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WINTER 2016 #02

€3.50 £2.50

FASHION

TRAVEL

ARTS

INTERIORS

Women in Dior • Caroline Mitchell • Haute Couture AW 2016-17

A taste of Puglia • Exploring southern Australia and Tasmania

Photographer and artist Alexia Sinclair • Showcasing Irish artists

Top tips on hiring an interior designer • Benefits of de-cluttering


THE WEDDING SHOP BOBBLE JUG


Our beautiful Georgian showrooms offer a unique experience for connoisseurs of interiors in all styles, from period-specific through to cutting edge contemporary. The showroom displays are all in room-settings, and are open to the public six days a week.

Showrooms, Design Studio & Workrooms 102-106 Main Street MOIRA BT67 0LH N. Ireland

The Beaufort Collection at SIMPSONS LONDON Ground Floor, unit G2 Chelsea Harbour Design Centre East LONDON SW10 0XF

T. +44 28 9261 9508 www.beaufortinteriors.co.uk

T. +44 20 8629 0882 www.beaufort-london.com

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Welcome to Anthology Issue 2

W

hen Anthology was launched earlier this year it received a very positive reaction from both readers and advertisers. The vision was to create a lifestyle publication showcasing captivating and informative articles to highlight arts and culture, fashion and beauty, home designs, travel destinations and so much more - in print. And so the journey continues providing visually appealing and intelligent content for the modern reader. A large section of this issue is dedicated to photography and depicts how this art form has changed over the past hundred years. The featured collections show how images help to preserve history, facilitate communication and move people in ways that words sometimes cannot. One of Ireland’s great photographic collections by Franz Sebastian Haselbeck, which has been painstakingly catalogued and

protected by his granddaughter, Patricia, chronicles an exciting period in Irish history. Photographs from ‘Women in Dior Portraits of Elegance’ will transport you through the archives of the atelier and pay tribute to the women who have worn the creations of the house of Dior. Fine art photographer and digital artist, Alexia Sinclair’s pictures combine the elegant finesse of contemporary fashion design with the sumptuous aesthetics of the Golden Age of painting. Her work is instantly recognisable with her signature found in the intricate creation and assembly of each image.  We are also delighted to showcase a selection of work from some of Ireland’s contemporary artists who introduce us to their varying styles techniques and themes. I hope you will enjoy these pages as much as we enjoyed putting them together! Edel edel@anthology-magazine.com

ANTHOLOGY PUBLISHING Limerick

ON THE COVER Alexia Sinclair is best known for her intense colour photographs portraying historical and allegorical figures. Her pictures combine the elegant finesse of contemporary fashion design with the sumptuous aesthetics of the Golden Age of painting. www.alexiasinclair.com (p.34)

SUBMISSIONS

EDITOR

ANTHOLOGY welcomes submissions - ideas, musings or long-form narrative and are keen to publish serious reportage. All we ask is that they are previously unpublished. Pitches to: info@anthology-magazine.com

SUB- EDITOR

PHOTOGRAPHY

Edel Cassidy Jeannie Croucher

ART EDITOR Ros Woodham

DESIGNER Lynne Clark

CONTRIBUTORS

Orna O’Reilly, Ivan Morris, Ros Woodham, Trish Taylor Thompson, Dolores White

ADVERTISING

Mary Hayes: advertising@anthology-magazine.com Printed by Turner’s, Longford Distributed by EMNews

From styled fashion shoots and portraiture to architecture, high quality photography is what ANTHOLOGY aims to bring to every issue. We are happy to view work. Link or PDF to: info@anthology-magazine.com

SUBCRIPTIONS

Anthology is a quarterly publication with a focus on beautiful features and imagery from Ireland and around the world. Subscribe to avail of free delivery directly to your door. Email: info@anthology-magazine.com ISSN: 2009-9150 The publisher accepts no responsibility for any of the views expressed or claims made by contributors or advertisers. While every care is taken to ensure accuracy of information contained in Anthology, we do not accept responsibility for any errors or matters arising from same. No part of this publication may be used or reproduced without written permission from the publishers.


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contents

12 26 34

8 TRAVEL A taste of Puglia 12 GOLF Golf and your health 14 ART Featured Irish artists 26 FASHION Women in Dior 34 PORTRAIT Alexia Sinclair – photographer and artist 46 INTERIORS Exit strategies for clutter 52 FEATURED HOTEL: IRELAND Waterford Castle 54 FEATURED HOTEL: EUROPE Kapari Natural Resort 56 HEALTH The art of sleep


58 58 FASHION Haute Couture Autumn /Winter 68 PHOTOGRAPHY The Haselbeck Collection 78 TRAVEL Southern Australia and Tasmania 84 INTERIORS Working with an interior designer 91 MUSIC Sing your little heart out 92 BEAUTY Capsule make up collection 94 BEAUTY Eye creams – tried and tested 96 FASHION The magic of red shoes 98 FASHION Caroline Mitchell

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78 96


A Taste of

Puglia

wo r d s a n d p i c t u r e s orna o ’ reilly

A

s I stepped off the aeroplane in Brindisi on my first visit to Puglia, I was immediately struck by the deep blue colour of the Adriatic Sea, which is clearly visible from the airport. Blue skies with a few white puffy clouds greeted me as I climbed onto the bus to take me to the Baroque city of Lecce. My second impression, as I whizzed along in the bus, was of the olive groves, stretching as far as the eye could see, and further. Puglia is a land of olive trees, producing more than half of Italy’s olive

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oil, more than any other Italian region. It is also the second largest wine producing area in Italy after the Veneto, producing around 14% of total wine production. The wines that come from this dry, sunny, breezy climate are rich and full bodied, with more than 30 Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) wines available. Little did I know, on my first visit back in 2011, that this was to be the beginning of a love-affair with an entire region. In fact, the pull of the stiletto heel of Italy’s boot has been so strong, I am planning to move

there permanently! Over several visits, exploring Puglia has been a great pleasure. Now I’m going to share with you some of my favourite towns, wines and food. As you drive down through Puglia, the countryside is mainly flat, except for the Gargagno Peninsula in the north, though the Valle d’Itria (Itrian Valley) around Ostuni, Locorotondo and Alberobello consist of the Murgia, a limestone plateau made up of rolling hills dotted with trulli and criss-crossed by dry stone walls, olive groves and vineyards.


travel

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After Ostuni, the White City on the hill, the Salento plains begin a stretch down to the southernmost point of Puglia right to the tip of Italy’s heel to Santa Maria di Leuca, where the Ionian and Adriatic Seas collide. One of the first seaside towns you will see as you head south is Polignano a Mare with its horseshoe shaped bay. With the blue Adriatic on your left, you will pass by all the wonderful marinas that dot the coast, with Ostuni and the Itrian Valley high on your right hand side. Circling the beautiful baroque city of Lecce and heading out to the coast, you will see the opulent holiday homes of San Cataldo, while you keep on heading south towards Otranto famed for its beaches. Driving up the coast along the Ionian Sea, you will arrive in Gallipoli, an old fishing village with a beautiful fortress dating back to the 13th century and a maze-like network of narrow streets. Puglia is an extremely fertile region. As well as olive trees and grape vines, there is also an abundance of tomatoes, artichokes, aubergines, figs, almonds and wheat fields to be found. With 800 kms of coastline, you can imagine that fish options are plentiful on most menus and seafood restaurants abound. However, meat is mostly eaten in the hills of the Valle d’Itria where sheep are bred. Foodies certainly won’t be disappointed at the variety of interesting local dishes and wines which are available. The pastas that are presented on every menu are either orecchiette or cavatelli – both small and ear-shaped. Typical dishes from this area are fave e cicorie selvatiche (broad bean purée with wild

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travel

chicory), orecchiette con polpette (pasta with tomato sauce and meatballs) and bombette (pork meatballs). Of course, one must not forget to try the wonderfully creamy burratina cheese. Accompanied by the local rosato wines, the food flavours are just out of this world. The two most popular and widely available wines from Puglia are Salice Salentino and Primitivo. Salice Salentino is made from the Negroamaro (Italian for black-bitter), which is dry red wine with a spicy, raspberry flavour and is full bodied, though not too acidic. Richer and more full-bodied is popular Primitivo, with its blackberry taste. The Primitivo grape ripens early and the result is a wine that is fruity and rich. Apparently, it is the same grape as California’s Zinfandel.

Bombino Nero grapes are late ripening and are mainly used to make the delicious rosato wines. Malvasia, usually blended with Negroamaro, is also used for the rosato wines with their hints of raspberry and cherry. Verdeca, blended with Bianco d’Alessano, is used in the making of the Locorotondo and Martina Franca Denominazione di Origine Controllata (DOC) wines, made either still or sparkling, and is considered an important indigenous grape in Puglia. Or indeed a fruity Chardonnay, which rarely fails to please. If you want a perfect holiday, full of sunshine, fresh fish, excellent wines, sandy beaches, blue seas, beautiful towns and scenery, look no further than Puglia, low down on the heel of Italy but high on excellence and variety for breathtaking views , food and wine.

Unesco World Heritage Site, Alberobello, a small town in South East Puglia is known for its vast number of unique trulli buildings, small dwellings built from local limestone, with dry-stone walls and characteristic conical roofs.

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Golf

li f e s t y l e

words ivan morris

W

hat is it that makes golf so beguiling? Is it is because a complete beginner can, out of the blue, execute a single sublime stroke as purely as the best player in the world? If it can be done once, it is reasonable to think that it can be done again. The problem is, one never knows when or where? Even, the best golfers cannot be sure. In golf, you use all parts of your body, including your mind, sometimes not enough and sometimes too much. How could you not enjoy a game in which every day, every game and every shot is different while at the same time tricking you into thinking that it is easy? Playing golf is like a major paradox. Hit down on the ball to make it rise; swing left to make it go to the right; swing right to go left; swing easy to go far and so on. Unlike the playing grounds of other games, golf courses are places of natural beauty that are not confined

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Tips for a longer life

And your Health

areas marked off for territorial combat. A net divides tennis players. Footballers defend opposite ends of a pitch. Golf is a leisurely walk through the countryside, which can be non-combative and friendly, or a tension-inducing confrontation that sometimes turns into a kind of mental torture. Players can enjoy the game for its own sake; playing alone or enjoying being in good company. There does not always have to be a winner and one does not always have to keep score. It’s an individual game but there are social aspects to golf that are heart-warming. We all enjoy the friends we make through a common interest. During a round of golf, you can chat continuously or play in silence. By its fresh air and exercise properties, golf is clearly a healthy pastime that is obviously good for you while, at the same time, one’s frame of mind enhances or impedes performance to an enormous degree. Golf brings us great joy one min-

ute and ruins our peace of mind the next. So what is a golf nut? Probably someone like Sean Connery aka 007 who I spotted one time coming off the Aloha course in the Costa Del Sol, after what must have been a bad day. In the locker room, he threw his golf shoes with maximum force against the wall while shouting a few, choice swear words. I was the star witness and I did what anyone would do - I burst out laughing. Mr Connery, however wasn’t pleased and he growled two words at me that I daren’t repeat. Then, I said to him: “You should have been here five minutes ago because I did exactly the same. Aren’t we both a right pair of right eejits.” Now, it was Connery’s time to laugh. Within minutes the pair of us were immersed in giving each other swing lessons and convincing one another that we would play much better next time. Golf nuts are not as crazy as they may seem. They have found a key to living longer and healthier lives. Research undertaken in 2009 at the renowned Karolinska Institutet in Sweden discovered that the average life span for the 300,000 registered Swedish golfers is noticeably longer than for other citizens of the same sex, age and socio-economic status. In fact it is 5-7 years longer on average. And the lower the golfer’s handicap, the better his or her chances are of surviving longer and in good shape. So, you golfers - keep enjoying the fresh air and the walks in beautiful places. It’s official -golfing is good for your general well-being and it will help you to live longer.


A uniquely Irish Destination

Dromoland Castle’s magnificent Renaissance structure was built in the 16th century and retains all the splendour of its rich and storied history. Majestically set on the shores of Lough Dromoland, it is surrounded by over 450 acres of breathtaking scenery, including a championship parkland golf course. Lavish interiors, fine food and superb wines complement the deluxe accommodations of the Castle’s 98 guest rooms, while Dromoland Castle Golf and Country Club, an intimate spa and traditional outdoor recreational opportunities ensure a unique guest experience.

Dromoland Castle is located at Newmarket-on-Fergus, Co. Clare, Ireland. The hotel can be contacted at 011 353 61 368144 or 1-800-346-7007 Website www.dromoland.ie.


Martina Furlong S

ince Martina’s return to Ireland in 2015 after sixteen years in London, she has been based at The Paintbox Gallery/Studio in Oulart, Co. Wexford. Here, visitors can view and purchase her original paintings and limited edition prints. An honours graduate in fine art painting from Limerick School of Art and Design, Martina paints landscapes and abstracts, working in oils and acrylics. Her landscapes are influenced by the beauty, ruggedness and magical quality of the Irish countryside while her abstracts are inspired by the things she encounters every day; nature, books, songs, people and buildings. With both subjects, she mixes reality with memory and imagination and paints her own interpretation of it. She does this by exaggerating colour and applying layer upon layer of paint using various tools and then working back into the surface of the painting to create heavily textured scenes. Martina has been actively involved in the Irish art scene since her return to Ireland last year and her work has been in several exhibitions across the country including KFest Music and The Arts Festival, Killorglin, Co.Kerry in 2015 and 2016 and Art Source 2015 in the RDS.

