Issuu on Google+

WINTER/HIVER 2005 www.biotech.ca

The official publication of BIOTECanada, the national biotechnology association

La publication officielle de BIOTECanada, l’association nationale de biotechnologie

NATIONAL BIOTECH WEEK LA SEMAINE NATIONALE DES BIOTECHNOLOGIES

Canada Post Publication Agreement Number/Numéro de convention de Poste-publications : 40064931

In Conversation with the Minister of Health, Ujjal Dosanjh Une conversation avec le ministre de la Santé, Ujjal Dosanjh Money, Money, Money Dr. Tony Brooks, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Une question d’argent M. Tony Brooks, D. Ph., PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP


The official publication of BIOTECanada, the national biotechnology association

La publication officielle de BIOTECanada, l’association nationale de biotechnologie

34 40

6 37

matières

contents

table des

SPECIAL Feature:

Article SPÉCIALE :

27 National Biotechnology Week 2004

22

WINTER/HIVER 2005

La semaine nationale des biotechnologies 2004

Celebrating IMAGENENATION–highlights from National Biotechnology Week

Célébrez IMAGENENATION–grande lignes de la semaine nationale des biotechnologies

Features

Articles

Money, Money, Money Dr. Tony Brooks, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Une question d’argent M. Tony Brooks, D. Ph., PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Ivey Biotech MBA Class of 2004 on the Market

L’arrivé de la promotion MBA 2004 en Biotechnologie de la Ivey school sur le marché du travail

Networks Strengthen Canada’s Biotech Community VWR International

Les Réseaux renforcent la collectivité canadienne de biotechnologie VWR International

Columns

Chroniques

BIOTECanada, A message from the President

BIOTECanada, Message de la présidente

Vaccine News, The National Immunization Strategy Final Report

Nouvelles des vaccins, Le Rapport final sur la stratégie nationale d’immunisation

News from CBI

Des nouvelles du CBI

Departments

Sections

11

Legal Matters Genes, Cells and LEGO Blocks

Questions de droit Gènes, cellules et blocs LEGO

17

The Federal Perspective In Conversation with Health Minister Ujjal Dosanjh

Le point de vue du fédéral Un conversation avec le ministre de la santé, Ujjal Dosanjh

45

Biotechnology Bulletin: INbrief

Bulletin de biotechnologie : ENbref

43

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada

3


WINTER/HIVER 2005 Publisher/Éditeur gordongroup Tel./tél. : (613) 234-8468 Editor/Rédactrice en chef Rhowan Sivel Copy editing/Révision gordongroup Judith Richer Translation/Traduction Aubut & Associates Sophie Campbell Art Direction and Design/Direction artistique et conception Lee-Ann Hall Cyr Columns/Chroniques Janet Lambert Ray Mowling Rob Van Exan Contributing Writers/Collaborateurs Tony Brooks Minister of Health Ujjal Dosanjh Judy Erratt Theresa Kennedy Konrad Sechley

The official publication of BIOTECanada, the national biotechnology association

La publication officielle de BIOTECanada, l’association nationale de biotechnologie

Register Now Online: www.techvision.com/bpn

3rd Annual BioPartnering North America

For additional copies of/Pour obtenir d’autres exemplaires de insights Tel./tél. : (613) 230-5585 E-mail/courriel : info@biotech.ca Advertising/Publicité Tel./tél. : (613) 234-8468, ext./poste 245 E-mail/courriel : advertising@gordongroup.com Sales Manager/Directrice commerciale Carole Norton Printing/Impression Dollco Printing Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to/ Retourner toute correspondance ne pouvant être livrée au Canada à : BIOTECanada 420–130 Albert Street Ottawa ON K1P 5G4

Canada Post Publication Agreement Number/ Numéro de convention de Poste-publications : 40064931

ISSN 1705-3315

©2004/2005 BIOTECanada Insights. Any errors, omissions or opinions found in this magazine should not be attributed to the publisher. The authors, the publisher and the collaborating organizations will not assume any responsibility for commercial loss due to business decisions made based on the information contained in this magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced, reprinted, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in part or whole, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written consent of the publisher.

©2004/2005 BIOTECanada Insights. Aucune erreur ou omission décelée dans ce magazine ou aucune opinion qui y est exprimée ne doit être imputée à l’éditeur. Les auteurs, l’éditeur et les organismes coopérant n’assument aucune responsabilité à l’égard de pertes commerciales pouvant découler de décisions d’affaires prises à la lumière des renseignements contenus dans ce magazine. Il est interdit de reproduire, de réimprimer, d'emmagasiner dans un système de recherche documentaire ou de transmettre cette publication en tout ou en partie, sous quelque forme ou par quelque moyen que ce soit (électronique, mécanique, photocopie, enregistrement ou autre), sans avoir obtenu au préalable le consentement écrit de l’éditeur.

4

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Vancouver, B.C., Canada Westin Bayshore Resort February 6–8, 2005 A partnership of BC Biotech, BioAlberta, BIOTECanada and Technology Vision Group

BIOTECanada is the national voice for biotechnology in Canada. Together with the Biotech Accord members, it represents 85 percent of Canadian health care, agri-food, research and other organizations working to bring the economic and social benefits of biotechnology to Canadians. Web site: www.biotech.ca.

BIOTECanada est le porte-parole national de la biotechnologie au Canada. Nous représentons, avec le Biotech Accord, 85 pour cent des organisations travaillant notamment dans les secteurs des soins de santé, de l’agroalimentaire et de la recherche pour apporter aux Canadiens les avantages économiques et sociaux de la biotechnologie. Site Web : www.biotech.ca.

BIOTECanada: 420-130 rue Albert St., Ottawa, ON Canada K1P 5G4 Tel./tél. : (613) 230-5585 Fax/téléc. : (613) 563-8850 E-mail/courriel : info@biotech.ca Web site/site Web : www.biotech.ca

BIOTECanada


A message from the President By Janet Lambert, President of BIOTECanada

elcome to this very special edition of insights magazine. I’m proud of this magazine not only for its strong contributors, advertisers and regular columns, but also because it comes on the heels of our successful first National Biotechnology Week.

W

From September 27–October 1, over 100 events, meetings and announcements from across Canada brought the biotechnology community together in an unprecedented way. Here in Ottawa during the biotechnology industry’s first Lobby Day, we met with a number of government representatives who heard our messages loud and clear: Biotech matters. Commercialization is key. Smart Regulations is a priority. We have put together a special six-page centre spread with photos, news and announcements from across Canada. I’d like to thank our sponsors and our members, and to highlight the hard work of the Biotechnology Accord and members of the Biotech Week working group who were hard at work planning this week with us since April 2004. A particular thank you to the staff at BIOTECanada for their creativity, tireless efforts, and sense of fun putting National Biotech Week together so successfully. One of the opportunities I had during Biotech Week was to speak at a BC Biotech Distinguished Speaker Series breakfast in Vancouver about Canada’s need for robust discussion on biotechnology. Without Canadians’ awareness, understanding and support, the promise of biotech in Canada will go unfulfilled. When I think about how Canadians tolerate the absence of fact-based and meaningful debate on biotechnology, I shake my head in dismay. These technologies are transforming our lives, and Canada is a world leader, yet few Canadians are discussing them in a comprehensive way. This silence—occasionally sprinkled with fruitless polemics—is not part of a grand design to hoodwink society or bypass the democratic process. The culprit is the lack of responsible leadership in the various groups that should be fostering debate. We, as citizens, are failing our democracy. And mea culpa, I include myself. I propose we end this passivity. Let all of us—industry, activists, government and Canadians—show responsible leadership. Let’s discuss our interests and explain any gaps between our espoused values and our actions. We industry types say we value people’s opinions. I fear our talk is regarded as glib. We may say that we know that society’s acceptance of the relative risks and benefits of biotech products are an essential part of the business environment that we require for long-term value and prosperity, but we do not always let this knowledge guide our day-to-day behavior. We must do a better job of informing and speaking with people outside our industry. We have to leave our labs and offices, and talk to people who do not wear white coats or business suits. Today’s consumers hear more about perceived risks than benefits. We must show them that the benefits are meaningful, not trivial. We must also show that these benefits are worth the possible risks, risks we are responsibly mitigating. We also talk about biotech’s potential to help reduce world hunger. Can we show that this promise is real, not hypothetical? Can we effectively communicate the range of biotech products that people in developing countries applaud? Activists inject their opposition to biotechnology with fears of globalization, distrust of multinational corporations, and discomfort with the influence of American power. These things are separate. Can they show that they oppose biotech on its own? Which scientific bodies produce data that they trust, data upon which they could base a conversation with industry? Activists should ponder the consequences of their success. If, as in Europe, consumers reject GMOs, the damage to the biotech sector as a whole may well oblige society to forsake environmental and health benefits. Developing countries would be obliged to forsake the potential benefits of higher yields of more nutritious, hardier crops that are better able to withstand the environmental stresses of drought and insects. Can activists justify how the goal of consumer rejection serves their publicly espoused goal of global equity? If not, intellectual honesty would demand that they drop their rejection in principal of GMOs.

6

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada


Message de la présidente Par Janet Lambert, présidente de BIOTECanada

ienvenue dans cette édition toute spéciale du magazine insights. Je suis fière de ce numéro, non seulement grâce à de solides auteurs, aux annonceurs et aux chroniques habituelles, mais aussi parce qu’il fait suite au succès de la première Semaine nationale des biotechnologies.

B

Du 27 septembre au 1er octobre, plus de 100 événements, réunions et annonces partout au Canada ont rassemblé la collectivité de la biotechnologie comme jamais auparavant. Ici à Ottawa, au cours du premier Jour de lobbying de l’industrie de la biotechnologie, nous avons rencontré des représentants gouvernementaux, qui ont clairement entendu nos messages : la biotechnologie compte; la commercialisation est essentielle; l’adoption de règlements sensés est une priorité. Des photos, des nouvelles et des annonces de partout au Canada nous ont permis de composer un cahier central de six pages. Je tiens à remercier nos commanditaires et nos membres, ainsi qu’à souligner le travail acharné des membres de l’Accord de biotechnologie et du groupe de travail de la Semaine de la biotechnologie, qui ont commencé à planifier cet événement avec nous en avril. Un merci tout particulier aux employés de BIOTECanada pour leur créativité, leurs inlassables efforts et leur sens de l’humour lors de l’organisation si réussie de la semaine nationale des biotechnologies. Une occasion qui m’a été offerte pendant la Semaine de la biotechnologie a été de donner une communication dans le cadre d’un déjeuner du Programme des conférenciers éminents de BC Biotech à Vancouver au sujet de la nécessité pour le Canada de tenir des discussions approfondies sur la biotechnologie. Sans la sensibilisation, la compréhension et le soutien des Canadiens, la promesse de la biotechnologie au Canada ne se réalisera pas. La tolérance dont font preuve les Canadiens par rapport à l’absence de débat raisonnable et axé sur les faits en ce qui concerne les biotechnologies me consterne. Ces technologies transforment nos vies, et le Canada en est un des chefs de file, pourtant peu de Canadiens en parlent de façon poussée. Ce silence – occasionnellement entrecoupé de polémiques stériles – ne fait pas partie d’un ambitieux plan visant à tromper la société ou à court-circuiter le processus démocratique. Le coupable serait plutôt le manque de leadership responsable au sein des divers groupes qui devraient favoriser le débat. Chacun, en tant que citoyen, manque à ses devoirs démocratiques. Et mea culpa, je m’inclus.

BIOTECanada president Janet Lambert with Chair Michael Denny and members of the biotech leaders panel at the Biotech Week launch event in Toronto. From left to right: Dr. Cal Stiller, Canadian Medical Discoveries Fund; session moderator Michael Vaughan from ROBTV; Dr. John Mendlein, Affinium Pharmaceuticals; Michael Denny, Orion Securities; and Janet Lambert. See more on page 27. La présidente de BIOTECanada, Janet Lambert, avec le president du Conseil Michael Denny et des membres du panel des chefs de file en biotechnologie à l’activité de lancement de la semaine des biotechnologies, à Toronto. De gauche à droite : le Dr Calvin Stiller, Fonds de découvertes médicales canadiennes; l’animateur Michael Vaughan de ROBTV; le Dr John Mendlein, Affinium Pharmaceuticals; Michael Denny, Orion Securities; et Janet Lambert. Plus d’information sur la page 27.

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Maintenant, je propose que nous mettions fin à cette passivité. Tous ensemble (l’industrie, les activistes, le gouvernement et les Canadiens), faisons preuve de leadership responsable. Discutons de nos intérêts respectifs et tentons d’expliquer l’écart entre les valeurs que nous épousons et nos actions. Nous, de l’industrie, affirmons que nous accordons de la valeur à l’opinion de la population. J’ai bien peur qu’on perçoive nos propos comme des paroles

BIOTECanada

7


(This less categorical position would also reduce the tension between their rejection of GMOs and their support of environmental bio-remediation, as well as the myriad of biotech’s potential health benefits.) Government has a duty to set a public policy framework that fosters meaningful dialogue. At present, much government consultation is cumbersome and timeconsuming and adds little value. It is usually of the hands-on-hips, “get this out of your system” variety, after the research and marketing has been done and after economic actors and institutions have staked claims. Can government design and use better policy consultation processes that answer: What is this for? Does society need or want it? If something goes wrong, who is responsible? Government also has a duty to harness technological progress for the good of all society. Once Canadians get behind a technology, government should do its regulatory duty without unreflectively adding layers of smothering bureaucracy. This is the best way to harness our publicly funded health care system to its competitive advantage: establish expertise that not only benefits us, but can be exported to the rest of the world, and invest in global health care industries home grown in Canada. Why is our biggest health care export cash? Why throw money at today’s health care problems only without thinking of future health care sustainability, and supporting it? Finally, Canadians can show more leadership. We should demand more investment in education to help create a science-literate populace. We should ask bracing questions of industry, activists and government: What risks and rewards do we want? How do your values align with ours? What trade-offs do we choose? Does Canada want to purposefully champion its biotech ingenuity for society’s benefit? Or does it prefer to drift along and possibly forsake it? Let’s start a responsible debate. And let’s start now. As you read through this issue of insights, you’ll understand some of the key issues Canadians are contending with on this technology: protecting our Intellectual Property, educating the next generation of biotech leaders, recognizing the potential of the technology across all sectors. Learn the issues and talk about them. I’ll be leaving the association at the end of the year to reunite with my family in Washington, D.C. Although I’ll be watching the Canadian scene from a distance, I’ll be celebrating its successes. It’s an exciting time in biotech right now, and I look forward to seeing us reach our potential to be a world leader. I look forward to next year’s National Biotech Week and to witnessing continued debate about biotech.

8

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

en l’air. Nous disons en effet savoir que l’assentiment de la société aux risques et aux avantages reliés aux produits biotechnologiques est essentiel à la valeur à long terme et à la prospérité de notre milieu d’affaires, mais nous ne laissons pas toujours l’assurance de cet acquiescement guider nos comportements quotidiens. Nous devons mieux renseigner les gens extérieurs à l’industrie et dialoguer davantage avec eux. Nous devons quitter laboratoires et bureaux afin de nous entretenir avec les personnes qui ne portent ni sarrau ni complet. Les consommateurs d’aujourd’hui entendent plus parler des risques perçus que des avantages. Nous devons leur montrer que les avantages sont considérables, et non futiles. Nous devons également démontrer que ces avantages valent les risques potentiels encourus, risques que nous tentons avec sérieux d’atténuer. Nous affirmons aussi que la biotechnologie pourrait réduire la faim dans le monde. Pouvons-nous prouver que cela peut réellement se faire, qu’il ne s’agit pas d’une hypothèse? Pouvons-nous dresser la liste des produits de biotechnologie auxquels les résidents des pays en voie de développement applaudissent? Les activistes s’opposent à la biotechnologie en invoquant la peur de la mondialisation, la méfiance à l’égard des multinationales et un malaise par rapport à la puissance des États Unis. Ces éléments sont indépendants de la biotechnologie. Ont-ils des raisons de s’opposer à la biotechnologie en tant que telle? Quels organismes scientifiques produisent des données auxquelles les activistes accordent foi, des données qu’ils pourraient utiliser pour entamer le dialogue avec l’industrie? Les activistes devraient considérer les conséquences de leurs succès. Si, comme en Europe, les consommateurs rejettent les OGM, les dommages au secteur de la biotechnologie dans son ensemble pourraient bien obliger la société à en abandonner les avantages sur l’environnement et sur la santé. Les pays en voie de développement devraient abandonner les avantages potentiels de récoltes plus abondantes de cultures plus nutritives et plus robustes, mieux armées pour résister aux stress écologiques que représentent la sécheresse et les insectes. Les activistes peuvent-ils expliquer en quoi leur objectif de rejet de la part des consommateurs sert leur objectif avoué d’équité mondiale? Si ce n’est pas le cas, l’honnêteté intellectuelle voudrait qu’ils laissent tomber leur rejet de principe des OGM. Cette position moins catégorique réduirait aussi la tension créée par l’opposition entre leur rejet des OGM et leur appui à la biorestauration, de même qu’à la myriade de bienfaits potentiels sur la santé de la biotechnologie. Le gouvernement a le devoir d’établir un cadre politique gouvernemental qui encourage un dialogue signifiant.

