and now 2021 – have been far from predictable. In the last philanthropy-focused issue of BIV Magazine, our infographic focused on COVID-19’s impact on non-profit and charitable organizations in B.C. and Canada. This year, we offer a follow up, which shows that these organizations continue to face significant barriers to recovery.

B.C. NON-PROFITS % 71 of B.C. non-profits expect a budget shortfall in 2021

% 64 have a reduced

% 48 1 in 5 are concerned about organizations say

ability to deliver programs, services and activities

shutting down their operations

% 42 have seen

% 37 report reduced

decreased revenue from individual donations

staffing levels

it’s likely they will shut down within 12 months

CHARITIES IN CANADA % 78 of charities have

% 55 report that

% 43 The average

% 34 of charities have seen

increased innovation and experimentation during the pandemic

revenue remains below pre-pandemic levels

decline in revenue

demand for services increase faster than capacity

Sources: Unraveling: Nonprofits, COVID-19, and the Fabric of BC Communities, Vantage Point (February 2021); From crisis to opportunity, Imagine Canada (2021).

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 16

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


TOP 100 CANADIAN CHARITIES FOR 2021 Here are the B.C. organizations that made Charity Intelligence Canada’s Top 100 list Aunt Leah’s Place

HeroWork

University of British Columbia

BC SPCA

Mennonite Central Committee

University of Victoria

David Suzuki Foundation

British Columbia

Ecotrust Canada

Rick Hansen Foundation

Greater Vancouver Food Bank

Simon Fraser University

Veterans Transition Network Victoria Hospice Society

Source: 2021 Top 100 Rated Charities, Charity Intelligence Canada (2021).

ALEKSANDR ZUBKOV/GETTY IMAGES

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 17

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

18 | BIV MAGAZINE: PHILANTHROPY ISSUE 2021 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

PARTNER CONTENT

FLOW-THROUGH SHARES A FOCUS IN THE FEDERAL ELECTION? WELL, THEY WORK Doubling tax credits for critical minerals are a win-win for charities and our planet PETER NICHOLSON

For most Canadians, the last federal election probably felt like more of the same. Climate change, housing and affordability, and the COVID-19 pandemic continued to be common issues of the day. And when people woke up on September 21, the result – a Liberal minority – seemed to almost mirror what we had after the 2019 federal election. T here is one policy discussion, however, that received far more airtime than ever before – flow-through shares. The subject itself is nothing new. This tax policy, older than your registered retirement savings plan, has been around since 1954 to assist Canada’s resource sector. Flow-through shares provide seed capital to junior mining companies so they can explore for resources, and in return, you receive a 100% tax deduction. Since May 2006, my firm has used this trusted, well-known policy to help major donors give more to charities of their choice. Once flowthrough shares are purchased by our donors, they don’t hold them for long – often less than a minute. The buyer can then sell their shares, at a discount, to a third party or liquidity provider, thus eliminating any stock market risk. The cash proceeds are then donated to charity, whereby the buyer receives a second 100% tax deduction. Combined, these two tax policies allow our clients, on average, to give up to three times more to charity, at no additional cost due

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 18

to the tax efficiency. When I speak with major donors, the tax incentives behind charitable giving are easy to grasp. We all know charities need our help. But mining? That topic is not as easily understood. But the truth is, there are equally good reasons why flow-through shares exist. First off, Canada is a world leader in mining, accounting for more than $100 billion of our annual gross domestic product, and producing over 700,000 direct and indirect jobs. Even better, it remains the number one employer of Indigenous Peoples. And if a deposit of gold, nickel, lithium or another mineral is found? It results in billions in tax revenue for federal and provincial governments. According to the National Hockey League, about 44% of players are Canadian. Did you know that 65% of all public mining companies are from the Great White North? While you might not think about it much, mining is even more Canadian than hockey. Fortunately, the importance of flow-through shares wasn’t lost among Liberals and Conservatives in this past election season. Although they didn’t win the election, the Conservatives made headlines when they proposed a flow-through structure for technology. Just as flow-through shares support and encourage Canadian junior mining companies, party leader Erin O’Toole felt it could do the same to

