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The Miegian The Miegian

Vol. 64, Iss. 2 | Feb. 16, 2021 | Bishop Miege High School


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Content Overview

During herd competitions on Jan. 28, senior Sarah Perico represents the Martina Herd as she competes in the cup stacking minute-to-win-it tournament. | EMMA LAZARCZYK

Staff List EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Isabel Copeland

PRINT EDITOR

Isabella Guadamuz

WEB EDITOR

Sindy Garcia

COVER PHOTO | ISABEL COPELAND

STAFF

Colin Batliner Ava Belchez Olivia Cerda Alena Gillespie Delaney Johnson Emma Lazarczyk Maria Nguyen Mary-Kathryn Wert

The Miegian and Bishop Miege Press are published by the newspaper staff of Bishop Miege High School. They are a student-produced newspaper. The editorial board decides the content of each issue. Opinions expressed are the views of the writer and are signed. The Miegian welcomes material (letters, guest columns, feedback) from faculty, administrators, students, parents and community members. This material will be reviewed by the editorial board and published based on the publication’s letters policy criteria. Materials can be dropped off in the journalism room, emailed to newspaper@bishopmiege.com or mailed to the newspaper in care of Bishop Miege High School. All letters and columns must be signed. The staff reserves the right to edit letters for length, language or potential libel, and to refuse any articles or advertising submitted. All opinion pieces submitted should contain an address/email address and a phone number where the writer can be contacted because the staff will confirm all letters.


Letter

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Dear readers, Time flies so fast. It is already the second semester and the second issue of the 2020-2021 Miegian. I am so honored to be writing this letter, and I am very excited to share this issue because I feel we have worked really hard to cover everything that reflects greatly on Miege — all the way from winter sports to the energy that keeps students going throughout the day and some history that makes up the people of Miege. This semester we put our heart and soul into this issue and getting everything together. I believe the Miegian staff is very

dedicated to covering no matter what challenges step in their way. We wanted to cover things that we feel matter most, and as a staff we make those decisions on what we want to share with everyone. As Editor-in-Chief when I edit their stories and help them with design and ideas for pages and stories, I feel comfort knowing that all the work they put in pays off. I hope this issue brings you joy to read because I am very passionate about these stories.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Instagram: @bishopmiegepress Twitter:@b_miege_press Web: bmpress.org

5041 Reinhardt Drive Roeland Park, KS

News 4 News Briefs 6 Teacher Hobbies 8 Sudent Employees Review 5 Local Coffee

Faith 10 Bonding Together Feature 12 Coding 13 Reading 14 Caffeinators

Athletics 18 Cheer & Dance 20 Girls’ Basketball 21 Bowling Opinion 22 Black History

Graphic 24 Valentine’s Day Photos 26 Perspectives Puzzle 28 Word Search


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News

LOCAL NEWS

News Briefs February 15

Stag Scholars

Congratulations to the six students in scholars bowl for being the 4A regional champions. The students who competed were freshmen Alex Haggerty, Alex Smith and Francis Cressey, sophomores Jordan White and Marialuna Schreiner Cintron and senior Charlie Hill. The team is coached by Michael Long and Alicia Baehr. | COURTESY PHOTO

STATE NEWS

Up Next The Kansas City Royals’ first warm-up and workout is sceduled for late February, with eight of the Royals’ top 10 prospects participating. Along with the prospects, returning veterans such as pitcher Wade Davis, who was a part of the winning team in the 2015 World Series, signed minor-league contracts.

PHOTO | UNSPLASH

NATIONAL NEWS

Groundhog Day

Every year on Feb. 2, Phil the groundhog emerges from his burrow in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, to predict whether the spring will come early, or if the winter will last six more weeks. The virtual celebration this year had more than 15,000 viewers. Phil’s prediction this year was that spring will come after six more weeks of winter. PHOTO | PIXABAY

Re-Registration

Re-registration has to be done no later than Feb. 15 in order to be able to select course classes. Select your classes by Feb. 28.

Febuary 17

Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday marks the start of the Lenten period leading up to Easter. The ashes symbolize both death and repentance.

March 15

Spring Break

Spring break kicks off with an 11:30 a.m. dismissal on Friday, March 12. Spring break runs from March 15-19 with March 22 off as a Stag Strut reward. ILLUSTRATIONS | ISABEL COPELAND


Coffee shops near Miege give junior boost of joy AVA BELCHEZ STAFF WRITER

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hether it’s a necessary part of your morning routine or a treat afterschool with friends, drinking a cup of coffee is always a highly enjoyable task. Luckily, there are several coffee shops just a short driving distance from Miege. I took the responsibility of testing out a couple of the local shops. These options are for when you feel like taking a break from the typical chain brand drive-through places, and supporting a sweet and small shop instead. The first place I tried, and definitely would recommend, is Café Corazón on Westport Road. They sell not only classic drinks, but specialty drinks with Latinxinspired flavors, prices ranging from $6-7. I chose a drink called the Cold Brew Hand Warmer, caramel apple flavored.

Review

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Not everyone may enjoy cold brew, but it was just what I needed to stay awake for the rest of the day, plus it came with amazing spiced flavor. I was also able to taste a friend’s drink, the Dulce Manzanita Latte, a sweet, creamy drink topped with caramel and an apple slice. The decor and atmosphere inside the shop is delightful and modern, and the barista was helpful and talkative. I can definitely see myself going back to try more of their menu. A small coffee shop, Hi Hat, is located just a few blocks from Miege in Westwood Hills, Kansas. Local coffee shops The next place that I like it are the best option for a cup of joe, according to recommend is Hi Hat Coffee off of junior staff writer Ava Belchez. I AVA BELCHEZ State Line Road. Hi Hat is a place that I’ve been to many times and will continue to go to. The menu Every time I’ve been to Hi Hat, the at Hi Hat features a number of drinks with baristas always make an effort to make creative names and a fun mix of flavors. conversation, something that has always The price of drinks ranges from $3-4. stood out to me, because it makes the I’m still making my way through the menu, overall experience more enjoyable. but as of now, my favorite drink is The While I love going to places like Blended Bee, one of their frappuccino Dunkin’ and Starbucks, the uniqueness options. of smaller coffee shops makes their visits The building itself is eye-catching; it stand out more. Since Café Corazón, Hi looks straight out of a little European town. Hat and several similar places are so close Inside, it’s rather cramped, so they only to Miege, I highly recommend taking let a couple people in at the same time. It advantage of them and gracing your can be hard to park when it’s busy, but the palette with a delicious cup of local coffee. coffee they serve is worth the wait.

