Page 1

SElECTEd

Best magaZiNe ‘13-’16 moNtaNa NeWsPaPer assoCiatioN

billings’ most read magazine

full tHrottle reVViN’ uP to ride

mike BurtoN lifetime olYmPiaN

liFT oFF

Hot air BallooNs

fiNd Your muse iN tHe magiC CitY

Plus -

SPECial SECTioN: from PiCtograPHs To PiNTEREST


The best care is right here.

Billings Clinic’s membership in the Mayo Clinic Care Network means Billings Clinic specialists can consult with Mayo Clinic on your care, creating another breakthrough we call home. For you that means no long-distance travel, peace of mind and access to the finest medical knowledge available. Right here at home.

To find out more, visit billingsclinic.com/mayo


Announcing a hardcover book!

COV

ER

NO TF

INA

L

BILLINGS MEMORIES II: THE 1940s, 1950s AND 1960s

Billings

MEMORIES II The 1940s, 1950s and 1960s • A Pictorial History

PURCHASE ONLINE AT:

Billings2.PictorialBook.com free shipping for online orders of two or more copies BOOK DETAILS: Due to the overwhelming popularity of “Billings Memories: The Early Years,” The Billings Gazette is proud to partner with the Western Heritage Center, Rocky Mountain College, Montana State University Billings, Billings Public Library and our readers on a new hardcover pictorial history book, “Billings Memories II: The 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.” This heirloom-quality coffee-table book offers a glimpse of Billings from 1940-1969 with a brief reprise of the early years through stunning and historic photos. In addition, we are thrilled to include photographic memories of years gone by from our readers. Reserve your copy today and save $15!

presented by

Pre-order now (discount expires 10/26/16). Select an option:  Ship my order to me  I’ll pick up my order $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling per $29.95 per book. Pick up order at The Billings book. Order will be shipped to the address below Gazette office (401 N Broadway, Billings) after after 12/02/16. 11/21/16. Quantity: ___ x $35.90 = $______ total Quantity: ___ x $29.95 = $______ total Payment method:  Check/Money Order  Visa  MasterCard  AmEx  Discover

Name Address City

State

Phone

E-mail

Card # Please note: photos that appear in this ad may not appear in final book.

4 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Send form and payment to:

Signature

Zip

Billings Gazette Communications c/o Memories Book P.O. Box 36300 Billings, MT 59107

Expiration Verification Code


FEATURES

AUG/SEPT 2016

BOOKBINDING

74

A LOST ART

FROM PICTOGRAPHS TO PINTEREST WORDS REMAIN, MEDIA CHANGES

BY BRENDA MAAS

89

MEANINGFUL MENAGERIE THE WORLD OF DOLL COLLECTING

BY CHARLI WHITE

85

79

BY TARA CADY

BOOKTOWN

BILLINGS LOVES THE PRINTED WORD

BY DARRELL EHRLICK

92

FULL THROTTLE

REVVIN’ UP TO RIDE

BY RACHELLE LACY

SElECTEd

Best magaZiNe ‘13-’16 moNtaNa NeWsPaPer assoCiatioN

billings’ most read magazine

100 Years of NatioNal Parks • summer siPPers • lost art of BookBiNdiNg

full tHrottle reVViN’ uP to ride

mike BurtoN lifetime olYmPiaN

liFT oFF

Hot air BallooNs

fiNd Your muse iN tHe magiC CitY holiday 2013 august / sePtemBer 2016

Plus -

SPECial SECTioN: from PiCtograPHs To PiNTEREST

97

ARTS & CULTURE SERIES AUTHORS

BY ANNA PAIGE

ON THE COVER GRAPHIC DESIGN BY TONI SCHULTZ/ GAZETTE STAFF

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 5


DEPARTMENTS

AUG/SEPT 2016

RIVER TO RIMS

IN EVERY ISSUE

8

FROM THE STAFF

10

THE LIST

12

PERSON OF INTEREST

14

GIVING BACK

16

ARTIST LOFT

18

ELEMENTS

20

MEDIA ROOM

THE WORD IS THE WORD

9

CONTRIBUTORS

107

SEEN AT THE SCENE

110

DATEBOOK

FUN, FASCINATING FINDS

OLYMPIC SWIMMER MIKE BURTON

LOCAL LITERACY PROGRAMS

JERRY IVERSON

GO FOR THE GOLD

BOOKS, MOVIES, MUSIC & WEB REVIEWS

114

WHY MAGIC CITY?

LAST WORD

SIGNATURE SECTION

FINE LIVING

22 33 37

GREAT ESTATES

THE PORCH HOUSE

HIDDEN PARADISE

EPICURE & LIBATIONS THE HEAT IS ON

MONTANA’S CROWNING JEWEL

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK

6 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

46

GARDENS

TRAVELOGUE

62

WESTERN LIFE

53 59 71

WESTERN LIFE

STEPHEN MATHER AND THE FOUNDING OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

PHOTO JOURNAL UP, UP AND AWAY

MISSING LETTERS

BY RUSSELL ROWLAND

UNPLUGGED EXPLORATION BY TARA CADY

In the early 1880s, immigrants and adventurers came in droves to seek their livelihood on the verdant land along the Yellowstone River. The hastily constructed tents and log cabins made it appear as if Billings materialized overnight – thus earning the name “The Magic City.” Today, as the largest city in Montana, Billings proudly retains its ‘Magic City’ moniker. As for Magic City magazine, we promise to continue our mission to uncover all that is unique and wonderful and changing in this great community … and we guarantee a few surprises along the way.


AUG/SEPT 2016 I VOLUME 14 I ISSUE 3

MICHAEL GULLEDGE PUBLISHER 657-1225 EDITORIAL

tM

Why 20 0 Minutes Matters to You

BRENDA MAAS MANAGING EDITOR 657-1370 TARA CADY ASSISTANT EDITOR 657-1390 EVELYN NOENNIG COMMUNITY LIAISON / ASSISTANT EDITOR 657-1226 CHARLI WHITE MARKETING INTERN 657-1474 PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEOGRAPHY

LARRY MAYER, CASEY PAGE, HANNAH POTES, BOB ZELLAR, JAMES WOODCOCK AND TAILYR IRVINE

Overall stress relief People have soaked in warm water for centuries to relax. These days, hot tub owners are quick to tell us about how soothing their spa feels and how recuperative it is. Studies show the soothing effects, too. For instance, blood pressure drops after time spent in a spa.

DESIGN

APRIL BURFORD, MARY GARRISON COVER DESIGN

Muscle recOvery and faster Healing A spas warm water massage promote healing by increasing circulation, carrying nutrients to help cells and tissue regenerate. According to the textbook Comprehensive Aquatic Therapy by Drs. Bruce Becker and Andrew Cole, “immersion in warm water can lead to a faster and longer-lasting recovery. An environment which is less prone to cause pain, and is even pleasurable, makes immersion in warm water a unique healing environment.”

NADINE BITTNER, ERIN HOAGLAND, STACEY SCHERRY AND TONI SCHULTZ ADVERTISING

DAVE WORSTELL GENERAL MANAGER 657-1352 RYAN BROSSEAU ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 657-1340 SHELLI RAE SCOTT ADVERTISING MANAGER 657-1202 SPENCYR SCHMALTZ ADVERTISING COORDINATOR 657-1254 MO LUCAS PRODUCTION/COORDINATOR 657-1204

MOre tHan a HOt tuB More than home-improvement or entertainment, a hot tub is an investment in your health and well-being. Our owners say that they have more energy, sleep better, and can do more with their day. Plus, time spent together in the warm water can lead to better relationships outside the hot tub.

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

MARCY BAUMGARTNER, BROOKE BUCHANAN, BILL COLE, CHRIS DORR, JAMEY EISENBARTH, JEFF EWELT, KIM KAISER, NICHOLE MEHLING MILES, PAIGE SPALDING, HELEN TOLLIVER, LIZ WILMOUTH, JEREMIAH YOUNG CONTACT US: Mail: 401 N. Broadway Billings, MT 59101 editor@magiccitymagazine.com FIND US ONLINE AT www.magiccitymagazine.com

FIND US AT VARIOUS RACK LOCATIONS THROUGHOUT BILLINGS: Billings area Albertsons I Billings Airport I Billings Clinic Billings Gazette Communications I Billings Hardware I Curves for Women Evergreen IGA I Gainan’s I Good Earth Market I Granite Fitness Kmart I Lucky’s Market I McDonald’s I Pita Pit I Reese and Ray’s IGA (Laurel) Shipton’s I Stella’s Kitchen & Bakery I St. Vincent Healthcare I Billings Family YMCA Valley Federal Credit Union (Downtown location) I Western Ranch Supply Western Security Banks (Downtown location) I Yellowstone County Museum Plus many other locations

discOver tHe HOt sPring difference

As the world’s best-selling hot tub brand, Hot Spring Spas offers hot tubs with better massage, cleaner water, energy-saving Energy Smart® features and the Absolute Best Hot Tub Ownership Experience®

Ho

in g t S pr

S pa s O

f fer s D eli v

er y,

S et Up and

Mai n

t e na

nce

Magic City Magazine is published five times a year by Billings Gazette Communications Copyright© 2016 Magic City Magazine. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without express written consent is prohibited.

2217 Grand Avenue • 652-7727 • www.lovethetub.com


EVELYN NOENNIG,

THE WORD IS THE WORD BY THE MAGIC MAGAZINE STAFF

What’s on your summer reading list? Folks convince themselves that they’ll be able to squeeze in a few more minutes to read, whether on an airplane, on a beach or on the patio during the longer summer nights. But, we wanted to ask a different question in this edition of Magic — not what are you reading, but how are you reading?

What’s the word? Some print pundits are down on the wood pulp press — prophesying as they did now decades ago that printing on paper would soon become obsolete. You might have even fallen victim to the myth of the paperless society. Remember when you were told that soon copy paper would go the way of the Rolodex? Instead, copiers and printers got cheaper and better and we’ve become inundated with paper everywhere, reluctant to let go of a scrap of information and unconcerned about hitting CTRL+P on everything. But that prediction of print dying has turned out to be as fanciful as a jet car — a bold prognostication that didn’t quite happen. We’ll save the rest of the conclusions for you to discover on the pages — ahem, the printed pages — of this edition of Magic Magazine. In it, we’ve taken a look at how people are consuming words, both in print and on a screen. For Billings and Montana, we’re not only still fond of words in any form, but there’s also something about this place that seems to bring out the writer and artist. In this edition, we feature a 3-part series on words (page 73) as well as and an arts-andculture series highlighting local writers (page 97). This is an inspirational kind of place.

Summertime We’ve spotlighted so many unique, beautiful and inspired homes in Magic, and this edition is no different. Check out “The Porch House” that begins on page 22.

8 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

In addition to the amazingly cool features (who doesn’t want their own dance hall?), the house was designed with people in mind. We know: That should be a no-brainer. But, during these summer months, when family and friends come to visit, we’re reminded that a house is more than wood, steel, glass and carpet. It’s a gathering point and the backdrop for memories of a lifetime. As the homeowner said, “It’s not about the building, it’s what you do in that building that counts.” We hope that during this summertime season, synonymous with grilling, get-togethers and porchside conversations, that you recall the simple wisdom which reminds us to slow down and savor the season. To help you do that, we’ve included a combined Epicure/Libations section on patio sippers and lighter fare (page 37), a timely Legends piece on the history of the National Park Service (can you believe it’s their 100th birthday?) and a great travelogue on Glacier National Park (page 62).

It’s Magic (Magazine) Please pardon this brief moment of shameless self-promotion. But, we’d like to thank the judges and the Montana Newspaper Association who deem Magic the best specialty and niche publication in the state for the fourth year in a row. “Magic is a champion among champions in terms of niche publications. The cover lures readers in. The content and ad design of the overall products are so well put together that this judge would want to be a subscriber,” the judge said. “The hard work and dedication shine through.” This is a great honor and nice recognition from our peers in the industry. But, it also represents the joy we have as we tell the story of this very special area. Readers make it possible to continue to tell these stories, the staff (all the goofy and great folks we work around) make it happen. Thanks to everyone — literally.

executive assistant to the publisher is celebrating 20 years at The Billings Gazette in July. Spending time in the Pacific Northwest with granddaughter Charlotte is a priority for her, and she somehow finds a way to sneak in trips while balancing work, volunteering and leading the Transition Network. Between visits, she utilizes texting and FaceTime to keep in touch, leaving her wondering how grandparents ever managed before technology.

TARA CADY grew up in the northwest suburbs of Chicago but has since fallen in love with the mountainous West. After finishing a degree in psychology in Colorado, her love of travel and meeting unique people inspired her to pursue a more creative path in a city that celebrates art and music. With Billings as her muse, she hopes to unlock hidden talents.

CHARLI WHITE is a homegrown Montanan blessed with curiosity and a love of all things artistic – both which led her to pursue a journalism degree at the University of Montana where she is currently a senior. Writing remains one of her favorite creative outlets and she loves pairing it with her other passion of photography. She loves a good read, talking to herself in Spanish, playing piano and snowmobiling, and she can make a bookmark out of just about anything.


CONTRIBUTORS

DARRELL EHRLICK

loves reading, writing, baseball, bourbon, cooking, Montana history, books, bacon, old albums, cigars, cats (especially crossed-eye Siamese and black cats), his patient wife and his two children who are his real day job. He tends to have an opinion on everything, often being wrong but rarely in doubt. He works as the editor of The Billings Gazette and was born and raised in Billings. He’s written other things, few probably worth mentioning here.

RACHELLE LACY was raised unsupervised as a self-proclaimed feral child, which explains her love of motorcycles and disinterest in writing about herself. Having been with The Billings Gazette for seven years, she’s worn many hats. When not immersed in the fittingly scattered newspaper setting, she enjoys live music – even if it’s bad – and is rather fond of her daughters.

KORI WOOD expresses her creativity in many ways – from hosting costume parties based on the Harry Potter series to wearing it on her sleeve in the form of watercolor tattoos. A complicated mix of two very different personalities, Wood has a soft spot for misunderstood fictional female villains, modern abstract art and both pop and punk music.

RUSSEL ROWLAND

is a native Montanan, born in Bozeman. He has published three highly acclaimed novels, In Open Spaces, The Watershed Years, and High and Inside, the latter two which were finalists for the High Plains Book Award. His most recent book, Fifty-Six Counties: A Montana Journey, is the result of two years of travel and research into every county in Montana. It has already garnered rave reviews. Rowland lives in Billings, where he teaches writing workshops and works one-on-one with other writers. More at russellrowland.com.

JOHN CLAYTON

, the 2016 Visiting Writer in Residence at Montana State University-Billings, writes about history and culture. His books include The Cowboy Girl: The Life of Caroline Lockhart and most recently, Stories from Montana’s Enduring Frontier. You can learn more at johnclaytonbooks.com.

KAREN KINSER agrees that traveling is the only way you can spend money and get richer. She also loves super-thin flatbread pizzas from her wood-fired oven, TED talks, gardening and St. John’s summer concerts. When she’s not gardening or making wine in Joliet, Karen is just as happy tent-camping in the full moon alongside the Madison River as she is listening for ghosts in historic hotels.

ANNA PAIGE

is a writer, photographer and founder of Pen & Paige, a freelance writing company based in Billings. Recognized for her work supporting arts and live music culture in the West, Anna’s writing is as diverse as her subjects, from poetry collaborations with musicians to artist profiles to concert photography.

Always open Sundays 12 – 4 Shop Local, Shop Downtown 2814 2nd Avenue North

259-3624 MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 9


THE LIST

THE LIST

PERSON OF INTEREST

GIVING BACK

ARTIST LOFT

MEDIA ROOM

ELEMENTS

FUN, FASCINATING FINDS WE THINK ARE GREAT

PORTABLE PIZZA

For the perfect pizza in five minutes flat, try the Mont Alpi portable table top pizza oven. Ideal for outdoor living, this stainless steel oven easily cooks a 12-inch pizza or an entire chicken in the comfort of your backyard.

Available at Pierce RV Supercenter $270

MADE IN MONTANA

Don’t let the dry heat of summer leave your lips cracked and skin parched. Lube up with hand-made body and lip butter by Beartooth Butters, and get a taste of the mountains without leaving home.

JOT IT DOWN

Craft a love note or add to your to-do list with this notepad, pen and wooden box set by Natural Life. Whether for fun or for focus, write all of your ideas in one safe place.

Available at beartoothbutters.com $4-5

Available at Joy of Living $14

SIMPLY SOLAR

AMONG THE GIANTS

Available at The Base Camp $15

Available at farcountrypress.com $17

Clean energy meets camping lanterns with inflatable solar lights by Luci. Charged by the sun, these lights provide up to 12 hours of illumination while remaining durable enough for your next backpacking trip.

10 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Imagine what it was like for dinosaurs to roam the world. Helena illustrator and author Ted Rechlin’s graphic novel allows kids 6 and up to do just that – envision life 66 million years ago. The illustrated account is as much entertaining as it is educational.


PERSON OF INTEREST

BY CHARLI WHITE I PHOTOGRAPHY BY CASEY PAGE

MIKE BURTON

INSIGHTFUL LESSONS FROM A LIFETIME OLYMPIAN

I LOVE SPORTS BECAUSE THEY BUILD THE PSYCHOLOGICAL ENDURANCE THAT YOU NEED TO STICK IT THROUGH, THE EXACT SAME KIND OF MENTAL TOUGHNESS NEEDED TO GRADUATE.

“Once an Olympian, always an Olympian. Never ‘former’, never ‘past,’” are the words engraved on Billings resident Mike Burton’s keychain. Athletically-inclined at an early age, the sky was the limit for Burton. That is, until a bicycle accident – more specifically a head-on collision with a furniture truck – at age 13 left him out of commission with a dislocated hip and torn ligaments in his knee. Restricted from playing football and basketball due to the injuries he sustained, Burton fought his limitations once he recovered and instead focused on swimming. He soon excelled as a competitive long-distance swimmer in high school and college, quickly gaining notoriety as an athlete. His dedication was such that he was “never one for mediocrity.” Contending with the best of the best, he soon added “Olympian” to his repertoire of identities as a dedicated and formidable competitor, world record maker, teammate, student and son, to name a few. Of all of his titles, however, Burton says being a husband takes the cake. “Carol, my wife, really completes me. All other identities are secondary.”

A change of scenery On Burton’s right hand, he proudly sports a “Live United” bracelet representing United Way of Yellowstone County where his wife

harder,” said Burton. In 1998, Carol accepted a position with United Way

works. Having lived in multiple states and visited sev- in Billings, and the duo readily packed their bags for the eral countries, a fortuitous change of his wife’s employ- move farther inland. A warm welcome into the comment was what drew Burton, an Iowa native, to Mon- munity put the couple at ease and made for a smooth transition to Montana. tana. “We were living in Washington at the time, and I Cultivating determination told her [Carol] it’s time we pursued her career a little Now that he’s retired, Burton volunteers with United

12 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


Way. He connected his love of athletics with could give me that I couldn’t handle.” educational success.

Adventures and escapades

“I love sports because they build the psyBurton’s choice of work usually never chological endurance that you need to stick kept him far from the water. Upon arrivit through,” he said. “The exact same kind of ing in Billings, he coached swimming at mental toughness needed to graduate.”

the YMCA and later at Senior High School Burton recalled one of his defining in Billings for several years, investing time moments as an adolescent which impact- and expertise in younger swimmers. ed his athleticism toward feats of Olym-

Red, white and blue decorations swath pic proportions. One Saturday, his coach, the Burton household’s dinner table. SimSherm Chavoor – a former WWII pi- ilarly-colored 1972 Munich Olympics lot-turned-swimming instructor – had drinkware commemorates an exciting past kept the team in the pool later than the al- while grandchildren’s photos set around the lotted two-hour practice. A few teammates living room tell of a lively future. Burton complained, and Chavoor told the group to says he’s most passionate about spending swim a ‘fast 66.’

time with his kids and grandchildren, as

Most swimmers consider a fast 66 a tor- many reside in other parts of the U.S. turous distance to swim nonstop, the distance The same love that brought Burton to being roughly the equivalent of a mile. And Montana is also what keeps him here. Dethis was right after the team had just finished spite living in multiple states, Billings will a hard two hours of practice. Passing team- always be home base. mates left and right, Burton gave it his all.