BIOTECanada


Pour le moment, les consultations gouvernementales en général sont lourdes, prennent beaucoup de temps et ajoutent peu de valeur. Elles sont habituellement amenées poings sur les hanches avec une phrase du style « bon, dites ce que vous avez à dire », une fois qu’on a déjà effectué la recherche et la commercialisation et que les acteurs économiques et les établissements ont déjà établi leurs droits. Le gouvernement peut-il concevoir et utiliser des processus de consultation qui répondent aux questions : À quoi cela servira-t-il? La société en a-t-elle le besoin/désir? Si quelque chose tourne mal, qui en assumera la responsabilité? Le gouvernement a également le devoir de contenir le progrès technologique pour le bien de la société. Cependant, quand les Canadiens appuient une technologie, le gouvernement doit remplir son mandat de réglementation sans imposer d’étapes déraisonnables de bureaucratie écrasante. Le moyen d’employer le système de santé public à son plus grand avantage concurrentiel consiste à créer, par l’investissement dans l’ensemble des secteurs canadiens des soins de santé, une expertise dont les bienfaits non seulement rejailliront sur nous, mais pourront être exportés dans le reste du monde. Comment se fait-il que notre plus importante exportation en matière de soins de santé soit l’argent? Pourquoi payer pour soulager les soins de santé d’aujourd’hui sans penser à la durabilité des soins et au soutien de cette durabilité? Enfin, les Canadiens doivent faire preuve de plus de leadership. Nous devons exiger plus d’investissement en éducation, afin de créer des citoyens au fait de la science. Nous devons poser des questions stimulantes à l’industrie, aux activistes et au gouvernement : Quels objectifs visons-nous et quel prix sommesnous prêts à payer? Comment vos valeurs s’harmonisent-elles avec les nôtres? Quels compromis choisissons-nous? Le Canada défendra-t-il activement son ingéniosité en biotechnologie pour le bienfait de la société? Ou préfère-t-il se laisser guider par le courant et peut-être abandonner ce secteur? Lançons un débat responsable et lançons-le maintenant. À la lecture de ce numéro d’insights, vous comprendrez certaines des principales luttes que les Canadiens mènent en matière de biotechnologie : la protection de notre propriété intellectuelle, la formation de la prochaine génération de chefs de file du domaine et la reconnaissance du potentiel de cette technologie dans tous les secteurs. Découvrez ces questions et parlez-en. Je vais quitter l’association à la fin de l’année, pour retrouver ma famille à Washington DC, mais j’observerai la scène canadienne à distance et je continuerai de me réjouir de ses succès. Ce qui se passe en biotechnologie actuellement est passionnant, et j’ai hâte de voir notre pays réaliser son potentiel de chef de file mondial. J’attendrai avec impatience la semaine nationale des biotechnologies de l’an prochain et la suite des débats sur les biotechnologies.

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Join our growing organization today! We have the tools to help your business reach its full potential … • Government Advocacy: Key issues of importance to the biotech sector • Communications: Issues management and public relations • Networking: Open doors and forge partnerships • Business Tools: Cost savings, international marketing opportunities Visit our Web site for more information: www.biotech.ca

Joignez-vous à nous dès aujourd’hui! Nous disposons des outils qui permettront à votre entreprise de s’épanouir pleinement… • Défence de dossiers auprès du gouvernement : Dossiers clés et cruciaux pour le secteur de la biotechnologie • Communications : Gestion des dossiers et relations publiques • Réseautage : On ouvre des portes et on forge des partenariats • Outil commerciaux : Économies de coûts, occasions de marketing international Visitez notre site Web pour obtenir plus d’information et l’application en français : www.biotech.ca

BIOTECanada MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION FORM

D à

Organization Name: _________________________________________________ Address: _____________________________________________________________ City: __________________________________ Province/State: _____________ Country: ___________________________ Postal/Zip Code: _____________ Web site: _____________________________________________________________

No Ad Vi Pa Sit

Contact Person (1): ____________________________________________________ Title: _________________________________________________________________ Tel.: ( _____ ) _____________________ Fax: ( _____ ) _______________________ E-mail: _______________________________________________________________

Pe Tit Té Co

Contact Person (2): ____________________________________________________ Title: _________________________________________________________________ Tel.: ( _____ ) _____________________ Fax: ( _____ ) _______________________ E-mail: _______________________________________________________________

Pe Tit Té Co

Category (Please indicate):

❏ Affiliate Membership ❏ Corporate Membership

Ca

❏ Academia Membership ❏ Service Organization Membership

❏ Foreign Corporate Membership

Welcome to BIOTECanada!

Bi

130 Albert Street, Suite 420 • Ottawa, Ontario • K1P 5G4 • Canada Tel.: (613) 230-5585 • Fax: (613) 563-8850 Web site: www.biotech.ca • E-mail: info@biotech.ca

42 Tél Sit

BIOTECanada

9


Legal Matters

Questions de droit

GENES, CELLS AND LEGO BLOCKS

GÈNES, CELLULES ET BLOCS LEGO

By Judy Erratt and Konrad Sechley

Par Judy Erratt et Konrad Sechley

nother block has been laid down in the path that defines the parameters of what is patentable within biotechnology in Canada. In a welcome 5-4 split decision rendered May 21, 2004, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) concluded in Schmeiser v. Monsanto1 that a commercial farming operation that was growing canola containing a patented cell and gene without license or permission was an infringement of Canadian Patent 1,313,830 (‘830).2 This decision is important, since just two years earlier this same court had ruled in Harvard3 that a genetically altered mouse was not patentable in Canada.

n autre bloc a été posé sur la piste définissant les paramètres de ce qui constitue un objet brevetable dans le domaine de la biotechnologie au Canada. Dans une décision divisée (5 contre 4) rendue le 21 mai 2004, la Cour suprême du Canada (CSC) a conclu dans l’arrêt Schmeiser1 qu’une ferme commerciale qui cultivait des plants de canola contenant une cellule et un gène brevetés sans licence ni permission constituait une contrefaçon du brevet canadien no 1 313 830 (‘830)2. Cette décision est importante puisque le même tribunal avait statué, deux ans plus tôt, dans l’affaire de la souris de Harvard3, qu’une souris génétiquement modifiée n’était pas brevetable au Canada.

A

Harvard placed Canada out of step with many counterpart jurisdictions including the U.S., Europe, Japan and Australia, where patenting of higher life forms is permitted. As a result of Harvard, the scope of protection of a claim to a gene or cell was unclear—a plant or animal containing a patented gene or cell could infringe claims to the gene or cell, yet the higher life form itself would not be patentable. BIOTECanada, an intervener to the proceedings in Schmeiser, and represented by Gowlings, requested that the Supreme Court address the issue of whether the subject matter claimed within Monsanto’s patent is a “composition of matter,” and to comment on whether a plant could infringe a patent that claims genes and cells that make up the plant. In Schmeiser, the court stated that they were not concerned with the discovery of volunteer or blow-by plants in their fields, nor were they concerned with the social utility of the genetic modification of genes and cells,4 the decision was concerned with whether the patent issued to Monsanto was valid, and if valid, was it infringed.

Validity The ‘830 patent protects Monsanto’s technology pertaining to glyphosate-resistant crops. As higher life forms are not patentable in Canada, it was not possible for Monsanto to obtain claims to the transgenic plants. Their patent, however, contains claims to a chimeric gene and glyphosate-resistant plant cell containing the chimeric plant gene. One of the issues before the SCC was the validity of the patent.

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

U

Avec l’arrêt Harvard, le Canada s’est trouvé déphasé par rapport à d’autres pays homologues, incluant les États-Unis, l’Europe, le Japon et l’Australie où il est permis de breveter des formes de vie supérieures. Suite à l’arrêt Harvard, la portée de la protection conférée à une revendication visant un gène ou une cellule était incertaine étant donné qu’une plante ou un animal contenant une cellule ou un gène breveté pouvait contrefaire les revendications visant le gène ou la cellule, alors qu'une forme de vie supérieure n'est pas brevetable. BIOTECanada, l'une des intervenantes dans l'affaire Schmeiser et représentée par Gowlings, a demandé à la Cour suprême de déterminer si l’objet revendiqué dans le brevet de Monsanto était une « composition de matières » et de présenter ses commentaires sur la question de savoir si une plante pouvait contrevenir aux revendications d'un brevet visant les gènes et les cellules composant la plante. Dans l’arrêt Schmeiser, le tribunal a déclaré que sa décision ne portait pas sur la découverte de plantes spontanées ou disséminées par le vent dans des champs cultivés, ni sur l’utilité pour la société de la modification génétique des gènes et cellules, mais plutôt sur la validité du brevet accordé à Monsanto et, le cas échéant, sur la possibilité qu'il ait été contrefait4.

Validité Le brevet ‘830 protège la technologie de Monsanto se rapportant aux cultures résistant au glyphosate. Étant donné que les formes de vie supérieures ne sont pas BIOTECanada

11


The Appellant argued that the subject matter claimed in ‘830 is not patentable. They argued that if Monsanto’s patent extends to plants, Monsanto would obtain patent protection indirectly to the plants, something that it could not do directly. It was the Appellant’s position that this line of reasoning would render the subject matter of ‘830 unpatentable, following the decision in Harvard.

brevetables au Canada, il était impossible pour Monsanto d’obtenir des revendications visant les plantes transgéniques. Le brevet de Monsanto contient toutefois des revendications visant un gène chimérique et une cellule végétale résistant au glyphosate qui contient ce gène. L'une des questions devant la CSC porte sur la validité de ce brevet.

The minority of the Court agreed with the Appellant.

L’appelant a allégué que l’objet revendiqué par le brevet ‘830 n’est pas brevetable. Il a prétendu que si le brevet de Monsanto s’appliquait aux plantes, Monsanto aurait obtenu un brevet protégeant indirectement les plantes, ce qu’elle ne pouvait faire directement. La position adoptée par l’appelant était à l'effet que ce raisonnement rendrait l’objet du brevet ‘830 non brevetable, selon la décision rendue dans l’arrêt Harvard.

The plant cell claim ends at the point where the isolated plant cell containing the chimeric gene is placed into the growth medium for regeneration. Once the cell begins to multiply and differentiate into plant tissues, resulting in the growth of a plant, a claim should be made for the whole plant. However, the whole plant cannot be patented.5

The majority of the Court did not agree with the Appellant. The claims at issue in the Harvard case were for a nonhuman mammal. The claims to a plasmid and somatic cell culture had already been issued in an earlier Harvard application. The majority found the claims in the Monsanto case to be somewhat analogous to Harvard’s earlier case, suggesting that to find a gene and cell claim to be patentable is consistent with both the majority and minority decision in Harvard.6

12

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Les juges dissidents ont été du même avis que l’appelant. La revendication concernant la cellule végétale cesse de s'appliquer au moment où la cellule végétale isolée qui contient le gène chimère est placée dans le milieu nutritif pour qu'elle se régénère. Dès que la cellule commence à se multiplier et à se différencier en tissu végétal, pour ensuite aboutir à la croissance d'une plante, la plante entière devrait faire l'objet d'une revendication. Toutefois, une plante entière n'est pas brevetable5.

BIOTECanada


La majorité des juges n’étaient pas d’accord avec l’appelant. Les revendications en litige dans l’affaire Harvard concernaient un mammifère. Des revendications ayant trait à un plasmide et à une culture de cellules somatiques avaient été accueillies pour une application antérieure de Harvard. Les juges majoritaires ont jugé que les revendications en litige dans l’affaire Monsanto étaient quelque peu analogues à celles faisant l'objet de l'affaire de la souris de Harvard, ce qui laisse croire que la conclusion qu’un gène et une cellule sont brevetables est conforme tant aux motifs majoritaires qu’aux motifs dissidents de l’arrêt relatif à la souris de Harvard 6. Les juges majoritaires ont de plus déclaré que la question de savoir si la protection par brevet du gène et de la cellule s’étendait aux activités mettant en cause la plante n’était pas pertinente pour décider de la validité du brevet 7.

Contrefaçon L’article 42 de la Loi sur les brevets énonce, en partie, que : The majority further stated that the question as to whether patent protection for the gene and the cell extends to activities involving the plant is not relevant to the patent’s validity.7

Infringement Section 42 of the Patent Act states, in part: Each patent granted under this Act shall … grant to the patentee and the patentee’s legal representatives for the term of the patent, from the granting of the patent, the exclusive right, privilege and liberty of making, constructing and using the invention and selling it to others to be used, …

Both the majority and minority of the Court agreed that Schmeiser had not made the invention within the meaning of section 42. The question therefore, was whether the Appellant, in collecting, saving and planting seeds containing Monsanto’s gene and cell, “used” the gene and cell. The Appellant argued that growing plants did not amount to “using” the patented cells and genes. The majority of the Court found guidance from the jurisprudence. ...the law holds that a defendant infringes a patent when the defendant manufactures, seeks to use, or uses a patented part that is contained within something that is not patented, provided the patented part is significant or important.8

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Tout brevet accordé en vertu de la présente loi… accorde, sous réserve des autres dispositions de la présente loi, au breveté et à ses représentants légaux, pour la durée du brevet à compter de la date où il a été accordé, le droit, la faculté et le privilège exclusif de fabriquer, construire, exploiter et vendre à d'autres, pour qu'ils l'exploitent, l'objet de l'invention… .

Tant les juges majoritaires que les juges dissidents ont convenu que Schmeiser n’avait pas fabriqué l’invention selon l’interprétation de l’article 42. La question était donc de savoir si l’appelant en récoltant, en conservant et en semant des graines contenant le gène et la cellule brevetés de Monsanto « avait exploité » ce gène et cette cellule. L’appelant a allégué que le fait de cultiver des plantes n’équivalait pas à en « exploiter » les cellules et les gènes brevetés. Les juges majoritaires se sont également appuyés sur la jurisprudence. … la loi considère donc qu'un défendeur contrefait un brevet s'il fabrique, cherche à exploiter ou exploite un élément breveté contenu dans une chose non brevetée, à condition que l'élément breveté soit important8.

Les gènes et les cellules brevetés sont importants. Ils « ne sont pas simplement un “élément" de la plante; au contraire, les gènes brevetés sont présents dans toute la plante génétiquement modifiée, dont toute la structure physique est formée des cellules brevetées » 8.

BIOTECanada

13


The patented genes and cells are significant. They “are not merely a ‘part’ of the plant … The patented genes are present throughout the genetically modified plant and the patented cells compose its entire physical structure.”8 In that sense, the cells are somewhat analogous to LEGO blocks: if an infringing use were alleged in building a structure with patented LEGO blocks, it would be no bar to a finding of infringement that only the blocks were patented and not the entire structure. If anything, the fact that the LEGO structure could not exist independently of the patented blocks would strengthen the claim, underlining the significance of the patented invention to the whole product, object, or process.8

Therefore, the majority of the Court found that “saving and planting seed, then harvesting and selling the resultant plants containing the patented cells and genes appears, on the common sense view, to constitute ‘utilization’ of the patented material for production and advantage, within the meaning of s. 42.” The conclusion reached in Schmeiser limits the effect of Harvard, as protection for biological subject matter that has been genetically altered is available in Canada. Tony Creber, counsel for BIOTECanada, commented that “[t]his is an important decision for the biotech industry in Canada as it confirms that inventions directed to genes and cells are patentable. If the Appellant had his way, this would have dealt a serious blow to the industry.” However, this decision is only a part fix, and as suggested by the Supreme Court in Harvard, patent protection of higher life forms needs to be reviewed and clarified by Parliament. BIOGRAPHY Dr. Judy Erratt and Dr. Konrad Sechley are both partners and patent agents with Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP in the Ottawa office. For further information contact judy.erratt@gowlings.com or konrad.sechley@gowlings.com. References

C'est en ce sens que les cellules ressemblent quelque peu à des blocs LEGO : si on alléguait que la construction d'une structure à l'aide de blocs LEGO brevetés constitue une exploitation contrefaisante, le fait que seuls les blocs ont été brevetés et non toute la structure n'empêcherait pas de conclure à l'existence de contrefaçon. Au contraire, le fait que la structure LEGO ne peut pas exister indépendamment des blocs brevetés renforcerait l'action, en faisant ressortir l'importance de l'invention brevetée pour l'ensemble du produit, de l'objet ou du procédé en cause8.

Les juges majoritaires ont donc conclu que « Le fait de conserver et de mettre en terre des semences contenant les cellules et gènes brevetés et de récolter et de vendre les plantes résultantes paraît logiquement constituer une “utilisation" de la matière brevetée en vue d'une production ou dans le but de tirer un avantage, au sens de l'art. 42 ». La conclusion formulée dans l'affaire Schmeiser limite les conséquences de l’arrêt Harvard étant donné que l'objet biologique génétiquement modifié peut être protégé au Canada. Tony Creber, conseiller juridique de BIOTECanada, fait observer que « cette décision est importante pour l’industrie de la biotechnologie au Canada puisqu’elle confirme que les inventions portant sur des gènes et des cellules sont brevetables. Si l’appelant était parvenu à ses fins, ceci aurait porté un coup dur à l’industrie ». Cette décision n’est toutefois qu’une solution partielle et, comme le suggère la Cour suprême dans l’arrêt Harvard, la protection par brevet des formes supérieures de vie doit être revue et clarifiée par le Parlement. BIOGRAPHIE Judy Erratt et Konrad Sechley sont tous deux associés et agents de brevets chez Gowling Lafleur Henderson s.r.l. à Ottawa. Pour de plus amples renseignements, veuillez communiquer avec Judy Erratt à judy.errat@gowlings.com ou avec Konrad Sechley à konrad.sechley@gowlings.com. Références 1

1

Schmeiser et al. v. Monsanto Canada Inc. et al.; Attorney General of Ontario et al., Interveners. 31 C.P.R. (4th) 161–209.

