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VOTER GUIDE A LOOK AT LEGISLATIVE CANDIDATES SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2018


Here are the questions we asked the candidates:

Legislative candidates respond to questions By TOM LUTEY tlutey@billingsgazette.com The 2018 general election is packed with contested races for the Montana Legislature. There are 26 contested races in The Gazette coverage area and a host of candidates who have never before run for a seat in Montana’s House or Senate. Women represent 40 percent of the candidate field, a good indicator that the number of women serving in the Legislature is likely to increase, as is has every session for at least a decade. There’s new energy with Bernie Sanders-inspired Democratic Socialists knocking on thousands of doors in Billings, carrying their message of livable wages, lower insurance premiums and making higher education tuition free. Also, there are hard fought battles between legislative veterans like Senate incumbent Dem-

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ocrat Mary McNally and former state legislator Tom McGillvray. The Gazette invited 55 legislative candidates to participate in this year’s general election guide. All but one of the candidates from Livingston to Miles City and all points in between accepted, giving us one of the biggest participation rates we’ve ever had. We presented each candidate with five questions on subjects certain to arise in the 2019 Legislature. The questions are the same for everyone. Each candidate was given response lengths of 100 words per question. Potentially, that gives voters a 500word sampling of where candidates stand on the issues of the day. We asked candidates how they would address a state budget that less than a year ago forced lawmakers back to Helena as it appeared there wouldn’t be enough money to fund state public services through the

October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

summer. The governor’s office had forecast a $227 million cash shortage over the two-year life of the state budget. Deep cuts were made to public services. Lawmakers will have to decide the fate of Medicaid expansion in 2019. The 2015 Legislature voted to offer Medicaid to working Montanans earning up to $16,600 a year. Roughly 91,000 Montanans working but still living in poverty, took the state up on its offer. However, that program will expire in 2019 if the Legislature doesn’t act to renew funding. It’s been nearly a decade since the Legislature passed a comprehensive infrastructure bill. Disputes over financing between Democratic Governor Steve Bullock and the Legislature’s Republican majority have thwarted attempts to repair roads, build bridges and renovate state buildings. We asked the candidates how they would

reach an agreement with Bullock, who will entering his eighth and final legislative session as governor. Also, we asked candidates to identify an issue important to their district and to tell us what they were going to do about it if elected. We wanted to know if they were familiar with the issues that mattered most to their voters. Finally, we asked candidates to address gun violence. Montana had six gun threats at its high schools in the first two months of the year. Two of those incidents involved guns on campuses. Montana ranks worst in the nation for suicide per capita and guns are Montanans’ preferred tool for suicide. The responses to our questions follow in this 2018 general election guide. Absentee ballots will be mailed by county election offices Oct. 12. Election Day is Nov. 6.

1. Should the 2019 Legislature address gun violence? Please explain your position on a proposal you feel most strongly about, either for or against. 2. From the first days of the current Montana budget, there have been problems. Tax collections have not been what the 2017 Legislature projected. The Legislature reconvened in November 2017 to patch a $227 million hole in the two-year state budget. Public services, including services for people with mental health issues and physical disabilities, were cut. What budget changes should the 2019 Legislature make to align revenue with spending? Would you raise taxes? cut public services? Please be specific. 3. The Montana Legislature has struggled to pass comprehensive state infrastructure bills for nearly a decade. There have been disagreements with the governor about bonding for infrastructure, or paying cash. There have been disputes over whether university buildings belonged in an infrastructure bill. What would you do to secure funding for the infrastructure needs of Montana? Where would that funding come from? 4. Funding for Montana’s Medicaid expansion program extended healthcare coverage to 91,000 working Montanans earning up to $16,600 a year. The program is set to expire in June 2019. Already there’s a ballot initiative to keep the program funded using tobacco taxes. Do you support continuing Medicaid expansion? Please explain your position. If you support continuing the program, how would you fund it? 5. Name an issue important to your district and explain what you will do to address it. Editor’s note: Candidates were limited to 100 words per response. Aside from trimming some responses to meet the word limit, the candidate’s answers have not been edited.


SENATE DISTRICT 19 Kenneth Bogner - R Age: 31 Occupation: American Legion baseball head coach Education: CCDHS/B.A. political science; Columbia University; M.A. public policy, Middlesex University, London, UK Past employment: U.S. Marine Corps; Montana Senate aide; Field representative for U.S. senator Online campaign info: Facebook: Facebook.com/ KennethBognerStateSenate Website: www.kennethbogner.com Address: Miles City

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No it should not, the Montana Legislature should not be restricting U.S. Constitutional rights. If it feels it needs to address vulnerabilities, it should work to eliminate some restrictions on gun-free zones in the state. Mental health services should be improved and focus on becoming more efficient in order to address suicide rather than taking away firearms. The Legislature should move toward providing a budget that forces departments to become more efficient rather than continuing to increase spending on their bureaucracy. We should not be raising taxes.

We should not be negotiating university buildings as a part of an infrastructure bill while rural and Eastern Montana’s roads, water systems, and schools are deteriorating. Unfortunately, this partisanship over the past couple of sessions has led to this issue being an immediate need in which bonding will likely be the solution before the needs get even more expensive. The Medicaid Expansion program is too expensive for the state in its current form. Currently, I do not support continuing the program. An important issue in Eastern Montana is what many refer to as “brain drain.” Eastern Montana

is losing its population, especially younger, to other areas of the state and country. This, coupled with Helena largely ignoring the issues of Eastern Montana has had many consequences on the local economy. In order to get the population to stay or return, eastern Montana needs to create an environment that competes with the economy and entertainment of other portions of the state. That starts with maintaining our infrastructure, improving mental health services, updating our education system, and ensuring access to public lands. I will be that voice that ensures Eastern Montana finally gets equal representation when it comes to securing these resources.

disenfranchised, of essential services. Those of us who can afford to pay more, should. And we all need a voice in the conversation. Comprehensive” may be the problem. What works in one context won’t necessarily work in another. Bonding makes sense in cases where people can see relatively immediate results. Gas tax increases make road sense. Universities have donor bases to prime the funding pump, and more. Importantly, there is the overriding tension between rural and urban contexts and constituencies, and their relative needs and priorities. Dare I say it? Rural Montana needs more infrastructure development than the more populous areas. The will to compromise on progressive tax increases, coupled with jobproducing infrastructure projects, could (no pun intended) pave the way toward progress. I-185 goes a long way toward resolving this question. Providing quality health care for the 91,000 Montanans who cannot otherwise afford it is the moral and right thing to do, and it makes sound economic sense. According to the Bureau of Business and

Economic Research at the University of Montana, continuing Medicaid expansion—the lion’s share of which is federally funded—will generate 5,000 jobs and $270 million in personal income each year from 2018 to 2020. Meanwhile, we can be working toward the establishment of universal health care in Montana, via the creation of a single-payer program. Everybody wins. Divisiveness. “Us” against “Them” thinking. Mindless regionalism. Variations of the disunity plaguing American society. We Eastern Montanans are uniquely prepared to address it. Come blizzard or drought, boom or bust, we “get” that as irreconcilable as some of our differences appear, we are ultimately all in this together. Hence my motto: Unity through Community. The way forward can only be through open and honest dialogue: all parties forthrightly engaged, none silenced. Recent legislative cycles demonstrated a glaring lack of this dynamic balance. The time is now to restore it. Senate District 19 is the place. Voting Democratic is the way.

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SENATE DISTRICT 19

Mary Zeiss Stange - D Age: 68 Occupation: Retired college professor, writer, bison rancher Family: Spouse, Douglas C. Stange Education: B.A., Magna cum laude/Phi Beta Kappa, English literature; M.A & Ph.D., religion and culture, Syracuse University. Past Employment: Several academic appointments, includ-



ing (among others) Eastern Montana College, Central Michigan University, Black Hills State College; then 26 years (1990-2016) as senior faculty member and administrator at Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY. Past political experience: Two terms of service on MTFWP Region 7 Citizens Advisory Council; Vice-chair, Carter County Democratic Committee, 2006-2008, and presently; Member of the Steering Committee, Adirondack Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice; Vice President of Artemis, the Women’s Working Group on Sustainability and Hunting, International Council on Game and Wildlife Conservation. Online campaign info: Facebook: https://www. facebook.com/MaryForMontanaSD19 Website: www.crazywomanbison.com Email: Mary.for.Montana@ gmail.com Address: Mary for Montana, POB 136, Ekalaka, MT 59324 Phone: 406-775-8808

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Montana is a gun-positive culture. We embrace the Second Amendment’s provision of a fundamental right to gun ownership and use. As a hunter and shooter, I support the Heller decision affirming the right to gunarmed self-defense. However, also following Heller, I recognize the need for reasonable gun regulation. In that light, one very problematic law on the books in Montana is “Stand Your Ground” which, as in the premeditated Missoula killing of an unarmed German exchange student in 2014, is murder masquerading as self-defense. It is bad law. It gives gun-owners a bad name. I would work to overturn it. Governor Bullock partially answered this question in his 8/30 announcement of the restoration of significant portions of the 2017 budget. This was good governance in action. We need to build upon this foundation. The key change to make is in the direction of genuine cooperation, with an eye toward the greater good for all. If this sounds like “socialism,” so be it. We cannot deprive the poor, the sick, the hungry, the

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SENATE DISTRICT 22

Douglas (Doug) Kary - R Age: 67 Occupation: 39 years marketing and sales; now in retirement Family: Married to Paulette for 44 years, two grown children Education: Associate degree in business management Past employment: Ranch hand, steel erecting and construc-

tion, survey assistant, truck driver, dock worker, marketing for an investor owned utility, graphic consultant and media sales. Past political experience: Currently serving as State SD 22, vice-chair State Administration Committee, Member of Senate Finance & Claims Committee, and Energy & Telecommunication Committee. Currently Vice-Chair on State Administration & Veteran Affairs Interim Committee. Past member of the Judiciary Committee. Served as State Representative House District 48 (2011-2014). Vice Chair Fish Wildlife & Parks Committee, member of State Administration and Federal Relations, Energy and Telecommunications Committee. Past Chairman for the Yellowstone County GOP in 2014 and Vice-Chair in 2013; Past Chairman of the Billings Traffic Control Board, Past Vice-Chair Heights Task Force Committee and current member, Past Chair for the Alternate Routes subcommittee for Heights Task Force. Online campaign info:

Email: dougkary@yahoo.com Address: 415 West Wicks Ln. Phone: (406)-698-1478 Local school boards, universities, and city and county law enforcement officials must develop their own policy that reflects the community’s opinions and needs. There has been shootings in public gathering places early in 2018 and the media gave it urgency that resonated throughout our nation. Our U.S. Constitution’s Second Amendment, “the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” Our Montana Legislature must not infringe on any Constitutional rights. This problem requires us to look at ourselves, what messages are we sending to our children? Life is precious and this concept must be nurtured. This question been answered in numerous articles within the Billings Gazette. The Legislative Estimated Revenue was $29.2 million below the budget estimate (within 2%), and appears to be improving. There was no need for a special

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healthcare coverage to those Montanans earning up to $16,000 a year. The program exceeded estimates by over 20,000 participates and when the provision requiring able bodied individuals to be gainfully employed was thrown out the state taxpayers we’re left holding the tab. Montana cannot afford to continue this program as is and I would not support it in the current form. The prevalent concern is property taxes. Those on limited incomes (senior citizens) and others just getting by, feel they are dangerously close to being forced out of their homes because of the constantly rising property taxes. I also hear of our expanding drug problems, no room at our county jail and therefore criminals roam free on warrant. The drug problem brings with it many other non-desirable activities such as increased burglaries, prostitution, car theft, and more violent crimes. I will work hard to not raise property taxes and address our overcrowded jails.

that is accurate and realistic, not designed to fail. We need adequate funding for the long term by restructuring the tax code to capitalize on reducing corporate welfare and tax holidays. The Montana legislature needs to put people above politics and ensure oversight to take necessary steps to guarantee a balanced budget. We must emphasize the benefits of infrastructure projects as employment opportunities and as economic stimuli. The ultra-wealthy and corporations must pay their fair share of taxes to fund infrastructure. As to date, that is not happening. In addition, cutting red tape and back door deals to safeguard wise spending, initiated through an impartial bidding and contractual process to eliminate favoritism. Allocating a larger portion of state gas taxes to cover funding and exploring grants for water and sewer projects. I’ll look at the ability to tax the purchases of tourist goods and services, as to not burden the middle class. Health care is a right, not a privilege. Hardworking, low-income Montanans lacking access to healthcare face a vicious

cycle, especially within small rural communities. People cannot work if they don’t have their health. Denying people healthcare results in large medical debt. We should use tobacco taxes and the future possibility of tax revenue generated from cannabis, as well as allocating funds from corporate taxes to take care of our citizens healthcare needs. Need to control the profit driven medical facilities that put a strain on the budget. Reasonable caps on durable medical goods and equipment and reducing administrative costs. For Senate district 22, Billings, our vision is for Heights residents to explore, encourage and foster the planning and coordination of Heights resources through effective transportation routes, encouraging small business development and expanding community facilities. The Inner Belt Loop and pedestrian path completion is a primary concern. I will be heavily involved to formulate the best possible outcomes in a timely manner. We need to look at transportation availability as well as protecting open spaces and rights of land owners.

session! The results could all have been done by our Governor with more efficient results. However he chose to play with the lives of those most vulnerable to make a political points, which caused many to suffer needlessly. The 2017 Legislative budget presented to the Governor was adequate to serve our state and he agreed with his signature, but not with his governance! “Comprehensive” is defined as “all-inclusive” or “ample”. The Governor was not flexible, demanded all his projects be included and when they were not, the Governor chose not to negotiate or show his reasoning, but instead played a political game by using his veto. Our Governor has done this in the past three sessions, all with the same results. There were many infrastructure bills passed during the session related to water and sewer, and were funded through existing programs, coming from many sources, the big one is the coal severance fund and a new fuel tax. Montana’s Medicaid expansion program extended

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SENATE DISTRICT 22

Jennifer Merecki - D Occupation: Small business owner Agadas Integrated Wellness and former health care executive. Education: Psychology and biology major; licensed Therapeutic Massage Therapist and body work specialist; Licensed International Personal Fitness Trainer; certified holistic and fitness nutrition practitioner; Certified health and wellness coach; business administration

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Past employment: Previous Yellowstone Valley Citizen Council Sustainability Committee Chairperson; Previous Yellowstone Valley Citizen Council Steering Committee Secretary; Former Health Care Executive Director, Montana and Multiple other states; Former Health Care Risk Management AdministratorMulti-State Level Past political experience: Democratic Presidential Candidate Campaign grassroots organizer; Democratic presidential candidate Campaign spokesperson, rally presenter and speaker; elected Yellowstone County Montana Democrat delegate; Elected Montana State National Democrat delegate; Elected National Delegate Whip for Montana; Montana Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee Staff; Yellowstone Progressive Action Network Administrator; Healthcare Reform Lobby ; Environmental Stewardship Lobby ; Published Political Columnist and Author “Progressive Pioneer”- Yellowstone County News; State Communications Progressive Director-Montana Democrats

October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

Online campaign info: Twitter: @merecki4montana Facebook: @Merecki4MTSD22 www.mereckiforWebsite: montanasd22.com merecki4monEmail: tanasd22@outlook.com Address: In the district Phone: 406-672-7190 I believe we need to address gun violence in the order of public safety. As a gun owner, I believe in and respect the Second Amendment and value my Constitutional right to legally possess firearms. Though, I know that with rights come responsibilities. While protecting the second amendment, we must implement common sense. My stance is not to eliminate or confiscate firearms but bi-partisan, sensible gun legislation that protects life and liberty. As a seasoned executive with expansive budget experience, I see financial opportunities that have not been utilized. We need to focus on restoring the service cuts effecting people with disabilities, the elderly, mentally ill and children. We need to be fiscally responsible by creating a budget

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SENATE DISTRICT 24

Tom McGillvray - R Age: 62 Occupation: Retired Family: Married to Margaret and have three children Education: BS Agriculture, MSU-Bozeman Past employment: Ameriprise financial advisor 27 years political experiPast

ence: Four terms in the Montana House of Representatives (2005-2012), House leadership 3 terms (Majority Whip, Deputy Minority leader, Majority Leader). Served on House Judiciary, Health and Human Services, and Legislative (leadership) Council committees. Chairman, Montana Republican Legislative Campaign Committee (2007-2009) Online campaign info: Facebook: Facebook.com/tvmcgillvray Website: tommcgillvray.com Email: tvmcgillvray@gmail. com Address: 3642 Donna Drive, Billings MT 59102 Phone: 406-698-4428 One’s murderous weapon may be a gun, knife, bomb, car or other means. Our problem with violence is not weapons, but culture. Many young men have absent fathers and are angry, frustrated and often feel ostracized. A large body of evidence suggests that many mass shoot-

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ings are committed by individuals with serious mental illnesses. While the legislature needs to be sure we provide funding support for community-based mental health, families also need to do their part. Communicating, counseling, respect for authority, more family time and less screen time are places to start. There was no “$227 million hole.” Revenue for fiscal 2018 came in $29 million short of projections (1% off) and current revenue appears to be on track to meet projections for the biennium. The special session was not needed, and cuts were made unnecessarily. We do not need tax increases. State revenue has grown above Montana population growth and inflation for the last 15 years. As we focus on economic growth and Eastern Montana resource development, our revenues will continue to grow. State spending needs to be managed with priority items increased and lower priorities eliminated or decreased.

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chosen to do so. That is where the decision-making should remain. I supported the Governor’s proposed 2017 budget, which had a mix of cuts and tax increases. I voted against final budgets because of excessive cuts to important public services. We had opportunities to increase fees in the short term to address what many believed was a short-term revenue shortfall, but none were passed. Long term we need a balanced approach: a more transparent process for estimating revenue that doesn’t pit one branch of government against another; and a mix of new revenue along with cuts. Our state economy is changing, and our tax code needs to change with it. I don’t believe we can – or should – rely on cash for all our infrastructure needs and have supported bonding. I don’t know many Montanans who are able to make a long-term investment in

a business or home strictly with cash. Montana has enjoyed, and protected, an excellent credit rating, and could have taken advantage of historically low interest rates over the past several sessions to make important investments. I was extremely frustrated by our failure to do so. As a result, many worthy projects, including local needs, have been neglected and potential economic benefits were unrealized. I support Medicaid expansion, and the studies do too. As of July, enrollment benefited over 13,700 people in Yellowstone County and 9 out of 10 have incomes below the federal poverty level. All but the lowest income enrollees pay premiums for coverage, and most have copayments for services. There is already a requirement to seek employment. The idea that beneficiaries don’t work or pay for their care is incorrect. Yellowstone County

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Infrastructure funding comes from multiple sources in Montana. State and federal gasoline taxes, the coal trust, bonding and cash in specific bills passed by the legislature. I support all these methods of funding for infrastructure. I would prioritize water and water treatment, bridges, and roads first, then state or university buildings. I would bond if: State debt service remains reasonable and constant over time, the bonding does not jeopardize Montana’s high credit ratings, the projects will serve multiple future generations and the bonding represents priorities supported by constituents of SD 24 first, then the community and state I represent. I don’t. There are approximately 50,000 able-bodied, non-working adults without dependents in the Expansion program receiving free insurance while a working person can be paying $30,000 per year. A person with millions in sheltered assets qualifies and gets it free because there is no asset test. Expansion

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is an entitlement program, meaning, if you qualify, you can’t be turned down and the state must pay whatever it costs. In the special session of 2017 vulnerable Montanans lost $49 million in funding while spending for the able-bodied in Expansion grew by millions of dollars. The program is unaffordable, uncontrollable and unsustainable. Crime: Billings has a growing crime problem. I’ve met hundreds of families who’ve been vandalized, burglarized and intimidated. My opponent voted for HB 133. This bill reduced fines from $1,500 to $500.00 for $1,500 in property theft, lowered the mandatory prison term for child rapists from 25 years to 10, cut in half prison sentences for felony (5 or more) DUIs and made effective treatment options for DUI offenders less accessible. In a city struggling with crime, I will make sure crime does not pay. I will support treatment options for low-level offenders and strong minimum sentences for violent criminals.