“All of the places we’ve lived have had

“I was so shot afterward. I’ve never been their great points, but Billings is it for me that tired in my life, neither before nor after – no question,” Burton said. “We wish more that Saturday,” he smiled. “But I knew from of our friends would come and visit us here that point on that there was nothing Sherm because we love it so much.”

Auto Home Business Life Medicare Long Term Care Farm & Ranch Financial Services

Burton’s three gold medals feature the traditional portrayal of Nike – the Greek goddess of victory – waving the winner’s crown. However, the design returned to the event’s Grecian roots for the 2004 Athens Olympics, replacing a Roman coliseum background with the Panathenaic Stadium.

Roger L Daniel Insurance 2047 Broadwater 406-252-3411 rdaniel@farmersagent.com MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 13


GIVING BACK

BY CHARLI WHITE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY HANNAH POTES

In honor of the Billings Public Library’s bench unveiling, Tom and Robin Hanel brought their red Volkswagen to the event. The bench’s matching illustration of the classic car invites kids to marvel in a good read.

FILLING THE GAP PROMOTING LITERACY FOR ALL

“The 30-million word gap is often a major reason why children fall behind in their first years of school – they missed ‌There’s a veritable enemy afoot in Billings. Known as the the opportunity to hear 30 million words by the time they 30-million word gap, it fells troops wide and far every year in entered kindergarten,” Modrow said of the literacy phrase. its zeal to oppress reading literacy. This year, however, begins the Word craze slow-but-steady march to victory. Two grassroots reading programs still in their infancy are Forget the Knights of the Round currently making big strides in the Billings community. Table – two new programs in the Wild Words Literacy confronts the issue head-on. Maddie Billings community are leading Alpert is one of two AmeriCorps VISTA members responsible the battalion. for running the program. Launched in January through The Leslie Modrow, development Housing Authority of Billings, she says it’s specifically designed director for the Billings Public Library Foundation, points out to reach children ages 3-11 in public and Section 8 housing. the importance of combating the deficit. “It’s part of the Bringing School Home movement in which

14 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


housing authorities across the country are recognizing their unique potential to bring educational programs to children,” she explained. “Because of our close relationships with our tenants and our connection with their housing, we are uniquely situated to reach families that might not be reached by other community programs.” For qualifying children, Wild Words offers a variety of activities including drama and poetry workshops, artsand-crafts afternoons and fun-filled one-on-one tutoring sessions. The program has also hosted additional community events such as book-based movie nights, reading-based board game days and Arbor Day activities. Alpert says there’s no shortage of participation opportunities, even if someone doesn’t qualify for Wild Words’ tutoring program. Community events are open to families, and the organization warmly welcomes volunteers.

Making contributions count The Billings Public Library Foundation has also started a new fundraising initiative, First Chapter Society. A dues-based membership program, First Chapter

GET INVOLVED Want to volunteer for or financially support one of these programs? Check out the contact information below:

WILD WORDS LITERACY wildwordsmt.wordpress.com facebook.com/wildwordsmt 406-702-1625

FIRST CHAPTER SOCIETY billingslibraryfoundation.org 406-237-6149

Society focuses on promoting early childhood literacy. “We want to catch kids as fast as we can and educate parents to start reading to their children from the time they are weeks old,” Modrow said. “One way we accomplish this is by allocating the program’s funds toward promoting community outreach as well as purchasing books that parents and caregivers can read to their kids.” Future plans for the society include promoting reading and comprehension skills for seniors as well as technological literacy, especially with computers and the social media realm. The library staff and volunteers work tirelessly to take literacy programs above and beyond expectation. First Chapter Society is just one initiative which provides that margin of excellence and propels community involvement, she explained. Both Wild Words and Modrow Billings Public Library Foundation are passionate about engaging children and their families in a good story’s magic and filling a community need. Offering support makes a significant difference in closing the gap.

It’s the place you’ll call home. Our experienced staff can help you get the job done right. First-time home buying success—it’s you and together.

It’s more than

just a mortgage.

CINDY REISS, Manager - NMLS# 901291, Downtown, 255-5148 TIFFANY MCNEFF - NMLS# 707795, Downtown, 255-5185 NATALIE PIGG - NMLS# 298633, Downtown, 255-5156 SARA MAINS - NMLS# 707785, Downtown, 255-5177 TASHA STRAIGHT - NMLS# 1423330, Downtown, 255-5189 RACHEL OSBURN - NMLS# 943338, Central Avenue, 255-6109 YVONNE KELLY - NMLS# 523512, Grand, 255-6086 IAN ULLMAN - NMLS# 1427776, Grand, 255-6094 TERESA GILREATH - NMLS# 707960, Heights, 255-5833 ROBYN BARTA - NMLS# 609679, Shiloh, 255-5874 MARK HAMILTON - NMLS# 799688, Columbus, 255-6019

COMPETITIVE RATES • FIRST-TIME HOME BUYER PROGRAMS ONLINE APPLICATIONS • INSTANT PREQUALIFICATIONS • REFINANCING LOCAL PROCESSING, UNDERWRITING, AND CLOSING

firstinterstate.com

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 15


ARTIST LOFT

BY KORI WOOD I PHOTOGRAPHY BY LARRY MAYER

JERRY IVERSON THE FINAL EXPRESSION IS UNPREDICTABLE. ABSTRACTION IS UNPREDICTABLE.

COMMUNICATING THROUGH ART

‌Jerry Iverson creates art in a log cabin studio. The contents are in disarray. A broom looms in the background and one wonders if it’s ever been put to good use. It’s enough to drive a slightly compulsive person crazy. To the average beholder it’s chaos, but to the artist it’s stunning—a scene that perfectly illustrates Iverson’s artistic process. “Unpredictability. That’s a primary element of a lot of what I do,” he explained, “I start in a space and I don’t know where it’s going to go. The final expression is unpredictable. Abstraction is unpredictable.” Growing up on a small farm in South Dakota, Iverson had no interest in being an artist. That passion came later, after college, when he hitchhiked across the country. These impromptu road trips often landed him in big cities where he visited museums. Even after being inspired by the art-

16 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

A mixed-media collection, Jerry Iverson’s most current works feature sumi ink to create bold, black lines. Regularly used in Asian calligraphy, the ink adds a decisiveness to the lines, giving them the appearance of the written word. work, it would be several years before he started to make art at 35-years-old. Iverson studied philosophy in college. As a young adult, he found himself working on a ranch outside Big Timber during the summers. Captivated with the seclusion of small


town Montana, Iverson relocated to Big Timber after graduating. He just needed to find a job. “I ended up going to shearing school in New Zealand. It was a well-paid profession that allowed me to live in a rural situation and have adventures the rest of the year,” he said. Iverson found living and working in a country setting rewarding. The lucrative job gave him access to the solitude that he loved so much and allowed him to journey across the country. Yet, the lifestyle was also rough. Iverson worked with a small group of people whose ideas often clashed with his own. As a result of the barriers, his creativity began to emerge. He created his first drawings and found he had a talent balancing quotidian subjects with nonrepresentational art, what he describes as “the intersection of everyday life and abstraction.” “I felt like it was hard to communicate. I couldn’t say what I wanted to say or express myself because our views were so different. I had time on my hands and I was inspired by the dramatic beauty and harshness of wilderness,” he said of the challenges of rural life, “I started drawing pictures and making art at sheep camp. I would draw pictures of a horse or a mountain or a tree—everyday objects of the world around me.” Art helped Iverson convey his ideas. Today, language

and expression continue to be underlining themes in Iverson’s work. His most recent Language Series collection utilizes abstract art to explore life’s ubiquitous problem: communication breakdowns. A mixed-media collection, his most current works feature sumi ink to create bold, black lines. Regularly used in Asian calligraphy, the ink adds a decisiveness to the lines, giving them the appearance of the written word. The defined lines lead the eye to familiar structures such like an a or a v. Iverson’s use of textures adds uncertainty to the work, highlighting a lack of semantic meaning. “The main message is that communication is difficult. You get the sense that there is an attempt to communicate something but you don’t know what,” he clarifies. When Iverson decides on an idea for a series, he examines all sides of the issue and the development often spans a number of years. He completed the Language Series over a 10-year period. “Part of my philosophy background is to analyze arguments. You have to examine all the different sides and subtle differences in the argument,” he said. Studying all areas of an issue makes Iverson’s art thought-provoking. After all, the subtle difference in dialects, writing and phrasing makes language and communication colorful.

COURTESY PHOTO‌

Jerry Iverson’s Untitled 45

Animal Clinic of Billings

and

Animal Surgery Clinic of Billings • Medical • Grooming Services • Spinal Surgery • Dental • Physical • Wellness Rehabilitation • Injuries • Emergency Service • Stem Cell Therapy • New Patients • General Surgery Welcome • Orthopedics • Referrals Welcome • Special Diagnostic, Imaging & Surgery Ken Brown, DVM • Darleen Miller, DVM • Bryna Felchle, DVM Bobbi Jo Lund, DVM • Christiane Youngstrom, DVM Kay Lynn Allen, Canine Rehabilitation Therapist Donna Rae Alexander, Professional Groomer 24-Hour

406.252.9499 1414 10th St. W. • Billings 1/2 Block North of Grand Ave. on 10th St. W.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 17


ELEMENTS

BY TARA CADY & CHARLI WHITE I PHOTOGRAPHY BY HANNAH POTES

GO FOR THE GOLD PLEDGE YOUR ALLEGIANCE TO THESE OLYMPIC ESSENTIALS LET IT SHINE

Light up the night with more than just fireworks. These sturdy, bold letters are the perfect décor to show your team spirit.

Available at Michaels $60

HATS OFF!

Montana is part of what makes America great. Take cover from the sun in a stylish hat made by Montana Shirt Company. It’s the best way keep cool, both literally and figuratively.

Available at The Northern Boutique $29

MAKE A SPLASH

Maybe you can’t swim like an Olympian, but you can surely try with these patriotic trunks. There’s nothing more American than spending an afternoon swimming, grilling and toasting to your country.

Available at Scheels $25

18 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

SAUNTER WITH SWANK Add some fun to your footwear with these striped flip-flops by SO. Slide them on for a lazy day at the lake or the pool.

Available at Kohl’s $14


RIO REIMAGINED

JUNE - AUGUST

Join Mario and Sonic the Hedgehog as they compete in the 2016 Olympic Games with events like soccer, rugby and beach volleyball. Available for both Nintendo WiiU and 3DS gaming devices, it’s time to reenact your favorite events with family. Who said competition had to be friendly?

Available at Target $40-60

LOVIN’ LEG DAY Sport your 406 pride in a trendy Montana Shirt Company top. Available for both men and women, these tanks and tees beg to be flaunted.

Pull on these punchy red, white and blue Under Armour leg warmers and limber up for your next dance routine. Wearing a color palette that oozes national pride, you can take your athleticism as seriously as your patriotism.

Available at The Northern Boutique $26-29

Available at Scheels $25

PATRIOTIC TO A ‘T’

3 MONTH MEMBERSHIP

AS LOW AS:

119

$

.00

(JUNE - AUGUST)

NO JOINING FEE & NO PROCESSING FEE FOR NEW MEMBERS

NEW EXPRESS LOCATION

GET YOUR KICKS

OPENING JULY 1

Do Routes 66 and 90 carry special meaning for you? Wrap these national symbols around your neck and maybe they’ll spark a conversation about your next road trip.

BILLINGS’ PREMIER

Available at Joy of Living $42

NEW: 15 Avanta Way, Ste A, 406-294-1900 3838 Ave B, 406-294-5040 1323 Main St, Ste A, 406-252-7737

Full Service Health Club NOW WITH THREE Convenient Locations

VOTED BEST FITNESS FACILITY









granitebillings.com

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 19


MEDIA ROOM

BY TARA CADY

BOOK

WRECKED IN YELLOWSTONE

MUSIC

THE STORY OF YOU A trio of men residing in both Billings and Red Lodge make up the reggae, folk and hip-hop ensemble Satsang. Named after the East Asian word for a spiritual gathering of truths, the band’s lyrics touch on mindfulness, growth and change while inspiring followers country-wide with their new album, The Story of You. Available at satsangmovement.com

DVD

TOUCH THE WALL Can’t get enough of the Olympic Games this summer? Watch Touch the Wall, a true-story based on Olympic medalists Missy Franklin and Kara Lynn Joyce’s rise to swimming fame. As one’s career ends and the other’s begins, the 2012 London Olympics were a bittersweet moment for the duo and their encouraging coach. Available on iTunes, Amazon Instant Video and Google Play

WEB ED

MEME GENERATOR

Journalist Mike Stark captures the untold story of businessman E. C. Waters, who settled down in Yellowstone National Park in 1886. Follow along as Waters’ intense presence and zany ambitions to build a grand steamboat challenged the calmness of the park in its early days. Available at riverbendpublishing.com

20 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Think you’re as funny as those who write the comic strips in the Sunday paper? Try your hand at creating your own meme with MemeCrunch’s Meme Generator. Slap a silly message onto your best friend’s photo for a good laugh on social media. Who knows, your meme might go viral. Available on iTunes and Google Play


Many people know Freyenhagen Construction for the remarkable remodels we complete—but that’s just the beginning of the value we deliver our customers. We believe in making the entire process as easy as possible, including the design of your new kitchen, master suite or addition. That’s why when you choose to have us complete your remodeling project, you have access to a team of designers with the knowledge, skill and ability to bring your vision for your new space to life. In our newly expanded showroom, they'll help you see how your new space will look and give you the opportunity to select everything from beautiful cabinetry to finishes that reflect your personal style, all in one one place. Most importantly, they’ll make sure you have an exceptional experience every step of the way.

(406) 652-6170 1343 Broadwater Avenue Billings, MT 59102 www.FreyenhagenConstruction.com

DESIGN-BUILD

KITCHEN REMODELS

COMPLETE HOME

BASEMENT REDESIGN

CUSTOM INTERIOR & EXTERIORS


FINE LIVING

GREAT ESTATES

Rusted sheets of metal. Boards of shiplap. Rough-hewn lumber reclaimed from beetle kill and barn wood. Each individual element, a plethora of materials and years of anticipation came together to create

The Porch House.

But more than a house, this home is an all-encompassing

Labor of Love. It stands

and unconditional as a testimony to dedication and vision.

 BY BRENDA MAAS I PHOTOGRAPHY BY LARRY MAYER


The home was designed for simple living with friends and family. “This house is for them,” said the homeowner, referring to their extended and growing family, “It’s not about the building, it’s what you do in that building that counts.”


1 Known informally as the “porch

    €Â?€­ ­  Â?Â?   

house,� this ultra-efficient home sits atop a hill overlooking the Stillwater River. Less than three years old, it was designed and built to look like it had weathered time and housed generations. With 360-degree views of six mountain ranges, rivers and rolling foothills, the placement is strategic. Yet there is so much more to this simple abode than what meets the eye. For years, the Billings-area professionals-turned-empty-nesters dreamed of a place where they could congregate, carefree, with their adult children and growing families – a gathering place for focusing on each other instead of the minutia around them. A 10-acre parcel outside of Columbus, nestled in the foothills at the end of the road seemed the ideal location.

2

Â?  Â?  Â?       

 

24 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


3 4

1. The kitchen wraps around the corner, creating a modified galley floor plan. Open shelving gives easy access while also morphing utilitarian pieces into art. The traditional subway tile backsplash mimics the shiplap walls, providing a strong contrast with the barn wood siding above. 2. Looking at the main living area from the loft, the simple-yet-efficient layout is dominated by airiness from the open space, plethora windows, immense ceiling height and multiple accesses to outdoors. The massive 48-star flag flew over the homeowner’s father’s home and easily portrays classic Americana. 3. Like most of the light fixtures inside and outside the house, the homeowners dug around and found inexpensive models. Several were located at a farm supply store. 4. In addition to the loft space, the upstairs houses the master suite. Not large by today’s standards, the room and next-door bath include all the necessary elements. “I’m the queen of compaction,” joked the homeowner about her ability to use each space effectively and efficiently. There are very few swing doors in the home; pocket-style doors use much less space.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 25


1 But there was one problem — no accessible water. The homeowners, who already had their plans and layout in mind, turned to Randy Hafer of High Plains Architects for assistance. A life-long devotee to conservation and simplistic living, Hafer guided the plans, which included SIPs (structurally insulated panels) for an ultra-tight, high-performance construction plus a rain-catch system to alleviate the water issue. As a result the home is so tight that in three years, the homeowners have not needed to use the backup heat source. The home has no HVAC system but rather uses its efficient construction, solar gain and natural air flow to regulate temperature. A wood stove in the great room adds ambiance plus heat on chilly days. Although Mike Handley Construction built the home, the homeowners themselves served as general contractors and, in fact, contributed their own sweat equity on many levels. For example, using vinegar, hydrogen peroxide and salt they “rusted” each individual sheet of metal on the exterior. “I was looking for that rustic feel,” the homeowner said. “We were trying to achieve something a bit more unique.” Additionally, the metal siding, fascia, soffits and roof not only add to the home’s aesthetics but also increase its ability to retard fires, as does the cleared zone around the property. They added rock borders to paths and beds for heat-tolerant plantings and sedges, which allows the minimal landscaping to naturally meld with the untouched sections of the property.

1. The upstairs of the bunkhouse sleeps at least six with a small adjoining bath. The blue French doors seem to bring the sky inside. 2. The homeowners commissioned a few local youth to deconstruct and salvage corrugated steel from a corn silo and used it as paneling on the ceiling and walls of the dance hall. The Montana and Texas state flags demonstrate the homeowners’ heritage and favored album covers were framed to set the authentic musical vibe. “You learn to get creative when you are on a budget,” said the homeowner of her propensity to reuse otherwise neglected items in decorating. 3. The bunkhouse-turned-dance-hall sits apart from the main home, creating its own presence without competing with the other structure.

green BUILDING IS THE NEW

BLACK

V Visit our Showroom and FFeel the Difference!

3039 Grand Ave. Billings, MT • (406) 656-9091 • MontanaWindowAndDoor.com

26 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


music as muse

2

The bunkhouse, originally known as Phase II, was recently completed. It marries the family’s love of music with the need for additional private and sleeping space. And, most importantly, it houses a dance hall. Once again, the homeowner designed and served as general contractor and Mark Crago of Broken Wire Fence brought the structure to life. “I could picture in my mind what I wanted, and I just had to articulate that,” she said. The lower level serves as garage for vehicles with rear storage areas. But more frequently than not, the homeowners pull up the overhead door, move the cars out and turn on the music. “We love to dance and there’s nothing better than a good, old-fashioned swing dance,” said the owner. They both grew up in Texas but moved to, and fell in love with, Montana 26 years ago. While that was years ago and hundreds of miles away, the couple has retained that musical love throughout their marriage and with their family, transferring it into a venue under Montana’s Big Sky.

It’s your home, at last.

Once you find that perfect place to call home, the next important decision is the financing. So many mortgage options, so little time. We get that. Our goal is to partner with you to help guide you through the loan process and find the best financing to fit your needs. We’ve got the experience and mortgage products that will have you moving into your new home, at last. Call today, and put my knowledge to work for you.