Peter Nicholson, president of the WCPD Foundation • WCPD

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


| 19

Critical minerals in Canada in 2017. Critical minerals support a broad range of industrial sectors, including renewable energy technology, healthcare and high-tech industries important to both the Canadian and international economy

MAP CREDIT: U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

attract technological innovation and investment in Canada. Put simply, flow-through shares are a proven tool to help stimulate investment. Meanwhile, the Liberals announced that they would eliminate flow-through share tax deductions for oil and gas exploration – a move that I fully applaud. These energy sources are rapidly becoming a thing of the past, and in truth, already make up a tiny fraction of flow-through share transactions. According to the Liberal platform, this policy change would only save the government $25 million annually, while having obvious environmental benefits. Speaking of the environment: the second proposal by the Liberals is perhaps the most exciting. I n addition to the tax deduction on flow-through shares, the government has offered a 15% mineral exploration tax credit, or METC. But now, the Liberals have proposed doubling this tax credit to 30% for critical minerals, which are essential to creating renewable energy technologies such as batteries, solar panels and wind turbines. If you’ve heard the term “critical minerals” a lot lately, you aren’t alone.

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 19

Computers, cell phones, medical equipment: they all depend on critical minerals, or the building blocks of products and services we depend on. In fact, the Canadian government has identified 31 minerals that are considered essential to our economy, national security and moving to green sources of energy, including nickel, copper, lithium, cobalt, uranium and many others.

THE QUESTION IS NOT WHETHER WE REQUIRE MINERALS AND METALS TO REACH OUR CLIMATE GOALS, BUT RATHER IF CANADA WILL BECOME THE SUPPLIER THE WORLD NEEDS j Pierre Gratton CEO Mining Association of Canada

2021-10-27 12:21 PM


BIV MAGAZINE

20 | BIV MAGAZINE: PHILANTHROPY ISSUE 2021 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

PARTNER CONTENT

Thankfully, Canada has many of these minerals in great abundance – we just need to find them, extract them and make the process efficient. According to Bloomberg’s 2020 clean energy rankings, for example, Canada ranks fourth in the global lithium-ion battery supply chain. China, Japan and Korea made up the top three. “The question is not whether we require minerals and metals to reach our climate goals, but rather if Canada will become the supplier the world needs,” says Pierre Gratton, CEO of the Mining Association of Canada. These stark realities have caught the attention of not just Canada, but our allies. Earlier this year, Australia and the United States, along with Canada, formally launched a landmark initiative – known as the Critical Minerals Mapping Initiative – aimed at researching and discovering critical minerals needed for the world of tomorrow. These reasons and more are why the Liberals are doubling the METC credit for critical minerals, which is great news for our renewable energy future. It is also great news for charities. Yes, purchasing flow-through shares with an immediate liquidity provider is already the best way to maximize your

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 20

gift. But when this increase in the METC comes into effect, those numbers look even better (30% tax credits plus a 100% tax deduction equals approximately the equivalent of a 160% tax deduction). So my message is clear: if you are a high earner, recently sold a business or experienced a large capital gain, you can help Canada’s mining industry while also giving to charities of your choice. A nd the next time you pick up that cellphone, boot up your computer or drive an electric car, consider this: the minerals inside may have done more than create jobs and make our planet cleaner. T hey may have helped a Canadian registered charity. É

For decades, Peter Nicholson has been a recognized leader in Canadian tax-assisted investments, with a specialized focus on philanthropic tax planning and tax reduction. Through his work with countless donors, foundations, and institutions and boards, he has helped generate in excess of $175 million in client donations. WCPD is Canada’s leader in this area, with over 500 closed charity flow-through offerings. To learn more about how WCPD can assist your philanthropic goals, write peter. nicholson@wcpd.com.

