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spring/summer 2018

rediscovermt.com

Lee Newspapers of Montana

YOUR LOCAL GUIDE for THINGS TO DO IN MONTANA


Montana - the Right Place MONTANA

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License plate image donated from ““The The Great Bear Bear”” painting by Monte Dolack. See the collection at the Monte Dolack Gallery at www.dolack.com.

VitalGround.orG

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rizzly bears once roamed the entire state from corner to corner, and the Great Bear has been Montana’s state animal since 1983. They define the strength, beauty and independence of both the state and its residents. Montana is The Right Place to appreciate these qualities, and you can show your support for Montana’s open spaces and unparalleled wildlife resources by getting your very own Vital Ground specialty plate the next time you renew your vehicle registration. For more information on Vital Ground’s license plate program and The Right Place Campaign, visit www.VitalGround.org.

“We don’t need to save thousands and thousands of acres – just those acres in exactly the right place.”

Background bear photo by Philip Demanczuk

The ViTal Ground FoundaTion•20 ForT Missoula, Missoula, MT• inFo@ViTalGround.orG •www.ViTalGround.orG •406-549-8650 2 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

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OUT HERE, BIG SKY MEETS BIG ADVENTURE.

BIGHORN CANYON, NORTH UNIT. NATHAN SATRAN PHOTOGRAPHY

OUT HERE, hitting the trails means pressing pause on boring and taking an unchartered route toward discovery. A mile is more than a measure of distance—it’s the thrill of a lifetime, a test of endurance and solitude with nature. Whether you are on two wheels, the back of a horse or your own two feet, each mile is a memory in the making.

Find your own amazing OUT HERE. Plan your next road trip today.

SOUTHEASTMONTANA.COM | 1.800.346.1876 #OutHereMT | #SoutheastMontana


MORE ROOM T O S TA R G A Z E

Montana’s best show happens live every night, and on the prairie that means 360° of spectacular, uninterrupted views of the galaxies. Spend the perfect evening basking in the glow of the impossibly bright Milky Way after a day of reveling in the unrivaled hospitality of our communities and forging unforgettable adventures in our expansive landscapes.

More room to roam means more space to explore here in Northeast Montana.

FREE PLANNER: CALL 800.653.1319 MISSOURIRIVER.VISITMT.COM

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SPRING/SUMMER 2018  R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A  5 Lolo Florence Stevensville

Superior

Thompson Falls Plains

Kalispell

Whitefish

37

Eureka

Ronan

Polson

Columbia Falls

Hamilton

Woodside

Cities that also include Montana’s best lodging value (Quality Inns, Super 8, Comfort Inn, Comfort Suites, Sleep Inn and Suites and Holiday Inn Express and Suites)

Deer Lodge

200

Dillon

Ennis

all

Whit eh

Butte

Boulder

Belgrade

gs illin B

Red Lodge

Laurel

Lewistown

Chinook

Columbus

Big Timber

Havre

Hardin

39 Colstrip

Forsyth

200

Miles City

Glendive

Wolf Point

200

Sidney

16

Sidney

16

www www.townpump.com .townpump.com

R ecipient of the and E xcellence Recipient Excellence Awards Awards for outstanding performance. performance.

Livingston

Bozeman

Townsend Three Forks

200 White Sulphur Springs

Great Falls

Conrad

Shelby

East Helena

Cut Bank

Helena

Rocker

Browning

Anaconda

Bonner

Missoula

Cities with Town Pump Stores, Car Washes, &/or Casino Operations

200

Troy Libby

We appreciate the opportunity to serve you and give back to the communities we live in.

Thank You For Supporting Our Montana Owned and Operated Town Pump Family of Businesses!


SPONSORS SPONSORS

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national wildlife refuge National park Indian reservation

Glacier Glacier Country

Central Country Country

Southwest Southwest Country Country Yellowstone Yellowstone Country

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Missouri River River Country Country

Glacier Country

Central Country

Southwest Country

Southeast Southeast Country

Yellowstone Country

Missouri River Country

Southeast Country

CONTENTS G L AC I E R GLACIER CO U N T RY COUNTRY Y E L LOW STO N E YELLOWSTONE CO U N T RY COUNTRY

SOUTHWEST S O U T H W E ST CO U N T RY COUNTRY S O U T H E A ST SOUTHEAST CO U N T RY COUNTRY CENTRAL CENTRAL CO U N T RY COUNTRY M I SS O U R I R I V E R MISSOURI CO U N T COUNTRY RY RIVER RREE D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

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AABBA OOU NN T I O N BUTO TIISSTSH T TU THH SEEICS CTTIS IOOEC ABOUT THIS SECTION

Rediscover Montana is a publication Rediscover Montana is a publication Rediscover Montana is — a publication ofRediscover Lee Newspapers of Montana Montana is a publication of Leeof Newspapers of Montana — Lee Newspapers of Montana — The of Billings Gazette, Missoulian, Lee Newspapers of Montana — The Billings Gazette,Gazette, Missoulian, The Billings Missoulian, MontanaThe Standard, Independent BillingsHelena Gazette, Missoulian, Montana Standard, Helena Independent Montana Standard, Helena Independent Record and Ravalli Republic. Montana Standard, Helena Independent RecordRecord and Ravalli Republic. and Ravalli Republic. rediscovermt.com ©2016 Record and Ravalli Republic. rediscovermt.com ©2016 rediscovermt.com ©2018 rediscovermt.com ©2016

FFR O M T H E G O V E R N O R R O M T H E G O V E R N O FFR R OOM O V ER E RNNOORRR M TTH E G OV

CCOONNTTRRIIBBUUTTOORRSS CONTRIBUTORS CONTRIBUTORS Chelsea Davis Chelsea Davis Chelsea Davis Bethany Baker Vince Devlin Vince Bridge Devlin Thom Vince Devlin Mike Ferguson Tom Bauer Mike Ferguson Mike Ferguson Tara Cady Brett French Brett French RobBrett Chaney French Mike Kordenbrock Charity Dewing Mike Kordenbrock Mike Kordenbrock Susan Dunlap Tom Kuglin Tom Kuglin Tom Kuglin Darrell Ehrlick Marga Lincoln MargaErickson Lincoln David Marga Lincoln Brett French Paula McGarvey Paula McGarvey Paula McGarvey Pat Hansen Jaci Webb JaciHoff Webb Matt Jaciman Webb Loren Benoit Matt Hudson Loren Benoit Loren Benoit TailyrBauer Irvine Tom Tom Bauer AmyTom Joyner Bauer Thom Bridge Al Knauber Thom Bridge Thom Bridge Michael Kordenbrock Walter Hinick Walter Hinick Walter Tom KuglinHinick Larry Mayer Larry Mayer Erin Loringer Larry Mayer Casey Martino Page Tommy Casey Page Casey Larry MayerPage Hannah Potes Hannah Potes David McCumber Hannah Potes James Woodcock Susan Olp James Woodcock James Woodcock Casey Page Bob Zellar Bob Zellar CoryBob Walsh Zellar

W EELLCCOOM E TTOO M OONNTA NA WW MM WELCOME E L C OMME ETO T OMONTANA O NTA TANNA A

Growing up in Montana, I never took Growing up in Montana, I never took for Growing granted the spectacular up Montana, Iwide never took took Growing in Montana, I open never for granted theinup spectacular wide open spaces that make our state wide one of the open for granted the spectacular open for granted the spectacular wide spaces that make our state one of the last truly unspoiled on Earth. spaces that make ourplaces state the of the that make our one state one lastspaces truly unspoiled places onofEarth. Montana is still a places placeplaces where you can last truly unspoiled on Earth. last truly unspoiled on Earth. Montana is still a place where you can walk for miles and see more elk, bear, Montana is still a place where you can Montana is still a place where you can walk for miles and see more elk, bear, and trout than people. Our world-class walk for miles and see more elk, bear, for miles and see elk, bear, andwalk trout than people. Ourmore world-class rivers, majestic mountains, and world-class rolling and trout than people. Our world-class and trout than people. Our rivers, majestic mountains, and rolling plains are where I hunt, fishand androlling hikerolling rivers, majestic mountains, rivers, majestic mountains, and plains are where I hunt, fish and hike with my family. plains are where I hunt, fi sh and hike plains are where I hunt, fish and hike with my family. We hope your travels will give you the with my family. with myyour family. We hope travels will give you the same special memories we have from We hope your travels will give you the We hope your travels will give same special memories we have fromyou the growing upspecial here. On behalf of the peosame special memories we have same memories we have from growing up here. On behalf of from the people ofgrowing Montana, we invite you to of join uspeogrowing up here. On behalf of the people up here. On behalf the ple of Montana, we invite you to join us in exploring the “Last Best Place. ” of Montana, we invite you to join us ple of Montana, weBest invite you”to join us in exploring the “Last Place. in exploring the “Last Best Place.” in exploring the “Last Best Place.” See you soon, See you soon, See See you you soon, soon,

Gov. Steve Bullock Gov. Steve Bullock Bullock Gov. Steve Bullock

FROM THE COVER Top photo: A moose stands in a mountain lake at dusk. Bottom left: An astral reflection on a lake in Glacier National Park. Bottom right: Devil’s Canyon in summer at Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area.

Kurt Wilson

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Saturday,, July 7 Saturday 3 5

Shodair Children’s Hospital brings 80 of Montana’s best men and women high school soccer players to Helena to play in the 19th Annual Shodair Soccer Classic. The games will be played att Carroll College - Nelson Stadium.

FREE KIDS’ SOCCER CLINIC - AGES 5-12 The Shodair Soccer Classic Kids’ Clinic is hosted by players in the Soccer Classic. The clinic will be held on Friday, July 6th, from 9:00AM - 11:00AM at Carroll College Nelson Stadium. The first 300 registrants will receive a t-shirt. Snacks and refreshments will be provided. Kids’ Clinic managed by Helena Youth Soccer Association.

100% of the proceeds from the Shodair Soccer Classic benefit the children and adolescents served at Shodair Children’s Hospital.

To learn more about the Shodair Kids’ Soccer Clinic and the Soccer Classic, call (406) 444-7560, or vcundall@shodair.org

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ExECUTIvE

AmORÉ BAY

NO INTEREST FINANCING UP TO 5 YEARSOAC! BREEzE

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1140 Enterprise Dr., Helena

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www.spasofmontana.com 10 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

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Southwest Country

Southwest Country Yellowstone Country

Southeast Country

INSIDE THIS SECTION INSIDE THIS SECTION INSIDE THIS SECTION

Yellowstone Country

Southeast Country

GGLL AACCII E R C O U N T R Y

REDISCOV

Going-to-the-Sunloop loop Going-to-the-Sun Glacier Road Trips

GlacierDistilleries Centennial Glacier Centennial

Missoula Marathon LiveMissoula Music inMarathon Western Montana

Calendar ofevents events Calendar of Calendar of Events

Visit Glacier Country for the Zootown Darby Logging Daly Days, Visit Glacier Country forDays, the Zootown Fringe Festival, Huckleberry Days Arts Fringe Festival,Bluegrass Huckleberry Days and Artsmore Hardtimes Festival, Festival, Garden City River Rod Run, Festival, Garden City River Rod Run, Missoula Celtic Festival and more. Missoula Celtic Festival and more.

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THE ULTIMATE GLACIER ROADTRIP By ROB CHANEY rchaney@missoulian.com When the 9-year-old cousins from Saudi Arabia come to town, the sheer expanse of Montana’s Big Sky Country can really challenge the attention span. Jonas and Jember Chaney want to see everything their home away from home has to offer, but they don’t care much for the driving in between. When you spend two calendar days inside airplanes or airports, conforming to another passenger seat falls way down the list of things that make a vacation worthwhile. But they really wanted to see Glacier National Park, the border of which lies at least three hours away. How to get there without making the road trip a form of punishment? The goal was no more than 60 minutes in the car without something to get out and do. Much of the time, that dropped to 40 minutes, with some careful scouting. In between, Jonas and Jember practiced the old standby of scavenger hunting for Pinto horses, bright yellow cars, bike vacationers, canoes

Bearhat Mountain in Glacier National Park

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ROB CHANEY photos, Missoulian

Favorite room at Glacier Park Lodge.

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Mid-summer snowball fight, by Going to the Sun’s Big Drift

ing and back down. Either road delivers scenic vistas, but the ROB CHANEY photos, Missoulian outer, straighter option means Capturing Wild Goose Island less car-sickness than the twisty route along Glacier Park’s border. The goal is St. Mary and the on roof-racks and roadkill to make main eastern entrance to Glacier the windshield time worthwhile. National Park. St. Mary Lake has When that lagged, they broke out a lengthy shoreline of attractions, journals to jot down sentences like Wild Goose Island. describing things they saw (to remember to tell Mom when they Once past the gate, Glacier’s got back). attractions accordion down to every 10 minutes or so, depending Right out of Missoula, we had on personal preference. Waterto check out the biggest cow in Western Montana, standing falls? Historic markers? Visitor at the intersection of Clearwater center displays? Gift shops? Short Junction. Barely 30 minutes into hikes? Snowball fights in the the trip, this also makes a good middle of summer? Check. stop for the bathroom break we The day ends at Apgar, where forgot to take leaving town. millions of rocks await ritual drowning in the waters of Lake Less than an hour on, Lincoln’s Adding elements to Blackfoot Pathways Sculpture in the Wild. McDonald while marshmallows Blackfoot Pathways Sculpture endure a flaming transformation in the Wild stretches both legs fly by. and the rocks they rode in on. A into s’mores. and imaginations. The 26-acre Jonas and Jember overnightsprinting Daspletosaurus statue public art installation proed in Choteau, torn between the To close the loop, three hours in the parking lot keeps you from attractions of camping by a creek missing this otherwise brief of driving stand between vides plenty to talk about while West Glacier and Missoula. Jonas strolling around (and sometimes on the edge of the Bob Marshall bump in the road. Wilderness or swimming in the through) the huge creations. By now, the rhythm of the road and Jember returned to Logan city pool and a soft hotel bed. Pass for mountain-goat spothas settled in, so we got away Highway 200 climbs away The town’s Old Trail Museum with a full hour’s push to East from Lincoln toward Rogting, Hidden Lake-hiking and a presents a mix of cowboy history, Glacier. The reward was a wander thorough dousing through the car ers Pass, which has a wide road literary references (including a through the Glacier Park Lodge, window at the Going to the Sun shoulder next to a stairway on display dedicated to A.B. Guthrie) aptly nicknamed the “Big Tree Road’s Weeping Wall. That ate the eastbound side. Climb up to and dinosaur discoveries. Lodge” for the immense Douglas up enough of the day that stops the trail that leads to a fantastic fir trunks holding up the lobby. like the Giant Hook and Ball in vantage point into the Scapegoat Barely 20 minutes up the Wilderness, the great plains of road, Bynum’s Two Medicine Motorists differ on the relative Hungry Horse, Columbia Falls water park, Polson’s Miracle of central Montana and meadows of Dinosaur Center and adjacent distance from East Glacier to America Museum and Garden of wildflowers. The walk takes 20 or Trex Agate Shop answer every St. Mary directly via Highway One Thousand Buddhas by Arlee 30 minutes and just enough sweat question one could have about 49 or the roundabout-yet-faster all passed by in a backseat snooze. to make the next hour to Choteau Montana’s thunder lizards, Highway 464 over to Brown-

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TOMMY MARTINO photos, Missoulian

“It’s a great afternoon ride in wildflower season, or to go for a picnic,” Bert Lindler (center) said. “It’s an opportunity waiting to be done.” Lindler said of the Road to the Buffalo, an embankment, originally raised to support steam locomotives, that now can be used as a recreation trail. Linder accompanied by his dog Camas and Ben Horan, executive director of Mountain Bike Missoula, road the two-mile stretch to Belmont Creek.

BIKE TO THE BUFFALO Little-used trail makes a great destination By ROB CHANEY rchaney@missoulian.com NINEMILE PRAIRIE — Where the Nimi’ipuu once dragged thousands of pounds of bison meat, Bert Lindler packed only a granola bar. He pedaled a bike on the embankment raised to support steam locomotives. The Blackfoot River flowed below, devoid of boats. Western Montana’s original freight corridor relaxed in springtime isolation. “It’s a great afternoon ride in wildflower season, or to go for a picnic,” Lindler said. “It’s an opportunity waiting to be done.” The Road to the Buffalo has some gaps. The biggest spans Belmont Creek, where Barely 45 minutes from Misa railroad trestle bridge was removed decades ago. A 50-foot drop from the rail soula, this little-known spot sheds grade to the water offers no safe crossing in an easily erodible gravel slope.

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its winter snow much sooner than many other recreation sites. And it comes packed with both scenic and historical value. The Nez Perce (Nimi’ipuu) Tribe knew the Blackfoot River corridor as the Cokahlah-ishkit, which translates to “Road to the Buffalo.” They used it to cross the Rocky Mountain Front and bring plains bison meat and hides back to their homelands along the Montana-Idaho border country. Lewis and Clark recorded the route on their way back to St. Louis in 1806. Ironically, if the Corps of Discovery had left the Missouri River around present-day Wolf Creek on their way west, they would have been a two or three days’ walk from the Blackfoot and the rest of the Columbia River system. Instead, they spent a miserable fall stumbling through the Bitterroot Mountains. Prospectors found gold near Lincoln in 1865, and loggers quickly followed to harvest the drainage’s big Ponderosa pines for mine timbers and smelter fuel. They initially floated logs down the Blackfoot to mills in Bonner before starting to build a railroad up the river channel in 1904. Today, the Blackfoot has become a popular trout stream after years of mining pollution was cleared up. The rails have been recycled and a new forest has grown up around the ancient stumps. Thousands of acres of private timberland owned by Plum Creek Timber Co. have been sold to The Nature Conservancy, which has transferred significant chunks to the federal Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service. The Nature Conservancy nearly doubled BLM’s Blackfoot River holdings with a 5,500-acre transfer north of Belmont Creek in December 2016. “There has been a lot of interest from horse riders, mountain bikers and hikers for recreational opportunities in that whole area,” Nature Conservancy lands protection specialist Chris Bryant said of the Blackfoot Corridor. “Our first

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project here was along the river corridor in the late 1990s. That’s what started it all.” While the popularity of floating, fishing and private property ownership led to the innovative Blackfoot Compact governing day and overnight use along the river, land-based recreation has been slower to develop. The BLM owns most of the best bits of the old railroad grade, but has had little ability to make it a destination. “You need to discover it on your own,” said BLM field manager Joe Ashor. “The recreational experience is meant to be fairly low-key, with not a lot of advertisement. Whether we can keep that approach in future years, as Missoula approaches 115,000 people, I don’t know. It’s becoming more and more popular.” The Road to the Buffalo has some gaps. The biggest spans Belmont Creek, where a railroad trestle bridge was removed decades ago. A 50-foot drop from the rail grade to the water offers no

appeal and social sustainability. It’s better to have purpose-built trails than repurposed logging roads that erode and weren’t meant to last. But those projects are difficult and expensive.” And probably volunteer. BLM’s Ashor said his agency doesn’t have TOMMY MARTINO, Missoulian funds available for significant Management of bike trails like the “Road to the Buffalo,” along the Blackfoot work on the Road to the Buffalo. River could be affected by new planning rules under consideration by the “We’re always looking for Bureau of Land Management. volunteers to step up and help us,” Ashor said. “We have a lot of good energy, but we just have limited safe crossing in an easily erodible into a mountain bike adventure. gravel slope. That leaves the rail That actually expands interest capacity and federal funds to construct new recreational facilities. in two unconnected segments, for people like Ben Horan, execAnd once you build something, it’s utive director of Mountain Bike one six miles long from Whitaker Missoula. While the area has been not guaranteed to have mainteBridge and one two miles long networked with industrial logging nance dollars.” from Riverbend Day Use Area. roads, designated bike trails would Nevertheless, a chance to travel Belmont Creek itself has a offer a very different picture. through wild country, without BLM-managed fishing access “A lot of people would love a house or car in sight for hours, site, but it’s several hundred yards to see some trail connections makes a worthy attraction. upstream of its connection to through here,” Horan said. “But “It’s a great place to take kids the Blackfoot and only reachable from Ninemile Prairie Road. That there’s a big difference between a on a strider-bike or go for a picnic when the trails are wet,” Horan gravel road crosses Belmont Creek 14-foot-wide, 15-degree logging said. “It’s like the Kim Williams considerably farther upstream — a road and a 30-inch multi-use Trail without the crowds.” connection that turns a casual ride trail. We try to think of user

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FROM GLACIER NATIONAL PARK TO MISSOULA

Local craft distilleries dot landscape By DAVID ERICKSON david.erickson@missoulian.com

KURT WILSON/Missoulian

Carl Bock sits in 2013 in the production area at his Steel Toe Distillery near Potomac where he makes “prohibition style” whiskey in 50 gallon batches. “What I’m trying to be,” he says, “is good hooch for good people at a good price.”

REBEKAH WELCH, Missoulian

Montgomery Distillery’s Indian Paintbrush is a summer drink flavored with strawberries and Rattlesnake Creek Distillers employee Ryan Taylor pours a Cucumber-Melon Twist, one of the distillery’s summer drinks, in 2017. jalapeños. REBEKAH WELCH, Missoulian

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In western Montana, Glacier National Park and all the mountains, rivers, lakes and wilderness areas nearby are a major draw for tourists. Montana hosts more than 12 million nonresident visitors every year, and the majority come to the western half of the state. They come for scenery and outdoor recreation, but once the hiking, skiing, boating or picture-taking is finished, a good stiff cocktail might be in order. And in Montana, a plethora of locally owned craft distilleries and breweries offer both tourists and residents a way to taste the harvests of the state’s agricultural producers, as they use everything from Montana barley to wheat to cherries and herbs to brew up their boozy products. In fact, the state of Montana has taken to promoting agritourism, and especially distilleries and breweries, as a key attraction. If you were to take a road trip, say, from Glacier National Park down to Missoula through Whitefish and Kalispell or Bigfork and Potomac, there are plenty of options to explore. Here are the highlights of a few of the distilleries, (and also see our sidebar of all the breweries in western Montana): Glacier Distilling Company, 10237 U.S. Highway 2 E., in Coram. They offer the North Fork, a traditional American-style rye whiskey, and the Wheatfish, a single-malt whiskey. The Fireweed is a cherry bourbon made from Flathead Lake cherries, the Bad Rock is a 3-yearold straight rye whiskey with hints of toasted vanilla and the Two Med is a hopped malt whiskey. They also have apple, pear, grape, cherry and plum brandies to go with a

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wide mix of vodka, gin, rum, absinthe and flavored liquors. Whistling Andy Distillery, 8541 Highway 35, in Bigfork. They have three different whiskeys ranging from unaged to a 3-year barrel bourbon. They also have a pink peppercorn gin and a pear gin, along with a cucumber gin. There’s a white rum and a coconut hibiscus rum, a hops schnapps and a vodka made with 100 percent Mission Valley corn. All the whiskeys are made from Montana grain, and they use all natural botanicals and flavors. “The Farmer’s Daughter is our most popular cocktail,” said manager Beth Woods. “It’s muddled cucumber vodka with rosemary-infused lemonade. People ask for it a lot in the summer. It’s delicious.” Spotted Bear Spirits, 503 Railway Street, in Whitefish. Their cocktails are crafted from fresh organic produce, fresh juice, house-made syrups, tonics and bitters. They offer vodka, coffee liqueur, an agave spirit and gin. Whitefish Handcrafted Spirits, 2134 Highway 2 E., in Evergreen (just northeast of Kalispell). They offer spirits such as Orange Clove Rum, Montana Wheat Vodka, Botanical Gin, Huckleberry Liquor and Cranberry Moon (a cranberry juice whiskey). They also have a Rock Creek Vodka, a Highline Whiskey and a Contraband clear whiskey. They will be releasing an agave liquor at the end of April. They also feature menu of burgers, tacos and nachos. Vilya Spirits, 101 E. Center Street, Suite 104, in Kalispell. They offer Silvertip American Dry Gin, Vilya Spirits Absinthe Verte, Absinthe Blanche, and Wild Huckleberry Liqueur. They also grow many of their own rare herbs required for their spirits in their own garden. Steel Toe Distillery, 23545 Highway 200, in Potomac. Owned by Carl and Christina Bock, one of their specialties is Settler’s Tea, which is made of rosehips, mint, English breakfast tea and 60-proof vodka.