KIMBERLY MACDONALD Mortgage Loan Originator 6 24th Street West Billings MT 59102 Direct: 406.655.1699 Cell: 406.861.0052 kimberly.macdonald@usbank.com NMLS#: 470804

usbank.com/mortgage

3 EQUAL HOUSING

Visit usbank.com to learn more about U.S. Bank products and services. Deposit Products are offered through U.S. Bank National Association, Member FDIC. Mortgage products offered by U.S. Bank National Association. ©2014 U.S. Bank Association. ©2014 U.S. Bank, Member FDIC.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 27


1

When it comes to life outdoors, nothing outperforms the world’s #1 decking brand. Only Trex® is engineered to eliminate time-consuming maintenance while providing superior scratch, fade and stain resistance. So when the time comes to build your next deck, make sure it’s Trex®. Classic Earth Tones

Premium Tropicals

Hardwood Floor Installation Refinish & Restore Solid Wood Installation Over Radiant Floor Heat Swedish No-Wax Finishes Quality Material From the Finest Mills

SOFT TOUCH DESIGNS, INC.

FFree Estimates

Quality Hardwood Floors

Dennis SSharbono WE GIVE IT THE SOFT TOUCH! 24 Years Experience Come Visit Our Showroom:

10056 South Frontage Rd. Billings • softtouchdesigns.net

656-3613

Toll Free 1-866-255-3390

Billings

1009 Mullowney Lane 406-256-0740

Laurel

501 E Main 406-628-8224


1. A sitting area in the loft creates a quiet nook to read, relax or, strangely enough, watch a movie. The homeowner conceptualized and custom-ordered a plexi-glass rail-wall for the loft instead of a traditional solid half-wall. A screen, which is discretely hidden above the massive flag, rolls down for movie night. 2. The home’s spiral stairs are simply stained and occasionally treated with wax, gaining a patina with use and age. The handrail was conceptualized by the homeowner. 3. The wall leading up the stairs features a guitar from Asleep at the Wheel, a gift to the homeowner. Several of the homeowners’ children play the guitar, as does one of the homeowners who learned to play as an adult.

2

Looking to buy or sell the finest real estate that Billings has to offer?

CALL RON THOM. Your agent for the Magic City’s most beautiful homes.

3

406.860.1284 Inside the rustic vibe gives way to a vintage-cottage-turned-Pottery-Barn atmosphere. Despite looking like something from a high-end magazine spread, the homeowner stresses that they completed the home on a strict budget. “That’s important for people to know; we saved a lot of money doing things our-

selves,” she said. “This is our dream and hard work made it happen.” During the course of nine months, the couple spent nights after work and entire weekends preparing the metal siding, priming and painting each piece of shiplap and hand-tiling the hexagon flooring and subway tiles of the baths and kitchen backsplash.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 29


1

1. The homeowners frequently watch storms from their home’s porch. With views for miles in every direction, rainbows are a common sight. 2. The cozy main-floor guest room fills with morning light. A pair of leather armchairs, positioned to take advantage of the view near the porch door, gives visitors a private place to relax, read or just take in the sights. The homeowner, who frequently entertains those from outof-state, leaves subtle touches of Montana throughout the room. “I layer over time,” the homeowner says of her decorating style. 3. The wall leading up the stairs features a guitar from Asleep at the Wheel, a gift to the homeowner. Several of the homeowners’ children play the guitar, as does one of the homeowners who learned to play as an adult.

30 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

2


Uniting Buyers & Sellers Since 1959

Sali Armstrong 406.698.2520

Chris Barndt 406.698.8163

Kelly Bohnet Erickson 406.861.5335

Victoria Brauer-Konitz 406.855.2856

Bobbie Brekhus 406.591.4550

Brooke Buchanan 406.860.4209

Stella Ossello Burke 406.690.9955

Maya Burton 406.591.0106

Diana Carroll 406.861.0059

Steven Caton 406.855.9109

Phil Cox 406.670.4782

Melissa Crook 406.200.5819

Nancy Curtiss 406.696.2434

Travis Dimond 406.927.8724

Lance Egan 406.698.0008

Myles Egan 406.855.0008

CC Egeland 406.690.1843

Jim Flynn 406.647.4309

Karen Frank 406.698.0152

Darwin George 406.764.4663

Janice Gill 406.672.8091

Rhonda Grimm 406.661.7186

Toni Hale 406.690.3181

Mark Hardin 406.208.5118

Rochelle Houghton 406.697-6878

Clint Kelly 406.698.7205

Amy Kraenzel 406.591.2370

Larry Larsen 406.672.7884

Sheila Larsen 406.672.1130

Susan B. Lovely 406.698.1601

Marie McHatton 406.672.8532

Don Moseley 406.860.2618

Ginger Nelson 406.697.4667

Jase Norsworthy 406.690.8480

Cal Northam 406.696.1606

Mimi Parkes 406.698.6980

Courtney Pope 406.670.9512

Gregory Propp 406.647.5858

Martha Ridgway 406.208.4658

Eileen SheltonThompson 406.698.6468

Bryan Somers 406.647.0155

Ron Thom 406.860.1284

Justine Timmons 406.839.5860

Ed Workman 406.690.0567

The Dolan Team

Bill Dolan 406.860.5575

Anita Dolan 406.860.5576

The Gina

& Cheryl Team

Gina Moore 406.545.9036

Cheryl Burows 406.698.7423

The Hanel Team

Tom Hanel 406.690.4448

Robin Hanel 406.860.6181

The Patterson Team

Dan Patterson 406.321.4182

Stephanie Patterson 406.321.0759

The Schindele Team

Pat Schindele Glenn McFarlane 406.591.2551 406.670.2202

406.254.1550 | 1550 Poly Drive, Billings | 444 N 9th St. Suite 5, Columbus | 111 S Broadway Suite C, Red Lodge Š 2016 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchise of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America Inc.Ž Equal Housing Opportunity.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 31


1 They dug through the scrap piles at

Magic City Granite for flawed pieces to fit the compact bathroom vanities. One piece was perfect except for an unusable section in the middle of the panel – which is where they cut out the hole for the sink bowl. They covered $15 hollow-core doors from the Habitat ReStore with barn wood to save money yet still maintain the home’s style. Ingenuity, creativity and love extends beyond the actual structure to the furnishings and accessories. In the master bedroom, the homeowner used chalk paint and elbow grease to enliven an Art Deco dresser and side table, and she split a leftover piece of rough-hewn wood to make two long, bistro-height tables. “I like the idea that you don’t just go to a store and buy something. We worked hard to make this happen,” said the homeowner. “When you are in the throes of it, it’s tough. But when it all comes together and your family is here, it’s all worth it.”

Blending current pieces with vintage for a

...timeless look!

2

Pop in for the perfect gift or let us help you find that distinctive accessory for your home.

Custom Landscaping Patios Outdoor Living

652-5337

springcreeklandscape.com

32 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Collector pieces from Big Sky Carvers, Kelly Rae Roberts, Gypsy Soule & much more.

Columbus, Montana Store Hours

406-322-6204 637 N. 9th St. Ste. 150 montanarusticaccents.com

Mon–Sat, 10am–5pm Sunday 12-4 pm

1. The main room of the 1,350-square-foot house is simple and to the point. The homeowner painstakingly primed and painted each piece of shiplap siding, which emits a vintage farmhouse vibe. As empty-nesters with a love of the outdoors, they opt to simply eat at the hand-made log counter that separates the kitchen space from the living space. Larger groups dine in the bunkhouse. 2. One of the homeowners’ dogs, named Arlo Guthrie, begs to be let in. “You can’t hurt these floors,” said the homeowner of the luxury vinyl tile (LVT) floors, which look like rough-hewn wood planks. Selected for durability, the floors tolerate dogs, kids, weather and the like.


hidden paradise BY CHARLI WHITE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY CASEY PAGE

“However many years she lived, Mary always felt that ‘she should never forget that first morning when her garden began to grow’.” From The Secret Garden

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 33


Plants of assorted heights such as salvia, red and yellow yarrow and a few varieties of sedge grass add graduated texture to each section of the backyard.

T

his uniquely-crafted outdoor area has been shaped by tender care similar to that proffered by the young protagonist in Frances Hodgson Burnett’s well-known novel. Having now arrived at the ‘flourishing’ stages, it seems hard to believe that even this beautifully matured garden in downtown Billings once began as fledgling flora. A close-up look reveals thoughtful details that anyone can appreciate. Currently in its full glory, vivacious blooms spread their petals and spill abundant foliage beyond ceramic pot corrals and wooden edging. Potted cacti and other small succulents grace distressed-wood shelves. A hum of bees busily flit from purple coneflower to groups of generously planted red yarrow. Lamb’s ear and delicate woolly thyme provide ample ground cover and add soft scent to the space. Many folks might overlook a seemingly unusable galley-style

34 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Above: Glass bottles buried upside-down make for a textured, appealing walkway. Inset: The purple coneflower’s warm coloring provides a lovely contrast to all of the greenery.


LITTLE GIRAFFE A L w A y s A F A vo R I T E

Above: A rust-red sign reads “Royal Crown Cola,� and a combination of lateseason irises and roses adds grandeur to the simple entrance of this backyard building. Left: Hydrangeas and impatiens fill the galley-style space with vibrant color.

Left: Tucked between two garden sections, this oversized flat seating arrangement is the perfect space to relax with a good read and glass of your favorite summer refreshment. Right: A smattering of woolly thyme spices up backyard manhole covers while keeping the lines easily accessible.

DOWNTOWN

502 N 30TH | 245-6434

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 35


Landscaping Artisans

Design & LanDscape construction

Above: The outdoor furniture’s soft oranges and earthy neutrals neatly complement the hardy terra cotta planters, balancing to the patio area. Left: Crycosmia’s eye-catching flaming red flowers make this assemblage come to life. nook tucked out of sight behind a small shed, but not these landscape-savvy homeowners. Creamy white hydrangeas and pink impatiens pour over a zigzag-patterned walkway composed of glass bottles buried upside-down, strongly conveying that size does not dictate significance. The curious admirer can’t help but stop and smell the roses – along with other fragrant flowers. Youthful delight awaits the captive audience casually perusing the varied sections. Charming beauty abounds here – a secluded oasis carefully framed by curving boxwood hedges.

nurserY & garDen center

7900 S. Frontage Road • 656-2410 2147 Poly Drive • 656-5501

www.billingsnursery.com “Like” us on

for upcoming events and promotions

36 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Potted cacti and other small succulents grace the distressedwood shelves.


FINE LIVING

SUMMER SIPPERS & LIGHTER FARE BY BRENDA MAAS & TARA CADY PHOTOS BY CASEY PAGE & TAILYR IRVINE Late summer in Montana is a season to be relished. Tasted. Swirled a bit and savored. When the heat of the day slowly releases its grasp and the last dredges of sunlight blink away, few experiences match kicking back on a patio and soaking it all in with little thought for tomorrow. This is truly living in the moment. And for that instant in time we have one word: Cheers.

EPICURE/LIBATIONS


FINE LIVING

EPICURE/LIBATIONS

bistecca at the granary Take one great gathering space, add some shade plus an open-air bar. The results: a summer venue where it can be difficult to score a table – likely because those who have one are enjoying themselves too much to move along. A long-time Billings’ fav, this patio has recently been re-invented with an appetizer and drink menu to match. Time to settle in, peruse your selections and prepare to be impressed.

38 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


GRILLED LOBSTER WRAPS‌ Ingredients for filling‌

2 lobsters (5 to 6 oz.), grilled, steamed or sautéed 1/2 pt. cherry tomatoes, halved 1 c. corn 1 avocado, diced

3 green onions, biased sliced 1 head of butter lettuce Splash of lime juice

Directions‌ Grill tails on high for four minutes per side. Chill completely, then chop meat and mix with corn and tomatoes. Reserve remainder of ingredients as a garnish.

Ingredients for dressing‌ 2 T. cilantro, chopped 2 T. Dijon mustard 1 t. sriracha 2 T. lemon juice 1 T. white wine vinegar 1/2 c. olive oil

Directions‌ Add first five items and blend with emulsion blender. Slowly pour oil into ingredients while using emulsion blender on high. Next, wash butter lettuce, drain and plate. Assemble appetizer using leaves as “boats” or wraps and placing scoop of filling on each leaf, and add garnishes.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 39


FINE LIVING

EPICURE/LIBATIONS

CRAB CAKES‌ Ingredients‌ 2 eggs 3/4 c. mayonnaise 1T. Old Bay seasoning 1-1/2 T. lemon juice 2 t. lemon pepper

2 t. garlic, granulated 1-1/2 t. oregano, chopped 1-1/2 c. Japanese bread crumbs 2-lb. 4 oz. crab meat Yield: 20 or more cakes

Directions‌ Mix the first seven ingredients in a large mixing bowl until well incorporated. Gently fold in the bread crumbs and crab meat, being careful to not break up the large lumps. The mix will hold in refrigerator for five days. Portion into 2-oz. patties (for 20 cakes or larger). Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cook each patty using a large frying pan. Add cakes to the heated pan and sear the first side. Use a thin spatula (i.e., fish spatula) to turn the cakes. After two minutes, flip and place into oven for four to five minutes. Remove from oven and let rest. Assemble on plate with lemon garnish.

40 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


CUCUMBER CITRUS COOLER‌

A vojito sans mint, this refreshing patio cocktail beats the heat and keeps it classy with a sassy mix of sweet and tang. Ingredients‌ 1 lime wedge 1 lemon wedge 2 slices of cucumber 1.25 oz. Pearl cucumber-flavored

vodka Ice Club soda 7-Up

Directions‌ Start with tall glass. Place lime and lemon wedges in glass plus two slices of cucumber. Add cucumber vodka, then fill glass with ice. Finish with equal parts club soda and 7-Up.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 41


jake’s bar & grill A popular West End location since 2009, this patio offers deep shade, convenient location and an abundance of class. Stop for an adult beverage or stay for a meal. There’s a good chance you will encounter someone you know.

WAR HORSE MARTINI

Just like Joan of Arc, this beverage is bold and steadfast. Are you brave enough to try it? Ingredients 1.5 oz. citrus vodka 1 slice jalapeño pepper .5 oz. lime juice

.5 oz. simple syrup .5 oz. strawberry purée

Directions Drop jalapeño slice into shaker tin with lime juice and simple syrup. Muddle, then fill tin with ice. Add citrus vodka and strawberry purée. Shake and pour it into a sugared rim glass. Garnish with another pepper if you like extra kick.

42 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


FINE LIVING

EPICURE/LIBATIONS

doc harper’s

GARDEN GIN & TONIC

The epitome of long, hot days – the G’n’T – gets turned on its head and packs a punch. Thirsty, anyone?

Although relatively new (by Montana standards) this

Ingredients

downtown bar has rapidly

1.5 oz. Whyte Laydie gin (or your favorite) .5 oz. dry vermouth 2 dashes orange bitters Tonic water Fruit varieties (cucumber, lemon, lime,

solidified its status in the heart of the city. With a new sidewalk patio, patrons can

grapefruit and berries)

see – and be seen –on

Directions

bustling Broadway Avenue.

Fill large wine goblet with garnishes. Add ice. Combine spirits and bitters in glass and top with tonic water. Add garnish for both color and flavor.

Serving martinis – and much more – Doc’s should be a

PHOTO ON PAGE 37

sure stop on the patio circuit.

SUMMER SANGRIA

Just the “sangria” evokes the vibe of summer. Because this recipe makes an entire pitcher – and because cocktails are best enjoyed with friends – be sure to invite your peeps to the patio. Ingredients 2 oz. sugar 10 Bordeaux cherries 1 lemon 1 orange 1 lime

1 bottle of dry red wine 4 oz. brandy (or favorite spirit) 4 oz. triple sec 2 oz. lemon juice concentrate 3 oz. orange juice Yield: one pitcher

Directions In large pitcher, mix all liquid ingredients and sugar. Refrigerate overnight for best results. To serve, add a few ice cubes to wine glass (if desired). Pour sangria in glass, leaving space to top with soda water and garnishes of your choice. We favor one of each.

HOME LOAN SOLUTIONS Purchasing • Refinancing g • Building • Remodelin ng •

Call Sam Van Dyke for your Real Estate Needs!

Sam Van Dyke Home Loan Consultant

NMLS# 776569

248-1127

www.billingsfcu.org 760 Wicks Lane • 2522 4th Ave. N • 32nd & King Ave. W

44 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


STEPHEN MATHER

BY JOHN CLAYTON

AND THE FOUNDING OF THE

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

FILE PHOTO

100 years of brand, strategy and selfless service his year, during the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, we’re hearing quite a bit about America’s most-loved bureaucracy. What we don’t often hear is that its 1916 founding was a masterstroke in communications strategy – a historical episode where great public relations created lasting societal benefits. On 14 occasions between 1872 and 1916, Congress had seen an extraordinary landscape and decided to set it aside. But these “National Parks,” commissioned one-by-one, lacked much of a plan. Who would run the parks? With what funding? With what goals? Policies varied across parks— and then also across 22 national monuments, which bore many similarities to parks but were created by the President rather than Congress.

46 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


Above left: Stephen Mather, the first National Park Service Director, tightly controlled the selection of new parks, demanding that they meet the highest standards of scenery. Above right: Superintendent Horace Albright and Mather beside a National Park Service Packard in 1924. NPS PHOTOS

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 47


Mather appreciated that even those who saw Glacier, Mount Rainier or Yosemite (like those pictured in 1890 camping in Yosemite) in smaller doses found the experience worthwhile—certainly worth having the government assign some funds to their upkeep. NPS PHOTO For example, Yellowstone was the first national park, but the total budgeted for its first five years was zero dollars. Then its early administrators proved both corrupt and ineffective at stopping poachers. So park administration was turned over to the military, which did an admirable job, but should the military manage all parks? Others, such as Glacier, used different schemes. After war started in Europe in 1914, military leaders wondered if managing a corner of northwest Wyoming should be among their priorities. Meanwhile, a movement called See America First was drumming up domestic tourism. Railroads and other tourism promoters suggested that people with the resources to experience cultural wonders should do so on their own continent before traveling to Europe. The movement gained force when the European war closed off many traditional continental sites. National parks faced a potential influx of tourists, including many using the new technology of the automobile. How could the parks be retrofitted to accommodate new transportation technology? As one early Park Service leader wrote of a 1917 visit to Yellowstone: “Everywhere you looked, there were piles of outmoded coaches, horse trappings,…abandoned camps, old stables, and disintegrating tent cities.” It was obvious that the nation’s parks in the

48 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Yellowstone was established as the first national park in 1872. Here is the north entrance arch in 1924. 1910s had been neglected for so long that they were going to need some polish to regain the jewel-like status they deserved. But who would supply the vision – much less the money – for the future of these administrative stepchildren?

Steve Mather’s quest Stephen T. Mather was a tall, lithe man with piercing blue eyes, prematurely white hair and a ruddy complexion. Although deeply driven and inwardly restless, he was outwardly amiable, gracious and charming. His constant en-

thusiasm earned him the nickname “the Eternal Freshman.” By his mid-40s he earned a fortune in borax, a mineral useful in water softening, eyewash and skin creams. Although today mostly limited to industrial uses, borax 100 years ago was a housewife’s staple. During a midlife crisis, Mather found that what he truly loved was camping in the wilderness. But on his horse-packing trips in the mountains near Yosemite and Mount Rainier, he got fed up with poor trails and swarms of cattle. In 1914 he complained, and Mather soon found himself invited to improve the parks’ management. It was the height of the Progressive Era, when a growing belief in creating government institutions to improve the lives of everyday people led to the founding of agencies such as the Federal Reserve and Federal Trade Commission. Mather became a leader in the movement to provide national parks with similarly-coordinated, professional management. Mather took a year in Washington to lobby Congress. He enlisted support from Progressives, conservationists, automobilists and railroad owners. He wined and dined every mover and shaker he could find. In the book Steve Mather of the National Parks, Robert Shankland quoted a contemporary saying that Mather “combined the zeal of an agitator with a charm and graciousness I’ve rarely seen equaled.”


