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February 24, ~988

Encounter w ·i th - Sid

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. states and under influence -of group / - fantasy, will undertake to_,discharge . what they imagine would be the goOd · _ · Ever since Sid: Thomas ·came · of the whol_e, . as.. the · urioffidal to this campus .iri the mid seventies· ~ delegates."_ He '[elates -this 'statement to he has 'been the source · of · endless an earlier article in which he states th~t ·'--. controversy. - . Sid Thomas, an · .... Associate Professor of Philosophy, has , t- . the downing of the Kprean Airliner· . ~ consistently written !etters to both The _- _ 007 in Sept 1983, was part of a staged act by the. Re'!gan . Administration to - Press and Sun Bulletin as well as ,Pipe distract world attention for what . · Drer.zm stati_ng his views on th~ ~-. . Thomas caU~ our crimes in. Central " condition· of this country as wellas the · ·America and throughout the world.· world. He ·has · addiessed a wide .. However, Professor 'Thomas spectrum of issues rangirig from the ' seems to-be .ignoring the facts. :The . · United States involvement in. Vietnam, . Intern'ational- ~ Civil · Avia.t ion the shooting down of a Kor~n- Airlifler · Organization, a speCial· United 1.'T~tions · in 1983 by ·~he - Soviet Union~ · to · orgamzatio~ set up to investigate the . suggesting his own cure for AIDS. incident, issued .a report in March oi. In · a February . 26, 1985 1984 that stated that human error oil Perspective Professor Thomas wrote .:. part 'of the -~oreans and' an iqhumane . 'about' the .psychotic charac-ter of this ' . response by the ·soviet Union were country. · He stated.' that _the major - causes of the incident·' ' ' problem in .America .is the abnormal In the January 24, 1984, issue psyche . " that ~ pervades in · US -of Pipe Dream Thomas -· wrote that He states · · government -officialdom. America is under judgement He feels further that the process of government that ot,Jr society j~ . ~n the _yerge of . "has become 'that of-a psycnptic killer mass. suicide because·.of out intense . that is not only 'lameni, but has already accumulation of guilt. He 'Cites the. killed and for the· U\Ste of blood;and Republican Party as the fundame~~l therefore starids guilJy in the objective .smir~e of guilt and ~tates'. that they sense of very, very lmuiy deaths and . have left a 1·"trail of deaths behind with · calamities." _· He concludes that the · . no end ~in sight."" He cites ail arbitrary leaders of this country have stages of number ·of 150,000 children.who were massive delusions of persecution and killed by "unnecessary budget cut paranoia and that they · were originally . ' . backs." ' ' ~ and still are terroristS. In Octobet of 1985, ·Professor . · In"-a J urie 17th -1984, letter to Thomas stnick again. This time h·e · ·the· Evening_Press-: ThoJllaS at~mpted was advocating operi censorship ·of ' to prove ohce·again the fundamentally · newspapers, .and . the. abridgem-e nt of satanic nature of .the United States basic civil -rights. Iri the October 18, government. - Thomas wrote that," a · fieJd of psychic: ferc~s~is set pp in · ' . 1985 issue of· -the Press and Sun - Bulletin }le WrOte a letter to the editor ' which individuals.• acting in trance by Brian Sullivan ,

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. As recently as la.St semester protesting the appear3J!ce of a cblunm our · tenured Professor, who teaches in .·that newspaper by Jeane Philosophy of religion, v-oiced his · ~irkpatric~.· He swed: tha:t, · '1Some · opinion on the .best ·d efense against · · people have the righUq be heard only AIDS. In a letter to th.e editor otPipe .iq private~ .not to be broadcast; she is()o. Dream on Sept 15, 1987., he stated that · · one of them,".. He goes on to state that ;'to permit her newspaper space -is to-. , the "Best defense against AIDS is tO say fuck you to ' th~ ·Po~." He state·s ·permit the .continued publicatibn of · . ·that because the Pope is the official known li_es~ criminal' and treasonous . · ; ·acts and 'deliberate undermining, in the ""' head ·.of the Roman Cathoiic Church, form of twisting into its opposite, of Continue~· on page 4 the .idea and ideal normal democratic processes." .

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f!..· Look At A · G-rayi:ng- P·an.tner , _ _by Billy Shor A former Black Panther, Stokely-/ Carmichael, spoke in the Susquehanna -Ro.o m of . the- University · Union · . yesterday. In the 1970's Carmic_hael formed the All African ·People's Revolutionary Party (AAPRP) and adopted his present name, K warne Ture. This name, Incidentally, is deri~ed from the names of two African dictators: Ghana's Kwame Nkrumah · and Guinea's Ahmed £ekou Ture, who are renowned for their _policies of · torture and mass killings. The AAPRP's self-d~scJibed · i~eology is Nkrumahism and it "will at some time . an advap.ce the triumph · of international socialist nation and the onwar'd progress · towards world communism.": Thus, many .critics of -. Kwame :fure:'and his AAPRP, ;rrgue that his , calls- for solidM.ity and a worldwide Pan Mrican movement are no more than a variation on the old · call for the overthrow of the capitalist

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system and the establishment of a wotldwide communiSt reg'iine. · _ ;I'hese-same critics point out that the goals and inspirations of Kwame '"' Ture are ra~ist in nature . and · have · nothing new or p~ogressive to offer as · shown by the enormous suffering_in · those African nations that have be~n forced · to adopt similar ideologies: · Guinea, Ghana.. Angola, Ethiopia and Idi Amin's Uganda. · . ~Kwame Ture insists-tliat the "U;S. · - is plagued. by a capitalist system that is backward~ stupid, vicious and is doomed to destruction." Furthermore, he does .not hide that 'the AAPRPis seeking to · be- that destroyer of the capitalist · system: "We are revolutionary party", "The AAPRP is ·not seeking to integrate into . the capitalist sy~tem~ .. ·it(seeks to destroy · it." Along with it's anti- capitalist comrilunist ideology, the, AAPRP is .~ also well known .for it's anti-Zionist stance, a thinly disguised form of anti·semitism. Kwame Ture argues 1that

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BINGHAMTON REVIEW

··· February 24;19~8

LetterS .To i. The 'Ed-itor ·. t/ •

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vastly superior . human beings, more deserving of wealth ·ana ·jx>wer than ' 1hefr "inferiors"; 4) the .elite .Masons · ~e July 15, 1987 edition of -the · ai:e racists and : esxists; 5) ,_ the -~lite Chicago Tnbune (sectimi l. _page 4) :Mason!t discriminate against non· ·r eported on a-~"secrei Masonic lodge MaSons in -aU' kinds .of comm.,on ways;. ' . accused of having plotted to ovhthrow . amoral or the state· [Jt:aly] . in -the ·late 1970's. .;;- :6) the elite M~sons immoral and libertarian/an~chistic; 7) . · . Members of the [Italioo] ·armed .forces· the elite Masons are .Ym selfish (this who joined the ·lodge were acquitted ' underlies their "don't tell me what tO · ar~ra Secret [governmen~] hearing.'t .-- The Tribune .also reported, in its Sept. . do" libertarian/anarchistic outlook); 8) 22, 1987 edition (s~tion· 1, page, 10), · _'the elite Masons are ~ore loyal to that fugitive "Ljcio Gelli, who headed Masonry than .t~ .their .own countries the secret P~ 2 Masonic , Iqdge at the an~ . have betrayed their COUntries for . center . of Italy's biggest postwar the 'sake of MaSonry; and-9) . the elite . .political scandal, surrendered to Swiss Masons are ,homosexuals :ot'.bisexuals . ·. -: a:uthqrities '[on . Sept~ 21, 1987, and · · who are behind · the.;;. mo-d ern is] ... awaiting extradition · to ) _taly .'' homo/bisexual "revolution;" . . · Unfortunately, few other details ofthis · · _· ' And there is more, much more, tOO · serious Masonic P-2 sca,n dal were much to list here. The reason for this--. ' provided.. . . ' ' flyer is that MaSonly .has po~er whic;h Hut you may be th~nking, Why·is . ' it should v.by stripped of, 'J)ecans~ J this ·important to me? Just ~hat is. e . Masons are using ·that power iO comipt . ·Masonry? , Masonry, also . called societies. (In 1981, at least oile-qpaher Freenta8onry, likes·.t o describe itself as · . ,. ofthe·u.s. Senate andone-ftfth ofethe -. -an international, benevolent, all-male U.S .. 'House and one-fifth of state . group that happens to have some . .. . governors _were ~ns.) . · · _ secrecy' about it, liaimless secrecy. Why doesn't the media. ex,pose and . The reality, however~ is very different.· ..._ help bring ·down/ Masonry~ The ·-frol!l the "front"· or' facade Masonry evidence . is ·strong ·that _Masons -,. erects to cover· its -true nature. (Shrine dominate network TV and Hollywood ' circuses --Shriners are : Masons--and ·and large .newspapers and in~gazines Mason~c hospitals . are p~t of that ?' and bopk publishiQg. · · .The elite ''publici-elations" front) · · .:Masoris·1eamed long. time ago that · Research on Masonry, rritich of ·. · C<?JltrOlling the media is very 1mportant which inyolved esoteric Masonic and th_ey work~ hard·at·coatrollmg . iitera~uie)iself (the :'hqr8e's m_outl)'.'), . it .arul at at C~hsoring words they don't . revealed· the~e facts_about tbe rcill · want to ·see,.publicized. (As . result, · _ Masonry: 1) · the l~ders of Masonry the major media pumot be trQsted.) deliberately deeeive non-Masons nll!S.-· /-There are, however, ·~ver~ books . __ they even deceive low-level Masons, · out th~t sbed some light on -Masmrry:, . who, through their membership fees, . ~: Sec~et SoCieties And Subversive . are just bei,ng ~ .to- further the . Movements by Nesta Webster, The Vnlocke!f Secret by James· ,: new.a r, ~ea4ers,' gqals; 2) low1level ~9ns ar:e deceived because if they were told the Grand Orient Mansonry Unmasked by truth abouf Masonry they ·probably . ' Melitsignor· George Dillon, · and . would · not join it arid pay ln.to it; 3) · Freemasonry LAnd· The Va:tican by · Leon de Poncins. the elite or leading Masons are powerhungry people who believe they are In ad9ition, I myself have recel)tly :finished a book on .Masonry which has · " _.,........_.....__...__.;;_ 1!21. references and which,' based on r rny acquain~ce with anti-Ma~onic_ 1.SttJgban(to~ literature, _is e·asily one . of the most te¥ealing works on,this secret society. What gan we do re Masonry? · In· the EXECUTIV>E BQARD ·. ' 1830's there was actually an Anti- · Editor-in-Chief Yan Rusahovsky Publishing Editor Masonic Party politically.active ip· this .Billy Shor Executive Director · Alex Larizman · . coun,try. _ We can recreate that party. AdvertiSing M~ager · B'rian Suliivan /We can expose Masonic politicians and · .Copy Editor . l{athryn Dohefo/ try to vpte them out. We can bOycott netwQrk TV and Hollywood nioyies' and news ·publications unti~ they fully . ' / . expose Masonry. . (If 'we do not Contributing Editor . Paul Scolese · . boycott. these m¢ia, we ·s.upP<>rt those ~ ··. Treasurer · Mor~ McCarthy who want to dominate· us:) -we have Jennifer Yantosh ~·ecretary options. . I believe · we ought to . CartOonist Stuart SYm-ons .Mike _ Nishi Photographer exercise them.