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

| 21

STEAM MENTORSHIP REMAINS CRITICAL IN THE COVID-19 ERA Diversity efforts require action today and online mentorship can help

NANCY ROPER

Today, only a quarter of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) careers are held by women. Women are still less likely to choose a career in STEM than in other fields, and those who do are more likely to pursue a degree in biology or other sciences, rather than mathematics, engineering or computer science. It’s been studied and reported that this gap likely exists due to a lack of support or role models, beginning at an early age. But despite this disparity, women have had great impact in the STEM fields – not least during COVID-19. Across these careers, women scientists have played powerful roles in Canada’s response to COVID-19, working, researching and repurposing their skills and resources to address this ongoing crisis. At Science World, closing the gender gap that exists in STEM is a central focus of our efforts. We run an annual hallmark event called Girls & STEAM (we added the ‘A’ to include art and design), which just completed its fourth year, having gone completely digital to adapt to the pandemic. Even in a virtual format, this event continues to deliver compelling content and interactive mentorship opportunities for young girls and women. We’ve also expanded our mandate, providing ongoing monthly virtual mentorship opportunities that allow young girls and women to connect with and learn from women who are already working in STEM fields.

In practice, this has meant hosting virtual workshops focused on Indigenous leaders in STEM careers, women paving the way in video gaming and more. We know mentorship is a cornerstone of setting young girls and women up for success, and the only way for them to see and learn firsthand from role models and people in fields that interest them. Many programs and initiatives have been forced to pivot online in a short timeframe as a result of COVID-19. A mentorship program must be carefully planned, thought through and rolled out. Inclusivity and access must be considered as part of an online program like this one, as reaching those in communities facing barriers is crucial to fostering diversity. A component of this is providing these learning opportunities at no cost to participants. Everyone deserves equal access to education and supplemented learning. It’s no secret that today’s youth do much of their relationship building online, and we must approach mentorship with that same mentality. Mentors must be carefully chosen: those that spark scientific joy beyond the necessary credentials, and those that have unique angles and a true passion for their field. To build diversity in STEAM fields, we must start working on this now. Without diversity within these fields, we cannot accommodate the needs of, and provide support to, diverse communities. This effort requires all voices to be at the table. This is only possible with philanthropic people, communities and businesses supporting the cause. É Nancy Roper is vice-president, development, at Science World.

TO BUILD DIVERSITY IN STEAM FIELDS, WE MUST START WORKING ON THIS NOW. WITHOUT DIVERSITY WITHIN THESE FIELDS, WE CANNOT ACCOMMODATE THE NEEDS OF, AND PROVIDE SUPPORT TO, DIVERSE COMMUNITIES

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 21

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


UNDERSTANDING DONOR-ADVISED FUNDS DFAs are becoming a popular way of giving, but come with concerns ALBERT VAN SANTVOORT

T

he 21st century has seen boundless change across almost every industry, and philanthropy is no exception.

Over the past five years, an emerging trend has introduced a different structure for philanthropic organizations, one that diverges from traditional charities and private family foundations. Instead of establishing personal foundations like the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, or donating to established charities, both donors and corporations are increasingly turning to donor-advised funds (DAFs).

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 22

DAFs supply the infrastructure needed to run a philanthropic organization. They provide donors with administrative convenience, cost savings and immediate tax advantages. Meanwhile, donors maintain advisory privileges as to what charitable causes will receive their funding. Donations can be invested through a DAF to generate investment income on a tax-free basis, and these funds can subsequently be given to various

