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THE MAGAZINE OF THE

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LEAGUE OF AMERICAN BICYCLISTS • SUMMER 2019 ISSUE

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IN THIS ISSUE

our 3-year strategic plan the bike new deal benchmarking progress on biking & walking the bright future of bike clubs national bike summit 2019 report advocacy in action: bike laws in the works


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IN THIS ISSUE AMERICAN BICYCLIST • SUMMER 2019 Bike New Deal Building a Bicycle Friendly America for people of all ages and abilities means laying a lot of groundwork for big, transformative changes. Here are our ideas for what that looks like.

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The Strategic Plan: Our Route for the Next Three Years Leading the movement to make biking better takes building a coalition. The League’s strategic plan outlines how we’re moving faster together.

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Benchmarking Report: Five Big Takeaways For the first time, the League authored the Benchmarking Report on Biking & Walking. These are five things you need to know from the latest edition.

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How Bike Advocates Are Affecting Big Changes

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Our work on Capitol Hill is diligent and it’s daily. We have big goals for Congress to help us make biking better. Learn what we’re asking from lawmakers—and how you can help.

viewpoint 2 Moving Forward Faster Together Bill Nesper, Executive Director

club hub 2 4 The Bright Future of Bike Clubs Ralph Monti, Chair of the Board of Directors

e d u c at i o n 1 6 The Coaches Behind the Instructors Alison Dewey

n at i o n a l b i k e s u m m i t 2 6 20 Years Celebrating and Protecting Bicyclists Lauren Jenkins 2 8 2019 Summit Awardees

b i c y c l e f r i e n d ly a m e r i c a 1 9 Interview with Dr. Kanika Tomalin 2 0 BFA: By the Numbers Amelia Neptune Editor: Lauren Jenkins, Communications Director

Design & Layout: Paul Halupka | ha-lup-ka.com

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VIEWPOINT

MOVING FORWARD FASTER TOGETHER e lm Pa

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ian : Br Photo

BY BILL NESPER

Welcome to the latest issue of American Bicyclist. With the summer months in full swing, this is a time when we often start to look back on the high season for bicycling advocacy, which includes our National Summit held every March and National Bike Month celebrated in May. This March, our 20th Annual National Bike Summit highlighted just how much we have grown over two decades as a movement and how much critically important work still remains to be done. Just as the first small Summit in 2000 signaled an important shift up in bicycle advocacy, we find ourselves at another pivotal moment in 2019: in order to create a future where people in every neighborhood, in every community—regardless of size or economic resources—can safely, comfortably, and conveniently bike for transportation and recreation, we need to amplify the voices for bicycling in Washington and deliver the resources to strengthen our network of partners on the ground. Over the past 20 years, our movement has grown in number and has become more representative of our communities thanks to our partner organizations at the local and state levels, like Advocacy Organization of the Year award winner Bikemore. With the help of the League’s Smart Cycling and Bicycle Friendly America programs, individuals like advocacy and education award winners Ed Barsotti, Deltrece Daniels, Jamie Gaskill, and Vivian Ortiz are making people’s lives and communities better through bicycling. We’ve been drawing a bigger circle and making new allies across

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different sectors. At this year’s Bike Summit, representatives from AARP, AASHTO, Amazon, Smart Growth America, USDOT, as well as business, public health, and transportation leaders from across the country joined local and state advocates to network, share best practices, and strategize. I’m incredibly proud of the success we’ve seen in our work here in Washington, DC, like increasing annual funding for bicycling and walking fourfold over the last two decades. We’re excited to share the progress of that advocacy with you in this edition. We’ve seen successes by local leaders, too, with more people riding, especially in Bicycle Friendly Communities that have combined low-stress bicycling network development with comprehensive education, encouragement, enforcement, and evaluation programs. But we recognize that even with these successes, the transportation system still largely prioritizes automobile speed and congestion relief over safety, active transportation, access and sustainability. The reality on the street is that people on bikes often experience distracted drivers, design that encourages high speeds, and disconnected bicycling networks that showcase a lack of real investment. While we are making progress together, we have to accelerate improvements for safer streets. As we move forward, I know this acceleration will happen because people like you continue to show up and generously contribute to our movement. You show up at community meetings, lead Bicycle Friendly Community efforts, teach Smart Cycling classes, and


“WE KNOW THAT BICYCLES ARE THE BEST VEHICLES EVER INVENTED...