Percy Schmeiser et Schmeiser Enterprises Ltd. c. Monsanto Canada Inc. et al.; Procureur général de l'Ontario et al., Intervenants. 2004 CSC 34.

2

2

Canadian Patent 1,313,830 titled “Glyphosate-Resistant Plants,” owned by Monsanto Company.

Brevet canadien no 1 313 830 intitulé « Plantes résistant au glyphosate », Monsanto Company (titulaires).

3

3

Commissioner of Patents v. Presidents and Fellows of Harvard College; Canada Council of Churches et al., Interveners. 21 C.P.R. (4th) 417–499.

Commissioner of Patents v. Presidents and Fellows of Harvard College; Canada Council of Churches et al., Interveners. 21 C.P.R. (4th) 417-499.

4

4

Schmeiser et al., 2004 CSC 34, paragraphe 2.

Schmeiser et al., 31 C.P.R. (4th) 169 para. [2].

5

5

Schmeiser et al., 2004 CSC 34, paragraphe 130.

Schmeiser et al., 31 C.P.R. (4th) 196 para. [130].

6

6

Schmeiser et al., 2004 CSC 34, paragraphe 22.

Schmeiser et al., 31 C.P.R. (4th) 173 para. [22].

7

7

Schmeiser et al., 2004 CSC 34, paragraphe 23.

Schmeiser et al., 31 C.P.R. (4th) 173 para. [23].

8

8

Schmeiser et al., 2004 CSC 34, paragraphe 42.

Schmeiser et al., 31 C.P.R. (4th) 177 para. [42].

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada

15


The Federal Perspective

Le point de vue du fédéral

IN CONVERSATION WITH HEALTH MINISTER UJJAL DOSANJH

UNE CONVERSATION AVEC LE MINISTRE DE LA SANTÉ, UJJAL DOSANJH

Q: In the October 5, 2004 Speech from the Throne, the federal government referenced the External Advisory Committee on Smart Regulations (EACSR) recommendations released in September, and the importance of a transparent and predictable regulatory system. For Canada’s primarily small and medium-sized biotechnology companies, an efficient regulatory system is key to sustainability. What are your reactions to the report and what are the next steps for the government in implementing the recommendations of the EACSR?

Q : Dans le discours du Trône, le 5 octobre 2004, le gouvernement fédéral a fait mention des recommandations du Comité consultatif externe sur la réglementation intelligente (CCERI) émises en septembre dernier et a fait valoir l’importance d’un système de réglementation transparent et prévisible. Un système de réglementation efficace est vital pour assurer la viabilité notamment des petites et moyennes entreprises de biotechnologie au Canada. Comment réagissez-vous à ce rapport et quelles sont les prochaines étapes à franchir par le gouvernement pour mettre en œuvre les recommandations du CCERI?

Health Canada agrees with the EACSR that regulatory reform should balance social, economic and environmental goals. The department endorses the EACSR’s view that the Canadian regulatory environment should be effective, costefficient, transparent, accountable to Canadians and flexible enough to adapt to fast-paced technological change. My department will review the EACSR report and consider how best to implement the recommendations in its own Smart Regulation implementation plan. Specifically on biotechnology, we will continue to work with partners across government, and with other stakeholders, on a comprehensive Stewardship Framework for Biotechnology that is a natural evolution of the 1993 Regulatory Framework for Biotechnology. It will ensure that a proactive approach is taken on legislative gaps, accessibility of safe and effective products, ethical issues, citizen engagement and emerging issues. One example of the implementation of Smart Regulations is Health Canada's Therapeutics Access Strategy (TAS). This strategy is delivering on the Government's commitments to improve the health of Canadians through timely access to safe, effective, appropriately used, and affordable drugs and other therapeutic products. Health Canada’s Health Protection Legislation Renewal initiative is another example of how the department is applying the principles of Smart Regulation. Health Protection Legislation Renewal involves the modernization of key pieces of legislation that will better protect the health and safety of Canadians. These pieces of legislation include the Food and Drugs Act, the

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Santé canada convient avec le Comité qu’une réforme réglementaire devra pouvoir pondérer les buts sociaux, économiques et environnementaux. Le Ministère appuie le point de vue du Comité voulant que l’environnement canadien de la réglementation soit efficient, rentable, transparent, comptable aux Canadiens et suffisamment souple pour s’adapter aux changements technologiques survenant à un rythme accéléré. Mon département entend analyser le rapport du Comité et essayer de déterminer la meilleure façon de mettre en œuvre ses recommandations dans son propre plan de mise en œuvre d’une réglementation intelligente. En ce qui concerne la biotechnologie, nous entendons continuer à travailler avec ses partenaires du gouvernement et de l’extérieur pour mettre au point un cadre de gestion intégral. Un tel cadre serait la suite naturelle du Cadre réglementaire pour la biotechnologie de 1993. Le Ministère ne manquera pas d’adopter une approche proactive pour aborder un ensemble de questions : lacunes législatives, disponibilité de produits sûrs et efficaces, enjeux éthiques, engagement des citoyens et enjeux émergents. Un exemple de la mise en œuvre d’une réglementation intelligente est la Stratégie d’accès aux thérapies (SAT) de Santé Canada. Cette stratégie vient concrétiser les engagements du gouvernement à améliorer la santé des Canadiens au moyen d’un accès en temps opportun à des médicaments et autres produits thérapeutiques sûrs, efficaces, abordables et utilisés de façon judicieuse. Le renouvellement de la législation sur la protection de la santé est un autre exemple de la façon dont le Ministère applique les principes d’une réglementation intelligente. Ce renouvellement comprend la modernisation de mesures législatives clés qui protégera mieux la santé et la sécurité des Canadiens. Ces mesures comprennent la Loi sur les aliments et drogues, la Loi sur les produits dangereux, la Loi sur la quarantaine et la Loi sur les dispositifs émettant des radiations.

BIOTECanada

17


Hazardous Products Act, the Quarantine Act, and the Radiation Emitting Devices Act. Q: The federal government has committed to new health protection legislation and appointed Dr. David Butler-Jones the new chief public health officer for Canada. What changes can Canadians expect to see toward the development of the PanCanadian Public Health Network? What role will the Chief Public Health Officer (CPHO) play in Canada and how will the Canadian Public Health Network strengthen collaboration among public health organizations nationwide?

Collaboration and working with the provinces and territories to design an effective, coordinated public health system is one of the Chief Public Health Officer’s priorities. Completing work on the Pan-Canadian Public Health Network is key to this coordination and to our ability to effectively respond to public health emergencies like SARS. The network will provide the mechanism for collaboration on public health and will facilitate national approaches to public health policy and planning. The CPHO is focused on providing federal leadership on matters of public health.

Q : Le gouvernement fédéral s’est engagé à adopter une nouvelle législation visant la protection de la santé et a nommé le Dr ButlerJones à titre d’administrateur en chef de la santé publique du Canada. Quels sont les changements auxquels les Canadiens peuvent s’attendre eu égard à l’élaboration du Réseau canadien de santé publique? Quel rôle cet administrateur est-il appelé à jouer au Canada et de quelle façon ce réseau pourra-t-il renforcer la collaboration entre les diverses organisations de santé publique à l’échelle du pays? Une des premières priorités de l’administrateur en chef de la santé publique est de se concerter et de travailler avec les provinces et territoires dans le but de façonner un système de santé publique efficace et coordonné. Un système de santé publique bien coordonné dépendra en bonne partie de la mise au point du Réseau canadien de santé publique; et il en ira de même de notre capacité de répondre adéquatement aux urgences en matière de santé publique telles que le SRAS. Ce réseau fournira le mécanisme nécessaire pour assurer une collaboration en matière de santé publique et facilitera des approches nationales en matière de politique et de planification visant la santé publique. L’administrateur en chef de la santé publique s’emploie notamment à assurer un leadership fédéral en matière de santé publique. Q : Les vaccins sont une industrie importante au Canada : la recherche dans ce domaine s’effectue dans des établissements canadiens sur le SRAS, le diabète et même le cancer. Quelles sont les stratégies en place pour appuyer la recherche et le développement des vaccins au Canada? L’immunisation est parmi les interventions médicales les plus efficaces et rentables. Dans son budget de 2004, le gouvernement fédéral a consacré 300 millions de dollars pour s’assurer que les enfants canadiens ont accès aux nouveaux vaccins recommandés. L’immunisation des enfants comporte de grands avantages pour la société.

Health Canada will continue to use a prudent process of science-based assessment for the potential risks of new biotechnology products.

Pour ce qui est de la recherche et de la mise au point de vaccins, le Laboratoire national de microbiologie s’emploie à mettre au point des vaccins pour plusieurs maladies infectieuses émergentes (virus d’Ebola, de Marburg, de Lassa, de Nipah), ainsi qu’un vaccin pour l’influenza de type H7N3 au moyen de l’utilisation de la génétique inverse. De même, un travail s’effectue pour mettre au point des vaccins pour le VIH. À cette fin, l’Agence de Santé publique travaille avec ses partenaires industriels et universitaires.

Q: Vaccines are an important industry in Canada with research going on at Canadian institutions for SARS, diabetes and even cancer vaccines. What strategies are there to support the research and development of vaccines in Canada?

Sur l’ensemble de la scène canadienne, le gouvernement fédéral appuie financièrement CANVAC (réseau canadien pour l'élaboration de vaccins et d'immunothérapies) au moyen des Centres d’excellence.

Immunization is among the most effective and cost-effective medical interventions. The federal government committed $300 million in the 2004 budget to ensure Canadian children have access to new and recommended vaccines. The benefits to society of having children immunized are significant.

Les Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada financent la recherche en matière de vaccins à raison de plusieurs millions de dollars par année. De même, le Conseil national de recherche effectue des recherches de très haute qualité dans ce domaine.

18

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada


For vaccines research and development, the National Microbiology Lab is working actively on vaccines for several emerging infectious diseases (Ebola, Marburg, Lassa, Nipah viruses) as well as working on an H7N3 influenza vaccine using a reverse genetics approach. As well, there is work focusing on HIV vaccines. The Public Health Agency works with partners in academic and industry. On the Canadian scene in general, the federal government funds CANVAC (Canadian Network for Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics) through the Networks of Centers of Excellence program. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research funds vaccine research to the tune of several million dollars a year. As well, the National Research Council does very high-quality vaccine research. Q: Biotechnology has the potential to improve the lives of Canadians through the food we eat and the medicines we take. Can you comment on your perception of the social value of new treatments and medicines to Canadians, and how it may impact your public policy making? Biotechnology and health innovation are important to Health Canada as new products can help Canadians maintain and improve their health, and lead to better health outcomes. Whether it is new drug therapies, improved diagnostics, more targeted treatments, innovative medical devices, healthier foods, higher crop yields, or a cleaner environment, there is little doubt that biotechnology will fundamentally alter and improve the quality of our lives. Health Canada will continue to use a prudent process of science-based assessment for the potential risks of new biotechnology products. Protecting the health and safety of Canadians and safeguarding our environment are Health Canada’s top priorities when we assess new products, such as genetically modified foods, for consumers. This will be at the forefront when developing policy.

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Q : La biotechnologie offre la possibilité d’améliorer la vie des Canadiens par la nourriture et les médicaments que nous consommons. Comment percevez-vous la valeur sociale des nouveaux traitements et médicaments et quel impact pourraitelle avoir sur l’élaboration des politiques? La biotechnologie et l’innovation en santé sont importantes aux yeux de Santé Canada car les nouveaux produits peuvent aider les canadiennes à maintenir et à améliorer leur santé et donc mener à une meilleure évolution de l’état de santé. Qu'il s'agisse de nouvelles pharmacothérapies, de diagnostics améliorés, de traitements mieux ciblés, de matériaux médicaux innovateurs, d'aliments plus sains, de meilleurs rendements en agriculture ou d'un environnement plus sain, il y a fort à parier que la biotechnologie aura une incidence profonde sur notre qualité de vie. Santé Canada se montrera prudent face à l'évaluation scientifique des risques potentiels associés à l'utilisation de nouveaux produits de biotechnologie. À Santé Canada, protéger la santé, assurer la sécurité de la population et sauvegarder notre environnement constituent les plus grandes priorités lorsque nous évaluons de nouveaux produits tels les aliments génétiquement modifiés, destinés aux consommateurs. Voilà ce qui nous guide lorsque nous élaborons des politiques. Des produits qui peuvent améliorer la santé et assurer la sécurité des Canadiens sont prisés par Santé Canada. Toutefois, il est important de noter que bon nombre de ces produits sont assujettis aux exigences de la Loi sur les aliments et drogues et du règlement connexe avant d’être offerts sur le marché canadien. Mon departement et d’autres ministères continueront à appuyer des initiatives qui visent à élaborer des approches et des mécanismes transparents pour faire face aux enjeux sociaux et éthiques liés à la biotechnologie.

BIOTECanada

19


Products helping improve the health and safety of Canadians are valued by Health Canada; however, it is important to note that many of these products are subject to compliance with the Food and Drugs Act and its regulations prior to coming onto the Canadian market. My department and others will continue to facilitate and support initiatives aimed at examining and developing transparent approaches and mechanisms to address social and ethical issues related to biotechnology. Additionally, as noted previously, Health Canada will continue to work on a comprehensive federal Stewardship Framework for Biotechnology that will maintain our science-based regulations while responding to public expectations to address all the stewardship issues of biotechnology, allowing Canadians to reap the benefits of responsible biotechnology. Q: BIOTECanada met with the World Health Organization Commission on Intellectual Property, Innovation and Public Health (CIPIH) in Ottawa in October. The Commission was meeting with members of the health and biotech communities about the global allocation of R&D incentives for research into products to treat, cure or prevent diseases affecting developing countries. In Prime Minister Paul Martin’s response to the February 2004 Speech from the Throne, he said the long-term goal as a country should 4HEALTH, continued on page 49

20

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

De plus, comme nous l’avons déjà mentionné, nous entendons mettre au point un cadre fédéral de gestion intégral pour la biotechnologie. Un tel cadre maintiendra notre réglementation basée sur des faits scientifiques tout en répondant aux attentes du public relativement aux questions de gestion touchant la biotechnologie. Une telle démarche permettra aux Canadiens de tirer profit des avantages d’une biotechnologie responsable. Q : BIOTECanada a rencontré des représentants de la Commission sur les droits de propriété intellectuelle, l’innovation et la santé publique de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (CIPIH), à Ottawa en octobre. La Commission a tenu des rencontres avec les représentants des milieux de la santé et de la biotechnologie sur l’affectation mondiale de mesures incitatives de R&D visant la recherche de produits pour traiter, guérir ou prévenir les maladies dans les pays en développement. Dans sa réponse au discours du Trône de février 2004, le premier ministre Paul Martin a indiqué qu’à long terme le pays devrait consacrer au moins cinq pour cent des investissements en R&D à une approche fondée sur le savoir afin d’aider les pays moins privilégiés. La biotechnologie offre la possibilité d’aider le Canada à atteindre ces buts et de devenir un chef de file mondial en matière d’aide aux pays en développement. Quelles recommandations feriez-vous à l’industrie de la biotechnologie pour qu’elle contribue à cette initiative? 4SANTÉ, suite à la page 49

BIOTECanada


Money, Money, Money

Une question d’argent

Dr. Tony Brooks, Ph.D., BSc., CA. Senior Manager, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Par M. Tony Brooks, D. Ph., B.Sc., CA. Cadre supérieur, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Biotechnology is an industry that is driven by science. The traditional view provokes images of diligent scientists wearing tired-looking lab coats, staring down microscopes, analyzing data, and working long hours in run-down university laboratories. They do this because they love and believe in what they do. These people are to be lauded because, unlike the rest of us, they are driven, not by financial gain, but by a desire to push the boundaries of our knowledge and achievement in the world of science. They are so intellectually immersed in pursuing their goals that their minds do not dwell on the subject of funding. But the paradox is that biotechnology today is all about money.

La biotechnologie est une industrie dont le moteur est la science. La vision traditionnelle veut que de diligents chercheurs vêtus de sarraus usés travaillent le nez au-dessus de leur microscope, à analyser des données pendant de longues heures dans des laboratoires universitaires ayant connu de meilleurs jours. S’il leur arrive de travailler dans de telles conditions, c’est qu’ils aiment leur travail et croient en ce qu'ils font. Ils méritent nos louanges, car contrairement à la plupart d'entre nous, ce n'est pas l'appât du gain qui les mène, mais le désir de repousser les frontières de la connaissance scientifique. D’ailleurs, la poursuite de leurs objectifs les absorbe tellement intellectuellement qu’ils n’ont pas le temps de penser au financement. Paradoxalement, aujourd’hui, la biotechnologie dépend entièrement de l'argent.