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SENATE DISTRICT 24 College of Business, MSUB Past political experience: MT House, 2011-14; MT Senate 2015-present Online campaign info: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/senatormarymcnally/ Website: www.Mary-McNally.com McNally4mtleg@ Email: gmail.com Address: Live in the district Phone: 406-671-1350 There are gun bills every session. One I regularly oppose is to allow guns in schools. This is a perennial discussion for MUS system, and will likely now focus on K-12 campuses as well. Allowing guns on campuses, and/or Mary McNally - D arming teachers is not a safe soluAge: 63 tion to gun violence, and law enOccupation: retired; emeritus forcement personnel are the first professor of business, MSUB to oppose this type of legislation. Family: Monte Smith, spouse Mt School Boards already have the authority to put guns in schools Education: BS, MBA, Ph.D Past Employment: 29 years, (MCV 45-8-361) but few have

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has realized over $10 million in healthcare services as a result of Medicaid expansion. We need to find ways to continue this program. Increasing crime and public safety are concerns for Billings. Incidents of violent crime and cases of child abuse and neglect have all increased significantly. Methamphetamine abuse has also skyrocketed. The expansion and renovation of Yellowstone County jail will ease crowding and help efforts downtown to get people with addictions into treatment instead of jail. However, additional initiatives need to be pursued, including: reinstatement of critical mental health and case management services; sensible (and bipartisan) sentencing reform initiatives; and access to drug treatment programs. I have been, and will be, an advocate for public safety and community well-being.

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VOTER GUIDE | October 2018

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SENATE DISTRICT 27

Cary Smith - R Age: 67 Occupation: Montana State Senator SD 27; part-time laborer residential and commercial remodeling and new construction Family: Married to wife Susan 47 years, six grown children Education: Graduated from the University of Utah cum laude in 1972 with a BS degree in psy-

chology and completed extensive course work in philosophy, history and political science. Completed two years of graduate school at the University of Utah working on a master’s degree in vocational rehabilitation program Past Employment: Retired after 32 years with Sears Roebuck & Co. Past political experience: Currently serving as State Senator District 27, Majority Whip, ViceChair Joint Appropriations Subcommittee Long Range Planning, Vice-Chair Public Health, Welfare and Safety Committee, Member of Rules Committee, Member of Fish & Game Committee, Member of Finance & Claims Committee, Member of Ethics Committee and Member of Environmental Quality Council. Past Member of Business, Labor, and Economic Affairs Committee. Served as State Representative House District 55 2009-2014, Majority Whip 2011-2014, Chairman of Rules Committee, Vice-Chairman of Health & Human Services Committee, Member of Business & La-

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bor Committee. Member of Fish, Wildlife & Parks Committee and Member Environmental Quality Council. Named MVP “Most Valuable Policy Maker” by Montana Chamber of Commerce 2013. Served as a member of board of the Montana Retail Association acting as Chair for two years. Served on the Board of Directors for the Billings Area Chamber of Commerce and was the Vice Chair of the Public Affairs Council and the Convention & Visitors Council in addition to being active in the Legislative Committee, Legislative Subcommittee, Local Government Committee and the Tourism Advisory Council. Online campaign info: Facebook: Cary Smith Email: cary@bresnan.net Address: In the district at 6133 Timbercove Drive Phone: 406-698-9307 Sad as it is to see the deaths resulting from gun violence in cities like Chicago and the mass shootings in public gathering places, we don’t need more gun laws. What we need is to

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enforce existing laws and follow proven procedures that are effective when dealing with active shooter situations or potential active shooters. While some believe we need to look solely to government to protect us. It appears that in many cases our government failed to do so. The shooting doesn’t stop until a good guy with a gun shows up or even better is already on site. As it turns out there was not a problem with the current Montana budget and the 2019 Legislature does not need to make changes to align revenue with spending. General fund revenues are on target and there is not a $227 million hole as the question states. As of the 7/26/18 General Fund Revenue Summary actual general fund revenues are only $29.2 below the budget estimate and as revenue continues to improve the $29.2 million deficit is disappearing. The special session the Governor called was not necessary. The extensive cuts that the Governor made to healthcare services were not necessary.

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The way this question is stated would lead one to believe that the Montana Legislature did not pass any infrastructure legislation during the 2017 session. The truth is the legislature passed roughly $1 billion in cash and federal matches for priority infrastructure projects including water, sewer, roads and bridges. The infrastructure problem bill last session was SB 367 where bonding would have been used for about $78 million worth of spending. This bill had a good chance of passing if the governor had been willing to negotiate and not insist that some pet projects be part of the final package. I opposed ObamaCare and Medicaid Expansion is a major provision of ObamaCare. Medicaid Expansion serves low income able bodied individuals without dependents and greatly reduces funding available for those that Medicaid was originally intended to help. Medicaid was originally instituted to assist the truly needy

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Please see Smith, 30

Endorsed by: 7 Former Montana Supreme Court Justices Ed Smith, Clerk of the Montana Supreme Court 37 Montana District Court Clerks Former Clerk of the U.S. Supreme Court For 23 years, Rex has served honorably as Deputy Clerk of the Montana Supreme Court. Rex is working to keep politics out of Montana’s courts.

Experience. Independence. Transparency. Paid for by Rex for Montana (D), P.O. Box 718, Helena, MT 59624 October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE


SENATE DISTRICT 27

Bryan Stafford - D

Elect

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to realize we need to tackle the difficult question of how to keep firearms out of the hands of individuals who exhibit strong indicators that they may be a danger to themselves or others. Another huge aspect of this problem involves mental health which would fall under other healthcare legislation. For some time, our tax structure has been in need of some serious renovations in order to make it fair for all. Currently, much more of the burden falls on middle and lower income Montanans who’s effective tax rate is over 6%. For those making greater than $86,000/yr, the percentages decrease downward ending at 4.7% for the top bracket (>$435,000). To make things worse, we subsidize the infrastructure used by our 12 million annual visitors because we don’t collect any funds to pay for services used. We can implement common sense changes that are fair. Visit Stafford4mt.org for further information.

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Age: 57 Occupation: Independent Software Developer Family: Married to Grace Kim; two children: Evan and Erin Education: Attended the University of Colorado in Boulder but left without a degree. Beyond that,

I am extensively self-educated Past employment: I’ve been a busboy, a stable hand, a concrete former, a professional ski patroller, an EMT working for an ambulance service, a dental laboratory technician, a remodeling contractor and, a firefighter (most recently having volunteered with the Molt VFD). Past political experience: None Online campaign info: Twitter: @Stafford4MT Website: Stafford4MT.org Email: bryan@nvsw.org Address: In the district at 7641 Charolais St. Phone: 406-655-9758 This issue is complex and spans multiple categories of legislative territory. As such, it eludes simple “sound bite” solutions. I believe we should start with the implementation of common sense solutions such as strong enforcement of current firearms laws. One only needs to look at Montana’s gun related suicide rate

Much of the capital spent on infrastructure makes its way back into our communities. One form this process takes is the salaries for the good paying jobs these projects generate. That money is then spent on rents, mortgages and goods and services at local businesses. Thus, funding should not only be considered as an expense but also as an investment since the money percolates back into all of our pockets in one way or another. Common sense restructuring of our tax code can provide the necessary funding for such projects. Again, for a comprehensive outline, please see my website (stafford4mt.org). The data is clear: Medicaid expansion is providing great savings for Montanans and a great boost to our economy. It has allowed rural critical access hospitals to continue serving their communities rather than preparing to close. It has boosted the number of good paying jobs across the state. The list of benefits goes on.

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Funding through specific targeting of tobacco products, a major source of healthcare related expenses, is a good start. Targeting other high risk behaviors that result in higher healthcare costs for everyone, along with overall tax reform would provide the additional funding needed to continue the program. Crime related to addiction has hit the Billings area hard over the last several years. We have seen an increase in burglaries, robberies, vehicle thefts and other criminal activity. As we have discovered, apprehension and incarceration alone is not the answer since it does nothing to address the root problem. Addiction falls into the greater category of mental health issues which we are realizing lie at the root of so many of our current problems. We need increased access to mental health care and I will work with legislators from across Montana to create and enact legislation that accomplishes this.

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Count on Custer re-eleCt Geraldine Custer for montana house distriCt 39

for As your Judge, I believe everybody deserves to be treated with courtesy and respect by the Court.

As your Judge, I will apply the facts to the law as it is written, in every case, without passion or prejudice.

I believe a Judge works for the people who come before him or her, both lawyer and parties.

As a Veteran, I look forward to serving you as your Judge.

As your Judge, I will be completely unbiased.

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If the law says I must, I will. If the law says I can’t, I won’t.

- 40 Years of Public service - former small business owner - TrusTed communiTY leader - a Proven Public servanT, ProTecTinG easTern monTana’s inTeresTs

Geraldine Custer

for house distriCt 39

DEPARTMENT 7 406.598.2117 www e.com g .Thomas d u J MT, 59103 • thomaspardyforjudge@gmail.com s r g n li il o B , F 2 Pardy . Box 169 PAI ardy • P.O D FO R



l BY Thom Crysta as Pardy for Judge epartment 7 • Treasurer D

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Paid for by Custer for hd39, Box 1075 forsyth, mt 59327 VOTER GUIDE | October 2018

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SENATE DISTRICT 29 University Past employment: FBI agent, chief of law enforcement BLM, and self-employed Past political experience: three Montana House terms, one Montana Senate term Online campaign info: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/david.howard.7161 Email: SenDavidHoward@ gmail.com Address: Lives in the district, P.O. Box 10, Park City, Montana 59063 Phone: 406 633-2762 For 20 years, I consulted businesses how to prevent workplace violence. The experience has proven that deterrence is the key. David Howard - R Deterrence is the action of disAge: 71 couraging or preventing an event Occupation: Self-employed through instilling fear of discovery Family: Wife, six daughters or subsequent consequence in the and 15 grandchildren mind of the perpetrator. With no Education: Master’s degree deterrence, there is no prevention. in public administration, DePaul We have to come to the realization

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that there are young and old predators that are going to walk into our schools or anywhere to commit violence unless we have prevention programs in place. This is a sad fact of life in America today. Blaming guns is like Custer blaming bows. The purpose of the Constitution is not to meet the needs of the people; it is to ensure the people have the liberty to meet their own needs. Montana’s biennial budget has grown to $10 billion, and Montana is $4+ billion in debt. Montanans pay about $4.5 billion and the federal government gives us $5.5 billion and their $21 trillion in debt is growing. Montana doesn’t have a revenue problem, we have a spending problem. We need long term solutions and one of them is raising Montana’s wages that are presently 46th lowest out of 50 states. The Gazette should have asked, Should the Legislature obligate Montanans to more

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long term debt to pay for more infrastructure? There were millions of dollars of infrastructure appropriated over the last five legislative sessions, but it is never acknowledged. The governor and organizations like the Chamber of Commerce and unions who would benefit wanted to borrow millions on the back of Montanans when Republicans were worried about a budget shortfall that came to pass. It is irresponsible to create more debt when the state funds less than half its budget, $4.5 billion out of $10 billion, and while Montana is $4 billion in debt. First, we need to know how Medicaid expansion is run in Montana. All of the present 91,000 on Medicaid expansion are non-disabled, and 47,000 claim zero income, pay no income taxes with ample employment opportunities in Montana. Second, if a person becomes unemployed they can obtain Medicaid

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for the next year even if they are re-employed. Through bad management seasonal employees can receive Medicaid for the next year even after they resume working and make over $16K yearly. Third, about 2,900, of Montana’s Medicaid beneficiaries live out-of-state. Fourteen beneficiaries have addresses in Hawaii. 73 have addresses in Florida and Montanans are paying for it. Property taxes are one of the biggest concerns for homeowners, including ranch and farm owners in Stillwater and Carbon counties. Those on limited incomes, like seniors, are the most at risk of being forced out of their homes with the constantly rising property taxes. Plus, the two year re-assessment is raising property taxes too quickly. We need a statewide cap on the amount property taxes can increase or it will become catastrophically damaging to Montanans.

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SENATE DISTRICT 29 Jeff Anderson; two adult children: Jessamin Anderson, Jasper Anderson Education: BA English, University of Montana, Missoula; JD UM Law School Past employment: Self, general law practice 32 years; New York City Departments of Environmental Protection and City Planning, seven years; law clerk, Montana Supreme Court Past political experience: Mayor, City Council, Red Lodge, MT Online campaign info: Facebook: Scanlin for SD 29 Website: ScanlinforSenate. com Email: scanlinSD29@gmail. Elizabeth Scanlin - D com Age: 71 Address: In the District at Occupation: Retired attor- 401 N. Word Ave., Red Lodge ney Phone: Home: (406) 446Family: Husband of 44 years, 1599; Cell: (406) 671-1124

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Addressing gun violence is a must for the 2019 legislature. The ability for any one person to kill or injure multiple others before he or she can be stopped will continue to be a threat not only to our schools, but to our homes, businesses and public areas like malls and event center parking lots. We need to have an open discussion and action regarding bump stocks, high capacity magazines, and unregistered arms. Making government more efficient comes first. Then enforcement of payment of required taxes and assessments always produces more than the cost to do so. In one county of my senate district alone, there are 6,000 delinquent taxpayers. Finally, we need to encourage emerging businesses and industries and train and re-train our own residents to meet their needs, producing more business

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and income tax revenue. Cutting services or raising taxes are least desired. As a former mayor, I experienced that funding comes from many sources: federal and state grants and loans, bonds, and cash on hand. Needs often come before cash reserves. Grants and loans are necessary for larger infrastructure projects like replacement of water and sewer lines; both federal and state agencies have programs to assist with this. Bonds are like loans, and allow private parties to participate in funding large projects. Finally, user fees are often helpful to have costs paid by those parties who directly benefit. Medicaid, or a similar program that assists health costs of lower-income residents, will continue to be necessary. It’s clearly cost effective to prevent and treat illnesses and diseases that will

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otherwise end up in an emergency room or long-term care, costs that would result in being paid by other insured parties or the public. It’s logical to obtain additional funding from sources known to cause illness and disease. My Senate District 29 — all of Carbon, Stillwater, and part of Sweetgrass Counties — is entirely rural, with 15 small towns and areas with residents that are predominantly agricultural and seniors. The last legislature’s tax cuts disproportionately affected us by cutting school funding and social service programs that served folks who are least able to make up the difference and travel distances for those services, and has resulted in new tax burdens on local property owners. I will make school funding and social services a priority for this district’s residents.

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SENATE DISTRICT 30 Family: Wife, Stoney, two grown children Education: Attended MSU Bozeman Past employment: 45 years self-employed in Construction Past political experience: 12 years in the Montana Legislature, numerous local boards including the school board, hospital board and planning board Online campaign info: www. facebook.com/John-Esp-forSenate Email: johnesp2001@yahoo. com Address: In the district at P.O. Box 1024, Big Timber Phone: 406-932-5662 The current administraJohn Esp - R tion and the implementation Age: 66 of the biennial budget is giving Occupation: Carpenter/cabi- short shrift to Community Mennetmaker tal Health Services all across the

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State. Until we do a much better job of identifying, helping and treating those at risk of committing violent acts in our communities we are just spinning our wheels. It’s going to take a commitment of funds and a further commitment to partner with local officials if we hope to prevent these tragedies. With the exception of the first year of the three year projection, the legislative revenue estimate has been remarkably accurate. Obviously I would have looked somewhere other than the programs for mentally disabled, abused children, and developing disabled individuals in my first line budget cuts. That being said, the Governor had to make tough choices, and didn’t have the luxury of knowing then that revenue would rebound as quickly as it did. I think we can fund a modest growth in

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current programs at existing revenue levels. We can’t however fund Medicaid expansion for able bodied adults within those levels. If we have cash left over, especially from one time revenue, we should spend it on infrastructure. Bonding for other projects is acceptable. No one talks about the backlog of deferred maintenance on State buildings, State fishing access sites, University buildings, and local school buildings. The state owns a lot of property now that they aren’t taking care of properly. Before we build and buy a bunch of new properties, we should take care of noxious weeds, peeling paint, cracked sidewalks, and upkeep on property we already own. The elephant in the budget room is the question: Should we pay more taxes to fund Med-

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icaid for able bodied people? I do not favor continuing the program in its current form. If we are going down that road, I think recipients should be required to work, and be without significant personal assets to qualify for benefits. Even with those reforms, significant new taxes will have to be levied across the board to fund this new program. In my view, we must reform it because it is not financially sustainable long term. The math just doesn’t work. Most people in my district would rather see services for those that truly need it, delivered locally by local people. The tendency lately has been to centralize authority in Helena and from there, dole out needed services from bureaucrats that do not know us or our community. I would work to reverse this trend.

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SENATE DISTRICT 30

Dan Vermillion - D Age: 51 Occupation: Business owner Sweetwater Travel Co. Family: Married to Lynn Donaldson, three kids, Charlie 12, Ben 10, Chase 10 Education: American University 1989; University of Montana



School of Law 1996 Past employment: Moulton Law Firm 1996 to 1998; Sweetwater Travel 1998 to Present Past political experience: None. Served on Montana Fish and Wildlife Commission 2007 to Present. Served as Chair of Commission 2013 to Present. Online campaign info: Facebook: Dan Vermillion for State Senate Website: www.vermillionforsenate.com Email: danvermillion@gmail. com Address: In the district at 44 Adair Creek Rd., Livingston, MT 59047 Phone: 406-222-0624 I have owned and used firearms since my first year as a hunter in 1979. In general, I do not believe that the state legislature should get involved in the gun debate since it is a federal constitutional issue. However, keeping our kids safe in school and keeping people safe in public gather-

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ing places, is a state legislative responsibility. I do not believe we should arm our teachers. I do believe we should have a resource officer in each school that has full law enforcement training. I also believe that our schools should take a look at making schools safer I have no interest in raising personal income taxes. However, there are ways to raise revenues with local option taxes, resort taxes, and excise taxes that need to be part of the discussion when the legislature is trying to fund state government. I also believe that state government can be more efficient, so we must look at expenditures to see where we can save money for the state through budget cuts. However, I don’t believe our cuts should be focused on the most vulnerable members of our communities. We need to make sure we fund our schools, our healthcare, and our infrastructure. Montana’s economy depends upon continued in-

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vestment in our infrastructure of roads, bridges, airports, schools, and more. I have always viewed the infrastructure question from a business owner’s perspective. Businesses look at the time value of money when deciding whether to make an infrastructure investment and, if they decide to make that investment, whether they should make that investment in cash or borrowed funds. Because infrastructure is a large expense, the state should capitalize upon its AAA bond rating to finance the infrastructure investments that our state needs. This investment in infrastructure will pay dividends to Montana farms, ranches, businesses, communities, and will create jobs for Montanans. In small towns like Livingston and Big Timber, Medicaid has been critical to keeping the doors of our hospitals and clinics open. In fact, Medicare and Medicaid provide over 60 percent of the revenue to the Livingston hospital. We must figure out a

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way to extend Medicaid to protect the 91,000 Montanans, including many in our community, that depend upon it. While I am sure there are some savings that can be found to help pay for Medicaid expansion, it is not realistic, nor responsible, to renew Medicaid without having a plan to pay for it. Affordable housing is one of the biggest challenges we face in southwestern MT. It affects our ability to grow our economy. It affects our families, our schools, and our communities. If elected, I will work across the aisle to create affordable housing options for Montanans here in Park and Sweet Grass Counties, and all across our state. Specifically, we will need to look at state tax credits for private investment in affordable housing options, affordable housing loan funds that are funded from different reserves the state can access, and any other program that can increase the supply of affordable housing for Montanans.