Kurt Wilson

Nic Lee, owner of Glacier Distillery in Coram in this photograph from 2011, mixes yeast into a mash to produce a whiskey.

make a Sudden Wisdom Rye Whiskey, a Whyte Laydie Gin, a Skadi Aquavit, a Quicksilver Vodka and a Montgomery Single Malt. They have an extensive menu of cocktails, including the Nightburner, which is rye, smoked vanilla syrup, bitters and a tobacco rinse. The Corpse Survivor is gin, curacao, lemon, fresh grape juice and an absinthe rinse. Don’t forget about Western Cider, 501 N. California St. in Missoula. They can and distribute their Poor Farmer and Poor Farmer Hopped Ciders, and they also have REBEKAH WELCH, Missoulian Western Cider employee Sophia Jensen pours a variety of ciders for customers. a wide variety of both dry and sweet locally crafted hard ciders “It’s based of the tea the English Hogan’s Hooch Light Whiskey and made from local and regional apples. colonists used when they were Crystal Springs Gin to go in their Ten Spoon Vineyard and trying to fight scurvy,” Bock said. ever-changing menu of different “Our version is delicious.” cocktails. Be sure to ask about the Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr., in They also offer American bartender’s secret menu and don’t Missoula. The company offers a wide variety of locally produced moonshine whiskey and a Europe- miss the sunny outdoor patio. an-style gin made with spices like The Montana Distillery, for- red and white wines, as well as dessert wines and a special cardamom, cinnamon, allspice, merly known as Flathead Vodka, Howlin’ Pear variety. grains of paradise and star anise 631 Woody St., in Missoula. They At Lolo Creek Steakhouse, without a lot of juniper flavor. make a Woody St. Premium Voda new distillery is expected to be Once you get to Missoula, there ka, a Fallen Dove Gin and a whole are three distilleries to choose line of flavor-infused vodkas using open by summer. They’ll have a variety of spirits as well as a from: everything from ginger to jalape4,000-square-foot tasting room Rattlesnake Creek Distillnos to bacon. next to the restaurant. It’s located Montgomery Distillery, 129 ers, 128 W. Alder St., in Missoula. at 6600 Highway 12, in Lolo. W. Front St., in Missoula. They They offer Circle Square Vodka,

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wide mix of vodka, gin, rum, absinthe and flavored liquors. Whistling Andy Distillery, 8541 Highway 35, in Bigfork. They have three different whiskeys ranging from unaged to a 3-year barrel bourbon. They also have a pink peppercorn gin and a pear gin, along with a cucumber gin. There’s a white rum and a coconut hibiscus rum, a hops schnapps and a vodka made with 100 percent Mission Valley corn. All the whiskeys are made from Montana grain, and they use all natural botanicals and flavors. “The Farmer’s Daughter is our most popular cocktail,” said manager Beth Woods. “It’s muddled cucumber vodka with rosemary-infused lemonade. People ask for it a lot in the summer. It’s delicious.” Spotted Bear Spirits, 503 Railway Street, in Whitefish. Their cocktails are crafted from fresh organic produce, fresh juice, house-made syrups, tonics and bitters. They offer vodka, coffee liqueur, an agave spirit and gin. Whitefish Handcrafted Spirits, 2134 Highway 2 E., in Evergreen (just northeast of Kalispell). They offer spirits such as Orange Clove Rum, Montana Wheat Vodka, Botanical Gin, Huckleberry Liquor and Cranberry Moon (a cranberry juice whiskey). They also have a Rock Creek Vodka, a Highline Whiskey and a Contraband clear whiskey. They will be releasing an agave liquor at the end of April. They also feature menu of burgers, tacos and nachos. Vilya Spirits, 101 E. Center Street, Suite 104, in Kalispell. They offer Silvertip American Dry Gin, Vilya Spirits Absinthe Verte, Absinthe Blanche, and Wild Huckleberry Liqueur. They also grow many of their own rare herbs required for their spirits in their own garden. Steel Toe Distillery, 23545 Highway 200, in Potomac. Owned by Carl and Christina Bock, one of their specialties is Settler’s Tea, which is made of rosehips, mint, English breakfast tea and 60-proof vodka.

Kurt Wilson

Nic Lee, owner of Glacier Distillery in Coram in this photograph from 2011, mixes yeast into a mash to produce a whiskey.

make a Sudden Wisdom Rye Whiskey, a Whyte Laydie Gin, a Skadi Aquavit, a Quicksilver Vodka and a Montgomery Single Malt. They have an extensive menu of cocktails, including the Nightburner, which is rye, smoked vanilla syrup, bitters and a tobacco rinse. The Corpse Survivor is gin, curacao, lemon, fresh grape juice and an absinthe rinse. Don’t forget about Western Cider, 501 N. California St. in Missoula. They can and distribute their Poor Farmer and Poor Farmer Hopped Ciders, and they also have REBEKAH WELCH, Missoulian Western Cider employee Sophia Jensen pours a variety of ciders for customers. a wide variety of both dry and sweet locally crafted hard ciders “It’s based of the tea the English Hogan’s Hooch Light Whiskey and made from local and regional apples. colonists used when they were Crystal Springs Gin to go in their Ten Spoon Vineyard and trying to fight scurvy,” Bock said. ever-changing menu of different “Our version is delicious.” cocktails. Be sure to ask about the Winery, 4175 Rattlesnake Dr., in They also offer American bartender’s secret menu and don’t Missoula. The company offers a wide variety of locally produced moonshine whiskey and a Europe- miss the sunny outdoor patio. an-style gin made with spices like The Montana Distillery, for- red and white wines, as well as dessert wines and a special cardamom, cinnamon, allspice, merly known as Flathead Vodka, Howlin’ Pear variety. grains of paradise and star anise 631 Woody St., in Missoula. They At Lolo Creek Steakhouse, without a lot of juniper flavor. make a Woody St. Premium Voda new distillery is expected to be Once you get to Missoula, there ka, a Fallen Dove Gin and a whole are three distilleries to choose line of flavor-infused vodkas using open by summer. They’ll have a variety of spirits as well as a from: everything from ginger to jalape4,000-square-foot tasting room Rattlesnake Creek Distillnos to bacon. next to the restaurant. It’s located Montgomery Distillery, 129 ers, 128 W. Alder St., in Missoula. at 6600 Highway 12, in Lolo. W. Front St., in Missoula. They They offer Circle Square Vodka,

SPRING/SUMMER 2018  R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A  17


CHRIS JORGENSEN/Gazette Staff

Country scribe Chris Stapleton is coming to Missoula Aug. 3 with three 2018 Grammys in hand.

Western Montana’s the place this summer for By CORY WALSH cory.walsh@lee.net Western Montana likely hasn’t ever seen a summer with this many concerts. In Missoula, two outdoor venues are lining up full seasons of performances by touring acts. If that wasn’t enough, there’s shows at the ballpark, in downtown and in the Adams Center on the University of Montana campus. In the midst of it all, grunge icons Pearl Jam will play to some 24,000 fans at Washington-Grizzly Stadium on Aug. 13. If you throw in the Montana Folk Festival in Butte, there’s more than 30 big outdoor concerts and counting. Here’s a quick overview to some, but not all, of what’s ahead:

ARTHUR MOURATIDIS/for the Missoulian

The grunge legends Pearl Jam, one of the few acts to have played Washington-Grizzly Stadium, are back for another show 20 years later on Monday, Aug. 13.

LIVE MUSIC music? There’s Bela Fleck and the Flecktones and the Wood Brothers on July 12; Trampled by Turtles and the Lil Smokies on July 21. Country? Justin Moore on Aug. 16. Heavy music? Alice Cooper on Aug. 18 and Primus and Mastodon on June 21. For the full line-up, go to logjampresents.com. Shuttles are available from downtown Missoula before and after the concerts.

Bon Iver

pacity venue is nestled along the Blackfoot River in Bonner, a quick drive outside of Missoula. The custom-designed space, constructed last summer, has three tiers: An outer, grassy bowl KettleHouse Amphitheater with great sightlines; a middle tier of reserved stadium seating and For a scenic concert experience, boxes; and a general admission it’s hard to beat the KettleHouse pit area in front of the brand-new Amphitheater. The 4,000-castage.

18 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

Rock ‘n’ roll Hall-of-Famer Alice Cooper is playing Bonner’s KettleHouse Amphitheater Aug. 18.

This season, owner Logjam Presents has booked a diverse lineup of acts. With some announcements pending, it may be a total of 15. It opens with back-to-back indie rock acts Bon Iver (May 31) and the Flaming Lips (June 3). Elsewhere, there’s a show for fans of most any genre. Reggae? See Slightly Stoopid on June 7 and Dirty Heads on June 22. Roots

Big Sky Brewing Company Amphitheater On the western edge of Missoula, the newly renovated amphitheater will have between nine and 13 concerts. An undeniable highlight last year was the inaugural Traveler’s Rest, a two-day festival curated by indie-folk band the Decemberists. Frontman Colin Meloy, a native of Helena who attended the University of Montana, and company hand-picks the line-up, which

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


CHRIS JORGENSEN/Gazette Staff

Country scribe Chris Stapleton is coming to Missoula Aug. 3 with three 2018 Grammys in hand.

Western Montana’s the place this summer for By CORY WALSH cory.walsh@lee.net Western Montana likely hasn’t ever seen a summer with this many concerts. In Missoula, two outdoor venues are lining up full seasons of performances by touring acts. If that wasn’t enough, there’s shows at the ballpark, in downtown and in the Adams Center on the University of Montana campus. In the midst of it all, grunge icons Pearl Jam will play to some 24,000 fans at Washington-Grizzly Stadium on Aug. 13. If you throw in the Montana Folk Festival in Butte, there’s more than 30 big outdoor concerts and counting. Here’s a quick overview to some, but not all, of what’s ahead:

ARTHUR MOURATIDIS/for the Missoulian

The grunge legends Pearl Jam, one of the few acts to have played Washington-Grizzly Stadium, are back for another show 20 years later on Monday, Aug. 13.

LIVE MUSIC music? There’s Bela Fleck and the Flecktones and the Wood Brothers on July 12; Trampled by Turtles and the Lil Smokies on July 21. Country? Justin Moore on Aug. 16. Heavy music? Alice Cooper on Aug. 18 and Primus and Mastodon on June 21. For the full line-up, go to logjampresents.com. Shuttles are available from downtown Missoula before and after the concerts.

Bon Iver

pacity venue is nestled along the Blackfoot River in Bonner, a quick drive outside of Missoula. The custom-designed space, constructed last summer, has three tiers: An outer, grassy bowl KettleHouse Amphitheater with great sightlines; a middle tier of reserved stadium seating and For a scenic concert experience, boxes; and a general admission it’s hard to beat the KettleHouse pit area in front of the brand-new Amphitheater. The 4,000-castage.

18 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

Rock ‘n’ roll Hall-of-Famer Alice Cooper is playing Bonner’s KettleHouse Amphitheater Aug. 18.

This season, owner Logjam Presents has booked a diverse lineup of acts. With some announcements pending, it may be a total of 15. It opens with back-to-back indie rock acts Bon Iver (May 31) and the Flaming Lips (June 3). Elsewhere, there’s a show for fans of most any genre. Reggae? See Slightly Stoopid on June 7 and Dirty Heads on June 22. Roots

Big Sky Brewing Company Amphitheater On the western edge of Missoula, the newly renovated amphitheater will have between nine and 13 concerts. An undeniable highlight last year was the inaugural Traveler’s Rest, a two-day festival curated by indie-folk band the Decemberists. Frontman Colin Meloy, a native of Helena who attended the University of Montana, and company hand-picks the line-up, which

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


includes a diverse range of acts in the “indie” spectrum. On Aug. 2-5, the Decemberists will close out both nights after performances by Death Cab for Cutie, Jeff Tweedy, Mavis Staples, Tune-Yards, Parquet Courts, Tinariwen, I’m With Her, and more. Go to travelersrestfest.com for tickets and more information. Be forewarned, last year the event sold out well in advance. The other concerts announced so far this year are Barenaked Ladies with Better Than Ezra and KT Tunstall (June 6); Shakey Graves with Jose Gonzalez (Aug. 25), and the Avett Brothers with the Head and the Heart (Sept. 16). A new annual event will premiere on June 15. For “Symphony Under the Big Sky,” the Missoula Symphony Orchestra will perform with trumpeter Chris Botti. Watch bigskybrew.com for updates on the concert series. Last year, concert promoter Knitting Factory Presents paid for a new, engineered amphitheater bowl with great sightlines and brought in a huge new stage that can accommodate most any touring band’s light and sound production. The venue is located off Airway Boulevard not far from the Missoula International Airport. Hotels are located nearby and Uber and Lyft services are available.

Downtown Missoula and the University of Montana On Aug. 24-25, the River City Roots Festival hits downtown Missoula. Several blocks will be cordoned off for the stage, an art show and food vendors. The admission-free event, which typically has up to 10 bands, will be headlined by the Infamous Stringdusters, who won a 2017 Grammy for best bluegrass album. For more information or to check in on the full line-up announcements, go to rivercityrootsfestival.com. The Celtic Festival Missoula is back in Caras Park on Saturday, July 28. Watch for line-up an-

Rebekah Welch, Missoulian

The Decemberists are returning Aug. 4-5 with two days of curated music at Big Sky Brewing Company. Helena native Colin Meloy and company announced the first half of the line-up, including Death Cab for Cutie, Jeff Tweedy, Mavis Staples, Tune-Yards, Whitney, Parquet Courts, Tinariwen, I’m With Her, Waxahatchee, Lucy Dacus and more to come.

nouncements at celticfestivalmissoula.com. Over at the Osprey Stadium, a yacht-rock double-bill of the Doobie Brothers and Steely Dan will play on June 7. The Adams Center at UM has three big country concerts from spring through early fall, with Chris Young (May 16), Chris Stapleton (Aug. 3) and Keith Urban (Sept. 29). Go to griztix.com for more information. Tickets are long gone for the Pearl Jam concert on Aug. 13 at Washington-Grizzly Stadium, but you might have luck on Craigslist.

Montana Folk Festival Butte will play host to one of the state’s biggest festivals July 13-15 with the return of the Montana Folk Festival. The event brings dozens of folk artists from around the country and the world to six stages and audiences of thousands. Watch for line-up announcements The Fearless Freaks are bringing their renowned live show to Bonner June 4 at the KettleHouse Amphitheater. at montanafolkfestival.com.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018  R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A  19


GLACIER COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS ARLEE ARLEE ESYAPQENYI (CELEBRATION) June 28-July 4 This 120th event includes dance and singing contests, a 3-on-3 basketball tournament, a parade, powwow, food and more. Visit Arleepowwow.com for more information.

BIGFORK WHITEWATER FESTIVAL May 25-27 Bigfork’s 43rd annual Whitewater Festival draws kayakers from all over the Northwest to compete on the thrilling rapids of the Wild Mile of the Swan River. Contact chamber@bigfork.org, visit Bigforkwhitewaterfestival.com or call (406) 752-2880 for more information. BIGFORK FOURTH OF JULY PARADE July 4 Noon event begins in downtown Bigfork. BIGFORK FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS Aug. 4-5 Two-day event includes 150 vendors in Bigfork from all over the country. Wood work, pottery, paintings, jewelry and all sorts of other types of art work are on display. The festival draws thousands of people each day to buy artwork, listen to music, eat great food or just people-watch. Visit Bigforkfestivalofthearts.com for more information. CROWN OF THE CONTINENT GUITAR FESTIVAL Aug. 26-Sept. 1 Create lasting memories as you see and hear music legends perform in the small meadow venue at Flathead Lake Lodge. A diverse lineup presents a mix of emerging and established artists from all genres. Call (855) 855-5900 or email info@crownguitar.org for more information. Visit Crownguitarfest.org. RUMBLE IN THE BAY CAR SHOW Sept. 2 Downtown Bigfork, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Visit Bigforkrumble.com or call (406) 260-8385 for more information.

DARBY DARBY LOGGER DAYS July 20-21 A family event featuring expert competitors performing skills of days gone by. Contact the Darby Loggers at loggers@darbyloggerdays.com. Visit Darbyloggerdays. com for more information. DARBY STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL July 21 78th annual old-fashioned ice-cream social with music by local musicians, vendors

Photo courtesy of Bob Carroll

Pocatello, ID-based band, Portneuf Gap, played last year’s Hardtimes Bluegrass Festival in Hamilton. The 10th annual festival will feature 11 bands and five solo musicians, July 27-29.

KURT WILSON, Missoulian

Thousands come together for the Missoula Marathon each year. Join the crowd, July 13-15.

and raffles. Call (406) 381-5114 for more org for more information. information. HARDTIMES BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL July 27-29 HAMILTON A family-friendly festival with an “old 14TH ANNUAL ART SHOW & SALE timey mountain feel” that features tradiJune 8-10 tional bluegrass music. Contact (406) 821Show and sale of oil paintings, soft pas- 3777 for more information. Visit Hardtimestels, watercolors, photography and bronze bluegrass.com. sculpture. Bitterroot River Inn, Hamilton. LAKE COMO TRIATHLON Visit Montanaprofessionalartistsassoc.com. July 28 DALY DAYS FESTIVAL A challenging XTerra-style race with .9July 27-28 mile open water swim, 12.6-mile mountain Music, food, fun, crafts and more as a bike and 7.7-mile trail run at Lake Como celebration of Hamilton founder Marcus in the heart of the Bitterroot Valley. Visit Daly. Visit Hamiltondowntownassociation. Lakecomotri.com for more information.

20 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

ANNUAL CHAMBER MICROBREW FESTIVAL July 28 At Second and Bedford Street in Hamilton, 3-10 p.m. Lots of brews, wine, cider, food and music. Call (406) 363-2400 for more information. BITTERROOT CELTIC GAMES & GATHERING Aug. 18-19 Highland and Irish Dancing, Highland heavy athletic competitions for adults and children, international pipe and drum bands, the gathering of the clans, scotch, mead and Irish whiskey tastings, vendors and live music. Contact (406) 274-8886 or visit Bcgg.org.

HOT SPRINGS HOMESTEADER DAYS June 8-9 Event includes a parade, rodeo and more.

MISSOULA MAGGOTFEST May 19-20 With new fields comes more teams to the annual social rugby tournament at Missoula’s Fort Missoula Regional Park. Both men’s and women’s teams from across the country, and even across the world, will be in town for a weekend of premier rugby, hosted by the Missoula Maggots men’s rugby team. Visit Maggots.org for more information.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


GLACIER COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS OUT TO LUNCH June 6-Aug. 29 Out to Lunch is the longest-running performing arts festival in the state of Montana. It attracts thousands of people to Caras Park every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in June, July and August. Out to Lunch features some of Missoula’s best food and performing artists from throughout the region. Visit Missouladowntown.com. DOWNTOWN TONIGHT June 7-Aug. 30 Downtown ToNight is Missoula’s outdoor, after-work happy hour and features live music, exceptional food vendors and a beer garden. Downtown ToNight is held every Thursday evening from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. from June-August. Visit Missouladowntown.com. GARDEN CITY RIVER ROD RUN June 22-23 Hundreds of classic cars join the festivities located in Missoula’s Caras Park, including the Friday night Cruisin’ Parade on Higgins Avenue and two-day Show and Shine. This year the River Rod Run will be put on by the Five Valley Ford Club. Visit Fivevalleyfordclub.com or call (406) 7280324 for more information. SUMMER MADE FAIR June 24 A modern art and handcrafted market featuring local and regional artists and makers. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Caras Park. Visit Handmademontana.com. MISSOULA MARATHON July 13-15 A weekend celebration had evolved around the Sunday marathon and attracts runners from across the U.S. Visit Missoulamarathon.org. CELTIC FESTIVAL MISSOULA July 28 Eighth annual event features the Young Dubliners, a festival regular, and as many as three other bands, at Missoula’s Caras Park. Other regular features include children’s activities, Irish road bowling, the Celtic Dragon Pipe Band and traditional music and dance. Visit Celticfestivalmissoula.com for more information. MADE FAIR MARKETPLACE Aug. 7-12 A modern art and handcrafted market featuring local and regional artists and makers. Western Montana Fairgrounds Commercial Building. Visit Handmademontana.com. RIVER CITY ROOTS FESTIVAL Aug. 24-25 Missoula’s signature celebration of the city, Roots Fest attracts more than 10,000 individuals to the heart of the community

SUMMERFEST CAR SHOW Aug. 11 Event begins at 8 a.m. in downtown Polson. FLATHEAD LAKE BLUES FESTIVAL Aug. 17-18 Held at the Regatta Shoreline Amphitheater, Polson Fairgrounds. Visit Flatheadlakebluesfestival.com for more information. 20TH ANNUAL POLSON FLY-IN Sept. 8 Held at the Polson Airport.

STEVENSVILLE Picasa

Off the shore of Flathead Lake, musicians sing the blues at the annual Flathead Lake Blues Festival, Aug. 17-18. for a variety of fun activities and was named the 2009 Montana Tourism Event of the Year. This event features quality live performances on a big stage on West Main Street, a juried art show, entertainment for children and families and a 4-mile run. This admission-free festival takes place annually the last weekend in August. Visit Rivercityrootsfestival.com for more information.