Mather’s mercurial salesmanship was aided by the meticulous efficiency of his young assistant, Horace Albright. Because Albright later succeeded Mather (and wrote memoirs about their time together), the two men’s partnership has been often and justly celebrated. But in 1915–16 a third member of their team was perhaps equally important. His name was Robert Sterling Yard. Yard had been the best man at Mather’s wedding, after the two worked together as young journalists for the New York Sun. Yard remained in journalism and publishing, as editor of Century Magazine and the Sunday New York Herald, and vice-president of the Moffat Yard publishing firm. In addition to a great network, Yard was blessed with an ability to generate lots of words quickly. Mather lured him to Washington to enlist those skills on behalf of the parks.

A sense of purpose Mather’s genius in the borax business had been to focus on marketing. Other borax producers saw themselves as mining companies, dragging the mineral out from the ground at inhospitable locations such as California’s Death Valley. Mather focused instead on customer relationships with the product. He capitalized on publicity stunts such as letters that he would ghostwrite from housewives to women’s magazines, and contests in which he asked homemakers to invent new uses for his product. Playing up the romance of mining, he changed his product’s brand name to “TwentyMule-Team Borax,” giving him an excuse to tell the story of its first Death Valley mine, where wagons weighing 35 tons were pulled by a team of 18 mules and two horses a total of 165 miles to the nearest railhead. (Part of the problem was that in the desert, they had to carry enough

FILE PHOTOS

Important dates in the history of national parks 1872: Yellowstone established as the world’s first national park

1906: Antiquities Act allows a President to establish national monuments 1886: Military takes over management without Congressional action; early monuments include Big Hole Battlefield of Yellowstone NP and the Grand Canyon (which, like sev1890: Yosemite, which was set aside eral other monuments, later became by Congress as a state reserve in 1864, a park) becomes a national park. Also established this year: Sequoia and General 1910: Glacier NP established Grant (now Kings Canyon) NPs 1916: National Park Service established to manage parks and monuments 1899: Mount Rainier NP established

1929: Grand Teton NP established 1933: A re-organization transfers numerous parks and monuments from the War Department and Forest Service to the Park Service, which expands its mission from scenery to also include history

was renamed Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in 1991. 2013: Pinnacles NP, in the California Coastal range, becomes the newest national park

2016: Castle Mountains National Monument, in the Mojave Desert, becomes 1946: Custer Battlefield National Mon- the newest unit of the National Park ument established. It had been Custer Service National Cemetery since 1879, and

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 49


water to survive the trip.) People loved and remembered the story, and when they went to the store they bought the package illustrated with a 20-mule-team wagon. Mather saw his job with the parks as similar to his job with borax: the most important function was marketing – using stories to demonstrate to people that their lives really needed the experience of visiting one or more national parks. Mather hoped that they would get out in the backcountry on lavishly catered two-week adventures like his own. But he appreciated that even those who saw Glacier, Mount Rainier or Yosemite in smaller doses found the experience worthwhile – certainly worth having the government assign some funds for the parks’ upkeep. To shape the parks’ public image this way, Bob Yard pitched, placed and frequently wrote himself more than 1,000 newspaper and magaAbove: Stephen Mather zine articles about the parks’ scenic beauty. Publications as diverse as Nation’s Business, American Motorist and several women’s magazines were suddenly celebrating the benefits of visiting a park. Some of Yard’s articles promoted a celebrity who personified the parks – the handsome, manly Mather. Yard’s strategy, which has since become far more common, was to make the parks’ case to the middle classes so that they would tell Congress to create –and fund – a National Park Service. Yard and Mather also made their case directly to policymakers. In April of 1916, National Geographic magazine did a special issue on AmeriHorace Albright, National Park Service Director ca – mostly on the national parks – and Mather (former Yellowstone Superintendent) sitting at a gave a copy to every member of Congress. He desk in Mammoth Hot Springs in 1933. took several influential Congressmen on pack trips in the Sierras to see the magnificent coun- had blessed America with a culture just as rich try firsthand. Mather even paid for those trips and valid as Europe’s. Preserving that natural himself. culture, Mather and Yard argued, should be the purpose of the national parks. As marketers, Mather and Yard downplayed Scenery as culture any problems in the parks, which were often unYard’s most memorable venture was the Na- derstaffed, underfunded and riddled with polittional Parks Portfolio, a collection of nine photo- ical patronage. (At Glacier, the story went, one graph-heavy pamphlets. Mather donated $5,000 of the politically-connected rangers had to be for production costs and leveraged 17 railroad assigned to patrol along the railroad track so he companies to contribute $43,000 for printing. wouldn’t get lost in the woods – and then had to Mather and Yard then sent the portfolio to be given a partner to shout at him when a train 275,000 hand-selected recipients including, of was coming.) Instead they created a vision for the parks, as course, all members of Congress. The portfolio’s text connected the parks with symbols of America in the spirit of the flag or the a sense of national identity. America in the 19th Statue of Liberty. With bold scenic photographs century had often felt inferior to Europe, which and stories of frontier heroism, they sold that viboasted grand old cathedrals and a vast history sion to Congress. On August 25, 1916, when President Woodof art and civilization. But the cathedral-like spaces of Yosemite row Wilson signed the bill into law, Mather Valley and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone learned the news from a telegram, because he was were just as ancient and inspirational. Nature off in the Sierra Nevada on another pack trip.

50 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

To shape the parks’ public image, Robert Sterling Yard pitched, placed and frequently wrote himself more than 1,000 newspaper and magazine articles about the parks’ scenic beauty. NPS PHOTOS

Enacting the vision Of course the story of the National Park Service is more than a story of marketing a bold and patriotic vision. Mather and his team also created an organization that could live up to that vision – which was arguably the more difficult task. Although it hadn’t been in his original plan, Mather was persuaded to become the Park Service’s first administrator. Despite a couple of breaks when he was hospitalized for bipolar disorder, he kept the job until felled by a stroke in 1929, just a year before his death.


Yard was a better advocate than administrator, so Mather set him up in a separate nonprofit called the National Parks Association (now the National Parks Conservation Association) where he could continue to campaign. Mather and the able Albright turned their attention to management. Here was where Albright’s organizational skills proved so valuable – as Mather’s assistant and then as superintendent at Yellowstone, Albright enacted Mather’s vision on the ground. For example, ending the tradition of patronage jobs, Mather and Albright turned the park ranger into a symbol of integrity, physical prowess and hard work. In another innovation, Mather insisted on selecting a single concessioner to run all the hotels or restaurants in a park. Competition might work in the general economy, but in parks Mather preferred total control to ensure consistently positive visitor experiences. Mather also tightly controlled the selection of new parks, demanding that they meet the highest standards of scenery. To relieve the pressure of enshrining substandard parks, he jump-started a movement to create state parks. Mather continually used his fortune to benefit parks and scenic beauty – for example, by helping to start the Save the Redwoods League; by privately funding the national parks’ first naturalist programs, and by purchasing, fixing and then do-

COURTESY PHOTO

Mather saw his job with the parks as similar to his job with borax: the most important function was marketing—using stories (like the Twenty-Mule-Team Borax) to demonstrate that people really needed the experience of visiting one or more national parks. nating the Tioga Road to Yosemite. Although he lived in Washington and Chicago, Mather kept a chauffeur and Packard automobile, with license plate USNPS-1, in Los Angeles for park tours. He circumvented low Congressional appropriations by privately supplementing the salaries of Albright, Yard and others. Some of his wealthy friends were puzzled that Mather would donate so much time and money to the federal government, rather than a legitimate charity. But Mather believed in na-

tional parks. Mather’s greatest accomplishments might today be summarized as “creating the National Park Service brand” even though that language trend didn’t exist back then. But one measure of Steve Mather’s success was that after his and Yard’s initial blitz, everyone knew and valued what the national parks stood for. Mather not only created an organization that has thrived for a century, but also created for it a public image that remains strong 100 years later.

Coming this Fall… FREE MSUB courses offered in your high school!

visit msubillings.edu/connections to find out how you qualify MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 51


Z52 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


UP, UP AND

AWAY A

n early morning blaze of hot pink, royal blue and honeyed gold leisurely floats above a swath of trees. A glorious sunrise? Close. It’s the colossal construction we know as a hot air balloon – a triumphant blaze of color bound only by expansive folds of billowing fabric. Sink your teeth into this photo compilation and satisfy your cravings for something daringly breathtaking. These tenacious cloud-climbers are sure to inspire daydreams of airborne adventure.

Not a cloud to be seen, this congregation easily rules the blue during the Big Sky International Balloon Rendezvous in 2015. CASEY PAGE/GAZETTE STAFF

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 53


LARRY MAYER PHOTOS /GAZETTE STAFF‌

ABOVE: A crowd gathers around the balloon basket for last-minute preparations in 2014. RIGHT: A hot air balloon floats past the Four Dances Bureau of Land Management area in 2005.

Simplistic flowers and multicolored stripes are just a few of the designs that give life to these high-flyers. JAMES WOODCOCK/GAZETTE STAFF‌

SEE THEM FOR YOURSELF: 2016 Big Sky International Balloon Rendezvous July 29 – 31 at Amend Park in Billings For more information visit: bigskyballoonrally.com facebook.com/bigskyballoonevent

54 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


ABOVE: Silhouetted by the rising sun, pilot Bill Dickinson helps Jan Frost and Sheila Bailey inflate a hot air balloon during the opening morning of a balloon rally in 2005. LEFT: Morning light casts a glow on inflated balloons preparing for liftoff in 2006. LARRY MAYER/GAZETTE STAFF‌

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 55


We put one thing at the center of all our efforts:

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 57


Is your dog afraId of thunder and loud noIses? ask us about sIleonow approved for canIne noIse aversIon

Integrity. Honesty. Confidentiality. Friday, October 14, 2016 The Northern Hotel Cocktails Hors d’Oeuvres and Silent Auction

Cuisine Gourmet Dinner and Live Auction

Comedy For more information call Jami 384-0329 or email jfunyak@famserv.com your pet’s Family Doctor

A winning combination – Winning your confidence while working for you. Travis Dimond 406.927.8724

406.245.4772 1321 north 27th street

Travis@Floberg.com

www.billingsanimalfamilyhospital.com

ALWAYS FREE

ORTHODONTIC SCREENINGS

We sp pecialize in nc clear an nd high tech braces. br Call us now for your free, no obligation screening appointment today!

406.655.9300 www.kovacsortho.com

58 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC

Bag STUFF The with CASH to

r e c n a C t h Fig


BY RUSSELL ROWLAND I ILLUSTRATION BY ROB JOHNSON

Missing Letters ‌ y mother, Lorene, recently came across a letter she wrote to her own mother. Lorene M was left at the ranch when her mother had gone to Belle Fourche, South Dakota to give birth to Lorene’s younger brother. The letter is adorable, of course – an authentic peek into what’s important to a kid that age. Seven-year-old Lorene talks about how she and her cousin have turned their grandfather’s old car into a clubhouse, but mostly she talks about how much she misses her mom. When I think of the loss of the printed word, that example is the first thing that comes to mind. MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 59


I wonder what it must be like for kids today to never experience the feeling that someone is so far away that they can’t actually talk to them or send them a text or an email. Do they ever experience that ache in their chest that comes from longing to hear someone’s voice? Will they always assume that people are a single punch away on their phone?

Independence, made this nation official. For decades, these two men wrote letters that addressed some of the crucial issues of the time and expressed their opinions about these issues, about each other and about others who were instrumental in the events that shaped this country. There is a wonderfully respectful tone to these letters, where even though letters were the only way they had to communicate other than occasional meetings in person, they were still discrete. They rarely criticize anyone, or each other. There is an air of formality that is almost painful. But the thing that is most striking about these missives is that, despite their formal tone, the words are packed with emotion. The prose was written as if special care has been Up close and in person‌ Just after finishing high school, my sister spent paid to each and every word. And because of that, about a year in Bolivia. During the entire time she the letters are pristine and special. Each word feels was there, we exchanged only a handful of letters. as if it really matters. At that time airmail was outrageously expensive. I also remember getting a reel-to-reel tape from her Just a phone call away‌ Today it’s so easy to get in touch with people at one point. By the time she got back, I missed that we often exchange emails or texts with our her terribly. The first time we saw each other, we were both friends and family members numerous times each overcome with emotion. She had gone through day. Plus with social media, we have a constant some horrific stuff during that year, and I was the flow of words coming at us. To me, this easy access generates a feeling first member of the family to get a chance to see that none of it is all that important anymore. The her so there were a lot of tears. I wonder what it must be like for kids today to proverbial words have become cheap – they lack never experience the feeling that someone is so heartfelt emotion. I don’t know about anyone else, but I want far away that they can’t actually talk to them or send them a text or an email. Do they ever to miss people from time to time. I want to exexperience that ache in their chest that comes perience that jump in my chest when I walk into from longing to hear someone’s voice? Will a room and see someone for the first time in they always assume that people are a single months, or years. I don’t want my relationships with other peopunch away on their phone? I recently started reading the collec- ple to feel mediocre and easy. So that rather than a tion of letters between Thomas Jefferson steady diet of ttyl from my friends, I might expeand John Adams – two of the most influ- rience something like this, from one of Jefferson’s ential men in our history, two men who were the final letters to his friend Adams: I learn with sincere pleasure that you have expeclosest of friends and then mortal enemies for a rienced lately a great renovation of your health. That time before they resumed their friendship. Jefferson and Adams ended up dying on the it may continue to the ultimate period of your wishes same day, on the Fourth of July, fifty years to the is the sincere prayer of usque ad aras amicissimi tui day after Jefferson’s masterpiece, the Declaration of (“ever at the altars of your dearest friend”). Sales of books, magazines and newspapers have perhaps taken a hit with the advent of the internet but nothing has changed more in our culture than the way we communicate with each other, and nothing is more in danger of being lost than a record of those conversations – those personal letters. These days, kids talk to their grandparents by Skype, which is fabulous, of course. They get the immediacy, the voice, the facial expressions. But what they don’t have is a piece of paper that they can hold in their hands decades later. And maybe more importantly, they don’t have the opportunity to miss each other.

60 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


Summer Carnival 1875K

Built Kid Tough www.fabricatorssupply.net | 406-245-6770


COURTESY PHOTO

62 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


MONTANA’S

Crowning JEWEL BY KAREN KINSER

Glacier National Park has mountains of monikers – Crown of the Continent and Backbone of the World, to name a few – describing its magnificence; however, no descriptions can rival the total-sensual immersion of being there. These million acres have it all – unique ecosystems with gushing waterfalls, hanging valleys, deep, teal-colored lakes and misty clouds ghosting across serrated mountain peaks. Scented cedar forests, alpine meadows and streams made milky by glacial melt punctuate this majestic American gem. Celebrate the National Park Service’s Centennial this summer – and renew your body and soul – with a visit to Glacier National Park.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 63


Two Medicine is rich with panoramic vistas and has plenty of hikes, lakes and waterfalls. PHOTO BY DONNIE SEXTON‌

T

hanks to George Bird Grinnell, Glacier became a National Park in 1910, its name derived from the 150 or so glaciers that existed then. In the 1930s, the Glacier-Waterton International Peace Park was established with neighboring Canada. In 1995, Glacier-Waterton was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to its distinctive climate and scenic views. The Great Northern Railway contributed to the expansion of Glacier when it set down tracks and built chalet-type accommodations in the early 1900s. Today, Glacier welcomes 2.3 million visitors annually and sees its biggest bulk of guests during July and August when the Going-to-the-Sun Road is open. Despite unpredictable weather conditions (that make the road’s opening date indeterminable year-to-year), visitations have grown steadily outside the prime summer months as well.

Going-to-the-Sun Road‌

The crown jewel of Glacier is undoubtedly this engineering marvel that crosses the Continental Divide and climbs to almost 7,000 feet over its 50-mile length – the Goingto-the-Sun Road. The highway passes through every kind

64 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

of terrain, from glacial lakes to tumbling streams, temperate rainforest, jagged mountain peaks, cedar forests and alpine tundra. Scenic pull-outs allow you to catch your breath and view some of the 25 glaciers still left in the Park. This road is narrow and crowded; RV-length vehicles are restricted, so consider using the free parking shuttle or scheduling a tour on the historic Red “Jammer” Buses. Blackfeet Indian guides with Glacier Sun Tours also offer insightful tours.

Take the road(s) less traveled‌

If you’re seeking solitude, visit the Two Medicine and North Fork areas of the Park. Two Medicine is rich with panoramic vistas and has plenty of hikes, lakes and waterfalls. Getting to the North Fork requires driving over dirt roads but the quiet and views of Bowman Lake are worth the effort. Stop in the tiny and electricity-free town of Polebridge to try huckleberry macaroon cookies at the Polebridge Mercantile.


Above: The Going-to-the-Sun Road passes through every kind of terrain, from glacial lakes to tumbling streams, temperate rainforest, jagged mountain peaks, cedar forests and alpine tundra. Top: The crown jewel of Glacier is undoubtedly this engineering marvel that crosses the Continental Divide and climbs to almost 7,000 feet over its 50-mile length – the Going-to-the-Sun Road.‌ PHOTOS BY DONNIE SEXTON‌Middle left: Bring your passport, and take an amazing day trip (or more) to the Canadian side of Glacier – the Waterton Lakes National Park. COURTESY PHOTO


Happy hiking‌

The 700-plus miles of hiking trails in Glacier range in difficulty from easy-peasy to strenuous. One of the easiest is the Trail of the Cedars, a one-mile round trip loop through an ancient red cedar forest and to the tumbling waters of Avalanche Gorge. Continue another 1.5 miles to Avalanche Lake. With over 200 waterfalls in the park you’ll want to hike to a few – most notably Virginia Falls or St. Mary Falls. At Logan Pass, enjoy the spectacular views of the Hidden Lake Trail (5.4 miles round trip), which climbs through alpine meadows known as The Hanging Gardens. Grinnell Glacier Trail is a strenuous six-mile hike, but will reward you with waterfalls, amazing views and an up-close-and-personal look at the glacier. Or, enjoy the beauty of and views from the Garden Wall along the Highline Trail near Logan Pass. Rangers also lead hikes daily. NOTE: Be very bear aware and carry bear spray (you can rent some from Glacier Outfitters in Apgar). If hiking’s not your thing, don’t despair. You’ll also find narrated boat tours on many of the lakes, as well as fishing, whitewater rafting, horseback riding and wildlife viewing.

Above: The 700-plus miles of hiking trails in Glacier range in difficulty from easy-peasy to Views … with a room‌ strenuous. One of the easiest is the Trail of the Cedars, a one-mile round trip loop through Cozy cabins, sheltering chalets and historic lodges are an ancient red cedar forest and to the tumbling waters of Avalanche Gorge. Top right: At a few of the many options in and around Glacier. Lake Logan Pass, enjoy the spectacular views of the Hidden Lake Trail (5.4 miles round trip), which climbs through alpine meadows known as The Hanging Gardens. PHOTOS BY DONNIE SEXTON‌ McDonald Lodge features rustic rooms in a picturesque

66 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


setting. In the northeast corner of the Park – dubbed the “Switzerland of North America” – you’ll enjoy the historic beauty and old-world charm of the Swiss-style Many Glacier Hotel. There are also two hike-in chalets and 13 campgrounds. Alternatively, visit the communities beyond the Park (West Glacier, St. Mary, Browning, Columbia Falls, Whitefish and Hungry Horse), and enjoy B&B hospitality, sleeping in a tipi, glamping in a safari tent, snoring under the stars in a tree house or sleeping cozily in a caboose at Izaak Walton Inn.