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VOTER GUIDE | October 2018

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HOUSE DISTRICT 29 Dan Bartel - R Age: 61 Occupation: Retired Family: Wife Danielle, three grown sons Education: High school Past employment: Self-employed businessman Past political experience: Current HD29 Representative Online campaign info: Facebook: Yes Email: danbartel2@gmail. com Address: Lives in district at PO Box 1181 713 West Main St., Lewistown Phone: 406-366-4160

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I strongly support the 2nd amendment. More gun control law, is not the answer. We just need to enforce the laws already on the books. Mental illness is an issue all Montanans need to address. Exposing young minds to a daily dose of violent video games,movies,TV shows, and unlimited internet is a problem. Family values are lacking in today’s society. We need to control the drug problem, and to address the social problems of today. I will fight hard not to raise taxes. We need to align government spending with revenue, not revenue to government spending. Government needs to be more

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efficient. We need to downsize our government. The citizens of Montana are at their limit on taxation in regards to income. In the 2017 Montana Legislative session, the Legislature authorized more than 200 million dollars to be spent in years 2018 and 2019 on infrastructure and local projects throughout Montana. The Montana Dept. of Transportation also has a budget of approximately 980 million dollars to spend directly on highway projects over the next two years. The two together is more than 1 billion dollars being spent on state government and infrastructure. The Legislature needs

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to have more input on infrastructure projects and prioritize the projects. I am concerned the taxpayer cannot afford to pay for 91,000 Montana citizens on Medicaid. We need to look at how the program is operated. We need to address asset testing requirements, income eligibility requirements, and work eligibility requirements. Taxpayers are looking at a cost of 120 million dollars to fund Medicaid Expansion. How do we fund government programs? We need to expand the use of our natural resources. This will allow us to continue to fund Montana programs.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 29

Rachel Stansberry - D Age: 57 Occupation: Speech-language pathologist Family: Married for 28 years to Scott, children Clare, Ingrid and Aidan Education: BS University of

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Wisconsin-Madison, MA-University of Montana Past employment: Currently employed: Central Montana Learning Resource Center Cooperative, Bearpaw Cooperative Past political experience: First-time candidate Online campaign info: Twitter: @rachrunsmt Facebook: Rachel Stansberry for MT HD 29 Website: Rachelstansberrymt. org Email: Rachelstansberrymt@ gmail.com Address: Lives in the disctrict at 906 W. Blvd., Lewistown, Montana 59457 Campaign address: PO Box 576 Lewistown, Montana, 59457 Phone: 406-366-1377 The pathway Montana has taken to address suicide prevention is an excellent model to begin our work on gun violence. Research by the CDC at the National level provided critical information

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October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

on the demographics of suicide. The 2017 Montana Legislature passed legislation to address the problem. From there, we’ve seen the impact of system wide change on individuals. The Arlee Warriors Boys Basketball team then brought it back to the National level. We all want our children, schools and public places to be safe. By using data, applying policy and evaluating effectiveness, we can continue to solve complex problems. Revenue will be a major issue in the 2019 Legislature. We need to strengthen our value for public institutions and services and commit to what should be covered at the state level. When cuts are made at the state level, increases appear at the local level. We need to capture revenue that doesn’t burden working Montana families. There should be a relationship between the cost something has to our state and the revenue we gain from that cost. For example, gas tax used for roads, tobacco tax used for

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health. As a legislator, I’ll consider all possible sources of revenue. Across the state, much of the public infrastructure is in a critical state of disrepair. In the last two sessions, the legislature did not take advantage of the combination of the growing state economy and low interest rates and recognize it as a favorable bonding environment. As a legislator, I would consider bonding infrastructure. I would look at a variety of possibilities for infrastructure funding, especially ones that capitalize on the thriving tourist economy. I would consider University buildings as part of an infrastructure bill. I support continued funding of the Medicaid expansion. In 2019, Montana will have to pick up five percent of the cost, roughly estimated to be $82.5 million over the next two years. The percentage will rise to ten percent by 2020. The proposed ballot initiative to fund the State’s share of the Medicaid expansion is sponsored by

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the Montana Hospital Association and the American Heart Association and proposes raising the State tax on tobacco. I support this proposal. We also need to fix the system, so the cost isn’t shifted onto those who pay for their own insurance. The Montana Constitution states ‘The state and each person shall maintain and improve a clean and healthful environment in Montana for present and future generations.’ I take this responsibility seriously. Big Spring Water is the pride of my community. Water is crucial to both Agriculture and Tourism and I will be attentive to any legislation that impacts these two economies I’m also very concerned about invasive species as these impact fishing, raw water users, agriculture and utilities. I support aggressive measures to prevent the introduction and spread of these in Montana waters as the consequences are costly to consumers.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 30

Kathryn Nicholes - L Age: 61 Occupation: Self-employed, computer services (software, hardware, websites) as Concise Logic since 1983; also making Volectar electric guitars since 2010. Family: Married since 1984, two grown children. Education: Bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Michigan State University

Past Employment: Artist, house renovator, Computer Sciences Corporation optimization programmer, business owner/ manager/bookkeeper, computer services, mother, supply manager and dietician, home-school teacher, 2010 census worker, medical advocate Past political experience: President of the Philosophy Club (senior year college), member of Leaders’ Group of First Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Second Life 2016-present Online campaign info: facebook.com/kghn4MT2018; Website: kghn4mt.com Email: Kathryn-G-H-Nicholes@kghn4mt.com Address: In the district at 10 Jawbone Road, Martinsdale MT 59053. Phone: 406-572-3323 Gun threats and tragedies have received attention far out of proportion to their prevalence. I find our current gun regulations tolerable. I feel strongly that trying to restrict 3-D printer files of gun components would result in either the evil of government surveillance over-intrusion,

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or the evil of unusual and irregular enforcement. The 2019 legislature can have more positive and practical impact by addressing any of these issues: health care access, mental health care including residential rehabilitation programs longer than 30 days, better temporary living shelters, job education and search support programs, and road safety infrastructure improvements. Addressing budget funding, I support legalizing growth and use of medical marijuana and adult recreational cannabis. I support development of industrial hemp farming in our suitable climate. I support both bulk export, and made in Montana processing - for food, biofuel, textiles and construction materials. Like alcohol and tobacco products, we can directly “sin tax” retail recreational cannabis sales. Our business tax base will expand if we grow, process, and sell legal industrial hemp. Workers in those new businesses would pay state income tax. This policy would add to the state’s tax base, raising revenue without raising rates.

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Economic growth is key to sustainable infrastructure funding. Austerity and high taxes to prevent debt are a losing strategy. I prefer loans and judicious tax increases. Letting human and infrastructure resources deteriorate hurts our future. Montana should have a state bank safeguarding the pensions of state employees, and potentially making fair loans for state projects. North Dakota’s state bank protected that state’s economy during the banking crisis, giving valuable stability. Montana’s electricity industry is significant. We export about half of our generated electricity. Enabling local ownership of grid-connected, distributed electrical generation will attract private investment for growth. Expanded Medicaid protects human resources. We should reduce Montana’s expanded Medicaid expense by changing the ACA income cutoff. Expanded Medicaid for ages 55-65 is NOT insurance, it’s a long-term loan of the individual’s medical bills, due at death. It doesn’t spread the financial risk

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of illness or protect aging adults’ assets. We should let people 55+ use the Healthcare Marketplace, and receive the Federal subsidy, even if those subscribers expect income less than 133% of poverty line. This would allow many at medically higher risk to withdraw from the state’s Medicaid responsibility, and buy subsidized actual insurance. The issue of right-to-repair affects farmers, ranchers, and rural residents disproportionately. It’s not fair to let manufacturers force owners to use distant authorized repair centers, or to abandon repairable machinery the company chooses to no longer support. The ingenuity and skill of farm mechanics contribute to the profitability of our agricultural sector. I assert that owners should not be legally prevented from exploring and modifying machines they have purchased, including examining proprietary software. Our state legislature should make a formal request for alteration of Federal intellectual property regulations regarding end-user restrictions.

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Frequently asked questions from Montana Secretary of State’s Office Q. What are the dates of the federal primary and general elections? A: A Federal primary election is held every even-numbered year on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in June. A Federal general election is held every even-numbered year on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November. Presidential elections are combined with the congressional, statewide, state district, and county elections. The 2018 federal primary election will be held on June 5, 2018, and the 2018 federal general election will be held on November 6, 2018. Additional 2018 election



dates are at https://sosmt.gov/ elections/calendar. Q. Where can I find polling place information and/or satellite location information? A. For polling place information and other voter-specific information, feel free to visit the My Voter Page service, https://app. mt.gov/voterinfo/. For a list of polling places and satellite locations for the upcoming or most recent federal election, visit Polling Places and Satellite Offices. Q. What are the dates of municipal primary and general elections? A. A municipal primary election, if necessary, is held every

odd-numbered year on the first Tuesday after the second Monday in September. A municipal general election is held every odd-numbered year on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November. Q. Where can I find out information about school elections? A. Visit the Office of Public Instruction website at http://opi. mt.gov/Leadership/FinanceGrants/School-Finance/Elections. Q. What are the deadlines for the close of regular registration for the federal primary and general elections? A. Regular registration closes

30 days before any election. Late registration begins the next day, and ends at the close of polls on election day (except from noon until 5:00 p.m. on the day before election day). Late registration can only be done at the county election administrator’s office or the location designated by the election administrator. Q. Do I have to vote in a primary election in order to vote in the general election? A. No. Q. Which parties are qualified for primary access in Montana? Is there party registration in Montana? Can people in a primary election vote for more

than one party’s candidates? A. The list of Montana’s qualified parties is available on our website at: https://sosmt.gov/ elections/parties. There is no party registration in Montana. Individuals who vote in a primary election are given all the parties’ ballots, and can choose in private which party ballot they wish to vote. Voters in a primary election cannot vote more than one party’s ballots. Q. How are Montana’s presidential electors chosen? A. The applicable laws and a complete list of Montana’s most recent presidential electors are available here.

VOTER GUIDE | October 2018

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HOUSE DISTRICT 38 Family: Married with three adult children Education: Bachelor’s degree in secondary education with some master’s credits from U of M Past Employment: Self-employed locksmith 1983 to 2013; Kmart manager 1973 to 1983; high school teacher 1972 to 1973. Past political experience: Two terms in the Montana legislature Online campaign info: Email: Ken.Holmlund@mtleg.gov Address: In the district at 1612 Tompy St, Miles City Phone: 406-951-6764 I am a strong supporter of the second amendment. Guns Kenneth Holmlund - R are not the problem but who has Age: 70 access to them is. Background Occupation: Retired lock- checks can only go so far but individual responsibility where access smith

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October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

to guns is concerned is critical. Most lifetime Montana citizens have been raised around guns but we learned to respect them for what they were, recreation tools. People with mental problems need to be better diagnosed and treated and should not have access to firearms. The revenue for the 2018 fiscal year came in very close to the projection of the legislature, only 1.2% below projection, a bullseye in our thinking. It is my belief the Governor over-reacted and cut the places that would harm the most vulnerable even though he was required to do the opposite. Cutting the growth of state government is a better solution than increasing taxes, if it is done within reason. The Montana legislature has a long term planning

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sub-committee in the Appropriations committee and I believe that is where buildings should be placed. Infrastructure is water, sewer and roads. Millions were appropriated during each of the last two sessions from the interest from the coal trust fund. Additional funding would be much more likely to pass if the buildings were not included in the bill. Quality schools funding must be found to help schools do repairs they cannot afford on their own. Bonding will have a difficult time passing the 2019 session. There is a lot of false information concerning Medicaid expansion. Just having a sunset date on the 2015 bill that gave us the expansion does not mean it will die. What it does mean is the legislature is required to take a look at it again and make some

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tweeks but it will not go away. The initiative will not fund the expansion-far from it. There is no desire to end Medicaid expansion by the legislature but some changes need to be considered. The legislature has no other possibility to fund it except from the general fund. Infrastructure funding is a vital concern and the funding for it will have to come from the coal trust fund interest and a low level of bonding. Last session a bill was proposed to allow $33.5 million in bonding and it could have passed. The governor’s people would not support it so it didn’t make it to the floor since a 67% threshold is required for passage. A higher level of bonding isn’t popular with the majority so a compromise must be reached to be successful in passing.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 38

Bert Pezzarossi - D Age: 45 Occupation: Occupational environmental services manager, SCLHealth Holy Rosary Family: Husband, Dan Hance, eight children: Austin, Alex, Anthony, Archie, Lane, Taevon, Tavian, Julious.

Education: Bachelor’s degree in business administration/management, University of Kentucky Past employment: Pezzarossi Cattle Co. Ranch hand; Holy Rosary Healthcare financial analyst; Eastern Montana Industries payroll/client payables, Miles Community College accounts payable Past political experience: Vice chair of the Custer County Democrats Online campaign info: www. BertForHD38.com Email: PezzarossiForHD38@ gmail.com Address: In the district at 517 So. Jordan, Miles City, MT 59301 Phone: 406-951-0447 (candidate cell), 406-852-5009 (campaign cell) The state legislature needs to fund infrastructure improvements to help schools strengthen security. Districts need to examine vulnerable entry points while protecting important fire exits. Districts also need funding for school resource officers or a plan for in-

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creased local law enforcement visibility and presence. As for arming teachers, I am against doing so, as proper training is unrealistic for weapon use in high stress situations; we are not going to be able to train teachers as much as law enforcement officers or military personnel. Further, the majority of Montana teachers don’t want to personally carry a gun in school. The Legislature must work with the Executive Branch to create realistic revenue forecasts to ensure the state budgeting process is productive and serves Montana citizens well. Currently, the highest income earners pay the same tax rate as a single parent working for minimum wage. This disparity in burden must be resolved. The cuts voted in by the Republican-majority hit the most vulnerable populations in Custer County and across the state. Mental health services and other State of Montana services are critical to our communities. Montanans deserve transparency and directness

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RE-ELECT

JESSICA

KARJALA foR HousE DisTRiCT 48 As your Legislator i will continue to • Support Montana’s working families • Fight for transparency against dark money • Fight for our hunting and fishing rights and defend our public lands

from their representation. Montana needs to finally pass a comprehensive infrastructure bill that develops and sustains roads, bridges, and college buildings. We must support Montana’s growth while ensuring all Montanans have a high quality, sustainable way of life. Investing in infrastructure means jobs and economic growth while maintaining basic public safety. The Legislature has failed to send a comprehensive bill to the Governor three of the past four legislative sessions. As Miles City’s representative in Helena, I will be a leader on this issue and bring critical funding to our community for urgent, long-neglected projects. Discontinuing Medicaid expansion means 91,000 Montanans who did not previously have healthcare will again lose their coverage; this is not a viable or ethical option. Medicaid expansion has also been an economic driver in many communities, allowing rural hospitals to keep

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their doors open, bringing about $350 million in new spending to the state’s economy, and adding 5,000 jobs in health care and other industries. Continuing to fund Montana’s Medicaid expansion is imperative, and as your elected representative, I will work to establish a sustainable funding plan. Access to quality, affordable, and adequate mental healthcare in Miles City is a crucial issue. Prioritizing this issue, both fiscally and socially, directly addresses the plague of suicides and family violence incidents in our state. In the 2019 Legislature, I will prioritize and author bills that appropriately fund mental health centers, school programs, and anti-bullying campaigns. Recruiting, training, and retaining mental health professionals in Montana must be a fiscal priority. Correctly tackling this epidemic, which affects people of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds, requires leadership and action that is free of empty rhetoric and “bandaid solutions.”

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Trusted. Effective. Ready to serve.

Ming Cabrera

• Support our Seniors and Veterans

Candidate for House distriCt 44

• Support our Public Education System

as your elected representative, i will advocate for:

You’ve told me your concerns and i have listened and look forward to continuing to serve you.

➤ Public schools and higher learning ➤ Living wages ➤ infrastructure to improve local business climate ➤ Quality healthcare, particularly for the elderly

Paid for by Karjala for HD48 – Democrat, 6125 Masters Boulevard, Billings, MT 59106

mingforlegislature.com Paid for by Ming for Legislature, Democrat, 1734 Poly Drive, Billings, MT 591202. Digna Cabrera,Treasurer



VOTER GUIDE | October 2018

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HOUSE DISTRICT 40

Lisa Barton - D Age: 57 Occupation: Unemployment Insurance Division field representative Family: Single Education: Bachelor’s degree in business; accounting major, management minor, and business ed teaching certificate

Past employment: Worked for Billings Job Service for three years and was a field auditor with the Department of Revenue. Past political experience: First campaign for office. Previous political experience includes lobbying for replacement of the Department of Revenue POINTS program and presenting a plan to the CIO, Brian Wolf, to reorganize the withholding unit and replace a failed system with a new system. This plan became part of SB270, sponsored by then-Sen. Corey Stapleton in 2003 and saved taxpayers millions of dollars. I testified in the 2001 legislature about the issues in POINTS as well. Once the bill passed, I supervised the unit that had to reconcile and review thousands of accounts before the conversion to the two new systems. Online campaign info: Facebook: Lisa Barton for Montana Website: BartonforMontana. com Email: lisaformontana@

gmail.com Address: In the district at 4040 S. Mountain View Road, Molt, MT 59057 Phone: 406-669-3240 Realistically, I do not see anything changing in Montana regarding gun laws. We can fund suicide prevention, mass shooting drills in our schools, and encourage domestic abuse victims to leave their homes before they’re fatally attacked, but otherwise no other legislation will pass in Montana. The guns used in most of these crimes and suicides are not semi-automatic weapons. I realize there is a short time between elections and the session and term limits mean legislators don’t get as familiar with the agencies as they used to, but I think it’s important to evaluate agency budgets more closely when deciding what should be cut. The proposal to simply lay off all employees who earned more than $50,000/year was irresponsible. I’d encourage more accountability during the interim and more visits

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are down drastically since the ACA was passed and that’s good for health care providers as well as their patients. The HELP program also has a component to assist people in finding better paying jobs. Therefore, I support the ballot initiative, though I wish the costs were not borne by just one segment of the population. But it’s clear that the majority party intends to kill this program, so the initiative appears to be the only way to save it. The cuts that came after the special session and the threat to end the Medicaid expansion which has helped so many families have taxpayers concerned about what will happen in the next session. I will work for a budget that maximizes a return of matching federal dollars. I believe that budget cuts need to be more surgical and well-thought out and the revenue process needs to be reviewed for more stable and accurate estimates to prevent drastic and hasty cuts to social services that we saw in the last bi-ennium.

by legislators to the local state offices and have listening sessions with employees to talk about what our perspective. State employees are taxpayers too and we want efficiency as well. Funding for infrastructure will come from multiple sources depending on the projects. Some funding can be derived from special revenue funds, some projects can be funded with increases in user-access fees, other projects will need general fund and bonding. We need to understand that if we don’t invest in our state’s infrastructure now and modernize our water systems, maintain our schools, and roads that the next generation of Montanans won’t want to stick around. Yes, it takes a sacrifice to do it, but our grandparents built our communities and we can’t let their investment go to waste. I’ve spent most of my career working with small businesses and understand well the wages/benefits that Montanans earn. Medical bankruptcies

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cut the waste out of State Government and NO NEW TAXES An Infrastructure bill has passed every Legislative Session. In the past, the funding would come from the General Fund or current revenue. The problem is the growth of our State Government has spent those dollars and the Legislature is being to asked to borrow & spend future money. I believe that our State should live within the revenue we have and cut the waste out of our State Government to afford the things we NEED. No more political pet projects should be thrown into an infrastructure bill. Medicaid Expansion is prioritizing able bodied, non working adults over those who really are in need and our most vulnerable citizens. The efforts promoting I-185 or deceiving and would not come close to paying

for Medicaid expansion. If I-185 passes, it will force cuts to other services or the raising of taxes to pay for Medicaid Expansion. House District 40 is rural town, farm & ranch. Big list of “important issues”. „„ local town & city issues that need some state intervention or assistance „„ fighting the war on coal, for our coal mine near Roundup „„ drinking water projects in Broadview & Roundup „„ Coal Board Funding for our local communities „„ Fight for NO MORE TAXES „„ Funding & services for our vulnerable (elderly, mental illness, CPS) There are a lot more issues, which is the most important? I do not get to make that decision I try to fight for all issues that affect the citizens in House District 40.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 40 Murphy Usher, four children Education: 3.5 years college Past employment: US Coast Guard; 14 years law enforcement; 24 years business owner; computer services, NASCAR racing, Harley-Davidson dealer, powersports dealer Past political experience: One term as Montana Representative, House District 40 Online campaign info: facebook.com/BarryUsherforMontana/ barry4montana@ Email: gmail.com Address: 5425 Clapper Flat Road, Laurel Montana 59044 Phone: 406-252-2888 a. School Violence - yes 2019 we should continue to disBarry Usher - R cuss school gun violence again Age: 48 as we did in the 2017 There were Occupation: Business owner sever bills proposed & passed by Family: Married to Ann Marie the legislature that the Gov ve-

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October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

toed. One allowed Local School Board to decide if they wanted “certain trained staff” to carry a firearm, which I supported. b. Suicide – the Majority of the Suicides in Montana Are on our Native American Reservations. We first make sure the Federal Government is providing enough funding for suicide prevention on our Reservations. The Governors 2018 Special Session and cuts to the most venerable citizens was premature. Governor Bullock focused the Special Session on raising taxes, which failed in the Legislature. The Legislature gave the Governor the tools to be able to fill the gap, which the Governor rejected, forcing the Governor to choose to make cuts, at which time the Governor chose what/where to make cuts. Currently revenue is near the Legislatures projections. Need to