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WE ASK iH~ CAKOIDA.TE.S:

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V\h~t i5 yolll' favoPite.-~?

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Matthew Carr Ezra Shapiro Mate Landsman Joseph Rosenthal Hod Helhnan · Thomas Witmer

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Sincerely~ ' WayneLela

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Bingha1'nton : Review is ·a non-profit student journal' -o f ,.news, · commentary. ~ and analysis pu·b lished · monthly.S~bscriptions: · are $30 · a .ye~. All subscribers will have · the ;Review sent ' directly· ' to · their homes. · Students . at Bingham~on· receive · the R;eview free of : 'charge. : - -' _ Letters to .the editor are en~ouraged and shouid be sent t0 Binghamton Review, 1 SUNY-~'ingp~ton; P.o·. B~x ~.20~m. Binghamton~ ·N.Y. ' 1390F oi: bro~ght- .to the Binghamton Rev,iew office at UU' 156. . All submissions to the Review become the property .of the Review. The ·Review · .r~serves,_,:ihe -F.ight to .edit'· an~ 'p rint 'any 5Ubmis~ion,s.' ·'·'All opinions ~xpressed. are those·of the author and dO not necessarily · reflect ·th.e' of the Rev.iew. . .

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·.· Businesses _and student ·groups .. . L~w - Rates .C€l:II~~B_ri·an' Su,l_l~yaA/f\d _Manager· 777-5302 '