Cyclists and pedestrians alike enjoy the East Coast Greenway where it passes through Cary, NC. Photo courtesy of East Coast Greenway

take action on local and state-level advocacy. You understand that the work has to be comprehensive and reflect the needs of the community beyond bicycling itself in order to be effective. Together, we can shift perceptions, and promote a positive vision of a future where more people see themselves in the picture. In order to have the broadest possible impact, our work must put people and love of community at the center. One of our roles at the League is in visioning and setting strategy for the national movement. We know that bicycles are the best vehicles ever invented. But we’re just beginning to show the

Riders at the 2019 National Bike Summit Photo: Brian Palmer

...BUT WE’RE JUST BEGINNING TO SHOW THE PROFOUND ROLE THAT BICYCLING CAN PLAY IN HELPING US BUILD STRONGER, MORE CONNECTED COMMUNITIES.” profound role that bicycling can play in helping us build stronger, more connected communities. We’re very proud to be sharing a look at our new 2019-2021 Strategic Plan in this issue. At its core is the conviction that the League is an organization of organizations and individuals riding together towards a future where everyone can use their streets safely regardless of mode or purpose, where every dollar invested in the transportation system contributes to making bicycling a safer, more attractive and convenient option for everyone. But we can’t do any of this without your good work and support. Thanks again for riding with us!

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Be Seen. Get the Green.

Raising awareness about the life-saving benefits of bicycle detection technology.

iteris.com/beseen


We know bike parking. Inside and out.ÂŽ

www.dero.com (888) 337-6729


BIKE NEW DEAL A BOLD VISION FOR THE FUTURE OF BIKING & WALKING BY KEN MCLEOD

Accelerating the movement to build a more Bicycle Friendly America will require a framework for the future—a vision for what it would look like for cyclists and biking to be essential elements of decision-making about our transportation system.

In our recent 2018 Benchmarking Report, the League found the U.S. is in the midst of a public health crisis of physical inactivity and deadly roads that are connected to the deaths of nearly 7,000 people walking or biking each year. To us, this requires action and the best bang for the buck is overhauling our transportation systems to make them safe, convenient, and accessible for people who walk and bike.

Building better places for people who walk and bike is technologically feasible today and only requires leadership to make it a priority. Our Bike New Deal addresses the urgency to act, and act in a big way to make biking and walking better for everyone.

R WE EN VIS ION FIV E MA JO IZE BIL MO INV EST ME NT S TO E AM ER ICA NS AR OU ND TH R, HIE ALT HE A OF S GO AL TU RE . MO RE SU STA INA BLE FU

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INVESTMENT 1 Connected, safe, all-ages bicycling networks in our communities

Photo: East Coast Greenway Alliance

A major part of creating a Bicycle Friendly America for Everyone in a Bike New Deal is building the foundations of our communities: sidewalks and bikeways and other infrastructure that are designed for the safety of the most vulnerable road users.

Photo: University of Florida

INVESTMENT 3 INVESTMENT 2 Commuter benefits promote active transportation and access to jobs for low-income and unemployed people New tax benefits should provide assistance to the most vulnerable workers, increasing the ability of low-income people and the unemployed to access jobs, and encouraging bicycling, walking, and transit use – rather than primarily encouraging car use in already congested urban centers.

Learn more, share online, and provide feedback:

bikeleague.org/BikeNewDeal

Bicycling mega projects like the East Coast Greenway completed in ten years, connecting our communities Establishing the interstate highway system in the 1950s reshaped American culture around cars. Bicycling-focused mega-projects are how we reframe the status quo. Within 10 years, we could see a transformation in long-distance bicycling, tourism, and the idea of how people can experience America: connecting communities small and large, urban and rural, though millions of small interactions, human connections, and people experiencing the diversity and hospitality of America in a way that is simply not possible on a highway. 7


The US is a leader again on vehicle and road safety standards

INVESTMENT 4

The United States no longer has the same safety standards for vehicles found in most developed countries that would protect other road users like bicyclists and pedestrians, including the testing of automated systems that could save lives today. The failure to ensure that vehicles are safe for all people is, in part, why the United States has about twice as many traffic fatalities per capita as other developed countries. Simply by meeting global vehicle safety standards through NHTSA’s New Car Assessment Program testing, the United States could reduce traffic fatalities.

Photo: City of South San Francisco

By 8th grade, every child in the US will have received bicycling education—on a bicycle

INVESTMENT 5

As we found in the 2018 Benchmarking Report, biking and walking are becoming more and more rare for children ages 5-15 years old. A major barrier to getting more youth on bikes and walking is a lack of publicly funded education on getting around safely by bike. By providing bicycle education in schools, a generation will be empowered to know the joy of biking, be able to safely use a low-cost form of transportation, and be safer drivers.

PERCENT OF TRIPS BY CHILDREN & YOUTH (Age 5 to 15) 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

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2001

2009

2017

A startling decline: In the 16 years since 2001, the percent of trips taken by children and youth has been consistently dropping. The League seeks to reverse this trend.


SUPPORT THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN BICYCLISTS

THROUGH PLANNED GIVING Many of our members express their

commitment to our long-term sustainability by naming the League in their wills or trusts.

