The Shield_Vol 66_Issue 5

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THE

SHIELD

Bishop Kenny High School Volume 66 | Issue 5 Jacksonville, Fla. BKToday.org

Reed Abercrombie • Cambryn Adams • Louise Adams • Kristoffer Aguilas • Julian Alberto • Niah Aleger • Cathryn Allen • Jolene Alonso • Zachariah Alvarez • Adrian Arreaza • Cameron Arreche • Lauren Ashley • Bridget Ausley • Toni Austin • Ryan Averitt • James Bagan • Colin Bailey • Jaylon Bass • Max Bass • Ryan Bell • Bryanna Bennett • Nicholas Bergin • Carly Bernardo • Nicole Bielamowicz • Camille Blaydes • Jacob Bochnia • Hannah Bonds • Jacob Bonnichsen • Joseph Bradley • Michael Brady • Taylor Brazinsky • Marc Brockunier • Abigail Bruner • Patrick Buckley • Olivia Burch • Austin Burt • Marian Cabrey • Anthony Calabro • Louis Caldropoli • Monet Cameron • Alejandro Castelo-Galliano • Nzuri Charles • Kaiyah Christopher • Niang Cing • Kathryn Citrano • Ivey Clem • Dean Corless • Gabriela Corri • Jenifer Corri • Mark Corri • Patrick Coyle • Hunter Crist • Renee Crist • John Cromer • Joseph Cusick • Niga Daniels • Krystal Dao • Mario Daragjati • Camille Daron • Hannah Daughtry • Yolondria Davis • James Deats • Elias Deeb • Thomas Deer • Grace Delaney • Robert Devine • Thomas Driggers • Taylor Droubie • Richard Durfee • Jordan Ellis • McKinley Elson • Rebecca Emery • Davis Enoch • Joseph Ernst • Isabelle Essa • Blessing Essien • Hannah Ethridge • Fred Farah • Mariam Fathalla • Claire Favo • Vincent Fetchero • Caitlin Fitzmeyer • Julia Fletcher • Kelli Fletcher • Abigail Frederick • Luke Galen • Clayton Gallaher • Reilly Gentges • Heidi Gerhart • Baleigh Gillespie • Klevis Gjoka • Alexa Gjuraj • Ana Gjuraj • Caroline Grant • Samuel Groblewski • Bryson Grove • Maddisen Gruver • Vivian Guo • Clare Gutteridge • Brian Guzman • Joseph Hale • Megan Hall • Mary Hanania • Sydney Harms • Majed Hassan • Casey Hayford • Anna Hernandez • Dylan Hernandez • Isabella Hernandez • Regine Hilaire • Luther Hinson • Christian Hollenbeck • Caroline Holloway • Marissa House • Luke Howard • Destinee Howze • Samantha Intorcia • Claudia Irizarry • Grace Isaac • Ray Jennings • Danna Jimenez • Maria Jimenez • Jackson Johnson • Auz’Jay Jones • Emma Jones • Jonathan Jones • Jordan Jones • Rami Kazaleh • Darien Kelly • Morgan Kelly • Matthew Kennedy • Parker Kennedy • Francis Kennelly • Brigid Kiely • Owen Klingaman • Connor Kolby • Patrick Larmoyeux • Olin Loudermill • Aaron Loveall • Ashley Loveall • Caitlynn Lucey • Cassidy Lunitz • John Lynch • Lucia Macchi • Daniel Madrid • Alexis Maggio • Daniel Malzahn • Taylor Manson • Azalea Mapp • Jolie Marcelo • Carly Marchigiano • James-Patrick Marquez • Lola Martin • Caneim Maxwell • Catherine Maxwell • Rachel Maxwell • Waverly Mayo • Andrew McBride • Daniel McCarthy • Kayley McHugh • Chloe McInerney • Caroline McMillan • Abbey Meisler • Gerard Mendis • Emily Merrill • Erin Merrill • James Meschia • Kevin Mesh • Renee Miles • Amanda Miller • Hannah Miller • Lindsay Miller • Sarah Miller • Rachel Moewe • Max Montana • Tiana Montinola • Morgan Moran • Juan Moreno • Josephine Morrill • Nicholas Mosley • Saiyan Mosley • Bryce Mullenix • Bryce Murray • Vincent Nase • Karsen Newman • John O’Keefe • Marlene Olavarria • Breana Orum • Thomas Palacio • Arianna Palomo • Bawi Par • Lauryn Parker • Julia Parry • Laina Parry • Eric Partain • Robert Peeler • Franchesca Peralta • Franco Pore • Tiara Porter • Ashley Portuondo • Gersi Prendi • Blaine Prevost • Ted Prevost • Hannah Prudencio • Vincent Qiu • Travis Quiza • Bryanna Racke • Kyashayah Radford • Charlotte Reeder • Victoria Reep • Olivia Reidy • Maya Reinhold • Halina Rhoden • Julia Rodriguez • Edward Roehrig • Andre Romano • Hannah Roskein • Lauren Ruen • Michael Rukab • Christopher Ryan • Kailey Ryan • Nicholas Ryno • Cade Sams • Nolan Scheets • John Schloth • Anna Schneider • Ella Schoening • Nathaniel Schooling • Olivia Schueth • Sean Seabrooke • Regina Self • Kylan Selmer • Noah Semple • Keegan Sexton • Noah Shalley • Zachary Shapiro • Brandon Singleton • Michael Sissine • Sarah Skala • Emily Skyles • Andrew Slade • Amelia Smith • Carley Smith • Eric Smith • Francise Soereh • Cody Southerland • Abigail St. John • Emma St. John • Cosette Steeves • Maggy Stinnett • Louis Sullo • Addison Sutton • Haley Sweat • Caitlin Taylor • Terry Taylor • Talia Terbrueggen • Caroline Thompson • Ann Thornton • Sarah Thornton • Nara-Lee Todd • Seth Tompkins • Lauren Trevathan • Michael Truss • Lacey Tucker • Bryan Turknett • Virginia Tyson • David Variano • David Venters • Augusto Villegas • Madison Wade • Jacob Wagner • Dawson Wakefield • Eve Walts • Janya Wheeler • Johnathan White • Elizabeth Wildsmith • Samantha Williams • Emily Willis • Madison Wilson • Michael Winston • Hannah Woodruff • Grace Wright • Megan Yates • Ashley Zedan • Omar Zumot


News

Opinion

3 Taylor Manson 4 St. Vincent de Paul 5 Dance Marathon 7eSports

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Feature

8 Service clubs 10 Future careers 11 Senior farewell 12 Senior destinations

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14 Max’s Corner 15 Since You Asked... 16 College rejection

A&E

19 Kenny Kravings 20 Spoilers Ahead 21 Kenny Kupid

Sports

Graphics by Rita Albert

26 Girls Basketball

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THE

Shield

The Shield is a member of FSPA. It is published six times a year by journalism students at Bishop Kenny High School 1055 Kingman Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. 32207 phone: (904) 265-9390 fax: (904) 398-5728 The policy of The Shield is to provide a forum for student expression. If you are interested in advertising in The Shield email newspaper@bishopkenny.org for more information. Letters to the editor are encouraged. Please submit them to room 224. Letters must be signed; names can be withheld upon request.