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

| 23

charitable endeavours over a period of time. Despite the recent popularity of DAFs, they are not new to the philanthropic community. The Vancouver Foundation believes it created Canada’s first DAF in 1968. DAFs have, however, increased in popularity and have seen significant growth in recent years. According to a report from Investor Economics, the annual growth rate for DAFs in Craig Hikida is the Vancouver Canada has been between Foundation’s vice-president 10% and 12% since 2016. of donor services • VANCOUVER T h i s i s a n a g g re s s i v e growth rate, according to FOUNDATION Leann Burton, director for partnership development with MakeWay, a foundation that supports DAFs geared toward conservation and environmental sustainability. DAF organizations, like the Vancouver Foundation and MakeWay, help establish, manage and operate funds, while donors help direct funds to causes that are important to them. The Vancouver Foundation is a community foundation that supports charities across B.C., and has the infrastructure to help manage over 2,000 different funds, according to Craig Hikida, the Vancouver Foundation’s vice-president of donor services. “Those who establish the funds still have the opportunity to support their favourite charities of choice, but we take care of all that messy stuff in the background,” says Hikida. “We will do the investment management, the tax receipts and [deal with] any CRA [Canada Revenue Agency] or legal issues. All of those things we have the infrastructure here to take care of. So people find us a more convenient way to have that private family foundation control without having to do all that administration.” Like in any business, there are economies of scale that can be achieved. Hikida believes that the Vancouver Foundation is able to provide administrative support on a more cost-effective basis. DAFs also allow for unique alternatives as to who influences the ultimate use of donated funds. Some organizations and corporations have employee-advised DAFs where corporate donations are aligned with employees’ charitable priorities. The Quebec-based Trottier Family Foundation created a staff DAF program, where each individual employee controls $5,000 of the program’s donations annually. Through a DAF operated by MakeWay, each employee can direct $5,000 to a charity of their choice, thereby giving the family foundation the ability to democratize their corporate giving. However, DAFs may not be the best solution for all corporate giving. Even industry proponents and insiders have concerns about some of the trends within this type of investing. While corporate DAFs are a good way to encourage and facilitate employee donations, Hikida is concerned that corporate DAFs can redirect funds away from traditional charities, jeopardizing the support they provide and that many have come to rely on.

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 23

There is also concern both within and outside the industry regarding current tax implications. Contributions to DAFs can be immediately written off, despite the fact that the money is invested and could take considerable time before it makes its way into the hands of charities and the communities they serve. Hikida says this is an issue, and it is why the Vancouver Foundation has implemented the requirement that all funds under its control must donate to their designated charities on an annual basis, so as to avoid the warehousing of funds. “While it is wonderful that we see more charitable capital going into these funds, we don’t see the same rate of capital going out to these communities,” says Burton. “There is a social concern that the capital has tax benefits to the individuals, but society has not yet benefited because [the donation] has not made its way out to communities.” Corporate charitable giving comes with both tax and public relations benefits, but a corporate DAF may be structured to provide benefits to a corporation under the appearance of charitable giving. There has been public concern that Mastercard is using its DAF funds to invest in Mastercard stock, and bolster its stock value. And there is concern that, as more and more corporations move into DAFs, they will be able to take advantage of similar benefits while also enjoying tax write offs. Burton also highlights that there is some opaqueness surrounding the investments that DAFs make, and that those investments might ultimately undermine the causes those charities are fighting for. She says that many of the investments DAFs make are in safe, traditional industries. A DAF with an environmental focus that invests in heavy-emitting industries could ultimately be hurting its own cause. É

Leann Burton is director of partnership development at MakeWay • MAKEWAY

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


SPONSORED CONTENT

Ronald McDonald House BC and Yukon keeps families close when it matters most WHAT WE DO

W

hen the unthinkable happens and a family is uprooted for their child’s critical medical treatment, there are many barriers they must overcome to stay together. Hotel stays are expensive, siblings need to be cared for, and staying in the hospital long term is unsustainable. That’s where Ronald McDonald House BC and Yukon (RMH BC) comes in—providing accommodation, comfort, compassion, and a sense of community to these families in need. Families who depend on RMH BC often arrive in Vancouver on short notice, not knowing how long they will need to stay: weeks, months, or even years. At the House, families can stay together under

the same roof with their sick child. They can enjoy everyday family moments like a home-cooked meal, playing catch outside, and snuggling up for superhero movie night. Most importantly, they can focus on helping their child to heal. Staying at RMH BC also affects families long after their stay. A study by RBC found that families with a sick child experience a catastrophic financial burden which takes an estimated 10 – 12 years to recover from. By staying at RMH BC, they can save $3000 – $6000 per month, making them stronger once they return home.