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HOUSE DISTRICT 43 an aviation major at Rocky Mountain College, and Riley, 12, an 8th grader at Medicine Crow Middle School. Education: Bachelor’s degree in political science, Montana State University Billings Past employment: A reporter in the south-central Idaho area for about 15-years before moving to Billings. Worked for MSU-Billings University Relations Department for two years. Past political experience: Community organizer for the Bullock-Juneau campaign and also served as the Special Assistant for Lynda Moss’ congressional campaign. Online campaign info: Blair Koch - D Email: blairkoch@gmail.com Age: 36 Address: Lives in the district at Occupation: Business man- 639 Joyce Street, Billings ager, Western Heritage Center Phone: 208-316-2607 I am with many Montana gun Family: Husband Walter, marowners believing the 2019 ried 18 years, two sons, Parker, 18,

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Legislature needs to seriously address gun violence. Gun violence can be addressed with a common sense approach to regulations and safety. In Montana, we can close legal loopholes to make our state safer. One in particular, aligning our state law with federal regulations that would make sure those with serious mental illness would not be allowed to purchase firearms. We should also do our best to make sure violent domestic partners are not allowed guns. Other common sense solutions include public safety notifications about the proper way to handle and store firearms. In the past several months, Montana has experienced devastating cuts to service- especially to public services dealing with mental health and physical disabilities. These cannot continue and I would not support such cuts in the future. Our state,

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like many others, are facing the realization that revenue must increase in order to meet the needs of the state. I would support very targeted tax increases, including exploring a more progressive state income tax. Infrastructure is needed to move Montana forward. From millions in needed highway repairs to internet In 2017, the Medicaid Health and Economic Livelihood Partnership Oversight Committee, reviewing a report by the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the U of M, indicated Medicaid expansion led to 5,000 jobs and $280 million in personal income in 2017. I support continuing this very important social safety net. I support the ballot initiative to fund the program via tobacco taxes, but realize this can not be a long term solution. Once again, the success of this ser-

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vice, as many others provided by Montana, depends on viable revenue not realized today. The 2019 Legislature and beyond needs to reevaluate its priorities. I would support investigating ways to increase revenue, including tax increases on those that can most afford it. Healthcare is a huge issue in not only my district, but Montana as a whole. Access to healthcare is a right that should be afforded to everyone, not only those who can afford it. It is also an important economic driver for our area and state. That said, I believe the profit-motive in our system needs to be addressed. I would support profit caps on some services and supplies and also believe in cutting costs for administrative services. I support exploring options, like Medicare for All, that could expand access and lower costs.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 43 and four grandchildren Education: Bachelor’s degree in science in math education; master’s degree in math education Past employment: Math Teacher, librarian, and small business owner Past political experience: Currently representing House District 43. I served on the State Administration, Education, and Agriculture Committees in the 2017 session. Online campaign info: Facebook: Peggy Webb for House District 43 Email: webb4house@gmail. com Address: Not in district, at 1132 Ginger Ave., in Billings. Peggy Webb - R Phone: (406) 248-1953 Age: 65 Violence of any kind needs Occupation: Retired mathto be dealt with on a local ematics teacher level. What works in one localFamily: Married to Roger for ity may not work in another. Guns 46 years, two grown daughters, are not our enemy – if guns were

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eliminated, those wishing to inflict harm would use some other weapon. If we are going to lower the suicide rate in Montana and violence in schools and public places, we need to get to the root of the problem. Broken families, depression, mental illness, and illegal drug use are major contributors to the violence our country is experiencing. Infringing on our 2nd Amendment rights is not the answer. As reported in recent news, the Legislature’s 2017 budget estimate was less than 2% below the actual revenue. We did not need to have a special session. The Governor “created a crisis” to try to get the legislature to raise taxes. Cuts did not have to be made, especially to those most vulnerable. I have complete faith that the 2019 Legislature will be able to balance the budget without raising taxes or cutting es-

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sential services, just as they did in 2017. If the Governor’s “building bill” does not pass, there is a misconception that the legislature did not pass infrastructure funding. According to my calculations, House Bill 5 appropriated over $176 million for true infrastructure (roads, bridges, water/ sewer), House Bill 11 appropriated over $37 million from the Treasure State Endowment, and House Bill 473, which increased the gas tax, was estimated to generate a minimum of an additional $27 million a year. I expect similar bills to be passed in the 2019 session. When Montana’s Medicaid expansion program was passed, it included a 2019 sunset. This was to find out if the program was working as expected, to determine the actual costs, and to decide if the state can afford it. The ballot initiative would not

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fully fund the program; in fact, it would not even fund half of it. This would leave the taxpayers on the hook for $34 million a year at the current costs. This figure stands to increase as Federal funding decreases, enrollees increase, and tobacco taxes decrease. This program has some major problems. I cannot support it. Taxes, especially property taxes, are a major concern for my constituents. They are also against a local options tax, or any kind of new tax, for that matter. Our state needs to live within its means and not strap our citizens even more by raising taxes. I will fight for my constituents by voting “no” on any new taxes. I will also be a champion for small businesses, which are the backbone of our communities. If small businesses thrive, they will raise wages and hire more employees which will increase our tax base.

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VOTERS GUIDE| October 2018

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V O T E R I N F O R M AT I O N G U I D E JON TESTER VETERANS HEALTH CARE DARK MONEY PUBLIC LANDS

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MATT ROSENDALE

Had 10 bills signed by President Trump to improve care for veterans and hold the VA accountable

Voted against critical funding for MT Veterans Homes

Including landmark bipartisan legislation to give veterans a choice of a local doctor when the VA can’t meet their needs.

Including building the Southwest Montana Veterans Home in Butte and against restoring a $3 million cut to the Montana Veterans Home in Columbia Falls - even though local veterans spoke out against it.

Secured 9 new VA facilities across Montana

Opposed Scholarship & First-Time Home Buyers Programs

Fought to secure funding for the Southwest Montana Veterans Home and delivered tools to hire additional VA doctors and nurses.

Voted against scholarships for Montana Purple Heart recipients and against creating a program to help Gold Star families purchase their first home.

Relentlessly fighting to lower the cost of health care for Montana families

Rubber-stamped every rate hike—up to 23%— Insurance companies asked for

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Consistently fighting to hold insurance companies and the pharmaceutical industry accountable to lower costs for Montanans.

Found every rate hike requested by insurance companies "reasonable," even though it's his job to hold them accountable.

Defending rural access to quality health care

Hired an insurance lobbyist, took money from insurance execs and cut himself a check

Fought to secure long-term funding for Montana's 17 community health centers that serve nearly 100,000 Montanans, and pushing for legislation to get more doctors and nurses in rural Montana.

Raised over $16,000 from insurance executives in Florida, cut himself a check, then pushed to expand policies like theirs.

Protecting coverage for the 152,000 Montanans with preexisting conditions

Gut protections for the 152,000 Montanans with preexisting conditions

Fighting back against Washington plans that would let insurance companies deny coverage to people with preexisting conditions.

Backed plans that would let insurance companies deny coverage to Montanans with pre-existing conditions like diabetes.

Backing bills to force dark money transparency

Voted against bipartisan law to expose dark money

Pushing legislation like the DISCLOSE Act to force dark money groups to disclose their big donors and spending.

Opposed the Montana Disclose Act, which required dark money groups spending in Montana elections to disclose their big donors and spending.

Endorsed by End Citizens United

Including introducing a Constitutional Amendment to overturn the decision that opened the floodgates for unlimited money in our elections and make clear that corporations aren’t people.

Champions keeping public lands in public hands

Endorsed by Citizens United

The group behind the flood of unlimited money into our elections, and opposes a Constitutional Amendment to rein in unlimited spending and declare corporations are not people.

Advocated for the transfer of our federal public lands

Consistently opposed efforts to sell or transfer our federal public lands, which could lead to the loss of public access for Montanans.

East Coast developer on the record as a longtime advocate for the transfer of our federal public lands, the first step to selling them off and losing access.

Works across the aisle to protect our treasured public lands

Deciding vote on the Land Board to obstruct permanent public hunting access

Including fighting to permanently authorize and fully fund the Land & Water Conservation Fund and passing legislation to protect sensitive areas like the Rocky Mountain Front and East Rosebud Creek.

October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

Voted against ensuring access to 20,000 acres in Eastern Montana and against protecting 7,000 acres in Southwest Montana from development.

PAID FOR BY MONTANANS FOR TESTER


HOUSE DISTRICT 44

Ming Cabrera - D Age: 60 Occupation: Semi-retired, property owner Family: Married, Digna Cabrera; with two children, MJ, and architect, and Stephanie, a public

school teacher Education: Creighton University, bachelor’s degree in science, and Manila Central University School of Medicine Past Employment: 30 years sales executive pharmaceuticals Past political experience: Eastern Montana Committeeman Democratic Party 2017-present Online campaign info: Facebook: Ming for Legislature Website: mingforlegislature. com Email: mingformontana@ gmail.com Address: I am a property owner on Main Street in my district Phone: 406-671-2527 Gun Rights are very important in the rural and urban settings of Montana. I am a gun owner and enjoy the hunting privileges – especially upland birds and target shooting. I am often found at Blue Creek partici-

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pating in “Five stand” or shooting “sporting clays”. I know the right to bear arms is important and necessary. The safety of Montanan’s must be considered. I will continue to support background checks to prevent those who threaten our community from obtaining dangerous weapons and will also fight to ensure adequate funding for mental health services to combat the suicide epidemic in our state. The primary job of a legislature is to make sure our state continues to balance the budget while setting realistic goals with revenue in mind. In order to secure more revenue for our state I will advocate for finding creative ways to ensure those tourists who visit Montana pay their fair share. I was not in favor of the cuts to mental health services during the 2017 session that affected veterans and the most vulnerable. We cannot afford to cut mental health

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services as a state with one of the highest suicide rates in the nation. I will be a strong advocate for infrastructure projects in Billings Heights. I support continuing to fund the by-pass highway from Lockwood and making Main Street more attractive to both commercial entities and those who drive daily on this state highway. Billings Heights is considered the fifth largest city in Montana with Main street having the highest traffic rate in the state at 40,000 cars per day. Furthermore, the population of the Heights continues to grow exponentially, furthering the need for smart investments in infrastructure and public schools. The most important consideration is the fact the Medicaid expansion is funded by both federal and state matching funds, with the federal government paying about 90% of the cost to help extend healthcare

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coverage to those in need including veterans, nursing home residents, and people with disabilities. Furthermore, the benefit of the program to our city, which features the largest medical community in the state, has provided a significant boost to our economy. Medicaid Expansion is essential to ensuring that our rural areas for every Montanan have access to health care. I want to reiterate the importance of infrastructure investment in the Billings Heights. Also, as the city continues to grow, so too does the need to make sure the public school system is continuing to provide for those enrolled and keep the community strong. I will be a strong voice for the Billings Heights and will make sure that the region is getting the representation it deserves in our state legislature. I will vote, I will be active and I will be there for you.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 44 Dale Mortensen - R Occupation: Private investigator/small-business owner, C.C.S.I. Family: Wife, Kelly, son Nic Education: B.S. social and criminal justice Montana State University Past Employment: Former law enforcement officer Big Horn County sheriff’s office, Gallatin County sheriff’s office and Bozeman Police Department Past political experience: Former field representative for Congressman Denny Rehberg Online campaign info: Email: dlm644@bresnan.net



Address: In the district at 446 Caravan Ave, Billings, 59105 Phone: 406- 855-1424 Schools have become “soft targets” for gun violence. Therefore, I believe the legislature should allow local administrators and teachers, assuming they are qualified and have concealed carry permits, to carry guns in schools. I strongly support the 2nd amendment and do not support additional restrictive gun legislation. I do not support tax increases. Revenue has come if fine and the special session was not needed. If cuts were needed, I would support budget cuts for

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non-essential services in departments such as the Department of Environmental Quality, Department of Natural Resources or Department of Administration etc. Infrastructure can be funded from economic growth and cash outlays from existing tax revenue. We do this already. For example, funding comes from the coal trust because of the development of our natural resources. As the economy grows, we will have the necessary revenue, as we have in the past, to fund infrastructure. Therefore, our focus should be on growth, not tax increases which reduce growth and dollars available for infrastructure needs.

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I do not support Medicaid Expansion. This program will take away money from vulnerable Montanans, education and other essential services. You don’t have enough money to do everything. We need to prioritize, and vulnerable Montana citizens should come first before able-bodied, non-working adults. Again, Montana needs can be funded if we focus on economic growth and not tax increases on those who can least afford it. Crime. Billings has a growing crime problem. Public safety must be a top priority of government and it will be a top priority of mine in the 2019 session of the Montana legislature.

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VOTER GUIDE | October 2018

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HOUSE DISTRICT 45

Danny Choriki - D Age: 61 Occupation: Homemaker, caregiver, startup and tech consultant, policy analyst Family: Divorced. Extended family in Billings area since 1984 and Montana since 1955. Education: Bachelor’s and master’s degrees in psychology

from Montana State University; post graduate work at The City University of New York in environmental psychology. Past Employment: Tech support and product management. Policy analyst. Strategic planning. Process engineer. Worked in Fortune 500 corporations, academic, nonprofits and in startups in online advertising and technology in agriculture. Past political experience: Worked with Montana Libertarian Party in late 1970s and 1980s. Candidate for legislature, petitions for ballot status, and initiatives for wine in grocery stores, citing of nuclear plants and the coal trust fund. In New York I worked with Green USA, Left Green, and the Marijuana Reform Party on various initiatives. Volunteered for Hillary Clinton’s Senate campaign in 2000. Currently involved with Billings Rises, the Amend Park Community Garden and the City of Billings Human Relations Commission.

Online campaign info: Twitter: @choriki_mt Facebook: https://www. facebook.com/ChorikiforMT/ Website: ChorikiForMontana.com Email: danny@chorikiformontana.com Address: 20 Marshall Drive, Billings, 59101, not in the district Phone: 406-748-6116 There is no single answer. We need data, research and evaluation of solutions. We must expand access to mental health programs and promote alternatives to violence. We need to find ways to keep guns out of the hands of children and those who would harm themselves and/or others. We should compensate families who lives are shattered by guns with a tax on firearm sales. There is more to this than rights. When enough people die, there will be a backlash resulting in emotion driven policy. Today we can still do it right. Let’s not wait too long. Read more at ChorikiForMontana.com/Gazette.

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Taxation and economic policy must be based on outcomes and not ideology. After two generations of cutting taxes there is ample data showing tax cuts are, as David Stockman, Reagan’s budget guy, called it “bad economic policy.� Taxes on the middle class has decreased over the past two generations. Taxes are not why the middle class is shrinking. The largest single factor are economic policies transferring wealth to those who live off capital and not work. I support raising taxes on upper income tax brackets, capital gains, sin and resource taxes, and corporate income. Read a detailed answer at ChorikiForMontana. com/Gazette. The argument that bonds are passing the “buck� to future generations is flawed. There is also a cost to deferring maintenance. The longer you wait, the more expensive the fix. That deferred cost is passed onto future taxpayers. Second, future taxpayers will use the infrastructure built by the bonds. So, they should

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pay some of the costs. Third, bonds have played a key role in building infrastructure for generations. The system works. Not using bonds has diverted revenue to capital projects forcing cuts in critical services and programs. I support using bonds to fund infrastructure. Read more at ChorikiForMontana.com/Gazette. Single payer health care for everyone is not just morally the right thing to do, it’s good for the economy and will lead to less expensive healthcare for everyone. While the transition will not be easy, Medicaid expansion is a step in that direction and I fully support it. The use of sin taxes is a good place to start since it is a revenue stream and a deterrent to behaviors that lead to higher health care costs. At some point a health care tax will replace insurance premiums. We need to think about this now. Read more at ChorikiForMontana.com/Gazette.

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Please see Choriki, 30

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Montana House District 43

Endorsed by the Montana Federation of Public Employees Paid for by Blair Koch for House District 43, Democrat, 639 Joyce St., Billings, MT 59105. 18

October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

ExperĐľnce Matters



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• 21-year legal career representing Montanans and Montana businesses and specializing in civil trial law • Appointed Billings Municipal Judge (2005-2010), presiding over thousands of criminal and other court proceedings • Active community volunteer • Raised in Billings and a multi-generational Montanan


HOUSE DISTRICT 45 Past employment: Marketing and business consultant, implementation consultant. Past political experience: State Legislator, 2013 – Present. Online campaign info: Twitter @DanielZolnikov; Facebook. com/DanielZolnikov. Website (if any): www.danielzolnikov.com daniel.zolnikov@ Email: gmail.com Phone: 406-861-5210 I am a strong supporter of the second amendment. I have earned a 100% score pertaining to our second amendment rights all three sessions I have served in Montana’s legislature. Governor Daniel Zolnikov - R Bullock recently stated his support of banning some semi-autoAge: 31 matic guns, including those not Occupation: Earning MBA traditionally used in hunting and Family: Single with ten rounds or more. Poorly Education: Marketing, in- thought out policy like this information systems, management tending to prevent the ownership degrees from the University of of AR15’s would result in a large Montana percentage of handguns being

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banned as well. I support our second amendment rights, and I will oppose any gun control legislation. Legislators typically serve on a budget committee or a policy committee. I have only served on policy committees, which includes my chairmanship of the House Energy and Technology committee. My goal is to support new and current energy development in Montana, and ensure we continue exporting our energy to the West coast states. The more a state exports, the wealthier it becomes. If more of our efforts were put towards supporting industry growth in Montana including responsible natural resource extraction, we would not be facing these types of budget issues. The majority of Montana’s infrastructure funding bills were passed in 2017. The legislation that failed to pass was supplementary infrastructure also

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known as additional infrastructure. The proposed additional infrastructure would have been mostly funded by bonding and obtaining long term debt. The fact that 45 million dollars of the 70 million dollar supplementary infrastructure legislation went towards 5 buildings prevented many legislators from supporting the bill. If we have excess funds, we should put it towards infrastructure and pay for it with cash up front. I am not a big supporter of bonding today’s projects so tomorrow’s generations can pay the bill. I opposed Medicaid expansion in 2013 and 2015. The argument behind supporting Medicaid expansion was flawed. Supporters including the hospitals claimed the money came from the federal government and it would be foolish to not accept free money. First, there is no such thing as free money. Second, our hospitals are now addicted to this free

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money and are currently working to impose a tax on tobacco users to fund the expansion of Medicaid for lower income individuals. Ironically, the tobacco users who will carry the burden of this increased tax are more likely to be lower income individuals. “Great job hospitals- further tax the people you are claiming to help.” I focus on energy policy and privacy/technology policy. It can take months and sometimes years to truly understand an area of policy so I plan on continuing my efforts regarding these issues. As for Billings, I am currently working on two different pieces of legislation to address human trafficking. I recently learned about trafficking and that the majority of prostitution is forced, not consensual and that Billings has more than its fair share of trafficked women. To allow for the trafficking of human beings in the United States, the land of the free, is abhorrent to me.

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Darryl Wilson

for House District 51

District 24 A trusted voice for the community And An AdvocAte for: QuAlity And AffordAble heAlthcAre Keeping public money in public schools preservAtion of And Access to public lAnds growing billings through business And worKforce development vitAl public sAfety initiAtives And community services Paid for by McNally for Sd 24, deMocrat, Po box 20584, billiNgS, Mt 59104-0584 

READY TO REPRESENT YOU IN THE MONTANA STATE LEGISLATURE

as your legislator, i will advocate for • Increasing of minimum wage to a living wage • Promoting trade schools to ensure a long-term quality workforce • Preserving and access of our public lands • Preventive health care for all Montanans

EarnIng your suPPort to rEPrEsEnt our coMMunIty at thE Montana LegisLature contact DarryL:

406.661.2552

rvrxing@bridgeband.com PaId for by darryl WIlson for hd 51, dEMocrat, P.o. box 1143, bIllIngs, Mt 59103-1143.