Viewing is by appointment at The Paintbox. All visitors are welcome to make an appointment to suit themselves with no obligation. Please see Martina’s website for upcoming Open Days/Events

The Paintbox, Oulart Lower, Gorey, Co.Wexford www.martinafurlong.com +353 (0) 874642440 Martina Furlong - Artist

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David McGlynn I

rish sculptor David McGlynn graduated from the National College of Art and Design with a BA in Art Fine Art Sculpture. Since graduating he has travelled widely, starting with a residency in Finland at the Keuruu Art Gallery. Representing Ireland for the Changchun International Sculpture Symposium in China, he spent three months creating a stone sculpture three meters in height for the Changchun World Sculpture Park in Jilin. David then continued on his travels to Hanoi in Vietnam. Working in clay and using traditional wood fired brick kilns, he formed a body of work composed of sculpture in ceramic and oil paintings. On his return to Ireland in 2006, David went on to study bronze casting and Foundry Engineering at the Belfast Metropolitan College. Much of David’s work focuses on the use of bronze casting and his subject matter is influenced by the human figure, landscape and music. His sculptures reflect a sense of wonder while also displaying a sense of playful humour. Through working in this medium he has become aware of the qualities and tensile strength of bronze which has inspired new ideas whereby forms can be perceived to be weightless or free floating. His current work employs this quality of suspension or flight and has evolved with the bold use and exploration of colour. In between preparing for new exhibitions and large scale projects, David is engaged in expanding his knowledge and use of materials such as stainless steel and new technologies like plasma and laser cutting. These explorations are already clearly visible in his latest work resulting in some truly captivating sculpture.

‘My work comes from a desire to share my experiences and celebrate life’

6 Fitzwilliam Terrace, Strand Road, Bray, Co. Wicklow +353 0877710975 davart7@yahoo.com www.davidcmcglynn.com

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Gillian Hennessy ‘T

he Doodler’ was a title that was bestowed on Gillian Hennessy through her early school years. Inked shapes and forms were snaked around the front of her schoolbooks and particularly in the margins of school notebooks to the irascibility of her peers. This continued into her early working years when she doodled her colleagues’ faces and items on her desk onto post-it-notes. Through CEAD at the National College of Art and Design and studying under the watchful eye of the Irish contemporary artists at the National Gallery lectures, Gillian learned the basics of the stripped back elements of drawing, negative and positive space and form of which she still uses as her mantra before picking up a paint brush or spirit level. Her artistic forte is large Irish contemporary landscape canvases depicting clouds in their ever changing form. Examples of her main artistic influences are Adam Hall, an American landscape artist and Scottish landscape artist, Scott Naismith. Her foundation for painting is the use of quality oil colours and gallery stretched linen canvases. Priming and layering are key and when the first layer of a block of colours is set down, Gillian knows immediately if the concept is workable. The key element to her success is constant research. She greatly admires work from the Dutch Golden Age, especially masters such as Gabriel Metsu and Johannes Vermeer with their honed artistic skills, who could capture still life ornaments, material, form and the figure all in one painting. By working closely with interior designers and through her many home owner commissions, Gillian is aware that, as an artist, it is vital to keep on top of what is popular in terms of interior trends and colours. Participating in the ‘House Interior Design Show 2016’ in the RDS proved to be a great success for Gillian and it brought her to the attention of many new clients. The next big event will be her solo show in Straffan Antiques and Design’s Big Art Gallery for the start of 2017. Gillian works from her studio space in Kill Co Kildare.

www.hennessyart.ie 087 9728334 gillianhen@gmail.com

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Lorraine Fenlon B

orn in Dublin into a family of artists, musicians and bookworms, Lorraine Fenlon has been painting from a young age. Now based in Carlow, she keeps busy doing exhibitions, commissions and teaching art to adults and children. Her work has found its way to collectors throughout Ireland, the UK, Europe and the USA. Lorraine’s art focuses on luscious depictions of fruit, rich contemporary landscapes and cheeky fish! She pushes the boundaries with strong composition, a vibrant colour palette and texture making her work stand out as being easily recognisable and desirable. “I like my art to feel uplifting to the viewer. My art is about happiness. Choosing a painting is a lifetime investment. I think it should enhance the home and create a positive mood.” says Lorraine. Lorraine is very passionate about her art and spreading the joy of it is part of this passion. While teaching, whether adults or children, she concentrates on passing on a sense of confidence to the student. She feels art is a wonderful way for anyone to relax and is something that can be continued throughout life, enjoying the creative process and the social element and it is also a way to contribute to the culture of the community. Her Fruit and Fish paintings are particularly popular for kitchen and dining areas. People spend large budgets doing up kitchens and also spend most of their time in the kitchen and it is now becoming more and more popular to hang art in this area for a finishing touch. Lorraine exhibits at various shows and galleries in Ireland and you can meet her at RDS Art Source on Stand A91 from 11th to 13th November 2016. Visit Lorraine’s website, where you can view and purchase original works and limited edition prints which are presented in contemporary wood lime-washed frames..

lolofenlon@eircom.net +353 87 676 9051 www.lorrainefenlon.com

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Manus Walsh A

lthough born in Dublin, Manus Walsh has lived in the majestic Burren in the West of Ireland for more than forty years and has gained inspiration in abundance from this landscape. He produces works of outstanding beauty, fluctuating between styles and genres depending on what inspires him at that particular moment. He has worked in acrylic, oils, watercolour, collage etc. and has also become a fine exponent in the craft of enamelling on copper and silver. In his early career he worked in the field of stained glass design, working for the famous Abbey Stained Glass Studios in Dublin. Fine examples of his work in stained glass can be seen in Galway Cathedral and more recently, in St. Johns Church, Ballyvaughan. While the unique landscape of the Burren has been a major influence in his work, he has also been influenced by his travels abroad, especially in Spain and Chile, where he has had numerous exhibitions over the years and produced works that are rich in colour and rhythm. Apart from his work in landscape, he has created a colourful series of works in still life, and of musical themes. Manus’s work is held in many important public collections including the AIB, Office of Public Works and The Arts Council and is also held in private collections in Chile, Spain, England, France, Germany, U.S.A and Italy.

‘My work comes from a desire to share my experiences and celebrate life’

Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare +353 (0)65 707 7270 walshmanus@hotmail.com www.manuswalsh.com

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Dominique Beyens W

hether highlighting the architectural grandeur of the capital city, drawing attention to a coastal or rural panorama or focusing on his beloved street photography, Dominique Beyens’ diverse style effortlessly captures the beauty of Ireland. A precise sense of timing and engagement becomes clearly apparent in his humorous portraits of animals, along with the satirical naming of his artworks throughout the series. A full-time artist originally from Belgium, Dominique has been living and working in Ireland for over 25 years. The commercial ‘Silver Halide’ series which is loved by locals and visitors alike, is well known but it has been the fine art carbon edition that has set him apart where he combines his practice as a painter and interest in alternative printing processes on proven age-old natural art materials. Works that are best experienced in situ rather than the digital medium. Dominique was awarded the prestigious RDS Freyer Art Award in 2012 overseen by judges from the RDS, National Gallery of Ireland, RHA and IMMA. His work has been collected and is widely shown both nationally and internationally. His ‘Dublin Town’ project was recently featured in the Irish American Heritage Museum on Broadway, Albany, New York. December 2015 Works are available from the small to the very large and Dominique is open-minded about seeking out new projects that might interest him regardless of scale.

+353 87 6369349 eclecticlens@gmail.com www.eclecticlens.com

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Women in Dior: Portraits of Elegance words edel cassidy

book cover:

Angélique dress by Mats Gustafson, 2016. ©Mats Gustafson.

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T

hrough his book ‘Women in Dior: Portraits of Elegance’, Laurence Benaïm, the French author, journalist and fashion historian, one gets to discover the tastes and memories, the day outfits and evening dresses of a number of women, both anonymous and famous, who have worn the creations of the House of Dior. It is an exquisite celebration of Dior’s most glamorous clients and the dress-

es they have brought to life. Embraced worldwide from the very first collection, Dior’s creations have dressed celebrities, debutantes, and other notable figures for generations. This new exquisite tome from the House of Dior focuses on the many extraordinary people who have brought the celebrated designs to life. Through fashion photography and rarely seen, never-before-published illustrations and letters from Dior’s archive, readers will discover the relationships that inspired the couture and helped build the venerable fashion house. With Christian Dior as couturier, then with his successors, the beauty of the clothes has seduced a multitude of women who found in the architectural lines a way to express their own individuality. Leading women worldwide have helped propel and keep Dior at the forefront of the fashion world. ‘Women in Dior’ showcases the greatest clients of Dior and their most beautiful dresses. Featuring designs by Christian Dior and also by subsequent head designers from Yves Saint Laurent to Raf Simons, this gorgeously produced volume presents Dior’s creations in a new revealing light, and is a must-have for students of fashion and those who aspire to high style.

‘Readers will discover the relationships that inspired the couture and helped build the venerable fashion house’


fashion

Princess Margaret accompanied by Sir Oliver Harvey while arriving to the Bal du Cercle Interallié benefitting the British Hertford Hospital in Paris, November 21, 1951. ©Rue des Archives/AGIP.

Princess Margaret Princess Margaret once stated, “my favourite dress of all… was my first Dior dress, white strapless tulle and a vast satin bow at the back.” This was the white ballgown in which she was photographed by Cecil Beaton for her 21st birthday in 1951. Dior had shown his second collection in autumn 1947, at the Savoy hotel in London. The Queen requested a separate private viewing the following morning for members of the Royal Family, including her daughter Princess Margaret. It was perfect timing too, for a beautiful princess beginning a great love affair with fashion, who would later visit him in Paris to order a number of outfits. “She crystallised the whole popular frantic interest in royalty,” Dior wrote. “She was a real fairytale princess, delicate, graceful, exquisite.”

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Rihanna

Rihanna chose a design from the Autumn-Winter 2015 haute couture collection to attend the Spring-Summer 2016 ready-to-wear collection’s runway show in Paris, October 2, 2015. ©Getty Images for Dior.

Rihanna, Dior’s first black muse starred in the Secret Garden advertising campaign filmed at the Palace of Versailles in 2015. The photographer Steven Klein remarked “Rihanna’s mystery and intrigue combined with her razor-sharp looks and sensibility, are the essential, perfect elements to create the stage for Secret Garden”. The palace holds particular significance with the house of Christian Dior, with the designer himself drawing inspiration from its imposing architecture in the Fifties. At the 2011 Grammy Awards, the star opted for a dramatic Dior Haute Couture gown in taffeta and hand-painted silk tulle. The breath-taking black gown had a yellow petal print underskirt with a rise and fall hemline. At her second annual charity Diamond Ball, she wore a champagne-hued satin strapless Dior Haute Couture gown and matching floor-sweeping cape, celebrating with panache the marriage of R’n’B and grand French tradition.

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Princess Diana

Lady Diana arrives in Buenos Aires, November 23, 1995. She carries the Dior handbag that she will eventually popularise, which will become the famous Lady Dior. ©Tim Graham/Getty Images

In 1995, France’s first lady, Bernadette Chirac, gave the symbolic gift of a Dior Bag to the Princess of Wales during an official visit to Paris. Princess Diana was besotted with this accessory, which she ordered in several colours and carried during various public appearances. The leather stitched to form a cannage motif and with semi-circular handles, was named the ‘Lady Dior’ as a tribute to the princess who was affectionately known as Lady Diana. In December 1996, a recently divorced Diana was again a free woman and seemed to want to declare it to the whole world. She wore a deep blue dress designed for her by John Galliano to a gala evening at New York’s Costume Institute to mark the 50th anniversary of Dior. It was one of the couturier’s first creations under the Dior signature.

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Geneviève Page

Geneviève Page wears a Christian Dior dress during the French Film Festival in London in 1957. © Keystone-France.

Early in his career, Dior was to cross paths with an actress, before either of them knew what the future would hold for them. Geneviève was Dior’s god-daughter and for her eighteenth birthday he designed a black velvet ‘New Look’ dress with a wide, pleated calf-length skirt and a black patent leather belt. Geneviève felt a little uncomfortable with the odd length and asked her godfather to drop the hem by a few centimetres. He was adamant, she recalls, “as if I had somehow attacked his authority as a designer.” Her friends wearing ordinary dresses looked on with envy. Later that night, she went to the Club des Champs-Elyées where she was approached by Marcel Rochas who asked who designed that “absolutely magnificent dress”. She was to become the actress, Geneviève Page and Dior emerged as the silver screens favourite couturier.

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fashion

Stockman mannequins adapted for different clients. ©Laziz Hamani.

Stockman Mannequins The Stockman’s dressmaker’s form was created in 1867 by Frédéric Stockman, a young sculptor and disciple of Lavigne who invented the tailor’s dummies. Stockman decided to open his own company, with the idea of providing dressmakers with forms in different standardised sizes. The Stockman’s dressmaker’s form is handcrafted from papier-mâché. This recycled paper is applied on a mould. After cutting off the mould, the bust is stapled back together and sanded. Then the bust is padded and covered in fabric and is imprinted with the Stockman logo and the size and shape references. During the 20’s and the 30’s Stockman provided dawning Couture houses with dressmaker’s forms such as Christian Dior including the famous ‘New Look’ dummy in 1947. The company now known as Siegel & Stockman will celebrate its 150th anniversary in 2017.

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Mitzah Bricard

Portrait of Mitzah Bricard, circa 1950. All rights reserved.

“Ms. Bricard is one of those rare people whose only reason for living is elegance.” Monsieur Dior said of his muse, whose unique extravagance helped inspire many of his designs. While she was officially responsible for the Dior hat collection, she played a key role in advising and influencing the couturier on many aspects of the brand, including the creation of the New Look. Having worked as a designer at Doucet and at Molyneux and having created the fashion department at Balenciaga, she was chosen by Christian Dior for both her experience and her international contacts. She is said to have inspired Dior to use ‘jungle’ print as well as the colour lilac, her favourite shade. The fragrance ‘Mitzah’ was dedicated to her in 2010, as part of the Collection Privée Christian Dior.