With a planned gift, you can balance your personal financial goals with your interest in supporting the bike movement...

for generations to come.

Founded in 1880, the League has the longevity and national reach to add value to your planned gift, delivering the freedom and independence that only bicycling can bring.

Reach out today to learn how your estate can help further the League's mission—and build a prosperous future for American bicycling. Contact Kevin Dekkinga

Director of Membership and Development Kevin@bikeleague.org | 202.621.5449


C R E AT I N G A B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY A M E R I C A

THE LEAGUE’S STRATEGIC PLAN: OUR ROUTE FOR THE NEXT THREE YEARS Since 1880, the League has been a leading advocate for bicyclists’ rights in the United States. We know that our victories on behalf of bicyclists have been because we’ve worked together with partner organizations and a dedicated network of change-makers on the ground. United in our belief that life is better when more people are on bikes, the League is shifting up and accelerating the movement to create a Bicycle Friendly America for Everyone. In this new Strategic Plan, you will see a continuation of the principles and strategies that have guided us in recent years to make biking better. Our promise is staked in the notion that cycling isn’t just good for us, it’s good for everyone in our communities and to our nation as a whole.

S T R AT E G I C G O A L S Investment In Better Bicycling

Ensure that every dollar invested in the transportation system contributes to making bicycling a safer, more attractive & convenient option for everyone.

Advocating for Safety for All Ages & Abilities

Ensure people of all ages and abilities can use our streets and highways safely regardless of mode or purpose.

A Healthy & Innovative Organization Build and maintain a strong, sustainable, wellresourced organization.

Equity, Diversity & Inclusion

Build a board and staff and a network of partners and allies that represent and are connected to America’s diverse communities.

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OUR MISSION

is to lead the movement to create a Bicycle Friendly America for Everyone. As leaders, our commitment is to listen and learn, define standards and share best practices to engage diverse communities and build a powerful, unified voice for change.

OUR VISION

is a nation where everyone recognizes and enjoys the many benefits and opportunities of bicycling.

WE BELIEVE

Bicycling brings people together. When more people ride bikes… » life is better for everyone. » communities are safer, stronger and better connected. » our nation is healthier, economically stronger, environmentally cleaner and more energy independent.


MAKING THE SHIF T:

A NEW APPROACH The League has embraced key shifts in focus that continue to improve our programs, organizational structure, and sustainability.

FROM...

TO...

Only looking out for bicyclists

Positioning bicycling as something that helps others achieve their health, sustainability, and economic goals

Only or primarily serving a bicycling population

Serving, relating to and adding value to the entire population—across America’s diverse communities

A reactive position of responding & demanding

Leading and building partnerships inside and outside bicycling communities

Focusing advocacy on the “right” to safe bicycling

Empowering policymakers with an understanding of the inherent value of Bicycle Friendly Communities

Current League culture

An organizational culture driven by an intentional “listening-andlearning” mode

See the full plan and dig deep on the Goals, Milestones & Strategies:

bikeleague.org/StrategicPlan

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C R E AT I N G A B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY A M E R I C A

5 BIG TAKEAWAYS FROM THE BENCHMARKING REPORT ON BICYCLING AND WALKING IN THE U.S. BY KEN MCLEOD

You can’t plot a new route or set a personal record without knowing where you’ve ridden before, or how long it took—you need to have a standard, a baseline. To fulfill the League’s mission to create a more Bicycle Friendly America for everyone, we need to know what bicycling looks like in America today so that we can make it better tomorrow.

Our recently released Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2018 Benchmarking Report does just that by analyzing data and official documents from states and communities. We found a mix of good news and bad, of reasons for optimism and reasons we must demand more urgent action. Where we have seen progress, it is thanks to forward-thinking advocates and city leaders, but further leadership at the federal and state level

is necessary to coordinate the design and implementation of cohesive, connected, and safe environments for bicycling and walking in America. With the 2018 Benchmarking Report and future editions, the League is continuing the important work of standard setting for our community so that together we can track our progress and set goals for making bicycling and walking better in the near and long term.

AS WE LO OK AH EA D, HE RE AR E FIV E KE Y E TAK EAWAYS TH E LEA GU 18 20 E TH IN ED IFI IDE NT BE NC HM AR KIN G RE PO RT.

