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the PHOTOGRAPHER

The Magazine of the BIPP / Autumn 2015

Autumn 2015

On the dark side

Daniel Freeman’s full moon mastery

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Autumn 2015

Raleigh International / Projects 22 Saraya Cortaville undertook a four-month trip to Tanzania as a photographer on the coms team for

Raleigh International – leaving her portrait business far behind. And we also catch up with James King who joined the Raleigh programme first as a venturer then returning 15 years later as a photographer. It’s all been life-changing stuff for everyone involved Bella West / Carers UK 38 A letter with a crazy idea set the wheels in motion that resulted in a book for Carers UK documenting on a close and highly personal level one woman’s journey through cancer treatment and recovery

Image © Saraya Cortaville FBIPP

Denise Swanson / Art 48 Hooking up with artists adjacent to her studio opened up a new and very challenging sector of work providing reproduction services for all kinds of media – we find out how Denise looked through artists’ eyes the Photographer is published four times a year by the British Institute of Professional Photography, The Coach House, The Firs, High Street, Whitchurch, Aylesbury HP22 4SJ. T: 01296 642020  E: info@bipp.com  W: www.bipp.com President: Roy Meiklejon FBIPP  Chief Executive: Chris Harper FBIPP  Directors: Suzi Allen LBIPP, Russell Baston HonFBIPP, Bryn Griffiths FBIPP, Scott Johnson ABIPP, Bella West FBIPP

Membership Services Advisory Board Suzi Allen LBIPP (National) Russell Baston HonFBIPP (National) Saraya Cortaville FBIPP (National) Tony Freeman HonFBIPP (National) Bryn Griffiths FBIPP (Midlands) Dave Hunt ABIPP (Scotland) Scott Johnson ABIPP (South East) Fyzal Kirk ABIPP (North East) Richard Mayfield FBIPP (Yorkshire) Alan McEwan FBIPP (National)

Image © Bella West FBIPP

Cover story / Daniel Freeman 4 Just about every photographer out there has ideas – even dreams – of their own creative road trip. Daniel Freeman found his at night, lit by the full moon

BIPP / News 57 The BIPP Guides, Company partners, member benefits, AGM Notice and Infot information The Business End / Leases 62 Taking on a commercial lease can be littered with potential traps. Here’s some help on what to look out for to come out unscathed John Miskelly LBIPP (Northern Ireland) James Russell LBIPP (North West) Bella West FBIPP (National) Stuart Wood FBIPP (National) Editor: Jonathan Briggs, editor@bipp.com Advertising: Tel 01296 642020 Email: jack@bipp.com UK Subscribers £20, EU £40, Rest of the World £50 ISSN: 0031-8698 Printed and bound by Magazine Printing Company, Enfield

Neither the British Institute of Professional Photography (BIPP) nor any of its employees, members, contractors or agents accepts any responsibility whatsoever for loss of or damage to photographs, illustrations or manuscripts or any other material submitted, howsoever caused. The views expressed in this magazine are the views of individual contributors and do not necessarily represent the views of the BIPP. All advertisements are accepted and all editorial matter published in good faith. The Publisher makes no warranty, express or implied, that any particular product or service is available at the time of publication or at any given price. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any means whatsoever, or stored in a retrieval system, or broadcast, published or exhibited without the prior permission of the publisher. This magazine is the copyright of the BIPP without prejudice to the right of contributors and photographers as defined in the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. All rights reserved. Registered at Stationers’ Hall, Ref B6546, No. 24577. © BIPP 2015

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News / Skyport HS – First look

The sky’s the limit Elinchrom’s new Skyport HS is an advanced and user-friendly trigger and control hub for your flash system – continuing the company’s enviable focus on the user’s ability to quickly access all the unit’s features

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ower is nothing without control – that is where Elinchrom’s new Skyport HS comes in and quickly makes you realise its value. After ten years and over 400,000 Skyport units sold, Elinchrom decided to not only raise the bar but also leap way over it with the launch of the EL-Skyport Transmitter Plus HS, (or thankfully, Skyport HS for short). The most advanced Skyport ever, it gives Elinchrom users the ability to control and visualise power settings across all their lights directly from the Skyport transmitter plus it provides the ability to shoot at speeds up to 1/8000s in Hi-Sync mode.

New visual feedback interface The Large LCD display of the Skyport HS features two-way control via a new Visual Feedback Interface that lets you see the exact power of every light in your setup right there on the transmitter. Users can control each light’s power level and modeling lamp setting directly from the Skyport transmitter, which instantly shows the updated power settings. This provides unsurpassed levels of two-way communication and control for every light in your setup right from your camera. But it’s Hi-Sync that opens up the world of flash photography to explore even further – Elinchrom’s Hi-Sync technology lets you go beyond the X-Sync of your camera. You can simply switch to Hi-Sync mode and access sync speeds up to 1/8000s to freeze motion, overpower the sun, darken backgrounds or use a wider aperture. The new ODS (Over Drive Sync) enables users to fine tune the Skyport plus HS transmitter’s trigger signal to optimise exposure at high shutter speeds

EL-Skyport Plus HS retails at £199

Image © Saraya Cortaville

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The new Skyport HS continues the Elinchrom commitment to quality, too, providing photographers with tools to enhance their shooting experience while also showing how Elinchrom is looking firmly ahead to the future but with integration in mind. The Skyport HS represents a seamless extension of the EL-Skyport family since it is also compatible with the three previous generations of flash units (including the ELSkyport Transceiver RX module for Style RX, Digital RX, and Ranger RX systems, and the integrated EL-Skyport modules for the BRX, D-Lite RX, ELC Pro HD, and ELB series). The Skyport HS adds synchronisation capability and ‘two-way control’ functionality to all Elinchrom lights with EL-Skyport capability. Adventure photographer Michael Clark, said: ‘The Skyport HS offers convenience and reliability that hasn’t been available with any transmitter before – with so many new advanced features and options that it opens up a whole new world in flash photography. I haven’t been this excited about a new product announcement in a long time!’

while gaining up to 2 more f-stops of light. The Skyport HS has 20 frequency channels that can be used for either Normal or Speed mode. The transmitter attaches easily and securely to the hotshoe with its one-touch quick-lock mechanism, and is powered by 2x AA batteries. It also features an integrated AF Illuminator for faster focusing and a mini-USB socket for firmware updates. Users can instantly distinguish what sync mode they are in as the backlit display glows green for normal sync mode, and red for speed sync mode. Range is an impressive 656ft (200m) outdoors, and up to 196ft (60m) indoors.

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Shadow walker Daniel Freeman found excitement and suspense on the long straight road in his youth. But his real adventure found form in the magical shadow times after sun-down, when light leaves and the darkness seeks to deceive

Image © Daniel Freeman

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re you an early riser, or late to bed? Have you ever thought about photography in reverse: shadow first and then the light? Could you explain to friends and family why it’s necessary to camp out in a pick-up truck to catch… the dark? This is all just normality to photographer and lecturer Daniel Freeman, who has set about the creation of imagery that really does let in the darkness. But far more than that, his work is photographic creation in the fullest sense – a careful formulation of idea plus opportunity and technical fulfilment that does everything strong work should. It triggers narrative and imagination in the viewer; fosters emotions, feelings and a gentle touch of wonder. Not least, there’s probably many fellow photographers who are currently feeling a little nag of jealousy. Doing what Dan does represents a kind of personal freedom that modern life seems to limit. There’s something of the road trip we never managed to take, or the creative instinct that somehow got lost along the way. Dan’s influences show themselves in this way. g Autumn 2015 / the PHOTOGRAPHER 5

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The wealth of creative freedom and expression that photography offers first really nested in Dan at the age of 17 through the heady combination of A levels, a motorbike and a Pentax MZ6. As he says: ‘I was riding around looking to put my creative stamp on the surroundings.’ It’s a comment that would reverse today. Around this time, Dan discovered the work of William Eggleston and Stephen Shore. Whilst Dan’s now matured imagery delivers its own unique touch and identity, there’s a small but crucial sense of Shore in his darkened worlds. He comments: ‘The importance of these two photographers in my opinion cannot be overstated. Of course, their work is synonymous with the development of colour photography, and yes they had a key role to play in visually documenting their world at that time, but it goes much deeper. It is easy to view them in a sentimental or retrospective fashion; but to me they are brimming with narrative – poured-over moments of the everyday that people would disregard as “nothing”. For me it’s about normality being viewed in a subtle yet still unexpected context.’ Dan’s image of Dungeness Nuclear Power Station is a classic in these terms. Carefully planned, constructed and executed with no special access or team of assistants holding reflectors. He parked up on public land and understood the combination of factors that would prove essential to the image. In doing so, Dan naturally has his own real life tales to tell: ‘I arrived at Dungeness in Kent around 4pm and parked my truck in the car park on the public side of the power station fence. I decided to get some sleep so I would be good and ready to shoot when night fell. My old pick-up is matt grey, and held together mainly by duct tape and good will – so it stands out a bit. I was dozing in the back, in my makeshift bed behind a very poor excuse for a curtain covering the back window, when I was awoken by the sound

