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GREEN SPACE 2019 | A CLIMATE FOR CHANGE

GUNNING FOR NET ZERO

PROGRESSIVE DEVELOPERS MEET CITY’S CHALLENGE PUTTING YOUR MONEY WHERE YOUR HOPE IS EV SALES RECHARGED B.C.’S. FIRST LIVING CHALLENGE HOME

BRIGHT, SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS FOR B.C.’S GREENER TOMORROW

ETHICAL INVESTING

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CLIMATE SMARTER

ELECTRIC AVENUES

B.C.’S GREENEST HOME

SUZUKI’S BURNING ISSUE

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WCRL.COM

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SPONSORED CONTENT

Radiant Buildings, Renewable Resources By Nancy Argyle

I

n Vancouver, rated the third best city in the world in 2019 by Mercer Consulting, one thing is very clear – geothermal has a lot of fans. With a population of more than two million people in the Greater Vancouver area enjoying one of the highest ratings for quality of life, many are also choosing geothermal systems for residential, municipal and commercial builds. Considering the numerous benefits, it’s not surprising to see large construction projects embracing geothermal but it’s especially gratifying to see how many individual residential projects have also opted in. Since geothermal installations work by moving heat instead of creating heat, there are many environmental benefits including a reduced carbon footprint as well as the use of a sustainable renewable resource that already exists in the ground beneath homes and buildings – a win-win for everyone. “Due to increasing awareness of global warming issues, eventually, I expect

geothermal to become the gold standard for new homes,” says Ray Roussy, president of Sonic Drilling Ltd. in Surrey, BC. Roussy, an engineer, is the developer and patent holder of modern sonic drilling technology which is now in use across six continents and in various applications. His drilling method has won four awards for best technology and he has subsequently patented the use of sonic drilling specifically for geothermal installations. Meet the Fastest Drill on the Planet With the ability to drill through mixed soils at a rate of 3-5 times faster than traditional methods, Roussy’s sonic drills are already the speediest on the planet but they come with an additional advantage that makes them ideal for geothermal installations, both big and small. In a patented one-step operation, sonic drills are able to drill the hole, case it, install the geothermal loop and then fill the hole with grout – something that no other technology in the world can do. With a clear savings from reduced on-site project time, sonic drills have quickly become the preferred drilling method for geothermal installations.

Vancouver Airport Catches Geothermal Fever In an attempt to significantly reduce greenhouse gases, the Vancouver Airport Authority recently embarked on an ambitious $360 million geothermal project to construct a new Central Utilities Building which will house all the necessary equipment to heat and cool the airport. The airport’s new geo-exchange system will initially use approximately 1,100 geothermal holes, drilled 400-500 ft. below ground, with additional holes planned for future projects. Considering the airport’s soil conditions, which can be challenging for traditional drilling methods, the Vancouver Airport Authority opted to use Roussy’s sonic drilling technology – given that it is able to drill easily and quickly as well as provide one-step geothermal loop installation. With his BC-developed sonic drilling technology now 35 years old, Roussy says he is delighted to see it at work on so many local projects, knowing the benefits it brings and the role it plays in furthering a clean energy future.

Geothermal Made Easy Drill 3-5x faster through tough soil conditions. Drill, case, loop and grout in one operation. Green drilling options available. Up to 70% less mess on site.

SONIC DRILLING LTD. (604) 588-6080 www.sonicdrilling.com

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CONTENTS

FEATURES

GREEN SPACE 2019 | A CLIMATE FOR CHANGE

8 RESPONSIBLE INVESTING Ethical investing gains respect on the street and traction from investors as it blooms into a trillion-dollar environment

GUNNING FOR NET ZERO

PROGRESSIVE DEVELOPERS MEET CITY’S CHALLENGE

13 CLIMATE SMART SUCCESS STORIES Vancouver-based Climate Smart for Businesses helps companies and non-profits measure and reduce their carbon footprints

PUTTING YOUR MONEY WHERE YOUR HOPE IS EV SALES RECHARGED B.C.’S. FIRST LIVING CHALLENGE HOME

BRIGHT, SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS FOR B.C.’S GREENER TOMORROW

16 ELECTRIC VEHICLES GAIN TRACTION Generous rebates fuelled an astonishing sales surge for electric vehicles in British Columbia

CLIMATE SMARTER

ELECTRIC AVENUES

B.C.’S GREENEST HOME

SUZUKI’S BURNING ISSUE

PRESIDENT: Alvin Brouwer EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER; VICE-PRESIDENT, GLACIER MEDIA: Kirk LaPointe EDITOR: Frank O’Brien DESIGN: Petra Kaksonen PRODUCTION: Rob Benac CONTRIBUTORS: Nelson Bennett, Susan M. Boyce, Frank O’Brien, Elizabeth Sheehan, David Suzuki, Graeme Wood, Hayley Woodin, PROOFREADER: Meg Yamamoto DIRECTOR, SALES AND MARKETING : Pia Huynh SALES MANAGER: Laura Torrance ADVERTISING SALES: Blair Johnston, Corinne Tkachuk, Chris Wilson ADMINISTRATOR: Katherine Butler RESEARCH: Anna Liczmanska, Carrie Schmidt

18 KICKING TIRES ON EVS After careful consideration and cost comparison, consumer puts the brakes on buying an electric car, at least for now 19 B.C.’S GREENEST HOME First Living Building Challenge house will generate more energy that it will ever need 22 GUNNING FOR NET ZERO Vancouver’s highrise developers are designing and building Canada’s most environmentally astute commercial towers

8

ETHICAL INVESTING

COLUMN

Green Space 2019 is published by BIV Magazines, a division of BIV Media Group, 303 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C. V5Y 1J6, 604-688-2398, fax 604-688-1963, biv.com.

Suzuki—10

16

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Copyright 2019 Business in Vancouver Magazines. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or incorporated into any information retrieval system without permission of BIV Magazines. The publishers are not responsible in whole or in part for any errors or omissions in this publication. ISSN 1205-5662 Publications Mail Agreement No.: 40069240. Registration No.: 8876. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Circulation Department: 303 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C. V5Y 1J6 Email: subscribe@biv.com

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Cover photo: Vancouver Deputy Mayor Rebecca Bligh at groundbreaking for city’s first net-zerocarbon office tower Photo: Nima Zadrafi

BRIEFS

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B.C.’s greenest employers

6

Net zero’s potential

6

Caribou trump resources

7

Is nuclear the answer?

7

Plastic ban heals black eye

11

Trans Mountain protesters

12

Forty businesses step up

15

BIGGEST ALTERNATIVE ENERGY COMPANIES IN B.C.

25

GREEN SPACE BUSINESS DIRECTORY

26

PRODUCED BY

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

BRIEF B.C.’s 18 greenest employers for 2019 Eighteen British Columbia employers, most in the public sector, have been named among Canada’s Greenest Employers for 2019 in a competition arranged for the 12th year by Mediacorp Canada Inc. Employers are evaluated by the editors of Canada’s Top 100 Employers in terms of: (1) the unique environmental initiatives and programs they have developed; (2) the extent to which they have been successful in reducing the organization’s own environmental footprint; (3) the degree to which their employees are involved in these programs and whether they contribute any unique skills; and (4) the extent to which these initiatives have become linked to the employer’s public identity, attracting new employees and clients to the organization. An example is Nature’s Path Foods Inc. of Richmond, which features an 11-stream recycling

station that captures everything from Styrofoam to batteries; two of the company’s manufacturing plants are certified as zero-waste facilities by the U.S. Zero Waste Business Council. The B.C. Greenest Employers for 2019 are: ʰ BC Housing Management Commission, Burnaby; ʰ BC Hydro, Vancouver; ʰ BC Public Service, Victoria; ʰ Capital Regional District, Victoria; ʰ Dentons Canada LLP, Vancouver; ʰ Hemmera, an Ausenco Company, Burnaby; ʰ Mountain Equipment Co-op, Vancouver; ʰ Nature’s Path Foods Inc., Richmond ʰ Ocean Wise Conservation Association, Vancouver; ʰ Perkins+Will Canada Architects Co., Vancouver; ʰ SAP Canada Inc., Vancouver;

Vancouver’s Mountain Equipment Co-op among B.C.’s greenest employers • CHUNG CHOW

ʰ Surrey School District No. 36, Surrey; ʰ TransLink (South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority), New Westminster; ʰ University of British Columbia, Vancouver;

ʰ University of Victoria, Victoria; ʰ Vancouver City Savings Credit Union, Vancouver; ʰ The City of Vancouver; and ʰ Whistler Blackcomb, Whistler.

BRIEF

Net-zero potential: 20 million jobs The reduction of emissions has the potential to generate close to 20 million jobs, according to a study from the Columbia Institute. The study says that reaching net-zero emissions by 2050 could unlock nearly four million in direct building-trade jobs in various areas while creating an additional 20 million indirect jobs. The 2017 study, Jobs for Tomorrow – Canada’s Building Trades and Net Zero Emissions, was commissioned by Canada’s Building Trades Unions and is the first study to predict the outcome to the construction industry if Canada honours its Paris Agreement goals. The study forecasts that, based on current construction

employment figures in the green building sector, a 2050 net-zero scenario could create 1.9 million direct non-residential building jobs. Additionally, the building of district energy systems could amount to over 547, 000 construction jobs, and moving to renewable energy sources could result in over 1.7 million direct construction jobs. The building-out of urban transit valued at $150 billion between now and 2050 would create nearly 245,000 direct construction jobs. “Meeting our climate goals is good for the planet and good for the economy and job creation,” says Charley Beresford, excutive director of the Columbia Insitute.

•ANDRIANO/SHUTTERSTOCK

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BRIEF Caribou safety trumps resource extraction The B.C. government has imposed an interim moratorium on commercial activities in the Mackenzie-Chetwynd-Tumbler Ridge area of the Peace region in northeastern B.C. to protect mountain caribou herds. The industry that will be most affected by the moratorium is forestry, although other activities like mineral exploration and natural gas would also be impacted. The moratorium is temporary, lasting only until June 2021, until a more permanent recovery plan can be put in place. The moratorium was announced June 20, following the filing of a report by Blair Lekstrom, which included a one-year pause in commercial activities among 14 recommendations. The Council of Forest Industries (COFI) greeted the interim moratorium and Lekstrom’s recommendations with some relief. “Timber supply shortages, high log costs and volatile market

prices have led to closures and curtailments across the Interior of the province. Considering these circumstances, it comes as some relief that the province has seen fit to pause to ensure that collectively we strike the right balance between caribou recovery and economic viability,” COFI CEO Susan Yurkovich says in a press release. Lekstrom, a former Liberal MLA and current Dawson Creek councillor, was appointed by Premier John Horgan to listen to the general public, following a backlash in the region against the province’s proposed caribou protection plan. The province is obliged to act, since the federal government has deemed the mountain caribou a threatened species, although the herds have not been officially designated an endangered species. Caribou herds in that region have declined from about 800 in the early 2000s to about 220 today. The provincial government

B.C.’s mountain caribou are deemed to be under threat •JUKKA JANTUNEN/ SHUTTERSTOCK

has spent $50 million to date on caribou protection and recovery in B.C. This includes a wolf cull and a maternal penning program, run by First Nations, in which pregnant caribou are captured and kept in

pens until their calves are a couple of weeks old to protect them from predators. . – Nelson Bennett, Business in Vancouver

BRIEF

Is nuclear the answer to controlling emissions?

•ALHOVIK/SHUTTERSTOCK

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Non-emitting nuclear power could provide an answer to concerns over greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions but it is unlikely it will be considered as an option in British Columbia. Vancouver declared itself a nuclear-free zone more than 30 years ago and all three major B.C. political parties are on record as being against the development of nuclear power. But modern nuclear power plants could produce non-GHG emitting heat for industry, power mining operations and remote communities, and produce hydrogen as well as synthetic fuels for transportation, according to Simon Irish, CEO of Terrestrial Energy Inc. Terrestrial is a Canadian

energy technology company developing an advanced modular nuclear reactor. “The newest wave of reactor designs, known as Generation IV, goes well beyond what previous generations of nuclear plants could do. They can pair seamlessly with intermittent renewables such as wind and solar. They are smaller, faster to build and modular,” Irish says. He adds the next-generation plants can be designed to make meltdowns impossible. “These next-generation reactors could arrive like the cavalry in the fight against climate change, but government partnership is needed to accelerate deployment and win the battle in time,” Irish says.