Stag Thoughts

What is your Super Bowl prediction, and why?

“Chiefs by 17, they have Patrick Mahomes and Tyreek Hill.”

“I think the Chiefs are going to win. It’s going to be a close game, but Chiefs by 9.”

“I think the Chiefs will win. They were born to win. They will win by about 7.”

Freshman Quinlan Griggs

Junior Jenna Dorsett

Sophomore Jon Weis


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Teachers

Teachers Outside Who: Ms. Frank What: Screen-printing Outside of her classroom, math teacher Tayrn Frank expresses her creativity through screen-printing. “[I] design a stencil off of a computer app,” Frank said. “And then I have a cricket that cuts it out. And then I push ink through a screen … on a shirt or sweatshirt or whatever. Then

you have to heat set it afterwards.” Frank makes designs for friends, weddings, or just for fun. She began her hobby during quarantine, and she said she enjoys being able to print anything she wants on clothing and not having to buy them from someplace else.

| AVA BELCHEZ

Who: Mr. Anderson What: Skiing Physics is not the only place science teacher Scott Anderson encounters slopes. After learning at 15, Anderson has enjoyed downhill skiing, especially with his family. He skied throughout college, and then was able to teach his kids how to. “The thing I enjoy the most is just the

being outdoors and the being able to hang out with my family,” Anderson said. “Believe it or not, riding chairlifts is fun because you are forced to sit there beside each other … and you have time to have conversations as you’re not going to have most of the time.”

| COURTESY PHOTO

Who: Mrs. Dessert What: Band Musician Spanish teacher Jennifer Dessert is known for playing the ukulele and taking her students around to other classes with it to sing. Her passion for performing stems from majoring and getting a master’s in theater. She has been involved in several bands, including a bluegrass band in Spain and a

| COURTESY PHOTO

vintage jazz band. Her favorite music she’s played is Joni Mitchell. “When you play music with other people, you get to know them really well,” Dessert said. “It’s just a really beautiful shared experience. You always kind of finish a song laughing because you’ve had so much fun.”

DESIGN | AVA BELCHEZ


the Classroom

Teachers

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Who: Mrs. Haggerty What: Business-Owner Not only does French teacher Leigh-Ann Haggerty devote her time to teaching in her classroom, but she also owns and runs her own business, “Language and Music House,” a small school in Westport for people of all ages. Haggerty has 15 employees that teach piano, trombone, trumpet,

Korean, Italian, French and much more. “It’s something that gives back to the community, but it’s still very much things that I love,” Haggerty said. ”Music and language really go together really well. Music is just a different language.” | COURTESY PHOTO

Who: Mr. Long What: Motorcyclist

| COURTESY PHOTO

Since he was about 7, art teacher Michael Long has had an affinity for motorcycles. A few years ago, he was given an old motorcycle that he took completely apart and then rebuilt. He had to sell it, but now owns an electric mountain bike. Long has traveled all the way to Mexico by motorcycle. He and his son, who also owns a bike, have

ridden more than 3,500 miles in the past year and a half. Long said it’s nice to ride whenever he gets the chance to. “It’s unique because you get to smell the area that you’re going through and see things you can’t see inside a car,” Long said. “It’s just a sense of freedom and really therapeutical.”

Who: Mrs. Christie What: Home-improvement Choir director Robin Christie takes on a do-it-herself mindset as she does homeimprovement projects around her house. She has improved room after room, doing work such as flooring, shelving and brickwork. Her projects include an entire bathroom and a Murphy bed, a bed that folds up and into the wall. She started doing home-improvement

projects so she could fix things around the house without hiring someone. Christie only planned to do the bathroom, but had to update other rooms to go with it. “When I succeeded in that I thought, I can do more than this,” Christie said.”And it’s just one project after another.” | COURTESY PHOTO


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Small Business

Work it!

Junior Francesca Dessert stands outside her workplace, Cupini’s. She works on busy Satiurday nights to make money and to help her community. | ISABELLA GUADAMUZ

Small businesses employ students amid pandemic

ISABELLA GUADAMUZ STAFF WRITER

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he clock strikes four on a Saturday afternoon, and the madness begins. Cupini’s has just begun to get busy as customers pour in from various parts of the city. The workers diligently wait for the shift to pick up the pace. The distant smell of both lasagna and garlic bread fill the air as orders rapidly come in. This is what a small business looks like on a busy day. Junior Francesca Dessert works at Cupini’s in Westport in her spare time. Dessert said she takes pride in working for a local business. “I think the best part of working for a small business is the community and warmth that I feel every time I clock in,” Dessert said. “The Cupini’s have always been so kind to me, and more understanding than I could ever ask for from a boss.” Dessert said that feels valued beyond just work and business at Cupini’s. “We love sharing memories about St. Agnes, as their son goes there, and overall

an adjustment to figure out how we were they have always been interested in how going to reach our customers during the I’m doing in school and my personal life,” pandemic,” Dessert said. “But for years the Dessert said. Cupini’s have had a really good take-out Dessert said she enjoys taking system set up, and we have had so many responsibility behind the register as a regulars who have kept us busy and in cashier and making new connections as a business, since COVID began.” server when she works on Saturday nights. Dessert encourages families, students “I enjoy interacting with customers and just establishing connections with people and the restaurant,” Dessert said. “In general, I prefer working weekends, when the restaurant is bustling with families, delicious food, and hectic yet positive energy.” Like most things during the pandemic, the restaurant has undergone drastic changes in the way it operates. However, Dessert remains positive about staying in business. Sophomore Coleman Murray changes the specials board at Fairway “COVID hit the Creamery. He works on the weekends when he has the time to spare. restaurant hard, and it was | ISABELLA GUADAMUZ


and faculty of Bishop Miege to support Cupini’s during an uncertain time. “Students and families should come to Cupini’s because we have an amazing family environment, and all the food is at a very affordable price,” Dessert said. “The service is very friendly, and you’ll get a unique spin on traditional Italian food with anything you order.” Dessert has worked at Cupini’s for almost three years now and has

“I love working the cashier position or server. I enjoy interacting with customers and just establishing connections with people and the restaraunt.”