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·and its 09mrades must settle with only · a#empts to. meddle }nto S.A. internal . divestment. . ·Furtliennore; _each year -Pi~e•pple --, F,~.ee . Nicaragua, ,and ~.hgpe to ·prevept ._tb~. _-aff~tS, they .V9tefl for. the far right . . the pool · of' workers ··gro-w s ·by an : It now appears/that the government- ·_ introductiort of democracy and human -extremistS parties in such numbers that . esQ.mated 600,000, who face ·a dim of Panamanian dictator, ManQ.el" · · . rights -inw ~e Sandirtista's domain. it .·e.clipsetf the . reforin '. minded . •future when it comes to finding full Noriega, is -going· to ., run out of time jobs~ The suffciring is then . '. available cash by the ~nd of March. · . magnified by the fact that the f;unilies · This is a direct result of the cessation ~J.Iffet when there are no jobs .. .' -of American ald, which was: caused byMeanwhile, neighboring siates·, such e; thl'l?l.l~. Is~ ...-•· Noriega's indictrfient : . ~... as BotSwana, the only democracy _in 1 Nori'ega, who was charge.d with' t . ' . Blac~ Afiiea, coUld suffer also because drug trafficking ~'d official corruption, ·. · rrtany Botswailans are employed in was indicted by a federal grandJliry in South Africa. - According. to · polls, a · .,_ Florida. · ._: His dealings with· .the large majority of .. worker . resent . Medellin Cartel cauSed the cut o(f of - sanctions when . they' cause . then_l aid to · the Centfal American hardship. It should_be pretty clear that ._, nation. 1 "Pineapple face", as he· is the main supporters of s_a nctions ·in ". -called- ·by his · Panamanian criti~s South Africa ·ar~ ·t he political . because of hi~ pox ~marked - face, ,haSdemagogues and the leftist elite, who . -~ decided to offer the .s ·o viets··a deal 'so . have 'little . to fear from . sanctions~ . 0: · Panama can get-sQme quick .cash. · In · They will not be hurt and if the black · ' return for a loan, Noriega has given the. '\vori.Cers are forced into poverty; all:the · Soviet's Pacific fishing .fleet ·the 'right better. Poverty · b reeds violence and ·to U§e port facilities in Vacamonte for violence 1~ to civil war. · - a thirty day period. Vacamonte, which It is high time for the sanctioneers is located on the Pacific _~ide ·of the and their supporters to reveal their true Progressiv~ ~ Federal Party as the Par.tama Canal, is already is home to a intentions: ~ther to pander to special · :official oppositiOn group . in large presence of the Soviet!s 'Cuban ., interest groups -in the U.S. to win · parliament. All of the,s e ele~toral · comrade. .This deal is thought to bC a elections or to foment violence and E~en thoagh E~stern bloc m1tions . results. h~ve only .served to furth~r possible prelude -to a larger Soviet- , civil w~ among .blacks. and between c_o ntinue ·to pay lip service to _a polarize c9nditions. - In fact, when the ·_ Panamanain agreement · · blacks and whites. · · peaceful settl~m-ent of ~e eight year Botha government attempied to make - On a related note, -the corruption of old Iran-Iraq war, they appear more some modest reforms., the extremist · Panamanian ·strongman, Manuel than willing to" supply- the IranianS: How does Iran pay for its. eight opposition party accused him 'of Noriega, doesn't appear to be limited to with new sophisticated weapon·s: year old war with its Arab neighbor selli~g·out the wl)ite · r ace. in South just him. -_In fact; it now appears the These ·actions. comes into, direct r Iraq? _ )YeP.? ac;c<?~ding, ~o }'ur~ish ·Africa. AU of this has been ·possible __ the entire upper . echekms of the conflict with the arms emb~r'goes :officials ·certain_ members. of .the by Congressman ~d activis~. ·. · _ -· _: · · Panamanian. military is aJs~ involved placed on the belligerents by most of Revolutionary ·Guard )lave deeided that · _ - ·T he program · of diVestment of · __ .·in various maleficence, including drug the world. · , the best way to ~upport the war effort American corporations ill South Africa ·· trafficking. Removing Noriega -Iri -January, ·the North · Koreans . is by going into the lucrative narcotics ~ is perhaps ·one of the biggest tragedies . therefore, either hy foreign pressure or . -delivered ·a shipment of Chinese made.·_ _ · for ' all but wealthy South Africans. business. The traditional Central ::· intermit dissention, seems unlikely to_ ~ silk worm • missiles, whiCh now Asian drugs: opium and heroin are ~ow l'his campaign so far has resulted in alter the cutTeilt sad state ·of affairs.- · menace gulf s.h ipping lanes~ . Now, it . bringing millions of dollars to sustain the ac'c usations· of over 170 U.S. ·~~,· Only drastic ~e_asriies, · such as·a ·coup'# ~ .. appears that an . agreement "s igned . . the jihad agamst Iraq. ' Perhaps what · companies-p,y )Vhite South Afridm ·at . ; d!etat by junior officers or a rev()lution between · . the . Iranian and Soviet' the Iranians like most about drug bargaia .·basement 'prices. So, rather of the ·Panamanian people can b~ govergments -will lead to a tr~sfer of -· . · then · punjshi.n.g South Afric;.m trafficking is that it ~ot only gjves expected to alter the current situation. · 'Soviet made SCUD-S .surface to - business, dives~ment gave it a big them ·q uick cash for their bloody border sUrface missiles . ..The missiles, ,whioh 'Grapes' ·bOOst', and-caused_a further decline of war, but it also helps to corrupt and · will be ·shipped to Iran -via an ·third American Influence. - ~ The new destroy _ the socit?ties of ·the "Gre3;t party, probably ..Syria, will be paid for. man~gement of these oldc American . . ·satan," ·(Ttle U.S.) ~d the - "Little With cries of the return of J. Edgar · _by Iranian ojl. ) Under-_ the guise of ' companies nq 'longer feel any -need to . Hoover, a group of New York based · _Satans" (Western Europe). · "4eav)_' machinery;" .. the SCUD-5 · promote 'th-e : Sullivan Principles, lawyers, calling themselves the Center . ·missiles will help to modernize the _ ·wliich for<;;ed int~gratiori and socially . · .,_ for Constitutional Rights, _accused the - Iran~"s forces~ which already threaten -the progressive ·progr~ms upcin ·'Pretoria·: · F~deral J31lreau __of In-vestigation, · gf With:the recent declaration of war _ · Persian Gulf. . .. . carrying · 'b ut\.:t'all _sorts~ of· -'illegal' ·FUrthermore, $e sanctions have forced by Colombian Pr~sident. Virgilio -'\ ' In ad'ditlon; ···other nations ~ have acli vi ties.:'·:' The alleged _yiolations · the . South -Afri~al!.s to · devel~p an Barco Vargas, en leftist terrorists and been-implicated in the. arms trade with concerned the F.B.I.'s stiiveiliance of in4~genqp~ :. arm_s , i~d~stry.- _ 1l.~ _d _ r tile Medellin -Cartel, a new wave of Jnfn; _ the would-be Latin American · . some 100 groups opp.o soo to Americ;,1'.s stockpiling of. oil from Arab nations m". · v~ol(mce· haS engulfed _ the n~tion in · superpower, Brazil is one of them; ·_ involvement -in Central America~ the Mide~st; billions of dollars which ... chaqs. Vargas denounced the terrorists_· Already caught in a scan_flal conce!fiing -Prime among these -organizations -was could hav~., been spent on improving and their allies, the narcotrafficantes · the sale of soine $2. billion worth of -' C.I.S.P.I.S. (Committee in Solidarity · ' the plight of1black South AfricanS.. - _ because of the "total challenge" they . · ·, arms 'to Libya, _Swiss banking _ with the People of :Ei S~vador). · The ·· Another hoped result of the _ pose· to the Colombian government. officials claim / that large sum~ of investigation - of -C : I.S.P.l.S/ · was' s~ctioq~ -.\\:ould be the collapse of the . ' The murder of Attorney-General Carlos monetary credi_ts have been transferred ' . ..·primarily focused on it connectioils 'to Hoyos' in late January underscores'the between ~e government g,f Ayatollah - / ·.soJth A:frlcan economy. 'Instead; a the Salvadoran Marxist. rebels, the war going'<:m between the government ' _Khqmeini BraZilian aims dealers~ -_ weak Rc}nd and a booming imporf ·_ FMLN,(Farabund~ Marti Nationq'l · · substitution 'b-ade haS lead to growth in ·and the.drUg lords. · Finally, it also ·appear~ ~that ·So ri th~ . _Liberatio'n Front). . Thougi1 now the economy. ·Supporters of\ · Coiombia, one of the oldest Latili Africa - is playing the role · ef violations were noted~- it seems clear · divestrnent~weren't too worried about American democracies, has been ·.intermediary for Teheran, in return for : that there was probable .causetor' the . 'the nation~.-: who would pick up the . Iran's oil. · · suffering from the growing strength·of investigation. _ . , slack left by .:,_de:p_arting American ·. the narcotrafficantes, who now posseSs . Perhaps what is most interesting compan_ies. Now Japan .is South vestm.e~t pri~ate armies. vast sums of money' . · abou_t this· report is not what is in it~ _Africa's number .one trading parl!ler, and the protection of certain corrupi.·but rather when it was released. The · :with -Truwan, Singapore, and South ~: It's been eighteen · months since officials. Since the early eighties, ovet ' _·allegations against the F.B.I. _have ·· -· the United SUites Congress took the ·_ Korea- all fighting for a ~piece of the 50 judges, including )2 Supreme · · been floating around since last fall. · pie. What these hypocrites don't care· . "morally imperative" step of imposing Court Justices, have ,been 'murdered or _Clearly, the main thrust of this report · \ about is the fact that Angola, a Soviet s.a nctions . o_n South . Africa. In that · assassinated. In 1985, the Medellin · 'was \ to score a propaganda victqry satellite, located next to Soqth Africa,time, the -res tilts of this· farcical Cartel fmanced the terronst siege of_the . -before the House vote on aid to\ the · employs American _oil companies to Congressional. policy and its...~win, the Pruilce 'o f Jus_ti.~e. <:;olomb_ia's Supr@~e . Nicaraguan rebels, _(which by the_~ .~·co~ _IIi addition, thi~ reign_ drill fo( oil which pays for Cuban : Qfteqor nationwid_e Divestment campaign, are passed the senate 51-48). Obvieusly, mercenanes, who help to perpetuate· ·has resulted in the deaths of hundreds . · liow _becoming quite dear. _T hes·e , for .the extremist Left the ·situation in · the . problem 'in, Namibia. · The .· ~ of police-officer~ and investigatOrs, and . ;'dynamic duo" of divestment _and . :g1 Salvador-has not gone well. In-1981 promineii:t journalists:.) ~ !~~ . . hypocrisy here is that the argument , sanctions have accomplished many .. it seemed all but assured that a agaipst 'Angolan divestment' _has Tli~ isttength the,Medellil!··eartef things, though none, of what the · _ Sandinista style government ·~ould has is derived from itS 80% monop<>ly always been that other nalions,.,su~h _ as . . authors intended. Higher blacf . soon rule in San Salvador. However, - _ unemployment, fewer jobs, -increased 1 ·of the· Anie:ricail coCaine m3rket; which .Frarice, -_ would replace the· American • . . .. . • ..> • r- _.. , - . --.• i . . the dictatorShip was removed, and ·a · f~s . . _ · · . · ' " amounts to· OV(!r' six ' b illion . 4 ollais a _Sou~ Afr:i_c a?. self - ~~fficiefCY _and a . , . _ - ·popularly .elected president, Jose __ - polanzed political climate are part of ~ - ye~. : This giv~& the '_ drug lord.S In.human -terms, the -real losers N~poleon Duarte turned the · si~uation _ have been the black workers. Now : · financ1al; i~sources to/ support -such the ·"Feel · Good" - policy of . the "'" around. IIi that time,leftist terrorist · • congress: · - " ,. they. are not only suppressed by a·racist : · -- gi:oups M-19., a leftist terrorl&t group, ' and rigbrlst death squads, ruiv~ been on · .> Thariks. t(lr.. the·-: ~p~.gre~s, . P-~ W.::, : . govep)rne.nt, but thanks the some self -. '- or-. to.. establish . their own; Los _ the decline. With · d-e mocracy's · Extradictables-, w.Qj,eb )V~ r~spQnsi~le·. 'rignteous American._Liberals, they are ; -- ' Botha· and the' National Party won· a' · triumphed in El' Salvador, · Nicaragu~ .· for -the' :Hoyos:. .as~assiri_ation· and J)le out of a jo'b. It is-estimated that at · landslide victory during · re~ent _ fell deeper and deeper into a socialist· · least 25Q,OOO workers ·h ave lo~t their _· elections. Similarly, because South Cqotin.u ed o~~a~~·~f}', ~~~- ·- : -, totalitarian state: Now, C.I.S.P.I.S. jobs because - of . sanctions . and African-voters·resented. Congressional _:

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February 24, ,1988

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. ·, . . --: . . • l teaching and becarri~ natuialized U:S,. .. ; time of the natives. I, tO.O, do ~e ' -citizen, ju,si as did my Swiss-Chinese . : -patt ~u,t a critic. _'always .turns into ·a . wife. · · ~ ' · _ · · · - ·· " · Soine ·experiences· in life .W.e ·nev~r . · prQiecfive mother:: hen, feathers " forget. The_last days of the big.war -iri . Where else ·in "ihe world could a · sta_~ding, .wh~n. encountering whar t May,1945, I remember most vividly: .newcomer be accepted -~ - ii university consider unfair judgements, outrageous ' standing with -my. back to a wall, with · professor in .such a . s~ort time? . laments abroad: hands,raised; and· staring at the m~e Nonetheless, this intellec~t,J.al setting ., , Qf a machine. gun, held by a grim ss~ provides indiVi.~uals, with a'_measure Qf' ·Many things · have. changed in man in a blade uniforln. That· was in . disappointment and frqstr~tion~; We _ : academia ;:;.. and not only ih academia -. Pil~ri. my native Czechoslovak town~ simply cannot stomach th~ contempt • to the better. · Whereas in the peale to be liberated the next day after .six ~- -:; for American , democr~lic .values , ~riod of th-e Vietnam war~ my views "- years ,of Nazi . occupation by _the - express((d by - numero'u~~.~American seemed to be ,those of an ·embattled Americans. · · Gen. Georg·e Patton aeademics, the yery.beneficiaries of the minority,' the .,. . young generfition of . arrived; Geqnans fled; l was not shot. privileged way of life they judge .On the ·· today I face in the classroom-has far - What a memorable time -for -· a ·· basis of their ~rfonmince; whereas the more rapport with my set and youngs-ter, barely a teenager. ' non-democrati~, totalil:fli'ian: system.s understanding of values than with_the-.... · they judge on the basis of~~ir alleged · , ~dvocates· of ideas_ and ·ideologies . increasingly ideas, promises. ~epeat~<f failur~s •. However,. soon .the li&rators-left ·. wrongs, stapstics abou~ mquntains~'of .. . ~'What is freedom? I am not-free!" . · and the country became squeezed irito a corpses are n(?t sufficient e-vidence to one does ~@t'occasidnally hear. red straitjacket with _hammers and / _ · move ow: aeademic ideolo~es. · sickles. The Iron Curtain deseended on " . ·Europe artd w.e started to suffocate . In case of postwar '· "By the very tact of having s~d . facing a new · . and more permanent -histOry, time ·has proven them· wrong. this with im~unity, you answerM ·the . .. enemy --- the totalitarian· state, taking To my bringing up these crystal clear question and proved your. fqolishness,'' chargeor'ourliv es: I planned to study _ fact-s · of life, ·they , retort that I am ' I retoi-adding. that "had you ever dared literature, ·and the Big Brother sent me biased because of my ·background to utter sucli words in the Soviet to a law s.chool. After graduation I · · ~xposure to' tyranny, I .would · Union, in C:?:echoslovakia and _a host wished to become a counsel for defense . argue, Is sahitaiy: it · provides ·the of oth~r countries; you would have (the 'little there was. left of it} and · · - ·opport~nity of comparative judg~ment, · :been put behind bars. ~- prebably; and instead -was assigned to a judicial bene~ not available to those whom I a(ll expelled from all institutions of higher to ser-ve , the. oppressive state inclined to c0 nsidet: as handicapped byt learningin ~e country-- stJrely." · machiriecy. · · ·the lack of 'tragic experience. It is this . .· handicap, which· leaves them with no Even if I were unable to unpeel inhibitions to· advocate their elitist . the ·iilverted commas from ·my eagerly Young, not ~r. quite powerful, . · acquired national identity, no· comqtas, designs~ contemptuous of. democracy and thoroughly miserable, I felt in my . and of common man. .-~ . . .. . . no stigmas.can be appended to our son, unwanted·role which I was detennined · · -a native· American ·of ·Czech-Swissto quit, to defy the. Big Brother _for' · . Chmese ·ucest:rY. He is just in age good: It took_four years of planning, - . . . ·And, not infrequently, o[common I was when facing a SS-man on the sense. Hence, accordingto.one of my · , surreptitious self-educ~tion in""English, lasi day_of ,the war. views-of the faculty colleagues,' a pr9fessor of . - 1 and the luck to illegally escape fro~ . world · and appreciation of democracy, philosophy, the only ;correspondent the country under rather interesting which he. does not take for granted, is · from the univ~rsity fo the only daily in ·circumstances. I·reached the West, to · ..based oil the appreciation related to our ~own, the Americ;;ms . -shquJ~ the Ame_ricans who had li~~rated us: him by bis -pare'Qts. ~ ·· ap6logize to the Soviets'' for · their · once and with whom, in their 'nation, I shooting -down the Korean airliner. preferred to share my liberation for good ' . None.of my American-:born colleagues, And all this has been · made /' solid democratS, ever to bother to p_ossible · by this imperfect, respond to th_is .and a · host of s·imilar ·extravagantly, even infuriatingly · Freedom is b1iss but atso a burden · outrages~ . I did speak ·up, earning the · tolerant America. '- Used, . misused, of responsibility. for one) owq_.fate, as · philosopher's contemptu~us . dismiss~ ' " . abused. -Yet America, our home, we I quickly .learned upon my arrival to / of not' Qeing &n Arrierican but m~rely · -had the lucktothooSe. ;, - New York. Unaccustomed to self . . . an "AmeriCan", an infe~or bree4 in-d ecis'ion-makin g _and · no ~ state . ·; in.vertedcpmmas. this article by Professor Ulc ·originally · ; . bureaucracy ;to order me .-w hat to do, I ~ - appeared ·~s a pamphlet published. by agoni~ed · over the cho_ice am_ o ng "We are better .Arpericans than you U.S.I.C. '. . . equally promising and- discouraging -- we had to earn it, we .even 'had to' . altemati.v~s. risk our lives to get here but your only merit. is your luck of havilig:.,been.born here," utters a hero ifi,my nQvel on his . ' Yet, o~ly in America: .. alone, way to the natura1~tion cerem9liy. ·: · ;. .without money, wiihout scholarship, I 1 ' went back t.O school, made a living as . r was nat~ized two decades ago. a waiter, · ob~ned a Pb,D. degree at Incessant critical dissections of matters · Columbia in ·three years, went into .Anieric~ have become a ~avorite pass •. ! Continued from page 6 .

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ones worth-fighting· for . . I don't think _ anyone ~an denythat the ideal in our · · soci~ty would. be· to end the use oJ dangerous drugs; so why shouldn't we be ·striving for. thiS_ideal? ·Are 'Ye ready · to just give up? Aren't we a stronger country than that? . . Apparently not. By giving needles to drug-u~rs, wear~ asst~ming - that we can't stop them~ This means that .all the -time and .money. we've . devoted to educating· our youth . have~be'.en · completely wasted. I can't se~ the logic in stopping these people from · · dying in ooe way just so they can kill · themselves some other way. It dpesn't make sense. we migbt as well just track· down all drug -addicts_ in the country, line them up against a wall, and blow them all .away, because the end result will be the same. They'll all :· be ·dead. AIDS or no · AIDS, every · person in this 'countpy who uses these kinds Qf drugs will be dead sooner or . later. . That _is, unless we try to save ' them ratherthan give up o11 them.

which Thoinas .feels is the 'source oi"; sexwil ~p~ssion for homosexuals, the~ people ~uffering _from _this disease, · should just ,use profanities toward the · Pope to c·ure themselves. He states · that this therapy will · "throw off the· lack of defenses . agai.n st diseases brought ~n by- guilt." · .'~ • When· we approacb·ed , ,P(ofessor Thomas to clarify his _views· < ·on· .these matters -our reporter was verbally aSSaulted. ' When informed th~t the reporter was from · the- ._ · Binghamton Review , Thomas made ·. tl)e . following statement, "get your , b3:lls out of iny office, you fucking kill people!" Subsequently we were denied an.interview. If you would like to find out more about Professor Thomas' -philosophy on the state of .. things .give him a call at XZ442 or · stop by his office 1214 in the.libtary tower ori Thursday 3_:00-4:00 or Friday 3:30-4:30 and tell bim the Bingham.ton Revjew s~nt you ...

Wor ld . Continued from page 3 ". kidnapping of the Conservative party .candidate for mayor of Medellin, · · Andres .Pastrana. Arango. It is also a well know fact that the Medellin Cartel · would like to take over the Colombian government. ln fact, before Carlos· · Lehder was extradited to the United _ States .to statui trial for the charge of drug trafficking-, ~e had established: his _ own political movement. . · The Colombian gove~nw~~t's, . _response to the new violence has lead to call_s for greater security and .closer_ ties to Colombia's neigh-bor, Venezuela, which has been fighting the narco-terrorists for sev:eral_years now. Varg~s has promised to qire _more · police investigators and judges. with an emphasis on better enforcement and ·(

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. by Ya~ Rusaiwv~ky The SUNY-Binghamton chap.t~r O'f the UJA is holding a Phon-a-Thon to · . raise . money for social programs in . Israel. The United Jewish_Appeal is an. organization that supplements social programs in Israel. . They work on improving neighborhoods, 'aiding. farmers and helping to settl~ recent' immigrants. ' The Phori-a-Thon which is taking place f:i:'om Sunday FebruarY 21 and · running until Wednesday February 24 will reach .1500 students on and off campus. Oren Werner, a SUNYBinghamton senior and the chainnan of the local UJA campaign Said that they hope td raise $10,000. "Eighty students.have volunteered to man tbe . ·telephones" for this fund raising drive_, said Werner. The calls will go out between '6 pm and 11 pm. werner said that the students targeted are mostly . Jewish, because Jewish students are more likely to donate their ptoney to

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Werner said that he wanted the Phon-a-Thon "to be something for the people who are calling" as. well as the . peeple being called. _Werner and other UJA members were very optimistic:-- ~.· Part of the money raised ~is weelc will go to a schol~ship fund for Jewi_sh students in the Broome :County area