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pictures alexia sincl air

Photographer and artist, Axelia Sinclair in conversation with Edel Cassidy, speaks of her inspirations, her creative process and the challenges facing artists in today’s commercial world

A

s a young child Alexia Sinclair was already well on her way to living a successful creative life. Blessed with a vivid imagination she would express her creativity in a variety of ways. Her favourite book, ‘Do it Yourself’ was a key that opened up her mind to a world of endless inspiration and ideas of creating artwork from everyday household objects. She would also play dress up and get her little brother to join in while directing her mother to photograph them both. At the age of four, little Alexia decided she wanted to be a dancer and began performing as a ballerina. Ballet gave her the scope to become immersed in a world of creating scenes, wearing costumes, roles, characters and emotions of the music and this world of fantasy has greatly impacted the way she approaches

‘The series took three years to complete and involved compiling over 2,000 plates of medium format film through hand illustration and digital montage’

her work today. Her parents also encouraged her by bringing her to the Bolshoi Ballet each year and she remembers sitting in the cinema as an eight-year-old watching ‘Amadeus’ feeling overwhelmed by the production and the music. ‘The Regal Twelve’, her first successful series was created as part of her Master of Fine Arts. She went on to win several awards for this series, which celebrates the lives of twelve powerful women in history. The series took three years to complete and involved compiling over 2,000 plates of medium format film through hand illustration and digital montage. Her series ‘A Frozen Tale’ was shot at Skokloster Slott, a Swedish castle which is set on frozen Lake Mälaren and is considered to be one of the finalist examples of Baroque architecture in all of Europe. Housing vast collections of rare books, artworks and weaponry, the museum has remained untouched for hundreds of years. Respecting the constraints of conservation, Alexia photographed her subjects within the castle, later adding the atmospheric elements that are typical of life in a 17th century castle. The ‘Rococo’ series is a collection of sensual portraits inspired by the 18th

> DELPHINIUM 2015, 1148 x 1118 mm / 1500 x 1500 mm, archival pigment, edition of 9 34 winte r 2016 a n t h o lo g y


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century pleasure playgrounds of French court. The project is guided by the design aesthetics and flamboyant fashions of the period. Through extensive research, Sinclair handmade costuming from richly embroidered silks, muslins, flowers and feathers, to accessorise and reimagine iconic women of the court. In the year leading up to shooting the series, she grew thousands of flowers for the elaborate sets, arranging the exotic flowerbeds around her models in a studio setting. 36 winte r 2016 a n t h o lo g y

Was your experience at art school what you expected? I attended the The National Art School in Sydney, which was a really strict traditional school where I had to study painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture and the history of art makers. This was in the 90s and there were no computers, at all, in the school and drawing was essential; if you failed drawing, you failed everything. Teenagers tend to hate that sort of discipline and traditional approach, but this education

has really influenced the way I work today. I wanted to become a sculptor, but thought, ‘I need to make a living’, so was drawn to photography. My work is influenced by painters and sculptors and I think of my work as being very sculptural, from the set building to the creation of the costumes, which in themselves are sculptures. Is it important, in your opinion, for students of art to go the traditional route and learn the skills and techniques of


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Rococo

Exquisitely costumed, painted and wigged Rococo characters are inspired by the lives, fashions and gardens of 18th century high society. Sensual, playful and flamboyant with sets constructed from thousands of live flowers, paying homage to the dreamlike landscapes of the period.

< HERALDS OF SPRING 2015, 1500 x 1500 mm / 1148 x 1118 mm, archival pigment, edition of 9

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FIELDS OF LAVENDER 2015, 1500 x 1500 mm / 1148 x 1118 mm, archival pigment, edition of 9

< THE PERFUMED GARDEN 2015, 1148 x 1118 mm, archival pigment, edition of 9

academic art, such as the technical aspects of drawing? I am a digital artist but I draw every day because I need to express myself and drawing is the most basic human expression, so it’s insane to me that artists don’t learn to draw. On the other hand, while an art student, I saw a lot of students who were not strong enough to stand up to teachers about ultimately what they wanted to produce. In that sense, it’s a shame to clip a student’s wings and insist that they learn the traditional style of producing work. It is important for an artist to be capable of having a clear vision of what they want to produce because it’s a tough road. Society isn’t built for artists and they have to be tough to survive. anthology winter 2016 37


The Regal Twelve

Celebrates European monarchs, the famous, the infamous and the obscure. Selection was based on their contrasting leadership styles, their flamboyancies and their enduring influence upon society in a time when women generally held little power.

> ALEXANDRA ROMANOV 2005, 635 x 635 mm metallic c-type, edition of 10 + 1ap

Tell me about your creative process? What are the steps you take from inspiration to execution? It depends on the series. So for instance with the ‘Regal Twelve’, which was my first very successful series, my whole aim was to master Photoshop. I was doing my Master of Fine Arts and as part of that I had a scholarship to Europe to explore museums. It was a tiny amount of money but I put all my savings into it and spent five months capturing the background landscapes and architecture and I didn’t really know what my plan was. When I returned to Australia, I thought about the fascinating stories I had heard about the women who lived in these palaces

and I hadn’t really seen paintings of a lot of them. Some were really popular and some had just vanished because women are not very well recorded in history. I then thought I should produce a series where I could build costumes and dress models and create a contemporary version of what these women could have been, using contemporary fashion models in these historical settings. It became my Master of Fine Arts Series and my aim with that was to shoot everything separately from little pearls to props and to master Photoshop in the process. Then with the ‘Rococo’ series, the aim was to build these amazing sets. It was not about going out and finding things but

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ELIZABETH I 2007, 635 x 635 mm, metallic c-type, edition of 10 + 1ap

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anthology winter 2016 39


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CINDERELLA 2012, 1000 x 1330 mm / 600 x 800 mm, c-type, edition of 15 + 1ap

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MACBETH 2009, 1118 x 1410 mm / 750 x 914 mm / 431 x 446 mm, archival pigment, edition of 65 + 1ap

Théâtre

From Shakespeare to Tchaikovsky, Théâtre is an ongoing collection of works around theatrical themes. Depicting a love for all things rich in the world of make-believe.

40 wint e r 2016 a n t h o lo g y


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THE NUTCRACKER 2012, 1118 x 1410 mm / 750 x 914 mm, c-type, edition of 15 + 1ap

< SOLOIST I 2012, 1483 x 1118 mm / 914 x 660 mm, archival pigment, edition of 8 + 1ap

actually to grow the flowers and at the same time build the costumes and the two were growing for over a year together. Then I place somebody into this imagined scene that I’ve grown and I build a story around that, so there was no compositing really in that series and it was all about the work coming before the photos were taken. The aim is always different with each series and I do think it’s really important that every new series is a chapter in my creative path because it’s not good to constantly be churning out the same material.

This work obviously demands endless patience. Is this something you find challenging? My husband tells me I have no patience, especially when it comes to having to say the same thing twice, but I’m really patient when it comes to something that I’m trying to achieve and it doesn’t annoy me because it takes time to produce a polished product. At the moment I’m doing an embroidered piece and it’s really slow going and I’m frustrated by the time it is taking but I can recognise the importance of that slow process. It also takes time for various ideas to constantly develop and if work is done too quickly it becomes devoid of great ideas. So patience is relevant when producing this kind of work. What photographers and artists have inspired you? At art school, when I had decided that I should be a photographer, I was looking at photographers and I wasn’t inspired at all by them. I still struggle to be inspired by

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photographers. I used to go to the school library which had an incredible series of books on painters like Botticelli and Caravaggio. At that time I was learning to paint in the style of ‘chiaroscuro’, which is the playing of light and dark. This is a style of lighting that I have developed in my work. Through learning how to paint this way, painting highlights and shadows, is how I developed my shooting and retouching style, not through photography. Nowadays so much I see inspires me, but the photographer that inspires me most is Gregory Crewdson. He is very famous now, but I discovered him when I was about twenty at one of his very first shows, in a group exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Australia. He had built little sets, in which there were little houses, little cars, little cocoons and little butterflies and all sort of things. It was just so weird. At the time I had no money but I bought a catalogue, which I still have to this day. I went to a talk of his a couple of years ago and I took it to show to him and he was so surprised and asked, “How did you get that?” He is inspiring because what he produces is a photograph, but there is so much story going on and so much consideration of the elements. I would say he is a painter really. For me the term painter doesn’t have to include paint, it’s more about considering every element that goes into the work. Light is obviously a key factor for you to create the best possible image. Can you tell me how you approach the use of light in your work? The meaning of the word ‘photography’ comes from the Greek roots and means ‘to paint with light’. People often ask, ‘How do you get that look in your post-production? What is being captured is light and nothing else and a lot of people don’t think about that when they take photos. Understanding how light plays with a scene and how manipulating the light makes a difference. Teaching, over the years, I will suggest sitting in a room and staring at a wall and seeing how a shadow falls into a scene. Observe how the light bounces off certain kinds of objects and how to replicate that. Even when not doing compositing work in Photoshop it is important to know how to use light to enhance your work and make things feel hyper-real. anthology winter 2016 41


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THE PORTRAIT HALL 2013, 1524 x 1143 mm / 1118 x 830 mm, archival pigment, edition of 6 + 1ap

> THE FEAST 2013, 1524 x 2032 mm / 1118 x 1410 mm, archival pigment, edition of 6 + 1ap

A Frozen TaleÂ

Shot at Skokloster Castle in Sweeden, set on a giant frozen lake, in which vast collections of paintings, antiques, tapestries, weaponry and rare books have also been frozen in time as the preserved interiors have remained untouched for over 300 years.

How do you keep up to date with technology? I use it all the time. Photoshop is becoming more and more automated and easier to use and I actually switch those automated controls off. In a way, using the automated version can result in everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work looking really similar because the actual 42 wint e r 2016 a n t h o lo g y

programme can control a lot of the outcome and everyone is doing the same type of contrast and grade. Some time ago, I developed a technique that worked for me and I just really remain true to that process. The programmes continue to develop and I continue to explore because using them keeps me on top of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out there.

Apart from academic art training, what do you consider to be the most important skills necessary to become a successful artist today? Being able to run a business is really important. Respond to emails within hours of receiving them because it is a very, very fast paced world. Understand how important


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media is. If you don’t get your work into magazines, newspapers and online blogs, then it doesn’t exist. The internet is wonderful to have, but I also think it is essential to exhibit. People who have seen my work online and then view one of my prints are taken aback because they will have had no idea that there would be so much detail

and they can be quite emotionally moved. I get comments like, ‘I had no idea your work was this good’. I shoot on a big medium format camera and the detail can be quite gob-smacking. The scale of my work can have a great impact. The scale relates to the particular artwork, some are meant to be small and some are meant to be large.

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Alexia Sinclair is currently based in London. Prints from all of her collections are available to purchase at www.alexiasinclair.com. She is also available for private and commercial commissions and to speak at conferences. All enquiries to: info@alexiasinclair.com anthology winter 2016 43


i n t e r i ors

Exit Strategies for Clutter words jeannie croucher

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ave you ever wondered if there was an easier way of organising your home, making it a more comfortable and stress free space in which to live? The benefit of decluttering for both our physical and mental well-being has become a hugely popular topic. There is plenty of advice and tips available from various books, websites, television programmes and even specialist consultants, all ready to facilitate your home re-organisation and transformation. In addition, there is easy access to recycling centres and a proliferation of second-hand and charity shops which are delighted to receive your previously loved items – some will even send a van to your house to collect bulky items! Many people would like to live less cluttered and more organised lives, with less worry, less responsibility and fewer possessions. Deciding to own less will usually result in having more money and time to do the things you really want to do. The biggest obstacle to be faced in this regard is getting started on a successful programme of simplifying the living environment. Here are just a few tips from the experts to make it all a little easier.

Fill a large plastic bag as quickly as you can with items that you can easily do without. See if you can do this in five minutes so you don’t have a chance to change your mind. Consider donating the contents of the bag to a charity shop so you have the added benefit of feeling that you have helped others.

Blogger Colleen Madsen, at ‘365 Less Things’, suggests giving away one item each day. By engaging in this simple yet effective daily routine, you will be amazed at the transformation to your home over a period of time.

Draw up a list of places to declutter, starting from the easiest and quickest to accomplish. The advantage of this method is that you can choose a small area to start, for example a bathroom or a closet and it means you won’t get overwhelmed with the task.

Easy tips to declutter and simplifying your life

A great way to make the most of wardrobe space is to use closet dividers or cut up shoe boxes and customise them to store small items. This makes it easier to see everything and also makes colour co-ordinating a dream come true.

One method regularly used by the experts is to use up to 4 boxes (or bags) to make the work of organising your household items easier. Each one is labelled – Throw out – Give away/Charity Shop – Keep - Re-locate. The idea is that all objects in the room – without exception – must be placed in one of these boxes or containers.

Marie Kondo, the much lauded Japanese organising consultant, suggests picking up whatever objects you own and asking yourself if that object gives you joy. If the answer is no, then thank it for its service and let it go!

The benefits of decluttering and minimal living are numerous. For example, it can provide more clarity and a more calming and pleasant living space. It is generally accepted that your home acts as a type of subconscious mirror to your emotional state of mind. Therefore, if you are suffering from some inner turmoil, it will reflect clearly in the condition of your environment. Clutter can accumulate as a result of energy-sapping emotions, like anxiety, grief or fear. Engaging in a form of relaxation such as mindfulness will help give you greater focus, as will the sheer physical aspect of clearing your excessive clutter. It also means that, eventually, you will have less time to spend on tidying and more time and money to invest in doing things you love with the people you love. 46 winte r 2016 a n t h o lo g y


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INTERIORS KITCHENS FURNITURE DESIGN DECOR PAINT

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Visit our showroom to see our Neptune and Browsers Bespoke fitted Kitchens. Upper William Street, Limerick, Ireland. www.browsers.ie


i n t e r i ors

Since 1969

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urphy Heating is a family-owned and operated full service contractor and supplier specialising in stoves and fireplaces, who have been serving homeowners, builders, architects and designers all over Ireland since 1969. A second generation business, operated by brothers Shane and Noel Murphy and their expert team, they pride themselves, not only in providing quality products, but in also a quality service, including nationwide installation and a backup and repair service. When planning a new build or a home remodel, one of the first decisions to be made is choosing the fireplace, stove or range cooker that will best suit your needs. Some factors to be considered would be calculating the capacity needed to heat the space you have in mind, ensuring adequate ventilation is available and that the product is visually suited to the overall design of the space. It is a good idea is to bring your house plans, or if renovating take a photo with your phone of your existing fireplace when making your choice.