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Editor-in-Chief Emily Willis Design & Layout Editor Franchesca Peralta Managing Editor Max Montana Business Manager Niah Aleger Web Manager Megan Yates News Editor Rachel Lechwar Features Editor Julia Rodriguez Opinion Editor Emily Willis Arts & Entertainment Editor Franchesca Peralta Sports Editor Max Montana

Staff Reporters Rita Albert Kaitlyn Bateh Dailey Jackson Katie Loberger Reilly Nance Tara Shear Mary Shoemaker Destiny Tran Emily Yalch Adviser Jessica Durbin

Follow The Shield on Twitter and Online: @bkhs_newspaper www.bktoday.org

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Taylor’s Amazing Opportunity

News

Senior accepted to participate in religious mission Destiny Tran | Staff Reporter

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Photo courtesy of Taylor Manson

enior Taylor Manson was accepted into the missionary program of Hard As Nails Ministry in February. Hard As Nails Ministry is a Catholic organization guiding the Gospel that visited Bishop Kenny in October. Their mission is to help teenagers understand their true worth and deepen their love for God. Hard As Nails Ministry chooses 40 applicants every year. Four other interviewees from Florida applied, but Manson was the only applicant accepted. She was also the first from Florida in Hard As Nails Ministry history. “The thought of getting the chance to travel the country and spreading the Lord’s word and inspiring others to do so is a dream I hope I get to live out,” Manson said. Throughout the whole application process, Manson felt she was going to get accepted. She felt God was calling her to become a missionary. Manson did not want to have her hopes up and have confidence in case she did not get accepted. Whenever she would think about the possibility of being rejected, she would say this prayer to herself: “Lord, it’s in your hands. You decide what my next step is whether I don’t get accepted and go to college, or I get accepted and move to New York.”

The Shield

Manson’s faith life before meeting the missionaries was not as strong as she wanted it to be. She felt her life was busy, stressful and stuck in a dark place. Then, Manson met Angela Fuchs and Leia Hunt, two missionaries from Hard As Nails Ministry who asked Manson to apply and said they needed her on the team. After many phone conversations with these missionaries, Manson knew

“The thought of getting the chance to travel the country and spreading the Lord’s word and inspiring others to do so is a dream I hope I get to live out.” she wanted to apply for Hard As Nails Ministry. Manson believes she has a story to tell and the passion to inspire others and show them, “the everlasting love of our Lord.” “I think this will be a great opportunity for Taylor and her formation,” her mother, Charlotte Manson said. Manson felt that the application process for Hard As Nails was a long and tedious process. She went through four interviews from October to January. At the beginning of February, Manson

received a call of her acceptance. “I felt shocked, as if I was not expecting it,” Manson said. Manson will move to Syracuse, New York at the end of July and begin her five-week training on Aug. 1. During her training, leaders will observe Manson to see if she is still a good fit for the program, then decide on what team she will be placed. There are four types of missionaries within the program: National, Local, You’re Amazing Crusade and International. Manson would be happy with any position but if she were to choose, she would choose the national team. To help fund her missionary work, Manson participated in a Yankee Candle Fundraiser through Hard As Nails Ministry and also created a Gofundme. She needs a total of $3,000 upon her arrival in August to cover necessities such as food and living expenses. Manson plans to be a missionary for at least one year. After one year in her mission, she will give herself the option to go to college or spend another year as a missionary. She hopes to one day serve as a missionary nurse out of the country. “I feel my faith has grown through the experience and with the help of others,” Manson said. “I am so excited and can’t wait to see where this journey brings me!”

Senior Taylor Manson is with missionaries Angela and Leia at the homecoming football game.

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News

Busy Vincentians

Society of St. Vincent de Paul volunteers for five community events Kaitlyn Bateh | Staff Reporter

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Photo courtesy of May Oliver

Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Wildsmith

he Society of St. drinks that are going to be Vincent de Paul, a used, in our case, for the service organization lunch,” Thurson said. “After with 125 members called getting that together, we Vincentians, give back to show up on the day of the their community during retreat and literally begin to March and April through make a massive assembly 40 Days for Life, the Gate line. After that, we then River Run, Kairos Retreat, clean up everything, so the St. Catherine Labouré next group that comes in Manor’s Bingo Event and has a clean slate.” the Eucharistic Congress. The same day as the Society of St. Vincent Kairos luncheon, another de Paul sponsor Noreen group of 15 Vincentians Thurson led students at the visited the St. Catherine 40 Days of Life devotional Labouré Manor to assist opportunity, which took elderly residents and play Senior and St. Vincent de Paul member Lola Martin delivers a speech at the place on March 8, when the Bingo with them. Teen Track for Eucharistic Congress. club volunteered as a group. “With St. Catherine “For the 40 Days For Labouré Manor, this is Life, volunteers will gather something new we started, together and they will go and it has worked out to the Women’s Choice of neatly,” Thurson said. “St. Jacksonville abortion clinic Vincent de Paul pays for and peacefully, prayerfully their Bingo Nights since pray as silent witnesses they don’t have room in for the end of abortion,” their budget for it.” Thurson said. “Thanks to The last service project Max Montana’s efforts, we Society of St. Vincent are able to participate, since de Paul participated we have not participated in last month was the several years.” Eucharistic Congress. They The club also participated in the prayer volunteered the next day portion of the Stations in the Gate River Run of the Cross. Eucharistic by distributing water to Congress is an annual participants running in the event and celebration 15K. Through their efforts Father Martin, Deacon de Luca and St. Vincent de Paul members stand for the for local Catholics, and in the River Run, they unborn at the Women’s Choice of Jacksonville abortion clinic. the Society’s 30 members collaborate with the Dreams took part in the festivities, Come True Foundation. including Senior Lola Martin “Dreams Come True works with organization, come true.” who was a speaker at the youth track. Two weeks later, the society terminally ill children and they receive “I think [Society of] St. Vincent de Paul credit for every volunteer we supply,” continued to extend their service when does a really good job in service, and in Thurson said. “They receive a certain they served lunch to Kairos retreatants helping in various capacities,” Thurson amount of dollars that they can then use on March 29. “We purchase all of the food and the said. “That is what we’re called to do.” to help the dream of the child, within the

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News

Bishop Kenny, Episcopal High Schools host Dance Marathon Reilly Nance | Staff Reporter