OVANDO FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION Called “The Biggest Taste of Old Time Americana, by the Smallest Old Town.” Ovando stands proud decorated in red, white and blue with flags flying everywhere. Including a Fourth of July Parade whose theme every year is “Everybody participates! Nobody watches;” with more horse entries than humans; patriotic speeches in front of the museum and lunch where the town’s volunteer fire department serves up a slab of beef so tender you don’t even need a knife. See Ovandomontana.net.

POLSON SENIOR OLYMPICS IN POLSON AND RONAN June 14-16 Email kayjn3@gamil.com, visit Montana. fusesport.com or call (406) 586-5543. MISSION MOUNTAIN NRA RODEO June 22-23 Youth events include Mutton Bustin’ and Mini Bull Riding, 7:30 p.m. at the Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo. Other rodeo events include bareback, steer wrestling, saddle bronc, team roping, tie down roping, ladies and youth barrel racing, ladies and youth breakaway roping and bull riding. Tickets $10 adult, $5 children under 12. Live music after Friday nights performance. Free vendors fair, no food items. (406) 261-2861 or (406) 883-1100.

FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION July 4 The Independence Day celebration kicks off with a parade at noon and fireworks at dusk. Contact the Polson Chamber of Commerce with questions at (406) 883-5969. MIRACLE OF AMERICA MUSEUM’S ANNUAL LIVE HISTORY DAYS July 21-22 The museum is open each day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day in Polson. Visit Miracleofamericamuseum.org or call Gil at (406) 883-6264 for details. POLSON MAIN STREET CHERRY FESTIVAL July 21-22 More than 100 vendors converge on downtown Polson, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday. Bring the entire family. Visit Flatheadcherryfestival.com for more information. FLATHEAD LAKE 3-ON-3 BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT July 28-29 Established in 1992, the Flathead Lake 3-on-3 is Montana’s longest running 3-on-3 basketball tournament. Visit Theflatheadlake3on3.com for more information. 4TH ANNUAL FLATHEAD LAKE FESTIVAL OF ART July 28-29 On the shores of Flathead Lake at Sacajawea Park in Polson from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Visit Sandpiperartgallery.com for more information. 47TH ANNUAL SANDPIPER ART FESTIVAL Aug. 11 This annual event takes place on the Lake County Courthouse lawn 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit Sandpiperartgallery.com or call (406) 883-5956 for more information.

WESTERN HERITAGE DAYS IN STEVENSVILLE June 22-24 A chuck wagon cook-off, beer garden, live music/street dance, parade, Salish drumming, singing, dancing presentations throughout the day at Historic St. Mary’s Mission, arts, crafts and vendors, sidewalk sales, and open houses throughout downtown Stevensville and more. For more information call (406) 777-3773 or visit Mainstreetstevensville.com. CREAMERY PICNIC Aug. 3-4 A traditional, family-oriented Stevensville celebration with a parade, Montana State Bar-B-Q contest, food vendors, crafters and booths; and incredible ice cream. For more information, visit Creamerypicnic.com or call (406) 777-3773.

ST. REGIS ST. REGIS FLEA MARKET May 26-28 Annual flea market occurs over Memorial Day Weekend in St. Regis. Visit Stregismtflea.org for more information.

TROUT CREEK TROUT CREEK HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL Aug. 10-12 More than 100 arts and crafts vendors display and sell wares at Trout Creek Community Park. Events include entertainment on stage, a parade, a 5K run, and much more. Visit Huckleberryfestival.com for more information.

WHITEFISH HUCKLEBERRY DAYS ARTS FESTIVAL Aug. 10-12 Art festival with more than 100 artists and food vendors, local live entertainment, a mobile climbing wall for kids and adults and a huckleberry dessert bake-off contest. All events take place in/around Depot Park, Whitefish, unless otherwise noted. Call (406) 862-3501 for more information.

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Telling the story of Montana for over 75 years

Makoshika State Park

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Photo courtesy of the Montana Office of Tourism & Business Development SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


Telling the story of Montana for over 75 years

Makoshika State Park

22 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

Photo courtesy of the Montana Office of Tourism & Business Development SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


theast untry

Southwest Country Yellowstone Country

Southeast Country

INSIDE THIS SECTION

INSIDE THIS SECTION INSIDE THIS SECTION

YELLOWSTONE COUNTRY

Gallatin Canyon

REDISCOVER

M O N TA N A

YYELLOWSTONE E L L O W S T O N RM ECOUNTRY COUNTRY S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 015

Gallatin Canyon The Bighorn – Montana’s Best Kept Secret

Tippet Rise Art Center

Tippet Rise Art Center Having a ball in Red Lodge

Lee Newspapers of Monta

rediscovermt.

Museum of the Rockies

Museum of the Rockies Another Record Year for Yellowstone Park

Calendar of events Visit Yellowstone Country for the Sweet Pea Festival, Great Montana Sheep Drive (Running of the Sheep), Headwaters Country Jam, Smoking Waters Mountain Man Rendezvous and more.

Calendar of events Calendar of Events

Visit Yellowstone Country for the Sweet

Red Lodge Songwriter Festival, SPRING/SUMMER Pea Festival, Great2016 Montana Sheep Drive

Gallatin River Fly Fishing, Great Montana (Running of the Sheep), Headwaters Sheep Drive and more Country Jam, Smoking Waters Mountain

R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

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Man Rendezvous and more.

SPRING/SUMMER 2016 SPRING/SUMMER 2018

R M R E D I S CROEVDEIRS CMOOVNE TA NO A N TA 23 N A

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Yellowstone’s top 10

BRETT FRENCH photos, Gazette Staff

A bull elk halts traffic inside Yellowstone National Park in 2017 as it crosses the road between Mammoth Hot Springs and Tower Junction. Tourists visiting the park are advised to “pack their patience” to endure delays and crowding.

PREPARE FOR CROWDS

Fee hike unlikely to stem tide of tourists at Yellowstone By BRETT FRENCH french@billingsgazette.com

record-setting 4.25 million in 2016. Last year’s visitation was down by a little more than 100,000. It’s anybody guess whether a Crowds during the most popular proposed doubling of the entrance months of July and August have fee to Yellowstone National Park — resulted in visitor complaints about if enacted this spring — will result a lack of parking spaces, long lines in a drop in visitation. at entrances, bumper to bumper “It’s hard to speculate,” said traffic when wildlife is sighted and Vicki Regula, Yellowstone public dense crowds at popular attractions affairs assistant. “But we anticipate like Old Faithful geyser. that it won’t be decreasing.” These are all good reasons that Secretary of the Interior Ryan tourists should be diligent about Zinke has proposed raising the fee at planning ahead. Luckily, Yellowsome parks, including Yellowstone stone’s website provides a wealth of and Glacier, from $30 to $70 for a information for visitors, covering seven-day pass. Note that it’s an ex- everything from what to expect tra $20 if you want to continue on to during different months of the year — hint, July is noted for its voracious Grand Teton National Park, which mosquitoes — to where there will be adjoins Yellowstone to the south. traffic delays. From 1904, when the first For instance, this year summer records were kept, visitation to Yellowstone has risen from 13,700 to a visitors will have limited access to

24 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

A child props herself above a cliff in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone in Yellowstone National Park. A large portion of the canyon will be temporarily closed off to the public this year as work on trails and overlooks is completed.

Here’s a list of the top 10 things Yellowstone’s staff wants you to know if you’re planning a visit: 1. Pack your patience: hundreds of thousands of people visit Yellowstone during the months of June, July, and August. It’s also a big place: traffic and road construction often make drive times longer than expected. 2. Practice safe selfies: do not approach animals to take pictures. 3. Early birds avoid crowds and traffic: visit the park during nonpeak hours (before 9 am and after 3 pm) and seasons (April/ May, September/October). Check out our list of seasonal highlights. 4. Plan ahead: campgrounds and lodges fill early, so finding a place to sleep at the last minute is unlikely. 5. Stay on boardwalks: hot springs have injured more people than any other natural feature (including animals). 6. Drive responsibly: observe posted speed limits and use pullouts to watch wildlife, take pictures, and let other cars pass. 7. Bears inhabit the entire park, not just the backcountry: learn how to travel safely in bear country. 8. Cell service and bandwidth are limited: don’t be surprised if you can’t receive calls or texts. 9. Explore beyond our borders: the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem includes much more than the park. Plan your trip to take in the vibrant communities, public lands, and natural wonders throughout this area. 10. Download Yellowstone’s app before you arrive!

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


portions of the north and south rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone as crews work to repair trails, roads and parking in the popular area. The closures include: the Brink of Upper Falls, from July 2018 through the summer of 2019; Inspiration Point and Inspiration Point road, completion expected in July (This closure also includes the North Rim Trail between Grand View Point and Inspiration Point.); North Rim Trail, between Cascade Falls and the Brink of Lower Falls, and between Grand View Point and Inspiration Point; Uncle Tom’s Point, area, Uncle Tom’s Trail (the stairs), and the entire South Rim Trail, Uncle Tom’s Point and parking are closed for reconstruction until July. Additional, short-term closures may occur throughout the year. With more people crowding into the same amount of space, Yellowstone continues to encour-

Trail work continues along the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.

age visitors to pack their patience, Regula said. Travelers can also try to avoid peak travel times by entering the park before 9 a.m. and after 3 p.m., she added. Or be considerate of other drivers by parking in pullout areas rather than stopping in the middle of the road to photograph or video wildlife. Visitors can also consider entering via the less-traveled entrances such as the Northeast

Specializing

in

YNP

Entrance at Cooke City and the East Entrance west of Cody, Wyoming. The West Entrance at West Yellowstone is always the busiest route into the park. Those who like to hike should consider the Bechler region that’s accessed from southeastern Idaho (26 miles east of Ashton). Although it doesn’t contain paved roads to drive through Yellowstone’s scenic grandeur, it does offer a picnic

area, campground, hiking and horsepacking trails. Heavy snow this year may mean those routes open to hikers later in the year, maybe not until July Regula said, but snowshoers and cross country skiers could still use the paths provided the road is open. The Bechler area is known for its waterfalls and natural hot springs. Bad weather and smoke seem to be the main elements that keep visitation to Yellowstone down. So if you don’t mind a bit of rain, snow or hazy conditions caused by wildland fires, then traveling on the worst weather days may mean smaller crowds at attractions and on the roads. “Spring visitation really depends on weather,” Regula said. Lower elevations near Mammoth and the North Entrance are typically snow free sooner than other areas of the park — including trails like Lava Creek, Rescue Creek and Blacktail, Regula advised.

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BIGHORN CANYON See what you’re missing

By BRETT FRENCH french@billingsgazette.com For more than 10,000 years people have been trekking to Bighorn Canyon. Those early travelers, just like the ones today, were camping out, marveling at the scenery, and maybe enjoying the mild winter climate. The American Indians who first visited the area walked along Bad Pass Trail, a route that provided access between the plains of what is now Eastern Montana and the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming. Visitors to Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area can still travel the same route and see a rocky, dry landscape that’s still fairly unmarred by humans. Created in 1966, the recreation area is quite possibly one of the best kept secrets in Montana and Wyoming. The 60-mile long canyon stretches across both states, channeling the Bighorn River north to its junction with the Yellowstone River in Montana. Now flooded by Yellowtail Dam to create Bighorn Reservoir, the winding waterway provides views of spectacular cliffs rising 1,000 feet or more to the rim. The scenery is popular with sea kayakers, the occasional canoeists, houseboats and motorboats. They come to water ski and wake surf, camp and fish for the reservoir’s plentiful bass, walleye, catfish and native sauger, along with the occasional trout. Those who don’t own a boat can sign on for one of the Hidden Treasure Charters tours on the south end of the lake, or rent a boat at Ok-A-Beh Marina on the north end. “I did a full paddle of the lake a couple of years ago,” said Christy

If you go Daily entry fee: $5 per 24 hours for each privately owned vehicle or individual on a bicycle. A daily pass may be purchased at the visitor center in Lovell, Wyoming, the Afterbay Contact Station, park headquarters, the Yellowtail Dam Visitor Center, “Iron Ranger” boxes located at the south and north entrances or online. Annual pass: $30 for one full year. How to get there: The recreation area is accessible from the north via Highway 313 south out of Hardin or by traveling east out of Lovell, Wyoming, on Highway 14A to the turnoff for Route 13 north.

Calendar items Every Saturday night throughout the summer National Park Service rangers give evening programs at the Afterbay campground theater on the north end of Bighorn Canyon. Learn about the history of the Crow Nation, historic river trips, the bears of Bighorn Canyon, floating the Bighorn, and more. BRETT FRENCH, Gazette Staff

Bighorn Canyon National Recreation and Bighorn Lake bridge the WyomingMontana border.

Fleming, chief of interpretation at the recreation area. “We could have done it in three but we wanted to hang out at Black Canyon for a day.” Black Canyon is one of the most popular water-accessible campsites on the north end of the lake. It won’t open, however, until the reservoir’s water is low enough to

26 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

reveal the beach. The canyon is known for having a healthy population of black bears. “I could hear them sniffing outside the tents,” Fleming said. “At first I thought it was my husband snoring.” The downside of the trip is that someone has to pick paddlers up at the end. Driving around the

reservoir is a 180-mile tour south and then up and over the Bighorn Mountains, or about 160 miles if traveling north and through the Crow Reservation. Either way, it’s a bit of a circuitous route. Fleming recommends that paddlers visit in the middle of the week when there are fewer motorboats. Three boat launches line the lake. At the north there is the Ok-A-Beh Marina, accessible from the south is Barry’s Landing and Horseshoe Bend, which is only usable after

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


the water level climbs in the early summer or late spring, depending on runoff.

Hiking Those seeking a dryland experience can find a variety of hikes in the recreation area. “On the northern end, one of my favorite trails — and anyone can do this walk — is the hike to the old headgate,” Fleming said. “It was put in in the late 1900s to irrigate the Crow tribal lands. The old stone structure is still there.” The historic feature is only visible at low water flows, otherwise it’s underwater. On the south side of the recreation area Fleming said the 1.8-mile (roundtrip) Upper Layout Creek trail is a scenic walk. “We don’t have epic long trails in the park,” she said. She also recommended the Sykes Mountain Trail, a route that provides an overlook of the canyon and the Horseshoe Bend Recreation Area. It is a 4.6-mile roundtrip hike. “There’s some sandstone, but once you get up to the top it’s good,” Fleming said. “I would take my parents on that one. They would hate me but I would take them.” A complete list of the park’s 15 hikes can be found on the recreation area’s website, including the short Two Eagles Interpretive Trail that provides visitors a chance to see some of the stones gathered hundreds of years ago to hold down American Indian’s tepees. Two things to watch out for while hiking in the area include rattlesnakes in rocky areas and poison ivy in wet places.

Drive time For those just looking to take a Sunday drive, the south end provides access to historic ranches, canyon overlooks and possible sightings of bighorn sheep or wild horses from the Pryor Mountain wild horse herd next door.

The legend of Big Metal From the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area’s website. The name must endure, for should the name ‘Bighorn’ ever leave the water, the Crow People will be no more.” Due to the Legend of Big Metal — the canyon, the waters of the lake and the river will forever be called Bighorn. In the days soon after the Crow came to this area, a boy and his stepfather went hunting. While the boy was looking over the edge of the canyon, the stepfather pushed him. The boy disappeared from view, and the cruel stepfather returned to the village telling the others that the boy had started home earlier in the day. A search party was sent out and when no sign of the boy was found it was assumed another tribe had captured him. However, the boy was safe; an outcrop of cedars had broken his fall. Here, from his precarious perch. He waited, hoping and praying for rescue. On the fourth day, his prayers were answered. He was rescued by seven bighorn sheep led by Big Metal, the chief of the bighorns.

In May the bighorn sheep lambs may be visible along the southwestern end of the park. Photographers have also captured shots of bobcats roaming the cliffs of the canyon. Since the area receives little snow in the winter, much of the park remains accessible and can even be hiked in the winter. The roads are less accessible following rain or snowmelt. “There are so many cool things in this area,” Fleming said. She should know, she grew up in nearby Powell, Wyoming, and has worked for the recreation area for 20 years. It’s a landscape that can look sparse, parched and even threatening in the aptly named Devil’s Playground. It may be an acquired taste for some, but those who explore the area’s nooks and crannies won’t be disappointed. What’s more, depending on the time of the year, it can seem like you have the whole place pretty much to yourself. That’s hard to find these days.

Big Metal was a magnificent creature with horns and hooves of glistening metal. He gave the boy his powers and his name, Big Iron. In turn, the seven sheep gave the boy a power that each possessed; wisdom, sharp eyes, keen hearing, great strength, a strong heart and sure footedness. They then gave him a warning: “We seven rule these Bighorn Mountains. The rivers down there in the bottom are the Bighorn River. Whatever you do, do not change the name. It shall be known as the Bighorn River. It you ever change the name of the river there will be no more Absarokee (Crow). The Absarokee will be no more.” Other animals then gave the boy “the right to practice their powers by calling upon them.” Among these gifts was knowledge, given by the Badger. This clever creature taught the young boy how to construct a sweat lodge and told him to build it when he returned to his village. Upon seeing the boy return to the village, the stepfather fled as the

young boy’s mother wept. Big Iron (Big Metal) told his people about the Bighorn sheep and gave them the warning which the sheep had given him. Big Iron built the sweat lodge and taught his people how to do the same. When Big Iron grew into manhood, his people observed that he had “unusual powers – keen eyes, a fine sense of humor, and a sharp mind. He was physically very active and strong… He became a good Warrior.” Big Iron outlived four generations, and before he died he told his people” he desired to be buried next to the Big horn River. One day Big Iron wrapped his blanket around himself and died. He was buried on the east side of his beloved Bighorn River about two miles above the Mouth of Rotten Grass Creek. Today, thousands of visitors come to Bighorn Canyon, drawn by the waters of the lake and the river. But it is the country itself and the history of the people, who call this land home, which casts a spell over those who would let it. For this is the Bighorn, and as the Bighorn it shall endure.

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The rumbling of motorcycles is constant in Red Lodge; see for yourself at the Beartooth Rally, July 20-22, and the Beartooth Rendezvous, Aug. 16-19. Gazette Staff photo

You’re in for a ride in

RED LODGE

By TARA CADY AND CHARITY DEWING tcady@billingsgazette.com cdewing@billingsgazette.com

When it comes to the small mountain town one-hour southwest of Billings, it’s all about the journey. Red Lodge holds the key to paths less-traveled. From rodeo and motorcycle rallies to beautiful byways and campsite pit stops, there’s plenty to discover without stepping indoors. Turn the wheel toward Red Lodge and find the driving force of summer tourism in Montana.

The scenic route The Beartooth Highway is more

than just a road, it is a popular destination point for many tourists. The 68-mile highway runs from the Yellowstone National Park northeast entrance across historic mining settlements of Silver Gate and Cooke City, past the Beartooth-Absaroka Wilderness, over the Beartooth Plateau and down switchbacks into Red Lodge. The highway begins and ends in Montana but a large part treks through the northwest corner of Wyoming and is surrounded by the Custer Gallatin and Shoshone National Forests. For tourists wishing to extend their stay, there are 13 campgrounds and more than 200 campsites along the highway. Several campgrounds in the Custer Gallatin National Forest take reservations, while most

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other campsites welcome guests on a first-come-first-serve basis. Higher-elevation campgrounds are closed until July and lower-elevation sites open on or before Memorial Day weekend. One popular site is the Island Lake Campground in the Shoshone National Forest. Pitch a tent for $15 a day, then take a two-mile hike to the Top of the World Store, where you can rent paddleboats, canoes and fishing equipment. Many travelers hike the high-elevation trails between June and September. Backpackers can follow the trails for a day-hike or camp overnight. Hikers are advised to prepare for unpredictable weather, even snow in summer. All campers and hikers should remember that this is bear country; be prepared

and use safe food storage practices. Cross-country skiing is another popular activity on the Beartooth Highway, with unending fresh mountain snow for the avid and extreme skier. Hit the slopes at the challenging Gardner Headwall or take advantage of Cooke City’s out-the-door skiing access with unlimited paths to forge in the snow. If you have wanderlust, take the high road to your panoramic destination on the Beartooth Highway. For more information call (406) 446-1718 or check out beartoothhighway.com.

Home of champions Ride tall in the saddle this Fourth of July season at the 89th


Mark your calendar MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND:

Beartooth Highway opens

JULY 2-3: Home of Champions Rodeo & Parade

JULY 20-22: Beartooth Rally JULY 27-29: Cruisen Red Lodge Car & Bike Show

AUG. 16-19: Beartooth Rendezvous motorcycle rally MID-OCTOBER: Beartooth Highway closure, weather-permitting

annual Home of Champions Rodeo and Parade. Beginning July 2, take part in what rodeo director Beth Boggio considers “one of the last Old West cowboy rodeos.” “In the state of Montana, the only true professional sport that is alive and well is rodeo,” Boggio said. PRCA-sanctioned rodeo, plus mutton busting, wild horse races and daily parades are just some of what event-goers can expect July 2-4. Parades begin at noon in downtown Red Lodge each day. Following the parade July 2, a Stick Horse kids’ rodeo is happening at Lions Park. The main rodeo events are held at the Red Lodge Rodeo Grounds at 101 Rodeo Dr. For more details on how to celebrate “Cowboy Christmas,” see redlodgerodeo.com or call (406) 446-2422.