JUNIOR FRANCESCA DESSERT several recommendations for newcomers. “I recommend the sausage and fennel ravioli, as well as the tomato and mozzarella salad and the passion fruit mousse cake,” Dessert said. Dessert gives helpful tips and tricks to anyone struggling to find a job.“ “If you’re a high schooler looking for a job, I would definitely recommend working with a local smaller business, not a chain,” Dessert said. “They are much more understanding when it comes to conflicts and creating a connection with employees.” Sophomore Coleman Murray works at Fairway Creamery down the road from Miege. Murray said working for a small business is a rewarding experience for him. “The most gratifying part of working in a small business has been the people” Murray said. “Customers have been a huge plus side for me. I love meeting the customers and just being surrounded by good energy all the time.” Although the coronavirus has affected Fairway Creamery, Murray contributes to the business in a meaningful way. “We get less people inside the restaurant, and we aren’t allowed to have people eat inside, which has made it so less people come in,” Murray said. “I really like working over in the ice cream section, but the barista position is pretty simple for me too. I help out wherever I can.” Because of his dedication to the store, Murray finds that there are many rewarding parts of the job. “It’s a good feeling to make money on my own without having to rely on other people,” Murray said. “Plus, I’m the only person from Miege who works here, so it’s nice being able to work with other people I don’t know.” Murray recommends Fairway Creamery to the staff and students at for a variety of reasons. “People should come to Fairway Creamery because of the environment and atmosphere,” Murray said. “The ice cream is pretty good too.” Some of Murray’s recommendations are so popular, the store has sold out. “I really like our pistachio ice cream, and would normally recommend it, but it’s all gone today,” Murray said. “The caramel apple ice cream is amazing though.” Finding a job as a high schooler can be difficult, but Murray offers some courage to those still struggling to find a job. “I would recommend just going out and filling out an application,” Murray said. “Just go for it. All I did was go inside and I asked for an application, and here I am today. You never know what might happen.”

Small Business

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Student Advice: How to Get a job

“My advice would be just go and get one. Don’t wait. Don’t be afraid.”

Senior Luke Hart, Cosentino’s

“If you really want to work somewhere, even if they aren’t hiring, ask for an application. Make sure you have a resume set up as well, in case the hiring manager asks you for one.”

Junior Francesca Dessert, Cupini’s

“From my experience speaking with managers and other important people at my job, the best way to make a good impression is to be friendly, personable, and honest. If you have confidence in yourself and your abilities, your employers will too.”

Senior Maizie Young, Price Chopper

Junior Francesca Dessert polishes a wine glass at Cupini’s. She works on smaller tasks in the quiet moments of her shifts. | ISABELLA GUADAMUZ


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Kairos

Craving Kairos

Senior retreat looks different this year

AVA BELCHEZ

Did You Know?

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STAFF WRITER

Kairos (kai-ros)

ach year, seniors look forward to going on the notable an ancient Greek word meaning the right, critical or Kairos retreat. Due to COVID-19, the question of whether opportune moment this year’s seniors would be able to go was up in the air. And if they could go, what would the retreat look like? Kairos director Bill Creach said he tried to stay optimistic, four-day process, so I always had an energy drink in my hand,” but was apprehensive about how the virus was going to affect Patterson said. “It was very draining, but very, very rewarding.” the retreat. Being a leader is not the easiest thing to do, as the leaders “Physical and emotional closeness are key factors in the describe, and they had to learn how to get used to their job. retreat,” Creach said. “And it gets expressive. There’s a lot “For people being a leader, you just have to realize what of hugging; sometimes I nickname it a hug fest. And so, you’re going into and just accept it,” Fontaine said. “It might be what’s Kairos without the hugs and the a little bit uncomfortable, but it’s fine.” closeness?” Typically, there would have been at least Senior Kairos leader Amy Patterson three retreats by now, but this Kairos is the “I’m happy and relieved agreed that being farther apart from first one this school year. Creach considered that all the great stuff classmates affected the retreat, but that in his options for the next Kairos and its happened. All the silly the end, it was beneficial. leaders before making his final decision. stuff, all the serious stuff, all “There [was] a lot more separation “I’ve got some different scenarios to try and distance that people were feeling,” to figure out,” Creach said. “But definitely, the emotional stuff, just a Patterson said. “But I feel like that also I’m hoping we’re back to normal next year whole combination.” helped add to the overall experience … so that we can have that August retreat for because there was this further separation the class of 2022.” that only brought us together more.” Some of the options include holding Creach said that although they were a couple more retreats before the end of not able to hug and had to be farther the school year and bringing juniors along apart from one another “the magic still to prepare to be leaders, or focusing on happened.” having as many of the seniors go as possible and bringing “I’m happy and relieved that all the great stuff happened,” alumni back to be leaders next The fiveCreach said. “All the silly stuff, all the serious stuff, all the year. fold Cross is a the emotional stuff, just a whole combination.” Creach said his goal is to symbol Several adjustments had to be made for Kairos to happen. have at least one or two more of Kairos. It was originally meant to take place last August, but due to the retreats this year to make up | AVA pandemic, it was postponed to January. The six leaders of this for the one’s missed, so that BELCHEZ Kairos went as juniors in February of last year. seniors who want to take part “It’s a whole different experience than when you went on the in the transformative retreat are retreat yourself,” Patterson said. “It’s like a whole new layer to able to. the Kairos experience.” “[On Kairos] we focus on The leaders and Creach said they were all grateful that the three relationships: relationships retreat was able to go on, even though it was not exactly like with each of us with ourselves, previous ones. each of us with the people in “I really enjoyed my experience as a leader,” senior Kairos our lives and each of us with leader Daniel Fontaine said. “It was very different, obviously, God,” Creach said. “I think the with COVID adjustments, but I still enjoyed my time.” retreat is a great way to meet According to Patterson, being on Kairos and being a leader people, get to know yourself is tiring, but worth every bit of it. better, but also work on you “I got maybe a total combined five hours of sleep over the and God as well.”