Refreshing repasts‌

Throughout the Park, you’ll find a variety of snack shops, cafes and fine-dining restaurants featuring Montana cuisine with panoramic views. In the Ptarmigan dining room at Many Glacier Lodge, discover local fare such as smoked Montana trout, bison chili and duck breast with Flathead cherry chutney. At the Two Dog Flats Grill in the Rising Sun Motor Inn, you’ll find unique options like red lentil dhal, huckleberry pulled pork, burgers and crunchy tofu tacos. Dine in history – in one of the original rail lodges – at

Top: With more than 200 waterfalls in the park you’ll want to hike to a few – most notably Virginia Falls (pictured) or St. Mary Falls. Left: In the northeast corner of the Park – dubbed the “Switzerland of North America” – you’ll enjoy the historic beauty and old-world charm of the Swiss-style Many Glacier Hotel. PHOTO BY DONNIE SEXTON‌ Inset: Thirty miles long, surrounded by mountains and with 185 miles of shoreline, Flathead Lake is a paradise for visitors interested in fishing, boating, sailing, waterskiing, swimming, sight-seeing and just relaxing. COURTESY PHOTO‌

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 67


the Belton Chalet in West Glacier, and savor local cuisine that ranges from bison meatloaf to Korean duck breast with stone fruit kimchi. Complement it all with plenty of regional microbrews.

Trek across the border

Bring your passport and take an amazing day trip (or more) to the Canadian side of Glacier – the Waterton Lakes National Park. Approximately a 40-minute drive from St. Mary to Waterton, the views are spectacular, as is the stunning Prince of Wales Hotel. Built in 1927, this beauty • www.nps.gov/glac/index.htm sits atop a bluff and overlooks glacial• http://glaciermt.com/ glacier-park.php ly-carved Waterton Lake. Have lunch or • visitglacierpark.com afternoon tea here • www.glaciernationalpark while marveling at lodge.com the amazing view of Check out Jake Bramante’s the lake and mounwebsite, hike734.com, where he tains. gives tips and has maps for hiking all 734 miles (which he did in 2011) Work off lunch by of trails in Glacier. hiking Bears Hump or drive through Red Rock Canyon. Optionally, take the Waterton Shoreline boat cruise and visit Goat Haunt (that’s back in Montana, so you’ll need that passport to get on the boat). On the drive back, don’t miss the homemade huckleberry pie at Park Café in St. Mary.

PLAN YOUR TRIP

The Hungry Horse Dam is the highest in Montana and only about ten miles outside Glacier. COURTESY PHOTO

BEYOND THE PARK As amazing as Glacier is, there are also charming communities near the Park. Here are a few to whet your adventurous appetite: St. Ignatius Mission Built in 1891 by Jesuit missionaries and Native Americans, this mission is noted for its history and the 58 murals painted on its walls and ceilings. Flathead Lake Thirty miles long, surrounded by mountains and with 185 miles of shoreline, this lake is a paradise for visitors interested in fishing, boating, sailing, waterskiing, swimming, sight-seeing and just relaxing. Enjoy the fresh fruits (Flathead cherries, anyone?) from the farm stands along Route 35 which hug the east side of the lake. Whitefish Mountain Resort If you’re craving adventure, stop here and challenge yourself on a zip line tour, whisk down an alpine slide, navigate through a suspended obstacle course on the Aerial Adventure Park or get high with the birds on a treetop canopy tour. Hike the Bob The Bob Marshall Wilderness, that is. You’ll find over a million acres of pristine wilderness, replete with 1,100 miles of trails, wildlife and scenic vistas of the Mission Mountains. Kalispell Bask in western hospitality at this town near Flathead Lake. Visit the Conrad Mansion and Hockaday Museum of Art, take a historic walking tour of town, hike along the cliffs above Kalispell in Lone Pine State Park, go clubbing at night and enjoy

pizza and brewskis at Montana’s authentic Moose’s Saloon – where you can toss your peanut shells on the sawdust floor. Whitefish This charming town will beguile you with its friendliness, hanging flower baskets, shopping, galleries, ice cream parlor, farmers market, craft beer, gourmet coffee and unique dining options (try the inventive Cajun and Southern cuisine at the Tupelo Grille). You can even schedule a hot air balloon ride from here. Museum of the Plains Indians Learn the history of the Blackfeet through videos, dioramas and displays at this museum in Browning.

Getting there & resources

To drive through the Park from the east side, head to Great Falls, take Route 89 to Browning and enter the Park at St. Mary. From Missoula, follow Route 93 North to Columbia Falls and enter the Park at West Glacier. Glacier is experiencing a surge of visitors, so be sure to plan ahead for accommodations.

Hungry Horse Dam and Reservoir This massive dam (the highest in Montana) and reservoir are only about ten miles outside Glacier and worth the trip for the spectacular views. The area is also famed for its huckleberries. Be sure to stop at the Huckleberry Patch for all things huckleberry (pies, fudge, jellies, teas, syrups, to name a few). Garden of 1,000 Buddhas Find your inner peace at this garden featuring – yes – 1,000 hand-cast Buddha statues. It’s on Route 93, north of Missoula. Marcus Daly Mansion About an hour south of Missoula, this 24,000 square foot mansion was built by Copper King Marcus Daly. Step back in time with a tour of this magnificent home in a stunning setting.

Marvel at the amazing view of Lake McDonald. PHOTO BY DONNIE SEXTON


JOY RIDING 101 Extend your trip with these scenic drives: The Seeley-Swan Scenic Drive This 90-mile long scenic highway stretches along the Swan Valley, from Seeley Lake to Swan Lake, and is near the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Enjoy waterfalls, hiking, birding, canoeing and outstanding views. Lake Koocanusa Scenic Byway The 67 miles of this highway in the Kootenai National Forest meanders along the Kootenai River and connects the towns of Libby and Eureka. Highlights of this trip in the northwest corner of Montana include wildlife (look for bighorn sheep), hiking, fishing, boating, ghost towns and the Libby Dam. From Libby, make the drive to Troy and visit the massive 500-year-old red cedars in the Ross Creek Grove Scenic Area. Looking Glass Road This one’s short – about ten miles – but is full of twists, turns, wildlife and spectacular vistas as it rises from almost prairie land to sub-alpine – and back again. From East Glacier, take Highway 49 (Looking Glass Road). At the junction of Route 89, you can either take a right turn to Browning (and visit the Museum of the Plains Indian) or make a left and head to St. Mary. This highway runs entirely through the Blackfeet Reservation, so hiking along the road will require a permit.

Above: The 90-mile Seeley-Swan Scenic Drive stretches along the Swan Valley, from Seeley Lake (pictured) to Swan Lake, and is near the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Left: Highlights of a trip in the northwest corner of Montana include wildlife (look for bighorn sheep), hiking, fishing, boating, ghost towns and the Libby Dam (pictured).

Garnet Back Country Byway Visit the Garnet ghost town as you make your way along the 12 miles of this byway and through the Garnet Mountains. You’ll be treated to views of the Swan Range, Mission Mountains and Bob Marshall Wilderness. The highway starts about 30 miles east of Missoula. Pintler Veterans Memorial Scenic Highway If you’re returning via I-90, jump off the Interstate at Exit 153 and enjoy this 64-mile loop that will take you through scenic mountainous areas and canyons into the charming town of Philipsburg (satisfy your sweet tooth at the Sweet Palace), past Georgetown Lake, by ghost and mining towns and into historic Anaconda.

COURTESY PHOTO‌S

Invisible Hearing Aids

CELEBRATING

30 Years

Dr. Gene W. BukoWski, Au.D.

Digital Hearing Aids, Open Ear Hearing Aids in all price ranges.

111 S. 24th St. W Billings • 656-2003

NO CHARGE SERVICES INCLUDE:

with the BILLINGS COMMUNITY 2351 Solomon Ave. 406-652-4886

www.westparksenior.com

Rimrock Mini Mall across from Rimrock Mall & K-Mart Convenient parking next to office door

• Hearing Screening • Hearing Aid Cleaning • 30-45 Day Trial with New Aid • New Heaing Aids with 3-4 Days

Doctor of Audiology Hearing Aid Specialist 40 Years Experience

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 69


If you wanted a Vette since you were a kid, you’ve waited long enough.

We have the largest selection in the region Z51 Performance Coupe 3000 KING AVE WEST 406-896-3000 HourS MoN-FrI 8AM-8PM, SAT 9AM-7PM, SuN CloSEd WWW.dENNYMEHolT.CoM

Z70 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Starting at $

57,800

Stock #4540


BY TARA CADY I ILLUSTRATION BY ROB JOHNSON

Unplugged exploration ‌When I moved to Billings from the Chicago suburbs, I back is what holds us all back. had the comfort of my friends and family in the palm of my hand. Anything exciting that happened was subsequently shared on social media: #illinoisgirlmeetsmontana. Knowing practically no one, I had no choice but to venture out solo when I wanted to explore. In those moments, I was isolating myself from the real experience of living in a new culture by being on my phone–and that’s no way to meet anyone. Curiosity led me here, but my digital comfort zone easily repressed motivation to keep moving forward. It took two months to meet some of my neighbors. I

From texting to talking‌ With the insurgence of new means of communication from instant messaging and texting to apps like Snapchat and Facebook, there’s no shortage of excuses to avoid face-to-face contact. Instead of meeting people out on the town, I could look to Facebook’s “People You Should Know” section for new mutual friends without leaving the comfort of my own home. Don’t get me wrong–online friendships are great, but “reacting” with an emoji lacks the emotional depth that comes with a heart-to-heart conversation. Texting breeds miscommunication. Body language and

live in a house near the alley but share laundry and a yard tone of voice are lost in the digital realm. How would you with another residence. With those tenants all col- know if that new friend you met online was truly laughlege-aged, I thought we might cross paths in ing out loud or just being sarcastic? You wouldn’t. Millennials are the technological innovators the laundry room or outside on the patio and strike up a conversation. Countless of this time period, a title once held by Baby times I thought about putting an invitation Boomers. The communication gap is not only in their mailboxes for a night of brews and widening between age groups but also withbarbecuing.

in them as well. Why spend the money

One day some of the neighboring ten- and vacation days to visit friends from ants and I were outside minding our own out-of-state when you can FaceTime on business. Feeling awkward, I said some- a regular basis? thing to break the silence.

A loving embrace in Chicago’s humidi-

Hello quickly turned into things we ty and busy surroundings stimulates the senshad wanted to say for a long time.

es more than a computer screen ever will. I might be able

I am to blame for not reaching out to keep up with the Smiths online, following the births of and missing opportunities. Once I got past my friends’ children on their feed, but little Matthew won’t the stutters and awkward silences, I uncovered know what our friendship means to his mom just from commonalities and discovered that what was holding me pictures and phone calls alone.

Naturally, we are afraid of what (and who) we don’t know, but what we don’t realize is that we’re preventing our growth by failing to interact with the rest of the world.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 71


Curiosity led me here, but my digital comfort zone easily repressed motivation to keep moving forward.

Awakening from the dream‌ Gone are the days when you’re new to the neighborhood and subsequently greeted by a nearby resident with a polite knock on the door and something scrumptious to share over small talk. As a twenty-something in a strange land locals call “the last best place,” I find myself stumbling on words to say to the bus patron next to me on my morning commute, let alone my neighbors. It’s much easier to stare into my phone – or hermit myself indoors – and avoid all chance of awkward communication. Naturally, we are afraid of what (and who) we don’t know, but what we don’t realize is that we’re preventing our growth by failing to interact with the rest of the world. Even for those of us not far from home, our established routines can be suddenly rocked when a dear friend moves away or a frequently-visited business closes. Attempting to hold onto what was through fragmented friendships with far-away friends via texting and the internet keeps you immersed in a stagnant nostalgic dream. Unplug and try something new. Strike up a conversation with a stranger and open your eyes, ears and mind to experiences that challenge your established routine. Having done that myself while white-water rafting on the Stillwater River, camping outside of Red Lodge and attending as many local artists’ concerts as possible in the year that I’ve been in Montana – with new-found friends I courageously met along the way – I will never be the same.

72 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


Special Section: From Pictographs to Pinterest

Words

on words

NADINE BITTNER/GAZETTE STAFF

How we translate our deepest thoughts has evolved over time. Technological innovations – from clay to mobile tablets and the pieces of paper in between – allow us to convey a message distinct from the spoken word. Etched, written or typed communication remains refined, with more thought put into expression and its interpretation than what can be easily mumbled or blurted out. Every pause, quote and question mark gives voice to the imagined dialogue in our heads. As we simultaneously condense our information intake to 140 characters or less and expand our breadth of knowledge through media, the written word is more important than ever. Join us as we navigate the channels of communication – from ancient cuneiform to social media – and discover why books maintain an overarching presence in the 21st century.

W

O


From Pictographs to Pinterest Words remain, media changes BY BRENDA MAAS

Z74 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


i‌ ght thousand years ago cuneiform symbols representing objects, words and concepts were printed on cylinder seals. Today, symbols representing objects, ideas or words are displayed on a tiny screen in the form of emojis. The media changes. The symbols change. But the idea of communicating thoughts in a permanent form — beyond the momentary conversation — is something that remains. Gutenberg conceptualized the printing press, mass copying books, treatises and letters — opening the world to ideas. Underlying his invention was the powerful, even subversive idea that everyone could read and learn, not just the affluent or those of a religious order. For the next 500 years, the written word became more common, industrialized and commercialized. From the town crier to the corner newsboy to mass market books and supermarket tabloids, print communication ruled. In the latter half of the 20th century, the advent of the internet and the concept of a paperless office burst on the scene. Mobile phones, texting, social media and cloud storage changed how we use, consume and store words. Who is reading what? Even with newspaper circulation numbers sagging, that does not mean Americans aren’t reading news. According to a recent Pew Research Center survey, more than seven-in-10 U.S. adults follow national and local news ei-

COURTESY PHOTO

ther “somewhat” or “very closely.” “Within the digital realm…The portion of Americans who ever get news on a mobile device has gone up from 54 percent in 2013 to 72 percent today,” Pew Research said. Sam Boerboom, an assistant professor in communication and theater at Montana State University Billings believes that journalism will – and should – remain strong. “Newspapers are still very, very valid,” he said. “There is a place for traditional print journalism – but there may be a new

business model.” He said Americans continue to communicate in an even wider world and the accountability which media creates is crucial. Sam Boerboom “The overwhelming majority of articles shared during a political season are based on newspapers, and when someone (a jour-

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 75


nalist) does good work, it circulates widely. Journalists help hold power to account,” he said. News, and the words written to relay that information, remain important; it is the delivery vehicle that has changed.

Reading between the lines Some suggest that the process of scrolling along on a screen, and how our brains react, vary greatly from physically turning

“The collective social conscious around these devices has not evolved as quickly as the technology, and we haven’t yet reformatted what the rules are. We are at a pivotal point.”

them, he said.

~ Cassie LaGreca

as a core of her business. In her mid-30s,

pages to scanning headlines. Some experts

ticle by Ferris Jabr suggests that the tactile

surmise that digital readers may not have

process of reading print stimulates our

as rich of an experience as a newsprint

brain into stronger focus and deeper com-

reader because the act of turning the pages

prehension.

of print often leads the reader to an arti-

“Modern screens and e-readers fail to

cle that he or she may not have otherwise

adequately recreate certain tactile experi-

read.

ence of reading on paper that many people

“Folks who are all-digital are missing

miss, and more importantly, prevent peo-

the layout. Those who read newsprint likely

ple from navigating long texts in an intui-

encounter articles that you might not have

tive and satisfying way,” Jabr said.

chosen,” Boerboom said. “That is important to us as citizens and as individuals.” An April 2013 Scientific American ar-

76 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

“Whether they realize it or not, many people approach computers and tablets with a state of mind less conducive to learning than the one they bring to paper,” he stated. Cassie LaGreca, a local graphic designer and the owner of Better to Gather, utilizes mobile communication and social media LaGreca sees consumers of digital media as both intelligent and somewhat fickle. “We are certainly shortening our words,” she said. “The headline is stealing the day – you have to catch that reader in the first five words or forget it.” She said condensed words or even concepts can be deceiving. “I do feel like there’s a bit of dumbing-down of content but also feel there’s a

Using computers, tablets and phones

significantly more mature audience,” she

doesn’t necessarily change the words,

added. “There’s been a huge shift in how

but it changes how we interact with

we consume content.”


Back at the beginning‌ Jim Gransbery spent his entire career in the newsroom as a reporter and editor. Now retired, he continues to immerse himself in news and to challenge his understanding of the world around him. Gransbery reads at least eight newspapers each day – all online except one. Jim Gransbery The most important element in communication, he said, is human. “Stories don’t write themselves,” he said. “Fiction or nonfiction, they require the research and knowledge of topic from an individual. It all comes from an original keystroke.”

• KID FRIENDLY • PET FRIENDLY • PARTY FRIENDLY Free Design Consultation

FLOORING • CABINETRY • WINDOW TREATMENT • RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

505 S. 24th St. West 65 6-9 3 0 0 • 1-8 0 0-320-0 420

Mon.-Fri. 8-6 • Sat. 9-5 • Sun. CLOSED MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 77


The human element remains at the root of avenues,” she said. “The collective social conscious around these devices has not evolved words because people bring emotion. “All good writing is evocative,” Gransbery as quickly as the technology, and we haven’t said. “The writer is trying to evoke an emotion yet reformatted what the rules are. We are at – that (practice) indicates that human nature a pivotal point.”

going away anytime

hasn’t changed in thousands of years.”

verbial stripes.

Boerboom points to the scholars in the early- to mid-20th century who decried television. “We’ve always yearned to communicate – the most sophisticated was poetry,” he said of the creative license that writers take with the written word. LaGreca, who embraces social media and digital communication, agrees. “I don’t think we connect any less deeply. Youth and subcultures have always played with language but now we have so many more

soon,”

Boerboom

said. The written word is changing its pro-

At a loss for words‌ Pew Research Center asked why people read, especially longer format pieces like books or magazines. Eighty percent of Americans age 16 and older said they read for pleasure and 78 percent said they read to keep up with current events. Is print fading off into cyberspace? The collective conclusion is no. “It’s just changing. Contrary to doomsayers, printed books are still out-selling e-books by a great margin. People are still buying them and industry data suggests that they are not

“The human psyche and communi-

Cassie LaGreca

cation hasn’t really changed,” emphasized

Gransbery, “it’s just the manifestation that has changed.” LaGreca, who is too old to be a Millennial but too young to be a Gen-Xer, keenly feels the turbulence. “It’s like Pandora’s box has been opened,” said LaGreca. “It’s all out there, and the shift is happening.”

2951 King Ave. West

Mon - Fri: 8am-6pm Sat: 9am-5pm

REMOTE START Starting at

349 Installed

3M CLEAR BRA Paint Protection from damaging rocks & bugs

COLOR MATCHING CHIP REPAIR

$

BEAT THE SUMMER HEAT!

NEVER GET IN A HOT CAR AGAIN.

78 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Before

After 406.656.3947 | 800.391.1668 – www.AutoTrimBillings.com


MAYER COCK AND LARRY D O O W ES M JA PHY BY ICK | PHOTOGRA BY DARRELL EHRL

N W O T K O BO D R O W D E T N I R P E H T S E V O L S G BILLIN

T Area used bookstores specialize in rare or collectible titles that showcase local history or authors.

eresa Kennedy didn’t think she’d heard it quite right when the customer said it. A library. The customer – youngish, probably in his 20s – wanted to have his own library. What the co-owner of The Book Cellar in Billings may have originally written off as a fluke has become a refrain today. That coveted 18- to 25-yearold demographic is making its reappearance at bookstores, talking about someday having a room in their house or apartment for a library. Or, having a nice shelf of leather-bound books.