Modern biotechnology is driven by hundreds of small companies that thrive, survive or die based on whether they can obtain financing. Financing is everything as it determines the number of scientists a company can hire, the number of projects that can be advanced, the speed at which those projects can be advanced, and ultimately reduces the time to market that will lead to the best source of financing—revenue.

22

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

La biotechnologie moderne se compose de centaines de petites entreprises qui prospèrent, survivent ou meurent, selon le financement qu’elles obtiennent. Le financement, c’est tout, car c’est ce qui détermine le nombre de chercheurs que l’entreprise engagera, le nombre de projets qu’elle fera progresser, la vitesse à laquelle ces projets

BIOTECanada


Biotechnology financing today So what is the current status of biotechnology financing? Since 2000, a bumper financing year, the biotechnology industry had been in what some had called a financing “nuclear winter.” However, in the third quarter of 2003, the U.S. public markets window opened with a rash of initial public offerings and riding on the back of this, we saw a number of large financings here in Canada. Angiotech raised US$250 million, QLT issued US$172 million in convertible debt and ID Biomedical closed a $140 million bought deal, to name a few. The U.S. IPO window remains open, but it is a very different market than the one that existed in late 1999/2000 because many companies are trading down from their initial offering prices. In the year to June 2004, of 33 IPOs only 16 were trading above their initial offering price by early October 2004.1 What does this mean for biotech companies? If the trend continues, the venture capital (VC) community may become more reluctant to invest as their exit activities are impacted. However, there are signs that the venture capitalists have accepted this new paradigm and the data clearly supports this shift. In the third quarter of 2004, there were five new or repeat IPO filings, and life sciences (biotechnology and medical devices) companies received 25 percent (US$1.4 billion) of all venture capital funds invested in the U.S. in the second quarter of 2004.2 This proportion (compared to all venture investments), remains close to the historic high. Also, in the year to June 2004, there were 366 biotechnology deals for a total of US$4.1 billion dollars invested, which compares well to 336 deals with an aggregate value of US$4.3 billion in the year 2000.2 Clearly there are plenty of investments being made in U.S. biotech companies, but is that translating to investment in Canadian biotech companies? As noted above, Canada’s public biotech companies have had considerable success over the past year or so, but the picture for Canada’s private biotechs is less clear.

Investing in biotech In the year to June 2004, there were 150 venture capital deals with an aggregate value of $505 million, while in 2000 there were 258 with an aggregate value of $826 million.3 This suggests that the financing world is reasonably healthy, but the aggregate dollars being invested

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

évolueront et enfin, c’est ce qui réduit le délai de la commercialisation, laquelle offre la meilleure source de financement : le revenu.

Le financement de la biotechnologie aujourd’hui Mais quel est donc l’état actuel du financement en biotechnologie? Depuis 2000, une année de financement exceptionnelle, l’industrie de la biotechnologie subissait ce que certains ont appelé un « hiver nucléaire » du financement. Cependant, au troisième trimestre de 2003, d'abondants premiers appels publics à l'épargne (PAPE) ont ouvert le créneau des marchés publics américains, et surfant sur cette vague, on a fait un certain nombre d'importants financements ici, au Canada. Angiotech a réuni 250 millions de dollars américains, QLT a émis 172 millions de dollars américains de titres de créances convertibles, et ID Biomedical a conclu une convention de prise ferme de 140 millions de dollars canadiens, pour ne donner que quelques exemples. Le créneau des PAPE américains demeure ouvert, mais on constate que le marché n’est toujours pas ce qu’il était à la fin de 1999 et en 2000, parce que de nombreuses entreprises négocient à la baisse par rapport aux prix de leur premier appel à l’épargne. Des 33 PAPE émis dans l'année qui a pris fin en juin 2004, seulement 16 se négociaient à la hausse au début d’octobre 2004 par rapport au prix initial1. Qu’est-ce que cela signifie pour les entreprises de biotechnologie? Si la tendance se maintient, le milieu du capital de risque hésitera davantage à investir, à cause de la faiblesse de ses mécanismes de sortie. Néanmoins, des signes indiquent que les capital-risqueurs ont accepté cette nouvelle situation, et les données dont on dispose confirment le changement. Au troisième trimestre de 2004, il y a eu cinq appels publics à l’épargne (appel initial ou appel subséquent), et les entreprises de sciences de la vie (biotechnologie et matériels médicaux) ont reçu 25 pour cent (1,4 milliard de dollars américains) de tous les fonds de capital de risque investis aux États-Unis au deuxième trimestre de 20042. Cette proportion demeure près du sommet historique atteint. Toujours dans l’exercice qui a pris fin en juin 2004, il y a eu 366 opérations en biotechnologie pour un investissement total de 4,1 milliards de dollars américains, ce qui se rapproche des 336 opérations de l’an 2000, d'une valeur globale de 4,3 milliards américains2.

BIOTECanada

23


are considerably less than in the U.S. and, if you ask CEOs, private Canadian biotech companies are still finding it very hard to raise finance. Also, when they do obtain financing, they will typically get far fewer dollars. The aggregate dollars per financing in Canada is approximately one-third of what it is in the U.S. This makes it harder for Canadian companies to progress their technology and it takes longer to get products to market. This also negatively impacts the view of potential U.S. investors in Canadian companies, who are already reluctant to invest in companies outside their borders due to long travel times, a lack of understanding of the different tax regulations, and a wealth of opportunities in their own backyards. Another concern is that the proportion of the total dollars invested in Canadian life sciences companies fell dramatically in the second quarter of 2004 as more funds

De toute évidence, on investit beaucoup dans les entreprises de biotechnologie américaines, mais cela se traduit-il par des investissements dans les sociétés canadiennes de biotechnologie? Tel que nous l’avons précisé ci-dessus, en biotechnologie canadienne, les sociétés ouvertes ont connu un important succès durant à peu près la dernière année, mais la situation est moins évidente en ce qui concerne les sociétés fermées.

L’investissement en biotechnologie Dans l'année qui a pris fin en juin 2004, il y a eu 150 opérations de capital de risque d’une valeur globale de 505 millions de dollars, alors qu’en 2000, il y en a eu 258, d’une valeur globale de 826 millions3. Cela suggère que le financement se porte assez bien, mais on voit que la somme totale investie est considérablement moins élevée qu’aux États-Unis. D’ailleurs, selon les présidents-directeurs généraux, les sociétés fermées de biotechnologie canadienne ont toujours beaucoup de difficulté à réunir des fonds. De plus, quand elles obtiennent du financement, la somme en est habituellement beaucoup moins élevée. Les dollars par opération de financement au Canada représentent environ le tiers du même type d’opération aux ÉtatsUnis. Il est donc plus difficile pour les sociétés canadiennes de développer leurs technologies et il leur faut plus de temps pour commercialiser leurs produits. Ce financement plus bas a aussi un effet négatif sur la vision qu’ont les investisseurs américains potentiels des sociétés canadiennes, ceux-ci étant déjà peu enclins à investir dans des entreprises hors de leur pays, à cause de la distance, du manque de compréhension des différents règlements sur les impôts et de la richesse de possibilités sur leur propre territoire. Un autre élément de préoccupation est que la quantité de dollars investis dans les sociétés canadiennes qui œuvrent en sciences de la vie a connu une baisse radicale au deuxième trimestre de 2004, pendant que des fonds plus abondants étaient dirigés de façon plus classique vers les entreprises de TI. Il semble que les nuages quittent le secteur des TI, mais s’installent dans celui des biotechnologies. Le créneau du financement pourrait être en train de se refermer, mais il reste à voir s'il s'agit d’une tendance à court ou à long terme.

24

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada


were directed to traditional IT companies. Apparently as the IT sector heats up, the biotech sector cools down. This may be an indication that the financing window is starting to close, but whether this is a long- or short-term trend remains to be seen.

Get shown the money! There are a number of things that private Canadian biotechs can do to improve their chances of obtaining financing. Firstly, always be in financing mode. Treat obtaining financing as a way of life rather than a cyclical process. Consider raising finance before you need to. In other words, always be ready and plan early. Secondly, build relationships with venture capitalists early and often. These are the people who will play a significant part in the company’s future, so knowing them well is key. And thirdly, leverage existing VC relationships to get access to other VCs that you may not ordinarily have access to.

Faites sortir les dollars! Il y a un certain nombre de choses que les sociétés fermées canadiennes de biotechnologie peuvent faire pour augmenter leurs chances d’obtenir du financement. D’abord, toujours être en mode financement. L’obtention de financement doit être un mode de vie plutôt qu’un processus cyclique. Il faut penser à réunir des fonds avant d’en avoir besoin. En d’autres mots, il faut être toujours prêt et faire sa planification à l’avance. Ensuite, établir des liens précoces et nombreux avec les capital-risqueurs. Ils joueront un rôle important dans l’avenir de l’entreprise, les connaître est donc essentiel. Enfin, utiliser ses relations avec les capitalrisqueurs pour en rencontrer d’autres qu’on n’a pas l'habitude de côtoyer.

Although the domain of the Canadian biotech company remains challenging, the outlook is not altogether bleak. Our universities, as the major source of start-up biotechnology companies, are well funded and still conducting excellent scientific research. We are able to achieve more with less due to our lower R&D cost base. We have an excellent R&D tax credit system that is often the lifeblood of early stage companies. We are attracting more and more expertise from south of the border. Canada's biotech sector is number two in the world based on number of companies, and continues to grow. And several of our biotech companies are achieving greater status in the international arena, which serves to increase our profile and attract greater outside interest. All of which is to our benefit, but it is clear that although the financing environment has improved somewhat over the last year or so, it all still comes down to raising money, and doing that, as a private Canadian biotech company, is no walk in the park!

Même si les sociétés canadiennes de biotechnologie ont des défis à relever, les perspectives ne sont pas complètement sombres. Nos universités, qui sont la principale source de nouvelles entreprises de biotechnologie, sont bien financées et effectuent toujours d’excellents travaux de recherche. Nous arrivons à faire davantage avec moins, grâce au prix de base moins élevé de notre recherche-développement (R-D). Nous disposons d’un excellent système de crédits d’impôt pour la R-D, souvent l’élément vital des entreprises en démarrage. Nous attirons de plus en plus d’experts de chez nos voisins du sud. Le secteur canadien des biotechnologies arrive en deuxième place à l’échelle mondiale en nombre de sociétés, et il continue de croître. En outre, plusieurs de nos entreprises de biotechnologie obtiennent une plus grande reconnaissance internationale, ce qui améliore notre image et l’attrait que nous représentons pour l’extérieur. Tout cela est à notre avantage, mais il est évident que même s’il y a eu une certaine amélioration du côté du financement au cours environ de la dernière année, la clé du succès demeure l’argent amassé, et en obtenir, en tant que société fermée canadienne de biotechnologie, est tout sauf facile!

Resources

Ressources

1

Source: Burrill & Company.

1

Source : Burrill & Company.

2

Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers MoneyTree Survey/Thomson Venture Economics/National Venture Capital Association.

2

Source : l’enquête MoneyTree de PricewaterhouseCoopers/Thomson Venture Economics/National Venture Capital Association.

3

Source: Macdonald & Associates Limited 2004 VC Industry Overview.

3

Source : 2004 Vue d’ensemble industrie du c-r de Macdonald & Associates Limited.

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada

25


cel´e`brate (selu`breyt)

a verb used to describe taking part in special enjoyable activities in order to show that a particular occasion is important.

cé-léb-rer [selebYe] v. tr.

Marquer (un événement) par une cérémonie, une démonstration. By Theresa Kennedy, Chair, National Biotechnology Week y definition a celebration is a fun event that acknowledges that a particular event is important; thus it was a fitting theme for Canada’s inaugural National Biotech Week held September 27–October 1, 2004. As the world’s second largest biotech region (measured by number of companies) it is certainly time to hold a week of national celebrations of Canada’s numerous successes in the biotechnology sector. The week was marked by several cities officially proclaiming biotech week, Gowlings announcing a new scholarship, several companies announcing important deals such as Xenon’s US$157 million deal with Novartis Pharma, and meetings with important decision makers such as BIOTECanada’s organized day on Parliament Hill.

B

The focus for this year’s efforts was to assist in continuing to build the profile of Canadian biotech innovators, researchers and the technology with decision makers and opinion leaders. In addition we looked to increase external communications, in particular with the general public, through a series of events across the country. With more than 70 events and announcements packed into National Biotech Week, our first celebration was an assured success. Next year, in addition to these objectives, we wish to have a greater emphasis on events that directly interact with the general public. 8

Par Theresa Kennedy, présidente du Conseil, Semaine nationale des biotechnologies ar définition, une célébration est l’action de marquer l’importance d’un événement par une démonstration, ce thème nous a donc semblé pertinent pour la première semaine nationale des biotechnologies du Canada, qui s’est tenue du 27 septembre au 1er octobre 2004. Le Canada étant la deuxième plus importante région de biotechnologies au monde (en nombre d’entreprises), il était bien temps de consacrer une semaine à célébrer à l’échelle nationale les nombreux succès du Canada dans le secteur de la biotechnologie. De nombreux événements ont marqué la semaine : plusieurs villes ont officiellement proclamé la semaine des biotechnologies, Gowlings a annoncé une nouvelle bourse d'études, plusieurs entreprises ont annoncé d'importants contrats, tels que Xenon son contrat de 157 millions de dollars américains avec Novartis Pharma, et d’importantes réunions avec les décideurs ont eu lieu, telles que la journée organisée par BIOTECanada sur la Colline du Parlement.

P

Les efforts de cette année ont porté sur l’aide au développement d’une image positive de la technologie, des innovateurs et des chercheurs canadiens en biotechnologie auprès des décideurs et des leaders d’opinion. De plus, nous avons voulu augmenter les communications externes, en particulier avec le grand public, à l’aide d’une série d'activités à travers le pays. Plus de 70 activités et 8

w w w. i m a g e n e n a t i o n . c a thank you to

Founding Partners / merci à Partenaires fondateurs

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada

27


4annonces étant prévues pour la semaine 4The establishment nationale des biotechnologies, un succès of Canada’s National certain attendait notre première fête. L’an Biotech Week is an important step for the prochain, en plus de ces objectifs, nous sector, generating espérons mettre davantage l’accent sur greater awareness of les événements auxquels prennent biotechnology’s directement part le grand public. social and economic L’établissement de la semaine nationale benefits. Canadians, des biotechnologies du Canada est une decision makers and étape importante pour le secteur, car elle the general public sensibilise les gens aux avantages alike need to learn socioéconomiques de la biotechnologie. more about this techLa population canadienne et les décideurs nology, which is doivent en apprendre davantage sur cette increasingly technologie, qui fait de plus en plus partie O’Neill and/et Marie Chantale Lépine, AstraZeneca with/avec encroaching in many David de nombreux domaines de la vie des gens; Lorne Meikle, Toronto Biotechnology Initiative areas of people’s je crois d’ailleurs que toutes les activités lives. With all of the events and meetings hosted I et réunions tenues ont permis d’éduquer un grand nombre believe we have educated a number of people. de personnes. It was an absolute pleasure for me to work with BIOTECanada and in particular I must thank them for their dedication, professionalism and sense of humor over the past 6 months.

Travailler avec BIOTECanada a pour moi été un plaisir total. Je tiens en particulier à remercier ses membres pour leur dévouement, leur professionnalisme et leur sens de l’humour au cours des six derniers mois.

A note of appreciation and congratulations to the Working Group partners and the Founding Partners: AstraZeneca, Aventis, Bayer Crop Science, Council for Biotechnology Information, GlaxoSmithKline, KPMG and QLT Inc. We could not have pulled this off without your participation.

Félicitations aux partenaires du groupe de travail et aux partenaires fondateurs : AstraZeneca, Aventis, Bayer Crop Science, le Conseil de l’information en biotechnologie, GlaxoSmithKline, KPMG et QLT Inc. Sans votre participation, nous n’aurions pas connu une telle réussite.

Preparations for next year’s National Biotech Week have begun. b

Nous avons commencé l'organisation de la prochaine Semaine nationale des biotechnologies. b

BIOGRAPHY Theresa Kennedy is currently the Director of Hill & Knowlton’s North American Life Sciences Practice. In this leadership position, Theresa helps both the U.S. and Canada develop relationships with key stakeholders and companies in the life sciences industry.

BIOGRAPHIE Theresa Kennedy est actuellement la directrice du cabinet nord-américain des sciences de la vie de Hill & Knowlton. À ce poste de commandement, Mme Kennedy aide les États-Unis et le Canada à établir des relations avec les intervenants et les entreprises clés du secteur des sciences de la vie.