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Graphic by Rita Albert

Photo by Dailey Jackson

ishop Kenny and Episcopal High they need. Through a personal fundraising Not only does this event raise money School joined together on Mar. link created by students and the popular to help families and children in need, 30 in the Carla Harris Performing social media slogan #ForTheKids, they but it also creates a bond between both Arts Center to raise participating schools. funds and awareness for “Most of the time, when The Children’s Miracle large groups from both schools Network, an organization are involved, it is in a rivalry that works to save and setting, like a sport,” President of improve the lives of sick Bishop Kenny’s Dance Marathon children, according to their board Emma St. John said. “I website. think Dance Marathon is cool Students raise money because it brings us together to through the activity of a work as one, instead of opposite Dance Marathon to donate each other, to better our city.” to the local Children’s The night was full of Miracle Network Hospital; activities to keep the volunteers all the funds raised in entertained: karaoke, music, Northeast Florida and games, icebreakers, crafts and, Southeast Georgia go of course, dancing. towards supporting “The Dance Marathon board the pediatric program planned so many fun activities at Wolfson Children’s for all the volunteers,” junior Participants from Episcopal and Bishop Kenny race to finish a whip cream Hospital, a facility which Sabrina Dale said. “My favorite pie. treats children from the area activity was definitely the karaoke and is only able to provide care since it was something everyone to sick children by way of community solicited donations for the cause. could laugh about and have a good time support. The goal of the event was to reach doing.” Each student who signed up to $40,000. In the end, the group more than Planning for next year’s event is participate was asked to raise at least $70 tripled that, raising $51,383.68 to fund already underway, with a goal to surpass to help kids in the community get the care research and help save kids’ lives. this year’s funds raised For the Kids.

The Shield

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News

New eSports team created Emily Yalch | Staff Reporter

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“Ever since I was little, I’ve been playing video games,” varsity captain Sergio Saab said. “At first it was just for fun, but in recent years I’ve been more involved in the competitive scene.” The team competes in the High School eSports League. They play Rocket League, a game similar to soccer, but instead of players, the teammates are toy cars. Allen has been teaching religion at Bishop Kenny since 2017. “Video games are not bad in themselves and we are using them as a means to bring people closer to Christ and to make the team better and more virtuous men and women,” Allen said.

The season began on March 20 and events are held in the computer lab every Wednesday. Matches are live-streamed on Twitch, a national streaming website, for anyone who wishes to watch. The team has so far won three out of four games. In order to compete in nationals, the team must be seeded in the top eight. “I’m definitely most excited for the National Tournament,” Saab said. “We as a team definitely have the skill to be the best team in the country, and I’m really excited to make that a reality.”

Photos courtesy of Carla Chin

eligion teacher Brandon Allen proposed and created an eSports team. Their season began in March. eSports is a national league of teams who compete against one another by playing different video games, depending on the tournament. The mission of the Esports league: We want to connect high school gamers and clubs across the country, expanding the world of high school esports. An interest meeting was held on Feb. 12 to convey information about the team and gauge interest. More than 100 students attended, but only seven students made the varsity team and seven students made the junior varsity team.

Junior Matthew Burgess practices Rocket League for the upcoming tournament while sophomore Jericho Rey Palomo spectates.

The Shield

Juniors Sergio Saab and Matthew Burgess get ready to compete.

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Feature

To Serve

Local clubs offer teens opportunities to earn service hours, learn leadership skills

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reshman Winston Peele is a member of the Robotics Club and serves as freshman class president in Student Council at Bishop Kenny. Outside of school, he is involved in other community service and leadership organizations, including the Nelson Mandela Youth Ambassador Program, in which teens carry out the service and mission of Nelson Mandela by participating in projects and fundraising for the youth in Johannesburg, South Africa. Additionally, he is co-founder and Vice President of an organization called The Young Leaders of Today in

which teens in the Jacksonville area get involved in government and civic duties to help underprivileged communities. “We are a student-based and governed organization that we have students work for equality, working through civic involvement and political actions,” Peele said. In December, the organization instituted an Advocate-Mentorship Program in local high schools Ribault, Raines and Fletcher. They also plan to meet at Florida State College at Jacksonville for a student town hall meeting on April 25, during which

students from all over the city will discuss ongoing problems within school communities, such as bullying and discrimination, and what solutions can be implemented to prevent them. Peele credits his participation in various organizations around Jacksonville to his motivation to make a change. “I like to change people’s lives,” Peele said. “I feel like...going through everything that I have and being 15, I want to motivate others to be themselves instead of being someone else.”

Photos courtesy of Winston Peele Left: Winston Peele represents The Young Leaders of Today, alongside Wells, on the Metrotown Civil Discourse panel. Top left: Peele speaks alongside President Rodney Wells. Top middle: Peele, along with President Wells, converse with Savannah LeNoble, a member of March for Our Lives, about gun violence prevention measures. Top right: Winston Peele meets with JSO officer to discuss ways to protect youth living in low income areas.

Check out The Young Leaders of Today website.

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Feature

To Lead Dailey Jackson | Staff Reporter

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ounded by junior Thomas Hulihan, student-run service club JaxTeensCare volunteers at charities throughout Jacksonville. “I wanted to start something that my friends from other schools could also be a part of,” Hulihan said, “so I made an Instagram one night and told people to share it on their stories and it just started going from there.” After the creation of JaxTeensCare, Hulihan implemented leadership roles within the club to help organize future plans. It is the goal of the club to involve students from all Jacksonville-area schools; current members hail from

Ponte Vedra High School, Providence High School, Fletcher High School, and of course, Bishop Kenny High School. “There are six officers, and they are from different schools so they can get their school to be involved,” Hulihan said. School counselor Scott Sberna stressed the importance of service hours and clubs outside of school, as well as how they look on college applications. “For those students who go above and beyond, for example, getting over 100 community service hours, it’s definitely something that we know, from the state universities we talk to, that they

like to see on a high school transcript,” Sberna said. “Anytime a student is affiliated with a particular school and they are giving time and effort to that school community, it shows something for a student who then commits to something outside of school.” Currently the club has 92 members, and held its first meeting on March 2 in the Gym at St. Paul’s at Jacksonville Beach. At the end of March, the club planned to host a beach cleanup, and on May 4, they plan to volunteer at Best Buddies Friendship Walk at Jacksonville Beach.

Photos courtesy of Thomas Hulihan Right: Members of JaxTeensCare volunteer to support The Arc Jacksonville, a non-profit organization that provides services to adults with intellectual and developmental differences. Top left: Students stand by poster thanking volunteers. Top middle: After making and preparing pasta salad, two members of JaxTeensCare get ready to serve it. Top right: Officers of JaxTeensCare pose for a selfie while waiting to serve meals.

Check out JaxTeensCare website.