HOW YOU CAN HELP RMH BC depends on generous community supporters like you to provide a home away from home for families when it

matters most. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, we have stayed open as an essential service for families with seriously ill children when treatment can’t wait – and you make sure that we are here 365 days a year for these families in their time of need. You can make a difference today by making a donation, joining our Housewarmers monthly giving club, or taking part in our Light the House community tree campaign. We also offer many corporate engagement opportunities that can take place from a safe physical distance.

Find out more at: rmhbc.ca 604-736-2957 info@rmhbc.ca

CHAMPIONS WANTED When the unthinkable happens and a family is uprooted for their child’s critical medical treatment, there are many barriers they must overcome to stay together. Hotel stays are expensive, siblings need to be cared for, and staying in the hospital long term is unsustainable. Ronald McDonald House BC and Yukon depends on community supporters like you to keep families close when it matters most.

Give today or get involved:

www.rmhbc.ca

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 24

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


SPONSORED CONTENT

Surrey Hospitals Foundation – together, we are unstoppable WHAT WE DO

S

urrey Hospitals Foundation is unstoppable in their determination to inspire and encourage the community to support innovative medicine and lifechanging health care, raising over $170 million since they were founded in 1992. Health care services in Surrey are primarily financed by government and through funds raised by Surrey Hospitals Foundation. In fact, the Foundation is the largest non-government funder of health care for families in Surrey and the surrounding communities. The Foundation’s work is essential, and critical to the health of 1.9 million residents who reside in the Fraser Health region. Thanks to the generosity of community donors, Surrey Hospitals Foundation is able to help fund every one of the region’s major health facilities including Surrey Memorial Hospital and the Jim Pattison Outpatient Care and Surgery Centre. They also support and fund the Czorny

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 25

Alzheimer Centre, along with many specialized community programs for newborns, children, adults and seniors. The Surrey health care campus provides care for the whole family, from birth to end-of-life. Because of past Foundation investments, the hospitals are able to recruit top medical professionals, hire the very best support staff, and purchase and operate state-of-the-art diagnostic and treatment equipment. In the past 10 years, Surrey Hospitals Foundation donors have supported important projects, such as: r 3FJOWFOUJOH QBUJFOU DBSF XJUI UIF opening of the Jim Pattison Outpatient Care and Surgery Centre, a first of its kind in BC; r 5IF PQFOJOH PG B TQFDJBMUZ 1FEJBUSJD Emergency Department, one of only two in the province, at Surrey Memorial Hospital; r *ODSFBTFE DBQBDJUZ OFX GBDJMJUJFT BOE improved space for patient care in the

new 8-story Surrey Memorial Hospital Critical Care Tower, a $512 million redevelopment and expansion project; r #FUUFS DBSF GPS UIF DPNNVOJUZ T "M[IFJNFS patients at Czorny Alzheimer Centre, a 72bed specialized, safe, comfortable home for dementia patients; r 5SBOTGPSNJOH UIF SFHJPOBM $IJMESFO T Health Centre at Surrey Memorial Hospital. This renovation increased capacity in response to a growing population in Surrey and Fraser Health; r 3FOFXBM PG BMM PQFSBUJOH SPPNT BU Surrey Memorial Hospital, Fraser Health’s busiest surgical centre; r 0OHPJOH TVQQPSU PG 4VSSFZ T $07*% response, raising funds to purchase urgently-needed equipment as requested by the hospital teams.

To learn more about Surrey Hospitals Foundation, and their current fundraising campaigns, please visit SurreyHospitalsFoundation.com.

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

26 | BIV MAGAZINE: PHILANTHROPY ISSUE 2021 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

INFLUENTIAL INDUSTRY LEADERS Recognizing excellent leadership among non-profit foundations and organizations Earlier this year, BIV published the inaugural issue of BC500, which recognizes some of the most influential business leaders in British Columbia. The publication features 500 individuals across more than 50 unique categories, which represent industries and sectors that contribute to the strength of the provincial economy. Here, in this issue of Philanthropy, we dedicate some additional magazine space to showcase the leaders who

have led careers in service of others. Many of the dozen individuals named in the non-profit foundations and organizations category on this year’s list have helped deliver important and valuable services during the pandemic. All of them are notable in their contributions to their respective organizations and the broader community. More information on all 500 leaders featured on this year’s list can be found at bc500.biv.com.