Image © Daniel Freeman

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of voices followed by shadows passing the rear window. Then, a very bright torch was shone around the vehicle. I leapt up and pushed open the door only to find a gun aimed loosely in the direction of my vehicle. The owner actually looked as shocked as I was, and exclaimed “I wasn’t expecting to see someone climb out the back of a truck!” It seems my lone pick-up had aroused suspicion. I explained that I was a night photographer and would be sleeping there until the full moon was high in the sky. He called in to let his colleagues know they could leave me alone.’ Dan expands on his reading of Shore: ‘His images invite and evoke our other senses to become involved with the viewing process. This suspense is evident thanks to compositions that allow the viewer to create their own narrative and develop it through picking up on visual clues throughout the frame. One can become absorbed in the work and come up with more questions and theories about the content within than there will ever be answers for. In some senses, this to me makes a magical photograph – one that leaves the viewer guessing, interpreting and reflecting, even though they know they will never get clarification.’

Image © Daniel Freeman

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Left: When my childhood best friend announced he was getting married in Cornwall, one question came to mind: what locations were nearby that I could shoot at night? As luck would have it, the moon was full at the time of the wedding, and so I spent hours pouring over images on the internet of nearby places of interest. I decided that this old tin mine would be worth a look, and so two days before the wedding, I drove down and arrived late afternoon. The weather was awful. It was my nightmare: all of the planning for nothing; overcast, wet and miserable. Nevertheless, I walked around the site during the day and took plenty of reference images of compositions I would like should the sky clear, but it did not. During the wedding itself, I noticed the sky clearing and, to my delight, it remained so even after the sun had gone down. So I purposely avoided the champagne, and around 10:30pm told the groom I was nipping out for some fresh air… I never went back. With the use of the moonlight and my daytime reference images, I composed this image. I had already decided on the shutter speed I wanted to best complement the exact amount of motion I wanted in the stars, and whilst said exposure time was running, a shooting star/meteor fell through the sky. I knew it would be in the frame, and was impatient to wait for the exposure to end so I could see it. Looking at the image on the back of the camera, I could not believe my luck when I saw that it had fallen right in line with the doorway! This one exposure made the entire trip worthwhile. Autumn 2015 / the PHOTOGRAPHER 9

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The fact that Dan prefers to use natural moonlight rather than extremely extended shutter durations or large location studio productions brings Shore’s magical realism into his own work. Rather than post-production, we find research and development of an idea; a creative process; and a high level of technical expertise. ‘For me, personally, I prefer to keep my images looking as natural and as true to how I saw the scene as possible. This means that I often shoot under a full moon, in order to light the foreground and or land in my photographs naturally. Using the moon as a light source, and being able to balance it against other present light is very important to aiding the creation of the natural feel I’m after. It would be easy to always create two exposures and layer them to make the ground look incredibly light, but this is not always an accurate interpretation of how the moon falls upon a subject and how it is seen at night. As well as planning to shoot around the full moon in the lunar cycle, I also look at locations in advance, and where possible, map out where I can stand, to utilise the moon as a light source without it being visible in the frame. This is not always possible with sites where I cannot determine the direction the focal features are facing, but I always try and compose to use the moon to full effect. I use maps online which chart the position of the moon by date and time, so I know where it will be relative to the location before I shoot. It’s all quite predictable!’ People often ask Dan if he’s scared to be out photographing at night alone, especially considering some of the locations he visits. But any fear is swiftly rejected: ‘I genuinely don’t have a fear of shooting in the dark at all. I am incredibly cautious, as complacency and arrogance can breed disaster and of course I am as susceptible to being jumpy at an unknown sound in the night as anyone else, but time and

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Image © Daniel Freeman

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This image: ‘In the southern Californian desert around Christmas time, I had been driving through this small town, which was as warm as an English Summer. In fact, it was so hot that I’d forgotten that it was even Christmas time at all. As I drove past this particular house, I was instantly drawn to the cross in the front garden. The lights were actually rotating and I knew that with a longer shutter speed I could make them appear as one continuous light, and in turn create the ‘burning cross’ effect. There was no

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political, racial or religious intention behind this image – it was purely for aesthetic purposes. I was in love with how the yellow complemented the blue from the neighbour’s house behind and there was something radiant about the way the light was spilling out from the structure (aided by the presence of the cross, and the slogan ‘Jesus Saves’). Knocking on the doors of strangers in the middle of the night and trying to explain that I am a photographer would no doubt have been met with a response very unbecoming of the nature 29/10/2015 21:10


Image © Daniel Freeman

of people one might associate with having such religious regalia in their front gardens… I decided instead that I would take my chances and just shoot it, having examples of my previous work on my phone ready to show should I be confronted. I also left the engine running in the car should I need to make a hasty retreat. This in itself was a problem as my hire car was a V8 Mustang GT which made one hell of a noise! In that moment though, all that mattered was getting the image. As I packed my gear away, and began to TP-2015-AUT DF p04-17.indd 13

leave the side of the road, a large pick-up truck pulled into the exact spot I had been photographing, the owner of which looked back at me with an inquisitive glance, wondering why I was sat in a car outside his house. Without a second’s thought, I put my foot to the floor. For me, there has always been a sort of guilty pleasure to be gained from photographing locations I shouldn’t really be in… and getting away with it without anyone knowing I was ever there.’ g

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Image © Daniel Freeman

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experience has taught me that nearly all obscure noises around this time are from nocturnal animals or the wind. Derelict buildings have their own soundtrack too – that of decayed and fallen materials, which bang and whistle to the sound of neglect in the wind. It is about being aware of these sounds, and realising that when one arrives at any location where there is no wind and all is relatively quiet, if the breeze picks up, this can cause the very sounds that can shatter the stillness. This is why where possible I do a walk around of the area upon arrival to make sure there is nothing untoward at the location, and am aware of anything that the wind could later attempt to scare me with.’ As Dan’s love of night photography grew, he felt compelled to travel further afield. He was also looking at images of locations that had been shot during the day, and having ideas of how they could look under the night’s sky. Trips that would take more than a day hence demanded a combined transport and sleeping solution: ‘Usually when I have finished shooting at night I am exhausted from concentrating on getting the images I want, and doing so in a safe manner,’ says Dan. ‘With the distance regularly being further than I could feasibly drive home from after the shoot

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Right: Not getting stranded by the tide was conflicting with how much I was determined to capture something of the meteor shower that I had driven to the Norfolk coast to see. The shower had been predicted nationally and I spent days deciding on the best place to go and witness the phenomenon. It did not disappoint, with up to six or seven every minute, and as such I was determined to capture one in an image. They seemed to be falling everywhere except where I was aiming my camera. I had to remain patient, because I knew the predetermined composition I wanted. When it finally happened, it fell in exactly the place I wanted it to, with no post-production for effect. As soon as I had achieved it, I packed up and waded through shin-deep water back to where my truck was parked. Climbing into the back of the truck in a discreet manner with soaking jeans was not an easy task, but I managed, and bedded down for the night. The following day before leaving for home, I walked into a cafe and asked for a table for two. The staff looked at me bemused as I had entered solo, and were further perplexed when I sat my camera bag and tripod on the opposite chair at the table, where I proceeded to review the images from the night before…

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concluded, I began looking at alternatives, instantly ruling out hotels and established overnight accommodation due to cost, and the need to book ahead.’ Of course, when you’re a night photo­grapher it’s a bit pointless booking a room for a night when that is the one time you would not be there. The solution had to be a bit more hard core: ‘Camping was out of the question as setting up a tent is not the easiest task by yourself in the dark,’ Dan explains ‘and it means finding a site if you’re not to arouse unwanted attention. So I purchased my tatty old Nissan pick-up truck and converted the back section into temporary living quarters.’ In due course, and as his obsession with the night has continued unabated, the old Nissan has given way to a little more ‘luxury’ in the form of a Mitsubishi Shogun Warrior: ‘Being a 4x4 and high off the ground means that I can go over rougher terrain, allowing me to park off the road without getting stuck. When I got hold of it, I removed the back seats, made another bed setup and blacked out the back windows for privacy.’ Does Dan get lonely or scared, parked up in isolated places in the middle of the night? Not at all: ‘I truthfully enjoy my own company, and quite often the opposite of loneliness is what I am feeling – contentment and a sense of freedom to do things my own way, even though it is not what most would consider normal.’ tP See more at: www.daniel freemanphotography.co.uk