VOTER GUIDE | October 2018

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HOUSE DISTRICT 46

Anne Giuliano - D Age: 53 Occupation: Physician, partner at Medical Imaging Associates and owner of Big Sky Vascular. Panel member at the St. Vincent Wound Healing Center Family: Married to Jim Lucey and we have three cats Education: Bachelor’s degree

from University of Massachusetts, 1987. Master’s degree from University of Massachusetts, 1993. Surgical Internship at University of Massachusetts, 1994. Diagnostic radiology residency at the University of Utah, 1998 and fellowship in vascular and interventional radiology, 1999. Diplomat of the American Board of Venous and Lymphatic Medicine 2009. Certified wound specialist physician 2014. Past employment: Diagnostic and interventional radiologist with Medical Imaging Associates, Idaho Falls, Idaho. St. Vincent Wound Healing Center, panel physician. Diagnostic and Interventional Radiologist with Eastern Radiological Associates, Billings, MT 7/1999-11/30/2011. Past political experience: None Online campaign info: Twitter: @AnneGiuliano4 Facebook: Anne Giuliano For HD 46 Website: annegiuliano.com Email: giuliano.hd46@gmail.

com Address: PO Box 51341, Billings, Montana 59105 Phone: 406-670-4680 Montana has the highest rate of suicide in the country and most are completed with a gun. Suicide and gun violence go hand in hand with the level of available mental health services. This is the issue we need to address at the state legislature. We need to restore the mental health services that were cut in the 2017 special session. In addition, enforcing the gun laws we currently have on the books is important to ensuring community safety. The state legislatures need to take a hard look at what a realistic revenue stream is for our state and match that with our funding for essential services. The cuts to services for mental health need to be restored. With that in mind we can look for alternative revenue sources to power our budget. We have a large tourist industry in Montana that could contribute. Our current tax struc-

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ture is inequitable and needs to be reworked. We need all Montanans to pay their fair share and we cannot continue to balance the budget on the backs of homeowners. Our bridges, roads, sewers and water supply systems need to be maintained and repaired. Many are in a critical state of disrepair. The longer we wait to address these issues the costlier the repairs will become. It is time to invest in our state and our infrastructure. Fixing our infrastructure creates jobs, will benefit our economy and promote business growth. Funding can be multi source including bonds, users’ fees and private/public partnerships. We must invest in our state for our long-term success. Medicaid Expansion is crucial for the health of our people and our economy. The program covers almost 10% of our population and 62% of our nursing home residents. Medicaid is keeping our rural health clinics and critical access hospitals open and financially viable. It is

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critical to our economy in Yellowstone County. The associated HELP-Link program functions to get Medicaid recipients trained for jobs and has a 91% success rate. Montana has one of the highest rates of employed Medicaid recipients. I will work to ensure that Montanans have access to affordable health coverage. Access to affordable healthcare is the number one issue in the District. Voters are concerned about the rising costs of premiums and the ever increasing deductibles. Small businesses are being hurt by the high costs of premiums. The administrative overhead of managing different health insurance plans is tremendous and those costs are passed on in the price of medical treatments. Medications are overpriced, and people must decide between medication and food. Increasing competition in the health insurance market will help lower prices. I will work to promote transparency in drug pricing and medication contracts this will help lower costs.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 46

Bill Mercer - R Age: 54 Occupation: Attorney (partner, Holland & Hart, LLP) Family: Spouse (Marci); Children (Whit and Ella) Education: Bachelor’s degree University of Montana, 1986; Master’s degree Harvard University, 1988; J.D., George Mason University, 1993. Past employment: 2001 -

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2009 United States Attorney, District of Montana; 2006 - 2007 Acting Associate Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.; 2005 - 2006 Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.; 1994 2001 Assistant U.S. Attorney, District of Montana; 1989 - 1994 senior policy analyst and counselor to the Assistant Attorney General, Office of Policy Development, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C.; 1988 - 1989 Presidential Management Intern, Revenue Estimating Division, Office of Tax Analysis, Department of the Treasury, Washington, D.C. Past political experience: Chairman (and member), Montana Board of Crime Control Online campaign info: Website: www.mercerforlegislature.com Email: wwmercer406@gmail. com Address: In the district at 4124 Laredo Place Mailing address: P.O. Box 2118, Billings, Montana, 59103 Phone: 698-1671

October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

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No, given the most prominent proposals, the Legislature would fail to protect the Second Amendment rights of Montanans should it enact them. The Montana Legislature has done a good job protecting citizens’ state and federal constitutional rights and must do so in the future. Many federal laws preclude gun possession and gun purchases by certain persons (e.g., most felons), including a prohibition of handgun possession by juveniles. During my term as U.S. Attorney, we prioritized investigations and prosecutions of illegal gun possession. There are many existing gun laws; we need robust enforcement of them as opposed to enacting new laws. I disagree with the assertion underlying the question. The Legislative Fiscal Division recently wrote: “The general fund outlook is solid…. … general fund revenue has continued to be strong and is anticipated to end FY 2018 close to official HJ 2 revenue estimates…. Structural balance, considering general fund revenue and current service level expenditure in the next biennium, will

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be positive.” Creating a climate to maintain existing businesses and add new employers is essential to the State’s economic health and tax revenue. If there is a revenue shortfall when compared to proposed spending, I would first look to reduce spending. Critical infrastructure warrants investment from the State. For critical infrastructure, bonding is a legitimate funding mechanism. What constitutes critical infrastructure is a tougher question. Given the budgetary challenges that the State has faced in some legislative sessions, there have been limits on the ability to support certain bricks and mortar projects. Whether State financing is essential for an infrastructure project may be informed by the availability of private resources to fund it instead of long-term debt or general fund monies. I would not have supported Medicaid expansion had I served in the 2015 Legislature, and my views are unchanged since that time. Its cost in the next biennium ($ 1.2 billion) is almost double the forecast in 2015. Before the federal

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Affordable Care Act authorized Medicaid expansion, policymakers in most states, including Montana, were troubled about how the state share of the program could be met given steep increases in costs. That question persists today, but it gets little attention. I favor the programmatic coverage offered through Medicaid as it existed before the Legislature authorized Medicaid expansion post-Obamacare. I grew up in House District 46 and have lived there since 2001. There are many issues of importance to the district’s voters. The most significant issue is improving the economic climate in Montana to create and maintain good paying jobs by keeping taxes and government spending low and minimizing government regulation. For voters with friends and family who wish to live in Montana, our ability to foster an inviting economic climate is a priority. Many voters would also assert that dependence on government and growth in governmental spending cannot continue to increase. I will work to advance these principles.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 47

Kathy Kelker - D Age: 75 Occupation: Shared ministry coordinator, Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd Family: Husband, Paul Kelker; adult children Steve, Matt, Chris and Sara Education: BA in English (Hiram College), MS in Special Education (MSU-Billings), EdD Adult Education with specialization in special education (MSU-Boze-

man) Past employment: Executive director of Billings Head Start, Inc.; assistant professor of special education, MSU-Billings; executive director of Parents, Let’s Unite for Kids; special education consultant teacher, Yellowstone West Special Services Cooperative (Laurel, MT) Political experience: Billings Public Schools Trustee (1983-1993 and 2000-2006); Representative in Montana Legislature, HD 47 (2014-18) Online campaign info: Twitter account: https:// twitter.com/KatharinKelker Facebook page: https://www. facebook.com/kathy.kelker Website: www.kathy4MTHouse.com Ways voters can contact you: Email: Kathyk4montana@ gmail.com Address: P.O. 20254, Billings, Montana, 59104 Phone number: 406-6985610 We should address gun violence. The Legislature has increased access to guns without controlling harmful gun usage.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 47 Colton Zaugg - R Age: 24 Occupation: Small business owner Family: Fourth-generation Montanan Education: Bachelor’s degree in microbiology Past employment: Researcher Past political experience: None Online campaign info: Facebook: @zauggformontana Website: ZauggForMontana. com Email: ZauggForMontana@



Along with many Montanans, I strongly support gun ownership and our hunting traditions. As Montanans, we are comfortable with guns, but we have not adequately faced our real gun-related problems. Montana ranks ninth nationally for overall rate of gun violence because of gun-related suicides and gun deaths among people younger than 21. We need to fully fund mental health services and work to lower our suicide rate. The legislature must have a serious, bipartisan debate about how to reduce gun-related deaths due to suicide. Recent budget cuts were unnecessarily deep, requiring the state to shirk its responsibilities for vulnerable populations. Montana’s next budget can be balanced without cutting services if we implement tax fairness by making the wealthiest Montanans pay their fair share. In 2003 the legislature collapsed tax brackets and lowered the top rate from 11 percent to 6.9 percent. With this change, workers making $17,900 have paid the same rate as someone with income over $1 million. If this disparity were corrected,

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gmail.com Address: 235 So. 41st St West Phone: 406-606-0122 Montanans recognize that the right to bear arms is the single greatest protector from aggressors. Unlike Governor Bullock, I believe blanket disarmament and outlawing of firearms will exacerbate acts of violence against Montanans. Would-be criminals shy away from homes, businesses, and institutions in which they know guns will be present. Gun free zones are a target for criminal assailants who seek to do harm to Montana children and families. Responsible, armed citizens are the best equipped to curb violence

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those who can afford to pay more would contribute their fair share, and we could provide necessary health and human services. State infrastructure bills have become political footballs in which is unfortunate because Montana’s infrastructure backlog is growing. According to the American Society of Civil Engineers report card for Montana, the immediate need to fund roads, bridges, water treatment plants is in the hundreds of millions of dollars, and longer term projections will reach billions. To secure funding for infrastructure, I will support the highest priority vetted projects statewide using the tools we have: Treasure State Endowment Program (TSEP), Board of Investments and Montana’s bonding capacity. I also support local Option Tax for cities and towns to fund taxpayer-selected infrastructure projects. I support renewing Medicaid Expansion because it has done what it was supposed to do— more people have access to medical care, including preventative care, and the increases in service have created economic benefits.

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against Montanans. You will be hard pressed to find someone who thinks the government does not tax us enough. Montana needs to live the very principles that parents teach their children, live within a budget and spend money responsibly. Montana should not put infrastructure on her credit card and expect future generations to pay for it. The best way to increase revenue for all state programs is by growing Montana’s economy. My number one goal in the 2019 legislature is to build a responsible and affluent Montana. ObamaCare is a failure for Montanans, insurance pre-

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A U of M independent analysis shows the expansion creates $350 million to $400,000 of new spending and 5,000 jobs per year. By 2020, the program is predicted to cost the state nearly $70 million and save another $42 million. I support funding the state’s portion of Expansion costs by raising taxes on cigarettes since smoking is a significant cause of health problems. One concern constituents have is balance billing which occurs when a patient gets a healthcare bill with unexpected costs, usually due to services from providers who are not in the patient’s insurance network. I will bring legislation to prevent surprise billing because patients should not be obligated to pay for out-of-network services they did not knowingly agree to pay for. For billing in emergency situations, or at in-network healthcare facilities when patients lack notice and an opportunity to approve care from non-contracted providers, this legislation would take patients out of the equation, and the provider and insurer would have to resolve the issue.

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miums are through the roof because unelected bureaucrats in Washington made decisions regarding Montanans’ health care choices. I will push as a member of 2019 Legislature to roll back ObamaCare which will lower insurance premiums, giving ALL Montanans more affordable health care. Members of my district want REAL representation. They want someone to fight for THEM. My opponent introduced 16 bills of which ZERO became law. I am committed to introduce legislation that will cut taxes, create jobs, and build a better Montana.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 48

Denise Johnson - R Age: 57 Occupation: Self-employed business coach Family: Married 31 years to husband Ron, three adult children Education: Bachelor’s degree in family consumer sciences with business management minor from Montana State University Past Employment: HR Manager for the Center For Children

and Families; Marketing/Volunteer/Development Coordinator at Head Start; Lifeline specialist at Billings Clinic; Owner/manager of local restaurant; customer service supervisor and marketing representative at Montana Power Co. Past political experience: My father served in the Montana legislature 30-plus years ago. During that season, I was a House Page and Girls State Representative. Since then, working with non-profit boards, corporate issues, running several businesses, and overseeing teenage date night curfews. Currently, I advocate for vulnerable populations who deserve a common sense voice in the political process. Online campaign info: Facebook: Johnson4legislature Email: johnson4legislature@ gmail.com Address: 9021 Hobble Creek Dr. Phone: 406-545-3615 The issue of violence in schools as well as increased suicide is a mental health issue,

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NOT a gun issue. Often mental health is treated like a weakness and thus, those who need help remain silent. Sending people to the Psych Center or to Warm Springs and then releasing them without supportive services is not helping people. Evidenced-based programs are working. That’s where we need to direct resources. We also need to address childhood trauma that leads to addictions and mental illness. With crisis levels of children in foster care, it’s no wonder we’re seeing increased violence and suicides. The Governor’s Special Session was a waste of taxpayer funds. The 2017 Legislature anticipated a shortfall and built provisions into the budget including recommendations to preserve services and cut administration. The Governor did just the opposite and was irresponsible in managing the state’s funds, including a $300 million “rainy day fund” which disappeared. DPHHS took the greatest hit which effectively hurt the most vulnerable in our state. I am committed to restoring services

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from these cuts and working to make sure hard-earned taxes are used to improve outcomes for our vulnerable populations. The Montana Legislature has passed an infrastructure bill every session. However, they have not passed a bonding infrastructure bill because it seems to be an “all or nothing” game. Instead of compromising and assessing priorities, pet projects get rolled into bonding bills that don’t have anything to do with infrastructure. Rather than making sure essential infrastructure needs are met, big government mentality throws it all out since they can’t have everything they want. When is the last time you got everything you wanted? Time for government to serve the best interests of the people, not political agendas. Medicaid expansion has essentially prioritized ablebodied, non-working adults ahead of vulnerable populations. Efforts to promote I-185 are deceiving and would NOT help Veterans nor create enough income to fund Medicaid Expansion. It’s irresponsible

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fiscal policy. I won’t support Medicaid Expansion. It has hurt the most vulnerable, (children without stable families, the elderly, and disabled) and taken away the incentive for able-bodied citizens to work. This creates further dependence on state-sponsored programs. Additionally, there is no cap on costs so it will increase government spending which means higher taxes for Montana citizens. Mental health, services to vulnerable populations, and safety for our children are all issues of great concern. Throwing money at these issues won’t solve the problems unless there is accountability and transparency. Big government is notorious for wasting resources and having little to show for it. We need to bring services into our communities where local decisions can be made based on local issues. We also need to direct more resources toward prevention rather than trying to fix what has been broken which costs exponentially more. It’s about using our tax dollars wisely to help our neighbors achieve better outcomes.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 48

Jessica Karjala - D Age: 53 Occupation: Legislator and volunteer Family: Jon, Kaitlin, Josie, Stanley, Caden, Jarek, and Bowen Education: Bachelor’s degree in literature, University of Montana Past employment: Advocate

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for people with disabilities, specializing in Medicare, Medicaid, SSDI, SSI and employment and rental property owner in Billings and Missoula Past political experience: Legislator, founded local political group and volunteered for many campaigns Online campaign info: Facebook: Jessica Karjala for Montana Legislature Email: Jessica.Karjala@gmail. com Address: I have lived near my district in Billings and Yellowstone County for the better part of the last 23 years. Phone: 406-672-8681 Having grown up in rural Montana I know rifles are a necessity for ranchers and farmers. Having earned the endorsement of the Montana Sportsmen’s Alliance, a Montana hunters’ rights group, for the 3rd time, I have a record of protecting Montana hunters’ rights. We must consider, however, that USA Today ranked Montana 6th worst in

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October 2018 | VOTERS GUIDE

the United States for gun deaths in 2018. According to the MT Suicide Review & Mortality Team Report, Montana has ranked as one of the five worst states for suicide for nearly 40 years and 63% of suicides in Montana are completed with a firearm. As an advocate for people with disabilities and as Vice Chair of the House Health & Human Services Committee, I found the cuts for critical services for people with disabilities, for children, for mental healthcare, for services and for the elderly morally unacceptable and unnecessary. Montana’s economy has been historically based on industries susceptible to greater market trends resulting in boom and bust cycles that create volatile revenue and budget cycles. As proof we just restored almost all funding cut during the session. However, because many critical programs and services cannot be restored, this was not a solution. Billings and Yellowstone County contribute 1 out of every 6 tax dollars to the state

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budget so we must elect people to the legislature who will vote for job creation and for our tax dollars to come back to us to fund public education, build and maintain roads, water systems, bridges and structures that support the ability for people to conduct business and lead healthy, quality lives. As your representative my voting record reflects voting for infrastructure. If we were to diversify our tax base, tax the app and e-commerce industries, develop quality public/ private partnership legislation we could easily fund critical infrastructure. Almost 1 out of 10 Montanans receive their healthcare from Medicaid Expansion and almost 80% of them work. Rural/ frontier hospitals and Federally Qualified Health Centers depend on Medicaid Expansion to keep their doors open. Medicaid helps small business owners and employers who cannot afford to provide healthcare benefits. Their employees eligible for Medicaid Expansion are healthier and re-

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tain employment longer. Medicaid Expansion has dramatically decreased uncompensated care helping lower healthcare costs for everyone. The question regarding Medicaid Expansion is not how we should fund it, but why would we not fund it? 90% of the program is funded by the federal government. Prescription drugs are the biggest driver of increasing healthcare costs. Drugs to treat things like cancer, diabetes, hepatitis, asthma, COPD, acid reflux, fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis should not force seniors and/or other economically challenged people to choose between their medications and their utilities, their rent or mortgages or their food in order to stay alive or healthy. I hear from people making these unacceptable choices when knocking on doors. I sponsored legislation to address rising pharmaceutical prescription drug costs last session and though neither bill was passed, I will continue to fight for lower prescription drug costs for Montanans.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 49

Emma Kerr-Carpenter - D Age: 29 Occupation: Community education coordinator at Youth Dynamics Family: Dan Cohn (fiancé) Education: Bachelor’s degree of arts and religion; bachelor’s

degree in international relations; Boston University 2012 Past employment: Home visitor for Family Support Network, Billings Past political experience: Board of directors, Northern Plains Resource Council Online campaign info: Instagram: @emmaformontana Facebook: @emmaformontana Website: www.emmaformontana.org emmaformontana@ Email: gmail.com Address: In the district at 444 Lewis Ave, Billings, MT 59101 Phone: 406-894-0377 We rank highest in the country for both completed suicides and accidental deaths caused by guns. It should be a no-brainer for the 2019 Legislature to close the fatal gap in Montana gun laws by requiring federal background checks for those seeking to buy guns.

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Montana has more requirements for vehicle owners and homeowners than for gun owners. We should ensure that Montana gun owners meet minimum standards of safety before being allowed to own or operate them. This common sense measure closes Montana’s fatal gap that results in the deaths of Montana children and adults. The Legislature’s job is to build a budget and tax system that encourages growth and prosperity for all Montanans — now and into the future. The 2019 Legislature must create a budget that is based on realistic projections of Montana’s revenue. Permanently cutting services that support the most vulnerable Montanans is not a path to a sustainable budget or prosperity for our working families. We must close loopholes that allow multinational corporations to avoid paying their fair share, increase the taxes of our most wealthy residents, and build a tax system that works for the Montana

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of today and tomorrow. Montana needs $67 billion to fund necessary infrastructure improvements like highquality schools, smooth roads, and safe bridges. This money will have to come from a combination of cash and bonding. Bonds do not mean more taxes for working Montanans, we can raise taxes on large businesses or other entities to bond these projects. I would like to buy a home one day, but I can’t buy it with cash. I will have to take a mortgage out to buy my house, and why would state infrastructure be any different? We have to pay for what we need. I strongly support Medicaid expansion and the cigarette tax proposed to fund it. Lots of my neighbors depend on Medicaid for access to critical medications and care, including insulin, EpiPens, physical therapy, mental health care, wheelchairs, and oxygen. Providing access to health care is one of our baseline obligations to

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our fellow Montanans. Medicaid expansion has benefited Montana by creating thousands of jobs in rural Montana. Every Montanan benefits when people can access preventative care instead of emergency care, have fewer medical bankruptcies, and are able to work and provide for themselves because they’re healthy. A top issue in my district is the cost of housing. Homeowners and renters, especially those on fixed incomes, face rising rents, utility bills, and taxes to pay for important things like roads and public schools. I would reconcile these issues in several ways. I would advocate for more state funding for public schools reducing the responsibility Billings property owners face to fund our schools. We can lower residential utility bills through commonsense financing mechanisms that pay for home weatherization and renewable energy solutions through savings, such as on bill financing.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 49 lings Education: Bachelor’s degree civil engineering, North Dakota State University Past employment: Bureau of Reclamation eight years; Bartlett & West (current employer) six years Past political experience: None Online campaign info: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NygaardforMontana/ Email: NygaardforMontana@ gmail.com Address: Currently at 601 Rimrock Rd., Billings MT 59102. Recently completed construction of two townhomes in the district. Phone: 406-850-1800 Colin Nygaard - R No, Montana should not legislate on a “national crisis” Age: 35 based on events in California, FlorOccupation: Civil engineer/ ida, or other states. Six gun threats project manager (guns were not fired) among a Family: Parents and three sib- population of 1,050,000 Montan-

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ans, equates to 0.0006%, this is an extremely small amount to try address. No reasonable method exists to remove every gun from Montana to prevent suicide, additionally, you would have to remove all rope, every poison, most drugs, every vehicle, and fence off all heights to prevent the other suicides. The solution is the people around suicidal or troubled individuals recognize the problem, speak up, and help your fellow Montanans. The $227 million hole does not exist, revenue is on track to very closely match projections. The special session and budget cuts were done prematurely and were unnecessary. State revenue has continued to grow in the last 15 years, higher taxes are not needed, fiscal responsibility needs to be a priority to ensure the State does not take on long term debts or unfunded programs.