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

RESPONSIBLE

INVESTING

Ethical investing gains respect on the street and buy-in from investors as it blooms into a trillion-dollar environment

Peter Leighton, cofounder and COO of RE Royalties: growth seen in wind and solar power, which are now increasingly competitive with hydroelectricity • CHUNG CHOW

I

Frank O’Brien

nvesting that aligns personal objectives in relation to environmental, social and governance (ESG) values has shifted rapidly from the left wing to centre ice for Canadian investors.

According to the most recent data from the Toronto-based Responsible Investment Association (RIA), assets in Canada managed using one or more ESG strategies increased from $1.51 trillion at the end of 2015 to $2.13 trillion as at December 31, 2017. That represents a 41.6 per cent increase in ESG-related assets under management in just two years. And, judging from Standard & Poor’s Financial Services

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LLC’s (S&P) tracking of ESG investments, the trend will accelerate. Its April 2019 study showed that the S&P ESG index has been running slightly ahead of the broader S&P 500 index for the past five years. S&P’s ESG index relates to environmental objectives, but it also excludes tobacco, controversial weapons, and companies not in compliance with the UN Global Compact,

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a voluntary initiative based on CEO commitments to universal sustainability principles. The bottom line: the composite score of the S&P ESG index was 71.57, an increase of 9.92 compared with the S&P 500’s score of 62.26; and this was despite excluding more than 30 per cent of companies based on eligibility requirements. ESG investing can no longer be considered a risk or a rarity. Responsible investing now accounts for 50.6 per cent of Canadian assets under management, up from 37.8 per cent two years earlier. “Surpassing the 50 per cent threshold marks a major milestone in the history and development of responsible investing in Canada,” understates Dustyn Lanz, CEO of the RIA. The audience – and potential – for ESG has attracted a number of Canadian investment groups, including startups, staking out specific investment targets. They are likely aware that millennials – those aged 18 to 34 – are becoming a force in responsible investing. James Tansey, executive director of the University of British Columbia Sauder School of Business’ Centre for Social Innovation and Impact Investing, says the evidence around social investing in public companies shows that millennials are 65 per cent more likely to select socially responsible investments than older Canadians. RE Royalties Ltd. (TSX.V:RE) of Vancouver, which launched last November on the Toronto Venture Exchange, for example, focuses on providing royalty-based financing to renewable energy projects, such as wind, solar and hydro power. In a June transaction, RE Royalties bought a portfolio of royalties from four solar parks in Ontario for $1.87 million. The solar parks have a generation capacity of approximately 60,000 megawatt hours of clean energy per year, capable of removing 2,971 tonnes of carbon

dioxide equivalent from the hydro grid or providing electricity to 6,600 homes annually. Currently the company, which was trading below $1 as of mid-June, has a portfolio of royalties on 58 solar parks, two wind farms, including one in B.C., and three hydro projects in Canada, the U.S. and eastern Europe, according to co-founder and COO Peter Leighton. Leighton sees growth in the U.S. market, where he says solar power provides electricity cheaper than off the hydro grid in all 50 states. “It costs two` cents per kw [kilowatt] for solar, which is one-tenth of what it cost five years ago,” he says. For Wayne Wachell it is what is not in the portfolio that defines the potential of responsible investing: namely no oil and gas companies. In B.C., where about 40 per cent of the population is against the expansion of oil pipelines, divesting could strike a chord with investors. “We launched our fossil-free suite of funds believing it was possible to generate strong returns without contributing to climate change. With each year, the data has supported that assertion. At the five-year mark, we can conclusively say: divesting from fossil fuels pays,” says Wachell, CEO and chief investment officer with Vancouver-based Genus Capital. Wachell notes the CanGlobe Equity fossil-free fund has outperformed the overall Canadian stock market index, which includes coal and major carbon-producing industries, since its inception in 2013. Historical data, he claims, shows that divesting from oil and gas would have yielded positive returns for investors as far back as 1998. “With the advancements being made in more climate-friendly sectors like technology, financial, consumer discretionary and telecoms, we can only expect to see the return potential for divested portfolios grow,” Wachell says. É

Wayne Wachell, CEO and chief investment officer, Genus Capital, says divesting from fossil fuels is the key to investment performance • SUBMITTED

INVESTING IN S&P 500 VERSUS THE S&P ESG Annualized total returns (%) 2013-18

10 8 6 Per cent

4 2 0 -2 -4 -6

5-year

3-year S&P 500

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1-year S&P ESG

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

WASTE: THE BURNING ISSUE Incinerating waste is not a simple, win-win solution to a complicated and massive problem

DAVID SUZUKI

Many urban areas have built or are considering building waste-incineration facilities to generate energy. At first glance, it seems like a win-win. You get rid of “garbage” and acquire a new energy source with fuel that’s almost free. But it’s a problematic solution, and a complicated issue. Metro Vancouver has a facility in Burnaby and is planning to build another, and Toronto is also looking at the technology, which has been used elsewhere in the region, with a plant in Brampton and another under construction in Clarington. The practice is especially popular in the European Union, where countries including Sweden and Germany now have to import waste to fuel their generators. The term “waste” is correct; there’s really no such thing as garbage. And that’s one problem with burning it for fuel. Even those who promote the technology would probably agree that the best ways to deal with waste are to reduce, reuse and recycle it. It’s astounding how much unnecessary trash we create, through excessive packaging, planned obsolescence, hyperconsumerism and lack of awareness. This is one area where individuals can make a difference, by refusing to buy overpackaged goods and encouraging companies to reduce packaging, and by curbing our desire to always have newer and shinier stuff. We toss out lots of items that can be reused, repaired or altered for other purposes. As for recycling, we’ve made great strides, but we still send close to three-quarters of our household waste to the landfill. Considering each Canadian produces close to 1,000 kilograms of waste a year, that’s a lot of trash! Much of the material that ends up in landfills is usable, compostable or recyclable, including tons of plastics. Turning unsorted and usable trash into a valuable fuel commodity means communities are less likely to choose to reduce, reuse and recycle it. Burning waste can seem easier and less expensive than sorting, diverting and recycling it. But once it’s burned, it can never be used for anything else – it’s gone. Incinerating waste also comes with environmental problems. Although modern technologies reduce many air pollutants once associated with the process, burning plastics and other materials still creates emissions that

can contain toxins such as mercury, dioxins and furans. As with burning fossil fuels, burning waste – much of which is plastics derived from fossil fuels – also produces carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide emissions that contribute to climate change. WASTE IS AN EXPENSIVE FUEL

Burning waste doesn’t make it disappear, either. Beyond the fly ash and pollutants released into the atmosphere, a great deal of toxic “bottom ash” is left over. Metro Vancouver says bottom ash from its Burnaby incinerator is about 17 per cent the weight of the waste burned. That ash must be disposed of, usually in landfills. Metro testing has found high levels of the carcinogenic heavy metal cadmium in bottom ash, sometimes twice the limit allowed for landfills. High lead levels have also been reported. Incineration is also expensive and inefficient. Once we start the practice, we come to rely on waste as a fuel commodity, and it’s tough to go back to more environmentally sound methods of dealing with it. As has been seen in Sweden and Germany, improving efforts to reduce, reuse and recycle can actually result in shortages of waste “fuel.” It’s a complicated issue. We need to find ways to manage waste and to generate energy without relying on diminishing and increasingly expensive supplies of polluting fossil fuels. Sending trash to landfills is clearly not the best solution. But we have better options than landfills and incineration, starting with reducing the amount of waste we produce. Through education and regulation, we can reduce obvious sources and divert more compostable, recyclable and reusable materials away from the dump. It’s simply wasteful to incinerate it. It would be far better to sort trash into organics, recyclables and products that require careful disposal. We could then divert these different streams to minimize our waste impacts and produce new commodities. Organics used in biomass energy systems could help offset fossil fuel use while creating valuable supplies of fertilizers. Diversion and recycling lessen the need to extract new resources and disrupt the environment while creating more value and jobs. That’s a win all around.É David Suzuki is co-founder of the Vancouver-based David Suzuki Foundation. This column includes contributions from David Suzuki Foundation communications manager Ian Hanington. Visit davidsuzuki.org.

TURNING UNSORTED AND USABLE TRASH INTO A VALUABLE FUEL COMMODITY MEANS COMMUNITIES ARE LESS LIKELY TO CHOOSE TO REDUCE, REUSE AND RECYCLE IT

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BRIEF Plastic ban healing Canada’s black eye A black eye for Canada ended this June as 69 containers packed with waste were returned to Vancouver after rotting for six years on a port in Manila, Philippines. A subsequent federal ban on single-use plastics could help heal Canada’s bruised reputation. ‘“We are beaming with joy now that Canada has finally reimported its garbage. Our persistence to get the garbage returned has finally paid off,” Aileen Lucero, national co-ordinator, EcoWaste Coalition of the Philippines, tells Green Space in a June 11 email from Manila. But Lucero adds that not all the waste was returned to Vancouver aboard the MV Bavaria. “Wastes from 34 containers have been disposed of locally.” The containers had been labelled as plastics to be recycled but contained mostly household garbage. The waste is being burned at a Metro Vancouver incinerator in

Burnaby. A few days before the MV Bavaria docked in Vancouver, the federal government announced a ban on single-use plastics, which could come into effect by 2021. Some of the items to be banned include plastic bags, straws, cutlery, plates and stir sticks. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he also wants to work with the provinces to establish requirements for plastic-product manufacturers to make them ultimately responsible for their own plastic waste. “With eight million tonnes of plastic pollution entering the oceans around the world every years plastics are on track to outweigh fish by 2050,” says Fisheries and Oceans Minister Jonathan Wilkinson. Every year, the Great Canadian Shore Cleanup campaign gathers about 3,000 tonnes of garbage, much of it plastics, from Canadian shorelines – something PeterRoss,

The Canadian-trash-laden MV Bavaria is waved goodbye from the Manila docks on May 31 • PHILIPPINE FOREIGN AFFAIRS SECRETARY TEODORO LOCSIN, JR.

executive director for the Coastal Ocean Research Institute, acknowledges is “a Band-Aid.” Last year, he says, 50,000 plastic bags, 22,000 bottles and 17,000 plastic straws were

cleaned up from Canadian shorelines. But, according to the federal government, less than 10 per cent of all the plastic used in Canada ever gets recycled.

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

BRIEF Trans Mountain decision sparks protests British Columbia First Nations critical of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion are expressing frustration and disappointment over the federal government’s June 18 decision to proceed with it. The project could face new legal challenges from First Nations groups, further delaying a costly government project that, at present, has no set timeline. The Squamish Nation says Canada’s court-mandated consultation with its community was a “shallow” attempt at consultation that has failed to address the nation’s concerns. “The failure to meaningfully engage with rights holders means this government is either not serious about building this pipeline or not serious about respecting Indigenous rights,” says nation spokesperson Khelsilem. In announcing his government’s long-awaited decision, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada doubled the size of its consultation teams as it reinitiated

Some B.C. First Nations have joined protests against the federal pipeline decision • CHUNG CHOW

consultations with Indigenous communities. “At the end of the day, we listened. And we are acting on what we heard,” Trudeau contends, while acknowledging concerns about salmon habitat, orca populations and increased tanker traffic off B.C.’s coast. Some First Nations strongly disagree. Last August, the Federal Court of Appeal unanimously ruled that Canada had failed to meaningfully

address the concerns brought forward by six First Nations in British Columbia who were challenging the line. The Tsleil-Waututh Nation, alongside Squamish Nation, was among the nations named in that court decision. B.C. Premier John Horgan says that, if it was in the interest of British Columbia, the province may join a legal action put forward by a First Nation. In a joint press release with the Tsleil-Waututh and Squamish

nations, Chief Kukpi7 Judy Wilson of the Neskonlith Indian Band – who is also the secretary-treasurer of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs – states she would oppose the project until free, prior and informed consent is recognized and implemented in Canada, a right, she notes, that is included in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. – Hayley Woodin, Business in Vancouver

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CLIMATE SMART

SUCCESS STORIES V

ELIZABETH SHEEHAN

ancouver-based Climate Smart Businesses Inc. helps companies and non-profits learn how to measure and reduce their carbon footprints. Its unique training program incorporates classroom learning, web-based software and one-on-one support. Rather than hiring a consultant, small and medium-sized businesses get the tools and knowledge to tackle greenhouse gas management in-house. Different businesses see different benefits from participating in Climate Smart. Cost savings from greater

efficiency are common, and there are significant marketing advantages from taking leadership on sustainability. Climate Smart is proud to recognize these three B.C. firms that have taken the Climate Smart strategy to the heart of their business.