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NATIONAL HOUSEHOLD TRAVEL SURVEY DATA SHOWS AN

INCREASE IN WALKING + THE IMPORTANCE OF BIKING TO WORK

Overall, the amount of walking in the U.S. went up and there was a statistically significant increase in the percentage of all trips done by walking – with 11.9 percent of trips in the United States done by walking. Unfortunately, the amount of bicycling mostly stayed the same, with lower rates of bicycling and walking among young people being offset by increased rates of bicycling and walking in other age groups. Notably, a higher percentage of bicycle trips were ridden by women in 2017 and a higher percentage of bicycle trips were by people from low income households ($25,000 per year or less) in 2017. The 2018 Benchmarking Report includes analysis of the 2017 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS), conducted roughly once a decade, which provides data on all modes of transportation across the United States – including data we otherwise do not have such as the minutes, distances, and numbers of bicycling and walking trips.

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Together, bicyclist and pedestrian fatalities accounted for more than 18 percent of traffic fatalities, a nearly 40 percent increase since the first Benchmarking Project in 2007. These increases in traffic fatalities were widespread, but not universal, with several states and cities making notable improvements in bicyclist and pedestrian safety. States like Oregon prove that it is possible to increase the number of cyclists on road ways while simultaneously reducing bicyclist fatalities through smart policies and infrastructure. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reported that people driving cars killed 835 bicyclists in crashes in 2016 – the highest number since 1991. NHTSA also reported that 5,987 people were killed by motor vehicles while walking – the highest number since 1990.

TRAFFIC FATALITIES ARE UP: THE NUMBER OF BICYCLISTS AND PEDESTRIANS KILLED BY MOTOR VEHICLES HIT 25-YEAR HIGHS IN 2016

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IN THE LAST DECADE,

BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN PLANNING HAVE BECOME ROUTINE FOR LARGE CITIES

When the benchmarking project began in 2007, only eight of the 50 largest cities reported having a Complete Streets policy and in 2010, only 35 had a bicycle and/or pedestrian master plan. Now, these actions are routine – with 40 of the 50 largest cities having a Complete Streets policy and 49 having a bicycle and/or pedestrian master plan.

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Rapid adoption of bicycle and pedestrian activities can also be seen in other areas such as Open Streets events (going from 10 cities in 2010 to 36 today) and bikeshare systems (expanding from 5 in 2012 to 44 today, not counting private dockless bikeshare systems). The best part about these local policy changes is that individual cyclists can have a huge impact by getting involved with their grassroots advocacy organizations and commissions.

THE BENCHMARKING REPORT IS NOW PUBLISHED BY THE LEAGUE,

LEVERAGING OUR PROGRAMS’ INSIGHTS AND DATA IN NEW AND EXCITING WAYS


WHEN IT COMES TO PLANNING FOR BIKES AND PEDESTRIANS,

STATES HAVE NOT KEPT PACE WITH CITIES OVER THE LAST DECADE

While large cities have reached very high rates of bicycle and pedestrian planning, states have not. Nearly half the states have no formal bicycle and pedestrian planning, whether evidenced by master plans (over a third have never adopted a master plan and half have not adopted one in the last decade) or Complete Streets policies (about a third have never adopted one and most lack legislation and complementary agency policies). This lack of supportive state planning and policies is important as states without plans or Complete Streets policies have worse outcomes than states with supportive policies. Since 2006, the rate of increase in bicycling to work has been three times higher in states with Complete Streets policies than in states without them.

This is the first Benchmarking Report on bicycling and walking in the United States published by the League of American Bicyclists, following previous editions by the Alliance for Biking and Walking. We used this opportunity to truly see the state of bicycling through the lens of bicyclists while leveraging our Bicycle Friendly America (BFA) programs to include data about businesses, communities, and states that would otherwise not be available.

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Further, while some state legislatures and state departments of transportation believe bicycling and walking are local issues, significant numbers of bicyclist and pedestrian fatalities occur on state-owned roads--in most states bicyclist fatalities are more likely to occur on stateowned roads than roadways owned by other jurisdictions. The lack of state support for bicyclist and pedestrian safety can also be seen in how little funding from the Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) is spent on bicycling and walking safety. In fiscal years 2014-2016, only 17 states spent any HSIP money on bicycling and walking safety and that spending was less than 1 percent of all HSIP spending despite bicyclist and pedestrian fatalities accounting for 18 percent of all traffic fatalities.

Similarly, we look forward to future efforts that coordinate our BFA work with data-driven benchmarks. As an example, our Bicycle Friendly Community program allows us to report on what people communities are reaching for bicycle education classes: women and lowerincome populations are the most likely to receive targeted outreach about adult bicycle education opportunities.

Produced with support from groups such as the Centers for Disease Control, AARP and Toole Design Group, the 2018 Benchmarking Report demonstrates an urgency and a desire to create bikeable and walkable communities for everyone. To learn more about the 2018 Benchmarking Report or download the full report, visit bikeleague.org/benchmarking-report

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E D U C AT I O N

THE COACHES BEHIND THE INSTRUCTORS BY ALISON DEWEY

A N E L I T E F A C U LT Y O F L E A G U E C O A C H E S G R O W S , E X PA N D I N G T H E N U M B E R S O F L C I s N AT I O N W I D E In creating a more Bicycle Friendly America, the League wants to make biking safer, easier, and more accessible to everyone, whether commuting to work, exercising, or simply enjoying the freedom felt while bicycling. Part of that is engineering and encouragement, but another part of that is education. To be a Bicycle Friendly Community, for example, a place must offer educational programs in bicycling skills for adults and children.