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I have spent career working in the infrastructure industry, I believe infrastructure is a core service of the State and should be a priority. Water, wastewater, roads, bridges, structures, and airports are critical to every Montanan and are used on a daily basis. Funding needs to be prioritized from existing sources by reducing funding for low priority programs and eliminating unnecessary programs. It’s important to recognize the budget does contain funding for infrastructure, but it is inadequate for long-term and overall needs of the State. I want to ensure we have safe and reliable infrastructure today and in the future. We need to make sure the Medicaid program is available for individuals truly in need, over half of the enrollees are able bodied adults. These individuals are taking resources from vulner-

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able Montanan’s. The program currently has multiple loopholes and disincentivizes people to work. Before we keep putting money toward this program, we need to be sure traditional Medicaid, which was designed for vulnerable Montana citizens, is funded adequately. The economy is an issue important to District 49 as well as all Montanans. No one wants to worry about money for mortgage, rent, food, or gas. We also want to have a little extra money to enjoy all the great things Montana has to offer. I will advance economic growth by encouraging business expansion and startups, provide additional skills and education opportunities for workers, and promote responsible development of our natural resources to create career opportunities for Montanans.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 50 Brothers Big Sisters, program assistant for Missoula Parks & Rec after-school program Past political experience: Volunteer work on local campaigns Education: Billings Senior grad; bachelor’s degree in sociology from University of Montana Twitter: @RaiseTheBahrMT Facebook: Jade Bahr for HD 50 Website: www.jadebahr.com Email: jadebahrmt@gmail. com Telephone: 406-855-7123 The Montana Legislature must address gun safety. We can do so without compromising the Second Amendment. In the wake of the Parkland mass shooting, there has been a lot of buzz about addressing mental health care in this country. We should be doing that anyway. But as it relates to gun violence, we should develop a mechanism for law enforcement to remove firearms when they identify someone who

1. Jade Bahr - D Age: 29 Occupation: Vocational specialist and community coordinator for adults with disability Past employment: Mental health support worker for at-risk youth, program assistant for Big

poses an immediate threat of harm to self or others. Any law must include due process for affected individuals and assure processes for returning firearms at the conclusion of temporary prohibitions. I work in the community connecting adults with disabilities to our available community resources. I see the benefits and gaps in public services. Every day I encounter people — real people — who cannot access the services they need to survive. These cuts are detrimental to the lives of the people I serve. But the big picture is not lost on me. Cuts could have been avoided if the Legislature had taken a fiscally responsible approach to the budget. In 2019, I will prioritize reversing permanent tax cuts that resulted from the Special Session and I will work to modernize our tax system. Out of state corporations and the wealthy elite must pay their fair share.

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Hands-on experience to protect the financial interest of the taxpayer

Becky Riedl for Yellowstone County Auditor My Priorities: • Transparency in county government • Ensure expenditures are reasonable, necessary, and fit the mission of the department • Safeguard taxpayer money from fraud and abuse

My Qualifications: • As a Certified Workforce Development Professional, I administered a complicated federal grant program requiring every dollar spent be documented and accounted for • As a trustee on highly regulated multi-employer trust funds I had the fiduciary responsibility of approving expenditures and accounting for the incoming funds • Currently I serve as an auditor and secretary/treasurer for three labor organizations Paid for by Becky Riedl for Auditor • P.O. Box 23173, Billings, MT 59104 • Wanda Grinde, Treasurer • Democrat

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October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

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We must address crumbling roads, bridges and outdated sewer systems that have been described as reaching a critical state of disrepair. As your legislator, I will work with the bipartisan Infrastructure Coalition to offer innovative funding solutions. In 2017, interest rates for bonding were at an all-time low. We may not have that opportunity again. “User fees” may be one option, and we must fully leverage federal match dollars for all highway investments. Nearly 10 percent of Montanans with insurance are covered thanks to our state’s expansion of Medicaid to adults earning $16,000 per year or less. These folks now have access to preventive health services including mental health care, dental and vision. That in itself is reason to extend the program. But Medicaid expansion has additional economic perks. A new independent report found this

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program generates 5,000 jobs and $270 million in personal income annually. Expanded Medicaid improves health outcomes, reduces crime and spurs the economy. Costs to the state are already offset by revenues associated with increased economic activity. As I have been out knocking doors in House District 50, I have met a lot of young families. Many struggle with the cost of childcare and some can’t afford to send their kids to preschool. Publicly funded preschool is the reality in 45 states. Pre-K improves educational outcomes and booms local economies. If we can’t get there this legislative session, we should continue to expand the STARS program, which is a public-private partnership offering grants to childcare providers who are also qualified to provide preK educational programs. We will realize savings in our larger education system.

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Vote to Retain

David

CARTER Justice of the Peace – Yellowstone County – Dept 1

Proven Experience on the bench since 2013 David Carter serves the people of Yellowstone County

HONESTY AND IMPARTIALITY ✓ Commissioner on the Montana Supreme Court Access to Justice Commission ✓ 11 Years as a Prosecutor in the Yellowstone County Attorney’s Office covering a wide range of crimes both in the Justice and District Courts ✓ Member and former Chairman of the State Bar Technology Committee ✓ Licensed to practice law since 2001 ✓ Married with 2 kids Paid for by David Carter for Justice of the Peace, Joni Carter,Treasurer, 1829 S. Mariposa, Billings, MT 59102


HOUSE DISTRICT 50 Quentin Eggart - R Age: 48 Occupation: Owner-EEC, Inc., an engineering and construction company Family: None Education: Bachelor’s degree civil engineering Past employment: MDT, CTA, HKM Past political experience: None Online campaign info: Email: eggartforhouse@eecmt.com Address: At 2940 Highway 3,

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well liked of course but if we want to continue to provide more and more services it is really the only way to fund it. I think there are certain services that can be cut and there is government waste that can be cut as well. Hopefully smart cuts will reduce or minimalize any tax increases. I certainly think there is plenty of room to raise gas taxes to fund ONLY infrastructure. Bonding these depends on bond rate and if it is cheaper to bond and do them now and pay later as compared to inflation then we should bond them now. I hate

NMHD50 Facebook: http://bit.ly/ LIKEHD50 Email: nmckentyHD50@ gmail.com Address: In the district at 1231 Lynn Ave. Yes this is an important topic to address. I believe in responsible gun ownership. Along with that mental health awareness and access to treatment should also be addressed. I believe guns in the schools to be a bad idea. I would rather focus on prevention rather than on internal defenses, such as increasing patrols outside and around the schools. Once a gunman is inside the school grounds you have already lost the most crucial battle. The shortfall has been a huge debacle of the Re-

publican led Legislature. Both Republicans and Democrats did everything they could to cook the numbers in their favor. The final predictions were a political pipedream that had no basis in reality. The austerity measures agreed to by the legislature that were all triggered by the “shortfall” of tax revenue that did not meet their false prediction was all a smokescreen to save face to their constituents during the session. In the final analysis the only real winners were the legislators facing reelection. There needs to be an overhaul of taxes in the state. University building is an education expense only. Money for state infrastructure should come from a combination of Gasoline, and sales taxes. County and city infrastructure should pri-

Billings, not in district Phone: 406-672-8798 We have the right to bear arms. I think gun violence is not something we can cure with more gun laws. Taking away guns will not lessen suicide. When I grew up many of us carried guns in our vehicles and there weren’t any problems. Society has changed for the worse. We need to get a handle on drugs because that is what causes most of the gun crimes. That is where we should be spending our resources. That is a very broad question. Raising taxes is never

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passing debt on to the next generation so this is a tight decision based on bonding rate vs costs of inflation-which we have seen in the Construction world to be quite high. I don’t have all the facts about Medicaid expansion to properly say one way or the other. Crime and drug use. We need to be able to fight these challenges. Of course that means more resources and how to pay for it. But I think addressing these issues will in the long run solve some of or other social services issues.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 50

Nathan McKenty - L Age: 39 Occupation: Airline agent



Family: Spouse, Heather McKenty Education: Bachelor’s degree in economics business management; bachelor’s degree aviation management with aviation science minor 2014; graduated from the Navy’s Nuclear Power Program as a nuclear electronics technician; graduated from Cut Bank High School 1998 Past employment: American Airlines; United Airlines; Meadowlark Companies internship; Alaska Airlines; Armorsource; US Navy nuclear reactor electronics Technician Past political experience: Current Yellowstone County Libertarian Party secretary info: Online campaign http://www.bit.ly/HD50Fund Twitter: http://bit.ly/

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marily be their responsibility, but aided by state funds, especially in more rural areas. Medicaid needs to be overhauled. I would not expand it at this time. Medicaid has become the medical insurance coverage of choice rather than what it was originally intended for. I intend to work on giving working Montanans better healthcare coverage options. Medicaid should be funded at a more manageable level covering those who truly can’t get coverage anywhere else. Lowering taxes and opening up opportunities for businesses to come in, grow, and thrive in our communities. I will repeal overcomplicated regulations to only that which is needed. I will put the people first.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 51 ship development program for Federal Judiciary, Washington, D.C.; attended University of Montana graduate program in public administration Past employment: Chief executive United States Courts for Montana; manager of Billings Job Service; Adult Probation and Parole officer for state of Montana Past political experience: Student Senate four years at MSUBillings; 2016 successful campaign manager for Representative Jimmy Patelis in HD52 Online campaign info: Facebook: Representative Frank Fleming Email: fleminglor5@gmail.com Address: 626 South 38th Street Frank Fleming - R West, Unit 22, Billings, which is in Age: 64 the district Occupation: Retired Phone: 406-652-6673 The state legislature has done Family: Adult son a good job of protecting 2ND Education: Bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education from Amendment rights of law abiding MSU-Billings; three year leader- citizens. Law enforcement needs to

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aggressively pursue and prosecute individuals who are restricted from gun possession. Local school districts need to ensure mental health awareness training to all employees. Students should be given a mental health survey to detect any potential danger that the student might be to harm others or themself. First of all we need to live within revenues that the state brings in. We cannot continually raise taxes as this notion is hurting family incomes and quality of life. I would not raise taxes. State government continues to grow at a high rate. We need to look at zero based budgeting for personnel in state government and have the agency they work for justify any new positions. Discretionary raises should not be given by agency directors in times of financial crisis. We should not be cutting services provided to our most vulnerable citizens such as

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those with mental health or physical disability. We should be paying cash for infrastructure. We need to live within our revenue streams coming in and not overly put a financial burden on our next generation of citizens. University buildings should not be in an infrastructure bill. Our university system needs to look at partnership’s with developers to build new buildings and lease them out with the idea of eventually owning the buildings. Gas taxes pay for infrastructure and any future raises in this tax should be offset by reducing taxes in another revenue source. We cannot financially sustain additional medicaid expansion. We need to more closely scrutinize the application and verification process for acceptance into the medicaid program. We need to assist the people on medicaid with job training and employ-

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ment skills to get them working if able to do so. Certainly I recognize that many on medicaid such as vulnerable seniors, developmentally disabled and mentally ill may never have the ability to hold a job. People on medicaid should be tested for illegal drugs and if using these they should be removed from the program. A priority for my legislative campaign effort is to ensure that Billings has an educated and trained workforce for the future. Billings will need to fill 30,000 jobs over the next 10 years. Our local colleges must work with area business leaders and legislators to closely examine course offerings to assist in placing graduating students into these future jobs. I have extensive experience as manager of the Billings Job Service in working with the local colleges, business leaders and Chamber of Commerce to develop new business and recruit a qualified workforce.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 51 Employment: Ten years for State of Montana; 20 years as a manager for Glacier Park Company & Trillium Corporation developing and selling BNRR property throughout the Midwest; the past 10 years owning and operating my own real estate company Political experience: Ran for Yellowstone County Commissioner and school board Online campaign Info Facebook: Yes Email: rvrxing@bridgeband. com Address: Adjacent to district Phone: 406-661-2552 I disagree with arming teachers; providing safety officers in schools makes sense. Darryl S. Wilson - D I have hunted and fished for 50+ Age: 60 years—gun ownership and use is Occupation: Broker/owner of part of Montana’s culture. The River Crossing Real Estate issue of suicide needs to take top Family: Married, three chil- priority in our State. We are losdren ing too many citizens—especially Education: Two years college children. Education is the best

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way to address this along with counseling. School counseling records should be preserved to provide a baseline for some youth. Saving even just one life is worth it. Gun legislation must be addressed through our law enforcement agencies, and they should come up with a proposal. The Governor has his projected budget and the Republican legislature has theirs; neither will compromise. Montana’s largest unforeseen expenses are wildfires or some unforeseen catastrophe. There must be a reserve in place, untouchable for catastrophes, and we must compromise. Montana needs to look at its average historical budget and revenues and make adjustment based on inflation. Any excess can be held in reserve for a catastrophe. Any monies left over from the reserve should be given back as an income credit or tax return.

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I will raise taxes on the top 5% — they have been getting a free pass for too long. Montana must look at different revenue sources because too much dependence is put on income and property tax. Montana is missing out on the billions spent each year by tourists. We need to capture more of that revenue. All communities should have a right to vote on a local option tax, but it must be tied to residential property tax relief, and part of this revenue should be included in our university system and trade schools to educate our workforce. Reducing revenue for our most needy in mental health, healthcare, or with disabilities will just cost more in the future. Montana must fund preventive healthcare. We must look at all potential revenue sources plus be fiscally responsible. Insurance rates along with medical prescription costs must be rea-

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sonable and competitive for our region. Insurance co-ops are an option along with one-user pay system. Let’s look at other states to see what has been successful for them. My district consists of middle to lower income who have expressed to me three main concerns: property taxes, living wages and healthcare. To assist lower income individuals, trade schools are the best option. Providing good paying jobs through education and specialized schooling will create more opportunities. Our local unions, medical facilities and financial institutions must be part of this solution for these specialized schools. Healthcare expenses can be addressed through accountability from insurers, and reasonable costs for prescriptions and medical procedures. A local option tax tied to residential property.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 52 (Down Syndrome) Education: Billings West High and some college Past employment: Oil fieldrelated employment Past political experience: Elected member of Montana House of Representatives 1985-87 Online campaign info: Email: Rodneygarcia1954@ gmail.com Address: Lived in the district for many years Phone: 406-850-7346 Our schools are well known as “gun free zones.” One of our most famous “gun free zones” is murderous Chicago ... how’s that working out? Reasonable gun laws can help or keep our Rodney Garcia - R kids and teachers at continued Age: 64 great risk. The only proven proOccupation: Retired from tection from someone bad with full-time work a gun is someone good with a Family: Three sons, two gun. I am very sure that Montana daughters and Lenny, my nephew schools will have no trouble at all

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attracting very well trained, vetted and certified school personnel or private citizens like retired law enforcement to keep our kids and teachers safe. Any legislation should rely heavily on law enforcement professionals’ advice. Government is way too big and expensive. Big government advocates persist in growing the cost of programs and then when revenues decline, as they always do on a cyclical basis, they absolutely threaten to cut essential services instead of coming clean that they were wrong. Our state payroll has increased by somewhere between 1,500 and 2,000 employees in (roughly) the last 10 years. The inevitable downturn in tax revenues due to the loss of Bakken related jobs is something we cannot control, but just maybe we shouldn’t have hired so many. Cut the hiring, not the programs.

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ans do so responsibly and should not be penalized for obeying the law; however, we must work on substantive, bipartisan legislation to end gun violence. It will be up to the 2019 Legislature to reduce gun violence and work to keep our schools, churches, and communities safe. Hardworking Montanans have been forced to pay more taxes because of corporate welfare. The 2019 Legislature needs to focus on whether the ultrawealthy are paying their fair share in taxes. With the appropriate legislation, we can work to restore mental health services and services for those with physical disabilities. I have four foster children in my home that rely on state-funded services so I know how critical these programs are to the health and safety of the next generations of Montanans. I will do everything

I can to restore the funding cut from those services. An infrastructure bill would stimulate our economy and bring more high paying jobs to Billings and to our great state at large. By bonding infrastructure we would see more jobs and opportunity for small business owners to expand and flourish. Also, I will prioritize an infrastructure bill to help MSU Billings. Last year, MSU Billings had multiple condemned buildings on campus. If we revitalize MSU Billings with the help of the new chancellor we can bring thousands of new students into Billings, spurring economic growth. Health care is a right. It should not be a privilege only for those that can afford it. As I go door to door and talk to my neighbors I hear stories about how people can’t work due to illness or

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I have not been in the Legislature in the last few years when all the arguments, for and against every option, were fought and since I pay close attention to every idea offered when I was in the Legislature and afterward, I cannot say what is best until I have all the information at hand. I can say, however, that whatever type of facilities government “owns,” (municipal water and sewer systems and pipes, roads, bridges, buildings, etc.), government is only the caretakers for the people and have an obligation to maintain them for their real owners, us. The big argument in favor of this Obamacare expansion was that it wouldn’t cost us very much at all; that the Feds will pay for it for 5 years. Ok, then what? Where are we going to come up with another $400,000,000? Legislators have

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to learn that, no matter how excellent a new program might be, sometimes the best thing is to admit that we just don’t have the money. It is not THEIR money they are obligating, it is ours. Why is that so hard for them to understand? The problems are the same for the 30-plus years of my service to Billings. Drugs are all over the state. I have worked hard to keep pornography from our kids, especially in public libraries. We need more and better jobs, not government ones but union and private companies’ employment so wages will go up for everybody. I am a doer, not a weak follower. I have a long record of getting things done and I will keep working with Republicans and Democrats alike for the people should they choose to send me back to the Montana Legislature.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 52 Marquez and Javier Marquez Education: MSU Billings, mass communication Past employment: Herberger’s sales associate/cash office Past political experience: Associated Students of MSU Billings student senator and Yellowstone County Democratic Central Committee vice chair Online campaign info: Twitter: @Amelia4MT Facebook: @MarquezForMT Website: www.MarquezForMontana.com Email: marquezfor52@gmail. com Address: In the district at 1121 Rays Lane, Billings Amelia D. Marquez - D Phone: 406-860-5420 Age: 24 The 2019 Legislature should Occupation: Therapeutic address gun violence. Ownyouth mentor, Yellowstone Boys ing guns is a part of many Monand Girls Ranch tanans’ way of life, and the vast Family: Rebecca Contreraz- majority of gun-owning Montan-

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injury. So many of our elderly, our kids in the foster system, and the disabled rely on Medicaid to get the care they need. My district has my word that I will always vote to continue Medicaid expansion, and I would consider a tobacco tax to fund it. Now more than ever, we must protect and expand our campaign finance laws. When I hear of politicians telling the Commissioner of Political Practices that they can take an illegal campaign contribution which was 42 times the maximum limit, then our democracy is in danger. In Montana, we pride ourselves on keeping dark money groups out of our elections and out of our legislature. I will continue that fight, because Montanans should decide who represents them in government—not corporate lobbyists or out of state special interest groups.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 53

Dennis Lenz - R Age: 62 Occupation: Self-employed farmer Family: Wife, Deanna; daughter, Danae and son Dustin Education: Texas Christian University certificate in ranch management; Yellowstone Valley

Bible Institute certificate in pastoral studies; licensed crop insurance adjuster; licensed emergency medical technician Past employment: Farmer 1987 to present; fire captain City of Billings Fire Department 1989 to 2014; crop insurance adjuster 2018 to present Past political experience: Montana State Representative 2013 to 2014, 2017 to present; Montana House of Representatives, sergeant-at arms 2015 to 2016 Online campaign info: Email: lenz4legislature@outlook.com Address: P.O. Box 20752, Billings, Montana, 59104 Phone: 406-671-7052 Oftentimes, after a largescale shooting, it is revealed that the mental health issues of the shooter were very evident to law enforcement and others prior to the incident. There seems to be a reluctance to address these issues, which leads to a lack of treatment and allows the shooter

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a legal pathway to obtaining firearms. My bill, HB 381, requires school districts to have a suicide response and prevention plan in place, and has had a positive response. The current open discussions about suicide can serve as a catalyst to break through the reluctance to talk about mental health. There is an ebb and flow to state revenue. But, this was anticipated by the legislature in the budget projections. The current budget is in line with those projections. The special session that was called by Governor Bullock was completely unnecessary, since the executive branch has many options at their disposal in order to deal with temporary budget changes. Instead, the governor hoped to put the legislature in a false crisis in order to raise taxes. So, while incurring the cost of an unneeded special session, Governor Bullock also made additional major cuts to programs for our poor and disabled.