Wax nostalgic at the Cruisen Red Lodge Car & Bike Show, July 27-29.

timeless cars will be revving their engines. The antique automobiles cool their motors Saturday for the Main Street car show from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., with judging from 10 a.m. to noon. Award-winning vehicles are announced at 2 p.m. Event organizer Casey Moore says the scene of generations of enthusiasts flooding the town is nothing short of magical. “There is ‘50s music playing, people strolling, Main Street is just full of people. And, everyone is just so happy,” said Moore. “It really brings the community together.” The party picks up speed Sunday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. for the drag races at Red Lodge Airport’s 500-foot runway. All cars are welcome to participate at $5 a race, or $40 for unlimited races. Proceeds from the events go to local non-profits in the Red Lodge Classic cars and community. American cuisine For information contact Casey Patriotism remains strong Moore or Rick Moore at (406) 664through July as the ski town plays 3264, or Brian Ullom at (406) 545host to the annual Cruisen Red 9979. More details can be found online at cruisenredlodge.com. Lodge Car & Bike Show. With favorite American activities like barbecues and drag races, Ride high there’s ample opportunity to get your fix of fun, July 27-29. On the heels of summer’s end The fun begins Friday, July 27, and school time, there’s opportuwith a barbecue at Red Lodge’s nity for last-minute motorcycling Pride Park from 4 to 8 p.m. After fun. you grab some grub, head to the Find your inner wild child at the Main Street parade at 7 p.m. where Beartooth Rally. From golf and the

Iron Horse Rodeo to poker runs and street dances, there is something for every Montana maverick. Festivities kick off Friday, July 20, with an 18-hole golf tournament at the Red Lodge Rodeo Grounds; the $55 admission includes lunch. If that’s not a hole-in-one, go to Bone Daddy’s Loop Poker Run at Bone Daddy’s Custom Cycle. Keep the engines revved up Saturday, July 21, for the Ride the Beartooth Pass Poker Run on Highway 212. Details for both poker runs are to be determined. The party maintains momentum Sunday, July 22, with the Iron Horse Rodeo. Events include a keg roll, beer chug, barrel race, obstacle course and wienie bite. Sign up at the rodeo grounds. Camping is available for $18 per person per night at the rodeo grounds entrance, 101 Rodeo Dr., first-come-first-serve. For more information call (406) 425-3451 or check out beartoothrally.com. After the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in South Dakota, ride on to Red Lodge for the 20th annual Beartooth Rendezvous, Aug. 16-19. The Beartooth Beemers welcomes all motorcyclists and their families to “the best little rally in the West,” where camping and connecting with fellow riders are encouraged. Gates open at the Lions Beartooth Mountain Camp Thurs-

Courtesy of Cruisen Red Lodge

day, Aug. 16, at 10 a.m. Located 10 miles south of Red Lodge, there’s plenty room for tents, plus cabins are available at an added cost. No RVs, four-wheeled vehicles, pets, fireworks or smoking are allowed. Accommodations include camping space, hot showers and toilets in bath houses, meals and electricity. Registration for all ages is $80 if postmarked through July 20 and received by July 28, or $100 if postmarked after July 20 or purchased at the gate. Admission includes dinners for Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Breakfast and lunches are available with monetary donation to the Lions Club. Thirteen cabins are available for rent at $240 each. Cabins hold eight bunks, which can be rented individually for $30 for all three nights. Bedding is not included. Souvenir decals are provided with registration, and T-shirts and sweatshirts can be purchased online at beartoothbeemers.org. New state regulations prevent a beer tent, but attendees are encouraged to bring their favorite beverages. Ice and/or refrigerator space will be available. Beside checking out sweet rides and reminiscing about road trips, a band is performing rockin’ tunes Friday night. Contact Rendezvous registrar Charlie Greear at registrar@ beartoothbeemers.org or (208) 6615639 for more information.

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Nature, art on the rise at Tippet Rise Art Center By CHARITY DEWING cdewing@billingsgazette.com Beauty seems to reveal itself in the most unlikely of places. In the quaint town of Fishtail lies Tippet Rise Art Center, the largest-known sculpture park by landmass. To simply call it a sculpture park does not do the attraction justice. The large-scale models are skillfully crafted into breathtaking creations. Against the backdrop of the Beartooth Mountains, the opposition of art and nature simultaneously contrast and establish a natural convergence. Some wield tree branches into colossal structures, like artist Patrick Dougherty’s piece, “Daydreams,” a massive twist of sticks and branches that extends into small, wooden house. What is most intriguing about Dougherty’s enchanting work is that it looks organic, as if wind or time somehow manifested the artwork, while capturing the diversity of man and landscape. Stephen Talasnik’s work incorporates linear and geometric shapes that look both natural and intentionally architectural as art that floats atop a pond, unable to be controlled but only viewed and appreciated. Other captivating pieces include titanic steel architecture with contemporary design that represents Beethoven’s Quartet, as well as incredible, massive structures that use giant stones that result in a magical Stone-

CASEY PAGE photos, Gazette Staff

Above: The main campus at Tippet Rise. Left: “Inverted Portal” by Ensamble Studio at Tippet Rise.

henge-like effect. Sculpture tours are available at Tippet Rise. Van tours can take up to eight passengers for $10 per person; riders 21 and under are free, and all tours require reservations. You can also tour on

your own on foot or pedal. Tippet Rise also hosts film screenings, classical music concerts and theater productions at the Olivier Music Barn and sculpture sites. From Shakespeare to “Peter Pan,” piano recitals and screenings of Tony award-winning musicals, there is something for everyone. These events sell out fast. It is hard not to feel inspired

at Tippet Rise as violin melodies carry through the breeze, played below massive sculptures and the Beartooth Mountains as the framework. While there is nothing humdrum or conventional, the innate and effortless union of concept art, music, architecture and nature has found a commonplace at Tippet Rise. For more information, go to tippetrise.org.

Plan your visit LOCATION:

96 South Grove Creek Road, Fishtail, MT 59028. Pre-registration is required to visit the art center.

HOURS:

The art center opens Friday, June 29. Fridays 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Saturdays 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Sundays 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Tippet Rise is in a remote landscape location and weather can change quickly. The center recom-

30 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

mends you bring the following items to ensure a comfortable time at the park: „„ Water „„ Walking shoes „„ Sun screen „„ Hat „„ Raincoat „„ A small bag or backpack to carry your belongings „„ Binoculars to view nature, wildlife and landscape

EATING AT TIPPET RISE:

Pastries, sandwiches, light snacks and beverages will be available for purchase during regular opening hours. For concert ticket holders and sculpture tour guests, dinner is available for purchase before each evening performance. Water and a water bottle filling station are also on-site at the Visitor Center.

LODGING:

There are many lodging options nearby. Detailed listings are available at tippetrise.org and vrbo.com.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


Nature, art on the rise at Tippet Rise Art Center By CHARITY DEWING cdewing@billingsgazette.com Beauty seems to reveal itself in the most unlikely of places. In the quaint town of Fishtail lies Tippet Rise Art Center, the largest-known sculpture park by landmass. To simply call it a sculpture park does not do the attraction justice. The large-scale models are skillfully crafted into breathtaking creations. Against the backdrop of the Beartooth Mountains, the opposition of art and nature simultaneously contrast and establish a natural convergence. Some wield tree branches into colossal structures, like artist Patrick Dougherty’s piece, “Daydreams,” a massive twist of sticks and branches that extends into small, wooden house. What is most intriguing about Dougherty’s enchanting work is that it looks organic, as if wind or time somehow manifested the artwork, while capturing the diversity of man and landscape. Stephen Talasnik’s work incorporates linear and geometric shapes that look both natural and intentionally architectural as art that floats atop a pond, unable to be controlled but only viewed and appreciated. Other captivating pieces include titanic steel architecture with contemporary design that represents Beethoven’s Quartet, as well as incredible, massive structures that use giant stones that result in a magical Stone-

CASEY PAGE photos, Gazette Staff

Above: The main campus at Tippet Rise. Left: “Inverted Portal” by Ensamble Studio at Tippet Rise.

henge-like effect. Sculpture tours are available at Tippet Rise. Van tours can take up to eight passengers for $10 per person; riders 21 and under are free, and all tours require reservations. You can also tour on

your own on foot or pedal. Tippet Rise also hosts film screenings, classical music concerts and theater productions at the Olivier Music Barn and sculpture sites. From Shakespeare to “Peter Pan,” piano recitals and screenings of Tony award-winning musicals, there is something for everyone. These events sell out fast. It is hard not to feel inspired

at Tippet Rise as violin melodies carry through the breeze, played below massive sculptures and the Beartooth Mountains as the framework. While there is nothing humdrum or conventional, the innate and effortless union of concept art, music, architecture and nature has found a commonplace at Tippet Rise. For more information, go to tippetrise.org.

Plan your visit LOCATION:

96 South Grove Creek Road, Fishtail, MT 59028. Pre-registration is required to visit the art center.

HOURS:

The art center opens Friday, June 29. Fridays 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Saturdays 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Sundays 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Tippet Rise is in a remote landscape location and weather can change quickly. The center recom-

30 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

mends you bring the following items to ensure a comfortable time at the park: „„ Water „„ Walking shoes „„ Sun screen „„ Hat „„ Raincoat „„ A small bag or backpack to carry your belongings „„ Binoculars to view nature, wildlife and landscape

EATING AT TIPPET RISE:

Pastries, sandwiches, light snacks and beverages will be available for purchase during regular opening hours. For concert ticket holders and sculpture tour guests, dinner is available for purchase before each evening performance. Water and a water bottle filling station are also on-site at the Visitor Center.

LODGING:

There are many lodging options nearby. Detailed listings are available at tippetrise.org and vrbo.com.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


YELLOWSTONE COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS BIG SKY GALLATIN RIVER FLY FISHING FESTIVAL June 29-30 The Gallatin River is the site for a funfilled weekend of rafting, running, biking, eating, dancing and, of course, fishing. This festival raises funds to support conservation and restoration efforts by the Gallatin River Task Force within the Upper Gallatin River Watershed. Visit Gallatinrivertaskforce.org. THE  GREAT GALLATIN PEDAL, PADDLE, RUN-OFF June 30 The Pedal, Paddle, Run-Off is a race for a healthy Gallatin River! Get a team of 3 (or more) together to bike, boat and run to, in, and from the Gallatin River. Event concludes with a fair, music, food, and more at Town Center Park in Livingston Rodeo Parade. Big Sky that evening. Visit Gallatinriverart galleries and businesses display artwork taskforce.org. located along Main Street and at the EmerBOZEMAN son Center for Arts and Culture. The galleries feature artists’ openings and receptions, ART WALKS and often provide hors d’oeuvres and comJune 8–Sept. 14 From 6-8 p.m. on the second Friday of plimentary refreshments.  Music may play each month June through September and as you stroll along Main Street in Downtown a special “Winter” Art Walk in December, Bozeman.  Visit Downtownbozeman.org.

Av a i l a b l e i n C a n o n E F / N i k o n F

LARRY MAYER, Gazette Staff

BOGERT’S FARMER’S MARKET June 5-Sept. 25 Bogert Park, South Church Avenue, Bozeman, MT On Tuesdays from 5 to 8 p.m. from June through late September, area vendors bring vegetables, arts, crafts, music, food and much more to this fun-filled family

environment. The Market is run by The Friends of Bogert Park, and proceeds go to rejuvenate the park, found on S. Church Ave. in Bozeman. BOZEMAN STAMPEDE RODEO Aug. 9-11 The Bozeman Stampede is a nonprofit rodeo serving as a fun community event that benefits Bozeman businesses and community – both culturally and economically – while supporting local agricultural groups. The rodeo is sanctioned under the PRCA and happens at 7 p.m. each night at the Gallatin County Fairgrounds, 901 N Black Ave. Visit Bozemanstampede.com. BZN FILM CELEBRATION June 7-10 BZN, the Bozeman Film Celebration’s inaugural film festival, launches its fourday event held at 10 a.m. daily June 7-10 in Downtown Bozeman and the MSU campus. Featuring more than 70 films from around the globe, this year’s festival will focus on women in the film industry, and will be complemented by a rich slate of panels, happy hours, community-wide events and parties, and an awards ceremony. Visit Bozemanfilmcelebration.com. Please see Calendar, Page 32

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SPRING/SUMMER 2018  R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A  31


YELLOWSTONE COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS Downtown Bozeman. Start with the Chalk on the Walk, 8 a.m., July 31; the Bite of Bozeman, 6 p.m., Aug. 1; Music on Main, 6:30 p.m. Aug. 2; Adult Run, Children’s Run and Parade, Aug. 4. Visit Sweetpeafestival.org.

LIVINGSTON

LARRY MAYER, Gazette Staff

You won’t fall asleep while counting sheep at Reed Point’s annual sheep drive Labor Day Weekend. The fun starts Sunday, Sept. 2, at 10 a.m.

Calendar From 31

CRUISIN’ ON MAIN ANNUAL CAR SHOW Aug. 19 At 9 a.m., come see the biggest car show in the region. Registration begins at 8 a.m. at the intersection of Black and Main Streets. All classes of cars are welcome to enter. All proceeds support Cancer Support Community, and prizes will be awarded in more than 14 car categories including a “People’s Choice” and Best of Show. Visit Downtownbozeman.org. MUSIC ON MAIN June 28-Aug. 16 Every Thursday evening for eight weeks from late June to mid-August, enjoy live music, food and fun in Downtown Bozeman. Bring the kids from 6:30 to 8 p.m. for kid’s activities. Then, enjoy live music from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Grab a bite to eat from numerous food vendors that will be on site or step into a few of the downtown stores that stay open late. Visit Downtownbozeman.org. SWEET PEA FESTIVAL Aug. 3-5 Celebrate the arts and community through events for the whole family in

32 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

LIVINGSTON ROUNDUP RODEO July 2-4 Livingston’s rodeo draws 10,000 spectators yearly to see top rodeo cowboys and cowgirls from across North America competing in multiple events. These are the best saddle-bronc riders, team ropers, barrel racers, and bull riders.  Fun starts 3 p.m. Monday at the Livingston Chamber of Commerce Parade held downtown. Monday-Wednesday rodeos start at 8 p.m. and fireworks follow at the Park County Fairgrounds. Kiddie Rodeo is 1 p.m. Tuesday, using stick animals. For more information, visit Livingstonroundup.com. FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS July 2–4 The Livingston Depot Center’s Festival of the Arts will be held in the Depot Rotary Park, on West Park Street (next to the Depot Center) in downtown Livingston Monday and Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Wednesday, doors close at 5 p.m. This three-day juried show features works from all media of arts and crafts, created by approximately 100 skilled artists and craftspeople. Nonprofit groups also offer specialty foods, and the Depot continues to host the acclaimed pie booth. Visit Livingstondepot.org. “CABARET” AT SHANE LALANI CENTER June 29-July 22 In a Berlin nightclub, as the 1920s draw to a close, “Cabaret” explores the dark, heady and tumultuous life of those in and from Berlin. But, there is romance, too. All shows are at the Dulcie Theatre Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., and Sundays at 3 p.m. Visit Theshanecenter.org. SUMMERFEST July 20 This year’s Summerfest is a day-long event with music and family-friendly festivities along the Yellowstone River. Local vendors and Montana talent add to the show that is held each year by the Livingston Recreation Department. Visit Livingstonmontana.org. PARK COUNTY FAIR July 25-28 This county-wide and 4-H fair has a carnival, games, rides, stock auction, commercial exhibitions, family entertainment, farmers market and pig wrestling contest.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


YELLOWSTONE COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS There are 20 water and electrical hookups for RVs and campers at the Park County Fairground, 46 View Vista Dr., Livingston. Visit Livingston-chamber.com.

RED LODGE RED LODGE MUSIC FESTIVAL June 2-10 The oldest and most successful music festival in Montana attracts more than 200 students annually to the Red Lodge Civic Center. With faculty from universities, colleges and symphony orchestras from across the nation, this is a full-blown, nine-day music festival with five evening faculty concerts, two evening student recitals, and afternoon band and orchestra performances. Student concerts are free. Visit Redlodge.com or Rlmf.org. RED LODGE SONGWRITER FESTIVAL June 21-23 Celebrate summer listening to some of the country’s best songwriters at various locations throughout Downtown Red Lodge.  Shows will start late in the afternoon and play into the late night.  A portion of the proceeds support Friends of the Beartooths, dedicated to the improvement and promotion of the Beartooth Highway and its neighboring communities. For more information and full schedule, visit Redlodgesongwriterfest.com. RED LODGE HOME OF CHAMPIONS RODEO AND PARADE July 2-4 Home of Champions Rodeo features some of professional rodeo’s top cowboys and cowgirls. Take in the ropin’ and ridin’, singin’ and swingin’ with a downtown parade each day at noon and a rodeo at 6 p.m. July 2-3 and at 3 p.m. July 4. Visit Redlodgerodeo.com. ART IN THE BEARTOOTHS July 14 The 45th Annual Art in the Beartooths is 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday, July 14 at the Carbon County Depot Gallery. This annual fundraiser begins with 30 artists painting live on the deck of the Depot Gallery and in Lions Park. As the artists paint until 2 p.m., viewing is free and open to everyone. Gates for the ticketed part of the event open at 4 p.m. in Lions Park. A no-host bar and hors d’oeuvres will be available while viewing the art created that day. Visit Carboncountydepotgallery.org BEARTOOTH MOTORCYCLE RALLY July 20-22 Plan on the 24th Annual Beartooth Motorcycle Rally being better than ever! As always this weekend promises lots of rides, food and fun each day, and in the evening you can dance under the stars. Visit Beartoothrally.com.

TARA CADY, Gazette Staff

The third annual Red Lodge Songwriter Festival brings families together for a weekend of inspiring music heard from local and Nashville songwriters, June 21-23. CRUISEN RED LODGE CAR AND BIKE SHOW July 27-29  Red Lodge’s premiere summer car show will have you in awe at your favorite classic cars and motorcycles. A 4-8 p.m. Friday BBQ is at Pride Park, with a parade down Main Street at 7 p.m. The Saturday car show is all day at Pride Park. The nostalgic drag races are Sunday on the airport runway. Visit Cruisenredlodge.com LABOR DAY ARTS FAIR Sept. 3 Enjoy art and fine crafts from 90-plus artists for one annual Labor Day Arts Fair, 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Monday, Sept. 3, in Lions Park, Red Lodge. Stroll the park and stop in the artists’ booths to shop for original creations. Food vendors surround the gazebo, and local groups entertain all day at the gazebo, rain or shine. Free Admission. Visit Redlodge.com.

REED POINT

Hell’s Belles, and Grass Roots. Visit Rockintherivers.com.

GREAT MONTANA SHEEP DRIVE Sept. 2 ​​​​​​WEST YELLOWSTONE Hundreds of sheep take to Reed Point’s SMOKING WATERS MOUNTAIN MAN main street at 10 a.m. during this Labor RENDEZVOUS Day weekend staple. Enjoy the street fair, Aug. 3-12 parade and street dance, as well as the The 13th Annual Smoking Waters MounClassic Car Show and Round Bale Roll. Visit tain Man Rendezvous and 1800s Living Stillwatercountychamber.com History Encampment show how mountain men lived, worked and traded in the THREE FORKS Old West. Held at the Old Airport in West ROCKIN’ THE RIVERS Yellowstone, the event is free to the pubMUSIC FESTIVAL lic and open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, one Aug. 10-12 mile from the park’s West Entrance. Spend The biggest country music festival in a day or a week at this encampment to see Montana has three days of music featur- traders’ row, a real encampment, entertaining more than a dozen bands. This summer ment and seminars about “life as it was.” go-to event has camping available, and the See the excitement of the era during Tomcrowds enjoy ice-cold beer, ongoing horse- ahawk and knife demonstrations for adults shoes and dancing, all at The Bridge near and children, black-powder shoots and Three Forks. Headliners include Skid Row, mountain-man storytelling. Traders must Stephen Pearcy of RATT, Tommy James & have primitive gear and canvas-style tents. the Shondells, Dennis Quaid & the Sharks, The primitive camp has no water or elecEve 6, Everlast, Theory of a Deadman, tricity. Visit Crazycrow.com.

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Reborn on the site of Anaconda’s century old copper smelter, Old Works is the first course ever built on a Federal EPA Superfund site. Jack Nicklaus incorporated historic relics into his design of Old Works. Granite slabs from the old mill line the banks of trout-filled Warm Springs Creek, protecting the 10th green. Massive stone furnaces border the third fairway, while the 150-foot flue provides a dramatic backdrop to the fourth green. Nicklaus also incorporated five sets of tees each hole allowing the course to measure from 5,290 to over 7,700 yards offering a challenge to players of all skill levels. All bunkers are filled with black slag sand - slag is a by-product of the copper smelting process - giving the course it’s unique and signature look. Managed by Troon and owned by Anaconda Deer Lodge County, Old Works is an 18-hole, par-72, public course spread across 220 acres. The club’s unique three-hole “Little Bear” course has two par 4s and a par 3 and is popular with families and with golfers short on time. The Old Works practice facility includes a driving range with multiple target greens, chipping and putting greens and two practice bunkers.

Black slag traps on hole 3

Old Works is currently rated as No. 94 on Golf Digest’s “America’s 100 Greatest Public Courses” list, making the course a must-play for golfers traveling near or through Montana. Moreover, Old Works is one of the most affordable Jack Nicklaus Signature designs in the world.

Old Works Golf Course 1205 Pizzini Way, Anaconda, MT 59701 406-563-5983 • www.oldworks.org

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SPRING/

S OSUSOUTHWEST OTUHTWHEWS ET SCTOCOUNTRY CUONUTNRTYR Y

INSIDEINSIDE THIS SECTION THIS SECTION INSIDE THIS SECTION

Montana Folk Festival Folk Festival TheMontana Oldest Theater Company in Montana

EvelBig Days Evel HoleDays Battlefield

CanyonCanyon Ferry Walleye Festival Ferry Walleye Festival Headwaters State Park

Calendar of events Calendar of events

Calendar of Events

Visit Southwest CountryJam, for the Butte Visit Southwest Country for the Butte Headwaters Montana Folk Festival, Freedom Freedom Festival, Butte 100Butte Mountain Festival, 100 Mountain An Ri Ra Montana Irish Festival and more. Bike Race, theRace, An Rithe Ra Montana Irish Bike An Ri Ra Montana Irish Festival, Fairy andFairy Wizards Festival, and Festival, Wizards Festival, Symphony Under theUnder Stars the andStars more. Symphony and more.

SPRING/SUMMER 2016 2016 2018 SPRING/SUMMER

RREEDDIIS R CO V IESRC O MVOENRTA 35N A ED MN OAN TA37

37


SOUTHWEST MONTANA HOT SPOTS

1

★ 2

7

★ 3

★ 5

★ 6

★ 4

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Welcome to

Butte • MT

An Rí Rá Montana Irish Festival

FREE ADMISSION August 10-12, 2018

Butte,Montana | The Original Mine

mtgaelic.org facebook.com/anriramontana

Come in to enjoy Our Fun & Friendly Atmosphere

Uno’s LoUnge & Casino 3235 Harrison Ave Butte, MT 406-494-0131

A Production of The Montana Gaelic Cultural Society Festival Partners: Butte-Silver Bow Government, Butte-Silver Bow CVB, Butte-Silver Bow TBID

Open Tues. - Sat. 11:30am - 7:00pm Montana St. & Rowe Rd.

Butte’s only Boutique Hotel in Historic Uptown Butte

Brand new rooms added!