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Fuji / Crystal Archive Paper

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When success is just child’s play

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love puppets, the One Vision prolab and Fujifilm Crystal Archive silver halide paper are a perfect mix for Aztec Photography. For Kerry Cooper and Roz Nash (left and right above), who collectively make up Chertsey-based Aztec Photography, much of their rapport with their junior subjects is down to their open and friendly natures and the experience they’ve gained over eleven years of photographing children at nurseries and primary schools. But they do also have a secret weapon and it’s not one that you’ll find in a traditional photographic handbook. ‘While Roz is the one that takes the pictures it’s my job to organise things and to entertain the children,’ says Kerry, ‘so that they’re relaxed and happy to be photographed. The way I usually do this is simple: I’ve got a glove puppet that I take with me, and they will be so busy watching and reacting to it that they eventually forget the camera is even there.’ For both Kerry and Roz, photography was not an initial career choice. Roz always

loved photography but eventually she went to work in the theatre instead, where she specialised in lighting. Kerry was a stay-at-home mum for a while and then took on an admin job in an office. It was only when they met up eleven years ago and realised they had a mutual interest in the creative arts that the idea to start a business together was born. With photography of this kind it’s not just a case of building a relationship with a school it’s also about speed of delivery and doing justice to your photography. Proofs especially have to look dazzling, because this is where orders will come from, and there are few pro labs that can manage both the volumes involved and the quality control required in order for this side of the business to run smoothly.

‘We love the colour and quality of Crystal Archive paper, and the service we receive from One Vision is nothing short of outstanding’ – Kerry Cooper

‘Our first lab could only manage to deliver proofs of a single picture,’ says Kerry, ‘but we knew that we would have a better chance of selling work if we offered a bigger selection. We eventually came across One Vision and they’ve been brilliant: they supplied us with a proof that features four separate poses, and sales increased immediately.’ Fujifilm’s silver halide-based Crystal Archive media is the natural choice for school photography since it features gorgeous warm tones and saturated colours, and these are the attributes that drive sales. From a lab’s point of view it’s also a paper that’s easy to work with and to use in volume, and the added benefit is that the silver halide aspect ensures that prints will naturally have a long life. ‘Both ourselves and our customers love the colour and quality of Crystal Archive paper,’ says Kerry, ‘and the service level we receive from One Vision has been nothing short of outstanding.’ See: www.aztec-photography.co.uk

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Fuji / Crystal Archive Paper

Quality is always the best business plan

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ver the years David Smithard has seen many changes in his business, one of the most fundamental being the number of imaging devices now available, including conventional cameras, cameraphones and tablets. To survive and thrive it’s meant that he’s had to up his game to ensure his product is still marketable. ‘So many people, if they bother with prints at all, will output them on a home printer or will use a cheap online service,’ he says. ‘For me printing is one of the most crucial stages of all: I’ve found a partner in One Vision who will output the proofs and the finished prints that I need to a very high standard. They also work with Fujifilm Crystal Archive paper, and the quality of this media is outstanding: beautifully saturated and with a lovely warm feel. People will look at the results they can achieve themselves, which will often be disappointing, and they’ll understand why it pays to have a picture professionally produced.’ Nearly twenty years ago David took on a job photographing a small toddler group, and word of mouth took care of the rest. Primary school/pre-school photography is now the mainstay of his business, and he’s become a regular fixture twice a year at a wide selection of schools within a twenty-mile radius of his home base in Leicestershire. These are pictures that parents can’t take themselves, and they’re such a priceless resource nearly everyone takes up the

option to buy. ‘I don’t get many returns,’ says David. ‘Normally I’ll sell around 90 per cent of the pictures that go out, and it just goes to show that people are still willing to pay for good quality pictures that mean something to them.’ These sales are crucial, not only to bring income in but to ensure that the schools themselves stay loyal to one particular photographer. They receive a 20% cut of the money that’s made, and considering that David is regularly achieving figures of £6,000 on a job that’s a serious boost to school funds. The competitive nature of the business also ensures that David himself is regularly receiving offers from rival labs, but he’s never been tempted to look elsewhere. ‘I’ve been with One Vision for eighteen years now,’ he says, ‘and I trust that they will always deliver the quality of picture that I need. This is down to a great lab and a great paper in the shape of Crystal Archive, and I’m not going to change that for the sake of saving a couple of pounds on a print order.’ See: www.davidsmithard-weddingphotography.co.uk Autumn 2015 / the PHOTOGRAPHER 19

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Fuji / Crystal Archive Paper

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Crystal Archive and Fujifilm X-Series – a perfect marriage for wedding shooter Kevin

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mere six years ago Wiltshire-based Kevin Mullins was earning his living in online marketing, leaving home at 5am every morning and not getting home until 16 hours later, exhausted and too tired to appreciate his growing family. It’s a familiar story but, unlike the crowd, Kevin decided to do something about it. That was in August 2009 and since then Kevin has shot 300 or so weddings, and in that time has acquired an enviable reputation for the quality and integrity of his reportage approach. ‘The un-staged images are, for me, the ones I can look at over and over again,’ he says. ‘I want to understand my subjects; I want to know more about them and their backgrounds; what was their story? I really want my wedding photography to generate the same emotions.’

proven archival qualities is also really important. I think that when people are spending relatively large amounts on framed items they want to know that, even if hung in well-lit natural light areas, the images won’t fade or warp. It’s Fuji X photographer Kevin Mullins, something clients ask me above, and One Vision Imaging’s about a lot, so it’s clearly busy print product despatch important to them.’ department, below. ‘Because it’s so easy for clients to order cheap and cheerful products via social media and other websites, when they’re investing in professional-quality products they want to know that they will stand the test of time and still look as gorgeous in 30 years’ time as they do today. If they are assured that this is the case then they are much more likely to place an order.’’ See: www.kevinmullinsphotography.co.uk

For information on Fujifilm Crystal Archive papers or to request a sample print please call Peter Wigington on 01234 572138, email photoimaging@fuji.co.uk or visit www.fujifilm.eu/uk/products/photofinishing/ photographic-paper

Kevin believes strongly that wedding images need to be printed out rather than be left to gather pixel dust on a hard drive, and it’s the reason why every package he offers includes an album as part of the deal. He also makes sure he has plenty of presentational products on the walls of his studio, so that when customers meet him for the first time they’re immediately aware of the impact these can create. One Vision has been a long-term partner, and they output Kevin’s work on Fujifilm Crystal Archive DPII paper, a media that still depends on traditional silver halide technology. ‘The fact that silver halide has such

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The will to explore

There’s a big, wide, world out there – beyond the studio, beyond your front door. We talk to two photographers who took the plunge and headed out into the great unknown, as part of Raleigh International’s worldwide projects. They discovered a great deal about themselves along the way

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Image © Saraya Cortaville

#1 Saraya Cortaville

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ife is nothing but full of surprises. A pretty big one was to hear that portrait photographer Saraya Cortaville had given up a successful studio business and disappeared off to Africa. Why would you do that? Think about all the vast inputs of time and energy that have gone into the development of the business, the marketing, the client base. Excuse the use of the phrase but… OMG! This was honestly the initial reaction to the news that Saraya was off somewhere in the back of beyond working as a volunteer photo­ grapher / manager for Raleigh International – an organisation that takes hundreds of young people away to generally far-flung corners of the globe to build schools, dig wells and carry out similar infrastruc­ ture improvements. Along the way, the volunteers, called ‘venturers’, get a life-affirming experience. The same tends to be true for the photographers, too. g

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Contrast these scenes with a busy ‘normal’ day in the studio and anyone with a spirit of adventure still nuturing photo­ graphic ambition can be excused ‘just get­ ting out there’. Saraya explains the situation: ‘I was looking to get out of my studio as, deep down, I wasn’t satisfied with what my professional life had become and sometimes you should be careful what you wish for – it kind of just happened. I needed something special, something big to move me on. I’d moved house a bit further away from my studio and the commute was getting me down. I began thinking that maybe the studio wasn’t right for me after all – indeed, after everything I had put into it.’