X

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) EMISSION IMPACT: ʰˇˁ+ - )/- 0/$*)$) ($..$*).+ -ˍˁʐˀˀˀ- 1 )0 ʰ$1 -/ ˂ˆ+ - )/*!0$'$)"(/ -$'.!-*(')ɾ'' Cost savings: ʰ1*$ ++-*3$(/ '4ˍˇˀʐˀˀˀ$)2./ $.+*.'! ..$) ˂ˀˁˀ

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GREEN COAST RUBBISH

Green Coast Rubbish is a family-run, Vancouver-based company dealing with waste in an environmentally conscious way. Green Coast Rubbish has worked with Climate Smart since 2010 to learn how to reduce its carbon footprint while complementing the growth and success of the company. Since 2010, Green Coast Rubbish has achieved at least a 75 per cent diversion rate of materials from landfill and has avoided an estimated 520 tonnes of CO2-equivalent emissions, equal to the energy use of 63 homes for a year. Green Coast Rubbish also hosts an annual spring cleanup in North Vancouver where it partners with local charities and businesses to recycle clothing, electronics, mattresses, household goods, Styrofoam, plastic, metal and wood. Since working with Climate Smart, Green Coast Rubbish has also made a switch to convert the majority of its fleet to run on 50 per cent biodiesel fuel. It has also introduced route optimization planning to reduce unnecessary costs on fuel, and offers transit passes to employees for commuting. “Joining Climate Smart gave us the tools to track our carbon footprint and crystallized our path moving forward towards reducing our emissions while building a more sustainable business model,” says Eamonn Duignan, a Green Coast Rubbish partner.

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

CLIMATE SMART SUCCESS STORIES

X

REID’S AUTOMOTIVE RECYCLING LTD.

Burnaby-based Reid’s Automotive Recycling Ltd., established in 1995, repurposes auto parts, refinishes alloy wheels and recycles end-of-life vehicles. Company owners Stuart and Teresa Reid see their industry as a key element of a low-carbon, sustainable economy. In 2014, Reid’s began working with Climate Smart Businesses Inc. in an effort to reduce the company’s carbon footprint. Reid’s spent the next year implementing a number of initiatives in an effort to reduce its impact. These included: ■ Improving insulation in the walls, roof and bay doors of the building, leading to a 32 per cent reduction in natural gas consumption (and 33 per cent reduction in emissions from natural gas consumption). ■ Expanding its recycling to include plastics, wood and metal, as well as implementing compost pickup. This led to an 85 per cent reduction in emissions from garbage. ■ Building awareness amongst staff on the environmental impacts of their commuting choices, leading to a 50 per cent reduction in emissions from staff commuting. “Working with Climate Smart was not only a logical next step for us, it resonated strongly with all of us who work here. The results have benefited us on many levels. Our expenses are lower and our staff are more engaged and work more collaboratively. This has assisted a growth in our revenue, increased our efficiency and helps us deliver a higher level of service to our customers. It’s really been win, win, win,” says company co-owner Teresa Reid.

ANNUAL GHG EMISSIONS REDUCED ʰ˃ˉ+ ʰ˃˃+ ʰˈ˅+ ʰˇ˂+ ʰ˅ˀ+

X

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LUNAPADS

Lunapads manufactures and resells reusable feminine care products in Vancouver. It has been tracking the company’s greenhouse gas emissions with Climate Smart Businesses Inc. since 2012. After discovering that third-party shipping made up 59 per cent of its overall emissions, Lunapads reduced the number of suppliers and focused on deepening relationships with a few key ones. It now purchases larger quantities from suppliers that mainly ship to Lunapads by marine freight and trucking, rather than air. Marine shipping is over one hundred times less emission-intensive than shipping by air. While the company has long manufactured their main Lunapads line in Vancouver, it was able to also shift the manufacturing of one of their underwear lines from overseas to Vancouver, significantly reducing shipping emissions. In addition, one of the owners picks up product from a local manufacturer on the way to work, eliminating the need for a separate delivery. From the 2011 baseline to the 2014 inventory, Lunapads recorded a 61 per cent reduction in third-party shipping emissions. During this time, the company’s number of employees increased by 25 per cent. Lunapads is committed to continuing to track and further reduce its emissions with Climate Smart. É

REDUCTION ACHIEVED ʰ#$-ʭ+-/4.#$++$)" ($..$*).- 0 4ˆˁ+ - )/

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Elizabeth Sheehan is c0-founder and president of Climate Smart Businesses Inc. For information on how your business can become a Climate Smart success, visit climatesmartbusiness.com.

2019-07-12 11:40 AM


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BRIEFS Forty B.C. businesses step up Forty B.C. businesses, from ice cream makers to a clean-tech company that developed direct air carbon capture technology, are calling on the provincial government to capitalize on the clean economy. Working with the Pembina Institute, the 40 companies have formed the new Business Coalition for a Clean Economy and have sent a letter to Premier John Horgan asking him “to demonstrate bold, sustained leadership by prioritizing investments in the clean future.” “B.C. is a hub for sustainable innovation, social responsibility and climate solutions, and businesses are key to B.C.’s success on these fronts,” says Karen Tam Wu, B.C. director for the Pembina Institute. Members include the cleanenergy companies Carbon Engineering and Innergex Renewable Energy, but also manufacturers and retailers such as Lush Cosmetics, Arc’teryx and Nature’s Path Foods, and high-tech companies, including Hootsuite. Asked about the letter, Horgan says that it sounds like the coalition is asking his government to do what it’s already doing. “I haven’t seen the letter but I’m ecstatic about that, because that’s exactly what we’re going to do,” says Horgan. Most of the coalition members are B.C. businesses. One member that is national is the Insurance Bureau of Canada. “Climate change is a clear and present danger that costs Canadians more than $1 billion in insured damages each and every year, due to storms, floods and

Business Coalition for a Clean Economy member Innergex Renewable Energy’s Ashlu Creek run-of-river hydroelectric power plant, northwest of Squamish • STEPHEN HUI, PEMBINA INSTITUTE

wildfires,” says Aaron Sutherland, vice-president, Pacific region, for the Insurance Bureau of Canada. B.C.’s CleanBC plan calls for a 40 per cent reduction in greenhouse

gases over the next 12 years. The two main pillars are electrification of the economy – including the natural gas industry – and lower-carbon standards for both

transportation and natural gas heating, the coalition contends. – Nelson Bennett, Business in Vancouver

EARN YOUR MASTER DEGREE IN

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at New York Institute Of Technology’s Vancouver Campus

nyit.edu/vancouver / 604.639.0942 / vancouverinfo@nyit.edu

00_Green Space 2019_xxp_0.indd 15

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

GAIN TRACTION

Generous rebates fuelled an astonishing sales rate for electric vehicles in British Columbia – 1,300 orders in two weeks this May NELSON BENNETT

H

igh gas prices and generous federal rebates persuaded more British Columbians to put in orders for electric vehicles, but the province recently reduced its plug-in incentives.

I THINK WHAT HAPPENED WAS WE HAD THIS HUGE BUBBLE OF ANTICIPATED DEMAND j Blair Qualey CEO, New Car Dealers Association of BC

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British Columbians put in orders for an estimated 1,300 electric vehicles(EVs) in a span of just two weeks in May, according to Blair Qualey, CEO of the New Car Dealers Association of BC. To put that in context, a total of 3,270 EVs and hybrids sold in B.C. for the entire year in 2017, according to FleetCarma. Since a new federal rebate came into effect May 1, all of the money that was in the provincial incentive program – the CEV for BC – has been tapped. “We had $6.5 million May 1, and on the 15th we ran out of money,” Qualey says. “So $6.5 million vanished in just over two weeks.” Qualey says the provincial government agreed to top up the fund by another $10 million, and another $32 million more is expected, as the last provincial budget earmarked $42 million for the CEV for BC program. The CEV for BC program got the $10 million top-up on a Thursday and was drawn down to $9.5 million by Friday morning. The provincial incentive offers a $2,500 rebate for a hybrid electric, and $5,000 for a battery electric vehicle. Starting June 22, however, the provincial rebate will be worth $3,000 for battery, fuel-cell and longer-range plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and $1,500 for shorter-range plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The federal incentive of $5,000 is stackable, meaning British Columbians who bought early gained up to $10,000 in rebates for an EV. When the new federal incentive was announced in the

last federal budget, applications for the provincial rebate slowed to a trickle. Then on May 1, when the federal incentive became available, applications for provincial rebates spiked. “I think what happened was we had this huge bubble of anticipated demand,” Qualey says. While the new federal incentive is largely responsible for the sudden spike in EV orders, Qualey says high gasoline prices may be adding to the incentive to switch from gasoline to electricity. “We would think that that [$10 million] would carry us, under normal circumstances, into the fall,” Qualey adds. “But it’s really difficult to say. The high gas price right now has really got people thinking about options.” GLOBAL TREND ACCELERATING

The recent spike in electric vehicle sales in B.C. is part of a global trend that saw 5.1 million EVs sold last year, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). That’s not including two-wheeled electric vehicles (scooters, e-bikes, etc.), or low-speed electric, which was about five million in 2018, with sales mostly in China. “Good news – the number of electric cars on the road continues to grow,” says Mechthild Wörsdörfer, the IEA’s director of sustainability, technology and outlooks. “The electric car deployment since the early 2010 decade was really fast.” The IEA’s new Global Electric Vehicles Outlook projects global EV sales to hit 22 million by 2030, under its new scenario, which assumes no policy changes. That would

2019-07-12 11:40 AM


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bring the total number of EVs on the road in the world to 130 million. There are currently more than one billion vehicles in the world, so if the IEA’s projections hold true, that means that 10 per cent to 20 per cent of the world’s vehicles could be electric by 2030. WĂśrsdĂśrfer says the three most important factors driving EV adoption are government policies (such as EV subsidies and zero-emission vehicle mandates), technology improvements (including falling battery costs) and charging infrastructure. Most of the world’s EV adoption has been in passen ger c a r a nd i s le d b y Ch i n a , wh ich a c c ou nt s for 45 per cent of the adoption, WĂśrsdĂśrfer says. China is also leading the way in electric bus adoption, with 460,000 now in use in China, and 90,000 new ones sector accounts for 10 per cent. It’s one of the more challenging sectors to decarbonize, Smith says. sold in 2018. There are roughly 250,000 electric light-duty commercial vehicles on the road. “What we’re seeing is that, while passenger emissions Merran Smith, executive director for Clean Energy are projected to go down, by 2025, the freight emissions are going to surpass the passenger emissions,â€? she says. Canada, says transportation accounts for 25 per cent of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions, of which the freight “They’re going up.â€? É

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

KICKING TIRES ON

EVS

After careful consideration and cost comparison, I put the brakes on buying an electric vehicle – at least for now

GRAEME WOOD

I STILL FIND THE [EV] MARKET IS TAILORED TO DEEPER POCKETS, SINGLE OCCUPANTS, LONGER COMMUTERS AND PEOPLE MORE CAPABLE OF TRADING IN PRACTICALITY FOR THEIR ENVIRONMENTAL CHOICE