When considering your heating needs, it is imperative to plan ahead and to seek professional advice on appliance size, chimney location and different heating systems available. At the recently renovated showrooms in Kinvara, Co. Galway, customers now have an opportunity to see many of the units under fire and also see Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s extensive portfolio of stoves and fireplaces from Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading manufacturers. These units incorporate the latest cutting edge technology resulting in energy efficient and environmentally friendly products. With many choices from traditional to contemporary, the product range caters for all situations and requirements. As every house is unique, and all customers needs are different, expert advice is available to help determine which product will be right for your home

Visit Murphy Heating at: Gort Road, Kinvara, Co. Galway T: 091-637159 Sales Requests: technical@murphyheating.com Services Requests: service@murphyheating.com Visit online store at www.murphyheating.com 50 wi n t er 2016 anthology


A majestic haven exuding timeless elegance & sophistication on the Western Algarve seafront

‘Voted one of Europe’s 20 most beautiful hotels by CNN’ T: +351 282 460 280

E: info@hotel-belavista.com

W: www.hotelbelavista.net


Waterford Hotel & Castle Golf Resort Luxury accommodation on a private island in Ireland’s Ancient East

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ast and present come together at Waterford Castle, where a rich and robust history blends seamlessly with contemporary comfort and luxury to make it a key component of Ireland’s Ancient East. Located on a private island in the River Suir, the centuries-old site of Waterford Castle sits just downstream from its namesake city, the oldest city in the Emerald Isle and is only a two minute private car ferry ride from the mainland. Originally erected as a single stone tower during medieval times, the island was inhabited by monks from the sixth to the eighth century. It was then taken by the Danes during the Viking era. A long line of the Anglo-Norman Fitzgerald family owned and occupied the spot for another eight centuries. Waterford Castle was transformed into a luxurious resort in the late 1980’s. The castle has evolved into an extraordinary,

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internationally renowned destination, with magnificent halls and rooms, each ordained with fine art, period furniture and fixtures. Unique details can be found at every angle from ornate original plaster ceilings to Elizabethan stone fireplaces. In 2015 the new proprietor, an Irish man, has taken the facility to new levels, “This has been an exceptional project, in that all of our additions and refurbishments aim to showcase the castle’s unique personality,” says spokesperson Bernadette Walsh. “Our team’s enthusiasm, professionalism and genuine love of the resort have made this a project from the heart.” Restoration of the castle’s historic furnishings and décor, with the addition of a collection of contemporaneous pieces, has been a priority. Recently it was decided to work in collaboration with Waterford Crystal to procure their finest chandeliers fitting to such a grand Castle.


featured hotel : irel and

Resort Activities

Munster Room Restaurant

Guests are welcome to enjoy an assortment of engaging activities. The resort offers an 18 hole championship golf course, a golf performance centre, tennis, clay pigeon shooting, falconry, croquet, playground, nature trails and kids’ club (on selected dates). The new owner has expanded the nature walking and biking trails to allow access to the Island Lighthouse. Experience the beauty of a vast array of wildlife from the resident deer, fox, badgers, hare, pheasants, peacocks, a siege of herons, swans and ducks - a bird watcher’s paradise. Recent changes have included an €100,000 investment to upgrade to the Island’s Des Smyth-designed, 18-hole championship golf course. A short-game area has been added with a state of the art golf performance centre offering custom fittings and much more.

Critically acclaimed in the 2015 Michelin Guide and two AA Rosette accredited, the warm ambience, oak paneled walls and extensive wine cellar makes this the perfect dining option. The award-winning culinary team uses only the finest local produce and create a truly memorable fine dining experience, offering traditional vintage afternoon tea, seasonal lunch and dinner menus with private dining options.

Family Lodge Experience Today, guests can choose to stay either inside the original castle’s 19 individually decorated luxurious bedrooms or in one of the 45 self-catering family friendly Resort’s lodges located a short walk from the Castle on the 310 acre island.

Weddings at The Island Resort With the stunning setting and the famous Irish homespun hospitality, more and more couples are keen to get married on the private island resort, offering exclusive Castle Weddings. Wedding parties have the option of exclusive use of the Castle and lodges for the ultimate experience of privacy in a truly romantic and picturesque setting. “Our mandate is to be the premier wedding venue in Ireland,” notes Walsh. “Lots of American couples, who have Irish heritage, travel here for a destination wedding. We also host many Australian, Canadian and of course, our local Irish and Europeans couples.” Renovations will continue with the building of an Island Spa. While upgrades carry on, Waterford Castle retains its oldworld charm and integrity. As it was when the monks first settled the island 1400 years ago, guests and visitors are invited to “leave your worries at the shore.”

‘The Bridgewater’ which was installed in the Great Hall is the last chandelier of its kind to be made at Waterford Crystal.

W aterford C astle H otel & G olf R esort T he I sl and W aterford , I rel and T: +353 (0) 51 878 203 www . waterfordcastleresort . com anthology winter 2016 53


Kapari

Natural Resort

An intimate 5 star retreat with an unparalleled panoramic view of the Aegean Sea

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ascading down a hillside from the highest point of the beautiful village of ImerovĂ­gli, on the Greek island of Santorini, Kapari Natural Resort is a testament to the timeless culture of the Cyclades. It is located on the site of the Venetian castle Skaros, an observatory destroyed by an earthquake in 1817. The 300-year-old cliff-side cave dwellings has been in the Adamidis family for decades and, following another devastating earthquake in 1956 that destroyed much of the picturesque village, they decided to set about restoring some of the few old dwellings that survived the destruction. In 2010, the estate was transformed into a luxury resort, using the most technologically advanced restoration methods to ensure that the centuriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; old traditional character of the building was preserved.

Guest Rooms and Suites The elegant 5-star complex combines traditional Cycladic architecture with contemporary minimalism. Earth-toned, rock-carved rooms and suites are sophis54 wi n t er 2016 anthology

ticated and modern yet convey a sense of timelessness and history, with breathtaking views across the famous caldera. Each room is equipped with touch-pad climate and entertainment-system controls, adjustable lighting, internet radio and Wi-Fi while fine linens with comfortable Duxiana beds allow for maximum comfort. The variety of accommodation ranges from the Vanilla rooms with private balconies or access to a wonderful shared yard and outdoor Jacuzzi with stunning views, to the Kapari Honeymoon Suite which offers the ultimate experience that newlyweds deserve, including a comfortable living room, two walk in dress rooms, twin master crafted built-in showers, a sky lighted Jacuzzi and even a steam bath. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also an elegant separate residence, ideal for larger families or groups of friends who require absolute privacy.

Kapari Wine Restaurant Each morning, hotel guests can sit and enjoy a rich healthy breakfast while admiring the beautiful sunrise over the Caldera and

Bay of Santorini. Only the finest ingredients are used and strict standards are followed to create wholesome and appetizing meals. The exquisite dinner menu features mouth watering Mediterranean recipes, combined with famous local delicacies and there is a large variety of premium wines to choose from. The Kapari Wine Restaurant is not just the best restaurant in the area but also allows dramatic views of the deep


featured hot hotel el : eu europe rope

Location Widely considered one of the most beautiful places in the world, Santorini is a Greek island tucked into the indigo Aegean Sea that captures the hearts of all who visit. It’s easy to understand why so many people fall in love with this legendary spot—its maze of towns perched on vertical cliffs create a dramatic setting that cannot be found anywhere else on earth. Blue domed churches set against white cubic architecture, local wineries, gourmet restaurants, art galleries, boutiques, along with pebbly beaches, and you’ve got the perfect formula for a romantic getaway or unforgettable adventure with friends. This exclusive Kapari Resort is located only 8 km from Santorini Airport and 10 km from the port and is the perfect location to visit nearby Oia, Fira and Firastefanie.

Weddings at Kapari A dedicated wedding planner along with the Kapari Hotel team will help couples plan and hold their Wedding Ceremony and Reception in a perfect setting that one could only dream of. Every detail of the special day is looked after, to ensure all runs smoothly, providing a lifetime of happy memories.

K apari N atural R esort I merovigl S antorini , 84700 T: +30.22860.21120 E: info @ kaparisantorini . gr W: www . kaparisantorini . gr

blue Aegean Sea and is one of the best vantage points on the island to experience Santorini’s famous sunset. The bar shares the same cave as the restaurant and is open throughout the day. Enjoy freshly squeezed juices, a variety of coffees, delicious finger food laying on comfortable lounge chairs, listening to eclectic, soft lounge music in the background. anthology winter 2016 55


Sleep

The art of

Sleep your way to health and happiness

words jeannie croucher

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leep is a basic part of all our lives and we human beings spend, on average, one third of our lives engaging in it. We are so accustomed to going to bed when it becomes dark and getting up when it’s bright that we often don’t question or think seriously about its importance to our very existence. In recent years, there have been many studies carried out and articles printed about what constitutes a healthy lifestyle, with a large emphasis on improving our eating and drinking habits, the recommendation of engaging in some daily physical activity and an awareness of the importance of avoiding too much stress, which we now know can lead to an increased risk of illness. However, sleep is one area of health that many of us think we know a lot about but regularly underestimate. With the 24/7, fast paced world in which we live, people appear to be getting far less sleep than the amount needed to function properly, especially adults, and the statistics prove that the situation is worsening. It is a problem that is not only affecting western countries but a global phenomenon, the potential consequences of which are alarming. A recently published (American) National Sleep Foundation Report found that two thirds of adults are not getting enough sleep on weeknights. In addition to this, in 2011, 32% of adults in the United Kingdom stated that they had averaged less than 7 hours of sleep a night in the previous six months: by 2014 that number had increased dramatically to 60%.

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According to Arianna Huffington, in her most recent book, ‘The Sleep Revolution: Transforming your Life one Night at a Time’, this crisis of sleep deprivation is having devastating effects on our lives, from its negative influence on our ability to work, our relationships and our overall health. It is an area with which we need to re-engage and take responsibility for ourselves to be able to cope successfully with all the challenges we may encounter in our daily lives. Studies have shown us that the amount of sleep recommended varies with age, with newborns needing between ten and eighteen hours per day, teenagers eight to ten, and adults who need seven to nine hours daily. The exact amount of sleep a woman or man needs is unique or individual to them and depends on many factors which can include age, health, physical exertion and mental activity. However the minimum amount required for a good night’s sleep for most adults is generally considered to be seven hours. Any amount less than this can be hazardous to a person’s safety, as concentration and alertness are diminished. This can lead to the occurrence of various types of accidents as fatigue and sleepiness can set in, for example, when driving for a period of time. It is estimated that fatigue is a factor in 10% of fatal car crashes and 57% in the case of truck drivers. Sleep disorders are not uncommon.

They include insomnia, which is characterised as a difficulty in falling asleep and the more potentially life threatening, sleep apnoea, where pauses in breathing are observed and narcolepsy, which is a neurological disorder involving the loss of the brain’s ability to regulate sleep-wake cycles. The interest in these disorders has increased over recent years as has the advice on how to treat them. However there are still many people who have not yet been diagnosed as having a sleep problem or worse still, they have been misdiagnosed. This certainly seems to be the situation in the case of women, whose symptoms


lifest yle

are manifested in a different way to men’s. According to Dr. Meir Kryger, former President of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, women ‘sleep differently’ to men, reporting a greater need for sleep than their male counterparts and they suffer more from sleep problems. In contrast to men, the kind of sleep issues women experience relate more to hormonal changes within the body, with menstruation, pregnancy and menopause causing many difficulties. Added to those bodily changes, there are also increasing demands on women’s time, with work and family life compounding the pressure on them. A lack

and others, but also, long term health and behavioural problems. So what happens to us during sleep? Well we basically drift into a state of unconsciousness where we lose a sense of awareness of our surroundings. What we do know is that there are two main stages of sleep, REM (rapid eye movement) and non-REM sleep and we switch between these stages five times a night. In nonREM sleep, the body moves around more and this is when it repairs itself from the ravages of the day but your brain is fairly inactive. In REM sleep, the muscles of the body are relaxed or ‘paralysed’, but the brain is very active. We usually dream during this phase. Most people during ‘Sleep that knits up the ravell’d sleeve of care, a normal night’s sleep will The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath, have brief awakenings Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, when they wake up for Chief nourisher in life’s feast.’ a few seconds and these mini events are not norWilliam Shakespeare, Macbeth mally remembered. The odd sleepless of awareness in relation to this area and a night will not be cause for alarm but if difference in the way their symptoms are this recurs over several nights and a permanifested can often cause women’s sleep son begins to experience symptoms such problems to being overlooked or mistaken as constant tiredness, sleepiness during for other disorders such as depression. the day and an inability to concentrate, There is a strong co-relation between then it might be time to do a little investisleep deprivation and the increased risk gation work. Check that the temperature of disease. For instance, in a study carried of the bedroom is comfortable and it out in the US of 71,000 nurses, those who is not too noisy and avoid eating heavy had five or less hours of sleep had a 45% meals or drinking tea, coffee or alcohol higher risk of cardiovascular disease in too close to bed time. contrast to the participants who slept for Other serious causes of insomnia an average of eight hours. While it is fair could be anxiety and worries about work to say that insomnia can be a symptom or home life, depression or more physical of other diseases, such as diabetes, heart causes such as breathing or joint probfailure or even cancer and can be one of lems. Keeping to a regular sleep routine is the first indications there is something strongly recommended as is the imporwrong in a person’s body, insomnia tance of winding down before going to bed can also be a sleep disorder in itself, and relaxing by listening to mellow music like narcolepsy and sleep apnoea. or reading when you are unable to sleep. These conditions can have If you feel like you may have some devastating consequences concern regarding this area and this for the sufferer, especially if advice doesn’t improve the problem, then not diagnosed or properly do not ignore your symptoms. Go to your treated. Lack of sleep can doctor to seek advice and hopefully a expose sufferers to the diagnoses will be established as to the strong possibility of, not root cause of your sleeplessness and a only injury to themselves plan put in place to remedy it. anthology winter 2016 57


HAUTE COUTURE Romance was in the air at Paris Haute Couture Week for Autumn / Winter 2016-17 where the most exquisite dresses in the world were shown. The spectacular display of red carpet-ready gowns featured a delightful mĂŠlange of fabrics and delicate details. The feminine, romantic and sometimes dramatic designs brought a sense of by-gone Hollywood glamour. Anthology captured some of the most magical moments of the week.

