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BUSINESS TRAVELLER 2017 PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS IN VANCOUVER

BOOKMARK MAGGIE LANGRICK |

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Five great B.C. books to take on a business trip

usiness trips are not vacations, but they too can bring opportunities for reflection, along with new connections, experiences and perspectives. Having the right book as a travel companion can make all the difference in maximizing your trip. You don’t want a mind-numbing beach read; a good business-trip book should

sharpen your mental acuity and enrich your knowledge base while also keeping you entertained. Here’s a selection

of recent B.C. releases worth slipping into your carry-on bag.

SOLITUDE: IN PURSUIT OF A SINGULAR LIFE IN A CROWDED WORLD

By Michael Harris Published by Doubleday Canada Hardcover, $25.99

Michael Harris’ 2015 bestseller The End of Absence warned us that the constant connectivity of the Internet is reshaping us into creatures with short attention spans who value information over wisdom, and quantity over quality in our exchanges with others. Now, the Governor General’s Award-winning author is back with a promise to restore our sanity through rediscovering the value of time alone, away from crowds both real and virtual. At the heart of the book is the notion that the modern habit of cramming hundreds of shallow interactions into our days is eroding our ability to cultivate a rich inner life. Connecting more deeply to ourselves, Harris says, can lead us to deeper and more meaningful connections with others. Next time you find yourself reaching for your iPhone to fill a spare moment, reach for this book instead, and discover the gifts of solitude. BEST FOR: Hiding out in your hotel room

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HOW TO BE EVERYTHING: A GUIDE FOR THOSE WHO (STILL) DON’T KNOW WHAT THEY WANT TO BE WHEN THEY GROW UP

By Emilie Wapnick Published by HarperCollins Canada Paperback, $22.99

Do you dream of playing in a band, going to film school, studying art and design, and maybe also getting a law degree while you’re at it? Your friends and family may call you a dreamer, a slacker, indecisive or worse, but author Emilie Wapnick has a nicer name for you: a “multipotentialite,” or person with many interests. Now a career coach, Wapnick herself did all of those things, and then wrote a book to help other people with similarly diverse passions. How to Be Everything argues that not everyone has “one true calling” in life, and that’s OK. Instead of instructing you on how to choose a particular career path, Wapnick’s book will show you how to design a multi-faceted life and career with room for all aspects of yourself to flourish. BEST FOR: Freeing your inner “multipotentialite”

NO NEWS IS BAD NEWS: CANADA’S MEDIA COLLAPSE— AND WHAT COMES NEXT

By Ian Gill Published by Greystone Books Paperback, $18.95

A lot of attention is being paid to the state of U.S. media right now, as august media institutions fight their corner against “fake news” fabricators and a combative president with an itchy Twitter finger. Meanwhile, Canada’s news media has been steadily spiralling into near-total collapse with little to no public outcry, prompting former Vancouver Sun reporter and CBC broadcaster Ian Gill to investigate why it’s happening and what can be done about it. In No News is Bad News, Gill examines the forces that have brought Canadian news to its knees, from shifting consumer habits and the 2008 economic downturn to relentless cost cutting in dysfunctional, change-resistant newsrooms. The result is an urgent rally cry for Canadians to start caring enough about this critical democratic institution to save it before it’s too late. BEST FOR: Brushing up on current events for cocktail reception conversation

2017-06-07 12:56 PM

Profile for Business in Vancouver Media Group

Business Traveller 2017  

Business Traveller 2017  

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