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.. . . . .,.}., ··• . . . ' Continued from front page . ) Brown, the Minority Affairs by Paul G. Scolese Zionists control the economic and Coordinator,' condemned the SA (for . On Febru,a.rY 3, 1988 a major victory · JX;?litical lif~ _of. the U:S. ·and Europe.. , .. passing the resolution ~d yowb4 tO_ . was \Von· i~ supix>rt of hUman life. Op A~ the Anu- Defamauon League of . : carry on · the _struggle _for bla~k.· that day the New Jer8ey SU:prerne · ' Bnai Brith. ~ : a gtoup tliat fights anti- ·. liberation-. He also · cbarged that .··. . Court, -in a·. unanimous dec_ision, . Semitisni ·pointS out, ·these 8llegation~_ ;·· ~ tln:'ougb this struggle the bl~cks have ·' declare'd tliii :conunercial .surrogate while being totally false, are. ·a received no .help from the whites~ motherhood cpritracts amounted ~ to . · callback to the ageless technique used · Matt.Tarilmas·, an, occ representative, . . nothing more_.ihat the selling of by · ailti•Semites of all coiors and · said that his own parents (who · are babies. The 'aecision was the result of times _to spread hatred toward the Jews white, he p(>irited out) -worked side by the much ppl>licized Baby ·.M ca.se. · · .and casting ~he minority as the · side with the thousandS of whites and , The , S upre.Ve Court restored· the blacks ·in ·the civil rights movement. traditional scapegoat. The AAPR~ pa,rental rig~ts of _the mother, Mary equates Zionism with racism cand thus . . · Daryl Fpx, fornier JSU :presideni, . Beth · Whitehead-Gould, but. the "Zionism must be destr0 yed." They · charged that the sA·resolutipn w~ too ·. ad?pting p~~~ts retained custody of~e · :· vow 'a lso to · "dismantle the illegal · · · \veak and tt>o broad io be effective. · He child. ·However the natural mother ,, state of I&rael." ,_ ln addition, Kwame . especially .condemned ·ihe SA ·d~ision : may .now s'ee;k a new custOdy hearing r, " ture is also -known for h~ assOCiation to strike out the censure of anti.,. ·The court JQ.und the surrogate mother with Louis Farrakhan- the Jea:der of the Semitism. Ari. Burstein, the current co~tracts illegal and maybe crirnimll JSU president, '~efended· . the . SA .· .. · for ,two reasons: ·~ ihe exchange of . militant ·and· anti-Semitic ."Nation- of Islam". these two -men share similar: resolution ·and Said:th3t "agreed..with . money. atip 'the inability of the natuial - aspiiations and are often on the same ' . the' SA in cond.ertming rac'ism." _· · mother tO qllange her mind and keep lecture circuit. · Many allege that while Respopding to 'criticism of . the SA, .. . . the child..'The COUrt believed that die being an anti-Zi'onist, anti-capitalist, Burstein \ add'e d . that, "Stokely . contract w~s · coercive ·because· tbe communist, Kwame Ture is a racist as ·Catmichael and. his organization fif mother was' forced to. surrender the well. Evidence of this is shown· in the· under the definition of racism." He child even J>efore conception. · Under 1976 CBS-TV interview withKwame dismissed the AAPRP definition of standard adoption ·laws the mother is Tute. In response to the interviewer's . 'Zionism as racism by stilting · that allowed to change her mind and keep · ·.· claim that Uganda's dictator .Idi Amin Zionism is a ·lengihg to return to the . the child. The decision to surrender the ."put-several white people's 1 heads on Jewish homelind of .Zion and that . child, the court believed, was never the block", Kwame replied,"We need a ·Zionism is ''part in parcel of Judaism". ~ voluntary. The-contractual agreement, lot more of them:" , While · . intemp:ting " to avoid .. tHe inducement of' payment, and the ' Three 'years ago' Kwame, Ture · . confrontafion and escalation of tenSion · threat of legal _action ~f the child was came to speak at Binghamton and . Burstein said that "The JSU ·will no_t .Qot surrendered did not allow for a ~ ·.succeeded ·in infuriating many students accept the perp~uatipn of racist ideas ' voluntary .decision. .Also, under New who described his statements as racist . on this campus." The BSU president· Jersey law th,c;} rights of the natural and anti-Semitic . . Distinctly, three ·Steve Richardson was unavailable for · parents .concerning the child are ·equat, ·years ago, the Student Assembly comment, while the vice president . regardless of the marital status of the · "rejected a resolution of non-support Jenavia Thompson, . declined to be . parents. The court said, ",T he whole · tor 'Ture's visit.·"· (Pipe Dream, Nov. ·· · interviewed. She 'simply denied ·that ' · purpase and effect of the surrogacy' S,i98S) . . This time however, the SA's th~ :asu was bnnging-Ture to ,campus . . contract .was to give .the father the approach was different'In a 35:1:5: · stating that it'was the AAP~P who . . ""'"e' xclusive righ( to the child ·_by 2 · voie, the SA condemned " all raCist, was doing so. She also said that destroying,the rights of the mother." t anti-religious and discriminatory - "S tud_ents should come to hea,r this Furthermore the court stated, "Worst .~ statements·. The SA resolution was man speak for themselves." . of all, ·however, is the . contract's total attacked from several. sides. Owen . disregard -of -the best interests of the .

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child. N 0 attempt .was . made ~~0 . determine the suitability of · the . adoptive couple -as patents or tlieir ..superiority -over the natural mother~ . The· couit also about ·-possible long term . psy·chologi~al . effects on all parties involved~ .· ·:espeeially that of the ·child: ·· · Also hinted at by the coiirt. was .the · benefits the wealthy would have .i:D · surrogate parenting. With the p;tym~J;tt ·. of large sums · of ·money as t-b e .motivating force, ·poor couples .woUid.. be at disadvantage. · In the future·'i~ would be - possible , to envision population of low income w()nuin "" being nothing more a breeding·· "' ·_class for the wealthy. . -.., ·. The court stated that surrO'gate · coil~cts would possibly be legal if:nq .· ·money changed hands~ .a nd the mo~e:f. ,was 'able to change.her·mind and keep. the child; However the cowt believed that few if any women would vol'1lriteet . as surrogate mothers. It -seems that few women would volunteer because . money is ttie motivating factor behiiui . surrogate contracts. . .r While t;he ,decision only affects New . · Jersey, its--effects may be nationwide. The New JersefSupreme Court is very ~ .. influenti~ in the ·field· of family law{ Also since there is a ~ck of precedent. in this area of the law, other courtS and legislatures may look tO this decisioh for guidance. · Currently several are considering leg!.slation banning · surrogate motherhood supported by the decision of the New Jersey Supteri)e . · Court. This decisiQn may also· affeei. legislation regarding other forms 0 f -artificial _insemination. Only the' future will tell whether this decision . will set a preeedent for later cases of this·nature. · II

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M~y Americ_ans were shocked by ~he ' sec'on<;t place ,finish ' of _·pat ' -Robertson. in the ·lowa. Republican.. . ·caucuses~ -whicb-- has thrust him_'irito the .· center· of 1>olitical ·coiltrovers·y . The -p~Jllic ·- continues -· to ·· e,quate Robertson with organized religion. 'He has -been criticized by "the public and th~. ' .. media . for h(is ·religious connections~ They also .falsely-claim.."' thatif el~ted president he woUld trY to \ institute '-Some· sort ·of national or organiZed -religion. Certainly some 'o f · the criticism of Robertson is -true, andhe;accepts ·it as part _o f -political -life.-: However·much-of the criticism of · RobertsOn is unt:nle, unfair, biased and · broughi about mainly :beCause of his conservative v.iews. c- ' While Robertson's political' ' ' religimis'· ties have been constantly . attacked, the public and the m.¢dia has~ .. cortsistently·· and consciously .ignored the religious connections_of ~ev. Jesse

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_ byMarc~ndsman ~ ·~ . ·place. , If he broke-- it in a driving · USA has end~ JackSon and plaiisJ~ Ymi_~antto hear something ·r eally accident, teach .him to drive safely;}~ u work' Jor his campaign~ - Also · stupid? . . · . · ' he broke it .while skiing, teach him to . · -communj.s~ have cO-spOnSored several , . , Our government--yes, the one you ·ski safely .. · If·he. broke it ih· a figbt,.· ..demonstrations and marches with.. and I live under--has recently docided, tO · ~eep him -from ge~ting into fights1 ·'-:An/ Jackson;· In fact the ·AFL-CIO chose · ~egin dis~ributing J!eedles .~ tor ounce I of preventiQn is worth a pound· · ~o boycoit_on~ of JackSon's marches . · mtravenous drug users·. .You know ofcure. .. _ '· : , last 1 year ' because , of-'comrn unist · ..heroin addi~ts~ ·· They're · doing - thi~ ·­ This whole idea eaSily applies to in:volvem~nt · because the deadly AIDS virus .can be AIDS. Rather. than giv¢ out needles-, ' "\<' transmitted-through sh1u:ed needles, and . how about leaching these people ·how The main reason fQr~ cpn$tantly . " by -offering 'clean' ~ needles ; our wise · · ·. dailgerous what they'~- doing is? What . ' ignoring.Ji,lckson!s,recOI:dand character:. l~~rs· SeeJ!l-to think they'll'be 'saving: about .locking ·them ' up "·sq ~hey can't hves. · After all, AIDS dpes kill. ' _ .is the fear'oftl)e media and•politic1ans · · get drugs, and treating them? We ha:Ve .· of .being -lab.el~d "r~cist". by ·bhick ; , · ·.MY . ONLY·, QUESTION ; JS; -~ the resources, and we also .seem ' to . -organizations',- notably _, ti!e NAACP. ·WHAT TJIE HELL DO THESE know- where-the addicts are. Doesn'tit . MORONS THINK HEROIN. The term .''racist" strikes such..fear in seem logical that if we find someone the .hearts -of American- society, that- r·. · -:QOES·? ·. who is a heroin addict, we should try people with ho~~st. criticism· of '/OU J ackspn :refrain from -criticizing him. . Q.AU '/OVR. . Con_structive , criticism . is Veery kP4. .. -/ GOvSM\-\a.rr ' important in the development of a · , s l-E~ candidate.. Jackson must 1~ 'not to'. , -~€~ "-toJ? ' ' take attacks directed towards him as . personal _. attacks. Unfortunately Jackson has created a climate around him that preveJ}ts honest criticism of 7

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The . term. ,"racist" . strikes fear ·in the ·· .. . heaff!f_· df AmerJca,n . ·~oci_e ~y~. ,th.at . -:peop.le ·. with . honest .. ~rit.iclsm - ~ oJ -. Jackson · refrah:~ ·.·f·r·o m·· · · _, criticizing him. .