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fashion

Ralph & Russo

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Georges Hobeika

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Elie Saab

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Zuhair Murad

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Stephane Rolland

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Haselbeck Collection The

The inspiring story of a granddaughter who preserved one of Ireland’s greatest photographic collections words edel cassidy research patricia haselbeck flynn images reproduced by permission of patricia haselbeck flynn © the haselbeck collection

T

he Haselbeck Collection is the product of the career of photographer Franz Sebastian Haselbeck (18851973), which spanned almost seven decades. It is recognised as one of the most important photographic records of early 20th Century Ireland. Franz’s legacy includes several thousand glass plate negatives, roll

above: Patricia Ingrid Haselbeck (only daughter of Frank and Ilse Haselbeck) with Teddy Bear Joseph in the garden of 77 Wolfe Tone Street, Limerick, shortly after she went to live with her grandparents in 1956. 68 winte r 2016 a n t h o lo g y

his apprentice, and became aware of the film negatives and original prints, which exceptional quality of his work but was chronicle the country’s rapidly changing not prepared for the wealth of historically social, military, political and industrial landimportant images of people and events scape. Photographic equipment, personal that would eventually be revealed. diaries, correspondence, documentation, a The Haselbeck family, Xavier and Lena postcard collection and an extensive library and their six children, were German immiof photographic books complete the colgrants who moved from lection. His only grandManchester to Limerick child, Patricia Haselbeck c. 1902 and set up a Flynn, is custodian of sausage and pudding the collection, assisted making business. Franz by her sons, Sean and was the eldest in the Darragh Flynn. family and as his natural As a little girl, artistic talent emerged Patricia went to live his parents reluctantly with her grandfather gave him their blessing and the extended in 1903 to leave the Haselbeck family; she lucrative family business was fascinated by his to move to Dublin to world. From the first follow his dream and time she was allowed Henri Cartier-Bresson attend The Metropolitan to enter his darkroom, School of Art, where he she was immediateattended as a night student, while being ly drawn into the mysterious world of indentured to the photographic studios of photography where images would appear Finnerty & Co. Westmoreland Street, as an out of a developing tank as if by magic. apprentice photographer. Here he learned As she grew up she became, in a sense,

‘Photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing and when they have vanished there is no contrivance on earth which can make them come back again.’


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above: Patricia Haselbeck Flynn at her home in County Limerick continues the research and preservation of her grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work. Dress: Paula Ka at Brown Thomas, Limerick; Make-up: Sarah Morris for Brown Thomas Beauty Style Team; Hair: Dawn Bennett; Photo: Ros Woodham, www.roswoodham.com. anthology winter 2016 69


left: Franzicus Sebastian Haselbeck, photo: Louis Anthony. below: Haselbeck Family outside 77 Wolfe Tone Street. The Photographer in 1911 with his mother and four of his five siblings on the steps of their home at 77 Colooney Street, (now 77 Wolfe Tone Street) Limerick.

the necessary technical skills, which together with his inborn eye for composition and detail, laid the foundation for a versatile career which lead him to work in studios in Dublin, Tipperary, Kerry, The Isle of Man and Paris. When he returned to Ireland, he spent a number of tourist seasons working with the renowned Louis Anthony Studios in Killarney. In time, he set up his own studios in Limerick and photographed a wide variety of subject matter independently, as a press photographer and by commission. His 70 wint e r 2016 a n t h o lo g y

subjects were varied and included early tourism, studio portraits, the RIC, British Military, the Irish Volunteers and Garda Síochána, sporting events and street scenes. The variety of assignments and the diverse political, cultural and social backgrounds of his subjects indicated that he was a well respected professional and also apolitical. However, towards the end of the Civil War his ‘Excelda Studio’ was ransacked. He was then to experience hard times and was employed by Siemens-Bauunion at Ardnacrusha, Co. Clare, as a German/

English Interpreter and Store Keeper during the construction of the vast ‘Shannon Scheme Project’. This allowed him photograph every step of the construction of the scheme and associated Limerick docklands activities. He subsequently returned to his work as a photographer and regularly toured Munster on bicycle, well into his eighties, photographing public events dressed in his trademark tweed jacket, bow tie and French beret - an ‘look’ he adapted during his time in Paris. Haselbeck’s diaries and correspondence give an insight into his personal life, loves and strong principles and the era in which he lived. He married Helen Young, a midwife from Cavan in 1919 and they had two children, Helen and Frank. He died peacefully in his bed in 1973. Since his death, the collection had been in the care of his son, Frank, who asked his daughter, Patricia, from his deathbed in September 1990 to promise to take care of his father’s work. She had no idea how she would keep that promise but was determined that she would. Little did she know, however,


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what a massive undertaking it was to be. The careful storage and documentation of the visual record and photographic equipment suggests that Haselbeck was very conscious of the value of his work. Some years before his death, he prepared detailed hand-written instructions for whoever would open the archive in the future on what methods should be used to process various types of photographic negatives. Stored for four decades, after the photographer’s death, in biscuit tins and cigar boxes, two thirds of the collection survived a perilous journey and remains intact. It has been rescued from floods and two accidental house fires. right: Franz Sebastian Haselbeck at the wheel of Louis Anthony’s car outside Kate Kearney’s cottage. In the back seat the gentleman on the left wearing a cap is believed to be Louis Anthony, beside him is photographer, Daniel MacMonagle. On the right is the proprietor of Kate Kearney’s cottage, John Moriarty. below: Local photographer Daniel Mac Monagle enjoying the company of three ladies.

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Curating the collection In the 1980’s, local historians, the late Jim Kemmy and Kevin Hannon began to actively encourage Patricia to preserve the images. She began by photographing the original prints and a little later began, under the patient tutelage of her friend, historian Dr. John Logan, to learn the rudiments of archiving. Aware that the glass plate negatives were in danger of deterioration she approached various local bodies for assistance but it was not forthcoming. She was about to give up hope of getting the necessary assistance to undertake this monumental project when a suggestion by the late Desmond FitzGerald, Knight of Glin, a great advocate of the work, led to the successful conservation and preservation of the collection. He reminded her of the period that her grandfather had

worked for Siemens –Bauunion and that the ESB, now operating the Ardnacrusha Power Station might be interested. Following a successful meeting in 2006, with Malcolm Alexander, ESB Group Heritage Manager, and ESB Archive and Heritage Manager, Brendan Delany, the project began in earnest. Over the next four years a team lead by Brendan Delany which included Pat Yeates, Gerry Hampson, of the ESB Archives, and of course Patricia, completed the cataloguing of the archive, digitalisation of images and the restoration of photographic equipment to museum standard. Assistance was sought from experts in various fields, including Military and Film Historian Dr. Lar Joye of Collins Barracks and Tom Toomey historian and author, who were both of exceptional help.

‘Haselbeck’s diaries and correspondence give an insight into his personal life, loves and strong principles and the era in which he lived’

below: Volunteers and Cumman Na mBan 1915. Seated far right are Madge and Carrie Daly, sisters of Edward Daly, the youngest volunteer executed for his part in the 1916 Rising. Another sister Kathleen was married to Thomas Clarke, also executed in 1916. Standing far right is Robert Monteith who evaded capture having landed on Banna Strand with Roger Casement, during a failed attempt to import arms from Germany. Back row 7th left is George Clancy who, as Mayor of Limerick, was brutally murdered during the War of Independence. 1921.

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The First Exhibitions The first public exhibition of the work of Franz Sebastian Haselbeck took place at The Hunt Museum, Limerick in October 2010 and was supported by the ESB and Siemen’s, Ireland. Dr. Hugh Maguire Director of the museum helped curate the exhibition which he aptly named ‘Fond Memories Bring the Light’. The exhibition and associated lecture series received a very positive response from the general public and extensive coverage by local, national and international media. This was followed by an exhibition in ESB Headquarters, Merrion Square, Dublin. The collection has also been exhibited in the RDS Dublin at The Irish Antiques Dealers Association Fair and in Limerick in collaboration with the Elemental Arts Festival, Limerick Museum and Archives and Limerick City of Culture 2014.

The Book In August 2013, a book of selected images entitled ‘Franz S. Haselbeck’s Ireland’ by Patricia Haselbeck Flynn was published by The Collins Press, Cork to excellent reviews both for the quality of the collection and also the meticulous research done by Patricia.


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above: Horses and men of the Royal Service Corps deployed at The New Barracks (now Sarsfield Barracks) Limerick in readiness for departure, with a complete field kitchen, bound for the battle fields of The First War.

The Journey Continues The main priority now is to find a permanent home for the collection but in the meantime a high level of interest has been shown from the US to exhibit The Haselbeck Collection there. The research continues with Patricia giving lectures all over Ireland on various aspects of her grandfather’s work by invitation of historical, photographic, architectural and other special interest groups. Enquires are welcome from organisations or individuals who would like to arrange lectures or to include some of the collection’s images in exhibitions, publications or those who simply wish to obtain prints of loved ones long since passed on. Email: haselbeck@eircom.net

above: Captain Charles Alexander Longcroft and Fredrick Hugh Sykes of No. 2 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps in a BE2a, an experimental reconnaissance aircraft, which took part in British military manoeuvres in Munster in September 1913, which involved 20,000 men.

The book, Franz S. Haselbeck’s Ireland is available at all good bookshops and from www.collinspress.ie anthology winter 2016 73


above: A lone soldiers walks through Vizes Fields Limerick in the 1930’s. In the background children play as women sit in the lane outside their dwellings. Vizes Fields is immortalised in Frank McCourt’s ‘Angela’s Ashes’. left: Full length portrait of English-born Irish revolutionary, suffragette and actress, Maude Gonne McBride wearing the elaborate style of ‘The Belle Epoque’.

right: Studio portrait. far right: Portrait of two young girls. Excelda Studio (c. 1920)

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right: Car accident on the corner of Wolfe Tone Street and Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connell Ave, outside what is now Bobby Byrnes, Limerick (18-04-1934). The car on the right appears to be an 8hp Ford Model Y. The Model Y was built at the Cork plant from the spring of 1933.

left: Children at play (1924) below: Boy and girl at water pump (date unknown)

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opposite: Archbishop Daniel Mannix 1864-1963. While President of Maynooth, he entertained both King Edward 7th and King George 5th for which he was highly criticised. He was appointed to Melbourne 1912 without being consulted, more than likely as a result of having antagonised nationalists and important Catholic hierarchs. The tall handsome ‘Prince Bishop’ as he was known was fastidious about his personal appearance and attire, which made him a favourite subject for painters and photographers amongst whom were John Lavery and Helmut Newton. (c. 1912)

top: The power station at Ardnacrusha - The ‘Shannon Scheme Project’ at Ardnacrusha was a major project undertaken by the new Irish Free State. Built under the leadership of German firm, Siemens- Bauunion, works commenced in 1925. The scheme was the beginning of the electrification of the country and led to the establishment of the Electricity Supply Board (ESB) above: A group of dockers pause to pose for the camera as ship is being unloaded for ‘The Shannon Scheme’ at Limerick Docks. The entire plant for was imported by sea from Germany giving massive employment in the region both at the site and at Limerick Docks. (c. 1925) right: A penstock under construction at Ardnacrusha, which would be used to channel water to a hydro turbine. The vast scale of the penstock can be seen in proportion to the man, working in the upper left of the cylinder.

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A

ustralia is vast; it is not uncommon for residents to sell up with a view to spending an undefined period exploring this great landmass, its immense spaces and entrancing horizons. Fellow travel enthusiast, Ed Walker, and I, however, had just three weeks and had plotted a route from Adelaide to Sydney via Tasmania. We would be overlanding in a trusty 30-year-old Toyota HJ47 Land Cruiser named ‘Betsy’ – a substantial rig, well able for the distances and mixed terrain we were hoping to experience, as well as having the capacity to carry all the camping gear we would need for both the expected heat and cold. Having torn ourselves away from the refined gastronomy and plentiful cellar doors of Adelaide, we headed east through the volcanic landscape of Mount Gambier where the stunning Blue Lake inhabits one of its

extinct craters. Eager to reach the ocean, we spent our first night beside a welcome log fire in a sand dune camp ground close to Port Fairy. The following morning, from our camp, we watched a family of dolphins hunting in the shallows just off the beach. The Great Ocean Road stretches for 150 miles between Allansford and Torquay, either side of Cape Otway on the Victoria coast. It was built by soldiers returning from the First World War and is dedicated to those killed during the conflict. The westernmost stretch is also known as the Shipwreck coast where over 600 ships are known to have perished. Over millions of years, the stormy ocean and blasting winds have carved the limestone cliffs into a stunning, yet treacherous, coastline. Undoubtedly, the most dramatic view is of the colossal rock stacks known as the Twelve Apostles,

which were formed as caves eroded to form collapsed arches, leaving these gnarly, 45-metre columns. From majestic cliffs to dense rainforest, we entered the undulating territory of the Great Otway National Park. Camping is restricted to official camp grounds and is strictly policed by rangers. We booked our pitch online and made our way through forest tracks to Parker Hill, glimpsing a family of shy koalas feasting on the eucalyptus on the way. A rocky track led from the isolated site down to a cove where the Parker River meets the ocean – the ideal spot to catch a fish or two for dinner. The remaining stretch of the Great Ocean Road is affectionately known as The Surf Coast, featuring famous surf spots such as Bells Beach – home of the world’s longest-running surfing competition, the Rip Curl Pro Surf.