Although it sounds a bit simplistic, Saraya’s first big step was to sit down… and google ‘voluntary photog­ raphers’. It was a move that set a long process into action: ‘I applied a whole year before I went out to Tanzania with Raleigh International,’ says Saraya, ‘and I knew for certain that I had a place at the end of the May before setting off in January this year.’ In other words, she must have had plenty of time to doubt her every move. But the appeal was strong: ‘I looked into five different possible project countries. I’d been to Asia and generally travelled a bit before but I hadn’t been to “proper” Africa – the thought of that was new and exciting.’ Saraya formed part of the communications team in Tanzania, paired with a writer and based centrally in the country. They travelled around the various individual projects taking place and documented everything to

g Image © Saraya Cortaville

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provide media to update their blogs, get information back home to the parents and advertising media for the charity. However it wasn’t much like the daily commute she’d grown to dread. Saraya says: ‘Every single day was different. We might spend two days travelling on buses to get to a project site, and then we’d be working with the ventur­ ers and attending community meetings. My photographic time was split between covering the work the team was doing, and

communicating the context and environment everything was set in.’ It couldn’t have been an easy transition, how­ ever: ‘I don’t know if I could say what my prior expectations were beyond fear. Of course I won­ dered what it would be like on the ground, but I was really scared of what it was I had done – I was shutting down my way of making a living entirely with nothing on the other side, no safety net if I didn’t like it or couldn’t cope with the living standards. I was going away and that was

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Image © Saraya Cortaville

that. My mind was full of questions… rather like starting school all over again: was I going to make friends (I wasn’t coming back until May)? Was I going to be any good at the job? Could I cope, living a very basic existence in a developing country? But once I made it there and jumped in, it was easily one of the best things I have ever done.’ At the beginning of the four-month assign­ ment there was a detailed briefing session but then Saraya would be self-managing: ‘We were

given a rough outline of where we were allowed to go and we had time constraints within which we had to return to base – that was the only location where internet access was available. We had project completions to attend and community days that were prearranged. At some point I had to get over the fear of being away in a strange land and start using the wonderful visual opportuni­ ties that were staring me in the face. You sink or swim.’

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Image © Saraya Cortaville

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Before embarking on the trip, Saraya ad­ mits to stress and worry: ‘I did obsess about closing the studio. But I just realised I’d be doing the same work in ten years’ time and know that it wasn’t for me. To be fair, it’s been so much better since I’ve been back – I let go of the overhead of a studio once and for all and now solely work on location. I needed a bit of a kick up the behind – I was simply going through the motions, getting stale. This decision made all the difference.’

And whilst she was away, was it hard to switch off from everything at home? She says: ‘Not at all – I didn’t think about work back home when I was in Tanzania. There were links in that almost all of my clients helped by sponsoring me. I raised £2,500 through my clients just to get me to Tanzania. I had no particular intentions of going home and doing the same type of work again, but it was amazing to realise how much they wanted to support me and help out with what I wanted to do.

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Image © Saraya Cortaville

I think for me on a personal level that was a bit of a surprise and yet another element of what I discovered through this whole process.’ Living conditions on the trip for managers and venturers alike were very, very basic. They had to dig their own toilet facilities and build their own showers. Saraya comments: ‘Perhaps this was what I was “most” afraid of: no washing facilities! The experience has made me so appreciative of what we do have. We had to purify our water everywhere we went. Pretty

much everything in day-to-day life that we take for granted was just not available. But we had to get on an dig in. Part of our role was to gee up the venturers, especially when times were a bit more difficult but it was great how people mucked in and cared for each other. By the end, none of us really wanted to come home!’ The projects in Tanzania ranged from building an early learning centre in one village where 80 per cent of the mums had

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aids, to building a kitchen at a school so the children didn’t leave at lunch time. Then there were wells and water pipeways, leader­ ship building and community resilience. But what about photographically? Saraya says: ‘It was really different for me and I most enjoyed the more artistic elements whilst my core work was the project cover­ age, my brief to fulfil. The challenges were always present for both types of picture I wanted. The communities were very welcoming of me but in their culture your taking of their image is thought to be steal­ ing their soul. It would take time at a project site to establish trust but it did happen and I’m pleased with the pictures I came back with for myself – you just always yearn for more time.’ Saraya took a basic kit of a camera body, a few lenses, periferals and a laptop: ‘Most of the time I slept on it – you try to be as careful as you can but in the end everything I took with me is now knackered! But that’s the way it is… I think many photographers have struggled who have tried to do it on an absolute minimum of equipment. After all, none of it means anything in reality.’ So what has changed, now Saraya is back at home and work? ‘Coming home was a shock to the system – the beauty of Africa was that you didn’t know anything for certain but you were always busy. Now there’s that self-motivation to find. I take pictures differently since the trip… my work has changed: I observe better; I make a definite decision to take a picture; the pace has come down. Raleigh International has been life changing: how I now go about work, relationships and view life is all for the better. I have a broader view of life and work so I’d say be brave and go for it – I did spend too much time worrying about it and now I would definitely go back again.’ tP

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#2 James King

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ames King, aka ‘Jungle Jim’, is a writer, designer and photographer with a passion for adventure. Seven­ teen years ago he landed head-first in the darkest depths of the Borneo rainforest, as a venturer on Raleigh International’s Expedition 98I to Brunei and Sabah. This expedition changed his life forever. From that moment on, his passion, wonder and curiosity for the ‘adventurous’ world was ignited – the need to explore the unknown and to find out what’s around the next corner. Life was waiting for him to seize it and turn his experiences into something dynamic... to find a way to tell his story. He picks up the tale: like Don McCullin, ‘ Photographers Steve McCurry and the pages of National

Geographic and Lonely Planet have always inspired me to just get out there and see the world for what it really is. From the gritty

troubles of Cambodia’s past to the sandy wastes of the Erg Chebbi Sand Dunes in Morocco – these are just two of the fabulous places I have been lucky enough to experience in life and which have left a lasting impression on my soul. It is what makes me, me... diving into life’s chal­ lenges with passion and drive, I want to experi­ ence the rich, the poor, the happy and the sad... Fifteen years after Borneo, I decided to rekindle my love of the jungle and take time out from my design career, throwing myself into the role of photographer on Raleigh International’s Expedition 13H to Costa Rica in the summer of 2013. Photography is a invaluable resource to re­ cruit new venturers and managers, publicise the work of Raleigh International, attract funding and sponsors and enhance the memories and experiences of the volunteers as they participate in a unique exchange of cultures and get to know some incredible people they would not otherwise have the chance to meet.

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Image © James King

Sixty-six days of photographic adventure ensued in the rolling green hills and jungles of Costa Rica. Forget the luxury hotels and tourist trails... this was real life experienced to the max shared with a whole host of creepy crawlies, howler monkeys, hummingbirds, a remote indigenous Borucan community, a dilapidated jungle prison island and 52 venturers aged between 17 and 24. The one thing I had learnt about a Raleigh International expedition was to be totally open minded, adaptable and ready to take on what­ ever is thrown at you. People may think it is easy to just “go and take some photos” but every day posed a new challenge from trying to keep the camera safe from the elements, trying to capture “the” moment, keeping one step ahead of the teams and just when you think your work is done you spend hours long into the night processing everything you have captured. For me, expedition 13H included several amazing projects including a visit to the Cabo

Blanco scientific reserve on the tip of the Nicoya Peninsula, Carara National Park, a school building project in the illusive village of Duserinak, hidden deep in the remote indigenous Chirripo National Park and a five-day adventure trek into the beautiful rolling hills of La Cangreja National Park. My favourite was the community project in a tiny remote village called Mayal, hid­ den in the mists of the Boruca indigenous tribal area in southern Costa Rica near the border with Panama. The Boruca are a tribal people who keep themselves to themselves in their farming community, renowned for their mysterious Dance of the Little Devils and their ornate bolsa Masks. The comedor (dining hall) system allows students attending school to receive a daily meal paid for by the government. However, this funding is only available if schools have a usable building. In Mayal, the school’s comedor had fallen into disrepair and g Autumn 2015 / the PHOTOGRAPHER 35