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Jackson. Americans should be alaimed hinl or his record. If the media had any by the mix of reljgion and politics. ·. ··backbone .they would stahd -up to:those To tell the truth, I don't see why to help them rather than . Therefore.-tliey· should be concerned we.should be so surprised. Mter more few sterile needles and wish them luck? ·, ·. · who woulq call them racists, and PJiOYe aboht the candidacy of Rev. Jackson. than .two -. years of "Safe. Sex" Wouldn't stopping drug USe stopAIDS . ' them_;wrol)g with objective journalism Many. people 'forgerthat when Pat _. prol!lo!iop~ it was only a rpatter of from being transmitted this way at the aP<>ut the.true n~ture of Rev. JacksO~. Robertson entered. the presidential race time before "Safe Drugs" came along. same time? · . · he gave up his ministry. He is also no Pat . Robertson cannot win. His The only problem ·is, there is no such · A popular dictum amongsf"the _ longer the host-of <_:;BN'~ TV program, . canc,lidacy is a p90r attempt to Claim;. . thiNg as safe drug 11s'e. Drugs kili. ·: · jack-asses who are supporting this · "The 700 Club". Robertson felt that it - · the conservative 'w i.ng of the They kill the people, who use· them, program is that people ar~ going~';'P WOUld not 00 pFOper Of him tO retrun · :Republica,n Party, already Claimed by . '-and they k:tll- the people who are / find needles anyway, so they might'as his . ministry while runnin;g for the p1ore acceptable and qualified Rep. victims .of most violent crimes. How · well be given clean ones. That has:to · president. . ,lfowev.e r Jesse Jackson . · Jack F .. Kemp . .. Any support that· the hell can our ·government sit back · be the most ludicrous argument I've · · continues t~. retain his ministry dtiriilg · RobertSon haS is too e-xtreme to rD.Bke . ~ ~ . and ~onate clean nee<nes to addicts? · ever heard · for doing something. · the campaign. He has igilored ariy a difference at .the conve~tion. Isn't their job- supposed to be to stop Following this line of reasoning~ we - .suggestions to .give up his h)ini~t.ry-. _ fiowev~ thy power_that !~cksQn has ·in cirug use, not encourage it? Isn't the . should be· giving mit guns to b-a nk . · Furthe~ore Jackson has far from a the ·Democratic ·~>:arty is much · more message supposed to ·be JUST SAY robbers. After all, a criminal din · clean record. Everybody remembers than Robertson's influe~ce in , the N 0? Or has it become JUST SAY -always find his weapon...right? We his racial s1ur about New York City ~ Republican Party. Siqce Jackson NO, UNLESS OF - COURSE might as wbll make it easier f6r them. being "hymie town". Such a remark . controls the (llajprlty <)( black voters, UNCLE SAM GIVES YOU A , In fact, why not eliminate the midOJe by any .other public figure would ,have J-ackson will have · quit~ . ~-- say at the _ CLEAN NEEDLE Tp SHOOT · ,.r · man? ,-Let'srigupaphonesefvice/ ahd . ·been career 'ending, y'e t in Jackson's convention .abQUt th~· Shbice- Of a , . 1 UP WITH!? -· · · we can start delivering the stolen · case it is now· completely ignored. . / ·nominee an4 the platfomi.·: - :. . , · · . ~. While .thinking person can see _money right-to the:s e people's houses. . Jackson also · has a tendency 1 to It would save ·~time, energy, and associate with· alf sorts of vile filtli. The current danger Jlt the political . how ridiculous this whole thing -is, it's~~ ~. all part of the same stupid phjlosoplfy~ probably some lives. Hey, if we can't His fiiendship with the militant racist system· lies in the ability . of an We're so worried :about AIDS -and stop thetit from robbing banks, we· cart , Louis Farrak~n is all but forgotten. egotistical demagogue, like Jackson, to stopping it that we ate blind ·to how at least save· the lives · of innocent . / -Jackson also found ·Fidel ·Castro and ~ control a powerfur faction .in a major . people being caught in the gunfire! -Y assir Arafat. to be reasop~ble Die~ American party. . If Americans are as' . ·' -our own moral StandardS are beginning · to self-destruct We'ye already begun Lest we forget, drug. trafficking is a : worthy of a warm embrace. Also concerned.about the mixing of religion ' handing out b~th control' in our high- ' crime. If our. government gives out ignored by · the media is the .''Red" ' and politics ;as they .claim, they sho~Ild · schools because we're concerned about. needles to needy addicts, then it is ~ influence in Jackson's "Rainbow ., be ruanned at the power of Jackson. teen pregnancy ... but we forget that _c onspiracy to cm:nmit -a felony. ·· If · Coalition". _The Communist Party teen ·.sex is' a serious emotional anyone accepting the needles is under problem'· in itself. What the hell is 18, then you also have a ·charge of next? Maybe soQn,- we'll start giving • ·contributing to tlie delinquency -of a out' boxing gloves to wife abusers. ·. minor. And God forbid anyQne should~ Th-at · way, they could beat · up their kill ·someone while on lreroin (does wives without hurting th~m as . ) this seem all that unlikely?), because serioJJ~iy. · Next, we can build a SPeCial then the United States Government can highwaf-system·f9r dtu'nk drivers, so · -' placed on triai for being an · irmocent people wouldn't get hurt. . I . accessory to murder, EVERY TIME can see· it no·w --ALL . DRUNK . IT HAPPENS; DRIVE~$ PLEA~E. · REMNN' .IN Obviously {at least, I thought it : THE RIGHT LANE AND TAKE · - ·.was obvious), we have to stop people ·_ EXIT I6iny of this sounds htsane~_ '· · from using drugs, or at least continue · . , you're'stiuting togei the idea~ . . . - making the effort to ,stop ·them. _ ,· · . It should. be :ob~ious thar if . Assuming th~t people ~e_,goingi to "Qse'~ · · · •.. someo~.~ :)i~,-~- :bre~en arn( and is' iJ!, . drugs nQ matter what is a resignation; e ~·. p~n. }ou-can:tjpst :hand 'him .a bqttle '_ -Sme, after all the years of media hype, of aspirin._ ¥()u .-lia~e to put his in . fighting drug use may'·seem; like a lost - _ a sling so tit will heal. Better yet; try cause... but lost causes . ~.e the only to keep ·him from doing whatever he ·Continued on.page 4 · did that . broke · his arm in the Trrst <