Hard &Vast

words and photos ros woodham

Ros Woodham explores the southern coast of Australia and the often overlooked state of Tasmania.


travel

To reach Devonport in Tasmania means taking a ferry across the Bass Strait – a merciless stretch of water for those with wobbly sea legs! Melbourne’s urban skyline shimmered in the dimming, dusk light as we sailed away from the mainland on the ‘Spirit of Tasmania’. Tasmania is comparable in size to Ireland and, although sparsely populated, it is rich in wildlife and wilderness reserves, and has a strong sense of community of-

ten overshadowed by the more traditionally celebrated tourism hotspots on the mainland. We plotted an anti-clockwise route around the island, staying overnight first in Stanley, a town of perfectly-preserved colonial buildings and cute cafés, nestling beneath the Nut, an immense flat-topped, volcanic plug rising 150 metres straight up from the water’s edge. Heading south, ‘Betsy’ made sure work of the unsealed roads of the Sumac Forest

‘A rocky track led from the isolated site down to a cove where the Parker River reaches the ocean – the ideal spot to catch a fish or two for dinner’

Reserve and the Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area – a fascinating, prehistoric landscape with a rich Aboriginal heritage which is being continually reshaped by wind, fire and water. We eventually emerged at the tiny settlement of Corinna where you can take the four-hour Pieman River cruise - a rustic, river-rainforest adventure heading downstream to where the Pieman River meets the Southern Ocean. West from here, we drove towards the Cradle Mountain National Park, an iconic wilderness destination. Our two-week National Parks Pass, purchased at the Tourist Centre, allowed us free entry to all of Tasmania’s National Parks. There are a number of walks to do around Cradle Eight stacks remain of the Twelve Apostles, a popular tourist spot on the Great Ocean Road, Victoria


above: The Great Ocean Road in Victoria offers endless, empty beaches; below: (Top) Dove Lake

at the foot of Cradle Mountain, Tasmania; (Bottom) Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Mountain; we chose the loop walk around the shores of the glacially formed Dove Lake at the foot of Cradle Mountain which stands at 1,545m at its highest peak. This protected area is covered in a wide variety of alpine and sub-alpine vegetation and is home to wombats, pademelons, Tasmanian devils and echidnas. We checked off all of these, except for the shy, elusive Devil. It was a chilly night at the park’s camp site, confirmed the following morning by having to chip off a layer of ice from inside the tent before packing it away. We continued to the Liffey Falls State right: A blue wren checks itself in Betsy’s wing mirror; below: Tasmania’s east coast.

Reserve where an isolated rainforest camp ground made the perfect base for a hike up to the Liffey Falls, a beautiful, cascading waterfall stepping itself down multiple tiers. Liffey Falls gets its name from the Liffey River – from which it is formed – which was named by Captain William Moriarty after the River Liffey in Ireland from where he came. Short on time, we were forced to bypass Hobart, Tasmania’s capital, preferring to visit Port Arthur on the Tasman Peninsula in the south east of the island. This amazing World


travel

Heritage site is best known for being a penal colony, originally built within the British Empire during the 18th and 19th centuries when it was the destination for the hardest of convicted British criminals and re-offenders. Port Arthur was named after George Arthur, the Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen’s Land From 1833 until 1853, and had some of the strictest security measures of the British penal system. There are dozens of structures here, best interpreted via a guided tour which includes a boat ride across the bay to see the Isle of the Dead, where boys as young as nine were detained. We took the Stanley Highway northbound on our return to Devonport, detouring via Coles Bay into the Freycinet National park to view the beautiful and aptly-named

Wineglass Bay which faces out into the Tasman Sea. There is no vehicle access to this idyllic beach but there is a sensational panorama to be captured by making the tough climb to the viewpoint above the bay. We had been tipped off about the Australian War Memorial in Canberra so, once back on the mainland, we made a bee-line for Australia’s capital and largest inland city. We spent the night there at a busy camp site on the outskirts of the planned metropolis to ensure an early visit the next day. The Australian War Memorial combines a shrine, a world-class museum, and an extensive archive and is regarded as one of the most significant memorials of its type in the world. From the steps of the War Memorial there is a stunning view towards

‘Liffey River was named by Captain William Moriarty after the River Liffey in Ireland from where he came’

above: The unmistakeable skyline with Sydney

Harbour Bridge and the Sydney Opera House

Parliament House on Capital Hill. The whole experience was moving and insightful – I’m glad we made the effort to visit. The Blue Mountains marked our final waypoint before arriving in Sydney and we wished we had more time to explore this dramatic landscape. There are extensive bushwalking trails providing endless views of the steep cliffs and eucalyptus forests which take on a distinct cyan hue earning this region its name. The foothills merge

above: The Liffey Falls are one of the more spectacular of Tasmania’s waterfalls; left: (Top) Melbourne is Australia’s second largest

city; (Bottom) Many isolated camp grounds are free but strict rules must be respected

top: Wineglass Bay opens into the Tasman Sea; above: A rare sight – koalas cling lazily to the branches of the eucalyptus trees.

into Sydney’s metropolitan area and we very quickly found ourselves the hub of Australia’s largest city. It was so exciting to drive Betsy across the famous Sydney Harbour Bridge with a view of the Opera House to the right. It was a symbolic ending to a sensational adventure which, we realised, had barely uncovered the tip of Australia’s proverbial iceberg, but had changed my perception of this country as being a large landmass with very little within. The truth is that you just need almost a lifetime to do it real justice. anthology winter 2016 81


i n t e r i ors

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Interior Design ‘Defined by luxury, designed for living’

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ngela Connolly, director of Conbu Interior Design, offers an interior design service to residential and commercial clients ranging from the redesign of individual rooms to the refurbishment of entire properties. Conbu Interior Design source and install and of course design everything according to an agreed budget and schedule, creating practical and unique interiors which reflect the clients taste, style and needs.

By Appointment at: Conbu Interior Design 24 The Crescent, Monkstown, Co Dublin 086 826 9995 angela@conbudesign.com www.conbudesign.com www.theinteriorsassociation.ie

Services include: •

Interior Design consultation

Curtains and blinds made to order

Bespoke sofas, chairs, bar stools, headboards and ottomans

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Product sourcing - artwork, accessories

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Conbu Interior Design launched a range of 100% Egyptian cotton, 400TC and 1000TC, bed linen in 2016. The range includes luxurious duvet covers, sheets, 82 wi n t er 2016 anthology

and pillowcases. Visit the Monkstown office where the quality of this stunning collection can be viewed and sampled. The complete range will soon be available to purchase online. Angela Connolly is President of the Interiors Association since 2014.


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How to work with a

Professional

Dolores White offers tips and advice on hiring an interior designer and how to work together to achieve your desired look words dolores white

View of the Acropolis from the Plaka District 84 wi n t er 2016 anthology


interiors

E

ven if some of us think that we are energetic and brilliant enough to excel in every role in life, there just might be the realisation that there are limits on our time. So when it comes to wanting that beautifully decorated and arranged home, it may be better to stick to what you do best and leave this job to the specialists. A designer can give you a professional assessment of your situation that will lead to a solid plan of action, and will offer an extra set of eyes that are trained to see and notice things that you may not. The scope of a project to some extent dictates the qualifications and experience required of the interior designer you are hiring. As with most professions, there are many extremely talented designers out there and some who are just not so good. Also, there are some that are more decorators or colour consultants. If you want to be sure of the qualifications of a particular designer, look them up online or ask around for references or referrals. If you are building a new home or extension, or undertaking a major renovation to existing space, you are already likely to be working with an architect. So you may want to get your architect involved in the selection of the interior designer — he or she may recommend someone they have already worked with, or suggest using an interior designer the firm may have on staff.

It is a good idea to have a look at the designer’s website and see some of their previous work. This is the best way to ensure the designer is a good match for your style. No two clients are alike, and a good interior designer should be able to adapt to your requirements. However, almost all of them have a fundamental aesthetic that remains consistent throughout their work. For example, if your taste is more pure whites and pale neutrals, don’t choose a designer whose signature is bold colour palettes. Before you pick up the phone and start calling prospective designers,

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spend a few moments thinking carefully about your preferred method of working. This little bit of soul searching will go a long way to ensuring you hire the right person, and will help to lay a solid foundation for a successful working relationship. For example:

- At what level do you want to be involved in the creative process? Do you want to be consulted on every tiny detail, or are you more interested in the big picture? - How involved do you want to be in the product research? Also do you prefer to be shown many or fewer options? - Will you be satisfied with a designer showing you photos of products, or do you prefer to see and feel everything before deciding whether it is right for you? - What are your expectations in terms of budget and a timeline?

‘Before you pick up the phone and start calling prospective designers, spend a few moments thinking carefully about your preferred method of working’

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Before your first meeting with your interior designer, it is a good idea to put a file together containing photos from the internet or magazines to illustrate your desired look. These pictures will instantly give the designer a sense of your vision of the finished product. He or she will ask you about specific points of the design and will use all this information as guidelines. Fabric swatches, paint samples and furniture catalogues are other good sources for demonstrating your desired look. You may wish to show examples of colours and furniture styles that you dislike, which can also be helpful. Once you have decided to work with an interior designer, be aware that the relationship is, by its very nature quite in-

timate. Given this, you reap immeasurable benefits when you take some time upfront to consider just what it is you want from this person you’re about to invite into your life. As with any relationship, clear communication and preparation can go a long way to alleviating any misunderstandings.


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EAMES DSR DARK GREY DSR DARK GREY ORGANIC CHAIR TEXTILE EAMES DSR DARK GREY ORGANIC CHAIR -- TEXTILE €69€60 ¤125 €60 ¤125 EAMES DSR DARK GREY DSR DARK GREY ORGANIC CHAIR TEXTILE EAMES DSR DARK GREY ORGANIC CHAIR -- TEXTILE €69€60 ¤125

€60 ¤125

US NAVY CHAIR 45CM EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR EAMESNAVY DAW CHAIR ARMCHAIR COFFEE 45CM NOGUCHI EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR €60US EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR €85 NOGUCHI COFFEE WOOD TABLE -€85 ASH €60 LEG - NAVYGREEN WOOD LEG NAVYGREEN ¤ 75 ¤ 295 TABLE - ASH US¤NAVY CHAIR 45CM EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR 75 EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR ¤ 295 NOGUCHI COFFEE NAVY CHAIR 45CM EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR €60US EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR €85 NOGUCHI COFFEE TABLE -€85 ASH DSW €60 LEG - NAVYGREEN DSW EAMES WISHBONE WOOD CHAIR TABLE BEIGE WOOD LEG - NAVYGREEN¤ 295DINING TABLE - ASH ¤ 75

EAMESCHAIR DSW BEIGE DAW ARMCHAIR EAMES DSW BEIGE STANDARD REBECA EAMES CHAIR DSW- WHITE SIDE CHAIR €90 REBECA EAMESCHAIR DSW SIDE - WHITE CHAIR REBECA EAMES CHAIRDSW - WHITE SIDE CH ELISE €90 €75 ARMCHAIR €75 ¤ 95 WOOD LEG - ORANGE¤ 95 WOOD LEG - ORANG €55 EAMESCHAIR DSW BEIGE DAW ARMCHAIR EAMES DSW BEIGE WISHBONE CHAIR DSWEAMES DININGDSW TABLE BEIGE STANDARD REBECA CHAIR SAARINEN - WHITEARMCHAIR REBECA EAMES DSW- WHITE SIDE CHAIR REBECA EAMES CHAIR DSW SIDE - WHITE CHAIR REBECA EAMES CHAIRDSW - WHITE SIDE CH ¤ 70 CHAIR ¤ 70ARMCHAIR ¤ 70 US NAVY BARSTOOL 60CM NOGUCHI COFFEE TABLE €90 ELISE €155 €290 €90 €75 €75 €75 ¤ 95 ¤ 95WOOD ¤ 95 WOOD LEG - ORANGE¤ 95 WOOD LEG - ORANG €65 €120 €295LEG - ORANGE €55 ¤ 70 CHAIR ¤ NAVY 70 CHAIR ¤ 70CHAIR NAVY 45CM US NAVY CHAIR 45CM EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR US NAVY 45CM USEAMES DAW ARMCHAIR 45CM US DAW ARMCH EAMESEAMES DAW ARMCHAIR EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR BUY EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE NOGUCHI COFFEE NOGUCHI COFFEE ONLINE €60 €60face boards and over€60€85 €60 €85 €85 Over 60 colours of laminate Limerick: WardrobesWOOD Cork: Sliding Wardrobes WOOD LEG - - ASH NAVYGREEN WOOD LEG - NAVYGREEN WOOD -Sliding NAVYGREEN TABLELEG - ASH TABLE -LEG ASH- NAVYGREEN TABLE NAVY CHAIR 45CM US NAVY CHAIR 45CM EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR US NAVY CHAIR 45CM USEAMES NAVY CHAIR DAW ARMCHAIR 45CM US EAMES DAW ARMCH DAW ARMCHAIR ARMCHAIR EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR DAW ARMCHAIR ¤EAMES 75Est, NOGUCHI COFFEE ¤EAMES 75 DAW NOGUCHI COFFEE NOGUCHI COFFEE US NAVY BARSTOOL 60CM SAARINEN ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE TABLE ¤ ELISE ARMCHAIR Garryglass Ind Ballisimon Unit 6, Mayfield Business Park, 75 ¤EAMES 75 ¤ 295 ¤ 295 ¤ 295 ONLINE S30 CHAIR - LIGHT BLUE EAMES DSR SIDE€60 CHAIR ELISE BAR STOOL 66CM BUY ORGANIC SAARINEN glass colours to chose from. €60 €85 €85 €60 €60 €85 €65 €120 €295 €55 WOOD LEG - - ASH NAVYGREEN LEG - NAVYGREEN WOOD LEG -Cork. NAVYGREEN WOOD ¤ 85 CHROMED LEG -WOOD PINK - SILVER CHAIR - TEXTILE TABLE - ASH TABLE -LEG ASH- NAVYGREEN TABLE Rd, Limerick. ¤ 67 ¤ 65 ¤ 140 ELISE ARMCHAIR US NAVY BARSTOOL 60CM ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE TABLE ¤ 7529 ¤48 75 US NAVY BARSTOOL 60CM SAARINEN SAARINEN ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE TABLE ELISE ARMCHAIR ¤ 75 75 ¤ 295 ¤ 295 295 S CHAIR - LIGHT BLUE EAMES SIDE CHAIR ELISE STOOL 66CM ORGANIC SAARINEN SE: CHAIR - LIGHT BLUE EAMES DSR DSR SIDE ELISE BARBAR STOOL 66CM ORGANIC Limerick: 061 26 Cork: 021 450 97¤74 sales@slideco.ie W:¤CHAIR www.slidecowardrobes.ie Nationwide Delivery | SAARINEN Call 1800 989 550