Coast-to-coast recognition of the week In addition to the province of Alberta and the City of Ottawa, declarations were made across the country proclaiming National Biotechnology Week. The Government of Saskatchewan and the City of Saskatoon declared September 27–October 1 Biotech Week, and on September 30, the province of Nova Scotia declared Biotechnology and Life Sciences Day. b

Reconnaissance de la semaine, d’un océan à l’autre En plus de la province d’Alberta et de la ville d’Ottawa, on a prononcé des déclarations dans tout le pays pour proclamer la semaine nationale des biotechnologies. Le gouvernement de la Saskatchewan et la ville de Saskatoon ont proclamé la semaine du 27 septembre au 1er octobre la Semaine Biotech et la province de Nouvelle-Écosse a proclamé le 30 septembre Jour de la biotechnologie et des biosciences. b

28

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

w w w. i m a g e n e n a t i o n . c a

Ken Lawless, President and CEO of the Ottawa Life Sciences Council received a proclamation from Ottawa Mayor Bob Chiarelli declaring Biotech Week at the OLSC AGM September 27 in Ottawa. Ken Lawless, Président et PDG du Conseil bioscientifique d’Ottawa a reçu, du maire d’Ottawa, Bob Chiarelli, une proclamation déclarant la Semaine Biotech à l’AGA du CBO, le 27 septembre à Ottawa. Myka Osinchuk, Executive Director of BioAlberta, with Mayor Bill Smith at MLA/CEO luncheon as he proclaims Biotech Week in Edmonton on September 30. Myka Osinchuk, Directrice générale de BioAlberta, avec le maire d’Edmonton, Bill Smith. Il a proclamé la « Semaine de la biotechnologie » à Edmonton le 30 septembre.

BIOTECanada


HIGHLIGHTS

GRANDES LIGNES

Over 40 events held from coast to coast

Plus de 40 activités d’un océan à l’autre

More than 50 announcements made from within the biotech community

Plus de 50 annonces faites par la communauté de la biotechnologie

Almost 2,000 visitors to www.imagenenation.ca in one month making it the most visited page on BIOTECanada’s Web site

Près de 2 000 visiteurs au www.imagenenation.ca en un mois, ce qui en a fait la page Web la plus visitée sur le site de BIOTECanada

2,500 attendees to events across the country

2 500 participants aux activités partout au pays

Over 40 leaders of the biotechnology innovation community visited Ottawa on Lobby Day and throughout the week for approximately 20 meetings

40 chefs de file du monde de l’innovation en biotechnologie on visité Ottawa le Jour du lobbying et durant toute la semaine, pour assister à environ 20 réunions

CREATING A BUZZ IN CANADIAN COMMUNITIES Building on media coverage about the biotechnology industry that reached millions of Canadian households during the week, BIOTECanada partnered with the Canadian Community Newspapers Association to further promote the value of biotech and its potential for improving our lives. With ads and editorial content running coast to coast highlighting Biotech Week announcements and events, the pickup from the partnership showed biotech matters in our communities. Of particular interest were the Young Scientist Footsteps Award and Gowlings National Student Essay Contest. b

FAIRE SENSATION DANS LES COLLECTIVITÉS CANADIENNES Pour poursuivre l’élan de la couverture média sur l’industrie de la biotechnologie qui a touché des millions de foyers canadiens durant la semaine, BIOTECanada, en partenariat avec la Canadian Community Newspapers Association, veut promouvoir davantage la valeur de la biotechnologie et les possibilités qu’elle offre d’améliorer nos vies. Au moyen d’annonces et d’éditoriaux publiés d’un océan à l’autre pour mettre en évidence les annonces et activités reliées à la Semaine Biotech, les résultats du partenariat ont illustré des questions de biotechnologies dans nos collectivités. Parmi les plus intéressantes, mentionnons le prix Young Scientist Footsteps Award et le Gowlings concours national de dissertation (bourse). b

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

MARK YOUR CALENDARS NATIONAL BIOTECH WEEK SEPTEMBER 26–30, 2005

FOUNDING PARTNERS With the support of our 2004 Founding Partners, the inaugural Biotech Week far exceeded its initial objectives. A high-impact comprehensive, bilingual national design campaign was launched in early September with the branding of Biotech Week as a “celebration of imagenenation” on a variety of products. When the Founding Partners came aboard, the campaign grew to include thousands of information kits distributed at events across the country with issue fact sheets such as GM foods, vaccines, plant-made pharmaceuticals and stem cell research informing Canadians about biotech. The campaign maple leaf with helix was displayed on thousands of posters promoting the nearly 40 events, including a National Reception in Ottawa. The new Web site, www.imagenenation.ca, boasted up-to-date, comprehensive event listings and received almost 2,000 hits in one month. T-shirts were also distributed prior to and during the week to raise awareness of the Biotech Week and its partners. The Founding Partners program made this promotion possible and increased exposure of biotech issues to the public. b Congratulations to this year’s Founding Partners: AstraZeneca Aventis Bayer CropScience Council for Biotechnology Information GlaxoSmithKline KPMG QLT Inc.

Lobby Day

:

Conor Dobson, Bayer CropScience Canada, and Judy Shaw, Syngenta Crop Protection Canada Inc., at the BIOTECanada offices in Ottawa on Lobby Day, September 28. Conor Dobson, Bayer CropScience Canada, et Judy Shaw, Syngenta Crop Protection Canada Inc., dans les bureaux de BIOTECanada à Ottawa le Jour du lobbying, le 28 septembre.

w w w. i m a g e n e n a t i o n . c a

BIOTECanada

29


MARQUEZ VOS CALENDRIERS

Biotech Week

a success!

1

SEMAINE NATIONALE DES BIOTECHNOLOGIES LE 26 AU 30 SEPTEMBRE 2005

PARTNENAIRES FONDATEURS

Quand les partenaires fondateurs sont arrivés, la campagne a affiché une croissance rapide pour inclure des milliers de trousses d’information distribuées lors d’activités partout au pays. Elle contenait des fiches d’information sur divers enjeux, comme les aliments GM, les vaccins, les produits pharmaceutiques faits à partir de plantes et la recherché sur les cellules souches pour renseigner les Canadiens sur la biotechnologie. La feuille d’érable et l’hélice et la campagne ont été affichées sur des milliers d’affiches faisant la promotion de près de 40 activités, dont une réception nationale à Ottawa. Le nouveau site Web, www.imagenenation.ca présentait une liste complète et à jour des activités et a accueilli près de 2 000 visites en un mois. On a aussi distribué des T-shirts avant et pendant la semaine pour sensibiliser le public à la Semaine Biotech et à ses partenaires. Le programme des Partenaires fondateurs a rendu possible cette promotion et a accru l’exposition des enjeux de biotechnologie dans le public. b

2

3

Photos gracieuseté de la Chambre de commerce de Vancouver

Grâce au soutien de nos partenaires fondateurs 2004, la toute première Semaine de la Biotechnologie a dépassé, de loin, ses objectifs initiaux. Une campagne nationale bilingue, complète et à incidence élevée, a été lancée au début de septembre, avec l’étiquetage de la Semaine de la Biotechnologie comme « Célébrez l’IMAGENENATION », sur une foule de produits.

4

5

Félicitations aux partenaires fondateurs de cette année : AstraZeneca Aventis Bayer CropScience Council for Biotechnology Information GlaxoSmithKline KPMG QLT Inc.

30

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

w w w. i m a g e n e n a t i o n . c a

BIOTECanada


Semaine biotech

un succès!

1

The Health Care Products Association of Manitoba (HCPAM) Biotech Luncheon on September 30 in Winnipeg attracted over 60 attendees including HCPAM members, Red River College and University of Manitoba students. The keynote Speaker was Sal P. Causi, Business Development Executive—IBM Life Sciences. He spoke about the future of the industry during his presentation 2010, The Threshold of Innovation—A Vision of the Future. Le déjeuner Biotech de la Health Care Products Association of Manitoba (HCPAM), donné le 30 septembre à Winnipeg, a attiré plus de 60 participants, dont des membres de la HCPAM, des étudiants du Collège Red River et de l’Université du Manitoba. Le conférencier invité était Sal P. Causi, cadre au Développement de l’entreprise, IBM Life Sciences. Il a parlé de l’avenir de l’industrie durant son exposé, 2010 au seuil de l’innovation – un aperçu de l’avenir.

2

Panelist Bill Newell, Senior Vice President & Chief Business Officer, QLT Inc., joined Robert Kilpatrick, Partner, Technology Vision Group LLC, and Hector Mackay-Dunn, Senior Partner, Farris Vaughan Wills & Murphy, for a robust discussion about biotechnology in British Columbia. Le paneliste Bill Newell, premier vice-président et responsable des finances, QLT Inc., s’est joint à Robert Kilpatrick, D. Ph., associé, Technology Vision Group LLC, et Hector MacKay-Dunn, CR, associé principal, Farris Vaughan Wills & Murphy, pour une discussion de fonds sur la biotechnologie en Colombie-Britannique.

3

One of the biggest highlights of BioPort Atlantic 2004 was the Thursday evening Networking Reception, which showcased some of the most innovative research being carried out across Atlantic Canada in life sciences. Un des événements les plus importants de BioPort Atlantic 2004 fut la réception de réseautage du jeudi soir, qui a mis en évidence certaines des recherches les plus novatrices réalisées dans la Canada Atlantique dans le domaine des biosciences.

4

On September 29, BioQuebec hosted the Multicentre Research and Ethics breakfast seminar in Montréal. (l-r) Dr. Alain Beaudet, FRSQ; Pavel Hamet, CHUM; Dr. Francois Bertrand, Merck Frosst; Dr. Luc Vachon, BIOQuebec; Isabelle Pean, Innovitech; Bernard Colas, Gottlieb & Pearson. Les conférenciers du petit-déjeuner causerie de BioQuébec – La recherche multicentrique et la déontologie à Montréal (g à d) : Alain Beaudet, D. Ph., président, FRSQ; Pavel Hamet, D. Ph., directeur général, CRCHUM; François Bertrand, D. Ph., vice-président de la recherche clinique, Merck Frosst Canada; Luc Vachon, BioQuébec; Isabelle Péan, Conseillère principale, Innovitech; Bernard Colas, Gottlieb & Pearson.

5

Working Group / Groupe de travail

QUOTABLE QUOTES

“The science is here in abundance. Canadian biotechnology began in 1921 with the groundbreaking discovery by Drs Banting and Best as they introduced human insulin as a treatment for diabetes. Today, Canada is ranked #1 in the world for its stem cell research.” « La science ici nage dans l’abondance. C’est en 1921 que la biotechnologie est née au Canada grâce à la découverte révolutionnaire des docteurs Banting et Best qui firent appel pour la première fois à l’insuline pour traiter le diabète. À l’heure actuelle, le Canada occupe le premier rang mondial dans le domaine de la recherche sur les cellules souches. » Dr. Alan Bernstein President of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research M. Alan Bernstein, D. Ph. Président, Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada “We are at a point in time where a seamless interface is developing between the plant and health biotech sectors, offering us new potential for a quality of life as never before.” « Nous en sommes au point où une interface transparente est en train de naître entre les secteurs de la biotechnologie touchant les plantes et la santé, ce qui donne lieu à des possibilités encore jamais vues en matière de qualité de vie. » Dr. Wilfred Keller Research Director, the Plant Biotechnology Institute of the National Research Council M. Wilfred Keller, D. Ph. Directeur de la recherche, Institut de biotechnologie des plantes du Conseil national de recherche “With a single blockbuster drug in a Canadian-based company, we can ignite an entire industry in Canada.” « La création par une société canadienne d’un seul médicament à grand succès peut propulser toute l’industrie au Canada. » Dr. John Mendlein Chairman and CEO of Affinium Pharmaceuticals M. John Mendlein, D. Ph. Président et chef de la direction d’Affinium Pharmaceuticals “Shame on our political leadership if they do not continue to make long-term, sustainable commitments to Canadian research. Shame on us if we become the hewers of wood and the drawers of water in the knowledge-based innovative global marketplace. We have the beginnings of a real Canadian Biorevolution that contributes to Canada’s wealth. We cannot, we will not, lose that opportunity.” « Nos chefs politiques devraient avoir honte s’ils ne continuent pas de prendre des engagements durables et à long terme envers la recherche au Canada. Nous devrions avoir honte si nous devenons les coupeurs de bois et les puiseurs d’eau dans ce marché mondial basé sur l’innovation. Nous assistons ici au début d’une véritable biorévolution qui contribue à la richesse des Canadiens. Nous ne pouvons perdre et nous ne perdrons pas cette occasion. » Dr. Cal Stiller Chairman and CEO of the Canadian Medical Discoveries Fund (CMDF) M. Cal Stiller, D. Ph. Président et chef de la direction du Fonds de découvertes médicales canadiennes (FDMC)

BIOTECanada Chair, Michael Denny, with Nina Grewal MP and Gurmant Grewal MP. BIOTECanada président du conseil, Michael Denny, avec Nina Grewal MP et Gurmant Grewal MP.

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

w w w. i m a g e n e n a t i o n . c a

BIOTECanada

31


Opportunities for

Opportunités pour les

Young Biotech Leaders

jeunes chefs de file en biotechnologie

Young Scientists Follow in the Footsteps of Watson and Crick’s Discovery of DNA April 2003 marked the 50th anniversary of Watson and Crick's discovery of the double helix structure of DNA. To honour this occasion, the Council for Biotechnology Information (CBI) Canada launched a search for young Canadian scientists who were working in plant biotechnology. This award program has been designed to showcase the excellence of our research community in agricultural biotechnology and the benefits it offers to consumers. Those chosen are Ph.D. (preferred) or MSc. candidates in a recognized Canadian university conducting plant biotechnology research.

De jeunes émules de Watson et Crick, découvreurs de l’ADN Avril 2003 a marqué le 50e anniversaire de la découverte, par Watson et Crick, de la structure en double hélice de l'ADN. Pour souligner cette occasion, le Conseil de l'information en biotechnologie (CIB) du Canada a lancé une recherche de jeunes scientifiques canadiens travaillant en biotechnologie végétale.

The Award includes $5,000 to each candidate to aid with his/her studies. To date there have been five students awarded this prize. In 2005, there will be another round of competitions throughout Canada. Details regarding previous winners and how to apply can be found on the Web site www.whybiotech.ca. b

Martha Mullally of Carleton University receives the Young Scientist Footsteps Award from Ray Mowling of the Council for Biotechnology Information and Janet Lambert, BIOTECanada president. Martha Mullally, de l’université Carleton, reçoit le prix Young Scientist Footsteps de Ray Mowling du Conseil de l'information en biotechnologie et Janet Lambert, présidente de BIOTECanada.

Ce programme de prix est conçu pour illustrer l'excellence de notre collectivité de recherche en biotechnologie agricole et ses avantages pour les consommateurs. Les personnes retenues sont des candidats à un doctorat (de préférence) ou à une maîtrise dans une université canadienne reconnue menant des recherches en biotechnologie végétale. Le prix consiste en un montant de 5 000 $ versé à chaque candidat ou candidate pour ses études. Jusqu'à présent, cinq étudiants ont reçu ce prix. L'année 2005 apportera une nouvelle série de concours dans tout le Canada. Les détails sur les gagnants précédents et les modalités de candidature figurent sur le site Web www.whybiotech.ca. b

National Scholarship Essay Contest

Concours national de dissertation (bourse)

National law firm Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP is pleased to host a national essay contest on the topic “The benefits of biotechnology to Canada.” The contest is open to all grade 12 high school students across the country who plan on attending a Canadian post secondary institution in a life sciences-related field in the 2005–2006 scholastic calendar year.

Le cabinet national d’avocats Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP a le plaisir d’annoncer la tenue d’un concours national de dissertation sur le thème « les avantages de la biotechnologie pour le Canada ». Le concours est ouvert à tous les étudiants et étudiantes de dernière année secondaire de tout le pays, qui comptent fréquenter un établissement postsecondaire dans un domaine lié aux sciences de la vie, au cours de l’année civile 2005.

The winner of the contest will receive his or her first-year tuition as well as an invitation from the Biotechnology Human Resource Council (BHRC) to attend one of their Introduction to Biotechnology Workshops held in locations across Canada throughout the year. This is a chance for all of us to recognize the outstanding opportunity biotechnology offers to young people as they enter a new stage of their academic career. We look forward to having essays submitted from across the country by March 31, 2005. A winner will be announced prior to the fall of 2005. For more information on the contest, including full contest rules and how to enter, please visit www.gowlings.com. Mr. Scott Jolliffe, National Managing Partner, Intellectual Property with Gowling Lafleur Henderson was on hand to announce the new Gowlings Essay Contest after the Biotech Leaders’ discussion at the Toronto Board of Trade Biotech Week kick-off breakfast.

32

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

La personne gagnante recevra un montant correspondant aux frais de scolarité de sa première année d'études ainsi qu’une invitation du Conseil de ressources humaines en biotechnologie (CRHB) à assister à l’un de ses ateliers d’introduction à la biotechnologie tenus à des emplacements de tout le Canada durant toute l’année. Voilà une chance pour nous tous de reconnaître les perspectives exceptionnelles que la biotechnologie offre aux jeunes qui abordent une nouvelle étape de leurs études. Les jeunes candidats de tout le pays sont invités à nous faire parvenir leur dissertation d’ici le 31 mars 2005. Le nom de la personne gagnante sera annoncé avant l’automne 2005. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur le concours, y compris le règlement complet et la façon de participer, veuillez visiter notre site Web à www.gowlings.com. M. Scott Jolliffe, National Managing Partner, Intellectual Property avec Gowling Lafleur Henderson était sur place pour annoncer le nouveau concours d’essai Gowlings après la discussion des chefs de file en biotechnologie, au petit-déjeuner de lancement de la semaine Biotech de la Chambre de commerce de Toronto.

w w w. i m a g e n e n a t i o n . c a

BIOTECanada


IVEY BIOTECH MBA CLASS OF 2004 ON THE MARKET uly 30, 2004—The Richard Ivey School of Business graduated its first Biotechnology MBA class this past spring. Many of the students have already secured a job with various pharmaceutical, biotech and consulting companies such as Biovail, Johnson & Johnson, 3M Healthcare, Mercer Management Consulting, Cytochroma, Conjuchem and Courtyard Group.