E

qually joyous for Kennedy, who owns the store with her husband, Larry, are the customers in highschool or college and those who have just graduated who come in looking for the classics – from Chaucer to Hemingway – not for some class, but because they simply want to read literature with longevity. Across town, Tom Vanek, owner of A Few Books More, has seen a similar trend. “Modern literature and the classics – John Steinbeck, Jane Austen and Ernest Hemingway – if we have 10 copies of those we don’t have enough,” Vanek said. Not so long ago independent booksellers fretted about the Nooks and the Kindles and the iPad – digital reading devices. And if that didn’t scare them, the trend of reading everything on a phone was worrisome. But a funny thing happened. People started coming back. And it wasn’t just the bookworms, the white-hairs or the collectors. It was customers like there had always been, folks who had tried and maybe even used electronic readers, but just couldn’t quite quit the feel of a book or the look of hardbacks on a shelf. Those same younger readers aren’t just returning for the classics or to build a library. “Young people are still attracted to beautiful books,” said Vanek, who runs the popular used bookstore in downtown Billings. “Maybe the gilt edges catch their eye. Maybe it’s the aesthetic – it feels like book, it may have a case. It’s a book for looks.” And then the habit may begin. “Once you buy a $200 book, you’ll do it a second time,” Vanek said.

NOT JUST A COWTOWN

Billings has always been a book town. Independent booksellers in the Magic City can tick off a family tree of stores – Copperfields, the Book Place, Broken Diamond, Thomas Books. Vanek and the Kennedys are two long-time used booksellers who have been able to grow their business for decades and show no signs of stopping. Gary Robson is general manager for This House of Books, which plans to open a new cooperative bookstore later this summer. He pointed out that most of the bookstore’s owner-stockholders are writers who saw downtown Billings without a new-book seller after Thomas Books closed. It’s an initiative for

80 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Above:LarryKennedyshowsanantiquebook,GreatHeroes andFamousPeople,inTheBookCellar.Right:LarryKennedy, ownerofTheBookCellar,looksthroughhisinventoryhe keeps in the shop’s basement. readers by other readers (and writers). “They like talking to people about what they’re reading. They want a place where you can have that back-andforth,” Robson said. The group of writers who bemoaned the fact that Thomas Books had closed admitted that they loved books and wanted to see a bookstore specializing in new books, but realized they were not bookstore owners. That’s where Robson came in, having run the bookstore and tea shop in Red Lodge. “Unfortunately, I am going to be the bad guy who has to take away the bookstore in Red Lodge, but we get to bring it to Billings and it has a fantastic book scene – libraries, Rocky Mountain College and (Montana State University Billings),” Robson said. “I find it surprising, the number of writers who live here. There is a wealth of writers in this Yellowstone community.”


Y ou r Be s t RE

STo LocaLNaTURaL FoR aLL

FooDS T a c & DoG Our Area’s Largest Selection Of All Natural Pet Foods, Toys, Collars, Leashes & Harnesses

Self-Serve Dog Wash. Professional Grooming for Dogs and Cats.

Visit us on the web at: Ask us your pet nutrition questions anytime on Facebook!

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 81


THE BUSINESS PAGE

Just last year, The Washington Post reported that used booksellers who survived both the Great Recession and the wave of digital readers are flourishing for two reasons. First, as readers drift back to the printed word, these stores offer both cheap inventory and a shopping experience. Because they survived, they were probably well managed, the report in the Post stated. The Magic City’s trend seems to mirror the national one. Vanek said business grew by 10 percent last year. Even though readers appear to be coming back to the printed word and bound copies, the change in reader’s technology and shopping permanently altered how booksellers do business. Customers can find any book – new or used – online, and can order from their phone. Vanek and the Kennedys suspect some come and browse in the store and order online, but that may have helped bookstores become more savvy. “We have to be more choosey about what we put on the shelf,” Vanek said. “We really have to know what you can sell and what you can’t.” Both used bookstores offer credit on tradeins. Larry Kennedy has been shrink-wrapping bundles of books and series, selling them together. The new approach has helped boost sales because he said customers perceive the value. “Some people like the search of used books, others want to binge-read,” Larry Kennedy said. “Kind of like binge-watching TV.”

Top: What readers find on the shelf at Tom Vanek’s store is just part of the total inventory. Vanek has off-site storage to house books. Above: Teresa Kennedy, owner of The Book Cellar, sorts a giant inventory of books the shop. Left: One of the most famous works of the Old West, We Pointed Them North, is a great example of how used bookstores can locate a rare copy of a well-known book, giving a collector the chance to see the book before they purchase.

“When you buy online, you don’t know what you’re getting and you may be disappointed,” Vanek said. “When you come here, you get to see it and look it over.” Some customers come in wanting to know more about books in genres they love like westerns, sci-fi or mysteries. THE PERSONAL TOUCH “Readers want to talk about books,” said Teresa Kennedy. And yet it’s not just about the lowest price. Book buyers – But it’s hard to find specific advice about recommendacasual and passionate – are looking for value. They’re looking tions, she said. for good, clean copies and they’re looking for solid advice.

82 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


“Readers want to talk about books, but it’s hard [for customers] to find specific advice about recommendations.” Teresa Kennedy, Co-Owner of The Book Cellar

Books on Montana and Wyoming history do well in area bookstores because readers tend to seek out information where they live and tourists want to know more when they come to visit.


Many book lovers continue to hunt “classic” copies of literature, not just for the content but also for the look of the book. “If you put out interesting books at reasonable prices, peoLarry Kennedy said small booksellers have the advantage over large corporate chains because they can stock smaller ple will buy,” Vanek said. So that book on the 1988 Presidential election may not publishers and lesser-known authors. sell, regardless of the price, “Amazon is missing some whereas a good book on dinothings,” Larry Kennedy said. saurs or Montana history will “They can’t stock all of the small sell again and again. presses and there are some realThere are those gems – those ly talented authors that don’t get once-in-a-lifetime sales. The a fair shake. We can stock them. Kennedys once had a rare book And, we know them.” of Kansas history that sold for Robson agrees and even bemore than $1,200. Vanek had lieves it his mission. a book with an inscription by “I consider it my job to find Will James. those books and put them out Each shop has its followfor readers,” Robson said. “We ing, too. live in an inspirational place.” Folks looking for books on hunting may go to Vanek TURNING THE PAGE while mystery buffs head to And, as the used bookstores the Kennedys. But both have look to reach customers in inlarge collections of Montana novative ways, Robson’s new history. book-selling venture will do the It may just be that used same. For example, This House books also have a certain soul of Books plans to produce podto them – the spiritual resicast conversations of local writdue of other readers who have ers and authors talking about loved the same words, pages their books and the craft of writand binding. ing. The downtown building in Many book lovers continue to hunt “classic” copies of “People like artifacts. This what used to be a Wendy’s will literature, not just for the content but also for the look of book was held by someone. It be a space for book clubs as well the book. was close to someone – a long as author readings. Both popular used bookstores have been in business for time ago,” Vanek said. “We have to be good caretakers and more than a decade. Billings is the kind of place that can sup- keep these in a good dry place and sell them to people who care.” port several bookstores, they said.


BOOKBINDING

A LOST ART BY TARA CADY | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LARRY MAYER

e live in a disposable world. Things are not always built to last. Cars, computers, books–it’s likely you can’t fix them yourself; you need an expert. And why pay someone to fix something when you can buy new for less money? That attitude – along with evolving technology – perpetuates the vicious cycle of replacing relatively new materials with the latest and greatest. Books – like cars and computers – are mass-produced. However, unlike the latter two, the inner workings of a book have not changed. From the cover, to the end sheets, to the pages of stimulating content in-between, books have remained relatively the same over centuries. Technology has made its mark on books in two ways: production and form. The former rids books of their previous hand-sewn quality as large manufacturers elect to save time and cost, while the latter converts books from their physical structure into electronic copies. Both leave traditional bookbinding behind as a nearly-lost art.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 85


John Rist attaches the cover of a late1800s family Bible to its end sheets using horse-hoof glue.

Filling a need ook people are a different kind of breed. That’s what bookbinder John Rist, owner of Americana Bookcraft in Billings, thinks. And he should know. Rist has been preserving the delicate craft of bookbinding since his parents bought the business while he was in high school in 1982. “Books have sentimental value,” he said. “There’s always a story behind them, and book lovers appreciate that.” Driven to protect a book’s contents, clients come to Rist hoping their tome – often found in the attic or basement – can breathe new life again. “When I fix it, I will bind a book that will outlive its owner,” Rist said. Aside from repairs, Rist also assembles new books for local writers and regularly binds together regional newspaper archives like The Billings Gazette and The Laurel Outlook. “If they’re feeling generous, they’ll leave me a copy,” said Rist of the books he binds. Notable jobs over the years include binding The Terry Letters,, actual letters General Al-

86 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

fred Howe Terry sent to his sisters during the Indian War of 1876, as well as old Walkers American Grill and Tapas Bar menus and Butte’s Heritage Cookbook. “Digital media has taken over a lot of what we used to do here,” he said of the now mass-produced publications such as medical journals, church hymnals, high school yearbooks and textbooks. Despite the workload’s decline, book collectors who recognize the need for quality over quantity make up a growing portion of Rist’s business.

Patient preservation Manufactured publications are not hand-sewn together with needle and thread. With glued bindings and paper covers, books that are less than twenty years old are brought to Rist for repair because of their inexpensive make-up. While a broken paperback may be sewn in thirty minutes, hardcover Bibles typ-

This worn, antique Bible’s spine has been replaced with leather-half binding.


ically take a month to repair. Some antiques take even longer depending on the damage. “I like doing it,” he said of the tedious and time-consuming work. “It keeps me out of trouble.” Rist hand-sews 95 percent of the books he works on. For ExxonMobil lab books, though, he uses his British Brehmer signature sewing machine that is roughly 75 years old. From a paper cutter with a 30-inch blade and Dremel hand drill to a foot-controlled Rosco punching machine and horse-hoof glue that smells like bleach, Rist’s industrial equipment – like the books he mends – stands the test of time.

Above: These iron rollers were once used to apply gold decorations, such as borders, onto books. Left: Ninety-five percent of the books John Rist works on are hand-sewn, while the remaining typically require the “hands” of the 75-year-old British Brehmer signature sewing machine.

A history lesson Bibles have been the “bread and butter” of Rist’s 34-year-old family business. And in not-so-distant times (think 18th and 19th centuries) Bibles were much more than Scripture. Within their casing revealed family members’ birth, death and marriage records as well as tintype portraits of prior generations. According to Rist, he can tell the rarity of a Bible from the late 1800s but can’t put a number on its worth. “Working with them is always nerve-wracking,” he said. “I could tear a page just by opening the book.” Rist is also sometimes afforded the opportunity to skim through content that few have seen. For example, a northern Wyoming man once brought in two books about the state of Illinois’ statistics, which Abraham Lincoln’s lawyer wrote in the mid-1800s. “One of my best clients is a book collector who used to work for President Nixon,” he said of Wally Johnson, whose library is filled with thousands of books from around the world. “It’s cool to see his library and the books that I’ve bound for him.” Though Rist’s clientele is typically an older crowd, he is not giving up on the younger generation. “I hope the new generation will keep reading books,” he said. “I am not discouraged.” Perhaps it is just that the younger book-loving crowd needs to understand the value of hand-sewn publications. That way their prized books can outlive them and be handed down to the next generation just as family Bibles have been for centuries. Rist’s plea to that demographic is this: “You can buy new books for less, but demand that they are sewn together.”

Just minutes from downtown Billings, located along Pryor Creek, this spectacular venue brings together the quiet of the country and the convenience of the city. We offer a stunning wedding garden and a brand new 7,800 sq. ft. reception hall featuring a beautiful foyer, private bridal suite, elegant chandeliers, & spacious patio areas

Rentals

No Bar Fees

No Curfews Vendor Choices

Clean Up Free Night Stay

Coming in June 2016

Creekside at Chanceys

A Great New Outdoor Venue


Nearly finished, a book sits in the press for 24 hours while its glue dries.

DON’T JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER

Above: “The glue brush is probably the most important tool,” said John Rist regarding the importance of getting the horse-hoof glue accurately applied to the end sheets and cover. Right: Notable books John Rist has worked on include The Terry Letters, a collection of correspondence between General Alfred Howe Terry and his sisters during the Indian War of 1876.

Award Winning Taste! Fresh & Smoked Local Meats No Chemicals or Sprays

THE BOOK BREAKDOWN Aside from the cover and the pages, what other publication lingo do you know? Test your book-loving friends with this cheat sheet: Bookbinder – someone who binds books manually using needle and thread or flexible adhesive Casing or case binding – elements which form the protective cover, including a thick board wrapped in leather, leatherette or buckram and glued to the pages using end sheets End sheets – blank pages at the beginning and end of a book Guilding – painted embellishments on leaf edges that can be seen when the book is closed Gutter – inner margin between two opened pages and the indent on a hardcover at either side of the spine Leaf – a single sheet of paper within a book

Locally Owned!

Leather-half binding – used in restoration when preserving the original cover, only replacing the spine with leather Perfect binding – method for binding paperbacks using adhesive

406-322-9073

406-322-5666

Signature-bound – books with pages that are able to lay flat, like a pamphlet Spine – the outside edge where the pages are bound together and the cover is attached

88 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

fter assessing a book’s damage, Rist gathers all of the tools required for the job. If it needs a new cover, he’ll measure and cut a thick board and either buckram, leatherette or leather to wrap around it. For the cover and spine’s title, Rist sends the client’s proposed artwork to a stamp maker in Washington. Using a hot stamping machine, Rist places the stamps and foil that matches the color of the font inside the machinery and heats the contents to 275 degrees. For a man who claims he’s not good with words, Rist had to learn how to read backwards in order to use the machine. New end sheets are cut to match the rest of the book’s inner contents. Page by page, Rist mends tears and corrects folds. The repairs are no easy feat. From torn pages to a ripped casing, Rist meticulously inspects each element of a book for damage. And meticulous is an understatement. Rist recently used 12 feet of acid-free mending tape to fix five torn pages of old sheet music–and that was only a fifth of what the job required. Once the cover has its title and the pages are repaired, Rist spreads glue onto the end sheets and attaches them to the inside of the cover, making it ready for the finishing touches. The gutter – the creases on either side of the spine – completes the book. The final product is then pressed with heavy weights, a state in which it remains for 24 hours. Upon completion, it sits on a shelf with all of the other unique antiques Rist has touched over the years.


meaningful menagerie BY CHARLI WHITE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY TAILYR IRVINE

A PEEK INSIDE THE WORLD OF DOLL COLLECTING ‌ ocks. Baseball cards. Classic cars. The common denominator? All of these items have been – and will probably continue to be – a source of great joy for the devoted collector. The obsession usually starts with a beloved childhood memory. Ask to view their singular items and you’ll find it hard to miss the sparkle in their eyes as they divulge treasured discoveries. The collections vary in size according to the owner’s wish and can be broad and all-encompassing in regard to their subject matter, but many gradually reduce to include only certain types of items. This is true for Dale Bochy, founder and owner of the Legacy Doll Museum in downtown Billings. She had previously owned a vintage furniture store on Montana Avenue, but eventually narrowed her focus to dolls and opened the museum in 2007. “It’s almost like you have to have a place to store your dolls,” she laughed. “I suppose it’s a passion gone awry. I’ve been a doll collector at heart from a very early age and though I didn’t start actually collecting until later, I never grew out of it.” Bochy noted that collecting dolls requires a certain amount of empathy, and those who accumulate them have a knack for picking up on the tender-hearted gentleness of the figurines. They have a special way of resonating with non-collectors, too. “There’s an iconic draw to dolls – a psychological element to them. I remember bringing a number of dolls to the Alzheimer’s unit and they [the patients] were so receptive,” she recalled.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 89


HISTORY TEACHERS

If dolls are superb vessels for capturing the human emotion, they are equally as significant in serving as historical artifacts. “Dolls are some of the best representations of our culture,” said Birdie Dapples, regional director for the United Federation of Doll Clubs (UFDC). “No matter what civilization or area, there are dolls which represent that specific culture and time period.” The sequential accoutrements that accompany the figurines are sometimes more indicative of the era than the actual doll itself. A 1965 Barbie dressed in an astronaut’s suit encompassed the thrill of space exploration not long before the first moon landing. Shirley Temple dolls complete with curly hair and a schoolgirl jumper mirror the celebrity’s plucky optimism that defied the solemnity of the Great Depression during the height of her film career. Other dolls strap on tangible occupations Multi-style doll strollers and rocking within businesses. Dapples recalls the strategic horses line the top shelves above advertising of a prominent company which incorfigurines from around the globe. porated dolls in the campaign. The curly-haired figurine toting a yellow umbrella and wearing a matching outfit sweetly nudged her way into the homes and hearts of 1960s America cradling a familiar blue package of Morton Salt. And still other dolls have served as the muses for wellknown written works. The Legacy Doll Museum houses an Adelaide Huret, the same type of doll which distinguished author Victor Hugo based the heroine of his 1866 novel, The Toilers of the Sea. For every age group, there’s a concurring doll that many people of that generation are familiar with. Some of the more modern household names which continue to thrive include Baby Alive, Madame Alexander, Cabbage Patch Kids and American Girl. Red, soft cloth roller skates add personality to imaginative outfits.

90 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


Dale Bochy, founder and owner of the Legacy Doll Museum, says Barbie dolls inspired her to begin collecting. UNIVERSAL APPEAL

Rich history such as this should not be subject to a fleeting lifespan. For this reason, the UFDC strives to “preserve yesterday and today for tomorrow.” Surprisingly, it’s often the communal aspect of doll collecting that holds the key to sustaining a heritage. “I stay in the doll world now more for the people. I do love the dolls, but the people are truly interesting,” said Dapples of her experience in the collecting community. “They’ve even converted me into an antique doll collector, but I still love my modern dolls.” Her interest in doll collecting sparked afresh when a new acquaintance invited her to attend a doll club meeting. It wasn’t long before Dapples was hooked. The amicable warmth that first drew Dapples into the doll-collecting community continues enticing people of all ages to partake in the Legacy Doll View rare, museum-quality doll Museum tours. Many exhibits by professional doll older generations have artists and vendors alike from shared precious moaround the U.S. in Billings. ments with the younger WHO: Heritage Doll Guild of ones while exchanging the Yellowstone fond recollections beWHAT: Sales room open to tween the shelves of the the public attentively organized disWHEN: Saturday, Sept. 24 from plays. 1-5 p.m. It’s those kinds of connections – be it to WHERE: Radisson Hotel (formerly the Holiday Inn their past or with friends Grand) and family – that most • $5 admission fee at the door people pursue, whether • Free on-site daycare for they’re faithful collectors children under 8 or simply admirers of the Visit region6conference.org familiar faces from childfor more information hood.

“WESTERN TREASURES” UFDC DOLL CONFERENCE

This rare French Jumeau doll is one of the highlights of the museum’s collection.

At one time the Legacy Doll Museum housed between 500 and 600 dolls.

ITTY-BITTY ABODE: A DOLLHOUSE TIMELINE 2500 B.C. – During this era, Old Kingdom Egyptians frequently buried miniatures such as wooden servants, boats and other domestic items within the deceased’s tomb. A.D. 1500 – High-class European adults hired craftsmen to fashion exquisite custom cabinetry, showcasing their delicate household miniatures in what was known as a “baby house.” A.D. 1600-1700 – The term coined by German toy makers, the ‘dollhouse’ became the child’s version of a baby house. 1800s – Dollhouses grew more affordable and increasingly popular among the middle class, thanks to mass-production technology of the Industrial Revolution. 2016 – Vibrantly-colored houses mimic beloved animated movies and cartoon characters; attributes like collapsibility keep the houses conveniently portable.