A $16,000 rebate on a new electric vehicle sounds tempting and nearly too good to pass up. So far the opportunity has presented itself as a mere blip in time – the first few weeks of last May. I had this opportunity with a local car dealer but ultimately passed on it after calculating the costs and practicality of buying a new electric vehicle (EV). Unlike the line of combustible engines on the market, I found the EV remains a tailor-fitted product with many more additional individual factors that need to be weighed before buying one – even with a $16,000 discount. For others however, a new federal $5,000 rebate launched on May 1 has been enough to nearly quadruple new electric vehicle purchases in B.C.; the provincial government told Glacier Media it issued 2,779 provincial rebates ($5,000 from CEV for BC) in May compared with a prior monthly average of 758 in 2019. A local dealer told me dozens of people also received $6,000 for turning in their used vehicle for the few remaining rebates from Scrap-It, an industry-led B.C. non-profit that offers rebates to turn in any used gas vehicle, no matter its resale value, for an EV. I had been aware of this opportunity with my dying 2002 Nissan Maxima (270,000 clicks) but passed, despite the dealer telling me Scrap-It may not return in 2020. Putting aside environmental factors first, I will outline a few of my personal circumstances and how I processed my decision to put the brakes on a new EV buy – at least for now. While I may not like it or agree with it, I, like many, am a creature of decades of urban planning that’s led to urban sprawl. My baseline assumptions while EV shopping include me living far from work, raising a family on two average incomes and two cars and presumably not having effective transit service to ditch the second – in other words, the typical driver. Of course, these factors change over time. Since I know I need a car soon, I first looked at feasibility. Note, the Tesla Model 3 is out of my price range and I had narrowed my search down to the base model Chevrolet Bolt ($44,800 suggested retail price, plus taxes) due to its relatively higher range (distance per charge). I calculated the cost of a Bolt to be about $625 per month for five years of three per cent financing, after the three combined rebates. I commute each workday and put about 1,000 kilometres per month on my car, costing me about $225 per month in gas. Even with B.C.’s relatively cheap electricity

costs, running a Bolt 1,000 kilometres will cost me about $30 monthly. I also considered that I’d use an EV for nonwork/family commuting when possible, meaning less gas for our 2012 Honda CR-V. So I’d estimate my new car payment is de facto $400 per month, discounting any differences I’ll pay in insurance. Not bad, but do I really need this EV over a much cheaper used gas vehicle? Here is where things start to unravel. Because I have a mid-range commute between Richmond and Vancouver I don’t drive enough to buy a new Bolt, which seems like a lot of car, price-wise, despite its small size and nondescript features. If I drove more or lived further away (potentially using the EV high-occupancy vehicle decal available in B.C.), it’s certainly a different conversation. Furthermore, getting electric SUVs into the market will certainly sway people such as myself. I could choose a cheaper EV model with less range, but the constant search for public chargers and daily plugging seems daunting. Furthermore, an EV may not be compatible with certain future housing options. I also need to consider that over time the battery’s efficiency will decline, leaving me with less range. And battery replacement would wash away any or most maintenance savings over a regular car (and an EV still needs new brakes, tires, electronic panel pieces, etc.). That said, I would concede batteries seem to be standing up to their warranties to date. This brings me to environmental concerns, which should mitigate some of the practical inconveniences of EVs I’ve briefly outlined. Here in B.C. our carbon-free hydroelectricity means we can rest assured using EVs is better than gas vehicles. However, I’m not at all convinced, what with the environmental toll of mining and manufacturing, the EV revolution is a better paradigm shift than an aggressive plan for more mass transit. Maybe I will have buyer’s remorse – both financially and environmentally. Regardless, I generally concur with a recent CBC analysis that concludes electric vehicles are at a “tipping point.” Batteries are improving, prices are falling, infrastructure is increasing and SUVs are coming. But I still find the market is tailored to deeper pockets, single occupants, longer commuters and people more capable of trading in practicality for their environmental choice. And so, even with the rebates, it still seems to me I’m paying a premium for an environmental choice. É Graeme Wood is an investigative journalist with Glacier Media, Vancouver.

• NAYPONG STUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK

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B.C.’S

GREENEST HOME

First Living Building Challenge netzero house in Vancouver will generate more energy than it will ever need

SUSAN M. BOYCE

W

Award-winning green

alking past the construction site on Vancouver’s west side, it’s easy to see the angular design and contemporary, minimalist architecture.

Harder to spot are the details that will ultimately produce what some are suggesting will become the greenest single-family house in the province, possibly in the country. Designed by HCMA Architecture + Design and built by Insightful Healthy Homes, this custom residence is one of only a handful of homes – and the only one in B.C. – pursuing a Living Building Challenge (LBC) certification. “This is by far the most rigorous certification in the world, one that is based on actual performance rather than a checklist of features,” says Arthur Lo, owner of

00_Green Space 2019_xxp_0.indd 19

builder Arthur Lo, president of Insightful Healthy Homes. B.C.’s first Living Building Challenge house, ascending

Insightful Healthy Homes. “But I believe it is the right thing to do, to build houses that are sustainable, energy efficient, healthy for the people who live in them, and beautiful to look at.” Insightful was awarded the Georgie Award this year for best environmental initiative by the Canadian Home Builders Association of BC for an energy-efficient house the company built in North Vancouver, but Lo says his Vancouver creation takes sustainable residential construction to an entirely new level. The Living Building Challenge program is based on

in Vancouver, takes sustainable residential construction to a new level • CHUNG CHOW

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

B.C.S GREENEST HOME

seven principles represented as the petals of a flower: energy, water, materials, site, health, equity and beauty. “This house will produce five per cent more energy than it consumes via photovoltaic solar panels covering most of the roof,” Lo says. “It’s less cumbersome than geothermal and more accessible.” Naturally, the building will also incorporate higher-than-average insulation and exceptional airtightness. Lo and Jay Lin, lead architect from HCMA Architecture, agree that sourcing materials remains the toughest part of achieving the certification: Lo describes the often-frustrating exercise in patience and tenacity as “a nightmare.” The reason? The Red List, a lengthy list of items that are not allowed in the home in any format whatsoever. “In order to know exactly what each and every product you use is made of you have to comb through all the data sheets,” Lin says. “Think about how many components there are in a water meter for example – you have to be able to track every one of them. And in the case of a proprietary material, the company isn’t going to release this information. So then you need to have them sign a letter saying there are no Red List items in their product.” “All the wood used in construction had to be recycled or FSC [Forest

LEFT: An array of rooftop solar panels will help the Living Building Challenge house generate more energy than it requires. Photo is from an Insightful Healthy Homes project in North Vancouver that won an environmental design award this year • INSIGHTFUL HEALTHY HOMES

we believe in exceeding performance standards And so do our building partners. Innotech Windows + Doors delivers the manufacturing expertise and product performance required for your LEED® Platinum, net-zero energy and Passive House Certified multi-family and single family projects.

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Stewardship Council] Pure certified,” Lo adds. “We deconstructed the original house and used the Shou Sugi Ban technique to char the old-growth fir, which we were then able to use as cladding.” But new wood presented a problem. With limited suppliers available who could provide product with no Red List materials, Lo couldn’t buy it as needed: rather he had to purchase an entire container from the Interior, creating storage challenges and the very real possibility of needing just one more board at the end of the build. An unusual requirement of LBC certification is that 40 per cent of the landscape must be agricultural, meant to encourage a more self-sustaining lifestyle. “The homeowner is still finalizing her plans, but she was very clear she wants to grow herbs and vegetables, maybe some fruit trees,” Lo says. As part of the water conservation, two eight-foot-diameter cisterns will capture rainwater run-off to be recycled into irrigation, plus there will be a grey-water treatment system so domestic-use water can be recycled for toilet flushing. With seamless indoor/outdoor integration already in place, this home’s interior is a testament to LBC’s requirement of honouring beauty. “There is a focus on sensory aspects as you walk through this house,” Lin says. A central skylight allows natural light to filter down from top to bottom so there’s a breezy, physical connection throughout all levels that was inspired by the way dappled sunlight moves through the tree canopy in a forest. “You can always see the sun or hear the rain. As you go up, landing by landing, it almost feels as if you’re passing through a series of tree houses.” Now almost two years into the building process, Lo is fulfilling yet another LBC requirement by opening the house for public viewing as an educational tool. “We will likely offer tours for a month or two,” he says. “People will be able to see how everything works and why we’ve incorporated it.” Lo acknowledges the financial cost of building this home is significantly higher than that of a conventional house. “There’s an incredible amount of prep – computer modelling, sourcing materials, working with the architect to create beauty. We were so lucky the owner agreed to do this. The industry needs people to champion pioneering design like this – design that makes the world a better, more sustainable place to live.” É

00_Green Space 2019_xxp_0.indd 21

“As you go up, landing by landing, it almost feels as if you’re passing through a series of tree houses,” says builder Arthur Lo • CHUNG CHOW

MEETING THE CHALLENGE The Living Building Challenge, from the Seattle, Washingtonbased International Living Future Institute, is the world’s most rigorous proven performance standards for buildings. A key aspect is that the building is self-sustaining. The Insightful Healthy Homes house, once completed, would be monitored to see if it qualifies as the first privately built Living Building Challenge house in Canada. Only one other project in Vancouver, an addition to the VanDusen Botantical Garden, has ever attempted to meet the Living Building Challenge, but it ultimately failed to achieve registration. Two other public-sector projects, both on Vancouver Island, also fell short of the challenge, according to Michael Berrisford, editor-in-chief of Ecotone Publishing, the publications division of the International Living Future Institute.

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

GUNNING FOR

NET ZERO

Vancouver’s high-rise developers are designing and building Canada’s most environmentally astute commercial towers

00_Green Space 2019_xxp_0.indd 22

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FRANK O’BRIEN

T

wo years ago, as part of its Greenest City Action Plan, the City of Vancouver released its Green Buildings Policy for Rezoning, which affects nearly all new buildings.

A main goal of this policy is to move buildings towards a low or near zero carbon emissions by 2030, a key part of the city’s recently announced “six big moves to reduce carbon pollution.” With a record-setting 4.6 million square feet of new office space ascending in Vancouver over the next three to four years, developers have embraced sustainability features. On Melville Street, Oxford Properties is building the tallest and potentially greenest office tower Vancouver has ever seen. The 36-floor Stack is one of only two highrise buildings in Canada being built to the Net Zero Carbon standard from the Canada Green Building Council. Net zero means that the building will be fully powered with renewable energy and will produce as much energy as it uses. “The Stack breaks new ground by incorporating employee wellness into the fabric of its design through its use of natural light, outdoor space and cycling amenities [and] we’re future-proofing the building with the adoption of smart building technology,” says Chuck We, vice-president of office at Oxford, the real estate arm of the Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System. At the June 20 groundbreaking for the project, City of Vancouver Coun. Rebecca Bligh noted that it is adding more than a first-class workspace that meets the city’s climate action strategy. Bligh says the development has also resulted in “more than $50 million in community amenities, which will include child care, subsidized housing and public art in the downtown.” Blue-chip tenants have pre-leased a total of 207,000

square feet in the 525,000-square-foot tower. Construction has started and completion is expected in the first quarter of 2022. The building is targeting LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum status, and its climbing, twisted box design is from James KM Cheng Architects and Adamson Associates Architects. A few blocks east, GWL Realty Advisors is completing the 33-storey Vancouver Centre 2 office tower, a 371,000-square-foot building. Expected to complete in mid-2021, and designed by Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership, Vancouver Centre 2 will be built to LEED Platinum standard and will be certified WELL, which refers to the health of the building for its occupants. BentallGreenOak’s first Vancouver flagship will be a 32-storey office tower at 1090 West Pender aiming for LEED Gold standards and Well certification. The Exchange office tower on Howe Street, which includes the Exchange Hotel built from the shell of the old Vancouver Stock Exchange, was built LEED Platinum and the hotel section was the first LEED Platinum heritage renovation in Canada. Telus Garden on West Georgia features its own energy district utility plant that recovers heat from adjacent buildings, as well as through an array of rooftop solar panels on the LEED Platinum tower.

THERE IS MORE OF A FOCUS NOW ON THE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING AND THE PRODUCTIVITY OF THE OCCUPANTS j Guthrie Cox President, Canada View Inc.

LEFT: The Stack office tower in Vancouver will be one of only two office towers in Canada built

SUNGLASS WINDOWS

British Columbia’s first commercial office tower equipped with new electric-powered, sunglasses-like windows that automatically react to sunlight has already opened at 988 West Broadway in Vancouver.

to the Net Zero Carbon standard of the Canada Green Building Council • OXFORD PROPERTIES

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

GUNNING FOR NET ZERO

The triple-A-class, 107,000-square-foot-tower by BlueSky Properties has View smart windows installed on 10 floors of the 11-storey, fully leased tower. Developed in Silicon Valley, the View Inc. smart exterior windows remove the need for blinds or screen while providing security since the glass can also be darkened with an app, according to View customer success manager Linh Nguyen. The double-pane windows are programmed to automatically track the sun and change the shading in response. While the windows reduce a building’s energy use by an estimated 20 per cent compared with conventional glazing, View is promoting the wellness aspects of the technology. “There is more of a focus now on the health and well-being and the productivity of the occupants,” says Guthrie Cox, president, Canada for View, which has offices in Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary. Cox points to a recent survey by the Harvard Business Review that shows that 78 per cent of office employees believe access to natural light and views improves their well-being and 70 per cent report improved work performance when daylight is available. View’s electrochromic windows use a single-line, low-voltage electrical current that allows a micro-thin layer of metal oxide to reflect or absorb light, tinting or untinting the windows. Cox says that 1,800 square feet of View windows draw the same power as a 60-watt light bulb, even when tinting. “It is like giant sunglasses,” says Nguyen, who estimates 400 buildings in North America have had the View smart glazing installed, with another 150 in progress.