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could no longer be used by the children. Whilst the community were working on re-building the school, Raleigh volunteers joined the local effort and built a brand new comedor, so encouraging students back to education. The finale of my Costa Rican jungle ad­ venture was to spend three days document­ ing a Survival Challenge, castaway on the dilapidated Costa Rican jungle prison island of San Lucas. An island haunted by fear and sorrow, it is most remembered for being the site of Costa Rica’s version of Devils Island where the most dangerous criminals spent their final years. The graffiti-ridden prison was shut in 1991 due to inhumane condi­ tions – it has since been slowly devoured by

the jungle and over-run by its resident howler monkeys. Renovations of the prison have re­ cently started by the Costa Rican government. Fifteen project managers and 52 venturers completed three days of fire-making, problem solving, raft building and jungle survival across different sites on the island... and all this with no electricity or even a sit-down toilet! All my experiences, adventures and travels – some behind the camera – have shown me that there is more to life than what you take for granted day to day. I want to inspire other people with a passion for photography to do something different, out of their comfort zone, outside of normal work and life – to value other people and cultures whilst experiencing some­ thing new and previously unknown. Don’t just

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Image © James King

settle for the easy life, push your photographic boundaries and dive in to an adventure of a life­ time. Discover your own spirit of adventure… James King http://werangutan.photoshelter.com

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t was only a matter of time before James realised his destiny was to combine all he had learnt and make something of his wild ideas. Taking inspiration from the people he had met and the places he had visited, the mythol­ ogy and local legends surrounding his own experiences of surviving in the darkest depths of the Borneo rainforest, the fictional story of ‘Jungle Jim and the Shadows of Kinabalu’ emerged. It is the beginning of an epic

adventure that mixes ancient mythology with a little monster bashing madness, topped off with a sparkle of magic to save the world (as we know it) from total destruction – and it’s a great read to boot! http://www.trouba dor.co.uk/book_info. asp?bookid=3512

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The un­ expected journey P

rior to the start of all this, in late 2013, Tiggy Walker is 52 years old, married with no kids and one dog. She produces TV commercials, and before marriage had her own production company. These days she freelances at Soho-based Blink. Tiggy’s made ads for 30 years for everything from bags of salad leaves to flash cars. Her husband is Radio 2’s Johnnie Walker, a bit of a radio legend, life with him is never dull. But none of that is what people notice about her on first meeting. Tiggy says in the foreword to Unplanned Journey: ‘When people meet me, the thing they first notice are my large breasts. Some women envy them while occasional men are affected by them. Indeed, once I met a retired Admiral at a party who gripped his glass so hard it shattered – spilling red wine all over my cleavage. He apologised saying he was just so excited to meet me. What he meant was “them”. The sad thing is that I hate “them”. At 32H they are heavy, get in the way, stop me buying most clothes and only one bra in the country fits. Twice I have met plastic surgeons to discuss a reduction but on moral grounds I decided to keep them. The good Lord made me this way.’ In the New Year of 2014, Tiggy wrote a letter to photographer Bella West. It went like this: ‘Hi Bella, this is a crazy idea, but go with it and see what you think. I’ve just been diagnosed with breast cancer. (Don’t worry – I’m fine about it.) I have an op next Wednesday and then six weeks later start chemo for five months and then radiotherapy. The whole process is eight to nine months. When Johnnie went through cancer the physical

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From Tiggy’s diary: ‘I apologised for the size of my breasts, took a deep breath and removed my bra. She was somewhat awestruck by their size but happily, unlike the Admiral’s wine glass, the lens did not shatter and she even made me feel great about them. “She’s good”, I thought to myself and before long it felt completely natural to be naked in front of her. I may not love them, but it is sad to think that from tomorrow they will never be the same.

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Image © Bella West

Bella explains: ‘This was our first shoot and the first time Tiggy had bared all for me. We had no idea on the severity of the cancer, or the treatment that she would need at this point. Manor Farm where this was taken was in a state of renovation at the time – it was somehow fitting that the portraits would develop as the house did. The door was something to hide behind and also indicative of an unknown direction that we were going in.’

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changes in him were enormous. At his worst he was a mere 8 1/2 stone. I regret that I did not photograph him. Morbid as it sounds. So I wondered if it would be interesting to have a weekly photographic record of how I look. For example losing my hair, the scar, my moods, etc, etc. I may even try and get a breast reduction at the end... If all the photos were put together like a contact sheet it may help others understand the changes that will happen to them through breast cancer. Whatever they may be. Obviously I would have to be naked and I have the hugest breasts – which may make it an unpleasant photo! And maybe it is something that should only be done with a model rather than an overweight middle-aged woman. What do you think? Is that something you would like to discuss? If you think it is a good idea we would need to get the “before” photo done on Tuesday. Let me know if this strikes a chord with you. Hope all is good with you, Love Tiggy.’

All images © Bella West

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Bella replied: ‘Yes, I would be honoured to do this with you, hugely honoured.’ What followed was an incredibly powerful portrait of personal strength rarely seen in mainstream media. Through Tiggy’s words and Bella’s images we are given a touching, pointed and often hard-hitting document of cancer treatment and recovery. Here in considerably shortened form are extracts from what became the book Unplanned Journey, the royalties from which are being donated to Carers UK. Tiggy and Johnnie Walker are Patrons of the 50th Anniversary Appeal.

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Bella says: ‘The operation. This was during the lumpectomy to remove the tumour and some of the lymph nodes in order to understand the strength of the cancer. A great deal of tissue was cut around the tumour in order not to damage it. I was suprised at the access I was given by Salisbury hospital – they encouraged me to take pictures and explained the process to me as we went along.’

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Bella West gives some thoughts on the assignment: ‘I was looking for a personal project to do – glib as that sounds in this context – but I was. The key was change and being close enough to her life through this time but not too close to ruin the scenes as they unfolded. I just said “how do you feel about me documenting the whole thing warts and all?” We didn’t know at that point what treatment she was going to have and we just went with it each step of the way, so I photographed everything: the operation, the chemo and also private portraits just really to photograph her as she was – that was important. ‘Halfway through the treatment Tiggy and Johnnie were invited to be involved with Carers UK and their PR

department saw the pictures and wanted to use them in some way so the book was the result. I stress: all I’ve done is shoot the pictures – it’s a book of her incredible story. On my side it put me into very uncomfortable situations – after this I feel like nothing can rock my professional stability. There were emotionally charged situations and I felt very honoured to be there, and some of the pictures were very graphic. Breast cancer has been covered a lot – but I was not trying to make her look beautiful or brave, just as she was. We weren’t close friends when it began and I think that was a good thing. Beyond the first pictures that I found very hard, it became a very close journey. It was amazing to be a part of it.’

Image © Bella West

From Tiggy’s diary: First chemo – ‘Nurse Emma, assisted by Jo, applied the cold cap (a freezer compartment for the head to prevent hair loss) while Sister Sue listed reams of side effects, warnings and general negativity about chemo. I was being attacked on both sides by nurses and from above by cold. Johnnie, Bella and I were having a quite a laugh as I pretended to be engrossed in a leaflet entitled ‘Constipation’. But then I saw the first syringe of red poison going in to my arm. I instantly burst into tears. The thing I dreaded beyond all else – chemical poison – was being infused into my clean healthy body. How fitting that it was red.

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Image © Bella West

From Tiggy’s diary: The Head Shave – ‘I was pleased. Proud almost. This WAS taking control. Now I really looked like the part I’m supposed to be playing – a cancer victim. In that I have been in denial about having cancer a large portion of the time, it is probably healthy for my overall acceptance.’ g

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Bella comments: ‘The set portraits were all done in certain locations I suggested. You can wait for something to connect – in her second round of chemo, she blindfolded herself and I felt that the lines of the squash court linked to the line of fluid going into her body. What if she didn’t survive? Would we carry on until she couldn’t do any more.’

Image © Bella West

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Image © Bella West

From Tiggy’s diary: Squash Court – ‘“Are you ready?” read the title of Bella’s email. No I was not. I’d asked to see a couple of our shots to send to an agent with the suggestion of a book. This plan goes straight out of the window. I cannot believe the size of my breasts. Even worse – my stomach. And then I see how I have aged. So shocked, I cannot look at the photos on my laptop. They remain small and less threatening on my phone. I cannot reply to Bella or even send them to Johnnie. I am so disgusted by how lardy I’ve become.’

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Image © Bella West

Bella comments: ‘The personal portraits were determined firstly by the location and then the light.This was my criteria and however Tiggy was on the day is how I would photograph her, but the location backdrop and light would determine the overall feel. There were times when I did have to question “why”?. Was I just being creatively self indulgent or is there a narrative to what was in front of me? So I very much allowed Tiggy to be as she was when we did make pictures. Keeping my own style running through was fundamental to me in order to work in a different genre yet still be recognisable.’