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Why not take your measurements and drop into us? EAMES DSR DARK GREY R DARK GREY EAMES DSR DARK EAMES GREY DSR DARK GREY ORGANIC CHAIR - TEXTILE CHAIR - TEXTILE ORGANIC CHAIR ORGANIC - TEXTILE CHAIR - TEXTILE Your wardrobe will be designed instantly €60 EAMES DSR DARK GREY ¤125 R DARK GREY €60 €60 EAMES DSR DARK EAMES GREY DSR DARK GREY ¤125 ¤125 ORGANIC CHAIR - TEXTILE CHAIR - TEXTILE ORGANIC CHAIR ORGANIC - TEXTILE CHAIR - TEXTILE €60 ¤125 €60 €60 ¤125 ¤125 €65 €65 ¤ 85 ¤ 85

US NAVY BARSTOOL 60CM S CHAIR - LIGHT BLUE €65

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€120 €295 €120 €295 €55 €55 CHROMED PINK - SILVER CHROMED LEG LEG - - PINK - SILVER CHAIR CHAIR - TEXTILE- TEXTILE ¤67 67 ¤ 65 ¤ ¤SAARINEN ¤ 65 ¤ELISE 140 ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE TABLE ARMCHAIR ZINZAN is 100% Irish owned. Showroom: Grand Canal140 Place, James Street, Dublin 8. By appointment only service@zinzan.ie EAMES DSR SIDE CHAIR ELISE BAR STOOL 66CM ORGANIC SAARINEN €120 €295 €55

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design ully affordable design beautifully affordable beautifullybeautifully design affordableaffordable design beautifully affordable design beautifully affordable design ELISE BARSTOOL €65

EAMES DSW BEIGE €75

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ELISE ¤ 95BARSTOOL REBECA CHAIR - WHITE €65 ¤ 95

EAMES DSW BEIGE EAMES DSW SIDE CHAIR

EAMES€75 DSW BEIGE LEG - ORANGE EAMESWOOD DSW SIDE CHAIR €75 ¤ 70 WOOD LEG - ORANGE ¤ 70

EAMES DSR DARK GREY CREAM EAMES DSW BEIGE EAMES DSW BEIGE DSW EAMES SORCHA CHAIR DSW BEIGE ELISE METALLIC 66CM ORGANIC CHAIR US NAVY CHAIR 45CM REBECA CHAIRDSW - WHITE REBECA CHAIR - WHITE EAMES DSW- WHITE SIDE CHAIR €85 REBECA CHAIR REBECA EAMESCHAIR DSW SIDE - WHITE CHAIR EAMES SIDE CHAIR €60 €78 EAMES €140 €70 €75 US NAVY CHAIR 45CM e110 €75 DAW ARMCHAIR €75 ¤ 95

EAMES DSR DARK GREY DSR DARK GREY ORGANIC CHAIR TEXTILE EAMES DSR DARK GREY ORGANIC CHAIR -- TEXTILE €69€60 ¤125

€60 ¤125

€60LEG - ORANGE ¤ 95WOOD ¤ 70

€85 ¤ 95 WOOD LEG - ORANGE ¤ 95 WOOD LEG - ORANGE ¤ 70 ¤ 70

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¤ 75

¤ 295

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70GREY ¤ 70 ¤ 70 ¤ EAMES DSR DARK GREY DSR DARK GREY EAMES DSR DARK EAMES GREY DSR DARK ORGANIC CHAIR - TEXTILE C CHAIR - TEXTILE ORGANIC CHAIR ORGANIC - TEXTILE CHAIR -¤ TEXTILE ¤125 €60 €60 ¤125 ¤125 NAVY CHAIR 45CM US NAVY CHAIR 45CM €60 EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR US NAVY CHAIR 45CM USEAMES NAVY CHAIR DAW ARMCHAIR 45CM US EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR E EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE NOGUCHI COFFEE NOGUCHI COFFEE €65

US NAVY BARSTOOL 60CM S CHAIR - LIGHT BLUE €65 ¤ 85

US NAVY BARSTOOL 60CM S CHAIR - LIGHT BLUE €65 ¤ 85

€120

BUY ONLINE €60 €60€85 WOOD LEG - NAVYGREEN WOOD - NAVYGREEN TABLELEG - ASH ¤ 75 SAARINEN ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE TABLE ¤ 75 ELISE ARMCHAIR ¤ 295 EAMES DSR SIDE CHAIR ELISE BAR STOOL 66CM ORGANIC SAARINEN €120 CHROMED LEG - PINK

€295 - SILVER

www.zinzan.ie €55 CHAIR - TEXTILE

€60 €85 €60 €85 WOOD LEG - - ASH NAVYGREEN WOOD TABLE -LEG ASH- NAVYGREEN TABLE ¤ 75 ¤ 295 ¤ 75 ¤ 295

¤ 67 ¤ 65 SAARINEN ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE TABLE¤ 140 ELISE ARMCHAIR EAMES DSR SIDE CHAIR ELISE BAR STOOL 66CM ORGANIC SAARINEN €120 €295 €55 CHROMED LEG - PINK - SILVER CHAIR - TEXTILE ¤ 67 ¤ 65 ¤ 140 ZINZAN is 100% Irish owned. Showroom: Grand Canal Place, James Street, Dublin 8. By appointment only service@zinzan.ie

Nationwide Delivery

| Call 1800 989 550

BUY ONLINE

www.zinzan.ie DSR DARK EAMES GREY DARK EAMES GREY DSR DARK EAMES GREY DSR DARK GREY ¤DSR 75 CHAIR C CHAIR ORGANIC - TEXTILE ORGANIC - TEXTILE CHAIR ORGANIC - TEXTILE CHAIR - TEXTILE BUY ONLINE Delivery | CHAIR Call 1800 989US 550 €60 €60 ¤125 Nationwide ¤125 ¤125 US NAVY 45CM €60 NAVY EAMES CHAIR DAW ARMCHAIR 45CM USEAMES NAVY CHAIR DAW ARMCHAIR 45CM US NAVY EAMES CHAIR DAW 45CM ARMCHAIR E www.zinzan.ie EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR EAMES DAW ARMCHAIR EAMESNOGUCHI DAW ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE NOGUCHI COFFEE COFFEE N ¤ 75 €60 €60€85 WOOD LEG - NAVYGREEN WOOD - NAVYGREEN TABLELEG - ASH ¤ 75 ¤ 75¤ 295 Delivery | Call 1800 989 550

ZINZAN is 100% Irish owned. Showroom: Grand Canal Place, James Street, Dublin 8. By appointment only service@zinzan.ie

Nationwide

€60 €85 €60 €85 WOOD WOOD LEG -- ASH NAVYGREEN TABLE -LEG ASH- NAVYGREEN TABLE ¤ 75 ¤ 75 ¤ 295 ¤ 295

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ZINZAN is 100% Irish owned. Showroom: Grand Canal Place, James Street, Dublin 8. By appointment only service@zinzan.ie

US NAVY BARSTOOL 60CM TABLE SAARINEN ARMCHAIR COFFEE TABLE L 60CM US SAARINEN ARMCHAIR NOGUCHI COFFEE TABLE ELISEARMCHAIR ARMCHAIR NAVY BARSTOOL 60CM USSAARINEN NAVY BARSTOOL ARMCHAIR 60CM SAARINEN NOGUCHI COFFEE NOGUCHI ELISE ARMCHAIR COFFEE TABLENOGUCHI ELISE ARMCHAIR S CHAIR - LIGHT DSR SIDESTOOL CHAIR STOOL SAARINEN 66CM UE EAMES DSR SIDE ELISE BARSIDE STOOL 66CM ORGANIC SAARINEN S CHAIR - LIGHT BLUECHAIR S EAMES CHAIR - DSR LIGHT BLUE CHAIR EAMES ELISE DSR BARBLUE SIDE STOOL CHAIR 66CMEAMESELISE ORGANIC BAR SAARINEN 66CM ELISE BAR ORGANIC €65 €120 €120 €295 €295 €55 €65€120 €65 €120€295 €295€55 €55

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CHROMED LEG- -TEXTILE PINK - SILVER CHAIR ¤ 67 ¤ 65 ¤ 140

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¤ 75

www.zinzan.ie www.zinzan.ie www.zinzan.ie www.zinzan.ie ¤ 75 ¤ 75 ¤ 75

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AMTICO AND FLOORCOVERING SPECIALISTS FOR OVER 30 YEARS

Please visit our Showrooms: 46 Mayors Walk, Waterford. T: 051 855600 E: jmcarpets@hotmail.com www.johnmurphycarpets.ie

anthology winter 2016 89


Halo Tiles & Bathrooms

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eading suppliers of tiles, bathrooms, timber and stone within the Irish market, Halo Tiles & Bathrooms, recently officially opened the doors of their new completely renovated flagship store, Tom Doyle Supplies in Camolin, Wexford. The showroom has been stunningly designed by Roisin Lafferty of Kingston Lafferty Design and was officially opened by RTE’s ‘Room to Improve’ star, Dermot Bannon. Over 500 visitors, who attended

on the day, were eager to see the brand new designs, displays and stock. They were also treated to a presentation on architecture and design from Dermot, who spent hours discussing plans and designs and giving individual advice to customers. Proud owners, Tom and Patrick Doyle, are delighted to now welcome customers to the new showroom where they have something to suit every style and budget. Tiles are imported from quality manufacturers in the UK, Italy, Spain and Turkey. Halo Tiles are the agents for Vitra Tiles and Gala bathrooms in Ireland. The collection is always growing, so why not visit one of the nationwide showrooms, where you will be welcomed by friendly and knowledgeable staff, or view on the website www.halotiles.ie

HOME HEAT WITH STYLE Agathos Showroom: Lea Rd, Portarlington, Co. Laois contact@agathos.ie Tel: +353 (0) 57 8636821 Mob: +353 (0)873445666 +353 (0)879384704 +353 (0)879348336

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oday’s fire places have changed from purely being a source of heat to specific ‘one off’ designs, combined with an efficient, economical and ecological heat device. We at AGATHOS offer this unique service to all our customers who wish to purchase a KRATKI* insert or freestanding stove and have it installed to the highest standards. We specialise in unique personalised design to meet our customers’ needs. Our mission is to create a heating system designed with aspirations, comfort and with your vision in mind. AGATHOS likes to work closely with clients and to

90 au t u mn 2015 anthology * KRATKI

www.agathos.ie

listen carefully to them for various requests and ideas which help us fulfil their wishes and also offer reassurance for any concerns. We have successfully completed dozens of projects and have access to a variety of finishing materials and more importantly have the extensive knowledge and experience to create or retro-fit a safe source of fire and heat in your home.

Let us make your dreams reality.

is a well known Polish manufacturer of fireplace inserts and AGATHOS are their licensed supplier in Ireland


Sing your little heart out words trish taylor thompson

What is it about walking down a busy street and hearing a lone busker sing that puts a smile on your face? Why is it so liberating to sing in the shower or in the car when no one is listening?

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here is an inherent quality to the sound of the human voice that is both beguiling and alluring. Whether singing solo or ensemble, there is a connection. Many books have been written on the benefits of singing. It enhances mood, broadens the mind, can raise spirits, not to mention the roof! Who can resist a good singsong? We all know deep down that there is nothing more uplifting and life affirming than singing out loud. I found myself recently on a flight to Barcelona with my own motley musical crew, my local village choir. We were on our very own ‘Grand Tour’, ready to take part in the Annual Choral Festival of Calella, a beautiful seaside town on the Costa del Maresme in Spain. We joined the parade of international choirs in the town square and with voices and arms raised we sang in our native tongues, waiting to perform for the Mayor of Calella who was unfortunately delayed. We nudged, whispered and shared bottles of water as the temperature rose. Quietly exasperated, we waited as the town hall clock ticked. However, in true Irish fashion, our musical director took the initiative and quietly cajoled us into singing a simple song, in the round ‘Siyahamba’ – A capella style. Like a charm of hummingbirds, we began to sing. One by one the other choirs joined in and by verse ten we were

all serenading the Mayor’s late arrival. The connection was made. The invisible thread that binds us all together wove its way discreetly through the multitude of international voices. We were snared, happily cocooned as one, one voice, one love, one heart. An old cinema reminiscent of ‘Cinema Paradiso’ was host to the main evening performances where each choir did a forty minute set - a mini marathon of singing. Irish

‘One by one the other choirs joined in and by verse ten we were all serenading the Mayor’s late arrival. The connection was made.’ flags moved to the rhythm of the music in the stalls where the unsung heroes, our families and friends, sat loyally and patiently through the sets as only Irish fans can do. Then it was time to return to the town square to rehydrate. Recorded music emanating from the local pub was switched off as we launched into rousing Irish rebel songs. The Russian Boys Choir roared out

rousing Russian nationalistic songs barely taking a breath. The Women’s Choir of Bavaria hummed folksongs from the Black Forest and the Scandinavians wowed us with multilayered harmonic melodies. The atmosphere was electric until the local Policia arrived asking us to pipe down! We duly stopped singing and resorted to whispering among ourselves, retelling the joys of the evening’s events. Then suddenly, we heard the faintest sound of singing, music wafting delicately through the late night air. We scanned the square to see where the sounds were coming from, only to find some of our newfound Swedish friends huddled under a beer bench, glasses in hand quietly humming Yazoo’s ‘Only You’ “Ba-da-da-dah. Bada-da-dah”. One by one we made our way under the table to join them. We broke into harmony and sang softly so as not to waken anyone. “All I needed was the love you gave. All I needed for another day. And all I ever knew – Only you”. Pure magic. So go on, join a choir, sing from the pews, fill your bathroom every morning with cacophonous sounds, take a deep breath and extend your life. Make new friends, travel to places you’ve never been to before and make some magic. Who needs to fly to Mars? The magic is all here... within. Go on! Sing your little heart out. anthology winter 2016 91


capsule make up Creating a

collection

in our make up bags being full of expensive products that we don’t need or know how to apply, and probably will never use. . Well-known make up artist and creative director of Make Up For Ever Ireland, Annie Gribbin, offers invaluable advice on putting together the absolute essential make up items, from the Make up For Ever Collection that every women should have on hand at any age and at all times. Annie believes the “The right make up “Make up is a magic tool that is simply to enhance we have at our fingertips! Used and not to take over in the right way, it can give us a your face.” Whether you are a make great boost of confidence and make us happier in ourselves.” up novice, someone who needs to update their routine or a make up artist in need of hether you are clearing out your make up bag, or a refresher class, Annie hosts a number of specialised courses, inbuilding up your collection the sheer amount of products cluding the very popular ‘One Day Masterclass for the Over 40’s’ at available can be overwhelming Make Up For Ever, 38 Clarendon and confusing. It is easy to be Street, Dublin 2. Further informaenticed into buying products that tion at www.makeupforever.ie ‘one can’t live without’ resulting

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92 wi n t er 2016 anthology

1. Primer

Step One Hydrating Primer €33.00 Provides a boost of moisture transforming dehydrated skin into a supple, healthy, plump surface for a flawless make up all day long.