All Beef Hamburgers, Homemade Fries, Homemade Ice Cream

Come Stay at one of Welcome to Hotels Butte Buttte’s Newest

Your Stay Includes: Business Service Health & Fitness Center Indoor Pool and Spa Free Breakfas

Located within walking distance of Festivals, Restaurants, Local Breweries & Distilleries and so much more that Uptown Butte has to offer! Only 12 rooms Available! Call or book online Today! • 53 W. Park • 406.723.8928 w w w. t h e m i n e r s h o t e l . c o m

2609 Harrison Ave – Butte

Reservations 406-782-2000

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Welcome to

Come Experience the Elegance and Charm. Beef - Seafood - Veal - Pork Chicken - Prime Rib All Dinners served Family Style and include Salad, Spaghetti, Raviolis, Fries & Dessert

Happy Hour Mon-Fri 5-7 - In our Lounge 25% OFF Appetizers Check out our Weekly Specials and Wine Selection at www.lydiassupperclub.com

“A Butte Tradition for 72 Years”

4915 Harrison Ave., Butte 494-2000 Dining Room: Opens Every Evening at 5:30 p. m

Take Home a Touch of Montana

Butte •MT

You have not had it good

Until you try one of our burgers!

IT!

GAMER’S Try Out The New Parking Garage!

GOT

Mon-Sat 7-2 & Sunday 8-2 | 15 West Park • 723-5453

NEW ELK TOOTH & ANTLER JEWELRY

1005 Cobban St. In Butte - 782-8269 4 Blocks east of the KOA

& GOOD TYMES CASINO Your one stop shop for ... FOOD • FUEL • FUN! • Players Club, Double Point Days Wednesday’s W Wednesda & Sunday’s • Hot Clock drawings every 15 minutes

Join us for a winning Good Tyme! Drive a Clean Car - Try our Touchless Car Wash 2544 Harrison Butte 782-9359 LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

Stop by Butte Visitor’s Center, get information on Individual Attractions, Walking Tours, Maps & More. Our staff will answer any of your Butte questions.

The Original JOhn’s POrk ChOP sandwiCh

A Lean Pork Sirloin With A Tradition Of Great Taste.

Make it a CoMbo! Add Fries & Medium Drink...$3.50 Add Fries & Large Drink...$3.75 2400 Harrison • 782-1783 8 W. Mercury • 782-0812 | www.PorkChopJohns.com 2400 Harrison • 782-1783 | 8|W W. Mercury • 782-0812 | www.PorkChopJohns.com

38 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

We Buy AntleRS!

Pete’s Antler Art

While in town don’t forget to try...

Buy Any sAnDWich or entree...

Large & Small Items • Cribbage Boards • Candle Holders • Wine Racks • Wall Sconces • Picture Frames • Antler Key Chains • Chandeliers • Wagon Wheel Art & Decor

1000 George Street Butte, MT 59701 Phone: (406) 723-3177 Toll Free: (800) 735-6814 www.buttechamber.org www.buttecvb.com

Take the Trolley Tour of “The Richest Hill on Earth”, call today. Summer Chamber Hours (late May-Sept.) Monday - Saturday: 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Sunday: 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


SOUTHWEST MONTANA HOT SPOTS 1 DEER LODGE Deer Lodge Chamber of Commerce

1109 Main St. (406) 846-2094 www.powellcountymontana.com/ deerlodge/

Deer Park Golf Course

RFWave High Speed Internet

204 E. Commercial Ave. (406) 563-5333 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-5pm www.rfwave.net

3 BUTTE Butte Plaza Mall

838 Golf Course Rd. 406-846-1625 Open Daily See us on Facebook

3100 Harrison Ave. (406) 494-3362 Mon.-Fri. 10am-9pm Sat. 10am-6pm Sun. 12am-5pm

Montana Bar

Broadway Café

412 Main St. (406) 846-2895

Old Prison Museum

1106 N. Main St. (406) 846-3111 Mon.-Sun. 9am-5pm MUSEUM

Timber Eatery

316 Main St. (406) 846-4747

2 ANACONDA Anaconda Country Club

1521 Country Club Rd. 406-797-3220 www.anacondacountryclub.com

Copper Village Museum/Art Center

401 E. Commercial Ave. (406) 563-2422 Mon.-Fri. 10am-4pm www.coppervillageartcenter.org MUSEUM

Dunne Communications Inc.

204 E. Commercial Ave. (406) 563-7115 www.rf-team.com

Glacier Bank

Member FDIC

307 E. Park Ave (406) 563-5203 www.glacierbank.com ATM

AVAILABLE

302 E. Broadway 406-723-8711 Mon.-Thurs. 11am-9pm; Fri. 11am-10pm; Sat. 5pm-9pm

Christina’s Cocina

2201 Silver Bow Blvd. (406) 723-8444 Sun. & Mon. 11am-8:30pm Tues.-Sat. 11am-9:30pm www.christinascocinacafe.com

Derailed Bike Shop 120 W. Broadway (406) 490-9607 Mon.-Fri. 11am-6pm

Geek Emporium

129 W. Broadway (406) 479-4322

Glacier Bank

Member FDIC

1880 Harrison Ave. AVAILABLE 3701 Harrison Ave. www.glacierbank.com ATM

Joe’s Pasty

1641 Grand Ave. (406) 723-9071 Mon.-Fri. 7am-7pm; Sat. 7am-3pm

Lisac’s Tire

2109 Yale Ave. (406) 782-4294 Mon.-Fri. 8am-6pm; Sat. 8am-5pm www.lisactire.com

Lisac’s Tri Stop

St. James Healthcare

2544 Harrison Ave. (406) 782-9359 Open 24 Hours

400 S. Clark St. (406) 723-2500 www.stjameshealthcare.org

Lydia’s Supper Club

Wetona’s

4915 Harrison Ave. (406) 494-2000 Mon.-Thurs. 5pm-9pm Fri. 5pm-10pm Sat. 5:30pm-10pm Sun. 5:30pm-9pm www.Lydiassupperclub.com

Miller’s Boots & Shoes

2121 Amherst Ave. (406) 494-7924 Mon.-Fri. 7am-3pm

World Museum of Mining

155 Museum Way (406) 723-7211 www.miningmuseum.org

301 S. Arizona Ave 4 DILLON 406-782-1306 Barrett Hospital Mon.-Fri. 9am-5:30pm 600 S. Highway 91 Sat. 10am-4pm (406) 683-3102 www.millersbootsandshoes.com www.barretthospital.com

Montana Broom and Brush

5 THREE FORKS

1245 Harrison Ave. (406) 723-6860 Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm www.mtbroom.com

Rich’s Tackle

Orphan Girl Children’s Theatre

Sacajawea Hotel

316 W. Park St. (Washington St. Entrance) (406) 782-5657 Mon.-Fri. 12pm-4pm www.orphangirl.org

50 W. Old Town Main St. (406) 285-4540 Fishing Tackle and Live Bait

5 N. Main St. (406) 285-6515 www.sacajaweahotel.com

6 BOZEMAN

Rediscoveries

Bozeman Brewing Company

Royse’s Hamburgers, Shakes & More

Outlaw Brewing

83 E. Park St. (406) 723-2176 www.rediscoveriesvintage.com

2340 Harrison Ave. (406) 782-1971 Dining Room: Mon.-Fri. 10:30am-7:30pm Drive Thru: Mon.-Fri. 10:30am-8:30pm, Sat. 10:30am-4pm

504 N. Broadway (406) 585-9142 www.bozemanbrewing.com 2876 N. 27th Ave. (406) 577-2403 www.outlaw-brewing.com

7 HARLOWTON Gally’s Brewing

30 Central Ave. S. (406) 366-6945 www.gallysbrewing.com

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map of montana 1

2 3

Be sure to grab a bite at these featured restaurants during your road trip! 1

Flip Burgers & Treats

928 US Highway 2 Glasgow, MT 59230 406-228-2997 facebook.com/ flipsburgersntreats “Fresh, Hand Pressed Burgers”

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2

Owl Café

203 E Main St. Laurel, MT 59044 406-628-4966 “Always Homecookin’! Bluegrass Breakfast Every Saturday.”

3

Redneck Pizza

11 S 5th Ave. Laurel, MT 59044 406-628-8733 redneckpizza.net “Montana’s Best Pizza Done Redneck Style”

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


VIRGINIA CITY PLAYERS:

Must-see theater

By DAVID MCCUMBER david.mccumber@mtstandard. com

The wonderfully preserved Victorian gold mining town of Virginia City is home to the Virginia City Players. Among Virginia City’s many “firsts” was the first theater company in Montana, back in the city’s earliest days in the 1860s. In this historic setting, the Virginia City Players have thrived since 1948, making it the oldest continually running summer stock theater company in the Northwest. The Players recruit professional-grade performers from all over the country, and many former players have performed in film, television and on Broadway. The Opera House, originally called the Old Stone Barn because it was converted from a livery stable, is an accurate replica of a 19th-century theater. Another huge attraction is the company’s Cremona Photoplayer,” a one-person orches- Virginia City Players’ shows contain Vaudeville tra instrument cre- segments, as this photo from last year demonstrates. ated in the days of Vaudeville and silent films. The Stevenson’s classic, adapted to the Virginia City Players’ Cremona stage by Bill Koch. The opening is the only one known to be still show will run from May 26 to July 1. in use. It was discovered behind Next up is “Cinderella,” adapta wall in an old theater in Deer ed for the stage by Christina Koch. Lodge in 1950. “This unique twist on the classic The 2018 season looks to be Cinderella story will delight the one of the Players’ most exciting. whole family,” the Players’ deIt kicks off with a production of scription proclaims. It runs from “Treasure Island,” Robert Louis July 3 to Aug. 5.

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A scene from last year’s Vaudeville portion of Virginia City Players’ show. Contributed photos

If you go DIRECTIONS: Virginia City is south of Butte on Highway 287. It is 85 miles northwest of West Yellowstone and Yellowstone National Park SHOWTIMES: Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 4 p.m.; Fridays, Saturdays 7 p.m.; Saturdays, Sundays, 2 p.m.

TICKET PRICES: Adults

$20, Children 17 and under $12; college students, military and seniors, $18. Groups of 10 or more, paying together are discounted 10 percent. Season passes: Adults $54; children $30; college students, military and seniors $48.

The final show of the summer is “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” another adaptation for the stage by Bill Koch. Its run is scheduled Aug. 7 to Sept. 2.

RESERVATIONS: virgin-

iacityplayers.com or 800-829-2969, ext. 2. Concessions are sold at the theater, and you can bring in drinks from the Bale of Hay Saloon. Dogs are allowed, although there are loud noises in the productions, and dogs who are likely to bark should not be brought.

Virginia City is a summer destination for thousands of tourists. But to experience Virginia City right, the Virginia City Players are a must.

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41


A SMOKESTACK

TURNS 100 By SUSAN DUNLAP susan.dunlap@mtstandard.com

The tiny town of Anaconda has something big to celebrate this year. Its greatest landmark – the Washoe Smelter stack – turns 100 years old. Built in 1919, the former Anaconda Company’s smelter stack stands at 585-feet tall. It is one of the tallest free-standing brick structures in the world. The Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., is 555 feet tall, by way of comparison. The stack contains over two million bricks which were manufactured locally. The inside diameter is 75 feet at the bottom. It tapers to 60 feet at the top. The former smelter – operations ended in 1980 – is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. After the smelter shut down, there was a plan to dismantle the stack. But citizens of Anaconda led the charge to preserve the stack and turn it into a state park. Access to a viewing and interpretive area is free. The stack may be viewed or photographed only from a distance. However, plans for a week-long celebra-

tion expected to commence around Aug. 8, to celebrate the stack’s centennial are being made. The date August 8 is significant to the Smelter City because that is Smelterman’s Day. When the company still operated the smoke stack, the town’s smelter workers and their families gathered for a picnic, To commemorate a parade, and there the completion of Anaconda’s Washoe were races for kids. Smelter stack in The town will be 1918, this postcard able to gather to cel- was published. The ebrate that life once stack weighed in at more. The stories of nearly 24,000 tons. the life of the smelt- Bricks used to build ermen are being it totaled 6,672,214. gathered by students for an oral history on what that life entailed. Black slag mounds line Highway 1 along the route leading to Anaconda from interstates 15-90. That is a reminder of how important the smelter once was to the town’s economy and of the environmental cost of processing Butte’s copper. The slag piles and Anaconda are still part of one of the largest - and longest running - Superfund cleanups in the United States.

39th ANNUAL ARt IN thE WAShOE PARK IN ANACONDA!

SponSored by Copper Village art MuSeuM Featuring new bands and artists.

July 20, 21, 22

Hours

Friday: 3-5:30 pm Short Notice,

6-10 pm Wayne Brothers Night Life Band Friday - Noon to 10:00 P.M. Saturday - 10:00 A.M. TO 9:30 P.M. Saturday: Noon - 3 pm Andy Larson; 3:30 to 6 pm Shane Clouse, 7-10 pm Ken Rich Sunday - 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Sunday: 1 to 4 pm Kelly Hughes

If you go As Rediscover Montana was going to print, Anaconda community leaders were still working out the details of the upcoming centennial celebration. To get updates and further information on what’s happening that week, contact Anaconda’s Chamber of Commerce at 406-563-2400. Anaconda Smoke Stack State Park is open all year. The park is located at the junction of Park Street (Highway 1) and Monroe Street on the eastern edge of Anaconda, adjacent to Benny Goodman Park.

80 Art and Craft Booths | 20 Food Vendors

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l a v i t s e F k l o F a n a t n o M @MTFolkFest | m o c l. a v ti Fes MontanaFolk

a n a t n o M , e t t u B

SIX STAGES

FAMILY AREA

DANCE PAVILION

REGIONAL & ETHNIC FOOD

ITIONS AREA D A R T A N A T N MARKET | MO S E L P O E ANCERS P T D S & IR F | E L A E P R KLIFE A FTSPEO A R C S MONTANA FOL N A MUSICI 0 5 2 R E V O

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Big Hole Battlefield A place to learn, a place to enjoy

LOCATION: 16425 Hwy 43 West, Wisdom FROM DILLON: Drive 65 miles NW on Hwy 278 to Wisdom; turn west on Hwy 43 and drive 10 miles to battlefield FROM DIVIDE: Leave I-15 and drive 62 miles west on Hwy 43 through Wisdom to the battlefield.

FROM MISSOULA: Drive 98 miles south on US 93 to Lost Trail Pass; turn east on Hwy 43 and drive 17 miles to the battlefield.

By PAT HANSEN The Nez Perce lived peacefully with Americans even though hundreds of white settlers began to inundate their homeland in portions what is now Oregon, Washington and Idaho. In 1863, a U.S. government treaty reduced the Nez Perce’s ancestral lands to 10 percent and forced them to move to a reservation in what is now central Idaho. Many moved, but a small number resisted government pressure to comply and about 750 men, women, children and elders fled east and north toward Canada –a four-month running conflict with the U.S. Army that covered 1,170 miles across Idaho and Montana, including the Big Hole Battlefield. The third battle of the Nez Perce War occurred on August 9, 1877 when the serenity of the broad Big Hole valley was shattered at dawn as army soldiers attacked the sleeping Nez Perce camp with withering gunfire and burned their lodges. Many women and children were killed as they ran for protection among the brush along the river while Nez Perce warriors mounted a counterattack. On Aug. 11,

If you go

FROM SALMON, ID: Drive 46 miles north on US 93 to Lost Trail Pass; turn east on Hwy 43 and drive 17 miles to battlefield. SEASON: Open all year except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. HOURS: Memorial Day to Labor Day – 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Winter hours 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

ADMISSION IS FREE TOM BAUER Photos, Missoulian

From a hill overlooking the North Fork of the Big Hole River, visitors can see the battlefield where the tragic events of 1877 unfolded. The Nez Perce, who work in partnership with the National Park Service, consider the whole meadow a sacred cemetery where many of their ancestors killed in the battle are buried.

with a few snipers keeping the soldiers pinned down, the remaining Nez Perce were able to escape – but ultimately were captured in early October only 40 miles south of the Canadian border. Please be respectful during your visit as Big Hole Battlefield is a burial ground and a place of mourning and remembrance for 90 Nez Perce and 31 soldiers and volunteers who died here. Three trails lead to key areas of the battleground – Nez Perce Camp Trail (1.6 mile round trip) to the Nez Perce encampment site where tipi poles reflect the

locations of lodges; the Siege Area Trail (1.2 mile round trip) where warriors kept soldiers pinned down - shallow pits they dug are still visible, and Howitzer Trail (.08 spur trail off Siege trail) where the big gun was captured by warriors, a replica is there now, but hill also provides a great overview of the entire battlefield. If you have time or stamina for just one hike, choose the moving experience of the Nez Perce Camp. The trail is suitable for wheelchair users, with help, but may be muddy when wet.

Hiking trails open from sunrise to sunset daily year-round (winter for snow-shoers and cross country skiers). Trail guides $1 at trail heads. Pets are not allowed on trails

AMENITIES: Visitor Center with museum

exhibits, introductory film, book sales, restrooms, and observation deck with viewing scopes.

INFORMATION: (406) 689-3155 or www.nps.gov/biho

Summer Events:

SPEAKER SERIES: Late June through late

August – Saturday and Sunday – 12 noon and 3 p.m. at visitor center - Nez Perce tribal members and other cultural demonstrators; check Park’s website for details.

TOURS AND TALKS: Late June through late September – Saturday and Sunday - Ranger led tours of the battlefield; 1.2 to 2 mile round-trip; 10-11:30 a.m. Deck talks - 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Tours and deck talks are offered weekdays if staffing allows; not offered on Commemoration Saturday.

ANNUAL COMMEMORATION OF THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE:

Aug. 11, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Admission is free to Big Hole National Battlefield, open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Nez Perce people and others gather to remember and honor those who died here during the August 1877 battle and to pay tribute to those who survived; includes pipe ceremony and drum circle (No photos please). Free and open to the public. Arrive early to allow time to park and walk to the Nez Perce camp on the battlefield. Bring chair or blanket,

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A proposed walkingbiking trail between Deer Lodge and Garrison would connect to the Grant-Kohrs Ranch trail system that is maintained by the National Park Service. Pictured here is a scene from the ranch. National Park Service photo

GRANT-KOHRS: A STEP BACK IN RANCHING TIME By PAT HANSEN Step back in time to the late 1800s and early 1900s at Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site at Deer Lodge. It is not just a museum, but a working ranch with year-round chores, and is a fun and interesting living history experience for the entire family. There is also a very good resource library. Visitors can easily spend two to four hours exploring, listening to the history and stories told by knowledgeable guides, and enjoying kid-friendly, hands-on activities. Johnny Grant, a frontiersman and trader, established his pioneer ranch and trading post here in the 1850s. He recognized the potential for raising cattle in the valley after seeing native grasses as high as his horse’s belly gently swaying in the breeze; the surrounding mountains provided protection during the winter and water was abundant. Grant built his cattle herd by traveling to Fort Hall on the Oregon

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Trail, where he traded emigrants one good cow for two sore-footed ones. He trailed them to the Deer Lodge valley and after they had rested and regained strength grazing on the lush grasses he took them back to the Oregon Trail and traded for other cattle. In 1866, Grant sold the ranch to Conrad Kohrs, who became a prominent cattleman of the late 1880s. Kohrs continued to build the cattle herd until at one point he had cattle grazing on more than ten million acres from the Canadian border to Colorado. It wasn’t until the devastating winter of 1886-1887 during which thousands of head of cattle starved to death on the open range that ranchers began fencing privately owned land, irrigated, raised and harvested hay. That winter changed the cattle industry and the open range era came to an end. To gain an insight into the lifestyle of the late 1800s, a visitor’s experience at the ranch begins with

a short walk from the Visitors’ Center along a path past teepees and Longhorn cattle lying in the shade of towering cottonwood trees to the original ranch house, bunkhouse row where the cowboys lived, the barns, blacksmith shop and other areas. The undisturbed view of rolling hills and rugged mountain scenery to the west is as it was when Johnny Grant and Conrad Kohrs lived here. Guides offer frequent tours of the ranch home with its beautiful Victorian décor and personal items that offer a look into the lives of both of the families who lived here. In the lower yard, watch the blacksmith at work at the forge and anvil, sample “cowboy coffee” at the chuckwagon, check out a splendid display of horse-drawn wagons, buggies, sleighs and equipment in the Thoroughbred barn, see the farm animals and take a wagon ride. There are a number of easy walking trails to explore and perhaps see some of the many bird species that nest here.

If you go LOCATION: North end of Main Street in Deer Lodge across from the fairgrounds. Leave Interstate 90 at either Deer Lodge exit. RV friendly and wheelchair accessible. Open Daily – except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day Admission is free

HOURS ARE: 9:00 a.m.-

5:30 p.m. Memorial Day to Labor Day; 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. the rest of the year

SUMMER EVENTS: Junior

Ranger Day – April 21; Cattle Branding and Family Activities – July 10; Haying with horses and a beaverslide stacker – Wednesdays (weather permitting) July 18, Aug. 1, Aug. 8; Pumpkin Sunday – Oct. 21; Holiday Open House – Dec. 2

MORE DETAILS: www.nps.gov/

grko/planyourvisit/hours.htm, or call 406-846-2070 ext. 250

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Headwaters of the mighty Missouri Park offers many activities By PAT HANSEN Within the boundaries of Missouri Headwaters State Park, the Jefferson, Madison and Gallatin rivers merge to form the 2,300-mile-long Missouri River – the longest river in North America. Meriwether Lewis wrote rhapsodically of this important geographic point in the western part of the continent: “The country opens suddenly to extensive and beautiful plains and meadows which appear to be surrounded in every direction with distant and lofty mountains.” The area looks much as it did when the Lewis and Clark Expedition camped here from July 25-30, 1805. Men of the expedition were encouraged when the acclaimed Shoshone woman, Sacajawea, recognized the area where she was captured as a youngster by the Hidatsa, but now returned as the interpreter and only female member of the Corps of Discovery.

Montana State Parks photo

Missouri Headwaters State Park opened in 1951 and has many stories to tell – beginning with the first people who were here 3,000 years ago. Its breathtaking views are among its many assets.

This National Historic Landmark is a must-see location for anyone interested in Lewis and Clark, as well as being a fun and relaxing stop for the entire family. The 532-acre park opened in

1951 and has many stories to tell – beginning with the first people who lived here 3,000 years ago. John Colter, another member of the 1805 Expedition, later made several trips to explore the area in search

of furs and began his famous run nearby. Pioneers slowly settled the surrounding area and transformed it into profitable grazing and farming land. Besides the confluence itself, there are walking, hiking and biking trails, overlooks, petroglyphs, extensive historical and environmental interpretive signage to enhance the experience. The new Peregrine Falcon trail is open with a shelter, benches and signage to help visitors identify common birds and raptors. You can climb to the top of Fort Rock, put your hands or feet into the various rivers and it’s a great spot for a picnic, photography, fishing, boating, swimming, fishing, and wildlife viewing. Much of the region’s abundant wildlife, lush vegetation, and scenic beauty, which have attracted people for thousands of years, are preserved in the park. The tranquility here is rejuvenating, so sit back and listen to the sounds of the river, a variety of bird songs, and the breeze rustling the leaves of cottonwood trees.