00_Green Space 2019_xxp_0.indd 24

TOP: Windows that track the sun and automatically tint in bright sunlight have been installed on a West Broadway office tower. The windows can help to lower energy use by as much as 20 per cent • VIEW INC.

Vancouver Coun. Rebecca Bligh at the Stack groundbreaking on June 20: office tower matches the city’s climate emergency response that calls for embodied emissions from new buildings to be reduced by 40 per cent from current levels by 2030 • NIMA ZADRAFI

The windows can help qualify a building to up to 13 LEED credits, according to View, which is based in California. The typical net fully installed cost of the View smart glass is $130 per square foot in the curtain wall applications of office buildings, Guthrie estimates, but added actual cost is lower due to ongoing reductions in energy use and the elimination of blinds and overhangs. É

2019-07-12 11:40 AM


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2020 GREEN SPACE AD

Call 604-688-2398 or email ads@biv.com C Space Close: June 18, 2020

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

GREEN SPACE DIRECTORY

The Green Space directory provides listings of professionals and firms with expertise in all aspects of green building design, construction, retrofit and demolition. The products section offers a range of green

PRODUCTS

ADHESIVES, CAULKS & SEALANTS

Cascade Aqua-Tech 3215 Norland Ave Suite 100, Burnaby V5B 2A9 ..................................... p: 604-291-6101 e: sales@cascadeaqua.com cascadeaqua.com

APPLIANCES Ben’s Appliances Sales & Service 13664 104 Ave, Surrey V3T 1W2 ....................................p: 604-581-4307 e: contact@bensappliances.ca maytagstorebc.com Bradlee Distributors Inc 13780 Bridgeport Rd, Richmond V6V 1V3 .....................................p: 604-244-1744 e: showroomrichmond@bradlee.net bradlee.net Echelon Home Products 11120 Horseshoe Way Unit 120, Richmond V7A 5H7 .....................................p: 604-275-2210 e: marketing@echelonhomeproducts.com echelonhomeproducts.ca Miele Experience Centre Vancouver 69 Smithe St, Vancouver V6B 1C1 .....................................p: 866-758-0462 e: gallerybc@miele.ca mielecentre.ca/vancouver Monde Home Products 11120 Horseshoe Way Unit 120, Richmond V7A 5H7 .....................................p: 604-275-2210 e: marketing@mondehomeproducts.com mondehomeproducts.ca

DECKING, FENCING & OUTDOOR STRUCTURES Longhouse Mill and Timber PO Box 782, Qualicum Beach V9K 1T2 Brian Jenkins .............................p: 250-248-5887 e: longhousetrading@telus.net longhousecedar.com Taiga Building Products Ltd 4710 Kingsway Suite 800, Burnaby V5H 4M2 .................................... p: 604-438-1471 e: marketing@taigabuilding.com taigabuilding.com West Wind Hardwood Inc 10189 McDonald Park Rd Suite 5 PO Box 2205, Sidney V8L 5X5 Shelley Nielsen ..........................p: 250-656-0848 e: shelley@westwindhardwood.com westwindhardwood.com Wishbone Site Furnishings 27090 Gloucester Way Unit 210, Langley V4W 3Y5 John Jansen ...............................p: 604-626-0476 e: john@wishboneltd.com wishboneltd.com

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building products and technologies available for construction projects in B.C. Many professional associations and buildingrelated organizations are listed as potential sources of green building information.

DOORS Innotech Windows + Doors Inc 27452 52 Ave, Langley V4W 4B2 Mika Laspa ................................ p: 604-854-1111 e: info@innotech-windows.com innotech-windows.com Vinyltek Windows 587 Ebury Pl, Delta V3M 6M8 ...................................p: 604-540-0029 e: sales@vinyltek.com vinyltek.com

ELECTRICAL & LIGHTING BC LED Online 347 Leon Ave Suite 210, Kelowna V1Y 8C7 .....................................p: 250-718-8100 e: info@bcledonline.com bcledonline.com Commercial Lighting Products Ltd 1535 Cliveden Ave, Delta V3M 6P7 Don Paul.....................................p: 604-540-4999 comlight.com First Light Technologies 3303B Tennyson Ave, Victoria V8Z 3P5 Scott Daly ..................................p: 844-279-8754 e: info@firstlighttechnologies.com firstlighttechnologies.com KM Roberts & Associates Ltd 18812 96 Ave Suite 20, Surrey V4N 3R1 Brian H Le Cappelain .................p: 604-882-8488 e: blecappelain@kmroberts.com kmroberts.com Portable Electric Ltd 3095 Hebb Ave, Vancouver V5M 4P7 Mark Rabin ................................p: 604-901-2500 e: info@portable-electric.com portable-electric.com

EXTERIOR FINISH & TRIM Longhouse Mill and Timber PO Box 782, Qualicum Beach V9K 1T2 Brian Jenkins .............................p: 250-248-5887 e: longhousetrading@telus.net longhousecedar.com MagO Building Products 2203 43rd Ave E, Vancouver V5P 1M8 Peter Francis .............................. p: 604-290-1961 e: pfrancis@magobp.com magobp.com

FLOORING & FLOOR COVERINGS Ames Tile & Stone Ltd 2229 Beta Ave, Burnaby V5C 5N1 .....................................p: 604-294-8453 e: burnaby@amestile.com amestile.com Bay Resource Group Inc 11280 Twigg Pl Unit 173, Richmond V6V 0A6 .....................................p: 604-324-8819 e: ed@bayresourcegroup.ca bayresourcegroup.ca The Eco Floor Store (BC) Ltd 5511 192 St Suite 203, Surrey V3S 8E5 Clayton Mickey ..........................p: 604-576-4400 e: clayton@ecofloorstore.ca ecofloorstore.ca

West Wind Hardwood Inc 10189 McDonald Park Rd Suite 5 PO Box 2205, Sidney V8L 5X5 Shelley Nielsen ..........................p: 250-656-0848 e: shelley@westwindhardwood.com westwindhardwood.com

Western Reclaimed Timber 26324 River Rd PO Box 93 Stn Whonnock, Maple Ridge V2W 1V9 Bruce MacDonald ......................p: 604-462-8845 e: info@westernreclaimed.com westernreclaimed.com

FOUNDATIONS, FOOTERS & SLABS

MECHANICAL SYSTEMS/ HVAC

Lehigh Hanson Canada 8955 Shaughnessy St, Vancouver V6P 3Y7 ...................................... p: 604-946-0411 lehighhansoncanada.com

Equipco Ltd 42 Fawcett Rd Suite 101, Coquitlam V3K 6X9 .....................................p: 604-522-5590 e: sales@equipcoltd.com equipcoltd.com Terra Mechanical Ltd 1643 Beach Grove Rd, Delta V4L 1P4 ...................................... p: 778-858-2991 e: office@terramechanical.ca terramechanical.ca Trane BC 3080 Beta Ave, Burnaby V5G 4K4 .....................................p: 604-473-5600 trane.com/vancouver

FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS Wishbone Site Furnishings 27090 Gloucester Way Unit 210, Langley V4W 3Y5 John Jansen ...............................p: 604-626-0476 e: john@wishboneltd.com wishboneltd.com

INSULATION Eagle Specialized Coatings and Protected Environments 15299 57 Ave, Surrey V3S 8R5 Douglas Pearce ..........................p: 604-576-2212 e: president@eaglecoatings.com eaglecoatings.com Small Planet Supply Canada 334 East Kent Ave S Suite 105, Vancouver V5X 4N6 .....................................p: 778-379-8700 e: info@smallplanetsupply.com smallplanetsupply.ca

INTERIOR FINISH & TRIM Barrisol BC 328 Esplanade E, North Vancouver V7L 1A4 Sita Carboni ...............................p: 604-981-9663 e: sita@barrisolbc.ca barrisolbc.ca Cascadia Design Products 1614 5th Ave W Suite 100, Vancouver V6J 1N8 .....................................p: 604-739-0966 e: info@cascadiadesign.ca cascadiadesign.ca The Eco Floor Store (BC) Ltd 5511 192 St Suite 203, Surrey V3S 8E5 Clayton Mickey ..........................p: 604-576-4400 e: clayton@ecofloorstore.ca ecofloorstore.ca MagO Building Products 2203 43rd Ave E, Vancouver V5P 1M8 Peter Francis .............................. p: 604-290-1961 e: pfrancis@magobp.com magobp.com West Wind Hardwood Inc 10189 McDonald Park Rd Suite 5 PO Box 2205, Sidney V8L 5X5 Shelley Nielsen ..........................p: 250-656-0848 e: shelley@westwindhardwood.com westwindhardwood.com

OTHER GREEN PRODUCTS Architek Sustainable Building Solutions 28 7th Ave W, Vancouver V5Y 1L6 Ronald Schwenger.....................p: 604-861-9446 e: ron@architek.com architek.com Pacific Arborist Supplies 1538 Bay St, North Vancouver V7J 1A1 Bonny Taylor .............................. p: 604-924-3361 e: bonny@radiusindustrial.ca radiusindustrial.ca Small Planet Supply Canada 334 East Kent Ave S Suite 105, Vancouver V5X 4N6 .....................................p: 778-379-8700 e: info@smallplanetsupply.com smallplanetsupply.ca

PAINTS & COATINGS Cloverdale Paint Inc 2630 Croydon Dr Suite 400, Surrey V3Z 6T3 ...................................... p: 604-596-6261 e: helpdesk@cloverdalepaint.com cloverdalepaint.com Eagle Specialized Coatings and Protected Environments 15299 57 Ave, Surrey V3S 8R5 Douglas Pearce ..........................p: 604-576-2212 e: president@eaglecoatings.com eaglecoatings.com

PLUMBING Barr Plastics Inc 31192 South Fraser Way Unit A, Abbotsford V2T 6L5 Dean Barrett ..............................p: 800-665-4499 e: info@barrplastics.com barrplastics.com Equipco Ltd 42 Fawcett Rd Suite 101, Coquitlam V3K 6X9 .....................................p: 604-522-5590 e: sales@equipcoltd.com equipcoltd.com

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RENEWABLE ENERGY, ON-SITE ENERGY PRODUCTION Hakai Energy Solutions Inc 2956 Ulverston Ave, PO Box 1236 Cumberland V0R 1S0 Jason Jackson............................p: 888-604-3128 e: info@hakaienergysolutions.com hakaienergysolutions.com Terratek Energy Solutions Inc Vancouver Scott Fleenor..............................p: 604-671-5812 e: vancouver@terratek.ca terratek.ca

ROOFING Detec Systems 1728 Shearwater Terrace, Sidney V8L 5L4 ...................................... p: 250-655-0911 e: info@detecsystems.com detecsystems.com

SITE WORK & LANDSCAPING BA Blacktop Ltd 18964 96 Ave, Surrey V4N 3R2 .....................................p: 604-455-3330 e: info@euroviabc.com bablacktop.com Denbow 40874 Yale Rd W, Chilliwack V2R 4J2 ......................................p: 888-933-6269 e: sales@denbow.com denbow.com

WINDOWS Centra Windows 20178 98 Ave, Langley V1M 3G1 ....................................p: 604-882-5010 e: info@centrawindows.com centrawindows.com

EuroLine Windows Inc 7620 MacDonald Rd, Delta V4G 1N2 .....................................p: 604-940-8485 e: info@euroline-windows.com euroline-windows.com Innotech Windows + Doors Inc 27452 52 Ave, Langley V4W 4B2 Mika Laspa ................................ p: 604-854-1111 e: info@innotech-windows.com innotech-windows.com Vinyltek Windows 587 Ebury Pl, Delta V3M 6M8 ...................................p: 604-540-0029 e: sales@vinyltek.com vinyltek.com Westeck Windows Mfg Inc 8104 Evans Rd, Chilliwack V2R 5R8 .....................................p: 604-792-6700 e: sales@westeckwindows.com westeckwindows.com

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GE0EXCHANGE BC

GeoExchange BC is the provincial industry association in British Columbia dedicated to the education, promotion and responsible design and installation of lowtemperature ground-source (geoexchange) energy systems. The vision of GeoExchange BC is to see “geoexchange” established as a widely recognized, reliable, highperformance, and competitive heating and cooling delivery technology in British Columbia. The mission of GeoExchange BC is to promote public awareness, improve professional capabilities, research and develop literature, and provide information sharing between industry professionals and other stakeholders associated with the geoexchange industry.

CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER Okanagan Geothermal Ltd. Enderby ......................................p: 250-838-0809 Jim Croken e: jim@okanagangeothermal.net Nick Croken e: nick@okanagangeothermal.net Schmidt Bros. Mechanical Ltd. Vancouver ..................................p: 604-224-7068 Roland Schmidt e: roland@schmidtbros.ca

CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER, DESIGNER OF SYSTEMS Energy 1 Services Ltd West Vancouver ......................p: 1-844-488-3700 Scott Miller e: info@energy1services.com Lockhart Industries (Duncan) Ltd. Duncan ....................................... p: 250-748-1731 Doug Lockhart e: lockhart@lockhart.ca

CONTRACTOR/ INSTALLER, DESIGNER OF SYSTEMS, ENGINEER (GEOEXCHANGE), SUPPLIER/DISTRIBUTOR, DRILLER GeoTility Geothermal Installations Corp. Kelowna .....................................p: 250-762-5776 Steve Begley e: sbegley@geotility.ca Gordon Horbay e: ghorbay@geotility.ca Jordan Parro e: jparro@geotility.ca Stuart Yanow e: syanow@geotility.ca

CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER, DESIGNER OF SYSTEMS, ENGINEER (MECHANICAL) Tritech Group Langley.......................................p: 604-762-4725 Bonnie Wood e: bwood@tritechgroup.ca

CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER, DRILLER Ground Source Drilling Ltd. Kelowna .....................................p: 250-808-7155 Len Faasse e: scott@groundsourcedrilling.com Scott Steward e: scott@groundsourcedrilling.com Red Williams Well Drilling Ltd. Qualicum Beach .........................p: 250-951-0556 Mary Sovereign e: redwoodcentre@shaw.ca Thomas Williams e: reds_drilling@shaw.ca William Williams e: reds_drilling@shaw.ca Sonic Drilling Ltd. Surrey......................................... p: 604-588-6081 Bill Fitzgerald e: bill.fitzgerald@sonicdrilling.com Ray Roussy e: jgrant@sonicdrilling.com

CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER, DRILLER, MANUFACTURER Sonic Drilling Ltd. Surrey.........................................p: 604-588-6080 Jackquie Grant e: jgrant@sonicdrilling.com

DESIGNER OF SYSTEMS Beatty Geothermal Consulting Vancouver ..................................p: 778-847-0224 Jeremy Beatty e: jeremy@beattygeo.ca

DRILLER Ground Source Drilling Ltd Kelowna .....................................p: 778-753-2779 Justin Faasse e: info@groundsourcedrilling.com Richard Cronin / Drilling & Grouting Consultant Abbotsford .................................p: 604-308-3165 Richard Cronin e: drillshark@shaw.ca

ENGINEER (GEOEXCHANGE) Associated Engineering Vancouver .................................. p: 604-293-1411 Ruben Arellano e: arellanor@ae.ca Rachel Bolongaro e: bolongaror@ae.ca Falcon Engineering Ltd. Kelowna .....................................p: 250-762-9993 Jeff Quibell e: jeff.quibell@falcon.ca

ENGINEER (GEOEXCHANGE), ENGINEER (MECHANICAL) HPF Engineering Ltd. Kamloops ...................................p: 250-828-7992 Neal Rogers e: neal@hpfengineering.com

ENGINEER (GEOEXCHANGE), UTILITY Fenix Energy Solutions Burnaby ...................................... p: 604-684-7241 Hart Starr Crawford e: hstarrcrawford@ fenixenergy.com

ENGINEER (MECHANICAL) Beaver Engineering Ltd. Langley....................................... p: 604-534-3151 Richard Marier e: richard@rmeng.ca

ENGINEER (MECHANICAL), SUPPLIER/DISTRIBUTOR NextEnergy West Technologies Enderby BC.................................p: 778-214-1125 Nick Croken e: nick@nextenergywest.ca

MANUFACTURER, SUPPLIER/DISTRIBUTOR International Pipe Inc Selkirk ........................................p: 204-482-4675 Kelly Culbertson e: kelly@internationalpipe.ca April Godlein e: april@internationalpipe.ca Crystal Thibeault e: pipe@internationalpipe.ca

SUPPLIER/DISTRIBUTOR Hydron-Aire / Water Furnace Bowen Island .............................p: 604-454-4712 Wayne Carpenter e: waterfurnacewayne@shaw.ca

SUPPLIER/DISTRIBUTOR, CONTRACTOR/INSTALLER Enerwest Geothermal Distribution Nelson........................................ p: 250-825-4011 Garry Meadows e: garry@enerwest.net

UTILITY FortisBC Kelowna ..................................... p: 778-215-4571 Dan Higginson e: dan.higginson@fortisbc.com

SERVICES

ARCHITECTS

BlueGreen Architecture Inc 436 Lorne St Suite 2, Kamloops V2C 1W3 Kevin Ryan .................................p: 250-374-1112 e: kryan@bluegreenarch.com bluegreenarchitecture.com Cornerstone Architecture 611 Alexander St Suite 307, Vancouver V6A 1E1 .....................................p: 604-253-8800 cornerarch.com DA Architects + Planners 1014 Homer St Suite 200, Vancouver V6B 2W9 ....................................p: 604-685-6312 e: rknill@da-architects.ca da-architects.ca Dialog 611 Alexander St Suite 406, Vancouver V6A 1E1 Edel Naughton ...........................p: 604-255-1169 e: enaughton@dialogdesign.ca dialogdesign.ca Formwerks Architectural Inc 1625 5th Ave W, Vancouver V6J 1N5 ..................................... p: 604-683-5441 e: info@formwerks.ca formwerks.ca Frits De Vries Architects Ltd 1834 1st Ave W, Vancouver V6J 1G5 Frits De Vries .............................p: 604-736-7820 frits.ca HCMA Architecture + Design 675 Hastings St W Suite 400, Vancouver V6B 1N2 .....................................p: 604-732-6620 e: office@hcma.ca hcma.ca Helliwell + Smith: Blue Sky Architecture Inc 4090 Bayridge Ave, West Vancouver V7V 3K1 Bo Helliwell ...............................p: 604-921-8646 e: bsa@blueskyarchitecture.com blueskyarchitecture.com Iredale Group Architecture 12 Water St Suite 220, Vancouver V6B 1A5 ..................................... p: 604-736-5581 e: architect@iredale.ca iredale.ca Local Practice Architecture 1447 Hornby St 2nd Floor, Vancouver V6Z 1W8 Michel Labrie .............................p: 604-343-4525 e: info@localpractice.ca localpractice.ca Merrick Architecture - Borowski Sakumoto Fligg McIntyre Ltd 839 Cambie St Suite 300, Vancouver V6B 2P4 ...................................... p: 604-683-4131 e: info@merrickarch.com merrickarch.com MIZA Architects Inc 2425 Quebec St Suite 303, Vancouver V5T 4L6 Michael Wartman......................p: 604-790-1688 e: mwartman@mizaarchitects.com mizaarchitects.com Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership 1066 Hastings St W Suite 1900, Vancouver V6E 3X1 Mark Thompson .........................p: 604-687-2990 e: mcmp@mcmparchitects.com mcmparchitects.com

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

GREEN SPACE DIRECTORY

NSDA Architects 134 Abbott St Suite 201, Vancouver V6B 2K4 .....................................p: 604-669-1926 e: info@nsda.bc.ca nsda.bc.ca Omicron Canada Inc 595 Burrard St Suite 500 PO Box 49369, Vancouver V7X 1L4 Karina Selnar .............................p: 604-632-3367 e: kselnar@omicronaec.com omicronaec.com Perkins+Will Canada Architects Co 1220 Homer St, Vancouver V6B 2Y5 .....................................p: 604-484-1558 e: info@perkinswill.com ca.perkinswill.com ZGF Architects Inc 355 Burrard St Suite 350, Vancouver V6C 2G8 .....................................p: 604-558-8390 e: info@zgfcotter.com zgf.com

ASSOCIATIONS Association of Consulting Engineering Companies BC (ACEC-BC) 409 Granville St Suite 1258, Vancouver V6C 1T2 ...................................... p: 604-687-2811 e: info@acec-bc.ca acec-bc.ca BC Bioenergy Network 666 Burrard St Suite 500, Vancouver V6C 3P6 ......................................p: 604-889-4549 bcbioenergy.ca BC Insulators - Heat & Frost Insulators 118 233 11th Ave E, Vancouver V5T 2C4 ......................................p: 604-877-0909 insulators118.org BC Sustainable Energy Association (BCSEA) 1631 Oakland Ave, Victoria V8T 2L3 ......................................p: 604-332-0025 e: info@bcsea.org bcsea.org BC Tech Association 887 Great Northern Way Suite 101, Vancouver V5T 4T5 ......................................p: 604-683-6159 e: info@wearebctech.com wearebctech.com BC Water & Waste Association 4299 Canada Way Suite 247, Burnaby V5G 1H3 .....................................p: 604-433-4389 e: contact@bcwwa.org bcwwa.org British Columbia Environment Industry Association (BCEIA) 1130 Pender St W Suite 305, Vancouver V6E 4A4 ..................................... p: 604-683-2751 e: info@bceia.com bceia.com British Columbia Insulation Contractors Association 4238 Lozells Ave Suite 108, Burnaby V5A 0C4 .....................................p: 604-438-6616 e: info@bcica.org bcica.org Building Owners and Managers Association of BC 409 Granville St Suite 556, Vancouver V6C 1T2 ......................................p: 604-684-3916 e: info@boma.bc.ca boma.bc.ca Canada Green Building Council - BC Chapter 1021 Hastings St W Suite 550, Vancouver V6E 0C3 ......................................p: 866-941-1184 cagbc.org

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Canadian Home Builders’ Association of BC 6400 Roberts St Suite 400 BCIT Campus, Burnaby V5G 4C9 .....................................p: 604-432-7112 e: info@chbabc.org chbabc.org Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Association 475 Georgia St W Suite 660, Vancouver V6B 4M9 ....................................p: 604-283-1040 e: info@chfca.ca chfca.ca Clean Energy BC 409 Granville St Suite 354, Vancouver V6C 1T2 ......................................p: 604-568-4778 e: info@cleanenergybc.org cleanenergybc.org Concrete BC (BCRMCA) 26162 30A Ave, Langley V4W 2W5 .................................. p: 604-626-4141 concretebc.ca Engineers and Geoscientists BC 4010 Regent St Suite 200, Burnaby V5C 6N2 .....................................p: 604-430-8035 e: info@egbc.ca egbc.ca Environmental Managers Association of BC PO Box 3741, Vancouver V6B 3Z8 Pamela ......................................p: 604-998-2226 e: info@emaofbc.com emaofbc.com Forestry Innovation Investment 1130 Pender St W Suite 1200, Vancouver V6E 4A4 .....................................p: 604-685-7507 e: info@bcfii.ca bcfii.ca Homebuilders Association Vancouver 7445 132 St Suite 1011, Surrey V3W 1J8 ....................................p: 778-565-4288 e: info@havan.ca havan.ca Mechanical Contractors Association of BC 3989 Henning Dr Suite 223, Burnaby V5C 6N5 .....................................p: 604-205-5058 e: staff@mcabc.org mcabc.org Passive House Canada 388 Harbour Rd Suite 200, Victoria V9A 3S1 .....................................p: 778-265-2744 passivehousecanada.com Planning Institute of British Columbia (PIBC) 355 Burrard St Suite 1750, Vancouver V6C 2G8 ..................................... p: 604-696-5031 e: info@pibc.bc.ca pibc.bc.ca Roofing Contractors Association of BC 9734 201 St, Langley V1M 3E8 ....................................p: 604-882-9734 e: roofing@rcabc.org rcabc.org Urban Development Institute - Pacific Region 1050 Pender St W Suite 1100, Vancouver V6E 3S7 ......................................p: 604-669-9585 udi.bc.ca Vancouver Regional Construction Association 3636 4th Ave E, Vancouver V5M 1M3 ...................................p: 604-294-3766 e: vrca@vrca.bc.ca vrca.bc.ca Western Red Cedar Lumber Association 700 Pender St W Suite 1501, Vancouver V6C 1G8 .....................................p: 604-891-1262 realcedar.com