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Our more than 6,000 League Cycling Instructors (LCIs) are key educators in communities across the country, leading classes so adults and youth can build their confidence and bike handling skills. Training LCIs to teach our Smart Cycling skills rests in the hands of our elite faculty of League Cycling Coaches. Without instructors like these, we couldn’t advance our programs nationwide.


J O I N U S I N W E LCO M I N G T WO N E W L E AG U E C YC L I N G C O A C H E S T O O U R N E T W O R K : JAMIE GASKILL

J A N M AT H E U S

Jamie Gaskill, an LCI since 2014, knows that bicycling education is about more than just bikes. Her commitment to reaching diverse audiences led to launching the Bicycle Friendly Driver class in December 2015, with a focus on teaching motor vehicle users more about how bicyclists ride and react.

Growing up in Iowa, Jan Matheus thought people who rode their bikes across the entire state must be crazy. Now, in addition to being a passionate bike advocate and an LCI since 2014, she’s a six-year participant in RAGBRAI, the ride across Iowa.

FORT COLLINS, CO

Q: Why did you decide to pursue becoming a League Cycling Coach? A: Being a League Coach enables me to combine my love of bicycling and my passion for people. Bicycling has the power to transform people’s lives and make the world a better place. By training League Cycling Instructors, I hope to inspire others to make a positive difference through bicycling and bicycling education. Q: Why is bicycle safety education important to you? A: Education is an essential component of creating a Bicycle Friendly America. I like to call education the “Gateway E” of bicycle friendliness. It is one of the most affordable and impactful ways to influence individuals and build a culture that embraces bicycling as a form of transportation and a form of recreation. In addition, I truly believe that by educating all road users we not only make for a better bicycling culture, we also save people’s lives and reduce the number of crashes. Ultimately when we have safer bicycling communities we will see more people riding bikes.

RICHFIELD, MN

Q: Why did you decide to pursue becoming a League Cycling Coach? A: I have been an educator for over 25 years. I find great enjoyment in helping people learn and succeed. Becoming an LCI was one of the best things I have accomplished, and I want to be able to help other educators and advocates find the joy in bicycle safety. Q: Why is bicycle safety education important to you? A: Riding a bike is good for so many things, health, mental wellness, environmental impact, plus it is so much fun. Teaching people how to drive a bike safely anywhere takes away many of the barriers we face. Smart cycling helped me be a more confident cyclist, and I believe that is the key. My goal is to help others be confident so they choose their bike more.

Photos on these pages courtesy of City of Fort Collins

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Turning cities into safer, more accessible and more welcoming places for people.

zicla.com/en usa@zicla.com Find us here


INTERVIEW WITH DR. KANIKA TOMALIN Photo: Maria Flanagan

DEPUTY MAYOR AND CITY ADMINISTRATOR, CITY OF ST. PETERSBURG

Photos: City of St. Petersburg Bicycle Co-op

B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY A M E R I C A

Q: We know when more people bike, communities see health benefits. Are there other benefits St. Pete is seeing by encouraging more people to bike?

Dr. Tomalin with a Coast Bike Share bicycle in St. Pete

A: Encouraging more people in our community to bike is producing great results that are advancing our goals in several areas. In addition to our Healthy St. Pete aim of becoming a healthier community overall, biking is helping our transportation, sustainability and resiliency goals. As a coastal city strategizing ways to align as effectively as possible with our natural resources, we are committed to doing all we can to encourage and contribute to an environment with less emissions and a smaller carbon footprint. This means community education, planting more trees, efforts to become 100% clean energy producing, and implementing Complete Streets, a citywide initiative designed to enhance equity among modalities. Extolling the benefits of transportation alternatives such as biking is a critical element of this work and we are excited to see more people biking in our community!

Q: How has St. Pete been most successful in encouraging more people to bike?

Q: What has motivated and shaped your advocacy for active transportation?

A: Our community is really the success behind our growing bike culture. Our neighborhoods, advocacy groups and biking enthusiasts have really come together to promote biking as not only a sustainable alternative mode of transportation, but as a healthy way to get out and spend time with family and friends exploring our beautiful city. We are committed to do everything we can to amplify and accelerate this positive momentum by creating policy solutions and innovative practices that reinforce our awesome culture.