JILL ATKEY CEO BC Non-Profit Housing Association

Jill Atkey has worked in the non-profit sector for more than 20 years and in leadership positions for the past 10. She led the development of the Canadian Rental Housing Index and the development of a 10-year strategy for solving B.C.’s affordability and homelessness crisis, which has informed government decision-making since its release in 2017. JANE ADAMS President and CEO Surrey Hospitals Foundation

Jane Adams is president and CEO of Surrey Hospitals Foundation. She has undertaken notable campaigns for BC Women’s, St. Paul’s and Surrey Memorial hospitals. In 2020, Adams was recognized as one of Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100. Kwantlen Polytechnic University recognized her life’s work with an honorary doctorate in 2014.

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 26

ANGELA CHAPMAN President and CEO VGH & UBC Hospital Foundation

Angela Chapman has a 30-year track record of success in development, alumni relations, communications and marketing for universities and health care across three continents. In January 2020, she became president and CEO of the VGH & UBC Hospital Foundation, the primary philanthropic partner of Vancouver Coastal Health and one of Canada’s largest healthcare charities. She joined the foundation in 2013 as senior vice-president, philanthropy, and became chief development officer in 2018.

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


| 27

CAROL LEE Chair Vancouver Chinatown Foundation

Carol Lee is co-founder and CEO of Linacare Cosmetherapy, headquartered in Vancouver’s historic Chinatown district. She is deeply committed to the revitalization of Chinatown and the Downtown Eastside. Lee is chair of the Vancouver Chinatown revitalization committee and honorary patron of the Chinese Canadian Military Museum Society. In 2016, she was appointed to the finance minister of Canada’s advisory council on economic growth. HOWARD BLANK Past chair Variety – the Children’s Charity

Howard Blank has served as an executive in the gaming, entertainment and not-for-profit sectors for over 30 years. He is a recipient of the lifetime display of excellence and philanthropy awards from the Canadian Gaming Association, the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers, the BC Achievement Foundation Community Award and others. He is CEO of Point Blank Entertainment Ltd. and sits on the boards of numerous non-profit organizations.

Thank you

QUEENIE CHOO CEO SUCCESS

As CEO of one of the largest non-profit social service organizations in Canada, Queenie Choo leads innovative programs in the areas of newcomer settlement, English-language training, employment and entrepreneurship, family, youth, community development, affordable housing and seniors care. She was chosen to lead SUCCESS as CEO in 2012.

Congratulations to the 2021 Giving Hearts Awards nominees. The best way to support a community is to be a part of it, especially in challenging times. Thank you for your generous commitment to philanthropy.

rbc.com/community-social-impact ® / ™ Trademark(s) of Royal Bank of Canada. VPS107757

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 27

125667 (10/2020)

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


BIV MAGAZINE

28 | BIV MAGAZINE: PHILANTHROPY ISSUE 2021 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

INFLUENTIAL LEADERS KEVIN MCCORT President and CEO Vancouver Foundation DAVID LONG CEO Greater Vancouver Food Bank

David Long is a classically trained chef who led the Terminal City Club through a $6 million renovation, on time and under budget, in preparation for the 2010 Olympic Winter Games. He currently serves as CEO of the Greater Vancouver Food Bank and was elected to the Food Banks Canada board of directors.

Kevin McCort was appointed president and CEO of the Vancouver Foundation in September 2013. Since he joined the Vancouver Foundation, cumulative granting reached $1.5 billion in 2020 and net assets currently exceed $1.4 billion. Serving the charitable and non-profit sector in Canada and abroad since 1983, McCort previously served for six years as president and CEO of CARE Canada in Ottawa, and co-founded the Humanitarian Coalition in 2005.

BARRY PENNER Managing director Vancouver Foundation

Barry Penner served as attorney general for B.C., minister of environment and minister of Aboriginal relations and reconciliation during 16 years as an elected member of the legislative assembly. He is immediate past chair of the Insurance Corp. of British Columbia’s board and past president of the Pacific NorthWest Economic Region.