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by ·'their govern~ents. Activ~ · ·agreement with the Soviets~. . The . · · .. measureS involve the whole ~trum . ' .: . ~ Foi over a ~yeat' the .. trial of 'John .. ' of .operationsh begining with QJmors SovieicQrtnection was looke4 !IJ>Qh as . :Demj~juk ( aceused of being ··~Ivan the t. . . ' . . - an . d forg·.e!r. i, ~s ·. apd ·.. ending with·' . .vital to the effort seeking out. war .· . . . · ti:erribfe" ~.~ mtlff~ss guard' at' the . criminals since the . Soviets had . ' k i<Jnapp!flg~fin~ assassiqations." 'v. .1'~eblinka. death. camp) has gripped the -attention of the citizens .of :Israel as it ,- · captured .much archival . information Thequ_.e~ti.bn~ble evi.dePce.suppli.· ¢ · · .·b rought back mem9ries a.nd spurned ' ..including. staff rosters . and constitute .by Ute Spy~~ts in ·the Demjanjuk.·c ase the govern.m ent of mafiy citizens who . . new interest in wwtf and_the pain of brings US. tp ano_ther_problem facoo . by .witnessed .the atrocities ofihe war. .th.e Holocau.st. The trial is · being · .· · · The·· qhe·stion. Utat ·surfaces· is:' ~ . ihe bSI in cooperating in cases of war · .earried live on Israeli television and What might .t he S9viet. m.otives be, fqr . ~rimes. , Difficulties . adse in· using ·many put a$ide-. their .·dailychores- in , Sovi.et documents as.a means ofpFOOf.. seeking.out Nazi war criminals? ln the · ·order to stay informed on the p:r:ogress .·· Neither.OSI or defense attorneys have' • .May/Jurie 1~87 isstie .of Freedom at. ·,Of the trful.. Derrijanjuk is facing. the · · · ~ccess::to,Sovte(archives and tliey 'lack' . ~Michael '\Valider : suggests that d~ath penalty if coJ!;victed -. · H~. would , .be_only the s~ond ih Israers forty. the ·rea&on~ ' for .going ,.·after Nazi authority tO. sullp9ena·,· information: year histpry to be•executed· (die ~ing .· , Thus, ~ tb'ey -~ can ·.only ·take what_ is ·ccillaboratc>rs' ha8 little or .nothing to, do . Adolf Eichmann) · . · . with ·tbe _Ho'locaust', Stalin and -his ~ providedforby theRu~sl~s . .· · ,. . -.· . .. . . . ~ ·· 1olin·Demjanjuk was dewrte,4 'to · stand trial :in ·. Israel chiefly t)lrough the wor.k.ofthe U.S. Justice Deparnnent's - m~ove, t~tie_ Office of Speciall~vestigations {OSI).. The agency was es.tablished ·.. in . F-o -r eign~ Mi.ni ~-try-' ~cus·t pdy ·September 1979 ·a s · a result of··. .·congreSsional hearings held in _1977-78 'card , 'dn ·, the c'ond,ition .that by tne SQbcommittee ·on Imnii_gr,ation, ,:~ ' te~~l n g ciocuin~_nt_._ Citizenship and Internatiortal .J;,.aw. Technica1ly the OSI;s mandate dQes not · · ailow theUnited St.ates govetnmeri_n o · · ( . - . '. . ? . prosecute · ~~ar ciriininals· for . cti!fles The Soviets .often forge documents. heirs ·. have shown ' cq_n_sistent ·anti'::' committed in other .countries. If · . ', Semitism. · Even in the 1960's whenIn 1~i8.6, the State. Iiepaitmen~ . howev~~ tlle govetQmen~ can ~stablish established .an Office' of Attive y . attempts were being m.a de' to.whip up · that a persol1 entered' the · u.s~ and . Measure-s and Re~po-nse ~ Anaiys is · . _. popular sentim~nt again~t, fascists, . . became a citizen ·by "concealment a they were not i_nterested in Hitler's · precisely to deal -with Sovi~t forgeries. material fact". i.e., collaboration with n:eatmefit of the Jews. . According to · -What ·greatly facilitated forgeries to be the Nazis; then it has . the right to 'Lucy S. · Davidowicz, in · their . possible wa8 that at the end of World denaturalize_.th~ citizen deport mm. "International Conference ' on · · w ar I~ •. not only captured documents , Another, response is to exf.!adite tile : Prosecuting Nazi War Ci:imimils" in but also· paper; ink, pdnting presses, ,, .individual \to 1,} copntry ,maufO:e.S claim~ . -- ·-March '1969; the~ Soviet. objective _was · stamps, and the· materials used by -the . - jutisdiction. for · ~ar crimes.. What to foster a ,hatred 'for fascism which ·local yadministrat.o rs to create · ., impelled the h~ngs to estab~i.Sh 9517 ' . tends to Spill ove,r to Germany and the : · documents. Given this, there is every"-. · Well, throughout the . 19.60's . the . U.S. · In tl).e late '70's, there came' the reason ' to ·be' suspicious.of, a seleetive . S-oviets .held show trial of Nazi uQ.bel,1eyable charge from,~. soviet . use o£ documentation and' forging of ~ollaborators cmd e~gag~ in .vigorous -'officialdom ~ whkh stated that the ·Jews ·. documents. • · · pi:ess· c~P,aigns 'about coll~boriuors in . ,themselves we~e · responsible lor tl)e -QerfllimY and. in the U.S. S·oviet Holocaust More recently in 1985, tf:le , offiei~s sent,special newspapers to the · Association ot: Soviet Lawyers and ·the' ,. . . When the Demjan]uk case·wa$ f:lrst TJ.S. documeiHin,g th~s~· alleged ·soviet Anti.;Zionist ., Com .i nittee being puhogether;-:the OSI offered an·collaborators:... One of these . 1904 . . publlshed-the.White Book which was a alleged copy of-the original personnel .· ~ewspapers. fe~tm:ed -John .bemj~jt4' viCious piece of anti-Semitism. · Other identification c~d :.o~ ~e · Demja,n)uk · of Cleveland whose· trial in the U ~s. · evidence suggests that · the Soviets , ~· while he was a. guard at TfebJirika in would ·b¢gin seventeen, y~s later. As . 1942 . .:- Demjarijuk: said that he WC\S _, attempt to, bring people, to justice for ... . the Gold War gave .way to.detente and past crimes· for .political purpeses. · · . being . mistaken for another person, Jimmy- Garter, perhaps .the disdain subsequently, ' the card became·· the . On:e of the .goats is to discredit diminished~ As. a resUlt, ·there rose a - overseas· Soviet emigFes who by and. fo.cus . of intense scrutiny.·. The cwd demand to establish -the OSI under the large. present negative information listS him as: being 5'9" at age- ,22; c~lminal .division'' or' the Justice " about' the· Soviet Union. . Ladlshiv , Demjanjuk:' is 6'1": In the middle of · -~p~ent the· tri·a l ·in 1981 in , Cleveland,- the : · B~tman, fornier .deputy director of the ·. Czechoslovakia-:.. Dis'i nforination . Soviets suddenly agreed. tQ have the ' ~•-:o, / ·.. .. ·. ' • origin~ car~ · flown to · Washingto_n~ .Department, writes "The real politkal-·· ' refugees from . Communist · cmmtries DC, to be tested by OSt and defense . In late January _of 19~0. tire first .- 'director .of OSI and are .perman~nt ~gets ~or _reta~iation·, . experts in t~~ Soviet em~assy . . · The . his heir .apparent .. "' ...

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~ professor who is denied terlute, or a _ What is the · most contraversial student who is denied admission, or a organization on' campu~? . · I . be-sides the· BINGHAMTON -. staff member·who is fired would have REVIEW.. Y6u. guessed. it; ' it's the . ' legal recourse if -it !s determified ihat the action was taken solely on . tpe ~otorious Gay People's Union, hated. basis of sexual preference. by many,·_feared . bY- some, ·and ugderstood by yery, yery fe~. Most · BR: So there is no discrimination on CamptlS?' . ~· ~ . students .·on . campus ' are.' _pretty · ·'GPU: Iil !)pite of this legislatio~, . suspicious of the GPU, and nearly gay people still experience _.the everyone I spoke t6-wasn:t very fond of them. "Those -people are gross! . detrimentat effect of 'homophobia' on .commented o~estudent, while another.· · 'our . campus.. Ma!_life·s t'!tions ~f homophobia can includ¢: .physical or. remarked that the G:l'U would be better verbal violence, or availability of gay- _ off ·~staying in the closet. ·affirming books . in the library _o r for The BINGHAMTON REVIEW . decided to Step beyond that infaQ'lOUS r . sale at the bookstore. n can also surface .in ' classrooms, from door in the basement-of the Union, and homophobic slilrs by professors, to the fin4 ·some answers to ' the quesiions inability to fairJy assigp ~ grades to ~any of us are asking. What are the~e pa~rs written ~bOut gay issues, an.d by people up to, anyway? - Are they · ignoring 'important · gay authors and. . merely a homosexl}al social club, or a otl)er. ·gay ··people who have ma4e · leftist politiCal · organiz·a tion · in - . significant . contributions to .· any· disgui~? Last year, 'they ,conducted a particular academic discipline. Gay · .wild march thro1:1gh . the Unfversity . faculty and staff members can also :· Union· that got an awful lQt of people ·.' suffer from · various forms - of · upset: Why did they do it? . Why dp . · discrimination, because legislation-. they seeQl to flaunt themselves so does not change ·people's hearts~ · o.Penly? Can't they be contentJ6 do as . .··BR: Wh~t exactly is· "homophobia"? ' they please behind dosed doors? . GPU: Homophobia is more than:,· -· -~ .The GPU agreed to grant tis an . just the fear of gay$. It' is also the · · interview, with th.e provisioa that the ·· prejudice against us. · If you think gays_, voices of those interviewed· not be are _inferior to straights, then you are: recorded. The following interview was . . . homophobic. IfJ{J)U believe ·tha(gays conducted on February 17th, 198a, in ·~ are· unfif for certain. occupations, yo\} the GPU office. . The questions were . are homophobic. What racism· is to· asked by myself, the answers given by · . blacks, ·and sexism is· to · :women, tllree GPU members, who _volunteered · -__homophobia is tQ us~ - ( to represent their . org.a nization. BR: As · far as legislation- is Though ,their answers d'o not · concerned, are you merely after equal · necessarily represent th'e views of every -civil rights? · . · ·GPO: ·member, the interview seems a . GPU: Although legislation does not reliable basis as to what the GPU is all change peop!e's hearts; civil rights are about. · . The interview below \Vas · a crQcial goal of the ·gay· community .. conducted by Marc Landsman. Non-gay people who accuse us of "wanting special . privileges" are BR: How .and why was the GPU unaware of our 'issues~ Their attitude . started? What is your primary goal now? . . . ·: is preposterous. We want the sam·e · rights that heterosexuals have in this . GPU: There·. has ·been · a gay· · society. We want the right to have organization on campus.since the early : 1970's. · The name hasbeeri cha'nged legally recognized relationships, jobs, ' : several times, but the purpose of ,the homes; and public a¢coinodatio.qs. We · " group continues to · _incorporate want to be treated . with equality in - political, . soCial~ and· educational r~gards to child.-custody and education. objectives.. -· - · - · . · . We do not. want to be divorced fro~ , .· BR: In what ways-does the campu~ our families, om friends; or out P,laces - ' ·discriminate against ~omosexuals? ·· · · of worship. We want to be free from fear and violence ~gainst us. Cle~ly, -GPU: ·Students: faculty, and staff are ·- you-can see that these basi~ human protected by Executive Order 28,-which rights are not "special treatment". We are·nQl fi,ghting for anY. pr-ivileges 'that bans discrimination on the basis of. sexual /'qri ,...,e~tation. ·F or e~am~le~ .a · straights do not have.