BUILDING CONTRACTORS Axiom Builders Inc 838 Hastings St W Suite 1100, Vancouver V6C 0A6 ..................................... p: 604-433-5711 e: info@axiombuilders.ca axiombuilders.ca Best Builders Ltd 5461 12 Ave Suite 103, Delta V4M 2B2 Todd Best....................................p: 604-943-2378 e: info@bestbuilders.ca bestbuilders.ca Bucci Developments Ltd 1669 3rd Ave W Suite 202, Vancouver V6J 1K1 ...................................... p: 604-688-7011 e: admin@bucci.com bucci.com Build-Pros Construction Ltd 3890 St Mary’s Ave, North Vancouver V7N 1Y1 Alex Nasooti ..............................p: 604-780-8118 e: info@buildpros.ca buildpros.ca CR Design & Build Corp PO Box 1488, Whistler V0N 1B0 Craig Ross ..................................p: 604-905-6645 e: info@crdesignandbuild.com crdesignandbuild.com Darwin Construction 197 Forester St Suite 404, North Vancouver V7H 0A6 .....................................p: 604-929-7944 e: info@darwin.ca darwinconstruction.ca Division 15 Mechanical Ltd 6582 144 St, Surrey V3W 5R4 ....................................p: 604-214-8730 e: info@div15mechanical.com div15mechanical.com Double V Construction Ltd 13303 78 Ave Suite 406, Surrey V3W 5B9 Shane Van Vliet ......................... p: 604-590-3131 e: info@doublevconstruction.com doublevconstruction.com Enersolv Design + Build Ltd 3711 North Fraser Way Suite 50, Burnaby V5J 5J2 ......................................p: 604-684-7244 e: admin@enersolv.ca enersolv.ca InHaus Development Ltd 1020 Mainland St Suite 142, Vancouver V6B 2T5 Dave deBruyn.............................p: 604-900-1820 e: info@inhaus.ca inhaus.ca

Insightful Healthy Homes 402 Pender St W Suite 505, Vancouver V6B 1T6 Arthur Lo .................................... p: 604-608-2771 e: info@insightful.ca insightful.ca Kindred Construction Ltd 2150 Broadway W Suite 308, Vancouver V6K 4L9 ......................................p: 604-736-4847 e: info@kindredconstruction.com kindredconstruction.com Kingdom Builders Inc 949 3rd St W Suite 217, North Vancouver V7P 3P7 ......................................p: 604-924-5464 e: info@kingdombuilders.ca kingdombuilders.ca

Lower Coast Building Group 120 Lonsdale Ave Suite 200, North Vancouver V7M 2E8 ....................................p: 604-626-7957 e: office@lowercoast.com lowercoast.com My House Design/Build Team Ltd 15356 Fraser Hwy, Surrey V3R 3P5 ......................................p: 604-694-6873 e: info@myhousedesignbuild.com myhousedesignbuild.com Naikoon Contracting Ltd 342 Esplanade E Suite 302, North Vancouver V7L 1A4 Joe Geluch .................................p: 778-340-1566 e: info@naikoon.ca naikooncontracting.com Natural Balance Premium Home Builders 3288 Dunbar St, Vancouver V6S 2C3 .....................................p: 778-330-7607 e: info@naturalbalancehomes.com naturalbalancehomes.com Velsen Homes Gabriola Island Adam Velsen ..............................p: 250-247-8808 e: adam@velsen.ca velsen.ca Ventana Construction Corp 3875 Henning Dr, Burnaby V5C 6N5 .....................................p: 604-291-9000 e: leed@ventanaconstruction.com ventanaconstruction.com Wales McLelland Construction 6211 Fraserwood Pl, Richmond V6W 1J2 ....................................p: 604-638-1212 e: info@walesmclelland.com walesmclelland.com

COMMUNITY & URBAN PLANNING Metis Design-Build 1511 13th Ave E, Vancouver V5N 2B7 Erick Villagomez .........................p: 604-708-0992 e: info@metisdb.com metisdb.com Pacific Land Group Inc 12992 76 Ave Unit 212, Surrey V3W 2V6 ....................................p: 604-501-1624 e: info@pacificlandgroup.ca pacificlandgroup.ca RWA Group Architecture Ltd 355 Kingsway, Vancouver V5T 3J7 Bev Holmes ................................p: 604-736-8959 e: admin@rwa.ca rwa.ca Urban Systems Ltd 1090 Homer St Suite 550, Vancouver V6B 2W9 .................................... p: 604-235-1701 e: vancouver@urbansystems.ca urbansystems.ca

CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL RECYCLING DEPOTS ABC Recycling Ltd 8081 Meadow Ave, Burnaby V3N 2V9 .....................................p: 604-522-9727 e: info@abcrecycling.com abcrecycling.com Ecowaste Industries Ltd 3031 Viking Way Suite 100, Richmond V6V 1W1 .................................... p: 604-276-9511 e: info@ecowaste.com ecowaste.com Electronic Recycling Association (ERA) 11280 Twigg Pl , Vancouver V6V 0A6 .....................................p: 604-215-4483 e: vancouver@era.ca era.ca

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Pacific Metals Recycling International 8360 Ontario St, Vancouver V5X 3E5 ......................................p: 604-327-1148 e: mlotzkar@pacificmetals.ca pacificmetals.ca Urban Impact Recycling Ltd 15360 Knox Way Suite 300, Richmond V6V 3A6 .....................................p: 604-273-0089 e: mike.sales@urbanimpact.com urbanimpact.com

COUNSEL FOR GREEN BUILDING DESIGN

CONSTRUCTION WASTE HAULERS 505-Junk 2268 No 5 Rd Suite 160, Richmond V6X 2T1 ......................................p: 604-505-5865 e: info@505junk.com 505junk.com Nickel Bros House Moving Ltd 1528 Broadway St, Port Coquitlam V3C 2M8 Cassidy vander Ros ....................p: 604-944-9430 e: cassidy.v@nickelbros.com nickelbros.com

Wood WORKS! BC A Program of the Canadian Wood Council Free-of-charge technical support and resources for building and designing with wood. Lynn Embury-Williams ...............p: 877-929-9663 e: lembury-williams@wood-works.ca wood-works.ca/bc

CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Green Coast Rubbish Inc 506 Brand St, North Vancouver V7N 1G1 Eamonn Duignan........................p: 778-689-4530 e: pickup@greencoastrubbish.com greencoastrubbish.com

AECOM 3292 Production Way Suite 330, Burnaby V5A 4R4 .....................................p: 604-444-6400 e: canadacommunications@aecom.com aecom.com Ausenco 855 Homer St, Vancouver V6B 2W2 .................................... p: 604-684-9311 e: info.nam@ausenco.com ausenco.com Citiwest Consulting Ltd 9030 King George Blvd Suite 101, Surrey V3V 7Y3 Roger Jawanda..........................p: 604-591-2213 e: office@citiwest.com citiwest.com Hatch 1066 Hastings St W Suite 400, Vancouver V6E 3X2 Mellissa Winfield-Lesk ..............p: 604-689-5767 hatch.com Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd 2955 Virtual Way Suite 500, Vancouver V5M 4X6 ....................................p: 604-669-3800 e: info@klohn.com klohn.com MCW Consultants Ltd 1185 Georgia St W Suite 1400, Vancouver V6E 4E6 ...................................... p: 604-687-1821 e: mcw_van@mcw.com mcw.com Williams Engineering Canada 1100 Melville St Suite 740, Vancouver V6E 4A6 .....................................p: 604-689-1915 williamsengineering.com

COST CONSULTANTS Advicas Group Consultants Inc 31 Bastion Sq Suite 100, Victoria V8W 1J1 ....................................p: 250-383-1008 e: admin@advicas.com advicas.com Target Zero Waste Consulting Inc 1567 Deep Cove Rd, North Vancouver V7G 1S4 Jeff Levitt ...................................p: 604-788-7024 e: info@targetzerowaste.com targetzerowaste.com

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DECONSTRUCTION/GREEN DEMOLITION

DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS Core Group Consultants Ltd 8988 Fraserton Crt Suite 320, Burnaby V5J 5H8 .....................................p: 604-299-0605 coregroupconsultants.com Developing Solutions Inc 1578 8th Ave W, Vancouver V6J 4R8 Nora Prevost ..............................p: 604-209-7179 e: devsol@telus.net Urbanics Consultants Ltd 409 Granville St Suite 1207, Vancouver V6C 1T2 ......................................p: 604-669-2724 e: info@urbanics.com urbanics.com

EDUCATION/TRAINING BCIT School of Construction and the Environment Burnaby Campus 3700 Willingdon Ave, Burnaby V5G 3H2 .....................................p: 604-434-5734 bcit.ca/construction Green Workplace Vancouver Nicholas Lamm ..........................p: 604-338-2429 e: info@greenworkplace.ca greenworkplace.ca Society Promoting Environmental Conservation (SPEC) 2305 7th Ave W, Vancouver V6K 1Y4 Oliver Lane .................................p: 604-736-7732 e: admin@spec.bc.ca spec.bc.ca

ENERGY MANAGEMENT FIRMS Capital Home Energy Inc 1778 2nd Ave W Suite 250, Vancouver V6J 1H6 Luke Dolan .................................p: 604-562-0387 e: info@capitalhomeenergy.com capitalhomeenergy.com Freethem Generation Inc 7131 Stride Ave Suite 305, Burnaby V3N 0E3 Claes Fredriksson.......................p: 866-882-0088 e: claes@freethem.com freethem.com

HiH Energy 128 Hastings St W Suite 210, Vancouver V6B 1G8 Ben Mills....................................p: 778-233-7978 e: info@hihenergy.com hihenergy.com Johnson Controls Ltd 3680 2nd Ave E, Vancouver V5M 0A4 ....................................p: 604-707-5200 johnsoncontrols.com Kambo Energy Solutions 409 Granville St Suite 131, Vancouver V6C 1T2 Angela Foster .............................p: 604-629-7813 e: angela@kambo.com kambo.com QMC Submetering Solutions 573 Sherling Pl Suite 1105, Port Coquitlam V3B 0J6 ......................................p: 604-526-5155 e: info@qmeters.com qmeters.com SES Consulting Inc 55 Water St Suite 410, Vancouver V6B 1A1 .....................................p: 604-568-1800 e: info@sesconsulting.com sesconsulting.com

Hemmera 4730 Kingsway Suite 1800, Burnaby V5H 0C6 .....................................p: 604-669-0424 e: phemsley@hemmera.com hemmera.com Keystone Environmental Ltd 4400 Dominion St Suite 320, Burnaby V5G 4G3 ..................................... p: 604-430-0671 e: keyinfo@keystoneenvironmental.ca keystoneenvironmental.ca NEXT Environmental Inc 2550 Boundary Rd Suite 215, Burnaby V5M 3Z3 Harm Gross ................................p: 604-419-3800 e: hgross@nextenvironmental.com nextenvironmental.com

ENERGY SERVICE COMPANIES

PGL Environmental Consultants 1185 Georgia St W Suite 1200, Vancouver V6E 4E6 Duncan Macdonald....................p: 604-682-3707 e: information@pggroup.com pggroup.com Pinchin Ltd 13775 Commerce Pky Suite 200, Richmond V6V 2V4 ..................................... p: 604-244-8101 e: jholland@phharcenv.com pinchin.com SLR Consulting (Canada) Ltd 1620 8th Ave W Suite 200, Vancouver V6J 1V4 Steve Neville .............................p: 604-754-3874 e: sneville@slrconsulting.com slrconsulting.com

Ameresco Canada 2608 Granville St Suite 360, Vancouver V6H 3V3 Doug Wall ..................................p: 604-684-4984 e: dwall@ameresco.com ameresco.ca Corix Utilities Inc 1188 Georgia St W Suite 1160, Vancouver V6E 4A2 .....................................p: 604-697-6700 e: info.utilities@corix.com corix.com Ecolighten Energy Solutions 1460 Main St Suite 200, North Vancouver V7J 1C8 Ryan Coleman ............................p: 604-971-2088 e: info@ecolighten.com ecolighten.com Fenix Energy Solutions Ltd 3711 North Fraser Way Suite 50, Burnaby V5J 5J2 Hart Starr Crawford ................... p: 604-684-7241 e: hstarrcrawford@fenixenergy.com fenixenergy.com