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from people, or one that limits the use of the guns, but one that is responsible and fair. I believe in the Second Amendment and a Montanan’s rights to bear arms. However, we have one of the highest rates of suicide in the state, often completed with firearms. We need to examine how we can have sensible gun legislation that protects life and liberty. I believe the 2019 legislature needs to examine areas to make our state better. Cutting public services a will lead to higher cost down the road—making life difficult for our most vulnerable populations. We need to provide care for people with disabilities, the elderly, mentally ill and children. If we do not our hospital bills will increase as those who need essential medical/mental health services will be utilizing our ER services in greater frequency, often without an ability to pay. As a legislator it is my obligation to ensure we are being fiscally conser-

vative with our budget and funds. Critical and comprehensive infrastructure is essential for Montana to be a great place to live and work. We cannot do it from bonds exclusively nor can we do it from cash exclusively. Just as one has to pay cash for a down payment and take out a mortgage to buy a home we must do the same for our state projects. The funding could come from non traditional sources such as partnerships, grants, bonds, and even a potential infrastructure bank to help fund building needs on University Campuses. However, we cannot let our focus of urban towns blind us from the needs of our rural neighbors. I believe the Medicaid Expansion program is essential to providing care for those who need it the most. I support using a tobacco tax to fund this program as well. Working as a mental health advocate I was able to see first hand how medicaid expansion

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There is no struggle to pass infrastructure bills in the Montana legislature. The Montana legislature passed millions in infrastructure money during the 2017 session: roads and highways- 900 million, long-range building – 136 million, renewable resource grants – 3 million, reclamation and development grants – 5 million, and treasure state endowment- 30 million. Any struggle has been to get 2/3 of the legislature to agree to borrowing additional money in order to spend even more money not in the budget. Where would that funding come from? From hard working Montanans, as always! Medicaid was designed for the most needy - children, families and the disabled. “Medicaid expansion” has expanded that coverage to non-employed adults who are able to work. These 48,000 expansion individuals have no restrictions on these benefits, such as drug testing, work requirements or asset testing.

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You could have millions in assets, but be on Medicaid because you show no income. The increasing costs to the state are staggering. 2015 fiscal estimates were 27 million, but current actual costs to the state are close to 90 million. Unrestricted expansion will kill Medicaid and hurt those who need it most. House District 53 has a great urban/rural mix. From north small-town Laurel to the western edge of big-city Billings, with farm land in between. It is a district that is full of independent, hard-working individuals who enjoy the freedom of living outside of the main city. As such, they are often also opposed to big government intrusions, like the local option tax that was proposed by many business and political executives from Billings. I will respect that position to help them grow our economy and produce the products that contribute to Billings as the outstanding business center of the state.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 53

Clementine Lindley - D Age: 39 Occupation: Entrepreneur/ small business owner Family: Husband, Andrew Lindley, three children, Isaiah, Aidrian, Tessa Education: Bachelor’s degree

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liberal studies from Seattle University; master’s degree peace and conflict studies focusing on mediation from University of Ulster Past employment: Program support coordinator, Northern Plains Resource Council; executive director, NAMI Billings Past political experience: Assistant sergeant at arms for the 2005 Senate; campaign volunteer; chari of Children’s Trust Fund; vice chair of Institute for Peace Studies at Rocky Mountain College; liaison of Students for ASUU. Online campaign info: Facebook: facebook.com/clementinehd53 Website: www.clementinehd53.com clementinehd53@ Email: gmail.com Address: 48 30th Street West, Billings, not in the district Phone: 406-459-0636 Yes the Legislature needs to address gun violence. Not in a way that removes gun ownership

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was money well spent. It helped some of the states sickest patients receive treatment that was previously not available to them. And countless studies have shown that taking care of people when they are well is a huge cost savings as opposed to treating people when they are ill. As I have knocked doors in HD 53 I have discovered there is concern about our employment situation here in Billings. Many of my potential constituents are business owners and are concerned with the direction we are going to fund Montana’s programs. They see Montana as a great place to live and work yet are finding it difficult to find quality employees who can do the work, or have found that they are losing revenue by having to replace an ever changing workforce. I believe that as a legislator we can work to focus on things like trades, apprenticeships, and certification programs.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 54 psychology, Penn State University Past employment: Program manager, Yellowstone Boys and Girls Ranch Past political experience: None, first-time candidate Online campaign info: Facebook: facebook.com/ benmckeeformontana Website: benmckeeformontana.com benmckeeformonEmail: tana@gmail.com Address: PO Box 22701, Billings, Montana 59104 Phone: 406-794-4082 As a gun owner, I value our 2nd Amendment rights. As a professional who has worked in children’s mental healthcare, the possibility of a shooting in our schools is a real concern. Solutions are currently being developed with the help of technology, such as software which will alert officials when an intruder has entered campus, allowing for immediate action to protect students and staff.

1. Ben McKee - D Age: 27 Occupation: Development director, CASA of Yellowstone County Family: Engaged to Celina Reno Education: Bachelor’s degree

The legislature’s role is to explore implementing these kinds of solutions. Above all else, I believe in the importance of responsibility in gun ownership, and I know that this value is widely shared throughout Montana. I’ve spent my career serving children and families in Billings, so I understand the dire consequences of targeting state reimbursement rates for cuts. It is not only lazy governance, it is economic malpractice. Cutting rates and shrinking services shifts the burden onto communities to compensate for the difference, affecting hospitals, nonprofits, and businesses. Legislators don’t do enough to meet with local officials to understand how decisions affect communities. We need to work together and get creative to explore funding mechanisms. Let’s pass local option authority to fund new infrastructure projects, and revisit bipartisan-supported revenue sources previously left on the table.

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gun control is not the solution. We can address violence by focusing on mental health, law enforcement and promoting civility within our communities. Revenue growth over the past decade has kept up with population growth and cost of living increases. We don’t have a revenue challenge, but rather a spending problem. Our government needs to change, focusing on outcomes, not high activity levels. We need to restore our government to be simple and frugal, cutting waste and burdensome rules, which cost all taxpayers and increase state bureaucracies. Making sure there are funds to provide for the poor and vulnerable is critical. We are a proud people in Montana and we expect the best in everyone, including our state government. We need to invest in infrastructure not just for safety, but to make our communities a better place to live. Now is the

time to set politics aside and work together to set long-term priorities. No more pet political projects. The legislative and executive branches of government need to work together, compromising as necessary, to identify the infrastructure needs in Montana which the legislature can utilize in setting priorities for long term funding. There has always been funding for infrastructure through the general fund budget and to issue modest amounts of debt to help fund larger projects is appropriate. Medicaid expansion as structured is untenable. First, the program is a disincentive to work-eligible citizens to strive for personal advancement in the workplace for fear of becoming ineligible. Second, the cost is significant, over $60 million per year to Montana taxpayers beginning 2020. Therefore, continuing Medicaid expansion, as-is, is not viable. Changes are

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There is no doubt that the legislature needs to pass an infrastructure bill and determine funding sources to be dedicated to construction and repair of Montana’s roads, bridges, and schools. Montana’s infrastructure, earning a grade of C- by the American Society of Civil Engineers, is in need of billions of dollars in investment. I support bonding as part of that equation, which will save money for taxpayers in the long run. Passage of local option authority in the legislature and subsequent voter approval will also open the door to funding needed infrastructure in Yellowstone County. One of the biggest successes of Medicaid expansion has been the preservation of Montana’s rural hospitals and health centers. Many of these were facing certain closure, which meant not only the loss of access to emergency services and treatment for much of Montana, but also the loss of jobs and livelihoods. Let’s not

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forget that the tobacco measure had bipartisan support in the 2017 legislature before the arrival of Big Tobacco lobbyists. I’ve spoken with doctors, nurses, and many other healthcare professionals in Billings, and the support for continuing Medicaid expansion is overwhelming. That is why I am supporting it. I’ve knocked on thousands of doors on the West End throughout this campaign, and it’s been a pleasure learning what issues matter to folks. Our district is more than 40% over the age of 55, so it is understandable that many are concerned – either for themselves or their parents– about how we take care of older Montanans, especially considering our many aging veterans. As a member of the Board of Directors at the Adult Resource Alliance, I am very aware of the obstacles and opportunities for senior services. Fulfilling these commitments will be a focus for me in the legislature.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 54

Terry Moore - R Age: 66 Occupation: Retired, service volunteer Family: Wife, Tena Moore, three children Education: Great Falls High School; Montana State Univer-



sity Bozeman, bachelor’s degree in business with accounting emphasis; Columbia University senior executive management program Past employment: First Interstate, CFO 1979-2014; KPMG manager 1974-1979 Past political experience: None Online campaign info: Facebook: TerryMooreforMontana Email: Terrill.Moore@iCloud. com Address: In the district at 5414 Green Teal Drive, Billings, Montana 59106 Phone: 406-671-5393 We each have one life to live. Therefore, individually and collectively, we need to stand against all forms of violence. Schools, neighborhoods and our community need safety and civility for people to flourish. Our Federal and State laws regarding guns are constitutional and need to be respected and honored. Further

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needed to encourage work-eligible participants (over 50% of current enrollees) to grow their income rather than be trapped in poverty, yet continue to provide Medicaid coverage for the most vulnerable. There are a host of free-market alternatives to be implemented to lower health care costs for everyone. A common theme of concern as I knock doors is education. Education is our state’s largest expenditure for good reason: our future depends on it! I will stand up for excellence in education. We ought to expect and have the best outcomes of any state, equipping our children for the future. If our children are prepared for the future, we can let go, knowing it’ll be a better place than we left it. Many children need alternative structures and further focus on technical skills, therefore, being flexible is important. Education and learning is for everyone. Never stop growing!

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Smith Continued from 6 such as widows, orphans and the disabled. The tobacco tax initiative isn’t the answer and will be short $34,000,000 annually of paying for the program. When Medicaid Expansion passed in 2015 it was estimated that by 2019 there’d be 45,723 in the program. That number is now approaching 100,000 and becoming a real budget buster. Constituents in SD 27 are concerned about ever increasing demands on

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Choriki Continued from 18

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Visit your county election office Monday through Friday between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and complete a registration form. Fill out and sign a voter registration application and drop it off at your county election office, or mail it to the county election administrator. Fill out and sign a registration form when you apply for or renew your driver’s license or Montana ID. You must provide your Montana driver’s license number or Montana MVD ID number when you register. If you do not have a Montana driver’s license number or MVD ID number, you will need to provide the last 4 digits of your Social Security number. If you have neither number, you will need to provide another form of identification. You will need to provide a residence address or specific geographic location information from which your residence address may be determined. The residence address must be in the county in which you are registering. The deadline for regular registration is 30 days before any election. If you miss that deadline, you can still register and vote in the election by late registering at your county election office or designated location. Once you’ve registered, you’ll get a voter

ture cannot make it happen for The Heights, but it can provide the tools. We can make city/county planning efforts easier and encourage long term planning. We must fund infrastructure projects like the connection to I-90 and clean water for Billings. We must pass a local option taxes enabling local development. With these tools the Heights can control its future economic and community growth. Read more at ChorikiForMontana.com/Gazette.

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October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

confirmation notice from your county election office verifying your registration and telling you which precinct and which polling place you vote in. Late registration is available at any time right up through the close of polls on election day, except between noon and 5 p.m. the day before the election. Be sure to keep your voter registration current by filling out a new form if your name or address changes. You can check to see the most current information on file at My Voter Page. If you move and become a resident of another Montana county, you must re-register in that county. If you are a student going to college in another county you can: — Choose to vote in your county of permanent residence, either by going to the polls or by absentee ballot, or — Register in the county where you are going to college and vote in that county. — If you are an out-of-state student going to school in Montana, choose to become a resident of Montana if you have resided in Montana for at least 30 days, and vote in the county where you are going to school, or — Vote in your original state, but you cannot vote in both states.

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household expenses that are growing faster than increases (if any) in household income. I will fight to stop excessive taxing and wasteful government spending for expensive unwanted programs. I will work to reduce taxes, healthcare costs, and support legislation encouraging responsible development of our natural resources which creates jobs, revenue for schools and lowers energy costs. Many are also concerned about the loss of freedom to enjoy the traditions that we so dearly love. I will work diligently to protect property rights, public land/stream access and strengthen our families.


HOUSE DISTRICT 55

Kathleen O’Donnell - D Age: 26 Occupation: Finance

Family: Married with one child Education: Graduated High School in 2010 however I went to Basic Training in 2009 with the Army National Guard Past political experience: Going to Helena and working on a bill to ensure all Montanans are protected. Working on local campaigns. Online campaign info: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ODonnellHD55/ Website: https://www.facebook.com/ODonnellHD55/ Email: odonnellhd55@gmail. com Phone: 406-781-9387 As a responsible gun owner I understand the importance of the 2nd Amendment. I also understand that our state ranks high in suicides and accidental gun

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deaths. The conversation of gun safety must be bipartisan and one that focuses on federal background checks for all gun purchases. I am also a strong believer in gun education and ensuring we have solid programs that teach gun safety to all individuals. One of the most important jobs of the Legislature is to pass a comprehensive budget that promotes growth and supports the people of Montana. We must come together and pass a budget that is realistic and based on revenue. We can help increase our revenue by supporting local businesses and bringing in industries with quality long lasting jobs. In addition we must provide support to our public services. Many Montanans rely on a wide variety of services and we cannot continue to cut these.

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are not enforced. No new gun law could have addressed the gun violence that has occurred over the last year. I support the 2nd amendment of the U.S. Constitution First of all, there was a 300 million dollar rainy day fund that was depleted before the start of the session, budget reductions should have started when those funds were being spent. So the start of the 2019 session the state will already be in the red. That is why safeguards were put in place to prevent this from happening again. The governor is the one who chose the cuts that unfairly targeted the services for mental health and people with disabilities. There were options approved in the special session that could have prevented the cuts to the most vulnerable.

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Infrastructure is more than just roads and highways, it includes safe drinking water, schools, dams, and so much more that is vital to Montana. It provides good paying jobs and growth to our state. The 2019 Legislation must put politics aside and focus on the people of this state by passing an infrastructure bonding bill. Bonding would allow us to fund critical projects that must be completed. By including our state universities we bring in more students which means more growth for our state. I not only support the Medicaid expansion I believe that our state should move towards a single payer health system. Healthcare should not be treated as a luxury but as a right. Unfortunately many people limit or avoid their visits to medical profession-

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als for fear of large unpayable bills. Due to this they are forced to miss work or threaten their well-being. Providing health care that focusing on preventative care would allow people to take care of themselves. This not only helps the individual but the overall economy of our state. There are many issues but the biggest issue for our district is infrastructure, more specifically water. When I first moved to Laurel in 2014 I received a water bill over $100. I thought it must be a mistake and called into the City. I was quickly informed that a certain amount is placed on the bill before your usage to cover the increasing cost to the city. We must put time and money into fixing this problem instead of placing projects on the back burner.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 55 married sons, nine grandchildren Education: Graduated Park High School 1971 Past Employment: Self-employed 30 years Past political experience: 2015 and 2017 sessions in Montana House Online campaign info: Twitter: @vjricci Email: ricthriftway@montana.com Address: In the district at 1231 5th Ave., Laurel Phone: 406-855-9153 Gun policies in school I believe are best addressed at the local level. Small rural districts handle policy in schools different than urban schools. Local Vince Ricci - R school boards should implement Age: 65 the strategies and policies that Occupation: Business owner suit their districts. We have more Family: Wife Debbie, Three than enough laws now many that

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I have answered this question the last two election cycles. Infrastructure bills pass every session. Bonding on the other hand is where the differences arise. Because bonding requires the State to borrow money it takes 67 votes in the House to pass. In my opinion infrastructure is roads, bridges, sewer projects and water projects. If these types of projects were brought separately they would pass. If the governor wants funds for university buildings or the historical center they should be brought in separate bills, not tied to other projects. I do not agree with the all in one bill approach to funding infrastructure. Senate Bill 405 was the Medicaid expansion bill. The bill required work requirements that have not been implemented thus growing the program beyond its

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sustainability. There are approximately 48,000 childless, non employed able bodied adults on the program. We need to take care of the state’s most vulnerable, work requirements need to be enforced. Without reforms in the system it will only grow beyond our ability to fund it. I would like to continue to work to obtain the money that the State has not paid the City of Laurel for the water intake. I want to work to improve Child Protective Services to keep more children and families together. The bill that established the Fighter Memorial needs to be updated and I want to bring a bill to update the language to align with the wishes of the Firefighter Memorial Committee. Again the Billings Chamber wants a local option tax which I would not support, it would hurt our Laurel citizens.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 56

Janna J. Lind - D Age: 32 Occupation: Government and psychology teacher at West High School Family: Married to Rob Hankins; 6 year old boy and three

older children in 6th, 7th, and 11th grades. Education: Graduated high school from Hysham; Bachelors of science in history and political science with an endorsement in psychology from Rocky Mountain College; Master’s degree in school counseling from The University of the Southwest. Past Employment: Taught for seven years at Hardin High school; worked at the Boys and Girls Club in Lockwood Past political experience: Currently a Lockwood School board trustee. Online campaign info: Facebook: Janna for Montana (@JannaLindHD56) Email: jannajlind@gmail.com Address: Live in House District 56. Phone: 406-697-9145 The Second Amendment is the last unadulterated American liberty. However, the inappropriate use of handguns

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and military grade weapons have become a public health and safety issue. I have taught through this school-shooting era and see the stress and concern our students face daily. My husband’s life has been threatened by a student bringing a handgun to school this year. I will work to ensure smart legislation is enacted for the safety of our students and family members. The 2019 Legislature needs to tap into Federal dollars allocated toward communication networks within schools for quicker reporting. Gun-free schools are critical to safe education. Montana needs to increase revenue by bringing in industries with higher paying jobs and supporting our small businesses at the state and local level. Our investment in businesses will secure their success and will ensure increased Montana revenue. We need to tap into our tourism industry at a higher rate by sup-

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porting restaurants and hotels. Property taxes must not be raised to make up for our deficit. That being said, it is detrimental to our way of life to cut public services. Without these services the students I teach everyday will seek out-of-state education and jobs. In order to address our budget concerns, we must pass an infrastructure bill in the 2019 legislative session. In order to compensate for the deferred maintenance to our buildings, roads, bridges and internet access, we need to begin this project now. Montanans must support an infrastructure bond as an investment in our state’s future. State university facilities belong on an infrastructure bill. The students I see daily are among the nation’s brightest individuals. To secure these intellectual resources stay in our state we need to bolster the facilities and bring in programs that appeal to the 21st century marketplace.