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Feature

Major Decisions Surveying class of 2019 interests for college, careers

Katie Loberger | Staff Reporter

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hoosing a major is one of the first steps toward one’s future career. In a survey of 42 seniors, the top three majors students are entering are nursing, biology and engineering. Many American students are going into STEM- an acronym for science, technology, engineering and math-- majors, with the exception of business, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Since the Great Recession, the number of STEM majors in bachelor’s degree-and-above programs has mushroomed, going from 388,000 graduates in 2009-10 to 550,000 in 2015-16—43% growth, according to The National Center for Education Statistics. The statistics from the survey show that Bishop Kenny follows the pattern that students choose those types of majors. As a business finance major, senior Lucia Macchi hopes to better understand money so that she can help solve the problems it causes in society. “I am most looking forward to having greater access to information than I’ve ever had before,” Macchi said. “I’m excited to meet and learn from my classmates who have different backgrounds and skill sets then I do and professors with decades of experience.” Macchi will attend the University of Pennsylvania in the fall. “UPenn has the best undergraduate

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business school in the country, and once I decided I wanted to major in finance, I became very interested in the school and the Wharton program,” Macchi said. Senior Grace Wright will attend Flagler College in St. Augustine in the fall. Flagler was her first choice. “I was drawn to Flagler because they have a surf team so I can continue my surf career in St. Augustine,” Wright said. “Plus, it is far enough away that it feels like I’m away, but still close enough if I need to come home. The small class size and school also interested me because I like to be known where I am, not just another student enrolled.” Wright has chosen to major in journalism since she is passionate about creative writing and feels like she will be able to go far with this major. Wright wants to work eventually write for SURFER Magazine or start her own magazine. Senior Brian Guzman will attend New York University. He plans to study neuroscience and wants to become a neurologist. “Ever since I was young, I’ve been fascinated by the human brain and wanted to pursue further investigation of how it works,” Guzman said. One technological advancement is intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging, which will allow neurosurgeons

Pick a major.

to have a real time image of the operation internally. Guzman’s ultimate career goal is to be at the forefront of the integration of technology into the medical field.

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Dear J1s, I love you so much and I just wanted to thank you for all the things you have taught me. You have taught me how to take initiative in my ideas, to challenge my creativity and to be more patient in the mornings. Although I’m still working on all those things, you guys have sparked a greater love for writing and sisterhood in me. My J1s, you are simply unforgettable and capable of taking over the world.

Mahalegar Dear J1’s (hand-motion), J2’s and Mrs. Durbin, J1’s, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed getting to know you all this year. Next year will fly by, so dwell on the good things going on around you and not on the uncertainties. My time on The Shield has been amazing and has only gotten better the harder I’ve worked, the more people I’ve interviewed and the more I’ve gotten to know my staffers. As journalists, you are here to present the most pertinent facts and happenings to Bishop Kenny students and I have no doubt that you will do that in a great way next year. J2’s, what a journey it has been. I can’t wait to see you all be successful in any endeavor you seek out in this life. Every day in newspaper was a joy with you all and I will cherish that time forever. Mrs. Durbin, thank you for being the best adviser ever and working so hard by our side through the last two years. Not the end- just a new beginning!

The Shield

My beautiful J1’s! You all are in for the longest, yet quickest year of your life. Enjoy the family you’ve made here and laugh at all of the stupid stuff that happens in this back room, like Max’s wall of quotes or playing human bowling. Please remember to lean on your classmates and support one another, no matter how bad you want to yell at each other and rip each other’s heads off. I’ll truly miss all of the work days, Uno games and burrito-eating times that we’ve shared in the back room. You guys are my family and I’ll miss you all more than you will ever know. Thank you for putting up with our terrible dancing, random singing and us screaming that we’re stupid. You all will forever have a piece of my heart.

Franchesca Peralta I am going to miss you all soooo much! Next year’s paper is going to be so amazing. I am so excited to see what you all are going to accomplish! Emily Yalch, you are going to make the website look so good and I cannot wait! Mrs. Durbin, thank you for all that you have given us, you truly made us all better friends and even more important, family. Good luck, J2’s. Love y’all always!

MeganYates

My fellow J2s, becoming a part of a family that makes food, sings to *NSYNC, takes stupid pictures, and, most importantly, leans on one another for support and love is a blessing that I will be eternally grateful for. Mrs. Durbin, you have pushed me harder than anyone in my life. You have been the most honest and realistic teacher, while also increasing my ambition to go above and beyond in everything that I do. You do so much for The Shield and the staffers and I are extremely thankful. Future seniors, you have no idea what you signed up for. Being a part of The Shield has been the hardest thing I have ever been tasked with. However, you are some of the hardest working people on the planet and I have full faith that you will keep the newspaper amazing.

Emily

Willis

Dear J1’s I will miss you guys so much. You are in for one heck of a year. Being a senior is so much fun. Don’t lose sight of your academics. It gets hard towards the end of the year, but you just have to stay focused and you will be fine. Cherish the last moments with your true friends. Make the most of every weekend but don’t forget to get your rest. I love you all and I know you are going to do such amazing things with The Shield next year. I’m going to miss each and every one of you J1’s, but you ladies will be perfect in every way. Love you the most sisters,

Julinthodagued

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Feature

Alumni find their perfect home outside of Bishop Kenny Rachel Lechwar | News Editor

University of Notre Dame

Jacksonville University University of Florida

Flagler College

Photos courtesy of respective alumni

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Feature

Out of State Some students packed their bags after graduation day to experience life not only outside the bounds of Bishop Kenny, but also the state of Florida to find home in a completely new setting. Maeghan Holzbaur, class of 2017, attends Notre Dame in Indiana and studies neuroscience and behavior. “I wanted to explore and get out of my comfort zone, and I toured Notre Dame over the summer,” Holzbaur said. “I just thought there were a lot more academic and diverse opportunities for me to be able to explore and meet new

people.” While there were some upperclassmen from Bishop Kenny and graduates from Ponte Vedra High School that she knew coming in to the university, Holzbaur had to start from square one with the environment. She had to acclimate to the colder weather and recommends investing in a coat for schools in the North that do not abide by the perpetual summer conditions in Florida. “Sometimes it was hard, but I found that keeping yourself occupied is really the way to beat that, and just surrounding

yourself with friends who are also from far places,” Holzbaur said. She spends time with these friends from across the country, in addition to keeping up with classes. Notre Dame also provides Holzbaur with the chance to study abroad in London next summer. “I feel like I’ve been able to take advantage of a lot of opportunities here and learn a lot of things and meet a lot of people that I definitely don’t think I would have been able to at a different school,” Holzbaur said. “Notre Dame is a really great place.”

In-state Whether out of a sense of comfort or requirement, some students decide to stay in-state for college. Olivia Zerkowski, class of 2015, fell in the latter category when she made the decision to attend Jacksonville University (JU). “I didn’t want to originally, but I’m really glad I did,” Zerkowski said. “I wanted to get out of state because I was sick of Florida, but that doesn’t make much sense when you have in-state tuition.”