KAIROS DIRECTOR BILL CREACH


Retreating from the chaos

Kairos

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Underclassmen attend NET retreats to strengthen their faith

EMMA LAZARCZYK STAFF WRITER

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he auditorium is silent. Classmates had spent the day growing closer to God as well as one another on a deeper level. To conclude their NET retreat, freshmen and sophomore students entered the auditorium for a prayerful reflection. CMT director Bill Creach works with NET every year to provide a spiritual retreat for students and allow them to take a step back from their day-to-day lives. “It’s good to take a timeout when things are crazy especially during a pandemic to just get your barring, to catch your breath and to kinda pause,” Creach said. “And remember what’s Classmates from the sophomore NET retreat joined together in small groups to get to know God’s words on a deeper level. “The retreat really opened my mind about choosing the right friends,” sophomore Jasmine important in life and also to get closer to God, to get closer to you yourself and Tolson said. “And seeing who has the right intentions for me.” | EMMA LAZARCZYK also get closer to people in your class.” excited for a chance to get closer to God to see God in the people I meet,” Tallia The idea of having retreats this year and her classmates — even more so than said. “To just see their joy and to see their was up in the air due to COVID-19. she did as a freshman. love really impacts me and helps me grow According to Creach, the faculty worked “I think as high schoolers we all try to in my faith, because I’m able to see the with NET to create a safe way for students be independent and walk away from God love of God in other people.” to experience a retreat this year. and be like ‘I got this, I can do this,’” Albers According to Tallia, NET’s mission “We just had our first Kairos retreat. said. “The retreat grounds us and brings us specifically this year is to guide students It gave me confidence we can pull it off,” back to the reality that we do need Jesus to hear God’s words and to know that with Creach said. “I was happy with NET making and we need other people to make us be God they are going to be okay. the adjustments to going to half day, I was closer to him.” “I think the retreat really did shine a happy with the administration going with NET missionary Tallia said she hopes light on my prayer life with God,” freshman the idea of remote learning — that frees that these retreats will show God’s love to Ben Frey said. “It has encouraged me to up the whole building.” others and transform their lives. connect with him more and grow in my Sophomore Anna Albers said she felt “My favorite part is probably being able faith.”

Meet a NET Leader: Tallia What made you want to lead retreats and be part of NET? I wanted to become part of the missionary [team] because I’ve always seen people in the world as my brothers and sisters in Christ, so I just had a deep connection to meet more people and be able to love them and be able to show them God’s love.

What is your goal for students after attending a retreat? My goal for [students] is to feel the love of God and that that love is able to transform their lives and they’re able to place God in the center of their lives and live their life for Him.

| EMMA LAZARCZYK


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Coding

CRACKING THE CODE Freshman Patrick Watson and junior William Watson log onto their computers on Jan. 14 to compete in the cybersecurity challenge. Every Thursday, the STAGS Who Code club meets to learn new programs and compete in the competitions. | ALENA GILLESPIE

Students compete in cybersecurity challenge

Frenzel said. “Normally, it is just as long as it takes us to finish.” Each week there are different tasks. Some include cryptography and analyzing log data. STAFF WRITER “It is a lot of brainstorming and solving problems,” he end of the day announcements echo over the intercom. sophomore Finnegan Stocks said. Students go their different ways throughout the hallways During competition days, the coders compete in a group of to their cars, sport practices and clubs. four against different schools from all around the world. Every Thursday, the STAGS Who Code club meets to learn “We were working through problems that we learned the and conquer the cybersecurity challenge. week before, like how to solve them,” Stocks said. Students logged onto their computers and joined their In addition to the cybersecurity challenge, students gain teammates. To begin the competition, STAGS Who Code knowledge in programming. mentor Joan Gladbach led the group in a prayer and wished “We learn about how to use different programming them luck. languages and how to interact with different programs,” “Good luck,” Gladbach said. “May the force be with you.” Frenzel said. Student’s eyes were locked and their Both Frenzel and Stocks joined STAGS minds were concentrated on the bright Who Code with the encouragement of computer screens. The room was silent Gladbach, who teaches them in a class. Trials “I like how you work with with scattered noises from the clicks come with coding, but that’s something that of keyboards, computer mouses, and your team to figure things Stock enjoys. murmurs to oneself. There was talking “I like the challenge and learning about out that you couldn’t just between group members in between different things,” Stocks said. “I look forward figure out on your own.” gulps of water. to learning about cybersecurity.” As the students were focused on their For Frenzel, the team aspect is a competition, Gladbach opened a bag of particular detail that he appreciates. popcorn and a box of rice crispy treats for “You work as a team,” Frenzel said. “I the coders to enjoy. like how you work with your team to figure Throughout the school year, students things out that you couldn’t just figure out in STAGS Who Code have been working on your own.” on the cybersecurity challenge. During Frenzel adds that for those wanting to the challenge, students stay an hour to an hour and a half after join STAGS Who Code should not be worried about catching school. up. “It is really just as long as we can go until we either figure “Just do it,” Frenzel said. everything out or can’t figure everything out,” freshman Luke