92 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


REVVIN’ UP TO RIDE

BY RACHELLE LACY PHOTOGRAPHY BY LARRY MAYER & CASEY PAGE

S

ummer rolls in, the bikers roll out. The hills are alive with the sound of cruisers. Warm weather combines with stunning local landscape creating an irresistible call to motorcycle enthusiasts, rally-goers and weekend warriors alike. While the reasons to ride span a spectrum as diverse as the individuals and groups offering them, a common motivation is prevalent: The best of friends share the unfettered rush of rolling through 360 degrees of slopeto-sky Montana beauty. MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 93


I

n Billings, summer’s weekly Bike Nights grow more popular every year. Riders meet at different area venues, sharing their common interest, refreshments and conversation. Local motorcyclist Randy Stone, known among friends as Rock, is one of them.

Jason Roe and Randy “Rock” Stone show off their HarleyDavidson motorcycles ahead of a one-day, interstate charity ride called Iron Butt for NF.

A Gulf War veteran, Rock initially began riding as a way to help himself reintegrate into civilian life. As he rediscovered peace, he also found something more — a new passion and rekindled appreciation for Montana’s breathtaking scenery.

Choices, choices

So what is the seasoned and frequent rider’s favorite touring route? “Close your eyes and throw a dart at a map of Montana. I can’t even tell you how many beautiful rides there are,” he said. As varied as the riders and their backgrounds are, that’s an oft-spoken sentiment in Big Sky Country. But socializing and scenery aren’t the only commonalities in the local bike scene. Philanthropy also abounds. This month, Rock rolls with two other local riders, Gary Hoffmann and Jason Roe, on a oneday, interstate charity ride called Iron Butt for NF (neurofibromatosis). Leaving Billings to join about 30 other riders along the way, they’ll cruise to DeKalb, Ill., to benefit a 10-year-old boy there who suffers from NF — if they can do it within the event’s 24hour challenge. The likelihood they’ll succeed is strong. The determined Billings riders plan to make similar runs every year, and welcome others to join them. “This is probably the best reason I can think of to ride,” Rock said before adding, “It’s like a family. These are my brothers.”

Pulling together

Charitable cause is a long-standing element of the area’s biking culture. The Roaddogs Independent Riders Organization in Billings serves area children by organizing an annual Christmas toy drive. The calendar is peppered with poker runs and other events for almost every reason imaginable. Local dealers and chapters alike sponsor fundraisers as well as awareness raisers. The big heart of the local biking community beats louder than a Harley’s muffler. When bikers aren’t rallying for a cause, many are drawn to bike rallies throughout the state.

94 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

Just south of Red Lodge, riders from across the nation converge at the annual Beartooth Beemers Rally. Carla Toth, the event’s organizer, expects about 160 riders from as far away as New Jersey and Florida at this year’s gathering, Aug. 18-21. Toth first became involved with organizing the rally in 2000. She had enjoyed joining her husband on rides, but declining eyesight eventually prevented her from doing so. Though she misses the bike runs, she is equally excited to run the event. “Organizing this event every year makes up for not riding. I’m Miss Congeniality now. I just love the people I meet. They’re the reason I’m here,” she said. The rally welcomes all motorcyclists to “Ride the Last Best Place” while enjoying camaraderie, catered meals, live music and rides through scenic destinations such as Cody, Wyo., and Yellowstone National Park. Toth’s passion for biking and her welcoming nature are evident in the lodging options and amenities she arranges. She explained, “We make them feel at home. We’re in the hospitality business, but they be-

The Roaddogs Independent Riders Organization in Billings serves area children by organizing an annual Christmas toy drive. come like family. Montana is so beautiful and there are so many places to go.”

Here it comes again

Local motorcycle enthusiasts have a special reason to celebrate this summer when an estimated 10,000 riders meet in Billings for The Gold Wing Road Riders Association’s annual Wing Ding. MetraPark will host the 38th annual event Aug. 31 to Sept. 3.


Above: Community members loaned motorcycles with historical and regional ties for the In the Wind: Montana Motorcycle Memories exhibit at the Western Heritage Center. Left: More than a dozen motorcycles are on display at the Western Heritage Center’s exhibit.

Deanna Darnielle’s 1947 Indian Chief motorcycle, restored by her father, dominates her West End office. This year marks the national convention’s fourth visit to the Magic City, ranking Billings as the second most-frequent host, just behind Madison, Wis. Organizers expect about 8,000 motorcy-

cles and trikes, the motorcycle’s three-wheeled equivalent that is steadily increasing in popularity due to its extra measure of comfort and safety. While numbers that high might lend to a little extra traffic congestion, the boost to the local economy is unparalleled. The Business Improvement District sponsors activities for the riders and the public alike, including a light show at 8:30 p.m. on Aug. 31, during which Wing-Dingers display customized bike lights in a designated section of Scheels’ parking lot. The Wing Ding parade through town offers an opportunity for residents to welcome riders that Saturday. Rally-goers will roll out from Faith Chapel on Shiloh Road and ride through the town en route to MetraPark. “It’s a wonderful time for the riders and residents to greet each other,” commented Alex Tyson of the Billings Chamber of Commerce. “We’re so excited that Billings is hosting Wing Ding 38.” Tyson expects the enthusiasm to catch on and encourages people “to just have fun with it.”

A history of fun‌

Adding to the Billings’ bike frenzy is a refocused attention to the history of riding. Deanna Darnielle, of Darnielle Insurance, may be one of the best contributors to that. “My dad was the quintessential motorcycle enthusiast,” the aficionado explained as she flipped through well-preserved glossies of her father’s collection of vintage motorcycles and memorabilia. Raised in a motorsports family, Darnielle talks about her father, Aubrey Darnielle, and his varied collection of vintage motorcycles that he restored to their bygone glory. According to Darnielle, vintage projects roll into someone’s life and garage one of two ways: as a barn find, an intact bike in need of some restoration, or as a basket case, a motorcycle in various parts and pieces in boxes and baskets. “He could take a basket case from a chicken coop and turn it into a beautiful bike,” she recalled. “He was ahead of the curve.” When Indian Motorcycles began to experience declining sales before temporarily ceasing

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 95


operations in the 1970s, dealers began closing their doors. Recognizing an opportunity, Aubrey bought as much remaining “new old stock” from those dealers, equipping himself to protect his passion.

Family tradition‌

His pursuit greatly influenced Darnielle. From an early age, she frequently joined other family members hopping on dirt bikes and rolling directly from the garage of the family’s home to adjacent undeveloped land. Her admission, “I’m comfortable riding,” might be an understatement. Darnielle raced at the Belaro Speedway during high school, “right alongside the boys,” she grinned. She not only raced, but also won the women’s class of the 4-hour Cross Country Marathon with a friend. Her familiarity with dirt bikes eventually eased her transition to road bikes. Since riding on the road is vastly different, she knew time and commitment would help her as much as they had helped her father with restorations. Today, Darnielle proudly displays her father’s restoration project, a 1947 Indian Chief, at her

96 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

West End office. The bike’s special rainbow color scheme shines brightly near the window, tempting many to imagine what it might feel like to ride a classic. Another of Darnielle’s bikes – a 1961 Harley-Davidson Sportster XLCH – is one of more than a dozen motorcycles currently on display at the Western Heritage Center. For this unique exhibit, community members have loaned motorcycles with local historical ties. Bikes from many manufacturers including Indian, Honda, BMW and Ducati, and memorabilia such as artwork, books, gear and gadgets throughout the exhibit testify to the longevity of the local motorcycle fervor. Echoing the unofficial majority of other bikers, Conrad Caron, guest curator of the exhibit, remarked on the companionship and friendship involved in bringing the show together. “That’s really what biking is all about,” he said of the camaraderie generated throughout the exhibit’s installation. “I ended up knowing all the people who put bikes in this.” The community’s response to Caron’s call for entries was generous. “I think that’s what has been so great,” said

According to Deanna Darnielle, vintage projects roll into someone’s life and garage one of two ways: as a “barn find” or as a “basket case,” like these vintage motorcycle goggles. Elisabeth DeGrenier, volunteer and education coordinator at WHC, about the great response to the center’s call for entries. “It’s so community driven.” As black-and-white 8-millimeter footage of motorcycle climbs in the South Hills dating back to the early 1930s flickered on the white screen in front of him, Caron noted, “Everything different has still stayed the same. The hills are the same. The quality of the people is the same.” The full-throttle enthusiasm of Montanan motorcyclists roars on.


A GREAT PLACE TO BE A

WRITER BY ANNA PAIGE

Our writing scene is vibrant because of wonderful collaboration among the writers, the community and the literary institutions. ~ DANELL JONES

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 97


M

ontana is a pretty good muse. Here writers become prolific, fed by vast and rugged beauty, pockets of solitude and an affordable lifestyle. Writing, though an act that can be accomplished anywhere, seems to flow better in Big Sky country. Novelist Craig Lancaster, after leaving a newspaper job in California, was looking for a small town that was more economical than coastal California. Billings wasn’t foreign to him, as his grandparents homesteaded in Montana and he had family living here. “Billings is just small enough that I don’t feel crowded,” Lancaster said. It was in this burgeoning burg that Lancaster started his first novel, 600 Hours of Edward. Challenged by a friend to participate in national novel writing month, Lancaster wrote and self-published his first novel, which was later picked up by Riverbend Publishing Company in Helena and then sold to a Seattle publisher. That was eight years ago. This summer, Lancaster published his sixth novel and the third in the Edward series, the protagonist of that first book.

Novel networking Russell Rowland, who in April published his first nonfiction work, Fifty-Six Counties: A Montana Journey, has lived in twelve states, though he was born in Montana and returned 25 years ago. “Aside from the fact that this is one of the most amazing places visually and spiritually, there are so many writers (in Montana),” Rowland said. “We push each other. When someone comes out with a book that is amazing, it inspires me to try and match that.”

98 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

“What I love about Billings and Montana in the larger picture is the arts are all accessible and intersectional.” ~ Craig Lancaster Rowland feels pressure to live up to that reputation of Montana writers, “Which I don’t think is a bad thing,” he said. For his latest work (Rowland has three fiction novels that came before, as well as an anthology of western writers co-edited with Lynn Stegner), Rowland spent the better part of two years studying and traveling around his home land, from Butte to the badlands to the mountainous western part.


Montana truths make for good books, as Montana reporter Ed Kemmick knows well. Kemmick spent decades writing for Montana newspapers before founding his own news website, Last Best News. In 2011, Kemmick’s first book, The Big Sky, By and By: True Stories, Real People and Strange Times from the Heart of Montana, was published. The compilation details some of the wilder episodes Kemmick spent reporting across the state. He recounts an interview with Evel Knievel’s widow in Butte, of the one-man-band Roy Young’s tenure at Billings’ Crystal Lounge and of the quieter characters of Montana, like Elizabeth Baker, a self-sustaining woman who lived in a shack above the Yellowstone River.

The write place While some authors write stories of Montanans, others consider the state to be a comfortable home for the fiction writing life. Billings-based writer and indexer Blythe Woolston found her calling in young adult fiction. She started writing in 2008 during a lull between jobs. “I was just trying to keep myself occupied,” she recalled. What she wrote didn’t turn out to be a great success, but it did show that she had the capacity to pen a large body of work. She then attended a conference on children’s literature at the Billings Public Library, which inspired Woolston to write novels for young adults. “I found out that (young adult fiction) is quite liberating,” Woolston said. “People believe it’s one kind of thing, but the truth is it’s broad and within it there are all kinds of genres to be represented.” With four published novels and a fifth on the way, Woolston found a niche in contemporary interest novels, creating near-future science fiction novels and thrillers for the market. Woolston was born in Missoula and grew up

in the Blackfoot River Valley. She taught for more than a decade at Montana State University, where she met her husband, Chris. His work took them to California, but they eventually returned to Montana to be closer to family. “I wanted my kids to have a relationship with their grandparents,” Woolston said. “And let’s be honest, the cost of living here is a hell of a lot cheaper than Santa Cruz, Alameda, Seattle… They have their siren call, but you can get by a little easier here. That may matter to a lot of creative professionals. We are not necessarily juggernauts when it comes to economics.” Kemmick agrees. One allure of Billings – and Montana in general – for writers is its relative affordability. “I forget which of the Livingston writers it was who said years ago that Livingston in the 1960s and 70s was like Paris in the 1920s and 30s— cheap and bursting with ideas. Or, as the folksinger U. Utah Phillips said of Butte some years ago, ‘You can starve to death cheaper in Butte than anywhere else.’”

New!

pieces!

• an underwire Swim Bra • ChooSe the Bottom • ChooSe the tankini to Cover Both

Swim Bra Sizes DDD to J Come in anD Have a SwimSuiT FiT!

TLC Lingerie

1400 Broadwater Ave • 406-655-9400

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 99


Tami Haaland (far right) and fellow writers Cara Chamberlain, Danell Jones and Virginia Tranel maintain a writer’s group. COURTESY PHOTO

Home base Woolston has been freelancing in Montana for 16 years. They established strong relationships with publishers across the country and maintain connections they’ve made through travel and living in other states. “I do believe that it really helps to see what the world has to offer. I love Montana desperately, but I am glad that we’ve gotten out. That really helps us as freelancers.” Former Montana Poet Laureate Tami Haaland

THIS HOUSE OF BOOKS

when working on the script. “I seemed able to create dialogue,” he said. “The Montanans I was tapping out onto paper a few blocks from London’s Hyde Park were sounding pretty much as I thought they ought to sound.” From this error came the quintessential Montana novel, This House of Sky.. It was Doig’s deciphering of the past, deeply rooted in landscape and family – his connection to place. This House of Sky went gone on to sell more than 170,000 copies and became a finalist for the National Book Award. Doig passed away in April of 2015, but his legacy of Montana fiction and nonfiction books Montana’s vastness is not one that is easily cap- continue to honor ways of life many would have forgotten. tured. Ivan Doig knew this well. He’d spent a good portion of his life gathering stories and digging up A new home memories of his family’s rugged upbringing in the western part of the state, loosely dubbed “the MonAnother house – or, more accurately, a booktana book.” He had dozens of journal paragraphs store – is being built in Montana. In tribute to collected before and after his father’s passing (his Doig, it will be called This House of Books. From mother died when Doig was quite young), but no a need to begin for a gathering place that honors real sense of how to convey the story he wanted the literary works coming from the West and beto tell. yond, a group of Montana writers and book enIt was 1972 during a London sabbatical when thusiasts are opening a bookstore. Doig decided to work on a play. Gary Robson, general manager and CEO of “I didn’t get past an act or so, because it was set This House of Books, owned a bookstore in Red on a Montana ranch and I was baffled as to how to Lodge for the past 15 years. Billings-based writsqueeze the Rocky Mountains, hayfields and oth- ers Craig Lancaster and Carrie La Seur contacted er necessary landscape into any theater I had ever Robson for advice as they sought to fill the hole seen,” Doig described in an intro to the novel that left when Thomas Books – Billings’ only indepenwas to come. He did notice something, however, dent bookstore (outside of Barjon’s, which fills the

Billings’ upcoming literary connection space

100 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

“It’s very exciting to me how much Billings is tilting toward the arts in its recent development,” La Seur said. CASEY PAGE/GAZETTE STAFF

metaphysical space) – closed in 2012. “The more I helped them, the more I realized what a cool project this is,” Robson said. “There aren’t very many book co-ops out there.” Co-ops in Montana occupy the space between nonprofits and corporations. The objective is to


“[The wonderful people in Billings] turn out for events and support writers with their enthusiasm and appreciation. This is a great place to be a writer.”

credits the larger community in and beyond Montana with her growth as a writer. “I have connections that are broad; that has been really important to me,” Haaland said. From a young age, Haaland wanted to be a poet. She recalls keeping journals as a girl growing up on the Hi-Line in north-central Montana. Haaland took her first poetry class with Montana poet heavyweight Richard Hugo at Montana State University and went on to study with Madeline De-

~ Danell Jones

including two-thirds of the board of directors, are part of the co-op. Writers from other states as well as community literary enthusiasts have also been bought into the co-op. Robson agreed to sell his existing business to the organization, which helped shorten the startup curve, and come onboard as general manager. “As much as I love downtown Red Lodge, it can be a high stress place to run a retail business,” he said. Robson experienced upwards of 300-percent differences in sales numbers in July compared to April. He’s looking forward to a more predictable monthly variance. “It’s a difficult business and technology is only making it more difficult, but there is great value to having a bookstore as part of a vibrant downtown,” said Craig Lancaster, supporter and one of the originators of the movement.

Roots use the money for the community, to essentially take the proceeds and distribute them back to the shareholders and community. This co-op functions like so: An individual can purchase $100 voting stock, which secures a vote at the annual meeting. There’s $500 dividend stock, which becomes profitable in the future if the co-op does well. Levels go up from there. The co-op also seeks volunteers. More than a dozen local and Montana authors,

Independent bookstores have a deep connection to the community in which they operate. “That drew me to indie long before I owned one,” Robson said. “If you walk into a chain bookstore in Billings, in Denver or in Austin, they will all be the same. Walk into an indie bookstore in four different towns and those stores are completely different. They take on the personality of the town and the personality of their owners. In this case the owners are the town.”

Board president Carrie La Seur found the time was right to open another independent bookstore downtown. “It’s very exciting to me how much Billings is tilting toward the arts in its recent development,” La Seur said. “Cheap(ish) rents and a critical mass of creComing soon This House of Books ative people can do amazing should open in late things for a city. They besummer or early come their own economic fall at 2906 2nd and cultural force.” Ave. N. For more In an article recently information or to get involved, visit published in the Huffingthishouseofbooks. ton Post, La Seur describes com. the feast a bookstore can serve for the hungry reader: “There is something irreplaceable about walking among shelves of carefully curated books, touching their spines, sliding the richness of a hardback’s thick paper cover into your waiting hands, reading a few paragraphs, then trying another.” Robson feels the bookstore is timed perfectly. “The downtown Billings revitalization movement is very strong and has a lot of support,” he said. Precious McKenzie, a founding member of This House of Books, agrees. She describes Billings as hub for the arts. “We are the biggest city in Montana. Our arts and music scene has exploded in the last five years or so. This House of Books will help fill that literary need in the arts community.”

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 101


“So much of writing takes place in isolation, but you can delude yourself if you spend all your time in isolation.” ~ Tami Haaland

Frees, William Kittredge and Earl Ganz, to name a few. She relocated to Billings from Bozeman in 1991, pursuing her MFA from Bennington in Vermont and became a professor of English at Montana State University Billings. Her first collection of poetry, Breath in Every Room, was published shortly after. In these pursuits, Haaland found community to be incredibly important to the writing process. “So much of writing takes place in isolation, but you can delude yourself if you spend all your time in isolation,” said Haaland. “You have to have greater connections. The people I trust most are the people who will look at my work

and say, ‘It’s not working.’ Having that honest relationship with writers is crucial.”

Not an island Billings writers are a nurturing bunch, supporting one another in peer review groups, banding together to offer writer’s workshops and encouraging one another to go on after rejection – to publish. Haaland and fellow writers Cara Chamberlain, Virginia Tranel and Danell Jones maintain a writer’s group. In a piece published in Writer’s Digest, the women describe their process: “A work-in-progress needs some feedback, but also lots of encouragement as the writer works through her process. We also allow ourselves to

The MosT CoMpeTiTive priCes inThe region

• Laser Treatments : BBL ( broad band light) Halo Erbium Laser Hair Removal Derma Planing • Botox® /Fillers • Tummy Tuck

Financing Now Available!