She was convinced to attend JU by former Bishop Kenny music teacher, John Shannon, who influenced her passion for music. Zerkowski is set to graduate in April as a vocal performance major with a Bachelor’s degree in music and performance. She currently teaches voice at the Bolles School and is looking to eventually teach a music class. “I want to say it has been chaotic, but like in the best way,” Zerkowski said. “I’ve just been so involved and it doesn’t stop, but I feel like I’ve grown more in three years than I ever have in my whole life.”

She stays busy through constant involvement in her sorority, Tri Delta, as well as the music program that often takes up her entire weekend. Because of this, Zerkowski is only able to see her parents once a month, though she appreciates the close proximity to her home. She is utilizing the school’s resources and small atmosphere of 2,500 undergrads to remain focused on her intended career path, all without leaving Jacksonville. “Since I went to JU, I can go there for free, so I don’t have to worry about debt, which is amazing,” Zerkowski said.

Small Colleges Other individuals take to smaller college settings better, with their intimate class sizes and contained campus. Caroline McClellan, class of 2016, makes her daily commute to Flagler College in St. Augustine every day. “At first, I was very apprehensive about the idea of college altogether,” McClellan said. “Now, I appreciate all the hard work I’ve had to put in to get where I am.” The transition into her fine arts degree was made easier through AP art class, but

she also had to transition from a school where everyone had known one another since elementary school to this new setting with no other Kenny graduates. “I thought it was going to be a lot worse than it actually was because I don’t deal well with change,” McClellan said. “I knew that I was going to have to break down and make a lot of new friends.” Since Flagler has fewer than 3,000 students, there are only 25 students in an average class. “I found that as I have progressed with my degree, I have noticed the same

faces in some classes and it is easier to talk to them once you have had like five or six classes with them because you can relate to them on things,” McClellan said. Many of these students gather around St. George Street, two streets down from the college, where McClellan and other students work. McClellan prefers this tight-knit setting to the atmosphere of larger colleges. “St. Augustine is very tiny compared to Jacksonville, so I think that that also has something to do with it being better suited for college life,” McClellan said.

Big Colleges When many Bishop Kenny students think of an ideal college experience, some of the most sought-after schools are ones with a large student body and energetic atmosphere like the University of Florida. Nick Beenen, class of 2018, experiences college life through this socialization— forming connections with roommates and joining the fraternity Alpha Tau Omega. “It is cool to have a big group of guys so that you can have fun together,” Beenen said. “It is a great way to actually meet people.”

The population of over 52,000 students and 100 graduate degree programs mean that Beenen’s classes can have anywhere from 25 to 375 students. He takes classes that align with his interests and still looks back on his time at Bishop Kenny as preparation for his intended path of chemical engineering. “Definitely the AP classes at Kenny helped me out a lot because first of all, I got good credits and second of all, like, AP Chem with Mrs. Schmitt— I couldn’t have been more prepared for Chem 1 than I was,” Beenen said. “I got A’s in Chem 1 while all my other friends were failing out.”

He thinks that it was a combination of his academic performance in high school and his extracurricular activities that gained him acceptance into UF. He maintained balance playing two sports, earning 800 service hours as a lifeguard and taking AP classes in high school just as he continues to focus on schoolwork while participating in college life today. “I was always able to get by pretty easily, but it’s definitely pushing me and making things more interesting all the while having a good time with some good friends,” Beenen said.

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Opinion

Solving Summer Max Montana | Managing Editor

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he final ring of the bell, a jovial farewell to teachers and acquaintances alike and a rush of anticipation for the period of relaxation coming your way; yes, an old chapter closes and a new season heats up. This fact alone is probably enough to inspire at least a smile and hopefully a chain of thought unveiling detailed plans and exceptional experiences all-too-ready to unfold with a flock of friends. A 180day school year ripe with extracurricular opportunities, rowdy sporting events and algebra homework often demands more from high school students than the months on the calendar which showcase illustrations of beaches and virgin piña coladas. But, more downtime gives us the ability to not only work on our education and social lives, but also on our faith, family and career choices. Whether your faith life is reciting the prayers along with Terry Taylor at the beginning and end of the school day or attending daily Mass, there’s always a bevy of readily-available approaches to invite Christ’s presence further into

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your life. Contacting your local parish about religious retreats, volunteering at vacation Bible school or venturing to a nearby chapel for Eucharistic Adoration can be a source of light in a season that has plenty. Playing sports, diving into swimming pools and simply ‘killing time’ with close friends often becomes the norm rather than the occasional lull for many of us over the summer, but spending time with family is a better long-term investment. Not to say that we shouldn’t spend ample time with friends this summer, but recognizing that in 10 years we’ll be coming home with a spouse and kids to see our parents and siblings is priceless wisdom that, if kept in mind, will only make your summer that much better. So, instead of making engagements with friends a near-everyday certainty, make that reservation with mom on Saturday night at the Italian restaurant she loves or book that tee time with dad at TopGolf on Sunday afternoon; it’ll be worth it. The percentage of Americans aged 16-24 in the workforce has increased

steadily since the 2008 Financial Crisis, according to childtrends.org. Also, 65% of 196 Bishop Kenny students who responded to a poll affirm that they will seek employment this summer. Even though these seasonal jobs may not inspire the solution to that horrifying query: ‘What do you want to do when you grow up?’ you can always take some alone time and write down what you’re undoubtedly talented in. If you’re a proficient public speaker, try guest relations at the Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp. If you’re more comfortable repairing a car from the last century than talking to your crush, call up a car mechanic’s shop. If you’re more adept at lounging around, try sprawling out, with a watchful eye, in a lifeguard’s chair. The America we have inherited is more prosperous and inviting than we appreciate and all it asks of us is the courage to step onto its stage and put our best foot forward. This summer, with a peaceful appreciation for today and a hopeful eye for tomorrow, look to God, family and your talents for guidance and hope.

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Opinion

Since You Asked...

Dailey Jackson | Staff Reporter

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rom the second we entered high school, we were all acutely aware that one day, we would all be leaving this second home to move on to the greatest adventure: college. Part of the high school experience is meeting new people and making new friends. For many students, friendships are not limited to just one grade level. After spending a school year with the same people, relationships and memories are bound to form. Graduation seems like the expiration date on these newly-formed friendships. Here’s some tips on how to not only value your time with the seniors, but how to let them go. Don’t dwell on it too much. Graduation is inevitable. The date will never change, and if you pretend it’s not there, it won’t go away. Knowing this, try and value your time spent with the seniors, especially if the event is the last of its kind, and try not to think about how much you’ll miss it. Just as they are experiencing their last senior year in high school, you are also experiencing your last freshman/sophomore/ junior year as well. Cherish the memories you have with them and try and stay in the moment. The memories, and the friendships, will last longer this way.