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Hard working, low-income citizens of Montana deserve health care. I support continuing funding for these 91,000 individuals’ health insurance. I am concerned at this point about a tobacco tax as it is unsustainable revenue source for the future. However, I will explore all options to continue funding Medicaid expansion past the June 2019 end date. As a legislator I will prioritize finding a long term solution to sustainable funding for low-income health insurance. Lockwood is the fastest growing community in the state. We are voting to build a high school to service our approximately 500 high school students. We are building the TEDD and increasing sewer infrastructure. One current concern and need is the building of a connection highway into Billings Heights. I will work to bolster infrastructure for our district, bring in small businesses to support our population growth and continue to support our local school system.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 56

Sue Vinton - R Age: 61 Occupation: Business owner, Vinton Construction, Inc. Family: Husband-Mike, children – Carrie, Jessica, Jake and Cooper Education: AAS human services, bachelor degree criminal justice, paralegal certification

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Past employment: Litigation paralegal for 15 years prior to joining Vinton Construction, Inc. Past political experience: Lockwood School Board 12 years; Montana School Board Association board , Montana Schools Unemployment Insurance Program board Online campaign info: Facebook: Sue Vinton for Montana Website (if any): Email: sue@vintonlog.com and sue.vinton@mtleg.gov Address: Live in the distrct at 5115 High Trail Road, Lockwood Phone: 406-855-2625 We must continue to find ways to address depression, mental illness and the disenfranchised among our citizens. During the 2017 Legislative Session I supported HB2 which provided for a Psychiatry residency program in our state; which we hope will lead to greater availability of mental health services state-wide. I will support our schools and their partnerships with mental health

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October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

professionals and law enforcement to keep our schools safe. Schools must have a School Resource Officer available to interact not only with students but with their families and the community. In building relationships, vulnerable individuals can be better identified and provided with help. Creating a budget based upon projections is challenging. In reality though, revenue collected for the 2018 fiscal year ended up within 1.2% of the legislature’s projection – making the 2017 Special Session called by the Governor unnecessary. The cuts to programs serving our most vulnerable citizens, also made by the Governor, were likewise unnecessary and particularly harmful and I support restoring those cuts fully. We must prioritize our spending, and I will support funding for services to the elderly, people with disabilities and mental health issues over “pet projects” and a bloated administration in Helena. Infrastructure bills have passed in virtually all Legis-

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lative sessions including $1Billion in infrastructure funding from the 2017 Legislature. One only need to travel our roads to see many current projects. Our schools have interest money at their disposal from the Coal Trust for needed repairs. I believe infrastructure includes roads, bridges, water systems and the like. I will not support infrastructure bills that include projects outside of actual infrastructure. I will likely support some funding for university buildings as long as the universities match any funds that come from the Legislature and I believe these projects should be voted on individually. Montana’s Medicaid expansion program has a number of flaws. The program hurts vulnerable seniors, developmentally disabled and mentally ill citizens by providing “free” health insurance to able-bodied, childless, non-working adults, leaving less money for the truly vulnerable. There are no cost controls on the program and the upcoming ballot

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initiative does not fully fund the programas the majority of money goes into general fund. Finally, the work requirement has not been utilized and there is no asset-test to determine eligibility. I support Medicaid for citizens who truly need it as long as a sustainable funding source is identified without increasing taxes. Residents of HD56, like many Montanans are concerned about increasing taxes and the high cost of health care. Families in HD56 are working hard to provide for themselves, give back to their community and save for the future. I will work equally hard to reduce government spending, and will explore all available options to lower the cost of health care and health care insurance. I will continue to work to reduce burdensome government regulations on businesses, thereby encouraging their growth and success. I will advocate for vocational education in our schools, enabling students to train to be successful in the future.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 58 Past employment: U.S. Army, Fort Benning, Georgia Past political experience: Two Terms in the State Legislature Online campaign info: Twitter: @berglee_seth Facebook: Seth Berglee for HD 58 Email: Rep.seth.berglee@ gmail.com Address: Joliet Phone: 406-690-9329 As a former instructor/shooter in the Army Marksmanship Unit this is an area I have a lot of experience in. First, I believe that the 2nd amendment clearly states that owning firearms for protection is a guaranteed right. Second, Seth Berglee - R for many Montanans firearms are Age: 33 a part of our life and culture. Gun Occupation: Self-employed violence is not synonymous with Family: Single gun ownership. Compare mass Education: Bachelor’s degree shootings in France vs. Israel. We in zoology, Ohio State University have options to increase safety to

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Billion in funding for infrastructure in HB’s 2, 5, 6, 7, 11. Bonding requires a supermajority of votes, so it a higher measure. There was consensus for a bill that would include some bonding, if it was strictly base infrastructure; sewer, water, roads, and bridges. If we prioritize projects based on need and cost I am optimistic that we can pass an infrastructure bill next session. I also hope my colleagues will join me in voting for HB8 to fund water projects. The program in its current form is unsustainable. The initial state cost estimate was $27 Million (2015), that cost will go up to $120 Million in 2020. The program should require 20-hourwork requirement for the 48,000 nonemployed, able bodied, childless, adults. Mandatory asset review. Also, a tiered system so individuals don’t get kicked off the program when they earn over the cutoff.

rights and ensure the safety of our communities. That is why I support improving Montana’s system of background checks. I believe our state should collaborate with federal systems to ensure we keep guns in the hands of responsible users and away from those we know have a history of violence. I don’t want to see taxes raised on hard working Montanans nor do I want to see life-saving services stripped from those in need. I think the 2017 legislature made knee-jerk decisions in stripping crucial support services from rural communities to balance the budget. It’s time the wealthiest start paying their fair share and contribute to our communities. The middle class is already the backbone of our economy, we don’t need to be the only foundation of the tax base as well. Infrastructural issues are why I’m running for office. On Council, I’ve seen the cost

shifting to our local communities because Representatives like my opponent won’t make tough choices to fund a statewide infrastructure bill that would invest our state tax dollars back in our local communities. Water and sewer rates are rising everywhere. Our bridges are collapsing and we can’t afford to fix them. When I am your Representative, I will prioritize passing HB 142 which would put $90 million dollars toward Public Works across our state and make critical investments in communities that have been neglected for too long. I support Medicaid expansion. University of Montana analysis found that Medicaid expansion added around 5000 jobs and generated about $270 million in income for Montanans. Additionally, it is estimated that it saved around 50,000 people from experiencing medical bankruptcy. If we don’t renew this life-saving

society without banning random types of firearms. For instance, I carried a bill last session that provided for armed personnel with the proper training in schools. Those cuts were premature and didn’t need to happen. In fact, the Legislature’s estimate ended up being very accurate and 99.65% of cuts will be restored per legislation in SB9. We provided options to offset cuts to essential services, but they were rejected initially, because they didn’t include permanent tax increases. (The Gov rejected the $32 Million prison renegotiation in Nov ’17 but took the money at the end of July ’18). We also passed a legislation last session for a budget stabilization fund to mitigate revenue issues in the future. Taxpayers deserve an efficient government that prioritizes spending. To start, last session the Legislature did pass over $1

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This keeps them in poverty and limits upward mobility. The program also takes resources from seniors and special needs. Grants, waivers, co-ops, transparent pricing, and direct primary care are solutions to increase the quality and affordability of healthcare. When I talk to people about our government, most view government in the limited role of administering the law and providing justices defined in the constitution. They want to live free lives without undue stress or burdens from the government. I ran because I love the Montana way of life and wish to preserve it for future generations. In the two terms I’ve served, I have worked diligently to expand the rights of the individuals, increase access for hunting, minimize the tax burden wherever possible, and streamline the regulatory processes for businesses.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 58 Education: Bachelor’s degree political science with an emphasis in Constitutional law Past employment: Bar manager, Natali’s Front Bar, Red Lodge Past political experience: Red Lodge City Council 2016-present Online campaign info: Facebook: www.facebook.com/AnnaDrew4MT/ Website: https://www.annadrewformt.com/ Email: annadrewformt@ gmail.com Address: PO Box 1315, Red Lodge, MT 59068. Physical address 321 N. Word Ave, Red Lodge, MT 59068 Phone: (406)-860-1978 First, this is not just a probAnna Drew - D lem with mental health nor Age: 28 just a problem with guns. This is Occupation: Advocate at Do- a problem of people with violent mestic and Sexual Violence Ser- or criminal pasts being able to acvices cess firearms too easily. I stand for Family: Mother, father and policies that protect responsible brother in Billings gun owners’ Second Amendment

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policy, there will be more costs to the Montana budget because of lost jobs and increasing medical writeoffs for those who need care and are unable to pay. Healthy Montanans are better able to work and contribute to our communities. Simply put, renewing Medicaid expansion is the smart, fiscally responsible choice for Montana’s Budget. In addition to infrastructure, my priority for our county is to bolster our local economy. As a young person working to build my future in Carbon County, I know how important this is. Agriculture is a bedrock of our community which keeps the rest of our economy strong. When I am in the legislature, I want to roll back HB 29, which raised taxes on small farmers. I will also support HB 631 which helps revitalize our agricultural community by helping new farmers assume the financial risk of a farm without the burden of student debt.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 59 laude with a bachelor’s degree in social anthropology from Harvard University, 1995 Past employment: Self-employed as a musician and costumer. Past political experience: Vice-chair of the Park County Democrats Address: 4632 Old Yellowstone Trail North, Livingston Phone: (406) 823-0362 Online campaign info: Facebook: quenbyforhd59 Email: quenbyforhd59@ gmail.com Mental health and gun violence go hand in hand. The 2017 Legislature chose to make tremendous cuts to the Department of Health and Human Services because of the budget deficit. In my district we lost our mental health facility, among other social services. As long as funding mental health services is viewed as optional, not only are we going to continue to see gun violence and

1. Quenby Landiorio - D Age: 45 Occupation: Musician, costumer, substitute teacher Family: Married to Sean Devine, stepmother to his three children Education: Graduated cum

tragedy, but we are also going to be forced to look for solutions to it through gun control only. If, however, voters can influence their legislators to see their way to fully supporting mental health services. According to the Montana Budget and Policy Center, Montanans making over $435k/ yr year pay the least in taxes 4.7%, while Montanans making between $34k and $54k/yr pay the most – 6.4% of their income. The top 5% of earners pay almost a whole point to over a point and a half less in taxes than our lowand middle-income families. As I see it, we don’t have to raise taxes or cut services. We can start by discontinuing tax breaks given to the top 5% tax bracket, like Federal deductions and capital gains earnings, and collect the full revenue the state is due. Montana’s population is predicted to grow 14% over the next 30 years. I think the most responsible way to fund

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and infrastructure bill is through a combination of bonding and cash. Because bonds are paid back over many years, the burden of paying it can be shared and thus decreased by a greater number of taxpayers as the population grows. By combining bonds with a cash we can mitigate the size of the loan and therefore how much interest we ask taxpayers to shoulder. Of course, we should only use as much cash as we can afford to keep the interest low without handicapping ourselves. We expanded Medicaid to include people making up to $16,600. Roughly 90,000 Montanans are now on Medicaid as opposed to the 1,200 statewide before the expansion. That means 90,000, or almost 1 in 10 Montanans,are making $16,600 or less working an $8-$9/hr fulltime job. Medicaid expansion is saving the state money, creating jobs and allowing the newly-insured to spend their hard-earned

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money on improving their families’ lives and futures as well as Montana’s economy. The state would continue to pay its share of Medicaid expansion out of the General Fund. Support voters initiative I-185 in assisting to fund the expansion through cigarette taxes. As of the 2010 census, 26% of district HD59 was 65 years or older and a full 50% was 55 years or older. Ensuring that this district’s social services are restored, fully-funded and easily accessible is the paramount responsibility of any representative to this district. But raising taxes every time we need to fund a public service is just not realistic for a population that relies increasingly on fixed incomes. Therefore, I see the call for innovative revenue sourcing as imperative to serving this district responsibly and compassionately. I know these are great challenges but I am heartened by devoted allies in our community.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 59 Education: Bachelor’s degree in agricultural education Past employment: Park High School Past political experience: Local school board, Montana House of Representatives 2013, 2015, 2017 Online campaign info: Facebook: Alan Redfield Email: redfield4mt@gmail. com Address: In the district at 538 Mill Creek Road Phone: 406-220-1247 Instead of addressing the gun part of violence we should look at the root cause of the symptoms we are seeing on the news. We need to address the menAlan Redfield - R tal health of the students and be Age: 65 aware of the increasing cyber bullOccupation: Rancher ing that goes on. We need to work Family: Married with two hand in hand with the schools and DPPHS to get people on the ground grown daughters

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October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

working with the individuals that are identified by the school and law enforcement that are in crisis before the tragedy happens. The parents are a big part of the solutions that need to be taught. First and foremost the assumptions to this question are wrong. The Governor’s management of the budget has been flawed since the 2015 session. Adding new programs to a budget then not having a way to pay for them is not good practice. WE have an excellent legislative staff that nailed the numbers the past two sessions. Revenue increased twelve-thirteen percent which is good but the cost has increased by 30 percent. We have to live within our means which is no new programs if we can’t fund the current programs. I am willing to take on reducing nearly 100 million in tax credits.

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The infrastructure funding could be changed by breaking up the projects into individual bills and scored for importance. The practice of putting everything into one big bonding bill makes it easy vote against because it’s easy to find something you don’t like, and we lose all the projects. WE need to look at what is truly needed rather than what some bureaucrat want. I believe that water projects should be of the highest priority as conserving and protection of our water resources are critical to the state. I will not support the Medicaid program as it is currently written. The program drives up the cost of health care as well as private insurance. The statewide initiative will mandate the program with no way to make changes and falsely claims that the tobacco tax will pay for it. While the current programs get everyone on insur-

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ance the problem comes when the insured can’t pay the deductible. I have a constituent with 4 children and has a $12000 deductible. If we have more cost to the program that now is costing $80 million what program do you cut. The important issue is the cuts to child protective services. The increase in drug addiction and mental health issues are taking a huge toll on the family structure. Our case workers are over worked and with the restructuring of the offices we lost several and others have to travel to provide services. We as state need to increase the workers in the field and continue to pair them with experienced case workers. This will get them the proper experience to be effective. This will require more funding which we could come up with by eliminating many of the tax credits currently in effect.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 60 21, 18 and 14 Education: Bachelor’s degree in sociology from Syracuse University Past Employment: Graduation Matters Montana Coach for Montana’s Office of Public Instruction, preceded by 10 years in nonprofit administration for youth development organizations in Livingston Past political experience: Current State House - elected 2016, Livingston Local Government Study Commission elected in 2004. Online campaign info: Facebook: Laurie Bishop for Montana Email: bishopforhd60@gmail. com Laurie Bishop - D Address: In the district at 211 S. Yellowstone St., Livingston Age: 48 Phone: 406-223-1122 I appreciate the frame of this Occupation: Director, Monquestion, considering that tana Afterschool Alliance Family: Married 26 years to Montanans are more likely to Storrs Bishop, three children aged take their own lives with firearms

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than to take the lives of another. When considering firearms, public health and safety this needs to be included in the conversation. Though I’m cautious about emphasis on mental health, which can leave people needlessly fearful that seeking help can result in losing their firearms. Given the onslaught of bills to expand firearms access in 2017, a win might be as simple as continuing to keep concealed carry out of schools, restaurants and the state capitol. Budget cuts and constraints have caused unnecessary harm that will be costly to recover from, for both our systems and individuals. At a minimum, the Legislature needs to restore the budget to the funding levels established during the 2017 session and take responsibility for raising the revenue needed to support both a healthy state economy and healthy citizens who contribute to it. We need legislators willing to consider revenue options that can

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generate targeted revenue from tourists and require corporations and the top 1% of income earners to pay their fair share. It’s popular to compare the management of the state budget to the expectations we have for our personal household budgets. Using that logic, we should acknowledge that most people pay for large capital investments (houses and cars) by taking out loans. Furthermore, we know that that proper maintenance of our assets can help avoid more costly repairs or premature replacement in the future. As long as we properly manage our debt load, bonding for infrastructure, including investments in our university system, is a logical and responsible way to move forward. Assuring that 94,000 working Montanans (the current number) continue to have access to healthcare is not just the right thing to do, it’s critical to our economy and vital to ensur-

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ing we can continue to have rural hospitals. I do not look at this as something that sits outside of our normal budget, requiring a unique funding source. Just as in my first answer in regards to the budget, it is the Legislature’s responsibility to raise the revenue to meet the needs of the state. Coming from a county with one of the highest suicide rates in the state, I have made mental health a priority from the start. In 2017 I passed the Montana Mental Health Parity Act, requiring private insurance policies to provide mental health benefits that are no less favorable than coverage for physical health. My district still cares about mental health and I feel the most important action I can take will be to help restore the state budget and lost mental health services to needed levels and continue Medicaid expansion, so that 94,000 Montanans retain access to healthcare benefits.

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HOUSE DISTRICT 60 Dan Skattum - R Age: 58 Occupation: Maintenance Tec. I/ Montana Department of Transportation, volunteer firefighter/EMT Family: Married to Lauretta, three adult children, and foster parent Education: Graduate of Park County High School, MSU, BSBC Past Employment: Owner/ operator pest control business, construction, sales Past political experience: Representative for House District 62 2011-2012 Online campaign info: Twitter: skattumd



Facebook: Dan Skattum Website: (coming soon) Email: skattums@gmail.com Address: In the district, East River Road, Livingston Phone: 406-223-0545 These are serious problems and deserve attention. Facts show areas with more gun control have more problems. There is a need to get the root of the problem. I do not believe gun control is an answer. Most State agencies budget are the same as the previous with some increases being asked for. A type of Zero Based Budget would require the agencies to look at spending just as we do in our households when money is tight.

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Look for unnecessary regulations that promote government inefficiencies and work on these problems. Most Infrastructure needs are and should be a local issue. I support the Coal Trust Fund process where monies go to the highest and best uses, with local participation and input. I would not have supported the gas tax increase passed last session; a lot of that money went in to the general fund. The Gas Tax (government spending increase) should not happen when The People of Montana are struggling. Montana should avoid adding debt. The People of Montana are generous people and help

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others when they need help. The above programs need to be tailored by the good people of Montana, give a helping hand and then encouragement to start helping themselves when able. The size of our Government has far out grown the growth of the population, and the rate of inflation. I would support and encourage others to support some type of “Zero Based Budget” not just an open checkbook. Many people in Montana live on 2 or more pay check per household, fixed incomes, etc. Most people are careful with their money, we should expect no less from our Government that is there to serve us.

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Sustaining the Quality of Yellowstone County through Honesty, Integrity and Experience

The Following PeoPle SuPPorT robyn DriScoll: Cathy Cullen Heide Hogan-Mankin Nibs & Kathy Moessmer Barb Gulick Sue Devries Lyle Hill Bob Adler John Culbertson Senator Mary McNally Dick Berg Patti Dillon Steve Henry Roberta Ciffone Jeanne Graves Linda Leligdowicz Rachel Schillreff Mary Hernandez Lillian Hartung Mary Lee & Marty Connell Terry & Kristy Bouck Linda Grosskopf Dr. Don & Carol Roberts Gary Blain Vince Ruegamer Chuck & Joan Tooley Senator Margie MacDonald

Chris & Dr. John Dorr Ceci Bentler Karen & Gene Jarussi Kris Schaffer-Urlacher Shelley Van Atta Joan Thulberry Carol Scovill Patrick & Jenny Lynch-Kuntz Cal Cumin Dan Page Russell Rowland Tom & Cindy Dell Peter Gesuale Paul Donato Sara Lovely Ben McKee Sarah Fowler Karen Moses Mike & Diane Boyett Heather Webster-Sather Susan & Russ Plath Marie Nelson-Moncure Marris Harris Stephanie Denton Baucus Vicki Dickinson Shawn Bettise

Stefanie Ruegamer Pat Burtchaell Doug & Kathy James Representative Kathy Kelker Steve Hurd Vicki Massie Joyce Davis Kevin Dowling Robert Trimble Jerry Klundt Julie Tschetter-Seedhouse Kris Carpenter Kim Peterson-Rolandson Ann Hanson Rene’ Rosell-Yarbrough Tully Olson Mike Turley James Haney Carol Blades Joe & Nancy Ruby Marilyn Lyons-Pogue Chris Woolston Erica Wiley Dave Pauli Brett Foster Lana Rae

Darrell Johnson Roberta Ciffone Alan Patterson Tara Schell Mahoney Lynn Davis Marc Burr Kathleen Shannon David & Elizabeth Klarich Bob Dalrymple Scott DeLay Monte Patterson Malia Gesuale Linda Wetzel Liz Welch Deborah Willis Victoria Zimmerer-Scott LaVerne Frank Anne Giuliano Sheila Kessler Marjorie Solomon Teresa & Bill O’Connor Cheryl Schiavon Councilwoman Penny Ronning Jerry & JoAnne Driscoll Juleen Nielsen

Councilman Brent Cromley Donna Dierenfield Becky Thatcher-Taylor Julie Hippler Jonathan & Annie Sapp Ralph Felton Steve Solberg Amy Aguirre Lynette Larson Christopher Goodridge Ming Cabrera Kathy Srock Curtis Harper Ryan & Jamie Arnold Judie Gage Mitch Bohn Rita Wells Jim Larson Brad Edwards Senator Jen Gross Jan Barry Julie Blakeslee Flynn Tolbert Becky Bey Lou Adler Betty Ann Roan

Paid for by Driscoll for County Commission, 404 Houle Dr., Billings MT 59102

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October 2018 | VOTER GUIDE

Lynn & Dan Carter Mike & Nancy Smith Kris Copenhaver Pam Rogina Dennis Stellingwerf Erin Schmidt Ann Walters Megan Simons Mark Redding Carolyn Lopez Linda Carlson Teresa Martinez-Mountains Jeff Meide Wendy Jungblut Linda Healow Theresa Solomon-Helus Scott McCulloch Rachel Larson-Long Sharon Peterson Beth McLaughlin-Quiroz Kathy & Dale Rumph Katie Cerda Deana Elder Sally Jordan Mark & Jeanne Astle Jonathan Peart

Profile for Billings Gazette

Voter Guide November 2018  

Voter Guide November 2018