If you go Located near Three Forks, Missouri Headwaters State Park is easy to access. Leave Interstate 90 at Three Forks exit # 274 onto the frontage road and drive two miles east, turn left onto Trident Road and follow the signs.

CONTACT NUMBER: 406-285-3610

camping; cost is $35/vehicle, available at Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks or many state parks.

AMENITIES:

Park is ADA accessible with restrooms, grassy picnic area with a shelter, walking and hiking trails and a boat launch. Pets are allowed but must be on a leash.

SEASON AND FEES:

There is a paved walking, bike riding trail that extends all the way into nearby Three Forks.

Daily Entrance Fee – vehicle: Montana resident - $0; Non-resident $6 (with Park Pass $0)

CAMPING:

Open all year from sunrise to sunset

Daily fee for walk-in, bicycle, bus passenger: Montana resident - $0; Non-resident $4 (with Park Pass $0). Out-of-state residents can purchase a Non-Resident Entrance Pass which allows free entrance for of unlimited number of visits to state parks and discounted

46 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

Park provides 17 primitive campsites - no water hookups or electricity - for RV or tent camping and a tipi rental. There is a camp host and camp sites have grill/fire ring, firewood, vault toilets and drinking water. For reservation call: 855-922-6768 toll-free (Mountain time), Mon-Fri 8:00am-7:00pm, Sat-Sun 9:00am-5:00pm, or visit www.stateparks.mt.gov

SUMMER EVENTS:

Speaker Series, Saturday evenings at 7 p.m. in the park’s picnic area beginning June 16. Free and open to the public; bring a chair. Evening concludes with a campfire and marshmallow roast. The 2018 theme is “Montana’s Abundant Resources” - presentations about natural resources, wildlife of the Headwaters region, historic people, live music performances, Montana’s raptors and bird species at the park. Check the website for dates and presenters at: www.stateparks.mt.gov/missouri-headwaters Saturday, July 28, from 8-10 a.m., is “Brown Bag Breakfast,” a commemoration of Lewis & Clark’s arrival at the Headwaters - breakfast, presentations and Native American drummers.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 


SOUTHWEST COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS ANACONDA ART IN WASHOE PARK July 20-22 Art in Washoe Park, Friday-Sunday, July 20-22. Annual Anaconda event includes more than 80 vendors, food and music. SMELTERMEN’S DAY Aug. 8-11 A celebration, parade and more are planned in Anaconda Aug. 8-11, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the Washoe Smelter stack in Anaconda and the annual Smeltermen’s Day.

The 8th annual Montana Folk Festival brings thousands together to listen to worldwide talent at no cost, July 13-15. Walter Hinick photos, The Montana Standard

BUTTE FREEDOM FESTIVAL July 3-4 Butte is home to Montana’s most spectacular fireworks display on July 3, and the festivities continue July 4, with Montana’s best Independence Day parade. MONTANA FOLK FESTIVAL July 13-15 Music from around the world is featured in Uptown Butte and the event is free. Go to Montanafolkfestival.com. BEER, BREW AND BIKES NORTHWEST MOTORCYCLE RALLY July 19-21 Beers, Brew and Bikes Northwest Motorcycle Rally, July 19-21, at the Butte Civic Center. Free admission; concert requires purchased tickets. BUTTE 100 MOUNTAIN BIKE RACE July 28 Butte 100 Mountain Bike Race is Saturday, July 28. The nationally-recognized event includes a 25-, 50- and 100-mile all off-road race that draws professionals and amateurs alike. For details, see Butte100.com. THE SERBIAN FESTIVAL Aug. 4 The Serbian Festival celebrates the food, music and dance of the Serbian culture, beginning at 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 4, at the Holy Trinity Serbian Orthodox Church, 2100 Continental Dr., Butte. AN RI RA MONTANA IRISH FESTIVAL Aug. 10-12 An Ri Ra Montana Irish Festival, FridaySunday, Aug. 10-12, at the Original Mine in Uptown Butte. Details: Mtgaelic.org. Admission is free. SILVER BOW COUNTY FAIR Silver Bow County Fair will be August 2018, at the Butte Civic Center. Please visit Buttesilverbowfair.com. COVELLITE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Sept. 12-16 The annual Covellite International Film

Powell County Fairgrounds, Deer Lodge. Details: 406-846-2094; Drafthorseexpo.com and Facebook. COOKIN’ ON THE CLARK FORK BBQ COOK-OFF AND BREWFEST July 28 Cookin’ on the Clark Fork BBQ Cook-off and Brewfest, July 28, Main Street in Deer Lodge. Details: Clarkforkbbq; Facebook.

DILLON

Butte’s own Tiernan Irish Dancers perform at last year’s An Ri Ra Montana Irish Festival. The festival returns to Uptown Butte, Aug. 10-12. Festival is set for Sept. 12-16, in Uptown Butte. BUTTE-TOBERFEST Sept. 29 The 10th annual Butte-toberfest will once again be held at the Original Mine yard in Uptown Butte on Saturday, Sept. 29. All proceeds will benefit the Silver-Bow Development Disabilities Council. Details: Buttetoberfest.org.

DEER LODGE BIG SKY DRAFT HORSE EXPO June 29-July 1 Big Sky Draft Horse Expo, June 29-July 1,

LABOR DAY RODEO Aug. 31-Sept. 3 Montana’s biggest weekend, the Labor Day Rodeo in Dillon begins Friday, Aug. 31, and runs through Monday, Sept. 3.

THE PHILIPSBURG 46 June 30 The Philipsburg 46, a backcountry mountain bike race, is from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 30, and combines a rugged riding experience with the western hospitality of Philipsburg.

SHERIDAN SHERIDAN SUMMER FESTIVAL Aug. 3-4 A two-day event, the Sheridan Summer Festival is Aug. 3-4, on Main Street.

THREE FORKS

HEADWATERS COUNTRY JAM June 14-16 ENNIS Headwaters Country Jam will be at The Bridge near Three Forks June 14-16. ENNIS ON THE MADISON For ticket information, go to HeadwaterFLY FISHING FESTIVAL scountryjam.com. Aug. 31-Sept. 1 The annual Ennis on the Madison Fly ROCKIN’ THE RIVERS MUSIC FESTIVAL Fishing Festival will be held Aug. 31-Sept. Aug. 10-12 The annual rock festival, Rockin’ the 1 in Ennis. Details: visit MadisonriverfounRivers will be Aug. 10-12, on The Bridge dation.org. outside of Three Forks. Details: visit RockPHILIPSBURG intherivers.com. BLUES, BREWS AND BBQ WHITEHALL June 16 Blues, Brews and BBQ starts at noon FRONTIER DAYS Saturday, June 16, at Winninghoff Park in July 27-28 Philipsburg. Details, (406) 859-3450 or Frontier Days, July 27-28 in Whitehall. (406) 859-3353. Details: 406-287-2260 or go to whitehallchamber@gmail.com.

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S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 015

INSIDE THIS SECTION

INSIDE THIS INSIDE THISSECTION SECTION Magic City Blues

SO OU C OCUONUTNRTY R Y SSOUTHEAST UTTHHEEAAS ST TCOUNTRY Lee Newspapers of Mo

rediscove

Magic City Blues Little Bighorn Battlefield

ZooMontana

ZooMontana Billings

Calendar of events

Crow of Fair Calendar events

Visit Southeast Country for the Montana Renaissance Festival, Heart and Sole Run, Strawberry Festival, Big Sky State Games, Crow Fair, Laurel’s Fourth of July Celebration and more.

Visit Southeast Country for the Montana SPRING/SUMMER 2016 Renaissance Festival, Heart and Sole Run, Strawberry Festival, Big Sky State Symphony in the Park, Big Sky State Games, Games, Crow Fair, Laurel’s Fourth of July Renaissance Fair, MontanaFair and more. Celebration and more.

Calendar of Events

SPRING/SUMMER 2018 SPRING/SUMMER 2016

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R E D I S C ORVEEDRI SMC O VNETA R NMAO N49 TA N A

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EVENTS Memorial Day at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument: In honor of America’s veterans, active duty personnel and casualties from the nation’s wars, a Memorial Day program is held at the national cemetery on May 29 at 11 a.m. Crow Native Days: June 22-25 at Crow Agency. To celebrate the culture and heritage of the Crow Tribe, a number of events take place, including parades, a powwow, Indian relays and rodeo.

Anniversary of the Battle of the Little Bighorn: June 25, will include guest speakers and other activities. Time to be determined. Courtesy Photo

Make a stop for the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument and explore the battlefield and prairie views.

LITTLE BIGHORN Battlefield draws people from around the world By SUSAN OLP solp@billingsgazette.com The Battle of the Little Bighorn is one of the most-studied skirmishes in the history of the United States behind Gettysburg, so it’s no surprise people come from around the world to visit the site. The Little Bighorn National Monument is the site of one of the most iconic battles in American history — the June 25, 1876, clash between Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer’s 7th Cavalry and a coalition of Indian tribes, most of them Cheyenne, Sioux and Arapaho, led by Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. A lot of Europeans from countries including England, Germany

and France are among the nearly 300,000 people who visited the battlefield in 2017, said Ken Woody, chief of interpretation at the national park. “They’re surprised by the wide open spaces. Their countries are so much smaller there than they are here,” Woody said. “I think they’re also shocked by how many Europeans were in the battle.” Of the 640 soldiers in the 7th Cavalry, scouts and civilians commanded by Custer, 128 were from Ireland, 125 were German and 15 were from Canada. “Some of them, Germans and Italians, couldn’t even speak English,” Woody said. The battlefield is located about an hour southeast of Billings off

50 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

Interstate 90. It draws everyone from passing tourists who stop for an hour or two to serious scholars who seek permission to spend weeks researching in the archives or walking the grounds. The peak months for visitors at the battlefield are June, July and August, with July the most popular. But the national monument is open year-round, with 30 to 50 people stopping by in the colder months compared with 1,000 a day in the summer. Many visitors bring their misconceptions with them to the battlefield, Woody said. “A lot of it is sensationalized by Hollywood,” he said. “Hollywood really molds a lot of people’s thinking.”

Real Bird Family presents the Battle of the Little Bighorn Reenactment: June 22-24. Located on Frontage Road between Crow Agency and Garryowen.

100th annual Crow Fair: Begins the middle of the third week of August at Crow Agency. During Crow Fair, the encampment is billed as the “Tipi Capital of the World.” The event includes parades, a four-day powwow, a rodeo and horse races.

IF YOU GO The Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument operates year round, but the hours change by season. From April 1 through Memorial Day, the entrance gate is open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Summer hours, from Memorial Day to Labor Day, are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. The entrance fee for non-commercial vehicles is $20; for motorcycles, $15; per person on foot or bicycle, $10; commercial sedan of one to six people, $25; commercial van, minibus of seven to 15 people, $40 and commercial bus, $100.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


Visitors tour the Indian Memorial at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.

One minor point, Woody said, is that movies often portray Custer with flowing blond locks. During the Civil War his hair was probably almost shoulder-length, Woody said, but it was cut short by the time he arrived in southeast Montana. Custer also battled a receding hairline. During the years Woody has also chatted with re-enactors who have worked as extras on Little Bighorn-themed movies who themselves are well-versed on everything to do with the battle. “When they tell the director, ‘It didn’t happen that way,’ the director says, ‘We’re not making a documentary,’” he said. The battle is so much more layered and complex than is shown in movies. And it requires context to truly understand. “It’s a complicated answer when we explain these things,” Woody said. Visitors to the national monument have a number of ways they can learn the facts about the battle’s participants and the timeline. During the fall and winter, the 25-minute DVD “Triumph and Tragedy Along the Little Bighorn” is shown upon request at the visitors’ center. From Memorial Day through

Billings Gazette

traditional, more powerful enemy tribes. The Indian Memorial was the longest project in national park history, Woody said. It involved 17 affiliated tribes which had to agree on the wall. The memorial was dedicated in 2003 and completed in 2014. “Ever since then people who visit are not as angry as they used to be,” Woody said. “Before, they were angry because they felt the Indians hadn’t gotten their due.” Visitors can drive their vehicles CASEY PAGE Billings Gazette Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument visitors’ center. on a 4.5-mile road tour and listen to cellphone audio descriptions of the various sites as they drive the artifacts on display, Woody Labor Day, park rangers give five along. Markers placed at pull-offs talks a day, about 40 minutes each, said. A new visitor center is in the along the way provide additional planning stages, but when it will which provide an overview of the information. be built isn’t yet known. battle, the participants, the reaAlso during the summer sons behind the conflict and some Visitors can also explore the of the battle’s aftermath. grounds. Two hundred yards from months, Apsaalooke Tours, run by the Crow Nation Office of Tourism “Some of us really have dedthe visitors’ center, a granite meand housed in the visitors’ center icated a large part of our lives to morial lists the soldiers of the 7th offers tours seven days a week, researching it,” Woody said. Cavalry who died in the battle. five times a day. Tour guides on People can visit the small muNearby stands the Indian seum at the visitors’ center, which Memorial which commemorates the short buses go into great detail contains Custer’s personal effects, the Sioux, Cheyenne and Arapaho about the battle. Visitors also can walk through firearms typical of that era, infor- warriors who allied in the battle the cemetery at the battlefield to form the largest Native army mation on the Indian scouts who where nearly 5,000 veterans from ever recorded on the Northern were with Custer and a display the Indian Wars up through VietPlains. Panels on the circular about the Plains Indians. memorial also honor the Crow A newly designed exhibit, nam are buried. Each Memorial and Arikara scouts who served which will open in 2019, will Day, an 11 a.m. ceremony honors provide a storyline to go along with with the U.S. Army against their the soldiers buried there.

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SUMMER IN THE MAGIC CITY By TARA CADY tcady@billingsgazette.com The Magic City earns its name in the summer months. As if by magic, Billings’ population booms as tourists and locals leave their homes for the plethora events happening across town. Residents know it’s summertime when the Downtown Billings Alliance launches its Alive After 5 concert series in early June. Every Thursday night from 5 to 8 p.m., one downtown business hosts a free show in the street. Through August, the various talent is guaranteed to make each week a welcome break from routine. And on the first Friday in June and August, the focus turns to fine art. More than 30 downtown storefronts participate in ArtWalk, a showcase of local and regional talent with media available for browsing and buying from 5 to 9 p.m. The DBA continues keeping downtown alive with its annual Strawberry Festival, June 9. Located under Skypoint at the corner of Second CASEY PAGE, Gazette Staff Avenue North and Broadway MontanaFair includes rodeo events, live entertainment, exhibits and carnival at MetraPark, Aug. 10-18. Avenue is a 60-foot straw-

52 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

Things to do Alive After 5: Thursdays, June through August

ArtWalk: June 1 and Aug. 3

Montana Renaissance Festival: June 2-3 Strawberry Festival: June 9 Josephine Crossing Summer Concert Series: June 12-Sept. 4

St. John’s Summer Concert Series: July 12-Aug. 9

Montana Brews & BBQs: July 14 Yellowstone Valley Farmers’ Market: Mid-July through midOctober

Magic City Blues: Aug. 4-5 MontanaFair: Aug. 10-18

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


Gazette Staff

ZZ Top and Phillip Phillips headline the two-day Magic City Blues festival in downtown Billings, Aug. 4-5. Last year’s event featured The Dusty Pockets, shown here.

berry shortcake, food trucks, free crafts and other activities for the whole family. Summer is in full swing by July with annual events like Montana Brews & BBQs taking over MetraPark’s Chiesa Plaza, July 14. Admission is free to the “Brewfest,” which features craft beers from across the state. July also marks the beginning of the Yellowstone Valley Farmers’ Market. In downtown Billings, health-conscious consumers can buy locally-grown produce every Saturday until mid-October. Food vendors are also on-hand for those who can’t wait to get home to eat. Everyone can keep cool during the dog days of Summer with two of Billings’ coolest summertime events: Magic City Blues and MontanaFair. ZZ Top and Phillip Phillips headline the adults-only blues festival on Montana Avenue Aug. 4 and 5, respectively, with ample acts to keep attendees starstruck during the weekend. And MontanaFair maintains the downtown fun with nine days of live entertainment, exhibits and carnival rides, Aug. 10-18. Downtown isn’t the only destination for summertime fun in Bill-

ings, though. becomes a ZooMontana 16th-century European wonderland for the Montana Renaissance Festival, June 2-3. Come costumed and blend in as jousting, story-telling and magic prevail. The Billings’ West End has a way with music, too, using two platforms – St. John’s Lutheran Ministries and Josephine Crossing – to share it with fans. St. John’s Lutheran Ministries hosts a summer concert series at the Fred & Marie Miller Pavilion on the corner of Rimrock Road and Shiloh Crossing Boulevard. The free Thursday night shows run from July 12 to Aug. 9 and feature artists like the High Country Cowboys, Midlife Chryslers and Laney Lou & The Bird Dogs. Openers start at 6 p.m. Similarly, McCall Homes’ Josephine Crossing subdivision holds a summer concert series. Regional bands — including John Roberts Y Pan Blanco — are slated for four concerts June 12, July 17, Aug. 14 and Sept. 4. From 5 to 8:30 p.m., families can enjoy music, food trucks and face painting with free admission. Proceeds from beer, wine and food sales benefit local nonprofits.

Don’t fly in the face of danger When you’re playing and working outside, remember: if a powerline is near, stay 10 feet clear. And if you see e a downed do line, keep a safe distanc ce, warn others and call 911 1.

Gary K. Meter Reader, 9 years so of service

SPRING/SUMMER 2018  R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A  53


CROW FAIR CENTENNIAL

By TARA CADY tcady@billingsgazette.com

One-hundred years later, Crow Fair continues to celebrate culture with the largest Native American event in Montana. The Apsáalooke people of the Crow Indian Reservation south of Hardin, Montana, host the annual six-day event in Crow Agency with powwows, parades and rodeo. Long-term fair participant and Crow Tribe member, Dale Old Horn, says the story behind Crow Fair began in 1862 when then-U.S. President Abraham Lincoln signed the Homestead Act. This law encouraged Easterners to occupy Indian land. The law was then expanded under U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant, forcing Native Americans to assimilate Western culture and lose their ethos. By 1904, the U.S. government wanted to prove the law’s success with a fair similar to county fairs. The Crow Tribe were to display livestock and home goods, but event planner and Indian Agent S.C. Reynolds was not prepared for the dancing that commenced at the inaugural fair. “Before that time, the Crows had been dancing clandestinely; they had to hide from the authorities and hide from the U.S. army and the U.S. agency forces,” Old Horn said. “Formally, they began to dance at Crow Fair.” While some elements of the fair remain true 100 events later, like the flat track racing Reynolds was known to participate in, Crow Fair has evolved as Native Americans took ownership of what was supposed to disintegrate their culture further. Old Horn defines Crow Fair as “an event that strengthened the practice of the Native culture.”

Crow Fair begins during the middle of the third week in August through the following Monday; a specific schedule is to be determined. Between Friday, Aug. 17, and Sunday, Aug. 19, morning parades led by the color guard begin each day at 10 a.m. A procession of veterans and active members of the armed services, the President, Vice-President and First Vice-President of the Crow Fair, Crow tribal officials and women on horseback travel through the campsites. Contests in varying categories like “best traditional dress” are included in the parades, according to the Crow Fair website. With one of the largest powwows in the country, Crow Fair draws more than 50,000 people to participate or just come and watch. The fourday powwow focuses on traditional dance style; Crow tribe dancers don regalia resembling what was worn at the turn of the 19th century. The powwow grand entries begin at 1 p.m. led by the veteran honor guard. Participating contest dancers of all ages follow in the procession. An announcer presents drum groups also in competition. The Crow Fair Rodeo completes the fair’s offerings with entertainment including youth events, professional cowboys and cowgirls and horse racing at the Edison Real Bird Memorial Complex. Rodeo director James Real Bird says the crowd gets into events like the flat track and Indian relay racing. “It’s something I look forward to every year,” said Real Bird, who has been attending the fair for 29 years. Sharmaine Hill is this year’s rodeo queen and Jay Old Coyote is powwow director. Since beginning to plan the event last September, Old Coyote jokes that he has six white hairs now.

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If you go Daily parades start at 10 a.m. The powwow grand entry begins Thursday, Aug. 16, at 1 p.m. Daily rodeo events are happening at the Edison Real Bird Memorial Complex.

Gazette Staff photos

Crow Fair reaches 100 years of celebrating Native culture this August in Crow Agency.

Below: Dancers laugh as they circle the arbor in part with the Grand Entry during Crow Fair in Crow Agency in 2017.

SPRING/SUMMER 2018


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Surround yourself with symphonic sounds and nature at the Symphony in the Park event at Pioneer Park, June 24.

Gazette Staff

SOUTHEAST COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS BILLINGS ALIVE AFTER 5 June 1-Aug. 31 The annual outdoor music series happens 5 to 8 p.m. at a different venue every week. Each evening combines live music, adult beverages, fresh food and favorite downtown locations such as restaurants, breweries and cultural venues. Call (406) 294-5060 or visit Downtownbillings.com. ARTWALK - DOWNTOWN BILLINGS June 1, Aug. 3, Oct. 5, Dec. 7 Many fine arts and crafts offered for sale during the Downtown Billings Alliance ArtWalk. Host sites include galleries, art studios, businesses, a downtown Billings church, nonprofit entities, restaurants and other venues who value the creative spirit that thrives in downtown Billings. ArtWalk is “weather-resistant.” Visit Downtownbillings.com. SPRINGFEST AT MOSS MANSION June 2 This juried art festival features handicrafts

and art by regional artists, antique booths, musical entertainment and a wide variety of refreshments. Pancake breakfast, artist demonstrations and lively musical acts are on the grounds of Moss Mansion. Call (406) 256-5100 or visit Mossmansion.com. MONTANA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL June 2-3 Revel in the atmosphere of a 16th Century European Country Festival at ZooMontana, 2100 S. Shiloh Rd. Explore the bustling marketplace, attend a royal wedding, interact with costumed characters and enjoy full-contact armored jousting tournaments. Storytellers, musicians, jousters and villagers welcome all while the air fills with scents of foods and ale from the Renaissance period. It happens 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Visit Montanarenfest.com. STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL June 9 Held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the streets of downtown Billings, the long-cherished

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community event opens the summer season with a rich diversity in arts and crafts, interactive children’s area, fresh produce and strawberries, food-truck fare, live street entertainment and a 60-foot strawberry shortcake. Call (406) 294-5060 or visit Downtownbillings.com. FESTIVAL OF CULTURES June 10 From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the campus of Rocky Mountain College, this free event lets you celebrate diversity and culture as thousands sing, dance and sample ethnic delicacies during this public event. Enjoy children’s activities, ethnic crafts, food and drink. Contact (406) 657-1042 or peacestudies@rocky.edu. HEART & SOLE RACE June 16 The 39th Annual Heart & Soul Race features people of all ages and abilities. Choose from 5K, 10K or 2-Mile Health Walk; all start at St. Vincent Healthcare and are a fundraiser for the YMCA and Billings TrailNet. (406) 254-7426, Heartandsolerace.org.