A: Active transportation is just another marker of a healthy community. Before serving as Deputy Mayor, I worked for many years as a healthcare executive. In that capacity, I learned the difference access to good healthcare and health services can make in a family’s life. Health factors, and their social determinants, affect everything from child development to the financial literacy of a family – so if we want to have an economically prosperous and vibrant community, we must consider health as one of our key ingredients to success. 19


BICYCLE FRIENDLY AMERICA:

BY THE NUMBERS BY AMELIA NEPTUNE

In our mission to build a more Bicycle Friendly America, the League sets standards on what it takes for an entity to be awarded a coveted “Bicycle Friendly” designation. In our Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 awards, our list of new Bicycle Friendly Businesses, Communities and Universities has continued to grow.

MN

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new Bicycle Friendly Businesses in Walker, MN (pop. 969)

PLATINUM

new Bicycle Friendly Businesses in Fergus Falls, MN (pop. 13,783)

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19,000 employees at Facebook, the largest Platinum-level Bicycle Friendly Business

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GA

THE LEAGUE

OF AMERICAN BICYCLISTS

GOLD

THE LEAGUE

OF AMERICAN BICYCLISTS

new Platinum-level Bicycle Friendly Businesses (our highest award!)

588

Population of the smallest Bicycle Friendly Community (Jekyll Island, Ga.)


TOP 3 COMMUNITIES

W I T H T H E M O S T B I C YC L E F R I E N D LY B U S I N E S S E S

#1

Fort Collins, CO

61

Including 12 new BFBs added in Spring 2019

43

#2

Tampa, FL

Including 4 new BFBs added in Spring 2019

#3

Arlington, VA

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BICYCLE FRIENDLY COMMUNITIES (BFCs)

19

cities & towns became BFCs for the first time

15

communities upgraded their BFC award level

68

communities renewed their BFC status

28.4% Population of the U.S. that lives in a Bicycle Friendly Community (as of 2018)

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Bicycle Friendly Communities and Businesses go together: in Davis, California, the city and Davis Food Co-op host an annual Children’s Candlelight Parade that Santa visits by bike! Photo courtesty of Davis Food Co-op

I N A B I C YC L E F R I E N D LY A M E R I C A ,

BIKES MEAN BUSINESS & BETTER OUTCOMES

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Photo: Brian Palmer

TO LEA RN MO RE AB OU T TH E BICYC LE FR IEN DLY D AM ER ICA PR OG RA M AN U, YO AR AWAR DE ES NE FA VIS IT BIK ELE AG UE .OR G/B


B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY C O M M U N I T I E S “There are many “By tying bicycling “Bicycling provides positive outcomes to economic a platform for but some of the most development, Carmel inclusion, community important to us are has been able to invest participation, healthy getting our community over $34 million dollars living, and equitable and visitors outside in bicycle related transportation. and moving around, infrastructure over the Ferguson’s investment increased tourism, and last five years.” in and commitment to improved accessibility bicycling has opened —Carmel, IN, to the outdoors a new lens through a Silver Bicycle Friendly Community and downtown for which residents and physically challenged visitors alike can adults and youth.” experience the people and places that make —Walker, MN, Ferguson what it is a Bronze BFC today.”

“As we begin to build high-comfort bikeways, we are also building trust and fostering inclusion in our diverse community to help make Houston a more user friendly and safer experience for all road users.” —Houston, TX, a Bronze BFC

—Ferguson, MO, a Bronze BFC

W E A S K E D O U R B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY COMMUNITIES AND BUSINESSES:

“What is the most positive outcome of making biking better in your community?” B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY B U S I N E S S E S “The most positive outcome from supporting bicycling in our community is the amount of support we have seen returned. The Boise community is active and supports us by volunteering their time at events, and advocating for bicycle infrastructure and education to make Boise the #1 Bicycling Capital in America!” —Boise Bicycle Project, a Platinum BFB

“The Florida Aquarium is fiercely committed to protecting and restoring our blue planet. Being a bicycle friendly business is not only good for our environment, but also the health and well-being of our staff, volunteers and guests - after all, we are one with each other.”

“For HSU, the most positive outcomes are lessening parking constraints and the role bicycling plays in meeting our greenhouse gas reduction goals. And through bicycling advocacy, we are strengthening our partnership with the City of Arcata, —The Florida Aquarium, Humboldt County Association of a Bronze BFB Governments, and other local transit organizations.”

“By riding a bike, we all become healthier and happier. Biking helps us understand our city, learn about connectivity by bike and lead public projects that improve bicycle and pedestrian facilities for millions of people across the Houston region.” —Harris County Precinct One, Office of Commissioner Rodney Ellis, a Gold BFB

—Humboldt State University, a Bronze BFB

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Photo: Brian Palmer

CLUB HUB

THE BRIGHT FUTURE OF BIKE CLUBS BY RALPH MONTI

Bike clubs are evolving to think beyond the ride calendar— and it’s helping some of them connect with new members.