• Liposuction • Breast Lift • Microneedling • Laser Facial Rejuvenation • Breast Reconstruction • Breast Augmentation • Facial Rejuvenation • Chemical Peels

Schedule your private consultation today! 2510 17th Street West | Billings, MT 59102 | www.billingsplasticsurgery.com

102 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

406-245-3238


disagree: We don’t feel pressed to come to any definitive answer about how a piece should develop. We always allow the writer to make the final decision about what needs to happen with her work.” Jones details the strength of the group’s longevity. “One of the great things about the group is that we help each other stay on track,” she said. “Getting pages ready to share every 10 days or so keeps you honest.” Jones was that kid who always had her face in a book. In college, she published poems and stories, then decided to pursue a doctorate in literature. She became a Virginia Woolf scholar, published academic articles and wrote a book blending her two passions: The Virginia Woolf Writers’ Workshop: Seven Lessons to Inspire Great Writing, which was published by Random House. She also has a small book out as part of the New Women’s Voices and is currently writing a biography of an African writer who sought fame and fortune in Edwardian London. “A great book changes me,” she said. “That’s why I fell in love with reading. That’s why I aspire to be a part of that sacred tribe of writers.”

Gaining momentum Kemmick feels the writing community has expanded and matured since he arrived in Billings in 1989. “There is just so much support for writers now, with more readings, more independent theater, the advent of the High Plains Book Awards and now an abundance of good coffee shops, which I certainly need to get writing done,” Kemmick said. “Also, we will soon have This House of Books, driven by local writers and aimed at building a community of readers and writers. In short, we’re on a roll.” Lancaster thrives on the community’s conductivity. “What I love about Billings and Montana in the larger picture is the arts are all accessible and intersectional,” said Lancaster. “If you are involved with the theater scene – even as a patron – you know the actors, directors, producers. You show up at the

Author Russell Rowland signs books at the Western Heritage Center in 2016. same events and you talk about what you are working on. That community is really accessible in a way that I haven’t found in larger cities. It may be overall more vibrant, but the avenues are harder to find.” In similar fashion, Jones sees connections beyond her home office as essential to work. “Our writing scene is vibrant because of wonderful collaboration among the writers, the community and the literary institutions,” said Jones. She cites places like the Billings Public Library and Western Heritage Center, which offer space for readings and workshops, along with venues like MoAv Coffee House, 2905 and Art House Cinema & Pub, which offer their facilities for performances and literary events. “Most important, though, are the wonderful people in Billings who love books,” Jones said.

“Aside from the fact that this is one of the most amazing places visually and spiritually, there are so many writers (in Montana).” ~ Russell Rowland

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 103


GATHER ‘ROUND: HIGH PLAINS BOOKFEST The 14th annual High Plains BookFest, held in Billings October 6-9 this year, is a four-day event of free public readings, workshops and panel discussions by contemporary authors from the American West and Canada. In conjunction with BookFest, the Billings Public Library hosts the High Plains Book Awards to recognize regional literary works that examine and reflect life on the High Plains including the states of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas and the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. This year’s theme “The Writers Community” celebrates the support that accomplished, published writers provide to the community. Corby Skinner, who was instrumental in establishing the awards in Billings in 2006, describes this year’s event as a reunion, bringing together writers who taught in Billings in the 1990s during a period of literary workshops hosted through the Writer’s Voice. It was through this organization that Skinner and others presented major lecturers, invit-

THE WRITER’S VOICE

FORMERLY A PROGRAM OF THE BILLINGS FAMILY YMCA, THE WRITER’S VOICE NOW OPERATES AS AN INDEPENDENT PROJECT OF THE BILLINGS CULTURAL PARTNERS TO DEVELOP AND EXPAND PROGRAMS FOR YOUTH AND ADULTS AND PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR RURAL COMMUNITIES TO ENGAGE IN THE LITERARY ARTS. 104 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


“That is what I love about this reunion – a lot of people who have gone on will come back.” ~ Corby Skinner ed well-known writers and offered writing workshops led by accomplished authors. “A lot of the people around today took those classes – people who have published since,” said Skinner. “That is what I love about this reunion – a lot of people who have gone on will come back.” Authors include Gary Ferguson, Pete Fromm, David Cates, Ruth Rudner, William Hjortsberg, David McCumber and David Romtvedt, to name a few. During the event, audiences experience a wide range of literary arts and activities from a diverse group of authors from seven states and three Canadian providences—defined as the High Plains area. For details on the High Plains BookFest and to view the finalists, visit highplainsbookawards.org.

Left: Author Laura Pritchett signs a copy of her novel Stars Go Blue at a panel as part of the High Plains BookFest at the Yellowstone Art Museum’s Visible Vault in 2015. CASEY PAGE, GAZETTE STAFF

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 105


Enhance your natural beauty

Monthly Specials July Ultherapy Special All treatments 10% off (up to a $600 value!) Radiesse Special $75 off treatment

August Hair Removal Package Underarm laser hair removal package All 6 treatments ONLY $400 Voluma Special $50 off treatment

September Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) Laser Special 15% off all package treatments (up to a $230 value!) Juvederm Special $75 off treatment

Facial Plastic Surgery and Medical Spa Trust the complexities of your face to facial plastic surgeon Dr. Matthew Wolpoe, the only physician in our region who is double-board certified in Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery and Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

To schedule your new patient consultation with Dr. Wolpoe, please call Guinevere at (406) 657-4653 or visit billingsclinic.com/facialplastics


SEEN SCENE AT THE

1

2

3

Food for Thought

4

Billings Public Library Foundation 1] Marjorie Fulton, Patrick Cross & Hilary Eisen 2] Bill Cochran & Joe Dillard 3] Donna Lincoln Smith & Janet Ganson 4] Tom Proper & Stella Fong

5

7

6

Stetsons & Stilettos NILE Foundation Fundraiser

The Northern Hotel 5] Kerra Roberts & Amy McGough

Montana Audubon Adventure Camps

9

8

Montana Audubon Center 6] Kyleigh Zents, Jeff Van Cleave & Leila Zentz 7] Joseph, Cherie, Kristofer & Jonathan Salman

YWCA Salute Celebration 2016

10

11

12

Crowne Plaza 8] Erin Kennedy, Commissioner Bill Kennedy & Mary Kennedy 9] Daniel & Jolyn Hoff 10] First Lady Robin Hanel & Mayor Tom Hanel 11] Marc & Lisa Donnot 12] Merry Lee Olson & Barbara Seeley

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 107


SEEN AT THE SCENE 13

14

MSU Billings Foundation Wine & Food Festival

Montana State University Billings 13] Jim, Linda & Jasper Heins 14] Dr. Mark & Cheryl Nook 15] John & Becky Salyer

15

16

15

Strawberry Festival

Downtown Billings 16] James & Tyrin Ikeda 17] Peg Straight & Jacque Alles 18] Steve & Donna Tobin

17

18

Hoedown on Montana Avenue! Billings Depot 19] Kaiden Caraveau & Nadine Porcelain 20] Kylie Ostermiller, Cassidy McJunki, Katie Ostermiller & Shylo Geiger 21] Morgan Jones, Hanna Walter & Marlee PortraZimmerman

19

20

21

Pat Cohen Fly Tying Event

East Rosebud Fly & Tackle 22] Beau Bulton & Russell Ness 23] John Michunavich, Kevin Harris & Pierce Oja 24] Pat Cohen & Connor Maas

22

108 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

23

24


SEEN SCENE AT THE

25

26

27

Book of Golden Deeds Award Presentation

28

29

Family Service, Inc. & Breakfast Exchange Club of Billings 25] Jim, Nicolette & Lyla Wallman 26] Connie Eaton, Lottie & J. E. Williams

Alive After 5

Downtown Billings 27] Mia & Brandi Garcia 28] Judy, Brent, Kirscha, Hudson & Kasch Gray 29] Rosalie, Moriah, Freya, David & Wella Hein

Photo Credit: Jon Pierce; Warren Dignen; Merry Lee Olson/YWCA Billings; Tony Smith/MSUB Foundation Wine & Food Festival; Kari Boiter/Family Service, Inc.; Jonathan Lutz/Montana Audubon Center; Brett Maas; Maddie Alpert

The Best Place in Billings for

Fresh Seafood, Certified Angus Beef™ Specialties, Spirits Private Room Available 245-7477 • 2401 Montana Avenue

406.591.9535 2317 Montana Ave www.NOVAbillings.org

Newly Remodeled Still the best drinks in town 2403 Montana Ave. 259-0047

Historical Downtown Billings, Montana Avenue www.montanaavenue.com

Fine Art • Custom Framing Cards & Gifts 2505 Montana Ave. • 252-0122 www.toucangallery.com

&Art Gallery

o Hours: Mon-Sat 6am-10pm • Sun 9am-5pm 2501 Montana Avenue • Billings, MT www.moavcoffee.com

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 109


MontanaFair MetraPark | Aug. 12-20 What’s not to love about funnel cake, freshly-squeezed lemonade and carnival rides? Make your way to Montana’s largest agricultural celebration, where you can get a taste of the region’s favorite pastimes (farming and the arts) all in one place. With seven live entertainment shows ranging from comedy and musicians to rodeo and supercross, celebrate the end of summer alongside family and friends. Visit montanafair.com for details.

JULY Exhibition is ongoing: Boundless Visions: Selections from the Permanent Collection Yellowstone Art Museum artmuseum.org Until August 21 Exhibit: The Falcon’s Eye: Nature Photographs by Michael Sample Yellowstone Art Museum artmuseum.org Until August 26 Norm’s Island Nature Tours Montana Audubon Center mtaudubon.org Until September 1 Exhibit: History on Canvas: J.K. Ralston Western Heritage Center ywhc.org

Until September 4 Exhibit: Primal Urges Yellowstone Art Museum artmuseum.org Until September 11 Sundays at the Center Montana Audubon Center mtaudubon.org Until September 13 Tuesday Evening Open Hours Montana Audubon Center mtaudubon.org Until September 25 Tippet Rise Art Center tours tippetrise.org Until October 1 Saturdays Yellowstone Valley Farmers’ Market Downtown Billings facebook.com/yellowstonevalleyfarmersmarket

110 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

July 21-22 Shakespeare in the Parks Pioneer Park shakespeareintheparks.org Until October 6 Thursdays Healthy By Design Gardeners’ Market South Park facebook.com/HBDyellowstone Until October 19 Exhibit: Echo: Unspoken Dialects Yellowstone Art Museum artmuseum.org Until October Hoof-it with a Historian: Billings Walking Tours Western Heritage Center ywhc.org Until December 17 Exhibit: In the Wind: Montana Motorcycle Memories Western Heritage Center ywhc.org

July 21-23 Crazy Days Downtown Billings downtownbillings.com July 22-24 & 29-31 You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown NOVA Center for the Performing Arts novabillings.org

Family Fun Day ZooMontana zoomontana.org July 28-31 Red Ants Pants Music Festival White Sulphur Springs, Montana redantspantsmusicfestival.com July 28 Alive After 5: Laney Jones & The Spirits The Rex downtownbillings.com Florida Georgia Line: Dig Your Roots Tour Rimrock Auto Arena at MetraPark metrapark.com Paper ‘n’ Pinot with Tawni Shuler Yellowstone Art Museum artmuseum.org


Rich Country Boys St. John’s Summer Concert Series sjlmevents.org

August 6 10th Annual Climb to Conquer Cancer Red Lodge Mountain Resort facebook.com/redlodgeclimbtoconquercancer

July 29-31 Big Sky International Balloon Rendezvous Amend Park facebook.com/bigskyballoonevent July 30 63rd Annual Mexican Fiesta & Car Show Mary Queen of Peace maryqueenofpeacebillings.org Dirty Dash MetraPark thedirtydash.com Clark Days Pompeys Pillar National Monument pompeyspillar.org

AUGUST August 2 Jon Pardi with Corb Lund in concert ZooMontana 1111presents.com August 3 Summerland Tour ZooMontana 1111presents.com

Beat the Heat 5K ZooMontana zoomontana.org

Magic City Blues | Aug. 5-6

August 4 Alive After 5: Downtime Montana Brewing Company downtownbillings.com Guthrie Brown & The Family Tree St. John’s Summer Concert Series sjlmevents.org

LemonZOOade Day ZooMontana zoomontana.org International Friendship Day Yellowstone Art Museum artmuseum.org August 10 Turnpike Troubadours in concert ZooMontana 1111presents.com

August 5-6 Magic City Blues Fest Downtown Billings magiccityblues.com

August 11 Alive After 5: Sneaky Pete & The Secret Weapons Pug Mahon’s downtownbillings.com

August 5 Summer ArtWalk Various Locations downtownbillings.com

August 12-20 MontanaFair MetraPark montanafair.com

Trunks & Treasures Tours Moss Mansion mossmansion.com Riversage Billings Inn Free Day Yellowstone Art Museum artmuseum.org

August 19 ZooFari ZooMontana zoomontana.org August 20 Nocturnal Life Night Tour Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary yellowstonewildlifesanctuary.org

Josephine Crossing Summer Concert Series Josephine Crossing facebook.com/josephinecrossingsummerconcerts

August 25 Alive After 5: Midlife Chryslers Northern Hotel downtownbillings.com

August 17 Olate Dogs in concert Babcock Theatre 1111presents.com

August 26 Movies in the Park Rose Park billingskiwanis.org

August 18-20 Yellowstone River Roundup PRCA Rodeo Grandstands at MetraPark metrapark.com

August 27 Kansas in concert Alberta Bair Theater 1111presents.com

August 18 Alive After 5: Dirty Power DBA Family Fun Night @ North Park downtownbillings.com

Yellowstone Alpine Klimb Ride begins in Red Lodge facebook.com/byklimo

Jam at the YAM Yellowstone Art Museum artmuseum.org

August 13 Quality of Life Run Billings Rimrocks qualityofliferun.com Rise and Shine Bird Walks Montana Audubon Center mtaudubon.org

High Noon Lecture Series Profiles of African-American Montanans Western Heritage Center ywhc.org August 19 & 25-27 Billings Clinic Classic Multiple locations billingsclinic.com/foundation/ events/classic

August 31-September 3 Wind Ding Gold Wing Rally Rimrock Auto Arena at MetraPark wing-ding.org

SEPTEMBER September 1 2016 YoungLife Clay Shoot Billings Rod & Gun Club billings.younglife.org

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 111


September 2-11 In Conflict NOVA Center for the Performing Arts novabillings.org

The Nitty Gritty Off Road Race Red Lodge Mountain Resort redlodgeevents.com/the-nitty-gritty September 14 Def Leppard with REO Speedwagon & Tesla in concert Rimrock Auto Arena at MetraPark metrapark.com

September 2-3 Burn the Point Downtown Billings & Rocky Mountain College burnthepoint.com September 5 37th Annual Labor Day Arts Fair Lion’s Club Park and Depot Gallery, Red Lodge carboncountydepotgallery.org September 6 Josephine Crossing Summer Concert Series Josephine Crossing facebook.com/josephinecrossingsummerconcerts September 7-9 Women Stepping Forward for Agriculture Annual Conference Bighorn Resort womensteppingforward.org September 8 5th Annual Party for Preservation Moss Mansion mossmansion.com

September 9-11 Home Improvement Show Expo Center at MetraPark billingshomeimprovementshow. com

September 10 Trunks & Treasures Tours Moss Mansion mossmansion.com

Sports Connection Gun Show Montana Pavilion at MetraPark metrapark.com September 9-October 1 Rock of Ages Billings Studio Theatre billingsstudiotheatre.com September 9 Fall Golf Tournament Pryor Creek Golf Course billingshabitat.org

September 16 Red, Whites and Brews NOVA Center for the Performing Arts novabillings.org Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue in concert Alberta Bair Theater albertabairtheater.org Oktoberfest Red Lodge Ales redlodge.com

Movies in the Park Rose Park billingskiwanis.org

Billings Clinic Classic Multiple Locations | August 19 & 25-27 Each summer the Classic fundraises for a specific part of the clinic and 2016 benefits psychiatric services. Like golfing? Gather your team and join a tournament. Staying local? Venture downtown for a street party Saturday, August 27. The night caps off with the band America, igniting strong ‘70s nostalgia at the Alberta Bair Theater. Go to billingsclinic.com/foundation/ events/classic for more information and ticket sales. COURTESY PHOTO

112 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE

September 15 High Noon Lecture Series Briskly Venture, Briskly Roam: The Legend of Yellowstone Kelly Western Heritage Center ywhc.org

Movies in the Park Rose Park billingskiwanis.org September 17 Color Me Rad MetraPark colormerad.com Evening Under the Big Sky Montana Audubon Center mtaudubon.org Nocturnal Life Night Tour Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary yellowstonewildlifesanctuary.org

September 17-18 & 24-25 Parade of Homes hbabillings.net


Ales for Trails Dehler Park | September 23 Help the Billings TrailNet raise money for local trail projects. In its 15th year, Ales for Trails brings the best community brews to Billings’ favorite baseball field for a fun evening where biking enthusiasts combine fundraising forces with microbreweries. For more information, visit billingstrailnet.org or facebook.com/bikenet.

September 18 Bridal Fair Yellowstone Art Museum artmuseum.org

September 23 Ales for Trails Dehler Park billingstrailnet.org

September 22-24 Region 6 Conference Heritage Doll Guild of the Yellowstone Region6conference.org

September 24 Saturday Live Pioneer Park efbps.org

September 22-25 All Nations Indian Relay Championship Grandstands at MetraPark metrapark.com

September 25 Walk to End Alzheimer’s ZooMontana alz.org/walk

September 27-October 2 Wrangler Team Roping Championship MetraPark metrapark.com

October 1 “Unite for the Night” Glow Run Pioneer Park unitedluvglowrun.com

September 28 Anniversary Free Day Moss Mansion mossmansion.com

38th Annual SAINTS Ball Holiday Inn Convention Center svh-mt.org

OCTOBER October 1-2 Boys & Girls Club Vintage Sale & Flea Market Boys & Girls Club of Billings begreatyellowstone.org

October 3 Atmosphere in concert Babcock Theatre 1111presents.com

August Art Walk Various locations | Aug. 5, 5 to 9 p.m. Seize the opportunity to meet local artists and understand the inspiration behind the craft. More than two dozen artists welcome the community into their workspace to discuss and sell their original art. With mediums ranging from paintings and drawings to sculpture, woodworking and everything in-between, ArtWalk celebrates the visual arts and encourages spectators to do the same, for free. For a map and details, see artwalkbillings.com.

MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I 113


GET YOUR HEAD IN THE GAMES

EXPAND YOUR KNOWLEDGE WITH THESE QUICK OLYMPIC-SIZED FACTS: „„ The first Olympic torch was lit in 1928 at the Amsterdam

Olympic Summer Games. „„ Opening Ceremonies featured a variety of musical

accompaniment until an official Olympic Anthem was adopted in 1960. „„ The U.S. boycotted the 1980 Summer Olympic Games

in Moscow. A total of 65 nations refused to participate that year. „„ Women began competing in the Games in Paris in 1900. „„ 1908 marked the first year that a stadium was prepared

specifically for the Games. „„ All five continents were represented for the first time at

the Stockholm Games of 1912. „„ The 1916 Games were cancelled due to World War I. „„ The first Olympic Winter Games were held in France in

1924. „„ Japanese athletes joined the Games in 1928. „„ Altitude supposedly gives some athletes an advantage,

notably creating controversy at the 1968 Games in Mexico. Source: olympic.org

114 I AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 I MAGIC CITY MAGAZINE


Your Largest and Most Complete Selection! • Shirts • Denim Jeans • Outerwear

• Footwear ...and More!

Men’s, Ladies, & Youth Styles BIG R WEST

BIG R HEIGHTS

BIG R EAST

BIG R SHERIDAN

2600 GABEL ROAD (406) 652-9118 216 N. 14TH STREET (406) 252-0503

1908 MAIN STREET (406) 384-0099

2049 SUGARLAND DRIVE (307) 674-6471


Magic Magazine August/September 2016  
Magic Magazine August/September 2016