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From Tiggy’s diary: Radiation damage – ‘Oh my God. My breast looks as if it has leprosy. I took off my sports bra after some self-imposed ‘let’s get the body back’ exercise, and as it came off so did an eight-inch layer of of skin from under my breast. So sore. I went to see a nurse at the surgery. I am not sure if it was the size of my breasts or the uniquely positioned burn, but she had never seen anything like it. Even the skin around my nipple is coming off. Gross. Sonya, the lovely breast care nurse, has arranged for me to go to the burns unit on Monday.

Image © Bella West

From Tiggy’s diary: Radiotherapy – ‘I was about to start the next challenge on the cancer assault course and neither J nor I had prepared for it. Indeed I feel that J has forgotten I am even having treatment still. We have slipped back to the usual way of me doing everything – helped enormously by his new Triumph Thunderbird motorbike and the good weather – every possible chance he is off. Added to this, on Sunday, I started taking homeopathic python venom again to support me through the radio. What happened took us both by surprise. As the journey progressed I cried more and more. Anger welled up in me. Not fierce, but a gentle anger. I guess from fear. But I had to tell Johnnie what was in my head… If it hadn’t been for our marriage I felt I would not now have cancer. I was not attacking but merely airing. A decade of dramas and upset. Things I’ve had to suppress and absorb. I said it was part of my healing to let this out. To expel all thoughts and energies that may be blocking me as I do not want the cancer to return. It did not make for an easy day. Johnnie dropped me at the hospital door and drove off. I was in tears when I met the radiographer. I told her it was nerves.’

Image © Bella West

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Image © Bella West

From Tiggy’s diary: Reconstruction – ‘Today the final dressing was removed. I also saw Mr Masood. He was pleased with his handy work but warned they would take several months to settle down. “Don’t buy expensive bras yet.” Was that aimed at Johnnie or me? He also reported that the breast tissue removed tested negative for any more cancerous cells. I knew it would, but it’s pretty fantastic to have my instinct confirmed. I tried to thank him, to tell him how amazing it is what he has done for me. But he’s a humble man and was not open to praise. When I think about it, every nurse and doctor has been the same. They do their jobs well because they take pride in them. I’ve not met one ego. And people knock the NHS… I think it is incredible. As Johnnie and I walked down the corridor I thought, well that’s it. The journey is over. Now I really can get on with my life.’ Autumn 2015 / the PHOTOGRAPHER 47

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Through the artist’s eyes If you think producing prints has the potential to be a nightmare, just ponder reproducing original artworks for their creators! This is one such professional challenge that Denise Swanson has embraced wholeheartedly

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t’s not unusual these days for photographers to be actively looking about for different ways to utilise their studio space. For some, the best policy is a bit of rental – either on an ad-hoc basis, or heavily advertised. But the trouble with such a scenario is that studios have a primary purpose – to be used creatively. Hiring out almost suggests that you can’t think of anything to do with your down time! Denise Swanson FBIPP was looking at just such a situation and instead began developing relationships with fine artists, initially in the studio complex where she is situated. Her reproduction work now extends to paintings, sculptures, drawings, any flat artworks, but also books, installations, exhibitions, and even live performance. All of this came about through a normal flow of contacts, but not in the strict photography world – she did an MA in fine art rather than in photography – so accessed an entirely different network. ‘Artists tend to have different types of conversations with one another,’ says Denise. ‘Perhaps their

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Right: Lynne Blundell is an emerging Preston-based artist who enjoys working with vibrant colours, abstract imagery and metallic paints, reproducing her paintings into greeting cards and prints. 48 the PHOTOGRAPHER / Autumn 2015

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Artowrk © Lynne Blundell / Reproduced by Denise Swanson Autumn 2015 / the PHOTOGRAPHER 49

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Artowrk © Claudette Johnson / Reproduced by Denise Swanson

Above: Claudette Johnson co-founded the BLK Art Group and took part in the first National Black Arts Conference, recognised as a formative moment in the Black feminist art movement in the UK in 1982. She is known for her large-scale, sensuous drawings of Black men and women which are held in various collections including with the Arts Council.

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obsessions are just as niche but they’re different to a photographer’s. My studio space is in a complex that’s shared with a lot of other artists and the vast majority do not have a clue as to how to go about photographing their own work. It’s an advantage and a massive challenge. To begin with, you have to understand how the artist sees their own work; what are the primary characteristics that they see?’ In the studio, Denise shoots tethered directly into Capture One. She explains what she is doing as she works on the set-up and clients get to see each shot as it is taken, straight from camera. Reproduction of 2D artworks is mostly about capturing the work as accurately as possible, ensuring no distortion, vignetting or light fall-off whilst minimising unwanted reflections, capturing colours accurately and of course preserving the detail in textures. Denise says: ‘I find

it really interesting, and love working with artists and the challenges that come along. Artworks in frames are clamped into an upright position, parallel to the lens, on a table easel. Two lights are placed at 45-degree angles on either side, to ensure the entire work is evenly lit.’ She continues: ‘My Elinchrom lights allow remote control either from my laptop or iPhone, which is useful when shooting large works and they fire automatically via wifi from the camera. For small flat 2D works on paper, such as drawings or artist books, I use a copy stand as this allows me to ensure that the focal plane is exactly parallel to the artwork. Larger works can be pinned to the wall. Artwork with geometric lines or shapes still sometimes require a little keystone correction but that is easily done in C1 Pro. Photographing 3D objects such

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as ceramics, sculpture, jewellery and glassworks are all completely different but each offers their own problems. For small items such as jewellery I use the same techniques and equipment I would use for my own macro work, so extension tubes and reflectors along with various clamps and acrylic stands. For larger items such as pottery and ceramics I normally use the shooting table with appropriately placed lighting above and to the side. Larger items can be placed on a sheet of acrylic in front of a background. Strip light boxes are used when a reflection is needed such as on glasswork or for tall glazed objects. ‘Larger floor-based sculptures are tackled slightly differently – they might require an overhead softbox or snoot on a boom arm along with a side light and background reflector, or it might be two smaller side lights on stands or poles and a strip light may also come into it too.’ Denise’s first job in this sector was to document an installation at Tate Britain, but photographing for artists in the studio followed as word spread: ‘It’s extremely important for an artist to possess high-quality reproductions. This can then be a potential revenue stream for use on different media, for PR purposes to support exhibitions and for recording and archival purposes. Beyond all of that there’s the process of applying for funding applications and representation when contacting galleries. All in all it’s quite a responsibility.’ In many ways, then, it’s rather like when us photographers go to a lab to get prints done – it may be an entirely logical and technical process, but somehow the heart and soul of an image or work of art comes crashing headlong into the equation! Denise quickly

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Right: Lubaina Himid MBE is a contemporary artist and professor of Contemporary Art at the University of Central Lancashire. She was a pioneer of the Black British Art movement in the 1980s. Focussing on themes of cultural histories and reclaiming identities, her work is in collections and shown in galleries worldwide.

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Artowrk © Lubaina Himid / Reproduced by Denise Swanson

Artowrk © Lubaina Himid / Reproduced by Denise Swanson


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explains how she deals with this inevitable aspect: ‘I get the artists right there, central to the task. It’s essential that we talk and we have to discuss what the purpose of the reproduction is. Of course this has a tendency to change… but they’re welcome to stay and be part of the process start to finish. Almost every piece is going to be colour sensitive and I request that they sign off the colours there and then. It’s really challenging… some are very, very demanding.’ Denise expands: ‘Often, they will tell you what it is in advance, but it’s something completely different – maybe they explain it’s an A4 drawing and then it’s actually A0. Once you’ve got over these aspects that obviously have serious technical implications there’s the simple need to be perfectly square to the image. The lens itself is important in order to get the surface flat – I often use a 100mm macro. Then although we might be describing an oil painting as “flat artwork”, in reality it simply is not. The paint has texture to the extent that through a lens it’s 3D. Capturing the detail in these textures of paint, oils and pallet knife action – as well as accurate colours – can be a full-on technical exercise.’

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Below: Susan Walsh is a Research Fellow in Contemporary Art at UCLan. Her work investigates themes of memory and identity, through moving image and photography as well as interventions and installations, both gallery and site based. She is involved in an ongoing investigation into basic needs survival using the device of either temporary memorial or mini museum. The Cart project was devised to highlight the plight of those who have to leave their homes quickly, asking ‘what would you take with you?’ In Preston, the cart was pulled across the city, turning into a live performance and participatory art event from which selected images were shown as prints in the accompanying exhibition.