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“This year has gone by so fast and I can’t believe all the seniors will be leaving soon. How can I cherish my time with them this year, and what will I do without them next year?” - Al Misu

Realize that this won’t be the last time you see them. Though the looming date of graduation seems like a final goodbye, this certainly will not be the case. Your friends may be leaving you physically but there are still ways to stay connected with them. If the college they are attending is close to where you live, make an effort to schedule activities together and even try to surprise them by visiting their college. If the college is far away, take time out of the day to talk or FaceTime to stay connected. Social media is one of the most powerful tools to keep in touch with someone, so use it to your advantage. Be supportive of them. The worst thing you could possibly do during your friend’s senior year is remind them of all the responsibilities they have when preparing for college and how different things will be next year. Whether it be college decisions, picking a major or choosing a dorm room, supporting your friends will help them transition easier into college life and could strengthen your friendship. Stay positive throughout the whole process, and remember that they are going through a life-changing journey and need all the support they can get.

“It’s crazy to think that my entire life is changing in a few months. I’ve made a second home at Bishop Kenny and I’m going to miss my friends. Am I just supposed go to college and make a whole new life?” - Al Misutu

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Emily Willis | Editor-in-Chief

e, as a class of 288 people, have experienced every moment from August 2015 until May 2018 together. We have bonded, argued and cried over monumental events and even the passing of one of our own students, Dominic Allmond. All seniors are feeling that same emotion right now, no matter how much we are wailing that we want to leave this place and never look back. It is impossible to spend four years within these walls and fail to grow an attachment to the nostalgic vibe that our school emanates. There are several ways that sentimental seniors can hold on to their high school years. You do not have to lose touch with your Bishop Kenny friends. There is a stigma that, after you graduate, you’re required to leave your past life behind and “find yourself.” That is not the case. It is almost impossible to be unable to make contact with people, even if they are thousands of miles away. Instagram and other social media apps are great ways to keep up with people that you have met at Bishop Kenny. The difficult part is working with your friends across the state, or even the country. Small efforts, such as keeping your Snapchat streak with your friend, can aid in avoiding losing contact. There is no denying that Snapchat is not comparable to real human

contact. However, if you truly want to stay in touch with your Kenny friends, you will put forth the effort necessary to avoid losing them. Look at pictures and videos. From the one your mom took of you in front of the door the first day of freshman year, to the one a professional photographer took of you and your friends before prom, these pictures are the proof that you went to high school. They were taken for a reason: for that moment to be captured forever. Even the goofy videos of you and your buddies singing passionately to “Colors of the Wind” from “Pocahontas.” Go back and relive those moments when you are feeling nostalgic. Make new friends. In addition to keeping in touch with your high school friends, find people with whom you can bond at college. You will be surrounded by thousands of brand new people. While making friends is not as easy as it was in pre-k when you simply bonded over your favorite dinosaur, you can cultivate relationships just the same. They will be mature and adult relationships, where you talk about future careers instead of dinosaurs (unless you are majoring in archeology). Speaking of majors, you will find yourself surrounded by people who are interested in the same topic that you are. It does not matter if your niche is political science or art historyyou will find your people.

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Opinion

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May 7, 2019

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Dear Student,

The Admissions Committee has carefully reviewed your application and we regret to inform you that we can not offer you a place in our class of 2023.

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Sincerely, Office of Admissions

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Opinion Next steps after colleges deny you Emily Willis | Editor-in-Chief

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he words that every senior in high school fears for their life: “We cannot grant you admission to our school.” It can be devastating when the place that you thought you would spend the next four years denies you. Dozens of emotions race through your head: disappointment, embarrassment, anger and sadness. Rejection stings, no matter who does it. Contrary to popular belief, it is not the end of the world. Clocks keep ticking and the sun keeps rising. Former President Barack Obama applied and was rejected from Swarthmore College. “It really broke my heart, actually,” President Obama said when questioned by a Swarthmore student in 2008. One factor to consider is that many colleges receive thousands upon thousands of applicants. University of Florida (UF) received 40,849 applications for their class of 2022, and only 14,866 were accepted, according to the “Gainesville Sun.” It is not a personal attack if a college does not accept you. They only know what you look like on paper, not your individuality. Your worth

“They’re not going to ask where you started, it’s where you finish.” is not determined by a couple numbers and test scores. “Admissions officers rarely know the person on the opposite end of that application,” school counselor Jackie Hardin said. “It’s easier to say ‘no’ to them because there is no personal attachment.” This especially goes for Ivy League schools with extremely low acceptance rates. In 2017, Juilliard School accepted 6% of applicants and Stanford University accepted 5% of applicants. While we all strive to be the best, looking at the statistics surrounding these acceptance rates helps us to be realistic in our expectations. “Let’s say they’re bringing in a class of 5,000 students; they could probably bring in a class of 15,000 students of very similar qualities,” head of the Office of School Counseling Jerry Buckley said. “It’s such a fine line between getting accepted and not accepted.”

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It is okay to be upset about college rejection. However, instead of sulking, it is more productive to look forward and redirect your feeling of sadness to motivation to succeed elsewhere. Where else did you apply and get accepted? What are the benefits of that school that may not have been available at your first choice? “If we’re talking about MIT or Harvard, it’s great and it looks wonderful at the same time, but think of the level of competition that might be there, whereas, at a different school, you might be able to shine even more so because that competition isn’t necessarily there,” Hardin said. One option to consider after being denied from your top-choice college is transferring in after earning your Associate in Arts (AA) degree at a community college, such as the Florida State College of Jacksonville (FSCJ). There are several perks to this path. The average cost of attending FSCJ is $16,600, while the cost of UF is $20,661 and the cost of University of Notre Dame is $64,775, excluding any financial aid. Many community colleges also have more flexible class schedules, giving students time to work at a part-time job to save money to eventually attend their dream college. “They’re not going to ask where you started, it’s where you finish,” Buckley said. “If you have that University of Florida degree four years from now, your future employer doesn’t ask, ‘Did you start at FSCJ?’” While many students have a college they have been dreaming of attending since freshman year, understand that there are thousands of options all over the country. Our perspectives of other colleges may be skewed because we have our heart set on our top-choice. We

obviously have reasons that we prefer to go to one school over another school, but all colleges can offer you an education that you will retain for a lifetime. “The biggest thing is to try to have an open mind,” Buckley said, “that faith that God is going to put you in the place that you were meant to be.”

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Arts and Entertainment

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s my time as a food critic comes to a close, I end my legacy here as the first writer of Kenny Kravings by showing you popular college spots from my future home-away-fromhome: the University of Central Florida. As many other students are moving to Orlando along with me, here are three of my favorite local stops to eat and hang out in hopes that you can find some similar restaurants here in Jax or wherever college takes you.