J

Created by Ivey Professor Jim Hatch, who recognized the need for specialized management education in the biotechnology field, the MBA Biotechnology Program gives students the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the rapidly evolving field of biotechnology and is the first of its kind in Canada. “There is a strong need in the biotechnology industry in this country for leaders who can manage the range of cross-functional areas while at the same time understand the science of biotechnology. We’ve designed the curriculum in such a way that when students graduate they will have the opportunity to become immediate contributors to the biotechnology industry and to ultimately provide the senior management that is needed in Canada,” says Professor Hatch. Taught by faculty from both Ivey and Western’s Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, and by industry experts, students gain an Ivey MBA along with the essential science needed to successfully operate in a research-driven environment. Also in 2004, the Ivey Biotech Program had the following guest speakers present to the students: Phil Blake, President of Bayer Inc.; Mark Poznansky, President and Scientific Director, Robarts Research Institute; Cal Stiller, Chair and CEO, Canadian Medical Discoveries Fund; and various other industry experts. As impressive as the program, is the list of its advisory council members who help guide and support the Biotech MBA—the most recent member being Picchio International. This list includes Angiotech Pharmaceuticals, Bayer HealthCare, Biogen Canada, Biovail Corporation, Eli Lilly Canada, Ernst and Young LLP, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry (UWO), GlaxoSmithKline, IBM Canada, IMI Inc., McKinsey & Company, MDS Inc., Merck Frosst, Picchio International, Robarts Research Institute, and Torys LLP. For further information, please visit our Web site at www.iveybiotech.com or contact us at (519) 661-3130 or biotech@ivey.uwo.ca.

L’ARRIVÉ DE LA PROMOTION MBA 2004 EN BIOTECHNOLOGIE DE LA IVEY SCHOOL SUR LE MARCHÉ DU TRAVAIL e 30 juillet 2004 – La Richard Ivey School of Business a remis ses diplômes à la première promotion du MBA en biotechnologie ce printemps dernier, et depuis, plusieurs membres du groupe se sont trouvé un emploi auprès d’une société pharmaceutique, de biotechnologie ou d’experts-conseils, telle que Biovail, Johnson & Johnson, 3M Healthcare, Mercer Management Consulting, Cytochroma, Conjuchem ou Courtyard Group.

L

Créé par le professeur de la Ivey School Jim Hatch, qui avait constaté la nécessité d’un enseignement de gestion spécialisé en biotechnologie, le programme de MBA en biotechnologie offre aux étudiants l’occasion d’acquérir une compréhension plus approfondie du domaine en évolution rapide qu’est la biotechnologie, et il est le premier du genre au Canada. « Au sein du secteur de la biotechnologie de ce pays, il y a un grand besoin de dirigeants pouvant à la fois gérer toute la gamme des domaines interfonctionnels et comprendre la science de la biotechnologie. Nous avons conçu le programme de telle sorte qu’au moment de l’obtention de leur diplôme, les étudiants aient la possibilité de contribuer immédiatement au secteur de la biotechnologie en vue de fournir au bout du compte la direction générale nécessaire au Canada », affirme le professeur Hatch. Recevant un enseignement des professeurs tant de la Ivey School que de la faculté de médecine et de dentisterie de la University of Western Ontario (UWO) ainsi que d’experts du secteur, les étudiants obtiennent un MBA de la Ivey School de même que les connaissances scientifiques essentielles à l’exploitation réussie d’un milieu axé sur la recherche. En 2004 également, le programme de biotechnologie de la Ivey School a invité les conférenciers qui suivent à s’adresser aux étudiants : Phil Blake, le président de Bayer Inc., Mark Poznansky, le président et directeur scientifique du Robarts Research Institute, Cal Stiller, le président-directeur général du Fonds de découvertes médicales canadiennes et divers autres experts du secteur. Aussi impressionnant que le programme puisse être, l’est la liste des membres de sa commission consultative, qui orientent et soutiennent le MBA en biotechnologie, le plus récent d’entre eux étant Picchio International. La liste comprend aussi : Angiotech Pharmaceuticals, Bayer HealthCare, Biogen Canada, Biovail Corporation, Eli Lilly Canada, Ernst & Young LLP, la faculté de médecine et de dentisterie (UWO), GlaxoSmithKline, IBM Canada, IMI Inc., McKinsey & Company, MDS Inc., Merck Frosst, Picchio International, Robarts Research Institute et Torys LLP. Pour plus de renseignements, veuillez visiter notre site Web à l’adresse www.iveybiotech.com ou communiquer avec nous au (519) 661-3130 ou à biotech@ivey.uwo.ca.

34

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada


Vaccine News

Nouvelles des vaccins

By Dr. Robert James Van Exan, Director, Immunization Policy Aventis Pasteur Canada

Par le Dr Robert James Van Exan, Directeur, Politique d’immunisation Aventis Pasteur Canada

THE NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION STRATEGY FINAL REPORT

LE RAPPORT FINAL SUR LA STRATÉGIE NATIONALE D’IMMUNISATION

have watched with interest and participated, where possible, in the evolution of Canada’s National Immunization Strategy (NIS) for the past four years. Having been involved with public health immunization programs from the vaccine industry’s perspective for over 20 years, I naturally held great hopes for the beginning of a new paradigm in Canadian immunization programs. For that reason, it was with great anticipation that I read the NIS final report, which was made public in mid-2004.

’ai observé avec intérêt et participé, dans la mesure du possible, à l’évolution de la Stratégie nationale d’immunisation (SNI) du Canada au cours des quatre dernières années. Comme j’ai été mêlé aux programmes d’immunisation en santé publique du point de vue de l’industrie du vaccin pendant plus de 20 ans, j’entretenais naturellement de grands espoirs à l’égard de l’avènement d’un nouveau paradigme dans les programmes canadiens d’immunisation. C’est pourquoi j’ai lu, avec de grandes attentes, le rapport final sur la SNI, qui a été rendu public au milieu de 2004.

I

The National Immunization Strategy evolved under the guidance of federal, provincial and territorial (F/P/T) public health officials. It represents a significant achievement in that it is a government initiative that lays the groundwork for a major Canadian health strategy based on the collaborative agreement between the federal government and 13 provincial and territorial jurisdictions. This is no small accomplishment given that Canada has effectively had 13 different provincially and territorially funded immunization programs. Each jurisdiction evolved its own immunization strategies and programs reflecting not only its unique public health issues and priorities but also the unique political perspectives and budgetary priorities of 13 different governments coming to grips with the larger issues of Canadian health care and the much needed health care reform outlined in the Romanow and Kirby reports. The NIS report outlines five core components: to establish national goals and objectives, to implement immunization program planning, to monitor and evaluate vaccine safety, to establish a vaccine procurement process, and to develop a national immunization registry network. These are supported by four key activities: immunization research, public and professional education, approaches to special populations, and vaccine-preventable disease surveillance. While the core components represent key government responsibilities, each component will require government collaboration with key stakeholders. The supporting activities will require even greater collaboration with stakeholders if the NIS plan is to be successfully and effectively implemented. Key stakeholders include a number of non-government organizations and interest groups that represent those who have a special role to play in the implementation of core components and activities of the NIS. These include groups

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

J

La Stratégie nationale d’immunisation a évolué sous l’impulsion des autorités sanitaires fédérales, provinciales et territoriales. Elle représente une réalisation majeure en ce sens qu’il s’agit d’une initiative gouvernementale qui jette les bases d’une importante stratégie canadienne de santé fondée sur l’entente de collaboration conclue par le gouvernement fédéral et les 13 provinces et territoires. Ce n’est pas un mince exploit, étant donné que le Canada possède, en fait, 13 programmes d’immunisation différents financés par les provinces et les territoires. Les stratégies et les programmes d’immunisation distincts reflètent non seulement des enjeux et des priorités uniques en matière de santé publique, mais aussi les perspectives politiques et les priorités budgétaires particulières de 13 gouvernements différents qui sont aux prises avec les enjeux plus vastes des soins de santé au Canada et avec la réforme de ces soins, qui est exposée dans les rapports Romanow et Kirby et dont on a grand besoin. Le rapport sur la SNI expose cinq grands éléments : l’établissement de buts et d’objectifs nationaux, la planification des programmes d’immunisation, la surveillance et l’évaluation de l’innocuité des vaccins, l’instauration d’un processus d’achat des vaccins et la mise en place d’un réseau national de registres d’immunisation. Ces éléments sont appuyés par quatre activités clés : la recherche sur

BIOTECanada

37


such as the Canadian Coalition for Immunization Awareness and Promotion (CCIAP), the Canadian Public Health Association, the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Nurses Association and the Vaccine Industry Committee of BIOTECanada, to name a few. The preliminary response of the key stakeholder groups is positive and supportive. This is encouraging since the success of the NIS will rely heavily on collaboration between government, the medical community, the private sector and academia. The architects of the NIS wisely sought input from key stakeholders during its development, but to date that input has been limited and without the feedback required to establish a true dialogue and, collaborative approach. This is to some extent understandable given the challenge of reaching consensus between 14 governments, but now

l’immunisation, l’éducation du public et des professionnels, les approches vis-à-vis de groupes particuliers et la surveillance des maladies évitables par la vaccination. Alors que les grands éléments représentent des responsabilités gouvernementales clés, chacun d’eux exigera la collaboration des gouvernements avec les principaux intervenants. Les activités à l’appui nécessiteront une coopération encore plus grande avec ces derniers pour que le plan de la SNI soit mis en œuvre avec succès et efficacité. Parmi les principaux intervenants, on trouve des organisations non gouvernementales et des groupes d’intérêts qui représentent ceux qui ont un rôle spécial à jouer dans la mise en œuvre des grands éléments et des activités de la SNI. Mentionnons notamment des groupes comme la Coalition canadienne pour la sensibilisation et la promotion de la vaccination (CCSPV), l’Association canadienne de santé publique, la Société canadienne de pédiatrie, l’Association médicale canadienne, l’Association des infirmières et infirmiers du Canada, et le Comité des vaccins de BIOTECanada. La réaction préliminaire des principaux groupes d’intervenants est positive et favorable. Cela est encourageant, étant donné que le succès de la SNI dépendra fortement de la collaboration des gouvernements, du monde médical, du secteur privé et du milieu universitaire. Les architectes de la SNI ont judicieusement cherché à obtenir la contribution des principaux intervenants à l’élaboration du document, mais, jusqu’à présent, cet apport est limité et dépourvu de la rétroaction nécessaire à l’établissement d’un dialogue réel et d’une approche axée sur la coopération.

envision the future of life science

From human health to the global environment, advances in the life sciences demand continuous innovation. It takes a focused leader to turn ideas into action. It takes a reliable partner to bring discoveries to light. For the life sciences industry, Invitrogen is both leader and partner. We make thousands of biotechnology research tools that empower scientists. Our leading-edge technologies simplify and enhance research in laboratories around the world. With Invitrogen’s broad range of products and services, scientists accomplish their goals and reach them faster, whatever their area of interest. As an innovator, Invitrogen continues to identify and develop new research tools. The aim: to gear biotechnology to the future.

Invitrogen. Your innovative partner in discovery. Invitrogen Canada Inc. 2270 Industrial Street Burlington, ON L7P 1A1 Tel: 800 263 6236 Fax: 800 387 1007 Email: caorders@invitrogen.com www.invitrogen.com

38

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Cet état de choses est, dans une certaine mesure, compréhensible, étant donné le défi de dégager un consensus entre 14 gouvernements. Cependant, maintenant que le rapport sur la SNI est maintenant publié, il est absolument essentiel d’établir un véritable dialogue et une vraie collaboration entre les gouvernements et les groupes d’intervenants pour que le programme d’immunisation du Canada puisse réussir. L’industrie du vaccin a beaucoup plus à offrir qu’un accès à des vaccins sûrs et efficaces. Notre industrie possède un intérêt fondamental, une capacité et une expertise dans la plupart des grands éléments et des activités à l’appui qui sont décrits dans le rapport sur la SNI.

BIOTECanada


that the NIS report has finally been made public, the time for real two-way dialogue and true collaboration between government and stakeholder groups is absolutely essential to the success of Canada’s immunization program. The vaccine industry has so much more to offer than access to safe and effective vaccines. Our industry has fundamental interest, capability and expertise in most of the core components and supporting activities described in the NIS report. Vaccine research, vaccine safety, security of vaccine supply, vaccine delivery technologies, cold chain distribution, vaccine advocacy and promotion, vaccine preventable-disease epidemiology, and enabling technologies such as bar coding for automated vaccine registries are all part of the industry-wide dialogue that is taking place today with governments, regulators, public health agencies, academia and non-government organizations on a global scale. The vaccine industry is a global industry. Vaccines are researched, developed, manufactured and distributed not just for Canada but also for the world. As a result, the immunization policies, goals and objectives developed in Canada will be to some extent influenced or impacted by the policies, goals and objectives established by government officials, public health officials and regulators in other countries and by organizations such as the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. Implementation of a National Immunization Strategy in Canada will require collaboration and to some extent alignment with global vaccine policies and requirements that influence the access and availability of vaccines and supporting vaccine technologies. The Vaccine Industry Committee of BIOTECanada can provide Canada with information and advice on the global issues and policies that will affect the Canadian immunization program. We look forward to contributing to the NIS with Canadian and provincial governments and all of the other key stakeholders in what we hope and expect to be a transparent and collaborative process that ultimately will make Canada stand out as a significant player in public health immunization. BIOGRAPHY Dr. Robert Van Exan graduated with an MSc and a Ph.D. with distinction from the University of Guelph in 1979. He then continued at Dalhousie University until 1981 as a Killam Postdoctoral Fellow. In 1981, Dr. Van Exan joined Aventis Pasteur (formerly Connaught Laboratories Ltd.) and in 2002 became Director of Immunization Policy responsible for industry collaboration and input in the development of the National Immunization Strategy. Dr. Van Exan was elected the first chair of the Vaccine Industry Committee of BIOTECanada in October 2003.

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

La recherche sur les vaccins, l’innocuité de ces produits, la sécurité de leur approvisionnement, les technologies d’administration, la distribution par la chaîne du froid, la défense et la promotion des vaccins, l’épidémiologie des maladies évitables par la vaccination, les technologies habilitantes, comme le codage par code à barres pour les registres d’immunisation automatisés, s’inscrivent toutes dans le dialogue qui se déroule actuellement à la grandeur de l’industrie avec des gouvernements, des organismes de réglementation, des services de santé publique, le monde universitaire et des organisations non gouvernementales à l’échelle planétaire. L’industrie du vaccin est d’envergure mondiale. La recherche, la mise au point, la fabrication et la distribution des vaccins se font non seulement pour le Canada, mais aussi pour le monde entier. Par conséquent, les politiques, les buts et les objectifs en matière d’immunisation qui seront élaborés au Canada subiront, dans une certaine mesure, l’influence de ceux établis par des fonctionnaires, des autorités sanitaires et des organismes de réglementation d’autres pays et par des organismes comme l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé, l’Organisation panaméricaine de la santé et les Centers for Disease Control des États-Unis. La mise en œuvre de la Stratégie nationale d’immunisation au Canada nécessitera de la collaboration et, jusqu’à un certain point, une harmonisation avec les politiques et les exigences mondiales relatives aux vaccins qui influent sur l’accès et la disponibilité de ces produits et des technologies auxiliaires. Le Comité des vaccins de BIOTECanada peut fournir au Canada de l’information et des conseils sur les enjeux et les politiques mondiaux qui auront une incidence sur son programme d’immunisation. Nous avons hâte de contribuer à la SNI avec le gouvernement fédéral, les gouvernements provinciaux et tous les autres intervenants clés dans un processus qui, nous l’espérons et nous y comptons, sera transparent et concerté et qui, au bout du compte, fera en sorte que le Canada se distingue comme un important acteur dans le domaine de l’immunisation en santé publique. BIOGRAPHIE Le Dr Robert Van Exan a décroché un diplôme de M.Sc. et un doctorat avec distinction de l’Université de Guelph en 1979, puis a poursuivi ses études à l’Université Dalhousie jusqu’en 1981, à titre de détenteur d'une bourse de perfectionnement post-doctoral. En 1981, le Dr Van Exan a joint les rangs d’Aventis Pasteur (auparavant Connaught Laboratories Ltd.). En 2002, il devient directeur de la Politique d’immunisation, chargé de la collaboration avec l’industrie et de participer à l’élaboration de la Stratégie nationale d’immunisation. Le Dr Van Exan a été le premier président du Comité de l’industrie de la vaccination de BIOTECanada en octobre 2003.

BIOTECanada

39


LES RÉSEAUX RENFORCENT LA NETWORKS COLLECTIVITÉ STRENGTHEN CANADA’S BIOTECH CANADIENNE DE BIOTECHNOLOGIE COMMUNITY VWR International offers Canadian companies VWR International offre aux entreprises cost-saving opportunities canadiennes des occasions d’économies By VWR International

Par VWR International

Canada prides itself on its ability to work together across large distances. In 1881, construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway got underway to help link east and west. It took only four years to complete this massive undertaking and it helped build a nation.