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Artowrk © Lubaina Himid / Reproduced by Denise Swanson Autumn 2015 / the PHOTOGRAPHER 55

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Artowrk © Claudette Johnson / Reproduced by Denise Swanson

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Many artists will work in North-facing studios, and this means they’ve been working in a very cool colour temperature. Their experience of their own work in a daylight balanced colour environment can be a relative shock: ‘Yes, now the greens are “beige” and they’re looking at their own work in a different way. The best approach to control it is to black out the studio – then there’s no potential for argument. They have to sign off in person – otherwise I’m opened up to a whole heap of trouble down the line! Photographers are generally aware of colour

management and different devices, but the majority of physical media artists are not. You can imagine the potential for clients to look at a file sent by email and decide that it’s wrong…’ Of course, the struggling artist never has much of a budget and so a commission must come down to end use. Denise comments: ‘If it’s just a bit of promotion that’s one thing, but if it’s for a series of limited edition prints then it’s a very different ball game.’  tP

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BIPP / News

PHOTOGRAPHY! The Work of the British Institute of Professional Photography BIPP will be mounting an exhibition at the Buckinghamshire Art Gallery in early 2016 and from there we’re hoping that certain parts of the exhibition will be available to view at other gallery locations around the UK. The exhibition is about inspirational imagery and film and will cover the huge range of outstanding work created by BIPP members. The idea is to inspire visitors to the gallery and raise the profile of you, as professional photographers.

The Buckinghamshire Art Gallery is a purposely designed exhibition space on the first floor of Bucks County Museum (previously the winner of ‘National Museum of the Year’). A domed ceiling and white walls provide a perfect backdrop for exhibitions. The exhibition programme is well respected regionally and often shows items from national/international collections. DATES 7 April - 21 May 2016, Oxheys Mill Studios

BIPP guides – Booking Your Wedding Photographer and Image Use Over the last 18 months, BIPP have been working on producing a series of informative guides that are easy to read, packed full of useful content and above all else, they’re free downloads. The first guide produced was The BIPP Guide to Booking Your Wedding Photographer. Aimed at buyers of photography, this guide informs the reader of the importance in booking a fully qualified professional whilst introducing them to what the BIPP and its Members do. To improve the footprint of this guide, we released the BIPP Wedding Card, which we can send out for free in small batches of around 30 cards. The card has the primary function of pointing people towards the online guide and the ‘Book a Photographer’ section of the website. If you’re interested in having a batch sent to you, please email jack@bipp.com.

resolving issues, this is a great source to have access to. Visit BIPP Guides under the Book a Photographer tab at www.bipp.com to download for FREE now.

The BIPP Guide to Using Images The recently released BIPP Guide to Using Images is also available as a free download from bipp.com. This guide provides a wealth of information about image use and copyright. With frequently asked questions, rights and wrongs and valuable information on Autumn 2015 / the PHOTOGRAPHER 57

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BIPP / Company partners

printed.com is an online custom print destination, dedicated to helping creatives, small business and printers bring their designs to life using cutting-edge printing presses and quality papers, across a range of over 80 products. Firm believers in the ethos “your print, your way”, printed.com keep an open dialogue with customers, resulting in new site features and product collections, the Photography Collection being the most recent example of this. The printed.com Photography Collection is a range of 17 carefully sourced products created with valuable input from the photographers and fine art enthusiasts. Products for self-promotion, such as postcards, stickers and DVD/ CD labels are included alongside products for client orders, like canvas prints and framed prints to create a handy one-stop destination. Photographers requested particular products, papers, canvases and finishes, all of which can now be found in the collection. Papers handpicked from Hahnemühle, Innova, Kodak and Epson complement the products, and finishes like frame wrapping, mounting and framing can also be requested to give printed shots a professional, high-end finish. Many of the products are available in custom sizes and some are hand finished for guaranteed precision. printed.com’s Newcastle-based printing facility was overhauled to accommodate the specialist nature of the new range, with the inclusion of an Epson Stylus Pro 9890 for unbeatable depth, clarity and colour-accuracy. This, combined with a designated dust-free environment, ensure pristine quality with each print ordered. www.printed.com

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BIPP / Company partners

Datacolor is a global leader in colour management solutions, providing software, instruments and services to assure accurate colour of materials, products and images. The world’s leading brands, manufacturers and creative professionals have used Datacolor’s innovative solutions to consistently achieve the right colour for more than 40 years. www.datacolor.com One Vision Imaging is one of the largest professional photographic laboratories to be found in the UK. For well over 30 years One Vision Imaging have been servicing professional photographers with the very highest standards of processing and finishing. As imaging specialists they also cater for many other sectors such as design and advertising agencies, graphic designers, Government funded bodies as well as keen enthusiasts. Not only do they offer the most comprehensive professional photographic services to be found anywhere in Europe but they pledge to ensure that their service is an unrivalled experience and that this is matched by their quality of product and product range. www.onevisionimaging.com

BIPP / Member benefits As you may have seen in our weekly e-Newsletters, we have recently had a change in our legal helpline provider. The new provider is Law Express and services include access to a free 24-hour telephone advisory service on legal issues and links to both personal and business-related legal issues. All of these features can be accessed via the Members’ Area of bipp.com, under the ‘Benefits & Discounts’ tab.

BIPP / AGM Notice

The BIPP AGM will be held at 12.30pm on Monday 30 November 2015 At: The Coach House, The Firs, High Street, Whitchurch, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire HP22 4SJ

Do you read your emails? A quick reminder about our weekly e-Newsletters. The weekly BIPP emails are put together to keep you informed about what’s happening, provide useful information about Events, Awards, Exhibitions and other BIPP-related matters. If you’re not subscribed to the list, please email jack@bipp.com

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BIPP / INFOT 2015

INFOT 2015

Derby University, Markeaton Street Campus, Derby DE22 3BD

The One and a Half Day Conference for Commercial and Industrial photographers Friday 13th & Saturday 14th November

INFOT, once a staple of the BIPP calendar for many years, makes its return this year. We’ve put together a jam-packed programme of seminars, talks and demos by some of the UK’s finest commercial and industrial photographers. Join us for this weekend of inspiring stories, new ideas and an insight into some of the profession’s most talented photographers. The provisional programme complete with timings for the event, can be found at www.bipp.com/events. SPEAKER PROFILES TIM FLACH FBIPP World-renowned photographer, artist and director, Tim Flach FBIPP, will be headlining INFOT 2015. Tim has work in several major international public collections and is best known for his highly conceptual images of animals. He is the author of the books Evolution, Equus, Dog Gods and More Than Human. Tim will be joined by… JONATHAN BEER FBIPP Studio Demo - How Jonathan Works Jonathan doesn’t do ‘talks’. He does photography. He does it so well, and with such a distinctive style, that he has become renowned for his attention to detail. Watch him work and you will become enthralled by the processes and attention to detail that have made him one of the most successful product photographers in the UK. SEAN CONBOY ABIPP Inside & Out – The Challenges of Architectural Photography With projects ranging from giant multiplex cinemas to multi-storey structures, Sean is often challenged with complex mixed lighting and atmospheric surroundings. Discover how he overcomes obstacles with a visual awareness and technical experience second to none.

ADAM COOPER ABIPP The Psychology of Commercial Video and its Platform usability Adam is Co-Founder and Creative Director of WeBelieveMedia, with over 12 years of experience in video production. Through working in TV and the service sectors such as travel and retail, Adam is fast becoming a pioneer of best practice in online video content across the globe. With several awards to his name Adam has been responsible for establishing and running two of the UK’s largest media production studios within retail - AO.com & Argos. BRYN GRIFFITHS FBIPP Developing A Career in Commercial Photography A prolific commercial photographer, Bryn is currently advising one of the largest retail chains in the UK on their multi-million pound photography division. Discover how he’s established himself as one of the leading commercial photographers of his generation and a Hasselblad Master. ERIC JENKINS HON FBIPP Chair of INFOT 2015 Eric has spent over 55 years working as a professional photographer within a Scientific Research Environment. Throughout his career, he has been involved with many