ALENA GILLESPIE

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FRESHMAN LUKE FRENZEL


BOOK POWER

Review

Top recommendations offered by Harry Styles MARY-KATHRYN WERT STAFF WRITER

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ometimes it’s easy to forget celebrities are just like us. I tend to have the mindset that celebrities are too busy to do things normal people partake in. Celebrity book lists have proved that very wrong for me. Social media has really changed the game for learning about celebrities’ favorite things and activities. On Instagram, I’ve been able to learn Kendall Jenner’s newest read and the Obamas favorite music. Social media is actually how I found out about Harry Styles book list. For those who may not know me, I absolutely love Harry Styles. So when I saw his book list I immediately felt the need to read them. I have to say, he has a very interesting taste in books, but I can say that I enjoyed most of the ones on the list. I want to recommend some of my favorite books on the list for a good read. “Norwegian Wood” by Haruki Murakami “Norwegian Wood” is one of my favorite books recommended on his list. I don’t think I’ve ever felt as many emotions before as I did reading this book. The book is about a quiet man named Toru who is devoted to his friend Naoko, but their mutual love is stained by the death of their best friend. While Naoko struggles with the pressures of life, Toru reaches out and connects with others. I would not recommend this book for some people as the contents are very depressing, but I enjoyed how real the book was. It’s definitely one of those types of books that leave you stunned and feeling raw, something I was not used to feeling after reading a book. Before you read this book, you should

read another one of Haruki Murakami’s works because this is definitely not the book to read to be introduced to this author. “Love Is a Mixtape” by Rob Sheffield “Love Is a Mixtape” is probably one of my favorite books I’ve ever read. Everything about this book makes me want to cry and feel melancholy for the author. In this memoir, he writes about the love story between him and his deceased wife, Renee, through their mixtapes to each other. Something that enhanced the experience of this book was listening to the song that each chapter had to go along with it. I loved reading this book and following their bittersweet romance. It definitely made me feel single, but also it made me appreciate the people in our lives who bring us joy, even if our moments together are fleeting. If you read any book on the list, this is the one to read.

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complicated relationship arc and shows the struggle for a “happily ever after.” This is another one of those breathtakingly real books that punch you in the face. This book faces what it takes to maintain love and the author’s philosophical beliefs on love. After reading this, I had food for thought for days as I even took time to reevaluate my own ideals. The biggest takeaway from this book is that even if we struggle, love will prevail, which is heartwarming in itself. After reading all these books I realized that there’s so much we don’t know about our favorite celebrities. If I didn’t look into these, I don’t think I would have ever realized just how much of a romantic Harry Styles is and how much of a philosophical thinker he is. I would definitely recommend checking these books out and reading some books that your own favorite celebrities read.

“The Course of Love” by Alain de Botton After reading this book, if you didn’t know Harry Styles is a romantic, you do now. This book is the story of a married couple and their

PHOTOS I MARY-KATHRYN WERT


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Caffeine

CAFFEINE

PHOTO | MARIA NGUYEN


CRAZE

Caffeine

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Caffeine adds some energy to student life ISABEL COPELAND & MARIA NGUYEN

STAFF WRITERS

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here are two types of people in the world: early risers and … not early risers. For the latter, the very first step of waking up in the morning can prove to be incredibly difficult. Students like senior Elizabeth Ruiz turn to a solution that is sure to give them the energy boost they need: caffeine. “My main source of caffeine is just homemade coffee, and I have it usually once a day or maybe two cups on the weekend,” senior Elizabeth Ruiz said.”There are for sure downsides to coffee, such as that I hit the wall once the caffeine wears off.” It is true that caffeine can affect health, sleep, and attitude, and the temporary effects of it can be both positive and negative to students. On one end, according to Live Science, there’s evidence that caffeine can help improve memory and boost concentration. “Last semester, I was in AP Government and Politics, and I had to stay up super late,” Ruiz said. “It just helped me stay awake for a few hours and be productive and focused.” For students especially, the earlymorning routine can sometimes be demanding, especially if they have homework, extracurriculars or any other activity that calls for an early start. Consequently, many turn to caffeine to ease along the morning. “I have a bit of a caffeine addiction,” sophomore Maggie Noblitt said. “I don’t like coffee because it makes me anxious, but I love energy drinks. When I am filled with energy, I get on a roll and get things done.” Of course, consuming energy drinks eight or more times a week like Noblitt does can have consequences that can


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Caffeine

greatly influence health. “Drinking a lot of Monsters does catch up to me sometimes, and I crash,” Noblitt said. “Because I drink Monsters so often, when I don’t have one I can also get migraines.” Caffeine can easily become an essential part of daily student life. However, while there is a sizable amount of students who drink caffeine often, there are just as many teachers and students who limit their intake. According to an online caffeine survey of 132 Miege students, about 17 percent of students don’t have any caffeine at all. “Drinking coffee is fine to an extent, but I wouldn’t drink it every day,” math teacher Taryn Frank said. “Whether you drink coffee a lot or a little, always do it in moderation.” Caffeinated beverages may be a must-have for many students and teachers, but others who don’t share their perspective have their reasons for choosing other beverages. “I feel like if you have caffeine regularly, and then one day you don’t have it, you will have less focus and studying will be harder because it can be addictive,” senior

Sarah Perico said. “Alternatively, I think the best way to get energy is sleep.” Although caffeine is a quick and easy way to speed up the body or brain, consuming caffeine too often can sometimes lead to health consequences. These potentially harmful side effects can vary from student to student. “I’ve seen students get headaches, be jittery, have their heart racing, or get stomach aches after drinking too much caffeine,” nurse Malisa McEachen said. “When it comes to energy drinks, the amount of caffeine is very high. Drinking several can have negative effects such as caffeine toxicities.” The repercussions of too much caffeine can lead to negative performances in academics, sports, or extracurricular activities. Especially if there is a certain level of dependence on caffeine, the toll that it can take on students can be dangerous. “I’ve seen a student who had all those side effects from too much caffeine.” McEachen said. “He got no sleep, so in the morning drank several Bangs. He ended up feeling absolutely horrible from it.” While it is true that too much caffeine can have harmful effects, this doesn’t mean that all caffeine is bad. Alternative energy sources or a limited intake of caffeine can still produce a healthy, energized lifestyle. “Not overdoing the caffeine can make the mind more alert, and there are even studies about physical enhancement due to caffeine,” McEachen said. “In moderate amounts, caffeine has its benefits.”