TRACY REDIES President and CEO ASTC Science World Society

Tracy Redies spent 25 years in financial services with HSBC, and then with Coast Capital Savings credit union, where she served as president and CEO. Redies was formerly the MLA for South Surrey-White Rock before becoming president and CEO of Science World in September 2020. She lives in South Langley with her husband, George, and they have four kids.

DICK VOLLET President and CEO St. Paul’s Foundation

Dick Vollet has more than 30 years of experience in the not-for-profit and corporate sectors, and is currently president and CEO of St. Paul’s Foundation, which raised a record-setting $73 million in the 2020 fiscal year. Vollet represents B.C. on the Imagine Canada advisory committee and sits on the board of trustees for the Providence Health Care Research Institute.

SARAH ROTH President and CEO BC Cancer Foundation

Sarah Roth has led teams through large-scale fundraising campaigns in the U.S. and Canada. She previously worked for Boston Children’s Hospital and New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Before arriving at the BC Cancer Foundation, she spent eight years as assistant dean of development and alumni relations in the University of British Columbia’s faculty of medicine, where she launched and completed a $437.6 million campaign.

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 28

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


SPONSORED CONTENT

A legacy for health care in British Columbia

V

ancouver, 1963. Vincenzo Albanese has left everything behind in postwar Italy to pursue a dream – a chance at a new life in Canada. Vincenzo hit the ground running in pursuit of his dream. He worked the trades to make a living during the day, and at night he went to school to learn English. Later, he would start his own construction company, helping build Vancouver, the city we know and love today, with his own two hands. “He loved Vancouver and he never stopped working for it,” says Angela Pachini, Vincenzo’s sister. “He would say he was very grateful to be in Canada, to have a new life, a new future.” Vincenzo loved his family and enjoyed spending his time with them, particularly his nieces and nephews. When he wasn’t working, he was with them: skiing and ice skating in the winter, enjoying tours of Stanley Park, and eventually tackling sports like marathon running with his niece, Maria.

Vincenzo Albanese

In September 2014, Vincenzo was diagnosed with stomach cancer. He fought bravely for more than a year, but in November 2015 he passed away peacefully in palliative care at VGH. Vincenzo chose to leave his estate to his family members and to several charities, including VGH & UBC Hospital Foundation. “He wanted to support those who needed it the most,” says Angela. “He loved Vancouver and wanted to take care of others in it, and he thought there was nothing better than the hospital caring for

sick people.” Vincenzo left his gift for VGH & UBC Hospital Foundation to distribute according to the most urgent needs. This decision would allow the Foundation to distribute his funds to several key and meaningful aspects of care, including new technology that allows patients and health care teams to access live medical interpretation in over 240 languages. “If he knew where the money was going, I know he would be happy,” says Angela. Vincenzo’s legacy is now forever tied to health care. His generosity and warmth in life carry on through the lives and wellbeing of the thousands of patients who will now have access to new programs and vital pieces of equipment.

You can impact the future of our health care system with a gift in your will. Visit vghfoundation.ca/legacy or contact Charlene Taylor at 604 875 4917 to learn more.

Gifts in wills have a meaningful impact on the health of future generations. There is no other place where your legacy can truly transform care and research for British Columbians. Together, with the support of donors like you, we will ensure the next generations will live longer, healthier and happier lives.

Define your legacy. Give today. Help transform health care in BC. For more information contact: Charlene Taylor, Director, Gift & Estate Planning 604-875-4917 charlene.taylor@vghfoundation.ca

Leave a legacy Save a life

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 29

vghfoundation.ca/legacy

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


SPONSORED CONTENT

Changing lives one meal at a time WHAT WE DO

I “Without the support and kindness from the Cloverdale Community Kitchen, I wouldn’t be the person I am today.” – Jamie, client of Cloverdale Community Kitchen

t’s not easy being a single mom, but Jamie’s story proves that with determination, the love and care of volunteers, and some extra help in the form of food and hot meals, anything is possible. In 2018 she became pregnant with her son. During her pregnancy, she experienced both health problems as well as abuse from her partner. She made the decision to leave the relationship in hopes for a better life for her baby. She attended the Cloverdale Community Kitchen during her pregnancy and experienced much needed support from volunteers which allowed her to feel confident as she embarked on her journey as a single mom. Because of the support of donors, the Cloverdale Community Kitchen has also helped Jamie keep her cupboards full of nutritious food through their Fraser Valley Regional Food Bank and has helped her create a special Christmas for her son through their Christmas Hamper Program.