Franchesca Peralta | Design and Layout Editor

12241 E Colonial Dr. Orlando, FL 32826 Fuzzy’s Taco Shop The first time I came here, I knew that I would love it. With a vibe resembling Lola’s, the burrito joint I visited last issue, the restaurant was full of bright colors accompanied by a hip and casual ambience with sports broadcasted on multiple televisions, welcoming people of all ages. Although the menu has mouth-watering items like taco bowls and burritos, my favorite dish is the Tempura Fish Taco. I am not normally a seafood lover, so I was hesitant to order this for the first time. Full of ingredients that I would never think of myself eating, let alone enjoying, from feta cheese to cilantro, this has easily become my favorite dish that I have ever eaten. From the first bite into the taco, you can feel the crunch of the fried fish and the crisp coolness of the lettuce. Eaten best with hot sauce drizzled atop, this taco will surely convince you to drop all you have and move to Orlando ASAP. Thankfully, a location is coming to Jacksonville soon.

$2.59 Lazy Moon Pizza 11551 University Blvd. Orlando, FL 32817

Located on University Boulevard, this pizza joint can easily be categorized as a college student hot spot; there is almost always a wait to get in, but let me tell you, it is completely worth it. From soups to calzones to slices of pizza bigger than your face, Lazy Moon is your place for a weekend night with your friends or for dinner when your family comes to visit. Lazy Moon offers “Lazy Faves,” which are the most popular pizza choices, but you can also make your own pizza by choosing from their copious topping options, including proteins, cheeses and vegetables. My personal favorite is Jason’s Mom’s Slice, topped with chicken, sautéed mushrooms, caramelized onions and tomatoes. This slice is just the right choice if you want something new and more flavorful than the standard pepperoni slice as the gourmet toppings are not something you would find on any traditional pizza from Dominos or Pizza Hut. Although these pizzas are to-die-for, be warned that these will help you gain the dreaded freshman fifteen if you do not enjoy them in moderation.

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9900 Universal Blvd. Orlando, FL 32819 Quickly Boba Shop

There are plenty of boba shops near UCF, but my favorite so far has been Quickly. At this relaxed and casual scene, located minutes away from campus, you can order dozens of different flavored drinks from three different size options. My personal favorite is Mocha with boba, as it gives you a slight coffee taste with a hint of chocolate. This drink can serve as a cool beverage to keep your temperature low on a hot day, but can also fill you up until your next meal. Here at this shop, you can play games like Jenga or dominos with your friends, or even just sit in one of the booths on your laptop and get some school work done. With its extensive menu ranging from milk tea to juice to espresso, this hangout will surely cater to any taste buds.

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Arts and Entertainment

Rita Albert | Staff Reporter

WARNING: Spoilers Ahead

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his fiancée Astrid that pull us into a time machine of adorable quotes restated from the first film. During the last 15 minutes of the movie, the score is all songs from the original movie, tying it all back together as one final completed story. This parallelism helps the audience gain some closure as the series concluded. Berk has undergone many changes since the original movie. It has experienced major construction, not just because of the dragons, but it has become a colorful town with taller buildings and looks more full and happy with the addition of dragons. When the people of Berk make the difficult decision to move, they transition to a larger area with lush grass and glistening waters. The scenery of the movie is bright with vivid nature and pastel sunsets, puffy white clouds, lively blue waters and detailed forests. There is extensive and intricate detail in the graphics of the animation. You can see the pores and individual strands of hair and stubble of the characters. Within nature, you can see the individual grains of sand and the detailed leaves of the trees. The light gleaming off each dragon scale, and the glassy look in their jeweltoned eyes portrays the thought put into these details. The animation quality is like nothing I have seen before. I believe that the story of “The Hidden World” was intriguing, but not as well

developed as the previous two movies. What sets it apart is not the plot, but rather the emotional intensity it conveys. In the series’ two previous chapters, the character development was a prominent part. However, the latest movie lacks character development and its main point is the story about moving away and the efforts to keep the dragons safe. Nearing the end, Hiccup realizes that it would be safer for the dragons to fly off and be free, and everyone in the village lets their pet dragons go. In the final scene of the film, we speed up to the future in which Hiccup and Astrid, along with their son and daughter, are sailing and he finds Toothless, who also has a wife and babies: the night lights. This ending signifies that Toothless and Hiccup would always find their way back to one another. All the ties back to previous films, combined with the finalization of the ending, epicly struck the hearts of franchise lovers. Glimpses into future events relieves some of the pain generated when the dragons flew away from Berk. The ending was quite a shock, and I bawled my eyes out for ten minutes in the parking lot afterwards; I am still in awe of how well executed the film was. Rush into theaters and watch this fiery movie before it flies out.

Graphic by of Rita Albert

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ow to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World’ captivates audiences around the globe in its lively and colorful display of scenery, heart-wrenching emotion, charming dragons and brilliant score. Based on the book series by Cressida Cowell, the films have excelled since the first movie was released in March 2010, and was nominated for such prestigious awards as the Academy Awards and Golden Globes. In its opening weekend, ‘The Hidden World’ secures the topgrossing movie with a fifty-five million dollar gross, according to Box Office Mojo, and for good reason. The movie is incredible, exhilarating, adorable, shocking and painful, sending audience members on an emotional journey. I laughed, I cried and I was definitely not prepared for the soul-stirring ride of conflicting feelings that I went on. The main character, Hiccup, chief of the Vikings, tries to protect Toothless, his Night Fury dragon, from being killed by infamous dragon hunter Grimmel the Grisly. In an attempt to keep all the dragons safe from those who have not learned to coexist with dragons, Hiccup leads the people of Berk, the Vikings’ home, on a quest to find “The Hidden World” where all dragons live so that they do not lose their beloved pet dragons. A new character is introduced: a Light Fury. Toothless is smitten and wants to see the glistening white dragon all of the time. This helps represent Toothless transitioning into the wildlife because the Light Fury is not domesticated. The movie begins with the iconic “Welcome to Berk” monologue that has opened each movie in the series, however, this was not the only tie back to the previous films. In the original movie, Hiccup draws Toothless in the sand with a stick and Toothless copies him. Hiccup then tries to step out of the drawing, but every time he steps on one of the lines, Toothless growls. In the conclusion, Toothless draws the Light Fury in the sand and when she steps on the lines, he growls at her too! Alongside this moment, there were also moments with Hiccup and

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Arts and Entertainment

Dear Hopeless Romantic Readers,

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have a confession to make: I’ve been writing about love for two years now and I still have never had a relationship. Yes, the ‘love connoisseur’ has never been in love but writes love columns. As ironic and fraudulent as the situation is, I’ve learned a lot about liking or loving someone by watching people make mistakes. I’m here to give you my last piece of advice before passing on the duty of Kenny Kupid to someone who’s probably been in love. Love yourself before expecting someone to love you or before loving someone else. This is annoying information that is constantly regurgitated to everyone seeking love for the first time, but the majority of relationships are built off of the fear of being alone. People use love as a bandage to patch up their insecurities for temporary high self-esteem. They expect their partners to fix their self-doubt and internal battles. Contrary to belief of teenagers in our generation, this should not be the case; your boyfriend or girlfriend is not Bob the Builder. They are not dating you as a repairman; they are dating you because they want to spend time with you. Stop wasting other people’s time by having them

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try to fix your personal problems. Loving other people without loving yourself is not love, it’s selfishness. Stop wasting time: tell your crush that you like him or her. If you feel attacked by my previous statement, it’s likely because you’re playing games and refuse to tell someone that you like him or her. However, there is never a ‘right moment’ to tell someone that you are obsessing over them. Just put your pride away, let your walls down and allow yourself to be vulnerable to rejection, because watching someone you want to be with be with someone else is worse than rejection. You’re watching all your desires and daydreams about the potential relationship with another protagonist. It hurts more knowing that you could have made that person so happy but you waited too long and decided to play games. Prevent that heartbreak and confess that you like the person before someone else does. Give all of yourself to someone, but don’t give up who you are. Although you should be open to change, someone who loves you won’t make you change your identity. Don’t give up what you wear, your friends, your beliefs or your opinions for a relationship.