“In moderate amounts, caffeine has its benefits”

NURSE MALISA MCEACHEN

Healthy Alternatives to Caffeine

SOURCE | MEDICAL NEWS TODAY

1. Tea

2. Smoothies

3. Sleep

PHOTOS | UNSPLASH

JUNIOR MICHELANGELO WORTHY “I’ve had caffeine for a very long time, probably since I was 10. My go-to drink is an Americano, but I use Roasterie coffee at home. Sometimes, I feel tired and out of energy, but it definitely helps my day.” PHOTO | ISABEL COPELAND


Caffeine

PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER LINDA ERNST “In moderation, caffeine isn’t bad. I have never drunk coffee in my life, so when I do, it gives me a big boost because I don’t drink a lot of it. However, in reasonable amounts, I think caffeine is just fine. Like everything in life, you have to have moderation.” PHOTO | MARIA NGUYEN

Did You Know?

32%

Students who get their caffeine from Starbucks

25%

Students who get their caffeine from QuikTrip

10%

Students who get their caffeine from Dunkin’ Donuts

ILLUSTRATION | ISABEL COPELAND

*Data from an online survey of 132 Miege students

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Cheer & Dance

Keeping the Spirit

The varsity dance team practices a new hip-hop routine choreographed by assistant coach Natalie Hogue at North Campus for an upcoming virtual 4A competition. | DELANEY JOHNSON

Dance, cheer squads change routines during season DELANEY JOHNSON STAFF WRITER

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ick lines, partner work and stunts – these are a few of the things that spectators won’t find in this year’s cheer and dance routines. Split squads and distanced dancing will be what winter sports attendees can witness this season. The Miege dance and cheer teams have found new, alternative ways to practice and compete through COVID-19. Throughout their season, they have encountered things, like online competitions, that have impacted how they present themselves. In the 2020-2021 seasons, both the dance and cheer teams were faced with new guidelines and restrictions in response to the global pandemic. “Since COVID-19, practices are shorter, masks are hard to wear while dancing and we have to be 6 feet away on the field, which can ruin the effect while we’re dancing,” senior Andreanna Edwards,

dance team co-captain said. The squads are still able to attend games but there’s a catch: the cheer squad’s routines are missing some of the movements that were commonly found during the winter season. “A big difference for cheer is that we have to do a split squad for basketball

“We have definitely grown and become stronger because we were completely focused on our sport.”

SOPHOMORE ANA GAJEWSKI games because we are only allowed to have 8 cheerleaders,” sophomore Ana Gajewski, varsity cheerleader and dancer said. “We are also not allowed to stunt, which is very sad especially during

basketball season because we focus on stunting a lot more.” Another difference due to coronavirus restrictions are the competitions. The dancers and cheerleaders both competed at state this year; however, the competition was completely online, which had never been done before. “This year’s state was done virtually, so we recorded our performance and submitted it online to be judged by KSHAA,” assistant dance coach Natalie Hogue said. “We performed our fight song, a band dance — which is what we would do for a pre-game or sideline dance — and a performance routine, which is similar to what we would perform for halftime.” The girls had mixed reactions about state being virtual, but they were still happy to be competing this season. “I think that I would have enjoyed state a lot more if we were able to perform in front of judges instead of a camera, but I’m still grateful that we


Cheer & Dance

Speak Up

“I’ve been cheering since high school and cheer has always had a big impact on my life and I really wanted to give my passion to other girls,” assistant cheer Coach Tayrn Frank said. PHOTOS & ILLUSTRATION | DELANEY JOHNSON

could compete,” senior varsity cheerleader Emma Ryan said. Two weeks after state, the teams discovered their placements. The cheer squad received 4th and the dance team received 14th overall. “We didn’t receive the placement that we were hoping for, but overall I enjoyed state because it was fun to bond with everyone and enjoy the dances we choreographed,” freshman varsity dancer Ainsley Murray said. Throughout the years of competing at state and at other local competitions, the

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“I graduated from Miege and was on the dance team when I was in high school, so I loved the idea of coaching here and giving back to the program that helped me grow as a dancer,” assistant dance coach Natalie Hogue said.

girls have acquired good luck charms that they carry with them for support. These charms range from clips, to pennies, to ribbons. “The penny is in my bag at all times and it always gives me good luck.” sophomore Dina McElwee said. “I found it on my birthday while walking to a restaurant, and the penny happened to be of my birth year so I took it as pure luck and have carried it ever since.” Throughout the season the girls have gotten to know each other and have been able to attend events, even though it is

The varsity dance team performs its state routine, choreographed by assistant coach Natalie Hogue, for a girls’ basketball game. | ISABEL COPELAND

MI

EG

E

not in the traditional way. “We have been able to be a part of football and basketball events, participate in assemblies and I have gotten to know the new girls on the squad each year,” Ryan said. According to Gajewski, the cheer team has grown closer together and they have been able to focus on their technique and choreography. “We have taken this time that we aren’t allowed to stunt to really focus on our cheers and just having very clean and sharp motions,” Gajewski said. “We have definitely grown and become stronger because we were completely focused on our sport.”


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Girls’ Basketball

Girls’ basketball team looks to continue success COLIN BATLINER STAFF WRITER

D

ue to COVID-19 ending the season last year short, the girls’ basketball team came into this season with a score to settle. Junior Allie Burns said she felt frustrated with the way last season ended and, with the rest of the team, is playing this season with an extra bit of motivation to win a state championship. “Last season we felt like we were robbed of a championship because the tournament was canceled when we were in the semifinals,” Burns said. “We are just trying really hard to stay healthy and finish strong with a state championship.” Playing in a season that can be halted at any point due to the coronavirus means that players have to be extra vigilant of their health. “We have to be extra careful of what we do so there is not an outbreak, so we are putting in more work than in a regular season to stay safe and keep our season going,” Burns said. Senior captain Payton Verhulst said that she wants to give the younger players a strong appreciation for the sport and a better opportunity to succeed. “The biggest thing I want to leave for the team next year is just to be thankful for every moment you get of high school basketball because it flies by so quick, and I make sure they just always give their best effort and leave it all on the floor,” Verhulst said. The athletic success at Miege gives another challenge for each team to continue the legacy and success. This is especially clear for the girls’ basketball team, which has won 21 state championships since coach Terry English started. “At Miege, I think the amount of success we have at all sports and activities is underappreciated because it’s expected here,” Verhulst said. “It’s a lot to live up to, but I wouldn’t want it any other way.”