Learn more about how you can support the Cloverdale Community Kitchen by visiting mycck.ca/things-we-do.

Visit MYCCK.CA Contact MEGHAN@MYCCK.CA

SPONSORED CONTENT

Create Your Legacy WHAT WE DO

Y SUPPORT THE YWCA INTO THE FUTURE WITH A GIFT IN YOUR WILL Your gift ensures that families across Metro Vancouver get the resources they need to build community, gain financial stability and move toward their goals and dreams.

WCA Metro Vancouver envisions a world where all people experience economic stability, wellness and equal opportunities. We work towards that by responding to the needs of our shared community and providing resources from the ground up. We build and operate safe and affordable housing for women and children, provide employment pathways, mentorship, food programs and more. We offer 72 programs in 66 locations, while advocating for change. For 125 years, the YWCA has helped build bright futures. Supporting our work creates a legacy that will last long into the future.

To leave a gift in your will, contact JoAnne Fahr at jfahr@ywcavan.org | 604 895 5829 | or Arden Sutherland at ardensutherland@ywcavan.org | 604 895 5859.

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 30

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


SPONSORED CONTENT

Variety BC is now funding private autism assessments WHAT WE DO

S

ince 1966, Variety - the Children’s Charity has been making a difference in the lives of children with special needs across the province. Variety recently announced that in addition to their core grant areas of mobility equipment, medical supplies, specialized therapies, educational programs and mental wellness counselling, they will now be funding private autism assessments. “Variety BC is addressing a huge need in our province as kids are waiting more than two years through the public system to be assessed,” said Cally Wesson, Variety CEO. “Without an autism assessment and diagnosis, kids go without the funding and the support in the school system that is essential to their development.”

For information on how you can support Variety by becoming a Corporate Partner, contact Meghan Bradner at 604.268.3883 or meghan.bradner@variety.bc.ca.

SPONSORED CONTENT

A BC home for independent voices WHAT WE DO

I

Knowledge Network is your commercial-free home for intelligent programming. For more information on giving to Knowledge: TIE

S. STRONG

CO

M

MU

NITIES.

ACCREDITED SINCE 2018

AG

A

M

I

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 31

RI

Donna Robinson 1.877.456.6988 knowledge.ca/partners

A

For more information on giving to Knowledge: Contact Donna Robinson 1.877.456.6988 or knowledge.ca/partners

Inspire lifelong learning. Support challenging ideas. Grow fresh perspectives. For generations to come.

STRONG C H

n a media landscape cluttered with sensationalized content from often-dubious sources, you can always count on Knowledge to provide intelligent programming you can trust. We search the world to bring you programs that inspire, challenge, and delight, free from commercial interruptions. As BC’s public broadcaster, we’re also dedicated to investing in BC stories made by BC filmmakers. And, we’re proud to have received accreditation by Imagine Canada for demonstrating leadership, excellence and trustworthiness in the charitable sector. Become a Knowledge Partner and join a vibrant, engaged community of independent thinkers who share your passion for our province and our world.

INE CANA

D

2021-10-27 9:23 AM


I give to my community and with Vancouver Foundation, my giving lasts forever. 75 years ago, a single gift started Vancouver Foundation and that gift is still making a difference in the community today. We can help you create a fund that gives forever. Get started at vancouverfoundation.ca/create or call Kristin at 604.629.5186

6Q ƂPF [QWT NQECN EQOOWPKV[ HQWPFCVKQP XKUKV communityfoundations.ca

Philantrophy_2021_32_FinalR.indd 32

2021-10-27 9:23 AM