Le Canada est fier de l’esprit de collaboration qui prévaut sur son vaste territoire. En 1881, on a commencé la construction du chemin de fer du Canadien Pacifique pour relier l’est et l’ouest. Il n’a fallu que quatre ans pour mener à bien cette gigantesque entreprise, qui a participé à la formation d'une nation.

National networks are a part of Canadian success. An excellent recent example of this is National Biotechnology Week—a program in which BIOTECanada and members of the Canadian Biotechnology Accord worked together to create a comprehensive calendar of events with close to one hundred events and announcements from coast to coast. The Accord, representing regional biotechnology associations in Canada, is helping put Canada on the map as far as biotech research and innovation goes. It promotes the strong science and excellent potential of the industry and its companies. The Accord also allows for cost-saving opportunities to help Canada’s mainly small and mediumsized companies reach sustainability. One program available to Canadian biotech companies part of this national network is a business solution with VWR International. VWR understands that today’s businesses expect higher levels of return on their investments. To accomplish this, VWR’s product selection is always attuned to the changing needs of its customers. Their programs are the result of significant time and resource investment to implement strategies that anticipate customer needs.

Special Product Portfolios In addition to comprehensive selection of major branded products, VWR offers a full line of exclusive products from the VWR Collection, including VWR Signature Products— delivering high-quality and superior performance; VWR Products—providing value at competitive price; VWR Family Brands—comprehensive product offerings designed to meet a wide variety of research needs. 40

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Les réseaux nationaux font partie de la réussite canadienne. Un récent et excellent exemple de cette force est la semaine nationale des biotechnologies, un programme auquel BIOTECanada et des membres du Canadian Biotechnology Accord ont travaillé ensemble afin de créer un calendrier d'événements complet, comprenant près de 100 événements et annonces d'un océan à l'autre. L’Accord, qui représente des associations régionales canadiennes de biotechnologie, participe à faire connaître partout la recherche et l’innovation en biotechnologie du Canada. Il fait la promotion des profondes connaissances scientifiques que possèdent les entreprises ainsi que de leur excellent potentiel. L’Accord fournit aussi des occasions d’économies qui aident le secteur canadien, surtout composé de PME, à atteindre la durabilité économique. Un des programmes offerts aux entreprises canadiennes de biotechnologie qui font partie de ce réseau est l'ensemble de solutions commerciales de VWR International. VWR sait que les sociétés d’aujourd’hui visent un meilleur rendement du capital investi. Afin de les y aider, VWR harmonise sa gamme de produits avec les besoins en constante évolution de ses clients. Cette société investit une somme considérable de temps et de ressources à élaborer des stratégies dont la mise en œuvre permet aux clients de prévoir les besoins à venir.

Les groupes de produits exclusifs En plus d’un vaste éventail de produits de grandes marques, VWR offre en exclusivité sa Collection VWR, une gamme complète qui comprend : les produits VWR Signature, de BIOTECanada


Programs That Increase Customer Productivity A global organization, VWR offers a number of dedicated support programs to meet the needs of each localized customer, including VWR bioMarke Life Science Program, VWR Safety Program, and the BIO/BIOTECanada Partnership. BIO and BIOTECanada have partnered with VWR International to work together by sharing ideas, resources and common values to create value by establishing efficient and effective processes that consistently produce excellent results that are geared toward total end-user satisfaction in the Canadian Life Science marketplace. The overall goal is to provide members of BIO and BIOTECanada an exclusive cost-savings program through pre-negotiated pricing and terms on the purchase of laboratory products from VWR International. For over 150 years, VWR International has supported customers through a combination of strength, vision and innovation. The company believes in customer focus, strong relationships with major manufacturers, customized programs, technological innovation and global distribution.

International Networks To be the most successful distributor for people engaged in science demands both distribution and process excellence. To be a global leader, you need a global distribution network. VWR’s network consists of 15 strategically located distribution centres spread throughout North America and Europe. VWR is by far the largest independent distributor of scientific supplies in Europe, and currently offers the only integrated pan-European distribution system. Additionally, VWR maintains more then 30 smaller regional service centres and a number of “Just in Time” facilities. Among its many geographic markets, VWR International offers over 750,000 proven products in total from more then 5,000 leading scientific product manufacturers. The company markets to a global clientele using the resources of 6,000 employees, a comprehensive library of catalogues produced in more then 10 different languages and a content-driven, easy-to-use Web site, www.vwr.com. Over time and with innovation, national and international networks have grown and changed in scale from relying on steel and wheels to relying on the telephone and internet, but they remain as important as ever. Groups such as the Biotech Accord are connecting industries and researchers across the country through initiatives that include business solutions. To find out more about the Biotech Accord, visit www.biotech.ca. For more information on the products and services offered by VWR, call 1-800-932-500 toll free or visit www.vwr.com. VWR International is a 2004 BIOTECanada Platinum Sponsor. VWR International est un commanditaire platine de BIOTECanada pour 2004.

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

qualité élevée et de performance supérieure; les produits VWR, de qualité, à prix concurrentiels; les ensembles VWR Family, complets et conçus pour répondre à un grand nombre de besoins de recherche.

Les programmes qui augmentent la productivité des clients En tant qu’organisation mondiale, VWR offre un certain nombre de programmes de soutien spécialisés, afin de répondre aux besoins de chaque client dans sa région, dont : le VWR bioMarke Life Science Program, le VWR Safety Program et le partenariat avec BIO et BIOTECanada. BIO et BIOTECanada se sont associés à VWR International pour un partage commun d’idées, de ressources et de valeurs, afin de produire des résultats d’excellence constante grâce à l’adoption de processus efficients et efficaces, visant l’entière satisfaction de l’utilisateur final au sein du marché canadien des sciences de la vie. Le but global de cette association est de fournir aux membres de BIO et de BIOTECanada un programme exclusif permettant une réduction des coûts d’achat des produits de laboratoire auprès de VWR International par la négociation de prix et de modalités de paiement. Depuis plus de 150 ans, VWR International appuie ses clients par sa force, sa vision et son innovation. L’entreprise privilégie l’approche axée sur le client, les relations solides avec les fabricants, les programmes personnalisés, l’innovation technologique et la distribution globale.

Les réseaux internationaux Être le plus important distributeur de produits scientifiques exige l’excellence en matière de distribution et de processus. Pour être un chef de file mondial, on doit avoir un réseau de distribution mondial. Le réseau de VWR consiste en 15 centres de distribution stratégiquement répartis à travers l’Amérique du Nord et l’Europe. VWR est de loin le plus gros distributeur de fournitures scientifiques indépendant d’Europe, et actuellement, il est le seul à offrir un système de distribution paneuropéen. De plus, VWR exploite plus de 30 petits centres de services régionaux et un certain nombre d’installations de livraison « juste à temps ». Parmi ses nombreux marchés géographiques, VWR International vend plus de 750 000 produits reconnus de plus de 5 000 fabricants de produits scientifiques de premier rang. L’entreprise commercialise ses produits auprès d'une clientèle mondiale grâce à ses 6 000 employés, à un ensemble complet de catalogues rédigés en plus de 10 langues et à un site Web convivial, axé sur le contenu (www.vwr.com). Au fil du temps et des découvertes, les réseaux nationaux et internationaux ont grandi et sont passés de la base de l'acier à celle de la fibre optique, mais ils conservent toute leur importance. Des groupes tels que le Biotech Accord relient les industries et les chercheurs de partout au pays grâce à différents projets et solutions commerciales. Pour en savoir davantage sur le Biotech Accord, veuillez visiter le site www.biotech.ca. Pour plus de renseignements sur les produits et services de VWR, veuillez visiter le site www.vwr.com. BIOTECanada

41


News from CBI

Des nouvelles du CBI

By Ray Mowling, Executive Director, Council for Biotechnology Information (Canada)

Par Ray Mowling, directeur général du Conseil de l’information en biotechnologie (Canada)

For more information please visit: www.whybiotech.com

Pour de plus amples renseignements, visitez le site : www.whybiotech.com

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY PROTECTION AND RESEARCH INVESTMENT UNDERSCORE CANADA’S STRENGTHS IN AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY

LA PROTECTION DE LA PROPRIÉTÉ INTELLECTUELLE ET LES INVESTISSEMENTS EN RECHERCHE ILLUSTRENT LES FORCES DU CANADA EN BIOTECHNOLOGIE AGRICOLE

he Canadian biotech railway is a concept introduced by Canadian biotech leaders, including the National Research Council’s Dr. Arthur Carty, Canada’s first National Science Advisor to the Prime Minister. As the application of biotechnology expands across surprising and diverse industries, a railway is an appropriate image to captivate the collective Canadian psyche about the need to harness the new bio-economy and get it on track. From gene therapy in humans to healthier biotech foods in supermarkets to biomass shingles in the corner hardware store, such applications owe their existence to a common origin: our fundamental understanding of DNA structure.

a voie canadienne des biotechnologies est un concept mis de l’avant par des chefs de file canadiens de la biotechnologie, dont le Dr Arthur Carty du Conseil national de recherches, le premier conseiller scientifique national du premier ministre du Canada. Alors que se diversifient de façon étonnante les applications de la biotechnologie dans l’industrie, l’image de la voie ferrée est bien choisie pour attirer l’attention collective des Canadiens sur le besoin de tirer partie de la nouvelle bioéconomie et de la mettre en route. Des applications qui vont de la thérapie génique chez l’humain à l’assainissement des aliments par le génie génétique en passant par les tuiles de biomasse de la quincaillerie ont une origine commune : l’approfondissement de notre compréhension de la structure de l’ADN.

T

Happily, agricultural biotechnology is succeeding around the world, both in research and in products being brought to market. Canadian farmers have exemplified that success by planting the biggest biotech acreage ever in 2004: 13 million acres. Even though adoption rates remained relatively stable compared to a year ago at about 77 percent for canola and 53 percent for soybean and corn, total acres planted increased as a whole. According to the Canola Council of Canada, 9.8 million acres of canola planted was biotech, Ontario, Quebec and Manitoba reported a record 1.6 million acres of biotech soybeans with approximately the same acreage being planted to biotech corn. While farmers are seen to be the enthusiastic early adopters of these new biotech products, made-in-Canada research and an open registration process contribute significantly to such success. It should come as no surprise that Canadian universities are leading the charge in bio-economy research. When the Council for Biotechnology Information (CBI) recently offered ten $500 travel bursary prizes for post-graduate students to attend the 2nd Canadian Plant Genomics Workshop in Quebec City, applications were received from 12 Canadian universities. The winners— Masters and Ph.D. candidates—are all under thirty years old and represent a wide range of biotechnology research, from cold and drought tolerance in crops to allergen identification in food. This is good news for Canada’s biotech research capability.

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

L

L’agrobiotechnologie remporte des succès partout dans le monde, tant en recherche que dans la mise en marché de nouveaux produits. Un exemple de ce succès est la surface record ensemencée de cultures biotechnologiques par les agriculteurs canadiens en 2004 : 5,3 millions d’hectares. Bien que les taux d’adoption demeurent relativement inchangés par rapport à l’année dernière (77 pour cent environ pour le canola et 53 pour cent environ pour le soja et le maïs), les superficies ensemencées se sont accrues. Selon le Conseil canadien du canola, 4 millions d’hectares ensemencés en canola l’ont été avec des cultures biotechnologiques. L’Ontario, le Québec et le Manitoba ont de leur côté annoncé que la surface ensemencée en soja biotechnologique avait atteint le chiffre record de 650 000 hectares, la surface ensemencée en maïs biotechnologique étant à peu près la même. Les agriculteurs sont perçus comme les adopteurs précoces enthousiastes de ces nouveaux produits issus des biotechnologies, mais la recherche faite au Canada et l’ouverture du processus d’enregistrement contribuent aussi de façon importante à ce succès. Et comme on pouvait s’y attendre, ce sont les universités qui ouvrent la voie en recherche sur la bioéconomie : quand le Conseil de l’information en biotechnologie (CIB) a offert récemment aux étudiants diplômés dix bourses de voyage de 500 $ pour leur permettre d’assister au 2e Atelier canadien sur la génomique des plantes à Québec, il a reçu des demandes de 12 universités

BIOTECanada

43


Underpinning Canada’s bio-economy and the development of new products, of course, is intellectual property (IP) protection and patent law. Although Canadian farmers have overwhelmingly shown their willingness to honour IP rights in exchange for access to patented seed, the application of patent law in Canada was tested in the Monsanto vs. Schmeiser civil case appealed to the Supreme Court on January 20, 2004. The Court’s 5-4 landmark decision in May confirmed that genes and cells can be patented, and that plants incorporating such genes and cells are subject to protection. Importantly, the decision also made clear that patent infringement only occurs when damage or loss is caused by use of the patented trait or characteristic. This means that researchers can possess patented material for experimental use without fear of patent infringement. Obviously our researchers cannot work in isolation and few recent collaborations have been more impressive than the one between the Beijing Genomics Institute and a team from Syngenta. Together, in late 2003, they completed the draft rice genome sequence for two rice varieties: indica and japonica. Developers now have a systematic approach to characterizing the 50,000 rice genes that control such complex traits as yield, abiotic stress and flowering cycles. And, as Dr. Randal Johnson of Genome Prairie aptly points out, since rice is the first cereal grain and first monocot species to have its genome fully sequenced, it represents the entry point for other grasses such as wheat, barley and corn. While this work was being done, halfway around the world another biotech rice success story was in the making. For years, researchers had been trying to cross a high-yielding Asian rice with an ancient, hardy African rice to create a new variety suitable for African growing conditions. Using genetic marker data, success has finally been achieved with NERICA, an upland rice currently being widely adopted across sub-Saharan Africa. It is fitting that NERICA, a product of biotechnology, should earn West Africa Rice Development Agency (WARDA) researcher Monty Jones a co-share in the prestigious World Food Prize for 2004, a year chosen by the U.N. to be the International Year of Rice. These milestones are significant in that they prove the power of our research, the confidence of our new technology adopters, and the magnitude of the benefits biotechnology can deliver to society and the environment. In addition to ongoing efforts to develop new products and bring them to market, the job that lies ahead is to effectively communicate that biotechnology is a process common to a broad range of scientific advances, whether they be in agriculture, medicine, resources or manufacturing.

44

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

canadiennes. Les gagnants – des candidats à la maîtrise et au doctorat – ont tous moins de trente ans et représentent un vaste éventail de recherches en biotechnologie, de la tolérance des récoltes au froid et à la sécheresse à l’identification des allergènes dans les aliments. C’est une bonne nouvelle pour la capacité de recherche canadienne en biotechnologie. La vitalité de la bioéconomie et de la mise au point de nouveaux produits au Canada repose en partie sur la protection de la propriété intellectuelle (PI) et la Loi sur les brevets. Bien que les agriculteurs canadiens aient dans leur immense majorité montré qu’ils étaient disposés à respecter la PI en échange de l’accès à des semences brevetées, l’application de la Loi sur les brevets au Canada a été mise à l’épreuve dans l’affaire civile Monsanto c. Schmeiser qui a été portée en appel devant la Cour suprême le 20 janvier 2004. La décision historique de la Cour rendue par 5 voies contre 4 en mai 2004 a confirmé que les gènes et les cellules pouvaient être brevetés et que les plantes qui contiennent de tels gènes ou cellules font l’objet d’une protection. Chose importante, la décision stipulait aussi clairement qu’il n’y avait violation de brevet que lorsque qu’un tort ou une perte était causé par l’utilisation de la caractéristique ou du caractère breveté. Cela signifie que les chercheurs peuvent posséder du matériel breveté à des fins expérimentales sans craindre la violation de brevet. Manifestement, nos chercheurs ne peuvent travailler seuls et peu de collaborations récentes ont produit des résultats plus impressionnants que celle du Beijing Genomics Institute et d’une équipe de Syngenta. Ensemble, à la fin de 2003, ils ont terminé un premier séquençage du génome de deux variétés de riz : indica et japonica. Les chercheurs possèdent maintenant une approche systématique à la caractérisation des 50 000 gènes du riz qui contrôlent des caractères aussi complexes que le rendement, la résistance au stress abiotique et les cycles de floraison. Et comme le Dr Randal Johnson de Genome Prairie l’a souligné, le riz étant la première céréale et la première espèce monocotylédone dont on ait achevé le séquençage du génome, il représente une fenêtre ouverte sur le génome d’autres graminées comme le blé, l’orge et le maïs. Entre-temps, à l’autre bout du monde, la biotechnologie du riz était sur le point de remporter un autre succès. Depuis des années, les chercheurs essayaient de croiser un riz asiatique à haut rendement et un ancien riz africain robuste pour créer une nouvelle variété convenant aux conditions de culture de l’Afrique. Grâce aux données sur les marqueurs génétiques, ils y sont enfin parvenus avec NERICA, un riz pluvial dont l’adoption est en train de se répandre à travers l’Afrique sub-saharienne. Ce n’est que justice que NERICA, un produit de la biotechnologie, ait valu à Monty Jones, chercheur à la West Africa Rice Development Agency (WARDA), de partager le prestigieux World Food Prize de 2004, une année désignée par l’ONU comme l’Année internationale du riz. Ces jalons sont importants en ce qu’ils illustrent la puissance de notre recherche, la confiance des adopteurs des nouvelles technologies et l’ampleur des avantages que la biotechnologie peut procurer à la société et à l’environnement. Outre les efforts en cours consacrés à la mise au point de nouveaux produits et à leur mise en marché, il faudra aussi réussir à faire comprendre que la biotechnologie est un processus commun à une vaste gamme d’avancées scientifiques, tant en agriculture et en médecine qu’en gestion des ressources ou dans le secteur manufacturier.