The team, according to assistant varsity coach Jeff English, is maintaining a 4.1 team GPA throughout the season. He said he is proud of the team on and off the court. “Being able to concentrate on their grades like they do and be so successful out on the basketball court is a pretty

awesome accomplishment for those girls,” English said. “We demand a lot of our kids. We put a lot of effort into it as coaches, and we know that our girls put a lot of effort into it as players. They do such a great job of being coachable and being responsible for the things we ask them to do.”

Going up for a contested layup against Blue Valley North, senior Payton Verhulst helps lead the Stags to 67-41 victory. | COLIN BATLINER


Bowling

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TOP BOWLERS IN THE ALLEY Sophomore CJ Reno Bowling has been part of sophomore CJ Reno’s life since she was in second grade. This is her second season on the Miege bowling team. She joined the bowling team because she found it as something fun to do in the winter. “My favorite memory of the bowling team was going to state last year and talking to everyone,” | ISABEL COPELAND Reno said. Reno added that it is a great way to make new friends. Her average score is 175, and she has an all-time high of 285.

Junior Natalie Koehler Junior Natalie Koehler has been bowling for the past five years. Three of the years have been on the Miege bowling team. Koehler joined the Miege team because she wanted to be part of a sport or activity during school. Her favorite | ALENA GILLESPIE memory of the team was from last year when they won regionals and went to state. Her average score is 160, and her highest score is 216. She encourages students who are considering bowling to join the team. “Just try out because we need a lot more girls on the team, and it is pretty fun too,” Koehler said.

Senior Daniel Fontaine Senior Daniel Fontaine started bowling his freshman year of high school and has been on the Miege bowling team ever since. “It was something I thought was fun, going bowling during school,” Fontaine said. “It has become a very fun competitive thing to do.” Fontaine’s average score is 170, and his highest score is 248. A fond memory that sticks out to Fontaine is when an alumni threw his ball at | ISABEL COPELAND the pin guards, causing the ball to bounce off and coast back towards them very slowly. He said that anyone who is considering joining the bowling team should definitely do it.

Senior Anthony Aquino Bowling is the sport that senior Anthony Aquino has known for a long time. He started bowling around the age of 5. This season is his fourth year on the bowling team. “Hearing that they had a bowling team really made me excited,” Aquino said. Last year when the girls’ team qualified for state, Aquino was the only boy on the team to qualify as an individual. He has an average score of 180, and an all-time high of 230. Aquino urged students to join the bowling team because they will have the chance to bowl for free, have a lot of fun and have Coach Eshelbrenner as a coach. STORIES/DESIGN | ALENA GILLESPIE

| ALENA GILLESPIE


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Editorial

A PIECE OF AMERICA Learning about Black History Month is essential MARY-KATHRYN WERT STAFF WRITER

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very February, my family and community celebrates our heritage during Black History Month. It’s one of the few times a year people actively learn about and revere Black people’s history. Stances may vary on Black History Month but this fact stands true, history is white-washed. Black History Month is one of the few times in the year that black people’s history is explored and celebrated. While I wish I could say every month is Black History Month, that’s just not the case. The American school system currently teaches major civil events but critically fails to mention accomplishments and contributions Black people have made, outside of the select few that get chosen like key Black figures in the civil rights movement or the civil war. While those are big parts of our history, we have done so much more. Few may actually know that the person who invented traffic lights was Black. I could mention so much more because the list goes on. This is what makes Black History Month so important. Black History Month is a time of remembrance and celebration of black history, which has helped in shaping this

country and continues to each day. All of these things show how important Black History Month is and how it should be celebrated, especially within our school systems. The education system is the most important institution in America, teaching millions of young Americans. By not talking about Black achievements and history in school, we are erasing the contributions made because millions of people do not have access to this knowledge. Not teaching about Black history creates a clear separation between White America and Black America. I hope for a day when Black History Month isn’t needed anymore. I hope

“Not teaching about Black history creates a clear separation between White America and Black America.”

for a day that Black History Month can be something celebrated every time of the year. But for that to happen, school curriculums need to be changed. Schools teach the history of America but do not include the important stories of these American minorities. By creating a more inclusive curriculum and teaching about minorities history, we can make a change. We can become a more inclusive and understanding America. Black History Month means so many things to me. It means progress. It means determination. It means character. It means now.

We are living through Black history as we speak, striving for progress. Black History Month means a time when all the hardships, accomplishments, suffering and celebrating our ancestors went through comes to light. It’s a time to appreciate heritage and devotion to character. Black History Month is a tool that, if used correctly, can be one of the stepping stones we need to truly reach the America we strive for.

By The Numbers

According to the United States Census Bureau in 2020...

African-Americans make up 12.8 percent of the U.S. population, nearly 42 million people.

The National Center for Education Statistics reported in 2017-2018, only 79 percent of Black students graduated from public high schools. ILLUSTRATIONS | MARY-KATHRYN WERT


Black History Month is celebrated by millions across the United States. Since it was recognized officially in 1976, it has been an important month of shedding light to the history of Black Americans. This years theme is: “The Black Family: Representation, Identity and Diversity”.

ILLUSTRATION | MARY-KATHRYN WERT

Did you know?

1. There are currently five Black Catholic Americans going through the canonization process. 2. The first official female self-made millionaire was Madam C.J. Walker. 3. In the 19th century, one in every four cowboys were Black. 4. Black History Month was placed in February to go along with Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass’ birthdays. 5. In 1940, Hattie McDaniel became the first African-American Oscar winner for her performance in “Gone With the Wind.” Sources: PBS and History.com

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR

Black History Month

Black History Month

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The majority of students responded with Martin Luther King Jr. when asked who their favorite Black historical figure was. Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15 and was the leader of the Civil Rights Movement until his assassination in 1968. I PIXABAY

Out of 127 Miege students, 40 percent said they have not learned about Black History in the last few years. 82.5 percent said they know little to nothing about Black History Month.