Bike clubs face a perpetual challenge: attracting new members. In recent years, this challenge has proven particularly pressing as many clubs “age out” and younger bicyclists opt for meeting riding partners through informal online groups, shop rides, or corporate ride groups. The result has been a decline in membership for many bike clubs, leaving their leaders looking for ways to stave off extinction. To support our clubs, this year’s National Bike Summit offered a specially conceived “Bike Club Leaders Super Session”. Club leaders, advocates and others shared solutions to increase member enthusiasm and successful strategies to grow membership. The overarching conclusion was that smart clubs are evolving from the “old” paradigm of

being a “rides-only” entity, and are morphing into a newer, more expanded operating model that offers activities beyond rides. The principal goals of this new bike club model are to serve the common good, become an influential voice in the community, promote the club itself, and, of course, attract new members with a mission and not just miles. Just as how we expect that companies must be leaders in corporate social responsibility, bike clubs are also re-imagining how their purpose extends beyond just rides. It will demand more work and a pool of diverse talent, but it will ultimately keep your bike club fresh, relevant, and reaching more riders well into the future.

C LU B L EA DER S : WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

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The League is planning additional club-focused webinars, workshops, and more in 2019. We would like to hear from club leaders about their challenges and successes. Please send your thoughts and feedback to: membership@bikeleague.org


Photo courtesy of U. of Kentucky

Local learn-to-ride programs and bike safety instruction

C K L IS T: C L U B L E A D E R C H E R R EC R U IT M E N T S H A P P R O A C H E S FO

Kids’ bike rodeos featuring League Cycling Instructors

Photo courtesy of Roseville, CA

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NATIONAL BIKE SUMMIT 2019 20 YEARS CELEBRATING & PROTECTING BICYCLISTS BY LAUREN JENKINS

With the time and effort League staff and volunteers put into planning, promoting and executing our annual Summit, the feedback from attendees of the 2019 National Bike Summit can be very gratifying. In a postSummit survey, 94% of attendees reported they would recommend the Summit to a friend or colleague. The yearly Summit is the largest gathering of bike advocates in the country, with sessions and plenaries dedicated to expanding advocates’ breadth of bike knowledge. From panels on diversifying bicycling communities to include people with disabilities to keynotes on the links between our built environment (like protected, connected bike networks) and a neighborhood’s well-being, this year’s Summit

26

offered programming on the many facets of making biking better. We were excited to bring neuroscientist Robin Mazumder as a keynote speaker for his ability to educate us beyond the bike. “He connected health, design, and human experience to a healthy community and healthy transportation,” one attendee said, “so it wasn’t just about biking, but a holistic, healthy community.”

[THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER] C O N N E C T E D H E A LT H , D E S I G N , AND HUMAN EXPERIENCE TO A H E A LT H Y C O M M U N I T Y A N D H E A LT H Y T R A N S P O R TAT I O N . S O I T WA S N ’ T J U ST A B O U T BIKING, BUT A HOLISTIC, H E A LT H Y C O M M U N I T Y.” — SUMMIT ATTENDEE, ABOUT KEYNOTE SPEAKER ROBIN MAZUMDER

Leaders in the public and private sector can be catalysts for building better places to bike. At the Summit, we heard from Stave Hartell (Amazon), Dr. Kanika Tomalin (City of St. Petersburg), Danielle Arigoni (AARP), and Christian Dorsey (Arlington County) on the panel, “Creating Healthy, Livable Communities in a Time of Disruptive Change”.

All photos on these pages: Brian Palmer

“Best Summit ever.” “I was inspired.” “I came to the Summit with no prior knowledge on bicycle advocacy—by the end of Lobby Day I felt comfortable in meetings, wishing I could do more.”


D I D YO U K N O W ?

58

%

O F S U M M I T AT T E N D E E S A R E R E P E AT V I S I T O R S

“The work you are doing involves both freedom and dignity,” Robin Mazumder told Summit attendees in his keynote.

Lobby Day was unreservedly the highlight of the Summit for a majority of attendees. While each of us is an individual voice for bicyclists in our communities every day, Lobby Day is a rare opportunity to have our collective voice heard at the highest levels of government. This year, in hundreds of meetings across Capitol Hill, Summit attendees made huge strides for the safety and accessibility of bicycling. Subsequent to the Summit, the League was asked to provide testimony on Capitol Hill about how to make our roads safer for people biking and walking and two bills were introduced that would put more federal dollars towards more plentiful and safer bike infrastructure.