MONTANA ACTIVE LIFE FESTIVAL June 16 Held before and after the Heart & Sole Race, this festival happens 8-11 a.m. at Dehler Park, home of the Billings Mustangs. This free healthy lifestyle event features live music, more than 40 interactive booths, kids’ events and family fun. (406) 254-7426, Heartandsolerace.org. SYMPHONY IN THE PARK June 24 Live, symphonic music comes to Pioneer Park for a relaxing evening while you sit on your blanket or lawn chair enjoying a picnic from food vendors. Take in the 4 p.m. Instrument Petting Zoo, 5 p.m. Billings Community Band Concert, 6:45 p.m. Young Conductors’ Contest and the Billings Symphony Orchestra Concert at 7 p.m. Reserved parking ($5) and reserved seating ($10) are available by calling (406) 2523610 or visit Billingssymphony.org. SUMMER CHRISTMAS Sept. 14-16 For three days there will be 70-plus

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SOUTHEAST COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS vendors with crafts, antiques, collectibles, small businesses and much more to fill your holiday shopping needs. Free admission; Shrine Auditorium, 1125 Broadwater Ave.; Friday-Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Call (406) 545-9711. SUMMERFAIR July 13-15 Yellowstone Art Museum hosts the region’s largest arts and crafts festival featuring some of the best artisans, craftspeople and entertainers in the area. More than 100 artists, community groups and food vendors are at Veterans Park, 13th Street West and Poly Drive. This year, the weekend event is open Friday night, 4–9 p.m. with live music by Mojo Cats at 5 p.m.; Saturday hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday hours are 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Admission is $3 for adults, free for children ages 12 and younger. Visit Artmuseum.org. BIG SKY STATE GAMES OPENING CEREMONIES July 20 The Big Sky State Games Opening Ceremonies will set the 33rd annual games in motion on Friday, July 20, at Wendy’s Field at Daylis Stadium. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. to the pre-games festival featuring interactive booths, climbing wall, obstacle course, food trucks, music, interactive booths and souvenirs. At 6 p.m., the 5th Annual Soaked fun run/walk first wave begins in and around Pioneer Park. Billings Fire Department fire hoses, sprinklers, foam machine, two slip ‘n slides and loads of water are the main attraction before a lap around the Daylis track. At 7:30 p.m. the Parade of Athletes begins with each sport represented, as well as the parade marshalls and State Games Character Counts Scholarship winners. A giveaway of 20 $100 bills, entertainment, torch lighting by an Olympic athlete and the Montana Mile (Montana’s fastest male and female milers) complete the schedule of events. Athletes are admitted with their Opening Ceremonies ticket. Visit bigskygames.org for more details. MAGIC CITY BLUES Aug. 2-4 Bring your ID for this 18-and older Montana Urban Music Festival happening on the 2500 block of Montana Avenue with gates opening each day at 5 p.m. See featured acts at Magiccityblues.com. MONTANAFAIR Aug. 10-18 MontanaFair is an agricultural celebration in the historic tradition of fairs. Held at MetraPark, the 9-day celebration has livestock, arts and crafts, a carnival and

Join the cast of characters at the Montana Renaissance Festival at ZooMontana, June 2-3. food. Stages provide entertainment that can include music, comedy, hypnosis, kids’ entertainment and variety acts. There are competitive events, entertainment and a PRCA rodeo event. Night shows feature internationally known artists. Visit Montanafair.com. CROW AGENCY LITTLE BIGHORN REENACTMENT June 22-24 Real Bird’s Battle of Little Bighorn Reenactment happens 1-3 p.m. each day, with the Real Bird family showing troopers and braves as they rush through the Little Bighorn River, just as they did 140 years ago. The battle is held at Garryowen, a portion of the Sioux camp where soldiers are believed to have attacked the village. Visit Littlebighornreenactment.com. CROW FAIR Aug. 15-20 Crow Fair attracts more than 50,000 spectators and participants from the around the world. Celebration features parades, a four-day powwow, a rodeo and horse races. The largest Native American event in Montana has one of the biggest powwows in the country and is held by Please see Calendar, Page 58

Gazette Staff

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SOUTHEAST COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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the Apsáalooke people of the Crow Indian Reservation just South of Hardin. Crazycrow.com

GLENDIVE BUZZARD DAY June 9 Celebrate the annual return of the turkey vulture at this family event at Makoshika State Park featuring the 10K, 5kK, fun run, various entertainment, food and fun for all ages. Visit Stateparks.mt.gov/makoshika or call (406) 377-6256.

HUNTLEY PROJECT THRESHING BEE Aug. 18-19 The South Central Montana Antique Tractor and Machinery Association sponsors this weekend of steam- and gas-threshing, and events for all ages. There’s static engine displays, plowing, hay bailing, binding, sawmill, blacksmith shop, tractor pull, parade, arts/ crafts, food concessions and more. Admission is $5 per person, ages 12 and older. Antiquetractorclub.org.

LAUREL FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION July 4 Laurel entertains more than 30,000 people, starting at the 6-11 a.m. pancake breakfast at Fireman’s Park, followed by The Chief Joseph Run that begins at Thomson Park with races set for 2, 4 and 8 miles. A Kiddies Parade begins at 10 a.m. at Western Security Bank and ends at Firefighter’s Memorial. The Grand Parade is at 11 a.m. A Food and Craft Fair begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 9 p.m. As soon as it is dark, one of Montana’s largest fireworks display takes over. Laurelmontana.org

POMPEYS PILLAR CLARK DAY July 25 Visit this historic sandstone pillar on July 25 the same date Capt. William Clark signed the monument during his travel down the Yellowstone River. Learn the pillar’s Native American heritage with presentations. Sponsored jointly by the Bureau of Land Management and the Friends of Pompeys Pillar. Call (406) 969-5380 or visit Pompeyspillar.org.

Gazette Staff

An Olympian torch lighting, SOAKED fun run and Montana Mile encompass the Big Sky State Games opening ceremonies, Friday, July 20, at Wendy’s Field at Daylis Stadium.

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Lewis and Clark Festival Upper Missouri Heritage

C ECENTR N T R A AL L CCOUNTRY OUNTRY CENTR AL COUNTRY

Lewis and Clark Festival

Cowboy Poetry Cowboy Poetry Lewis and Clark

Red Ants Pants

Red Ants Pants Fort Benton

Calendar of events Visit Central Country for the Whoop-Up Days and Rhubarb Festival, Riverside Voices, the Montana State Fair, Pioneer Power Day Threshing Bee, the Montana Chokecherry Festival and more.

Calendar of events Calendar of Events

VisitMontana CentralSPRING/SUMMER Country for Whoop-Up the 2016 Days, State Fair, Whoop-Up Days and Rhubarb Festival, Red Ants Pants Music Festival, Riverside Voices, the Montana State Fair, Mountain Rendezvous and more. Pioneer Power DayMan Threshing Bee, the Montana Chokecherry Festival and more.

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Chart-topper Suzy Bogguss to headline music and poetry gathering in Lewistown By JESSE CHANEY jesse.chaney@helenair.com While chart-topping country singer Suzy Bogguss will headline this summer’s gathering of western musicians and poets in the geographic center of Montana, most of the roughly 70 performers are everyday folks living the rural lifestyle. “It’s a passion for them to write poetry or entertain,” said Karen Kuhlmann, executive director of the 33rd annual Montana Cowboy Poetry Gathering and Western Music Rendezvous in Lewistown. “They’re real-deal people who have long, deep family roots in the ranching and agricultural tradition of Montana.” Scheduled for Aug. 16-19, the annual event aims to “preserve and celebrate the history, heritage and values of the American cowboy in the upper Rocky Mountain west.” The gathering will include more than 50 hours of entertainment occurring simultaneously on multiple stages. The event will also include a Western Art and Gear show featuring the work of numerous artists, as well as discovery workshops, a Friday night Jam ‘n Dance and a Sunday morning cowboy church service. “It’s not slick,” said Kuhlmann, whose preferred title is “trail boss.” “It’s not overly produced. It’s really authentic. It’s really the real deal.” The gathering started in 1986 in Big Timber but moved to Lewistown in 1990 to accommodate more people, according to event materials. Kuhlmann said it typically draws some 2,000 attendees, including many “regulars” from Montana and Canada. “It gets to be kind of a family,” she said. This year’s event will pay tribute to western artist Charlie Rus-

Provided Photo

Suzy Bogguss will headline the 33rd annual Montana Cowboy Poetry Gathering and Western Music Rendezvous in Lewistown.

Photo Provided

“It’s not slick,” said executive director Karen Kuhlmann, whose preferred title is “trail boss.” “It’s not overly produced. It’s really authentic. It’s really the real deal.”

sell, whose likeness will be used in the official event logo, pins, posters and other materials. Organizers selected Bogguss as the headliner because she was “highly requested by a lot of our regulars year after year,” Kuhlmann said. The award-winning singer/ songwriter is known for numerous Top 10 Billboard singles, includ-

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ing “Drive South,” “Just Like The Weather,” “Hey Cinderella,” “Letting Go,” “Aces” and “Outbound Plane.” Several of those came from her 1991 Platinum album “Aces,” which she has referred to as a “tipping point” in her career. “I love to play the radio hits from Aces every night, but in truth, every single song on that record gets requested at my live shows,” the

artist says in her biography. “So for the first time in awhile I went back and listened to the album start to finish. The songs are timeless, but over the past 25 years I feel like I’ve grown as a vocalist, and when we started recording Aces Redux I got so excited because these songs took on a whole new life that is more representative of who I am and what I do now.” Bogguss will take the stage Saturday, Aug. 18, at the Fergus County Performing Arts Theater. Tickets to her show range from $20-$30, and pre-show meet-andgreet tickets are available for $50. The day headquarters for the Montana Cowboy Poetry Gathering and Western Music Rendezvous will be Fergus High School, 1001 Casino Creek Road in Lewistown. Visit www.montanacowboypoetrygathering.com for a full schedule of events and other details. For more information or to buy tickets, contact Kuhlmann at (406) 538-4575 or kbkuhlmann@ midrivers.com.

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The Missouri River as it passes by Fort Benton.

KURT WILSON, Missoulian

Upper Missouri River Heritage Area By ERIN LORANGER erin.loranger@helenair.com A nonprofit organization is working to establish the landscape along the Upper Missouri River from Fort Benton to the Gates of the Mountains as a national heritage area. The organization says the Upper Missouri River area in north-central Montana is concentrated with cultural, historic and recreational resources, and the designation as a heritage area would give residents and tourists an opportunity to celebrate those assets. A National Heritage Area is an honorary designation, meaning private landowners and public lands are not affected. Jane Weber, Chair of the Upper Missouri River Heritage Area Planning Corporation Board of Direc-

National designation would add to region’s allure

area in Montana. A 2012 study found that National Heritage Areas have an overall economic impact of $12.9 billion, according to the Upper Missouri River Heritage Area website. The study showed $4.6 billion was direct, including tourist spending and grant-making activities. Another $8.3 billion was indirect, which included employee spending and businesses supported by the tourism industry. Weber said the heritage area designation would build on established nationally significant landmarks in the region that attract residents and tourists. Those include: Montana State Parks First Peoples Buffalo Jump: First Peoples Buffalo Jump State Park offers unparalleled access and education. The archaeological site has one tors, said the group is in the process into law in 1984, 49 of them have of the largest bison cliff jumps in of conducting a feasibility study. been created. The Upper MissouSince heritage areas were signed ri River would be the first heritage Please see HERITAGE, Page 62

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Heritage From Page 61

North America. The state park has a visitor center and interpretive trails to describe the people who used the site 1,000 years ahead of Lewis and Clark. The state park also offers wildlife viewing, hiking and special events throughout the year. The park is open daily in the summer and the visitor center is open April 1 through Sept. 30, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fort Benton National Historic Landmark: Fort Benton, often referred to as the birthplace of Montana, is along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail and the Nez Perce National Historic trail. Visitors can check out the Missouri River Breaks Interpretive Center and view the state’s memorial to Lewis and Clark. Fort Benton has a memorial for Shep, a faithful dog who became famous for

Montana State Parks

First Peoples Buffalo Jump State Park offers a 3.5 mile hiking trail.

waiting for his owner to return for more than five years. When Shep’s owner became sick and died at the hospital in Fort Benton, his family back East requested his body be sent home on the train. Shep supposedly whined when the train left the station and waited each day at the platform looking for his owner

to return. C.M. Russell Museum and Studio National Historic Landmark: Charlie Russell is known as one of the first western artists to spend the majority of his life in the West. He created over 4,000 works of art in paint, ink, bronze and wax that tell stories of life in Montana.

The C.M. Russell Museum in Great Falls is dedicated to preserving his work and educating Montanans and visitors on his life and art. The museum is 65,000 square feet that includes Russell’s original house and studio. The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from May 1 to Oct. 31. Great Falls Portage: The Great Falls Portage was one of the most challenging parts of Lewis and Clark’s expedition. The supplies, including canoes, had to be carried by hand or in shoddy wagons for about 18 miles to bypass the dangerous falls and rapids. Although the historic landmark is privately owned and not open to the public, the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Interpretive Center traces their journey. The center is located in Giant Springs Heritage State Park in Great Falls and is open Memorial Day weekend through Sept. 30 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.

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Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Interpretive Center celebrates its 20th year By TOM KUGLIN tom.kuglin@helenair.com

U.S. Forest Service

A life-size depiction of the 1805 Great Falls portage is the centerpiece exhibit at the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Interpretive Center.

The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Interpretive Center is celebrating its 20th year along the banks of the Missouri River in Great Falls. The center tells the story of the 1804 expedition of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, journeying 8,000 miles across the country and the people and land their party encountered along the way. The center averages about 50,000 visitors each year with a mix of tourists and residents. “We have a range of different things – we have the center itself that details the story of Lewis and Clark from beginning to end, interpretive short talks and a public education program in the schools,” said Jeff LaRock, the center’s supervisory interpreter. Built in 1998, the center is operated by the U.S. Forest Service and partners with the Lewis & Clark Foundation for some of its programming. Foundation executive director Jay Russell noted that the foundation raised funds for construction and continues to fund programs and guest speakers. Once inside, the facility offers self-guided exhibits, interpretive videos and talks. The main hall’s anchor is a two-story display of the expedition portaging the great falls of the Missouri. While the falls are absent due to dams, visitors often unknowingly ask where the waterfalls are located, which offers a good chance for a history lesson, LaRock said. “The falls are a big part of why we’re here in the first place,” he said. “Because they had to portage here, they had to spend more time here than anywhere else on the trail except for in winter.” One unique aspect of the center is its attention to not only telling the story of Lewis and Clark, but also the perspectives of Native Americans they met during the journey, LaRock said. Outside visitors enjoy about two

Bob Brown

The Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Interpretive Center in Great Falls attracts an average of 50,000 visitors annually.

miles of trails with plenty of scenic overlooks of the Missouri, and an amphitheater for programs. The center also offers a Junior Explorer program and Lewis’ Lookout scavenger hunt. The first weekend in May is the center’s anniversary and a busy time. The third Saturday in June is the annual Lewis and Clark Festival, featuring period dress, live music, food, Native American dancers and a black powder rifle opening. The center also features frequent guest speakers and other special events. The interpretive center is unique regionally when it comes to the Forest Service, said Helena-Lewis and Clark public affairs officer Kathy Bushnell. She touted many of the programs and particularly the summer speaker series. “It fits in our overall mission of serving the public and our conservation education interpreting the area,” she said, “and allows us to serve the public outside of what we do in our regular management work.” The center is open year-round. Summer hours after Memorial Day are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Entrance fees are $8 for those 16 and older and free for those 15 and younger. Group discounts are offered and the center honors federal passes. Reporter Tom Kuglin can be reached at 447-4076 @IR_TomKuglin

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KURT WILSON photos, Missoulian

An obelisk and a painted steel cutout of Shep, arguably the most famous dog in Montana, stands on a bluff above the railroad station where the faithful dog held vigil for the return of his long-dead master for 5 1/2 years.

PORTAL TO HISTORY By AL KNAUBER al.knauber@helenair.com

Fort Benton comes highly recommended. Forbes Magazine’s list of America’s top 15 prettiest towns included Fort Benton and said that the West is well preserved and celebrated there. Andrew Evans, National Geographic’s “digital nomad,” savored the languid Missouri River downstream of this historic river town as it passed through the famed White Cliffs area. He wrote of the experience and compared his feelings to those of Meriwether Lewis, whose passage with the expedition helped cement Fort Benton’s place in history. Fort Benton is north and east of Great Falls and less than an hour’s drive along

64 R E D I S C O V E R M O N TA N A

Fort Benton preserves Montana’s early riverboat history

At the peak of its rowdiness, women were not allowed on the town side of the street separating the row of bars from the river.

Highway 87. It bills itself as the birthplace of Montana – a claim that history supports and a trademark protects. “This is really where Montana began,” said Randy Morger, who is a fifth generation Fort Benton resident and member of the Central Montana Tourism Board. He calls his hometown with its population of about 1,400 people an idyllic little spot. “You’re captured by this tiny, little town that revels in its history,” he said. The town traces its roots to 1846, when the foundation was laid for the fort that would be built there, Morger said. The first steamboat arrived in 1860, according to the Fort Benton information website www.fortbenton.com. The discovery of gold two years later

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in what would become Bannack further fueled Fort Benton’s growth as those seeking their fortunes and others that would provide them with the goods they needed passed through the town. The 30-year era of the steamboat ended in 1890 when the railroad arrived, Morger said. What remains of that history helps bring people there today. The fort is being reconstructed and several of its buildings now help tell this story of the town’s past. “When you drive up, it looks like a fort,” said Sharalee Smith, a member of the board of trustees for the River and Plains Society in Fort Benton. Buffalo hides, beads, Hudson Bay blankets, pots and pans are all part of the trade store’s character that greets visitors, she said. Blackfeet tribal elders were brought to the old fort to help with the interpretation of the trade store’s history, Smith said. The Museum of the Upper Missouri, the state of Montana’s Museum of the Northern Great Plains, Homestead Village, The Hornaday Smithsonian Buffalo Gallery, the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument Interpretive Center, Joel F. Overholser Historical Research Center, and the Schwinden Library and Archives are destinations for visitors and historical researchers alike. What there is to see at these museums and destinations includes the rifle Chief Joseph used for his surrender, which is on display at the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument Interpretive Center, the 5 millionth International Harvester Co. Farmall tractor at the Museum of the Northern Great Plains, the bell and telegraph from the steamboat Far West and the Hornaday Smithsonian bison. There’s so much to see that admission tickets to the town’s museums and attractions are valid for two days, Smith said. This is also the Montana town with a life-size bronze memorial

KURT WILSON photos, Missoulian

Once known as “the bloodiest block in the West” for the rowdy behavior and the number of gunfights during the steamboat era, Fort Benton’s Front Street is much quieter these days.

to a sheepherder’s dog. and a street dance. Shep, as the dog was The parade along Front named, kept his vigil for Street begins at 11 a.m. on more than five years at Saturday, which is filled the train station after with activities such as seeing his owner’s body open houses and tours of loaded on a train in 1936 museums, entertainment, for delivery to relatives another street dance and back East. The dog met fireworks that night. four trains each day Sample the biscuits and until its death in hopes gravy breakfast on Sunday of the sheepherder’s and know your purchase return. will help fund repairs to the The Grand Union town’s swimming pool. Hotel, built in 1882 and But if you’re looking A longhorn, sculpted from horseshoes welded together, since restored, is anfor something a little more low-key or planning a visit other reason for visitors grazes in a Fort Benton yard. at another time of the year, to include Fort Benton there’s always the opportunity in their plans. town this year is its 40th annual to sit on one of the benches and The hotel was known as the summer celebration held from just watch the Missouri River as it finest hotel between St. Louis and Friday, June 23 through Sunday, passes by. Seattle, Morger said. June 25, according to the town’s A vacation to Montana without And the Grand Union is the website. place to stay, Smith said, if visitors Friday’s activities include a pig a stop in Fort Benton wouldn’t be nearly as fun, Smith said. “If peoare lucky enough to be able to get a roast lunch, an ice-cream social, room there. concerts by the city band, a comple want to see a really pretty little Among what’s planned for the town, Fort Benton is it.” munity pot luck and pie auction

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CENTRAL COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS CHOTEAU

Jayme Fraser photos, INDEPENDENT RECORD

Young dancers, sometimes holding the hand of a relative, filled the arena at the Rocky Boy Youth Powwow in 2016.

Celebrate Native American culture at Rocky Boy Powwow By THOMAS PLANK thomas.plank@helenair.com Pounding drums, rhythmic chanting, sizzling frybread and brightly colored beads and regalia will highlight the 54th Annual Rocky Boy Powwow and Celebration this summer on the Rocky Boy Reservation south of Havre. The 2,500 members of the Chippewa Cree Tribe who live on the Rocky Boy Reservation in north-central Montana are hosting the lively celebration of Native American culture Aug. 3-5. With vendors, dancing and drumming competitions, feeds and contests, the Powwow brings in people from all over the state and nation. Powwows are cultural events that celebrate a tribe’s history, tradition and vitality and also connect Native tribes and cultures from across the country.

one. The Chippewa migrated from the Great Lakes area to Montana, following a divine prophecy that said they would find a homeland to the west. The Cree roamed between southern Canada, Montana and Wyoming until conflict forced the two tribes to seek a reservation together. So in 1916, near the Bear Paw Mountains in Box Elder, the Rocky Boy Reservation was created. “Rocky Boy” is actually a mis-translation of the original name of a leader of Chippewa Indians. “Stone Child” is the correct translation. Three-year-old Liam Parker (bottom “The Rocky Boy Powwow is right) stands at the end of his first dance, an initiation ceremony the largest event hosted by the completed with his family at the Chippewa Cree Tribe of Rocky Rocky Boy Pow Wow Grounds. Boy Montana, and we want you to know that all are welcome,” event The Chippewa Cree are a com- materials say. For more information, call 406bination of two tribes that came together over time to combine into 395-5705.

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METIS MUSIC AND ART FEST June 8-10 Held at the Choteau Pavilion, the festival is based on celebration and preservation of the Metis. It includes indigenous arts, music, cultural foods, dance, historical preservation and an emphasis on the Metis (Michiff) language. Call (406) 371-7293 for information. OLD NORTH TRAIL TOUR: NORTH July 14 Follow the Old North Trail north of the Teton River. This tour will be a sixto seven-hour driving and walking educational adventure. Meet at the Old Trail Museum at 7:30 a.m. Call (406) 469-2304 or (406) 466-2161 for more information. OLD NORTH TRAIL TOUR: SOUTH July 21 Follow the Old North Trail south of the Teton River. This tour will be a sixto seven-hour driving and walking educational adventure. Meet at the Old Trail Museum at 7:30 a.m. Call (406) 469-2304 or (406) 466-2161 for more information.