To learn more about Black History Month, scan the QR code provided.

MOMENTS TO REMEMBER

Mae Jemison Mae Jemison joined NASA as an astronaut and became the first Black woman to go into space, serving as a mission specialist on the space shuttle Endeavor. Along with being an astronaut, she has degrees in chemical-engineering and medicine.

Garrett Morgan

Claudette Colvin

Garret Morgan was the inventor of the three-position traffic light signal. Along with the traffic light, he also invented a smoke hood (the early version of a gas mask) and a hair straightening product. He was known as a trailblaizer for Black inventors.

Everyone knows Rosa Parks but Claudette Colvin was actually the first to refuse to move seats on a bus for a white person. At only 15 years old, she was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, for not giving her seat to a white woman on the bus.


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Valentine’s Day

Very Valuable How much do students care about Valentine’s Day? 25

Number of Students

20 15 10 5 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Rating

*Data from online survey of 129 students

Who would play your significant other in a romantic comedy?

“Zendaya because you know she’s nice, she has a nice smile. She has a nice face. I just like her personality, it’s a vibe.”

Senior Khol Saint-Louis

“Leonardo DiCaprio, he was hot when he was young.”

Junior Grace Roland

“Ariana Grande because she is just so beautiful.”

Junior Jaylen Burch


Valentine’s Day

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Valentine’s Vantages Perfect Valentine’s Dates Junior Alice Brandt

Sophomore Cassidy Reno

Freshman River Ball

“I think my perfect Valentine’s Day would be not super crazy. I would obviously want to sleep in and have a nice relaxing morning. At night I would want to go to a nice dinner with someone or stay at home and have a nice dinner at home. I’m not very picky. I love chocolate so I would want chocolate. My perfect Valentine’s date would be nice and fun.”

“The perfect date I feel like would be one where you and your significant other walk around the park, then go to get ice cream and just make a huge mess and then go to the lake or park and just have fun on the playground, and then go home to watch Disney movies or play games.”

“My perfect Valentine’s Day date would be dinner at a fancy restaurant in a private room. The restaurant would probably be Italian. First, he would pick me up from my house at 5 with a cool car and we would go eat. Then, we would get home around 8 and stay up late watching movies. We would eat too much chocolate, but it would be worth it.”

“Sarah Cameron from ‘Outer Banks’ because she’s funny and I feel like we’d be a great mix.”

Sophomore Aidan Wing

“Dev Patel, he is really handsome, and he has a really nice accent.”

Freshman Isabella Parr

ILLUSTRATIONS | COLIN BATLINER

“Margot Robbie because she’s my type.”

Freshman Ethan Hansen

PHOTOS | OLIVIA CERDA


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Perspectives

Stag Perspectives

1. NO ROOK-IES HERE Sophomore Martina member John Stelle took a win over junior Lucas member William Watson, which put Martina into the next round of the chess tournament. The winning herd for the chess tournament was the Reardon Herd. | OLIVIA CERDA

1 2. ALL ABOUT THAT BASS Sophomores Vincent Lopez and Ryder Cahill, junior Michael Hanson and senior Joseph Lopez practice singing to pianist Amy Hetherington’s music during Concert Chorale class. This group, the Miege Tenors, was practicing for the endof-the-year competition called KMEA, which stands for the Kansas Music Educators Association. | ISABEL COPELAND

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3. SPRINTING TO THE TOP During a late-night practice, junior Riley Phelan dives into the water for warm-up. Swim practice started with a prayer before the team entered the water. The team practices most weekdays at Blue Valley Northwest. | ISABEL COPELAND

January | February

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4. IN IT TO WIN IT While playing a new herd competition “Junk in the Trunk,” sophomore Cameron Soldner represents the Reardon Herd. Students participated in herd activities for minute-to-winit games during A and B lunch periods for students to watch. | EMMA LAZARCZYK

Perspectives

5. TUNNEL VISION Junior Gabriella Henderson-Artis dribbles at the top of the key against Blue Valley North. The Stags won 6741. | COLIN BATLINER

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6

5

6. HITTING THE RIGHT NOTES Choir director Robin Christie instructs the Girls’ Glee choir at St. Pius X Parish in Mission, Kansas. The theme centered around women and songs written by women. The choir recorded six songs to submit to its annual competition. | MARIA NGUYEN

DESIGN I OLIVIA CERDA

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Valentine’s Day Puzzles T M V D C N

L WA R C D D Y Y WZ K X T H V X R E K V F X A B T Y F MT B S G

I R K A I R O M A N C E E K Y

I J WG S C T V I P U B I U WJ P E D F E O S H I Q J R X U V D D W Q

Words: Heart Love Chocolate Flowers Valentine Sweet Cupid February

Pink Candy Romance Roses Sweetheart Hugs Kisses Friends

D L S P I D O S M N Q F WK E E WA O E S I O X MT E R G A J B S F Y WV D S WQ X J P I R P X Y WK C V L D Y H J H I N L Q T O O A V I D E L C D Q L S E Y O R I G Z WI L B U O C S A F H S P I N V A L E N T D C P Q F B E A A B Q Y R X

L C R S T G O U G P F T M K A K I K G U

Q O I K R Y C C F U L R G K B R T N A N

F T U D F F Y F F C O A F L F C B U E T

U U W Q B U S K S Q G D Z R L L T N Z O WQ O A V X O N D E S R E B R U A A E WS U WH B I I E G WL D T Y N A U WN T X T L H P C L X K WE X V WC X D V N I Q X

K J J K T S E R Y R O Y C Q Y T A WD P

Z Z I H S E

Want the answers? Scan the QR code!

Unscramble the Letters to Form a Word sfgit

nlage

ssero

wob dna rwroa

closocehta

PUZZLES | MARIA NGUYEN AND ALENA GILLESPIE

Profile for Bishop Miege Press

The Miegian Newspaper: February 2021  

The February issue of Bishop Miege High School's newspaper

The Miegian Newspaper: February 2021  

The February issue of Bishop Miege High School's newspaper

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