2. Foundation

Water Blend €39.00 Give skin a fresh, dewy glow that feels lightweight, sheer and comfortable. The quick and easy application makes it ideal for both the face and the body. The water-based waterproof foundation evens out the complexion to leave a natural-looking, satin finish.


beaut y

3. Powder

Ultra HD Powder Compact €35.00 Powder is a key step as it will prevent your make up from moving. The new generation of HD make up is both invisible on HD cameras and to the naked eye. The HD Powder is an extremely fine powder available in one universal shade to make the skin absolutely radiant. It sets the foundation and matifies the skin without changing its natural contours.

6. Eyeshadow

4. Blush

HD Cream blush €28.00 Unlike any other cream or powder blush, this unique formula melts on the skin for an extremely natural flush of colour with a long lasting result. Its blendable, second skin texture allows for easy, controlled application. HD Blush has a soft focus effect that diffuses light for a radiant finish.

Artist Shadow €20.50 These shadows boast superior colour pay-off and high blendability. Choose three neutral matte shades to begin. This will take you from day to night using layering.

5. Eyebrow Pencil

Pro Sculpting Pencil €23.00 Easy to use and specifically designed to contour and sculpt brows in 3 easy steps. 1. The slanted edge colours and defines. 2. The brush combs and sculpts. 3. The sponge tip highlighter adds natural light for perfectly sculpted brow.

8. Eyeliner

Graphic Liner €23.00 The clever foam tip quickly creates a precise line with just the right amount of product. Define the eyes with a deep black finish that stays put for 12 hours.

7. Mascara

Smoky Stretch Mascara €23.00 This smooth formula glides on lashes for incredible length and perfect definition. Its molded multi-bristle brush grips lashes starting from the root, covering every single lash for optimal separation without clumping. Shorter bristles on the tip work magic on tiny lashes.

Essential Tools

- Foundation brush or sponge - Short handled kabuki powder brush - Angled contour brush - Dome shaped Blush brush - Domed shaped sable eye blender - Tapered eye contour brush - Miniature eye definer - Small straight haired nylon eye liner brush - Eyebrow brush/comb - Retractable nylon Lip brush

9. Lip Pencil

Aqua Lip €16.50 The extremely waterproof texture of this pencil allows to reshape and emphasize the lip contours. Ultra long-lasting and non-transferable, it stays on for hours, even in extreme conditions. It is water and saliva resistant.

10. Lipstick

Rouge Artist €20.50 Available in 50 shades with 3 different finishes, there is something for every individual and mood. Natural or sexy, the Rouge Artist range lasts all day and leaves your lips soft and moisturized. anthology winter 2016 93


6

Tried and tested:

eye creams

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he first place where visible signs of aging will occur is the delicate area around the eyes. The skin here is extremely fragile and thin and does not have the support of sebaceous glands or collagen and elastin fibers to provide it with flexibility and strength. There are twenty two little muscles in the eye area in perpetual motion, enabling 10,000 blinks per day. Fine lines that can develop into deep wrinkles and traces of tiredness can therefore appear prematurely. As women age, there will be a decline in estrogen and progesterone, the hormones produced by the ovaries. The loss of these hormones causes a reduction in the synthesis of collagen, elastin and other components of skin matrix, lowering the production of sebum and therefore leading to skin thinning, dryness and other negative changes. Not everyone uses a specific product for the eyes and some will argue that eye creams are nothing more than a little pot of anti-ageing moisturiser. However, trial and error has certainly convinced me that a really good dedicated eye cream is the way to go. Eye creams are formulated specifically to be gentle on this area, and often come with ingredients that target eye-specific concerns, such as crowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feet, puffiness and dark circles. If you want to either address these issues, or prevent them, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I consider to be six of the best. 94 wint e r 2016 a n t h o lo g y

I LOVE

words edel cassidy

Dermalogica Age Reversal Eye Complex On application this fragrance-free, silky smooth cream gives an immediate feeling of firmness. It absorbs easily and quickly keeping the skin soft and hydrated without feeling heavy. The key ingredient is pure vitamin A or retinol, which is used in an optimum strength of 0.1% and this contributes to the reversal of fine lines, sun damage and the darkened areas beneath the eye. The tube with the narrow nozzle is a great idea because you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to worry about spreading bacteria by dipping fingers in the cream or having to take the time to sanitise a spatula.

Icelandic Relief Eye Cream Light, refreshing and calming, this product is free of parabens, petroleum, mineral oil, chemical sulphates, phthalates and dye. It is also 100% vegan and cruelty-free. Ideal for sensitive skin, there is a cooling sensation on application and it noticeably reduces dark circles and puffiness. Some interesting ingredients, include Icelandic kelp which aids in revitalising the skin and fighting inflammation. It also contains cotton powder to act as an optical diffuser, filling fine lines and wrinkles and brightening the eye area. Tip: Keep in the fridge for an even more refreshing and calming sensation.


fashion beaut y

Sisleÿa Eye and Lip Contour Cream Designed to treat the lips and eyes, two areas permanently in motion and more likely to show the effects of the passage of time. Sisley is famed for the use of botanical essences and their presence is evident with the delicate fragrance of extracts of orange blossom and rosewater. A blend of natural ingredients including padina pavonica algae extract to tone the skin, liquorice to maintain hydration and carrot to brighten skin tones, ensures there is not the danger of irritation sometimes experienced with other high performance creams. A gentle cream, easily spreadable that tightens, smoothes and absolutely fights fatigue.

Zelens Triple-Action Advanced Eye Cream The texture is more like a balm, but it’s not greasy and quickly melts into the skin. Dr. Marko Lens, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon and expert in skin cancer and skin anti-aging is the man behind the Zelens range. Infused with Acetyl Octapeptide-3, a non-toxic alternative to Botox, it tightens and lifts the upper-lid noticeably and signs of fatigue are diminished. Naturally occurring amino-acids reduce swelling and water retention to minimise puffiness and peptides reduce the appearance of dark circles under the eyes by eliminating blood-originated pigments in the skin that are responsible for these.

Guinot Crème Eye Fresh

Elemis Pro-Collagen Eye Renewal

A light refreshing cream that wakens up the eye area and leaves a subtle pearlescent sheen. The cooling metal cryo- massager, moulded in the shape of the eye contour, works wonders as it stimulates blood flow and really makes sure the product penetrates the skin. The lovely list of ingredients includes avocado extract for protection, cornflower water to detoxify and mango butter to nourish. It also contains caffeine which is great to perk up the skin in the same way as coffee can boost the body’s energy.

A light non sticky gel cream that is easy to apply without dragging the skin and gives an instant moisture boost and feeling of comfort. The eye area immediately feels firm, more hydrated and looks illuminated. The unique combination of potent seaweeds and volcanic algae smooth and firm the skin and lock in moisture. Independent clinical trials have proven that this product reduces the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. The dispenser container is particularly appealing and as one pump is sufficient for both eyes the product goes a long way.

anthology winter 2016 95


The Magic of

RED SHOES words dolores white

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here’s something about red shoes! Just like the LBD, it is a sartorial fact that every woman will benefit from having a pair in her fashion arsenal. Considered alluring and glamorous, they make a bold and confident fashion statement that can make even a basic outfit look spectacular. Red shoes, historically, have long been associated with power and identity. During the reign of Louis XIV, only those in the royal favour had the right to wear shoes with red heels. It was the perfect method for controlling the unruly upper class because when anyone fell out of royal favour, everyone would know. Aristocrats who behaved themselves didn’t have to face the shame of not having red heels on their shoes. Literature, music and movies have all found red shoes to be a fascinating subject: In the film ‘Wizard of Oz’ (1939), Dorothy, played by Judy Garland wore a magic pair of ruby slippers. These are on display in the National Museum of American History and are now considered among the most treasured and valuable items of film memorabilia. Fascinated with Dorothy’s ruby slippers, Kenn Duncan, a prominent dance photographer published a collection of photographs entitled ‘Red Shoes’ in 1984, for which he photographed 44 celebrities in various settings all wearing red shoes including boots, sandals, sneakers and ballet slippers. ‘The Red Shoes,’ published by Hans Christian Andersen in 1845 tells a moral

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tale about the idea of temptation and eventual redemption. The story is based upon the protagonist’s desire for a pair of shoes and the consequences of her vanity. The 1948 film, ‘The Red Shoes’, is a story within a story about a young ballerina who joins an established ballet company and becomes the lead dancer in a new ballet called ‘The Red Shoes’, itself based on the fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. Kate Bush’s 1993 album, ‘The Red Shoes’ was inspired by the 1948 film, and describes the dancer, possessed by her art, who cannot take off the eponymous shoes and find peace. “She gotta dance, she gotta dance, and she can’t stop ‘till them shoes come off” In 1976, a 22-year-old Elvis Costello paid tribute in his song, ‘The Angels Wanna

Wear My Red Shoes’. The lyrics tell a surreal tale of angels offering the singer immortality in exchange for his footwear. David Bowie’s ‘Let’s Dance’ in 1983 was seen as the video which highlighted racism in Australia and introduced Aboriginal rights issues to the world. It was also one of Bowie’s most popular songs internationally. The lyrics contained a message that resonated: when all is against you, what else can you do? “Put on your red shoes and dance the blues!”


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1. Patent Over-the-Knee Boots with Inlaid Stars by Chiara Ferragni, www.chiaraferragnicollection.com 2. Belvoir Textured Slippers By Unique, Topshop 3. Aiyana High Heel Court Suede by Dune, www.dunelondon.com 4. Princetown Fur-lined Leather Loafers by Gucci, Harvey Nichols 5. Roilla High Heel Sandals by Vince Camuto, Brown Thomas 6. Telephone Court Shoe Suede with studs by Dorateymur, www.dorateymur.com 7. Suede Flats by Aquazzura, Harvey Nichols 8. Suede Sandal by Raye, Harvey Nichols 9. Rosa 60 Courts by Dolce & Gabbana, Brown Thomas 10. Satin Pumps with Crossed Silver Chains by Chiara Ferragni, www.chiaraferragnicollection.com 11. Eden Heel Pump in Fandango Suede with Rose Gold by Ralph & Russo, www.ralphandrusso.com anthology winter 2016 97


Caroline Mitchell’s

Amazing Yarns words edel cassidy photos paul cooley

Regardless of what’s trending for Autumn / Winter, it is always advisable to own a few select clothing pieces that will stand the test of time. Knitwear ticks all the boxes in that it is classic, beautiful, eternally glamorous and never quite lets on exactly how old it is.

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any of us will have memories of learning to knit our plain and purl stitches at school, or possibly from our mother or grandmother. Caroline Mitchell was no different. Her mother had her knitting and crocheting by the age of five, dressing her many dolls in what is now her signature knitwear. Creator of luxury designer knitwear that is classic with a contemporary edge, Caroline is a graduate of the Limerick school of Art and Design and, although she didn’t specialise in knit in college, she describes how she followed this career path. “The first ‘proper’ job that I got was in a knitwear factory and it just sort of stuck! I worked for a few years in men’s knitwear, and then

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in the late nineties I started my own label concentrating on wholesale, at one stage supplying up to thirty shops nationwide and exporting to the UK, USA and Sweden.” When the economic downturn hit, Caroline decided to move away from wholesaling and concentrate more on commissions, specialising in mother of the bride or groom, special occasion, and bridal. She still produces a small ready-to wear collection stocking in selected shops, including ‘Marion Cuddy’s Irish Designers Emporium’ in Powerscourt Townhouse Centre in Dublin. Her knitwear is machine knit, hand cut, and features hand beading, crochet and appliqué details on easy to wear shapes. Describing her process she explains “I love to cut holes in pieces of knit and then fill those holes with beads! I like to use soft luxurious textures, always trying out new colour combinations. The beads I use are glass, resin or Swarovski, and all the crocheted details are done by hand.” The Autumn / Winter 2016 trends in Caroline’s collection are metallics, oversized shapes, colours such as indigo,

lavender and mulberry. She has blended sparkly yarns with fine crepes to make her own shades, and introduced a kid mohair mix for the more casual pieces. Her readyto-wear collection consists of dresses, tops, skirts and scarves and ranges from more dressy pieces to jumpers that can be worn with jeans or leggings. She also likes to produce made-to-measure pieces for any size as she feels knitwear is actually very flattering even on curvy ladies.

For further information visit: www.carolinemitchellknitwear.com


Available Sim Free instore and online.

Dublin, Limerick, Cork, Galway. T 1850 66 8888 | www.compub.com Subject to availability. TM and Š 2016 Apple Inc. All rights reserved.

Profile for lynne clark

Anthology magazine issue 2 winter 2016  

A collection of beautiful experiences

Anthology magazine issue 2 winter 2016  

A collection of beautiful experiences

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