They will accept all of you, so don’t sacrifice who you are. Compromise in a relationship is fair and natural, but you should never sacrifice who you are. Do not ever risk your friends for your significant other (unless faced with extreme situations). If you abandon your friends and disappear into thin air, you will end up lonely, clingy and stuck in a relationship. The world will continue to spin and all your friends will move on. They won’t wait for you but most likely will find your replacement. Lastly, spread love as often as you can because life is not guaranteed. Start telling people how much you care and love them, now, instead of waiting for tomorrow. Start forgiving people or apologizing for your wrongdoings because life should not be spent holding grudges. Your experiences in this world can make you protective of your heart but fight against the natural instinct to protect yourself. It is okay to be cautious but not okay to withhold yourself from love. Allow yourself to heal from the pain and spread love because what you give is what you receive.

Love, Niah Aleger

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Sports

Hoopin’ for History

Girls basketball team looks back on their success Max Montana | Managing Editor

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he whistle blew and the gravity of the situation fell onto her mind with all its weight. Sophomore Jasmyne Roberts, the power forward who averaged 18.4 points per game and ranked as the ninth best player in the state of Florida this season, directed her nervous energy towards thinking of the thousands of free throws that she made in practice. Despite the pestilent crowd noise and the stakes of the scenario, with the Crusaders finding themselves down 47-48 against Southeast in the 2019 FHSAA Girls Basketball State Championship, Roberts converted the first free throw attempt, to the visible delight of her energized teammates and ecstatic student section. “I knew that the first one was the hardest, because you’re always thinking ‘Alright, this is the one I have to make, it determines everything,’” Roberts said. “We fought that game.” Even with Southeast calling a timeout to ‘ice’ Roberts, the Crusaders’ leading scorer knocked down the second free throw, ran back on defense and tipped the ball out to punch Bishop Kenny’s trip to the state championship game. This moment, the likes of which hasn’t been a reality to a Bishop Kenny Girls Basketball team since 1993, became a reality to this new generation of student athletes. “Everyone’s got a role and it’s really important for [them to] 1) understand their role, 2) accept their role [and] 3) star in their role,” girls basketball head coach Charlsea Clark said. “By the time tryouts come around and the teams are set, we’re not introducing anything new.” Clark started her stint as head coach in 2015 and finished her first two seasons at Bishop Kenny with 12-15 and 11-14 records respectively. But, with an 18-10 record last year, the team came into the 2018-2019 season aiming for more. “Seeing the program transition into what it is now has been super amazing,” senior shooting guard Janie Citrano said.

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“For me as a senior, seeing that is just something super special and I am happy to be a part of it. I’ve been with [Coach Clark] for four years. I’ve spent a lot of time with her in the gym and I think the leadership role, I take it through this time that I spent with her.” Propelled by two separate 12-game winning streaks, the 2018-2019 season proved itself a turning point for the program as two sophomores, power forward Jasmyne Roberts and guard Maddie Millar, stepped onto the scene and rejuvenated the team on both sides of the court. “I fit in really nice and everyone

“It was almost like our vision that we had in our mind all season came true; we made it.” made me feel welcome,” Roberts, who averaged 18.4 points per game and 9.7 rebounds per game, said. “[They] made plays around me and for me. It was a good transition for me and my playing style.” The Crusaders spent six days or about 12 hours practicing and working out together during the season every week on average. “We spent so much time together,” Roberts said. “We were with each other more than we were with our own families.” Though their camaraderie and skills were cultivated early in the season, Clark would still wait to confirm her suspicions of a beyond-exceptional season. “We knew this team was special in Atlanta at Christmas time,” Clark said. “We won the Fleming Island Christmas Tournament before Christmas and then we went to Atlanta and faced three really good teams and won that tournament.

Our staff knew... [that] this team might be special, we might be able to go further than they have in a long time.” Cruising into the Florida state tournament on an eight-game winning streak capped with a triple-overtime district championship win against crosstown rival Ribault, the Crusaders picked up where they left off and defeated Tallahassee-area Rickards to punch their tickets to the Final Four. “The most rewarding moment of my entire career as regards to basketball as a player and a coach was that night here at Bishop Kenny when we beat Rickards to advance to the Final Four,” Clark said. “To have the gym packed, to do something that not a lot of players [and] I’ve never done to cut down nets with everybody around, that had to be one of the most amazing parts.” Citrano, however, found the next stage of the season even more memorable. “One [moment] that sticks out to me, I think getting to see the court when we first got to Lakeland, stepping out onto that court,” Citrano said. “It was almost like our vision that we had in our mind all season came true; we made it. I’ll never forget finally making it there.” The team defeated Southeast High School by a score of 49-48 with the help of Roberts’ clutch free throws. Though the team would fall in the championship to American Heritage 58-40 the following day, the success of the season and the hope of the future is not lost on Bishop Kenny’s coaching staff. “This year was super encouraging and with us returning the same five starters,” Clark said. “Everybody’s already talking about ‘gosh you’re gonna be right back where you were,’ already putting us in that top spot. And so for me and for our coaching staff, it’s how do we get them there again? So there’s going to be a lot emphasis on skill development in the offseason.”

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Photos courtesy of Tim Yocum; Graphic by Rita Albert Clockwise from top left corner: The Bishop Kenny Girls basketball team huddles up and listens to Coach Charlsea Clark prior to the 2019 FHSAA 6A Girls Basketball State Championship on Thursday Feb. 28 against American Heritage; Coach Charlsea Clark looks on during the tip-off as Jasmyne Roberts jumps for the ball against American Heritage on Thursday, Feb. 28 during the FHSAA StateChampionship in Lakeland, Florida; The Crusaders pose with the state runner-up trophy and medals following their loss against American Heritage in Lakeland, Fla.; Jasmyne Roberts, number 24, shoots the game-tying free throw during the 2019 FHSAA 6A Girls Basketball State Semi-Final on Wednesday, Feb. 27 against Southeast.

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May 2019