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BIPP / INFOT 2015

TICKETS ARE STILL AVAILABLE! SEE WWW.BIPP.COM/EVENTS aspects of specialist scientific imaging techniques and a wide spectrum of general photographic disciplines. He is currently working as a consultant for the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. Eric has been involved in the organisation of INFOT for many years and has campaigned to bring this conference back to the BIPP calendar. Our thanks go to him for his support and enthusiasm for ‘all things INFOT’! GEOFFREY PICKLES FBIPP Mapping the Trends in Commercial Photography Geoffrey is at the forefront of product photography, shooting tens of thousands of products and sets for Argos, Homebase and Habitat each year. He’ll use his experience and knowledge of large-scale commercial operations to show us how he believes commercial photography will develop in the future! DENISE SWANSON FBIPP Why Apathy Costs Money! Juggling photography and print work for other artists, directorship of a gallery, her role as the BIPP’s advocate for all things copyright and her own nature photography, Denise Swanson is a force of nature! She’ll give us an overview of the latest developments in copyright & licensing, but will also find time to show how she founded Oxheys Mill Studios in Preston. Working together with other artists, Denise has created a regional studio space and gallery, allowing a creative hub to be developed in the centre of an industrial city.

people and lifestyle, where his ability to easily and quickly connect with people mean that he is especially successful in getting his subjects to open up and bringing more out of them. Apart from regular commissions for his TV and magazine clients such as the BBC, ITV, Radio Times and Grazia, a lot of his assignments are in corporate portraiture, book commissions and annual reports. Again, this is an area where he feels his open and relaxed style helps his business subjects feel at ease. PAUL WITNEY ABIPP Droning on about UAVs... Paul is the Head of Photography & Video at the British Geological Surveys Headquarters. They have been using UAV’s for various projects such as photogrammetry and to capture images that would be too expensive for a helicopter or too dangerous to send a person to, such as landslides in this country and also sites such as Glaciers in Iceland. Paul will cover the production of a show reel and open source freeware used in photogrammetry to build digital 3D models of land forms. He will also bring their latest UAV, weather and space permitting there will be a practical demonstration outside.

To book by phone, please call Leah at the office on 01296 642020

STUART WOOD FBIPP Press & PR – Winning Commissions & Keeping Clients Stuart Wood’s work is varied, but his specialities are

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Business / Leasing

Devil in the detail A

part from hiring staff or buying capital equipment, taking on leased premises is one of the biggest fixed costs a business will face. While headline costs are a major worry, firms taking on leased premises need to be aware of the many hidden liabilities when acquiring commercial leased premises. Many of these are not immediately apparent and all will have a cost. Right to break It is well known in the property world that where a tenant has a right to terminate a lease any conditions imposed by the lease must be strictly complied with or the right to terminate is lost, leaving the tenant liable under the lease to continue to pay rent, service charges and rates and so on for the remainder of the lease term – which could be more than ten years. As a result, tenants should resist agreeing any pre-conditions to termination, particularly those that are extremely difficult to comply with. Prime examples include ‘no breaches of the lease’ – there will always be minor breaches no matter how diligent a tenant, or that the tenant must give ‘vacant possession’ by the break date – any failure to strip out fitting out works or even leaving behind a few loose items could count as still being in possession and cost the tenant the right to break. Rent deposits Providing a rent deposit as security is

Could a commercial lease be too good to be true? The fact is there’s a cost to everything and landlords aren’t exactly known for thinking kindly towards tenants when the implications of agreed clauses haven’t actually been understood not as simple as it sounds and some deposit clauses can seriously affect cash flow. For example, landlords often add VAT to the base amount of security so that in the event of default the deposit is not 20% short. The problem for tenants is that until there is a default and the landlord draws down, payment of the VAT element is not actually VAT and so the tenant will not get a VAT invoice and cannot recover the tax in the usual way. Deposits given to landlords can often be a substantial sum. Interest will be earned on the money and it should accrue to the tenant. However it is only likely to be nominal and will not be at a commercial rate of interest. Tenants often don’t appreciate that a rent deposit is actually an unlimited liability and not just limited to the initial fixed sum. This is because rent deposits always contain requirements to pay more into the deposit account to cover any amounts withdrawn by the landlord. At the same time, landlords often insist that if the rent under the lease is increased following a rent review that the deposit is topped up by a corresponding increase. This is often not appreciated and can affect cash flow. Turnover rent Retail leases in shopping centres or large landlord schemes often charge a rent based on the gross turnover of the leaseholder. This tends to be the amount by which a certain agreed percentage of gross turnover exceeds the base rent. The lease will often list a few sources of income that will be excluded from the calculation of the gross turnover. But there is one exclusion that is often ignored and which is important – that of online sales. These should be excluded from the calculation unless orders are being fulfilled from the premises. If this issue

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Business / Leasing

is ignored, centrally collected online orders could be caught and charged by this provision. Worse still, online orders could be caught by the turnover provisions of the leases of other stores in the area with each sale being counted multiple times. Repair and the end of the lease Any lease obligation to keep the property in repair implies an obligation to first put that property into repair. This means in simple terms that if a property has any defects or disrepair at day one, the tenant will be liable for bringing the property up to a good state of repair and decoration before they start trading. This could be costly. Therefore, it is strongly advised that tenants arrange a survey that includes the roof, structure and foundations where they are included in the property being let, as any defects here could be extremely expensive to repair. Similarly, most leases often require a full strip out of the premises and removal of all fit out when the term of the lease ends. This costly liability is often ignored. Rent review Leases in excess of five years often include upwards-only rent reviews based on the open-market value at that time. However, some leases contain yearly increases (or other review provisions) linked to the increase in the Retail Prices (All Items)

‘Worse still, online orders could be caught by the turnover provisions of the leases of other stores in the area with each sale being counted multiple times.’ Index. The point here to consider is whether the increase is ‘compounded’. Compounding occurs where the rent is increased in year one by the increase in the Index, and then in each subsequent year the rent is further increased by the change in the Index since the previous year, and so on. This is not always immediately apparent and could increase the rent over time far more than was anticipated.

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To avoid this, each yearly increase should be calculated using the initial (year one) base rent as the benchmark. Each year that year one rental figure should then be increased by the increase in the Index from the month immediately before the start of the lease term to the relevant date of review. That way, increases aren’t applied to already increased rents but the rent is still uplifted in line with RPI. Service charges Few realise that in the scrum to secure premises overlooked service charges and rates can often double charges due under the lease. It’s important to exclude as many of these from the service charge as possible while also negotiating a cap to the charges. There are a number of common exclusions that prospective tenants should be alive to. A good example includes any monies paid into a reserve fund. Here a landlord is planning for large or recurring items of expenditure in the future. However, tenants will not get these monies back if they sell the lease or when the lease ends, even where the monies have not been spent. Allied to this are construction and building equipment costs as well as any relevant defects that need fixing. These costs belong to the landlord as the risk of building is theirs. Similarly, any costs that related to getting the premises ready to hand over to tenants should be disbarred. Some service charge provisions contain rights for a landlord to recover the costs of refurbishment of the building. It is not reasonable for a landlord to be able to recover costs of upgrading its own asset and so this should be limited

to repairs only. Another area for contention involves the costs of lease renewals, rent reviews, lettings, collection of rents and arrears etc from other tenants. These are landlord’s own administrative expenses and should not be borne by a tenant. And then there are costs of services from which the tenant does not benefit. For example, if premises are self-contained and on the ground floor with direct access from the highway, without use of a loading bay, it is not reasonable for a tenant to then have to contribute towards repair and maintenance of the common parts of any offices above or any lifts, or any such parts the tenant does not use. By extension, costs that are attributed to parts of the building which are unlet should not be passed on to tenants either. Landlords have to pay a tax – the Carbon Reduction Commitment – on the basis of the carbon footprint generated by their properties. This is a tax on the landlord’s asset and these costs should not be passed on to the tenants. Moving on to service charge caps, there are a number of key points for tenants to remember. Firstly, the date of annual increases must be linked to the anniversary of the lease start date and not the landlord’s service charge accounting dates as this could result in a premature increase in the cap to a tenant’s disadvantage. Also, great care should be taken to make sure that any increase in the cap is not compounded as this could effectively add an increase on top of an increase. Tenants should also aim to have all costs payable to any merchants or tenants’ association included in the service charge cap. This especially applies to marketing and promotion costs which are often charged through the tenants’ association. Likewise, all contributions to reserve funds can sometimes be excluded from the list of service charge costs – they need to be included. On your guard Tenants need to be on their guard as landlords are not in the business of framing lease contracts in anything but their own favour. Contracts are onerous and need careful consideration and it is remembering that landlords are essentially looking for profit through rent while as much of their own costs are covered by tenants. Stuart Darlington is a partner in the real estate team of Michael Simkins LLP.

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the Photographer - Autumn 2015  

On the dark side (Daniel Freeman's full moon mastery)

the Photographer - Autumn 2015  

On the dark side (Daniel Freeman's full moon mastery)

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