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BR:.Is ·the.GPU a pofitically slanted behind closed doors . . For example: a .organiZation?. · . man and a woman holding ·hands at a .r . GPU: It would be inaccurate to label · bus stop ·is not ~rceived as "public the GPU as~ leftist-organization~ ·The. .. . sex". But a same-:sex.couple behaving poUtical ' perspectives ·of gay people_ in the same way will .be considered to vary· considerably. . The GPU, be "flaunting their sexuality · in - · however, does become involved in public". · ··. · . . coalitions·with other minority groups~ . BR: Last year, the GPU conducted a particularly around issues of feminism march through .the Pipe ·Dream ,and and anti-racism. People of all political 1. WHRW offices . .Itwas later described .. _viewpoints aie welcome to join the as violent and· militant, and · turned, GPU. · In'any 'neutrals' off.. Doesn't this kind , . BR: Do~s the ·GPU encour~ge gay of militancy ultimately hurt your · pride'to its members?. cause? - GPU: Yes, we do. GPU: There were' specific .events that · BR: Why are you so concerned about Jed up to the demonstration last year. · ' confidentiality if you are proud-to be Repeated incidents of homophobia over gay? · . · - the air on WHRW and in the pages of · · GPU: Coming 01:1t of the closet i$ Pipe Dream w.ere at the root of the risky. One can _lose family, friends.• a · protest. . Repeated phone _calls to/ job, or even a place•to live~ . The risk w~w we had made, and repeate4 · [ of hatrassment from - people With · Persl>ectives and Letters~to.;the Ediwr : whom you w_o rk and live is in Pipe Dream·we had written pad been considerable. We belie.ve tHat each · ignored, or were not taken·· seriously. person has the .right to j11dge .the risks . Because the proper ·channels were . Jor his/herself ~d to decide who should fruitless, militant action was know and when. We must assume that necessary. In other words, if y'Ou are. . anr gay perso~ is' clos~ted until _w~. respectful of u~ when we . speak, we know otherwise. . This does not won't have a need to yell. Last year's , conflict with e.ncouragmg gay pride and' protest was a iast resor:t, after pro~r_ -self acceptan~e. For example: .a channels were used to address specific student ·may · join the GPU feeling events. Militant action as a last resort negative about her sexuality. She may . is produc_ti~e because it exposes -the ' 'a lso believe that lrer · patents will · homophobe. It also brings issues out disown her if' they know she is ·gay· . into the ()pen for debate, and it As a supportive organization-, we . provides clo.s eted gays with st;rong _would encourage her to accept and p()siti ve image of. the GPU ., · believe in herself...but we would not Furthermore, the description of the · . encourage her_to risk her education if ..· ·p rotest, as violent is inac·c ura·t e. coming 011t to her parents would result ., ·· Accusations were made but charges in the termination financial support. were never filed . . Whatever did happen We W(jUld .encourage . her to examine was blown out of proportion. the risk and make her ow1~)~dividual BR: What does the GPU have _choice. · planned for the future? Can there ever · BR: Isn't banning together -in a sensebe a time when the GPU can disband? . drawing a line that' encourages ' discrimination?' GPU: Currently, we are emphasiziRg Gi>U: No. In banning together we . , the social and educational goals of the are . creating a positive identity with GPU. We pian political action·only-as whiCh we can expose the barriers that a response to soine specific event ·or . ·confine 'and oppress us. ·.We do not situation . . Even -if there does come a . ~ · create these barriers but are committed day when our civil/ights are-ensure.d, ' ' to dissol:ving them. To keep us in ibe there will still be a need for the GPU. closet is to make us disappear, which Gay people . share. a culture · . and , i.s the goal of . our eneltiies. therefor~ tlie GPU would continue to Ho1n<.>sexua1 ac.tivity. is'-one aspect of . be a .social and cultUral otgcm~tion . .being gay, just' as heterosexuality is·' BR: In other words, you have more · one· ~spe.ct · ofbeing straight. To be in common than, just . a commop gay also includes cultural exp~ession. enemy? ( Gays have a history, a culture, and a · · GPU: Yes! way of life. ·To keep sex behind ·closed . . .• d()ors d~s not keep gays (or straigh~) .

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·engineering journals, · by· hiring· by Joseph Rosenthal · research assistantS. When Mr. Dekin ' { Does the F. B ~ · I. ·have the, · _ _. was asked whetlier he had·,heard of any - right ,to ask university librarians for·' .such activi_ties by Soyiet agents here · _lists · of names . of people who h~ve on our camp11s, he replied .that, ''W.e . 'looked at, or . borrowed certain have no knowledg~ of agenfs of any · · sensitive, unclassified, ·materials, -or · ·foreign governmento perating· on the · ·does that practice impede the freeJlo\v campus.'' However, he did .state that, of information? .A recent (Jan 22, "It is certainly the case that foreign 1988) Pipe Dream - arti~le :entitled, · · nationals or people-representing any "FBI and Librarians Clash on StUdent number, of ins~tutions, foreign . and ~ights", raised -these issues. Part of domestic, can .h~ve access_to wh&tever .'what it discussed was the lack . of~ materi~s the-library makes available:" . cooperation tliat university librarians . And how, would the~e foreign nationals have given ' F. B. l. agenis in these .know what materials the library makes. investigations. The tnvestiga,tions availab~e? They can easily fmd out by .'have-mainlyfocu8oo on campuses with means of a databaSe search, which ·Can extensive .technical holdings, . such as be accomplished . by p.un~hasing a_, Columbia~ the State University . of · courtesy ,card, for a mere ren dollars~ or "" · New · York at Buffalo, and ·. the by hiring a student with a university University ofMaryland. Mr. Albert' IDcard. . · Dekin, . the .Acting - Director , of . When Mr. Dekin was asked, - . Un'iversity Libraries, was asked a few ''Thebretically~ if an F. B .. I.. . agent · questions regat:ding, the situation · O~L caine in and stated who he' was, and:he this catnp~s.· ~ , ., ' wanted' _you . to' report the ham'e~ of . It must be understood that the-· people who .asked·· to look at certain people who the F. B. Lis trying to· sensitive·material~. would you be·able . expose in these investigations are to comply, and/or would _'~ou c~mply?'.' .· Soviet agents, who ·c ompile these sensitive ~· documents, usually

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....In -response, Mr. Dekin said, "We are case of. individual rights ve:r:sus the rights of individuals collectively. ·. one : . neither, I think, ~illing nor able to mighi say · that in this ·case, putting comply ·with any sort of request that individual rights above U: S. !!_ational violates ·the pghts of individuals in the ,· sense of. their rights to privacy in the . ' security is very dangerous. If one terms of their seeking information of wpuld agree with thtJ,t statement, then this . sort. , We 'w ould not provide one would probab~y also agree that the information-in SliGh ·a fashion reqpested policy of our Univ~rsitY Librari~s not by any individual -of that sott which. -· to com) ly with the F. .B. I. is · would . comprom1se the · individual's irresponsible. However we -cannot right to privacy." In addition, he stated . dismiss people's rights · to privacy, . that~ "IQ. particular1 we have gone to · rights that we hold -dear fn t:~is som·e lengths tQ protect the records of country.. .. . .r · borrowing, foF·.e~ample, and other U$e .So are . there, in fact, Sovie! 'of library · ~ervices S<? thai · the . . agents or _agents .of other foreign ·· individual is prorectetl ft:~m that sort of . governments i~imical to the United investigation·or e~posiu'e.,~~ · ~ ·states . on ·our campus, busi'ly Mr. Dekin was ftir'ther 'asked compiling s·e nsitive, unclassified if the library could possibly posse~s materials or even classified materi~? ·· actual· classified information. Mr. Mr. Dekin doesn't know, and also · Dekin suggested that it was ve·ry · , suggests that he wouldn't comp,ly with unlikely that they would .get classified F. B. I. efforts to find out. To 'him, materials from the u. s. ,:government, . the individual's right to privacy and ,:because . of 'gov~rnment sc.reening · ·· free flow of information come first. .. processes. . But . he , also said, "We The reservation tha:t one might have·is might ·get someth-ing that's been · that where shouid the line be drawn donated to us, but we would not ' . between ideaiism of values and the ' regulady scree}\ it for that pui-po~e." possibility of compromising our .. Clearly this issue ·~ s another c~untry's security? ,

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Profile for Binghamton Review

February 1988 - Binghamton Review  

An Encounter With Sid Thomas

February 1988 - Binghamton Review  

An Encounter With Sid Thomas

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