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING Ambleside Environmental 1489 Marine Dr Suite 427, West Vancouver V7T 1B8 ......................................p: 604-281-3993 amblesideenvironmental.com ARCADIS Canada 1080 Mainland St Suite 308, Vancouver V6B 2T4 ...................................... p: 604-632-9941 e: canada.info@arcadis.com arcadis.com Core6 Environmental Ltd 1166 Alberni St Suite 305, Vancouver V6Z 3E3 ......................................p: 604-696-2673 core6.ca CSR Environmental Ltd 3855 Henning Dr Suite 206, Burnaby V5C 6N3 Mamoud Bashi...........................p: 604-559-7100 e: mamoud@csrenviro.com csrenviro.com GOGREEN Environmental Consulting Inc 3050 Gordon Ave Unit 3, Coquitlam V3C 4S7 Erling Kjerside............................p: 604-944-1113 e: erling@gogreenwastewater.com gogreenwastewater.com

GREEN WALLS & GREEN ROOFS Green over Grey - Living Walls & Design Inc 555 Burrard St Suite 900, Vancouver V7X 1M8 ....................................p: 604-837-0333 e: info@greenovergrey.com greenovergrey.com

INDOOR AIR QUALITY SERVICES Design Intent Balancing Services Ltd 32615 Marshall Rd, Abbotsford V2T 1A8 Damian Evans ............................p: 778-552-1487 e: designintent@shaw.ca Island Clean Air Inc 326 East Kent Ave S Suite 101, Vancouver V5X 4N6 .....................................p: 604-322-2979 e: info@islandcleanair.com islandcleanair.com Sterling IAQ Consultants Ltd 2844 Bainbridge Ave PO Box 84014, Burnaby V5A 4T9 .....................................p: 604-678-1284 e: michael@sterlingiaqconsultants.com sterlingiaqconsultants.com

INTEGRATED GREEN BUILDING CONSULTING SERVICES Architek Sustainable Building Solutions 28 7th Ave W, Vancouver V5Y 1L6 Ronald Schwenger.....................p: 604-861-9446 e: ron@architek.com architek.com

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GREEN SPACE 2019 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

GREEN SPACE DIRECTORY

Built Green Canada 8615 104 St, Edmonton AB T6E 4G6 Jenifer Christenson ....................p: 855-485-0920 e: info@builtgreencanada.ca builtgreencanada.ca

Insightful Healthy Homes 402 Pender St W Suite 505, Vancouver V6B 1T6 Arthur Lo .................................... p: 604-608-2771 e: info@insightful.ca insightful.ca Light House: Sustainable Building Centre 425 Carrall St Suite 90, Vancouver V6B 6E3 ......................................p: 604-677-3126 e: info@lhsbc.com sustainablebuildingcentre.com Recollective Consulting Inc 128 Hastings St W Suite 210, Vancouver V6B 1G8 Eesmyal Santos-Brault ..............p: 604-669-4940 e: info@recollective.ca recollective.ca

INTERIOR DESIGN Square One Interior Design 1201 Pender St W Suite 720, Vancouver V6E 2V2 Jennifer Hamilton ......................p: 604-678-1085 e: jennifer@sq1.ca sq1.ca

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Our Designs Landscape Architects & Associates Inc 1335 Fernwood Cres, North Vancouver V7P 1K3 Donna Rodman ..........................p: 604-929-0776 e: donna@ourdesigns.ca/oceanspirit@telus.net ourdesigns.ca Universal design, riparian planting design, health-care planning and design. Additional office: Nelson, B.C. PWL Partnership Landscape Architects Inc 1201 Pender St W Suite 500, Vancouver V6E 2V2 Margot Long .............................. p: 604-688-6111 e: mlong@pwlpartnership.com pwlpartnership.com space2place design inc 291 2nd Ave E Suite 200, Vancouver V5T 1B8 ......................................p: 604-646-4110 e: studio@space2place.com space2place.com

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS ByCar Engineering Ltd 7808 132 St Suite 105A, Surrey V3W 4N1 ...................................p: 604-591-2766 e: info@bycar.ca bycar.ca Integral Group 200 Granville St Suite 180, Vancouver V6C 1S4 .....................................p: 604-687-1800 e: info@integralgroup.com integralgroup.com Rocky Point Engineering Ltd 211 Georgia St E Suite 102, Vancouver V6A 1Z6 .....................................p: 604-559-8809 e: info@rpeng.ca rpeng.ca

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PRODUCTS & TECHNOLOGY PROVIDERS BQE Water 900 Howe St Suite 250, Vancouver V6Z 2M4 Patrick Littlejohn ........................p: 604-685-1243 e: info@bqewater.com bqewater.com Delta Controls Inc 17850 56 Ave, Surrey V3S 1C7 .....................................p: 604-574-9444 e: marketing@deltacontrols.com deltacontrols.com Denbow 40874 Yale Rd W, Chilliwack V2R 4J2 ......................................p: 888-933-6269 e: sales@denbow.com denbow.com Inventys Inc 8528 Glenlyon Pky Unit 143, Burnaby V5J 0B6 Brett Henkel ...............................p: 604-456-0504 e: info@inventysinc.com inventysinc.com Plan B Energy Storage (PBES) 8286 Sherbrooke St, Vancouver V5X 4R6 .....................................p: 604-425-1053 e: info@pbes.com pbes.com Pureworld Solutions Inc 8116 Alexander Rd Suite 204, Delta V4G 1G7 George Terry...............................p: 604-878-8092 e: george@pureworld.ca pureworld.ca Quadrogen Power Systems Inc 8288 North Fraser Way Unit 110, Burnaby V3N 0E9 .....................................p: 604-221-7170 e: sales@quadrogen.com quadrogen.com Rothoblaas Canada Construction Products 16655 64 Ave, Surrey V3S 3V1 Antonio Lo Conte .......................p: 604-788-9788 rothoblaas.com Terra Mechanical Ltd 1643 Beach Grove Rd, Delta V4L 1P4 ...................................... p: 778-858-2991 e: office@terramechanical.ca terramechanical.ca

RENEWABLE ENERGY Ballard Power Systems Inc 9000 Glenlyon Pky, Burnaby V5J 5J8 ......................................p: 604-454-0900 e: marketing@ballard.com ballard.com Connect Thermal Energy Solutions 12235 No 1 Rd, Richmond V7E 1T6 Dana Westermark ......................p: 604-241-4657 connect-tes.com Corvus Energy Inc 13155 Delf Pl Suite 220, Richmond V6V 2A2 .....................................p: 604-227-0280 e: info@corvusenergy.com corvusenergy.com Delta-Q Technologies Corp 3755 Willingdon Ave, Burnaby V5G 3H3 .....................................p: 604-327-8244 e: info@delta-q.com delta-q.com EA Energy Alternatives Ltd 37471 Hwy 16 E, Telkwa V0J 2X2 Kevin Pegg .................................p: 250-846-9888 e: sales@energyalternatives.ca energyalternatives.ca General Fusion Inc 3680 Bonneville Pl Suite 106, Burnaby V3N 4T5 .....................................p: 604-439-3003 e: info@generalfusion.com generalfusion.com

Innergex Renewable Energy Inc 1185 Georgia St W Suite 900, Vancouver V6E 4E6 ......................................p: 604-633-9990 e: info@innergex.com innergex.com Nexterra Systems Corp 650 Georgia St W Suite 1218 PO Box 11582, Vancouver V6B 4N8 ..................................... p: 604-637-2501 e: sales@nexterra.ca nexterra.ca Peace Energy Cooperative 1204 103 Ave Box 2567, Dawson Creek V1G 5A1 Wendie Demyen ........................p: 250-782-3882 e: admin@peaceenergy.ca peaceenergy.ca Pembina Institute 55 Water St Suite 610, Vancouver V6B 1A1 Stephen Hui ...............................p: 604-874-8558 e: stephenh@pembina.org pembina.org Schneider Electric Canada 3700 Gilmore Way, Burnaby V5G 4M1 ....................................p: 604-422-8595 e: canadian.pss@schneider-electric.com schneider-electric.ca/sesolar.com SHARC International Systems Inc 1443 Spitfire Pl, Port Coquitlam V3C 6L4 ......................................p: 604-475-7710 e: lynn.mueller@sharcenergy.com sharcenergy.com VREC - Vancouver Renewable Energy 130 Broadway W, Vancouver V5Y 1P3 Rob Baxter .................................p: 778-869-8333 e: main@vrec.ca vrec.ca Westport Fuel Systems Inc 1750 75th Ave W Suite 101, Vancouver V6P 6G2 .....................................p: 604-718-2000 e: info@wfsinc.com wfsinc.com

SALVAGE CONTRACTORS Richmond Steel Recycling Ltd 11760 Mitchell Rd, Richmond V6V 1V8 .....................................p: 604-324-4656 e: john.rai@simsmm.com simsmm.com/richmondsteel.ca

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Associated Engineering (BC) Ltd 2889 12th Ave E Suite 500, Vancouver V5M 4T5 Lianna Mah ................................ p: 604-293-1411 e: laup@ae.ca ae.ca Glotman Simpson Group 1661 5th Ave W, Vancouver V6J 1N5 .....................................p: 604-734-8822 glotmansimpson.com RJC Engineers 1285 Broadway W Suite 300, Vancouver V6H 3X8 .....................................p: 604-738-0048 e: vancouver@rjc.ca rjc.ca Weiler Smith Bowers 3855 Henning Dr Suite 118, Burnaby V5C 6N3 .....................................p: 604-294-3753 e: wsb@wsb-eng.com wsb-eng.com Wicke Herfst Maver Structural Engineers 2227 Douglas Rd, Burnaby V5C 5A9 Brian Maver ...............................p: 604-484-2859 e: info@whmengineers.com whmengineers.com

SUSTAINABILITY CONSULTING Avid Consulting Group Ltd 610 Granville St Suite 3113, Vancouver V6C 3T3 Jo Anne Gin................................p: 778-317-8814 e: joanne.gin@avidconsulting.ca avidconsulting.ca Biocentric Business Solutions 1140 Castle Cres Suite 190, Port Coquitlam V3C 5R5 Chris Knoll..................................p: 604-328-7253 e: chris@biocentric.ca biocentric.ca Green Workplace Vancouver Nicholas Lamm ..........................p: 604-338-2429 e: info@greenworkplace.ca greenworkplace.ca

WASTE MANAGEMENT/ SOIL REMEDIATION Annacis Waste Disposal Corp 7231 120 St Suite 446, Surrey V3W 0M6 Paul Antoniou ............................p: 604-594-7848 e: paul@annaciswaste.com annaciswaste.com Belkorp Environmental Services Inc 1508 Broadway W Suite 900, Vancouver V6J 1W8 ....................................p: 604-688-8533 belkorp.com Covanta Burnaby Renewable Energy Inc 5150 Riverbend Dr, Burnaby V3N 4V3 Russ Anderson ...........................p: 604-521-1025 covanta.com EcoAction Recycling Services 159 7th Ave W, Vancouver V5Y 1L8 Nick Amado ...............................p: 604-876-3330 e: info@ecoactionrecycling.com ecoactionrecycling.com Fleetwood Disposal Ltd 659 53rd Ave E, Vancouver V5X 1J4 Mickie Anderson........................p: 604-294-1393 e: info@fleetwoodwaste.com fleetwoodwaste.com Peak Disposal Services Inc 10320 East Whalley Blvd Unit 5, Surrey V3T 4H4 .....................................p: 604-690-7325 peakdisposal.com Recycling Alternative 449 Industrial Ave, Vancouver V6A 2P8 Jeff Wint ....................................p: 604-874-7283 e: info@recyclingalternative.com recyclingalternative.com Revolution Resource Recovery Inc 19500 56 Ave, Surrey V3S 6K4 Christine Thompson ...................p: 604-539-1900 e: christine@aforceofnature.ca aforceofnature.ca Wescan Disposal 925 Sherwood Ave Unit 6, Coquitlam V3K 1A9 Dispatch .................................... p: 604-526-9511 e: sales@wescandisposal.com wescandisposal.com

West Coast Reduction Ltd 1292 Venables St, Vancouver V6A 4B4 Jared Girman.............................. p: 604-255-9301 e: info@wcrl.com wcrl.com

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Profile for Business in Vancouver Media Group

Green Space 2019  

Green Space 2019