BIOTECanada


Biotechnology Bulletin

TEN THINGS THE LIFE SCIENCES WORLD NEEDS TO KNOW ABOUT CANADA C

anada has some great messages to share with the world about our innovation capacity, large talent pool and appealing investment environment. For example, a proud Canadian milestone this year is that, for the fifth consecutive time, the 2004 KPMG Competitive Alternatives international business cost study ranked Canada the lowest-cost G-7 country in which to do business. It also ranked Canada as the most competitive country in nine of 17 sectors, including biomedical research. “Through smart investment in our people and institutions, Canada has developed a real talent and capacity in the life sciences.” Speaking at BIO 2004 in San Francisco, Colin Robertson, Consul General of Canada in California offered that remark to a large audience interested in how to spread the Canadian message. Here’s what he said the life sciences world needs to know about Canada to answer that most common question asked by investors, “Why Canada?” We’ve got the talent and we’re bringing in more of it. Immigrants are a vital part of the creative community. In Canada, we celebrate multiculturalism and value bilingualism. Tolerance and diversity are integral to our public policy approach and are increasingly determinants in site location.

We’re committed to learning. Education is a priority. We make learning fun and as a result, Canada has the fastest rate of growth in the number of workers devoted to R&D, in external patent applications, and in business expenditures on R&D among G-7 countries. We’ve got history. Canada has been a player in the life sciences industry for decades—from Banting and Best to Michael Smith to all the hardworking researchers in our universities and research labs. We’ve got depth. Nearly 500 Canadian biotech companies across a broad range of sectors are doing research, including in both human and animal health areas. We’re close. A quick flight takes you to North American biotech clusters.

4TOP TEN, continued on page 46

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

Bulletin de biotechnologie

DIX CHOSES QUE LE MILIEU DES SCIENCES DE LA VIE DEVRAIT SAVOIR AU SUJET DU CANADA e Canada a d’importants messages à partager avec le reste du monde au sujet de sa capacité à innover, de son vaste bassin de talents et de l’attrait de son environnement d’investissement.

L

Par exemple, une réalisation dont le pays est fier cette année est que pour la cinquième fois, l’étude internationale 2004 de KPMG sur le prix d’exploitation d’une entreprise Competitive Alternatives a classé le Canada comme le pays du G-7 où il coûte le moins cher de faire des affaires. L’étude a aussi désigné le Canada comme le pays détenant le plus grand avantage concurrentiel dans 9 des 17 secteurs, y compris celui de la recherche biomédicale. « Grâce à un investissement judicieux dans ses ressources humaines et ses différents établissements, le Canada a produit de réels talents et une vraie capacité en sciences de la vie. » [traduction] Lors d’une conférence au congrès BIO 2004 à San Francisco, le consul général du Canada en Californie a adressé cette remarque à un vaste auditoire qui souhaitait savoir comment diffuser le message canadien. Voici aussi ce que selon ses dires le milieu des sciences de la vie doit savoir au sujet du Canada pour pouvoir répondre à la question si courante de la part des investisseurs : « Pourquoi le Canada? » Nous avons de précieux talents et en recevons sans cesse de nouveaux. Les immigrants constituent un groupe essentiel du milieu créateur. Au Canada, nous célébrons le multiculturalisme et accordons une grande valeur au bilinguisme. La tolérance et la diversité font partie intégrante de nos politiques publiques et jouent un rôle déterminant dans le choix des emplacements. Nous avons des engagements en matière d’apprentissage. L’éducation est une priorité. Nous rendons l’apprentissage amusant, et par conséquent, le Canada a le plus haut taux de croissance du nombre de travailleurs qui font de la recherche-développement (R.D.), des demandes de brevets externes et des dépenses commerciales en R.D. parmi les pays du G-7. Nous avons une longue expérience. Le Canada est un acteur du secteur des sciences de la vie depuis des décennies : de l’institut Banting and Best à Michael Smith, en passant par tous les dévoués chercheurs de nos universités et laboratoires de recherche. Nous avons un profond champ d’expertise. Près de 500 entreprises de biotechnologie canadiennes d’une vaste gamme de secteurs font de la 4DIX CHOSES, suite à la page 47

BIOTECanada

45


AWARDING EXCELLENCE IN CANADIAN BIOTECH he inaugural Prix Galien Biotechnology Award was presented this year in Montréal, building upon a well-established and prestigious annual award program in the field of Canadian pharmaceutical research and innovation. The annual prize, the Nobel Prize of the pharmaceutical industry, represents one of the highest honours in the pharmaceutical industry.

T

Originating in France, the awards are now received in many other European countries. In 1994, the award was handed out in Canada, making it the first North American country to recognize the efforts and achievements of pharmaceutical research and development.

4TOP TEN, from page 45 We’re connected. Canada is the most wired nation of our geographic size in the world. We pioneer in tele-health, and doctors in Alberta direct operations on patients in the far north. We’re “best value.” In addition to KPMG’s ranking, Canada is ranked as the top place to do business by the Economist and one of the best places to raise a family by the U.N. We share with America a commitment to reward innovation and protect the rights of our creative community. We can be proud of what we are doing in life sciences in Canada. Like the moose, we’re big enough to make a difference in the world, but, like the mouse, small enough to be an incubator for change, to experiment in new ways of doing things. We have made a virtue of good governance and working collaboratively in the public interest. All levels of government are working together for success. We partner well and we’ve taken that approach across the border and internationally. Public-private partnerships. We do it best— Genome Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research. <

46

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

From 1994 to 2003, the Prix Galien was composed of the Prix Galien—Research and the Prix Galien—Innovative Drug Product. With the addition of the third award category, the Prix Galien— Biotechnology, the program now recognizes a Canadian emerging biotech company evolving in healthcare or in a related field that have made a significant contribution in terms of innovation. On October 12, 2004, in Montréal, this honour was awarded to Ecopia BioSciences Inc. for development of its powerful discovery platform, DECIPHER® technology, which improves the identification of lead compounds in bacteria and unveils their enormous potential as a source of new drugs. DECIPHER® technology uses a combination of genomics and bioinformatics to probe bacteria for new drugs, which can then be isolated using leading-edge chemistry. <

PLANTING CURES A European example of plant-made pharmaceutical development Treatments for AIDS, diabetes, rabies and tuberculosis are among the many potential applications for a new project using genetically modified crops to produce vaccines and other pharmaceutical drugs. In July 2004, Pharma-Planta, a consortium of 39 academic and research institutions in 11 European countries and South Africa, received 12 million Euros from the European Union 6th Framework Programme. The EU Framework was designed to create a true European research area and of the 17.5 billion Euros committed to the project, life sciences, genomics and biotechnology for health will receive just over 2.2 billion Euros. The five years of funding will be used to perfect techniques for the production of antibodies and vaccines. Project organizers say plants provide the opportunity to inexpensively produce modern medicines in high enough quantities, making them available to everyone, especially developing nations where the needs are great. One of the program goals is to show plants can be used safely to produce pharmaceuticals. Currently, plant-made pharmaceuticals are subject to a number of regulatory agencies and so a large portion of the Pharma-Planta budget will be dedicated to exploring methods and places for production in contained and field conditions. Crops under consideration include maize, tobacco, potatoes and tomatoes. Although clinicals are anticipated to begin in 2009, it could be some time before doctors have access to the inexpensive treatments developed by the consortium. <

BIOTECanada


RÉCOMPENSE DE L’EXCELLENCE EN BIOTECHNOLOGIE CANADIENNE

O

catégorie, le Prix Galien – Biotechnologie, a pour but de récompenser une entreprise de biotechnologie canadienne émergente qui travaille sur la santé ou sur un domaine connexe et qui a apporté une importante contribution en matière d’innovation.

Nés en France, les Galien sont aujourd’hui remis dans de nombreux autres pays européens, et en 1994, cette coutume s'est étendue au Canada, qui est ainsi devenu le premier pays nord-américain à reconnaître les efforts et les réalisations de la recherche-développement pharmaceutique.

Le 12 octobre 2004 à Montréal, on a accordé cet honneur à Ecopia BioSciences Inc. pour la mise au point de sa puissante plate-forme, la technologie DECIPHER®, qui accélère la découverte des composés produits par les bactéries et de leur énorme potentiel pour la conception de nouveaux médicaments. La technologie DECIPHER® associe la génomique à la bio-informatique pour explorer les bactéries à la recherche de nouveaux médicaments, qu’elle isole ensuite à l’aide de techniques chimiques de pointe. <

n a remis cette année à Montréal le premier Prix Galien – Biotechnologie, qui vient s’ajouter à la prestigieuse liste de ce programme de récompense annuelle du domaine pharmaceutique canadien de la recherche et de l’innovation. Le Prix Galien, en quelque sorte le Nobel du secteur pharmaceutique, représente un des plus grands honneurs de l’industrie.

De 1994 à 2003, on a octroyé le Prix Galien – Recherche et le Prix Galien – Produit innovateur. L’ajout de la troisième

4DIX CHOSES, suite de la page 45 recherche, y compris dans les domaines de la santé humaine et animale. Nous sommes près de vous. Un court vol d’avion vous amènera auprès des grappes d’entreprise nord-américaines de biotechnologie. Nous sommes branchés. Le Canada est le pays le plus branché de sa taille géographique au monde. Nous sommes des pionniers de la télésanté, et des médecins dirigent des chirurgies dans le Grand Nord à partir de l’Alberta. Nous représentons la « meilleure valeur ». En plus du classement de KPMG, le Canada est considéré comme le meilleur endroit où faire des affaires par the Economist et un des meilleurs endroits où élever une famille par l’ONU. Nous partageons avec les États-Unis un engagement à récompenser l’innovation et à protéger les droits des créateurs. Nous avons de quoi être fiers de ce que nous accomplissons en sciences de la vie au Canada. Le pays est assez grand pour influencer le cours du monde, mais il est assez petit pour être le lieu de changements et d’expérimentation de nouvelles façons de faire. Nous avons pour vertus la bonne gouvernance et le travail de collaboration dans l’intérêt du public. Tous les paliers de gouvernement travaillent ensemble à la réussite. Nous savons bien travailler en partenariat et avons transmis cette approche au-delà de la frontière et à l’international. Les partenariats public-privé. Nous faisons preuve d’excellence en ce domaine grâce à l’exemple de Génome Canada et des Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada. <

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

LA SEMENCE DE REMÈDES Un exemple européen de mise au point pharmaceutique à base de plantes Des traitements du SIDA, du diabète, de la rage et de la tuberculose figurent parmi les nombreuses applications potentielles d’un nouveau projet qui utilise les cultures génétiquement modifiées pour produire des vaccins et d’autres produits pharmaceutiques. En juillet 2004, Pharma-Planta, un consortium de 39 établissements universitaires et de recherche de 11 pays européens et de l’Afrique du Sud, a reçu 12 millions d’euros du sixième programme cadre de la recherche de l’Union européenne (UE). On a conçu le programme cadre de la recherche de l’UE pour créer une réelle zone de recherche européenne, et des 17,5 milliards d’euros consacrés au projet, les sciences de la vie, la génomique et la biotechnologie de la santé recevront un peu plus de 2,2 milliards d’euros. Les cinq années de financement serviront à perfectionner les techniques de production d’anticorps et de vaccins, et les organisateurs du projet affirment que les plantes constituent une occasion de produire des médicaments modernes à faible coût en assez grande quantité pour les offrir à tout le monde, particulièrement aux pays en voie de développement, où les besoins sont criants. Un des objectifs du programme est de démontrer qu’on peut utiliser les plantes en toute sécurité pour fabriquer des produits pharmaceutiques. Actuellement, de nombreux organismes réglementent les produits « agropharmaceutiques », une grande portion du budget de PharmaPlanta servira donc à explorer des méthodes et des lieux de production dans des conditions contrôlées et naturelles. Les cultures dont on envisage l’utilisation comprennent le maïs, le tabac, les pommes de terre et les tomates. Même si on espère commencer les essais cliniques en 2009, il faudra probablement un certain temps avant que les médecins aient accès aux traitements à faible coût mis au point par le consortium. <

BIOTECanada

47


4HEALTH, continued from page 20

4SANTÉ, suite de la page 20

be to devote no less than five percent of R&D investment to a knowledge-based approach to develop assistance for less fortunate countries. Biotechnology has the potential to help Canada meet these goals and be a world leader in assistance to developing nations. What are your recommendations for the biotech industry to help realize this potential?

Notre gouvernement s’est engagé à rendre viable le système de santé et à favoriser l’innovation dans le secteur de la biotechnologie. Afin d’appuyer les pays en développement, le Canada doit posséder une solide industrie de biotechnologie nationale qui, aux yeux de la communauté internationale, offre des produits novateurs, efficaces, sécuritaires et de haute qualité.

Our government is committed to promoting both the sustainability of the health care system and innovation in the biotechnology sector. To support developing countries, Canada must have in place a strong domestic biotechnology industry that is seen internationally as innovative and of high quality and that produces safe and effective products. In the budget, the Government of Canada made a number of commitments, including $50 million to improve the capacity for commercialization at universities, hospitals and other research facilities. And $60 million was dedicated to Genome Canada so that it can continue its outstanding, leading-edge research. Canada has one of the safest and most effective regulatory systems for products of biotechnology in the world. We believe this system also gives clarity to industry and helps foster the conditions for innovation so Canadians, and potentially people in other countries, can benefit from safe and effective new technologies.

Dans son budget, le gouvernement du Canada a pris plusieurs engagements, notamment celui d’affecter 50 millions de dollars pour rehausser la capacité de commercialisation des universités, des hôpitaux et autres établissements de recherche. De plus, il versera 60 millions de dollars à Génome Canada pour continuer sa recherche de fine pointe. Le Canada est doté de l’un des systèmes de réglementation les plus sécuritaires et efficaces au monde pour ce qui est des produits biotechnologiques. Ce système assure aussi une transparence à l’industrie et favorise l’innovation, de façon à ce que les Canadiens, et possiblement des gens d’autres pays, puissent tirer profit de nouvelles technologies sécuritaires et efficaces.

Leave it to our imagination gordongroup has provided innovative marketing and communications solutions since 1987. Count on us for: Advertising Annual Reports Corporate brochures Marketing campaigns Web sites

Lee-Ann imagineer

We bring confidence and creativity to everything we do. Imagine what we can do for you. Mary Dila (613) 234-8468, ext. 285 901–141 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, ON www.gordongroup.com

g Proud publisher of BIOTECanada insights magazine

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada

49


Find It Here

Trouvez ce que vous cherchez

ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY

RÉPERTOIRE DES ANNONCEURS

Biogen Idec Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Biogen Idec Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

www.biogenidec.com

www.biogenidec.com

CANVAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

CANVAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

www.canvac.ca

www.canvac.ca

Deeth Williams Wall LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

Deeth Williams Wall LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

www.dww.com

www.dww.com

Genome Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52

Genome Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52

www.genomecanada.ca

www.genomecanada.ca

Gordongroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

Gordongroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

www.gordongroup.com

www.gordongroup.com

Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

www.gowlings.com

www.gowlings.com

Innomar Strategies Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

Innomar Strategies Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

www.innomar-strategies.com

www.innomar-strategies.com

Invitrogen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Invitrogen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

www.invitrogen.com

www.invitrogen.com

Lorus Therapeutics Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Lorus Therapeutics Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

www.lorusthera.com

www.lorusthera.com

McCarthy Consultant Services Inc. . . . . . . . . . . .19

McCarthy Consultant Services Inc. . . . . . . . . . . .19

www.mccarthyconsultant.com

www.mccarthyconsultant.com

Merck Frosst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

Merck Frosst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

www.merckfrosst.com

www.merckfrosst.com

PricewaterhouseCoopers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

PricewaterhouseCoopers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

www.pwc.com

www.pwc.com

Richard Ivey School of Business . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

Richard Ivey School of Business . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

www.iveybiotech.com

www.iveybiotech.com

Ropack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Ropack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

www.ropack.com

www.ropack.com

Rx&D Canada’s Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

Rx&D Canada’s Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

www.canadapharma.org

www.canadapharma.org

Sarnia-Lambton Economic Partnership . . . . . . . .26

Sarnia-Lambton Economic Partnership . . . . . . . .26

www.sarnialambton.on.ca

www.sarnialambton.on.ca

Serono Canada Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Serono Canada Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

www.serono-canada.com

www.serono-canada.com

Sim & McBurney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

Sim & McBurney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

www.sim-mcburney.com

www.sim-mcburney.com

Simon Fraser University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Simon Fraser University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

www.sfubusiness.ca

www.sfubusiness.ca

University of Guelph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

University of Guelph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

www.realestate.uoguelph.ca

www.realestate.uoguelph.ca

University of Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

University of Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

www.usask.ca

www.usask.ca

VWR International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

VWR International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

www.vwr.com

www.vwr.com

50

insights Winter/Hiver 2005

BIOTECanada



2005 vol 3 Winter