CONRAD WHOOP-UP DAYS June 1-2 The annual Whoop-Up Days at the Conrad Lions Whoop Up Rodeo Grounds is a two-day rodeo that also includes a parade, fun run, pancake breakfast, live entertainment and more. Visit Northernrodeo.com for more information.

FORT BENTON FORT BENTON SUMMER CELEBRATION June 22-24 Montana’s “birthplace” community celebrates summer with a parade, arts and crafts, historical tours, free entertainment, street dances, a fishing derby and fireworks on the levee at Old Fort Benton, 1900 River St. Also included is a fun walk and run. Visit Fortbenton. com for more information.

GREAT FALLS FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK The First Friday Art Walk is held on the first Friday of the month in downtown Great Falls, promoting galleries, studios, businesses, artists and musicians. Call (406) 453-6151 for information.

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CENTRAL COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS LEWIS AND CLARK FESTIVAL June 15-17 Every June you have the chance to go back in time and celebrate Lewis and Clark, who spent nearly a month in the Great Falls area on their way to the Pacific in 1805. Call (406) 761-4434 for information. MONTANA STATE FAIR July 27-Aug. 4 Experience Montana’s culture and history at the Montana ExpoPark in Great Falls. Includes superstar entertainment, carnival rides, a pro-rodeo, food vendors, livestock shows, stage acts, exhibits and more. Call (406) 727-8900 for information.

MONARCH MONARCH ROCKS! FESTIVAL Aug. 11 This annual festival raises funds to restore the 1902 Monarch Great Northern Railway Depot. Crafters, tours of the Drover Car bay-window caboose, a petting zoo, classic car displays, food by Electric City Concessions, and music are part of this free event. Call (406) 236-5377 for more information.

LEWISTOWN PIONEER POWER DAYS June 9-11 Old fashioned power is the focus of the Pioneer Power Days, held annually in June near the Lewistown Airport. The event offers the chance to experience history as it was in an early 1900s town. Call (406) 538-5236 for more information. SNOWY MOUNTAIN MUZZLELOADERS June 22-25 Step back in time and join the Snowy Mountain Muzzleloaders at East Fork Reservoir in beautiful central Montana for an exciting weekend in June, filled with activities of the mid-1800s. Call (406) 366-6462 for more information. CENTRAL MONTANA FAIR July 25-28 Enjoy two nights of PRCA Rodeo action, entertainment by Easton Corbin, a demolition derby and more at the Fergus County Fairgrounds. Call (406) 535-8841 for more information. MONTANA COWBOY POETRY GATHERING AND WESTERN MUSIC RENDEZVOUS Aug. 16-19 Country music chart-topper Suzy Bogguss will headline this annual event featuring a slew of cowboy poets, western musicians and artists. The event aims to celebrate and preserve the history and heritage of the cowboy lifestyle. Call (406) 538-4575 for more information.

Susan Dunlap, The Montana Standard

Lewistown hosts the 32nd annual Cowboy Poetry Gathering and Western Music Rendezvous, Aug. 16-19.

ULM

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS

BUFFALO JUMP HALF MARATHON May 20 Set for its 11th year along the rolling dirt roads of this tiny town in central Montana, this race offers ample unspoiled natural beauty for runners to look on as they make their way around the area formerly known as the Ulm Pishkan State Park. Email bbrist01@ugf.edu for more information.

RED ANTS PANTS MUSIC FESTIVAL July 26-29 The fun starts with a street dance downtown and runs through Sunday with live music at the festival grounds on the Jackson Ranch. Connect with good folks and celebrate rural Montana. The festival’s fans have enjoyed headliners including Merle Haggard, Emmylou Harris, Charley Pride,

Keb’ Mo, and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. The festival is designed to bring people together and support the Red Ants Pants Foundation, which is dedicated to women’s leadership, working family farms and ranches, and rural communities. The festival was founded and is produced by Red Ants Pants owner Sarah Calhoun. It remains a home-grown celebration, run by a dedicated crew and 250 festival volunteers. Call (406) 547-3781 for information.

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REDISCOVER

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INSIDE INSIDETHIS THISSECTION SECTION

COUNTRY MMISSOURI I SI SSSOOU R V ER U N T RY M U RRI IRRIVER I VIER CO UCO N T RY

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Great Plains Dinosaur Great PlainsMuseum Dinosaur Museum

Touring the Hi-Line

Lee Newspapers o

redisc Dino trail

Dino trail Visiting Makoshika

Fishing opportunities

Fishing opportunities Fort Peck Calendar of events Visit Missouri River Country for Frontier Days, Red Bottom Celebration, Fort Peck Summer Theatre, Longest Dam Race, Milk River Gospel Jamboree, Big Muddy Motorcycle Rally and more.

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Calendar ofofevents Calendar Events

Visit Missouri Country for Longest Dam Race, River Milk River Catfi sh Classic, Frontier Days, Red Bottom Celebration, Wolf Point Wild Horse Stampede and more. Fort Peck Summer Theatre, Longest Dam Race, Milk River Gospel Jamboree, Big Muddy Motorcycle Rally and more.

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SUMMERTIME ON MONTANA’S HI-LINE

EMPTY SPACES AND INTERESTING PLACES By MIKE KORDENBROCK mkordenbrock@ billingsgazette.com

Spread out along Montana’s Canadian border, the region known as the Hi-Line offers expanses capable of curing that classic summertime symptom of wanting to get away. But in between stretches of quiet, beautiful prairie, rivers and mou ntains, there are plenty of opportunities to drop back into civilization and history. Travel back in time and explore Montana’s Native American history through the the Buffalo Jump Archaelogical Site and the Wahkpa Chu’gn Interpretive Center in Havre, one of the largest Hi-Line communities with a population of around 10,000. Several nomadic peoples used the bowl-shaped site over a period of thousands of years to corral, slaughter, cook and process bison. The archaeological site offers a layered view of excavations on site that paint a stunning picture of the scope of history. “They can see those layers of history,” site manager Emily Mayer said. “That really brings it home that they really did use this site because here’s the evidence and you can see it.” Tours take visitors through a bison corral and roasting pit, among other excavated sites. Other artifacts are available for view inside the interpretive center. One of the

TOM BAUER/Missoulian

The bluffs of the Wahkpa Chu’gn Buffalo Jump lead down to the Milk River, which runs through Havre on its way to the Missouri.

neatest offerings of the tour is a chance to try your hand at the atlatl, a device used to throw spears roughly three feet in length. Mayer chuckled recalling her various attempts at mastering the atlatl. “You take a look at a picture and think ‘Oh I can do that,’” Mayer said. “It looks easier than it really is.” The site was original discovered

by John Brumley in the 1960s when he was a boy. Mayer said Brumley’s discovery as a youth led him into a career in archaeology. For a more festive time, the Great Northern Fair takes place from July 18 through July 22. The city’s chamber of commerce boasts that the Great Northern Fair is the largest on the Hi-Line. Visitors can expect food booths, carnival games, live music and a

rodeo. If the heat is luring you to sleep, check out the fair’s Demolition Derby. There’s plenty else to do in Havre, including taking the city’s Havre Beneath the Streets Tour. After an arson fire ravaged numerous Havre businesses in 1905, local entrepreneurs and owners moved underground. Please see Hi-Line, Page 70

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Hi-Line From 69

“Basically, it’s a fun, family historical tour that kind of gives you a little history of our town and the surrounding area and the people that lived here,” said tour office manager Christy Owens. A barbershop, a saloon and an opium den are among the subterranean structures preserved beneath Havre. The tour lasts about an hour as groups are led through passageways to 18 different displays. Of course, there are plenty of other interesting events and spots to check out throughout the summer along the Hi-Line. Journey east, to the town of Scobey, population 1,032, which sits about a 20 minute drive south from Sasketchewan. Make a pit stop along the way for a slice of pizza in Glasgow, at Eugene’s Pizza on Klein Avenue. Considered by many Montanas to be the best pie under the Big Sky, Eugene’s is sure to leave a hungry traveler satisfied. A 2018 Washington Post analysis determined Glasgow to be “the middle of nowhere,” in America due to its distance from any population center of more than 75,000 people. Continue on to Scobey, where summer picks up steam in the last week of June with a tribute to days past. Pioneer Days, as the two day celebration is known, takes place west of town in a historically preserved community known as Pioneer Town. Daniels County boasts that Pioneer Town contains 35 preserved historic buildings that help give visitors a sense of life in early 20th century Montana. Classic cars provide automobile enthusiasts with plenty to study amid festival activities before the Dirty Shame Show takes place. A “threshman’s breakfast” of pancakes and sausage is served during Pioneer Days in old cook cars once used by harvesters. A multi-act variety show in the Rex Theatre, The Dirty Shame Show includes old-fashioned skits,

If you go PIONEER DAYS  When: Last weekend in June  Where: 7 West County Road, Scobey, MT  For information: Call 406-4875965 WOLF POINT WILD HORSE STAMPEDE  When: July 12-14  Where: 153 Cahill Road, Wolf Point  Cost: $15 general admission. Children 6 and under admission is free.  For information: 406-653-1770 or 406-653-2012 HAVRE BENEATH THE STREETS  When: Daily, tours begin at 9:30 a.m. Last tour departs at 3:30 p.m.  Where: 120 3rd Avenue South  Cost: $17 adult, $9 kids ages six through 12, children five and under free. Group rates available for 15 or more people.  For information: 406-2658888 GREAT NORTHERN FAIR  When: July 18-22  Where: 1676 Highway US 2 West  Cost: TBD  For information: 406-265-7121 BUFFALO JUMP HISTORICAL SITE AND WAHKPA CHU’GN INTERPRETIVE CENTER  When: June 1 through Labor Day, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Where: 3993 6th Street West, Havre  Cost: People 18-64 $10, 65 and over $9, kids 13-17 $7, kids six-12 $5, children under six are free.  For information: 406-2654000

live music and dancing. Just an hour south of Scobey, a stop in Wolf Point should keep things interesting in early July. The Wolf Point Wild Horse Stampede features numerous attractions, including a Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association rodeo, a wild horse race and a street dance, July 12-14.

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TOM BAUER/Missoulian

Where buffalo were once stampeded toward their demise at the Wahkpa Chu’gn Buffalo Jump on the western edge of Havre, a shopping center now provides modern goods. Wahkpa Chu’gn is located on a steep bluff just behind the mall, and visitors can see one of the best preserved buffalo jumps in the northern Great Plains.

TOM BAUER/Missoulian

A buffalo skeleton is on display at the Wahkpa Chu’gn Buffalo Jump.

TOM BAUER/Missoulian

Pill bottles are displayed in Boone’s Drug Store in Havre Beneath the Streets.

Missouri River Country

Missouri River Country Pioneer Days in Scobey, June 24-26, features the Dirty Shame Show, five family-oriented, internationally-known variety shows starring the Dirty Shame Belles and Dixieland Band.

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DUSTING OFF

MAKOSHIKA Upgrades highlighting dino digs help Glendive park stand out

By MATT HOFFMAN mhoffman@billingsgazette.com Makoshika State Park is coming off of a banner year — records for visits, camping revenue and volunteer hours. But the eastern Montana park’s advocates aren’t simply stretching out to bask in the badland sun; they’re doubling down on the park’s paleontology legacy. “If you want to have fun with dinosaurs, Glendive is the place to

SPRING/SUMMER 2018

be,” said park manager Chris Dantic. The visitor’s center houses a fossilized triceratops skull, and prehistoric icons like Tyrannosaurus Rex have been found in the park. Smaller finds — like leaf fossils — are common. The park dusted off and upgraded its paleontology lab for this year after a hiatus of about a decade, with a major assist from the Friends of Makoshika State Park. The professional-quality lab can be used by paleontologists for field work, but is more geared towards giving visitors a taste of the discipline.

Gazette Staff

One of the most complete Triceratops skulls ever unearthed calls the visitor’s Please see MAKOSHIKA, Page 72 center at Makoshika State Park home.

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Makoshika From Page 71

“If you bring kids in there, they can be paleontologists for a day,” Dantic said. It’s not the only new addition for this year. The park is rolling out a series of programs, from moonlight hikes to wildlife presentations to dinosaur-themed movie showings. Testing out some of those programs last year had encouraging results, Dantic said. About 30 people showed up for an inaugural moonlight hike, and more than 200 attended a showing of “The Good Dinosaur” at the park’s outdoor amphitheater. A $3 million paving project in 2016 on the road up to the amphitheater and an overlook also helped make the park more accessible for the average traveler. When Dantic talks about the amphitheater — “one of the best ones in the state that nobody really even knows about” — he could be talking about the larger park. Tucked just outside of Glendive, the park ranks as the best by the state’s own accounting, looking at options like visitor’s centers, camping and other amenities, Dantic said. But the running narrative is that Makoshika and other state parks can get lost in the long shadows of Glacier and Yellowstone national parks, plus Montana’s sharp-peaked national forests. So far the park has been able to capitalize on national trends that show more retiring baby boomers are traveling to visit natural areas across the country. Camping revenue went up about 40 percent last year, while overall visits hit a new record of about 94,000. “It was the first time we had some consistent camp hosts down there, plus there were veteran camp hosts,” Dantic said. The park also added a new tipi campsite, which proved popular. Upgrades to a disc golf course help

CASEY PAGE Photos, Gazette Staff

The rough terrain of Makoshika State Park contains the kind of mystique that draws certain types of travelers — geotourists — who seek a direct connection with local people, landmarks and customs.

draw in a different crowd than the camp-and-hike visitor. Makoshika has long been known for its stark and shifting terrain, with striking rock formations and stripes of color in the hills. More than a dozen trails wind through stretches of pine covered flats and up to rocky lookouts. The Montana State Parks Foundation announced a $15,000 grant to upgrade one of the park’s trails this year. The park still has some major priorities, like getting potable water at campsites and building a new campground. The park has water available at the visitor’s center. But the upgrades that have gotten done have received major local support, Dantic said. The park’s volunteer hours roughly quadrupled to 3,600 last year — the equivalent of about two full-time employees. “The community’s been excited,” he said. “It’s a good vibe in the The city of Glendive is seen from a hill in Makoshika State Park. park.”

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Bob Webster

Fort Peck Lake, Missouri River Country, BELOW: The theater in Fort Peck.

FORT PECK LAKE AREA Activities for every season

By Billings Gazette There are enough events yearround to draw visitors out to the far-flung reaches of northeast Montana. In a state known for its blue-ribbon stream fishing, anglers at Fort Peck Lake and the surrounding area come for the walleye and pike. In the winter, good ice conditions call for ice fishing. The Ice Fishing Derby, usually held early in the year, invites people to embrace the cold and sit over a fishing hole. The main event is held during the summer. The Montana Governor’s Cup Walleye Tournament bills itself as northeast Montana’s

premier fishing event. The 31st installment of the competition is set for July 12-14. Sections of Fort Peck Lake are peppered with boats for the event,

and the pounds of fish add up for the top fishers. Thousands of dollars are up for grabs. It took nearly 59 cumulative pounds of fish to win the 2016 event.

Of course, there’s more going on in the Fort Peck area than fishing. The Fort Peck Summer Theatre has a busy 2018 season on tap with five main productions scheduled for the four-month run. Unsurprisingly, the year’s first production is a musical about ice fishing. “Guys on Ice” starts out the season on June 1. The theater also offers camps and other events. The nearby town of Glasgow hosts its Blues and Brews Festival on May 5. The event includes live music, food and, yes, beer and wine. During the fall, the place to be is Poplar. There, the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation hold the annual Poplar Indian Days powwow. It’s an event that puts the food, music and colorful displays of the tribes on display.

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MISSOURI RIVER COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS CULBERTSON FRONTIER DAYS June 8-9 Enjoy two full days of western hospitality and fun, including rodeos at the Saddle Club, Saturday parade, barn dance and concessions on the grounds. Visit Culbertsonmt.com/events. ROOSEVELT COUNTY FAIR Aug. 8-11 Culbertson’s free event of traditional family activities food, crafts, plants, 4-H and FFA livestock auction, fashion revue, petting zoo, various vendors and fun run. Ranch Rodeo happens Aug. 11. Free noon meal Friday and Saturday. Visit Culbertsonmt.com/events. SADDLE CLUB WAGON TRAIN Sept. 1-2 Local folks bring their “Old West” covered wagons or saddle horses for a ride. Imagine the working cowboy’s way of life 100 years ago. The weekend includes food, entertainment and hay for the horses. Call (406) 790-0600 or visit Culbertsonmt.com/events.

FRAZER RED BOTTOM CELEBRATION June 15-17 See the oldest powwow on the Fort Peck Reservation. The Red Bottom Celebration honors Native American culture and traditions through dancing, food, crafts, fellowship and more. Open to all.

FORT PECK FORT PECK SUMMER THEATRE June 1 – Sept. 2 This century-old theater features three plays this summer. “Guys on Ice” runs June 1-10; “Cabaret” happens June 15 July 1; “Leader of the Pack” is Jul 6-22; “Disney’s The Little Mermaid” runs July 27 – Aug. 12; and, “Almost Maine” shows Aug. 17 – Sept. 2. Friday and Saturday shows are at 7 p.m.; Sunday shows are at 4:30 p.m. Visit Fortpecktheare.org LONGEST DAM RACE June 16 All events for The 24th Annual Longest Dam Race begin at Kiwanis Park in Fort Peck. Entry fee is $25, $10 for children age 10 and under and $5 for each additional event. Events Include: 10K Run, 5K Run, 5K Walk, 1 Mile Run/Walk both competitive and casual and 10 Mile Novice Bike Race. All start at top of the Fort Peck Dam and finish at Kiwanis Park. For information, call 406-228-2222 or visit Glasgowchamber.net.

CASEY PAGE, Gazette Staff

The Fort Peck Theatre’s summer lineup includes “Disney’s The Little Mermaid,” with various shows happening June 1-Sept. 2.

GLASGOW BONNIE CITY BLUES & BREWS May 5 Cottonwood Inn’s doors open at 5 p.m.; music by Carl Banks, 4th Street Band, and Downtime. Pre-sale tickets $35 each or $60 for a couple; and, at door $45 each. Visit Glasgowchamber.net. MONTANA GOVERNOR’S CUP WALLEYE TOURNAMENT July 12-14 Held at Fort Peck Lake, this 200-team, 2-day tournament is hosted by Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture. For information, call (406) 228-2222. MILK RIVER CATFISH CLASSIC June 2-3 The “grand daddy” of the Montana Cats Tour is a nighttime event annually boasting a full 80-team field and more

than $10,000 in guaranteed cash and prizes.  Slots fill fast, so see Montanacats.com to register. NORTHEAST MONTANA FAIR July 31-Aug. 4 The Northeast Montana Fair has a carnival, PRCA Rodeo, Demolition Derby and live music. It all happens at Valley County Fairgrounds in Glasgow. October Road opens for John Michael Montgomery at the Aug. 4 fair concert. Gates open at 6 p.m.; music starts 7 p.m. Pre-sale tickets are $35 each for adults, and $45 at the gate. Students $20 each, under 5 free. Visit Northeastmontanafair.com.

MALTA THE MILK RIVER GOSPEL JAMBOREE June 22-24 Malta hosts his music event organized

through a nonprofit group founded in 2001. Visit Mrgjamboree.org. SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS – OTHELLO June 28 The troupe from Montana State University bring free, professional productions throughout the state in parks and public spaces. Othello happens 6:30 to 8:30 Thursday, June 28, on the Malta Courthouse lawn. 2018 PHILLIPS COUNTY FAIR Aug. 2-5 In addition to all the expected summer fair activities, music headliners this year include Sammy Kershaw, Aaron Tippin and Collin Raye, as they form the trio ‘Roots & Boots’ to play the Grandstand on Friday, Aug. 3. Visit Phillipscountyfair.com. Please see Calendar, Page 76

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MISSOURI RIVER COUNTRY CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Calendar From 75

PLENTYWOOD SHERIDAN COUNTY FAIR July 26-29 This traditional fair and PRCA rodeo in Plentywood has all the entertainment you’d expect. See details at Facebook/ SheridanCountyFair.

POPLAR WILD WEST DAYS June 8-10 Friday is family day, with an assortment of kids’ activities and vendor booths, followed by a horseshoe tournament beginning in late afternoon. On Saturday, a community rummage sale, breakfast, a pie social, 11 a.m. parade; and, rodeo at the Poplar Saddle Club Rodeo Grounds. Saturday evening has the annual arm wrestling tournament, which includes age groups for the kids. Sunday has a Cowboy Church Service for everyone, a parade at 11 a.m. and the second day of rodeo action. See Visitmt.com.

SIDNEY SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS - OTHELLO June 29 The troupe from Montana State University brings free, professional productions throughout the state in parks and public spaces. Othello happens 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday, June 29, at Veterans Memorial Park. MONSTER CAT CATFISH TOURNAMENT July 21 Cash prizes pay from $100 to $1,500. Find out more at Montanacats.com. SUNRISE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS July 14 Visitors can enjoy browsing displays of artists and crafters from many states while taking in live music in scenic Veterans Memorial Park. There is also a “writers’ row” and free children’s events. Visit Sidneymt.com. RICHLAND COUNTY FAIR & RODEO Aug. 1-4 The Richland County Fair & Rodeo offers home-style events and rodeo action. Visit Sidneymt.com.

PHOTO: SEAN HEAVEY/Courtesy Sleeping Buffalo Hot Springs

Sleeping Buffalo Hot Springs is one of many hot springs throughout the state of Montana in which geothermal hot springs heat pools of water for soaking and relaxing. The resort is located in Saco.

University brings free, professional productions throughout the state in parks and public spaces. Othello happens 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, June 30, at Faith Home Park. WOLF POINT WILD HORSE STAMPEDE AND PARADE July 12-14 This two-day celebration includes the annual stampede and several parades. For more information, Wolfpointchamber.com WADOPANA POWWOW Aug. 3-5 See the oldest traditional powwow in Montana. It allows elders and younger generations to hold special ceremonies WOLF POINT for naming of individuals and honoring of family members. For the young people, SHAKESPEARE IN there are run/walks and outdoor activiTHE PARKS - OTHELLO Courtesy photo ties. Open to everyone; for information The Longest Dam Race returns to Fort Peck for a 24th helping of competitive June 30 The troupe from Montana State call (406) 650-7104 or (406) 650-8724. walking and running at Kiwanis Park, June 16.

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Rediscover Montana 2018  
Rediscover Montana 2018