Left, middle: At post-election year National Bike Summits, Lobby Day offers an opportunity for advocates to educate freshmen lawmakers about our policy priorities. For Vivian Ortiz, it was an opportunity to catch up with a friend, newly elected and new Congressional Bike Caucus member Rep. Ayanna Pressley. Left, bottom: In plenaries and in breakouts, in mobile workshops and at poster sessions—there are so many ways Summit attendees can learn and share with each other. Deltrece Daniels, left, was one of nearly two dozen poster presenters.

Next year, plan to join the League and hundreds of your closest bike friends at the 21st National Bike Summit, March 15-17, 2020, at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Arlington, Virginia. Stay up to date at bikeleague.org/summit

READ MORE ABOUT WHAT WE’RE ASKING CONGRESS TO DO FOR BICYCLISTS ON PAGE 30 27


Deltrece Daniels CLEVEL AND, OH EMERGING LEADER

This award is a special accolade for a young person who is new to the bicycling movement and has demonstrated exceptional and inspiring bicycle advocacy.

HONORING OUR 2019 NATIONAL BIKE SUMMIT AWARD WINNERS Each National Bike Summit, the League recognizes the individuals and organizations who inspired us, motivated us, and encouraged us to make biking better over the past year. At this year’s 20th edition, we honored four advocates and one organization for their vibrant advocacy for people who bike and walk.

Jamie Gaskill FORT COLLINS, CO G A I L & J I M S P A N N E D U C AT O R OF THE YEAR

This award recognizes a person that has worked to elevate bike education in their community or state by being an active League Cycling Instructor who teaches classes, serves diverse communities, and shows innovation in their education work. 28

Photos on these pages: Brian Palmer

N AT I O N A L B I K E S U M M I T 2 0 1 9


Bikemore B A LT I M O R E , M D A D V O C A C Y O R G A N I Z AT I O N OF THE YEAR

This award goes to a bicycling and/or walking advocacy organization or club who, in the past year, made significant progress to grow and strengthen their organization and fulfill their mission.

Ed Barsotti AURORA, IL A D V O C AT E O F T H E Y E A R

This award goes to a leader who has shown tireless commitment to promoting bicycling and walking by going above and beyond the call of duty to transform their community with their time, knowledge, and creativity.

Vivian Ortiz M AT TA PA N , M A S U S I E S T E P H E N S J OY F U L E N T H U S I A S M AWA R D

This award commemorates Susie Stephens, one of the Alliance for Biking & Walking’s founders and an enduring inspiration for many members of the bicycle and pedestrian movement.

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ADVOCACY IN ACTION � THE LEAGUE’S AGENDA

FROM LOBBY DAY TO LAWS FOR SAFER STREETS:

HOW BIKE ADVOCATES ARE AFFECTING CHANGE B Y CA R O N W H I TA K E R

IN M ARCH , hundreds of advocates attended the National Bike Summit and met with lawmakers on Capitol Hill to deliver a message:

People who bike and walk deserve better, safer roads.

In the months since our Bicycle Lobby Day, we’ve been seeing our efforts, backed by your voices, making headway on the Hill. Read on to learn how we’re making it happen. 30


DELIVERING ON BETTER POLICY: H OW T H E L E AG U E M A K E S A DVO C AC Y WO R K

Photo: Brian Palmer

League Advocacy Every week, the League is meeting with lawmakers and their staff on Capitol Hill to promote and protect the rights of people who bike. We rely on the voices of passionate League members and bicyclists to give power and urgency to the issue of making biking better for everyone.

Summit Lobby Day In March, advocates attending the National Bike Summit conducted hundreds of meetings with Members of Congress, senators, and their staff. This year, the League and our advocates asked Congress to enhance the Transportation Alternatives program, increase and improve funding mechanisms for road safety, and encourage more people to commute by bike with a tax benefit.

It was the first time since 2011 that Congress heard testimony from the bike advocacy community. Mike Sewell, who is a League Board member, a daily bike commuter, an LCI, and a traffic engineer, represented the League in asking Congress to improve road safety for everyone.

New Bills Introduced Take a look at the following pages to get a look at the new legislation and its potential impact nationwide.

Better Biking for Everyone Throughout the summer and fall, the League will continue building on the advocacy of our membership to ensure Congress takes the necessary steps forward to increase funding to improve biking for everyone. The League relies on members like you to continue taking action to make our advocacy stronger. Together, we can create the resources and political will to build a more Bicycle Friendly America.

Photo: Office of Comissioner Rodney Ellis

Bike Safety Hearing In April, after bike advocates were a resounding voice on the Hill, the League was invited to testify at a House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee hearing on road safety.

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P RO B LE M Commuter Tax Benef its Have Disappeared

Currently, bike commuters do not recieve any tax benefits similar to those extended by employers to car commuters or transit users. Congress suspended a previous bike commuter benefit in 2018.

P RO B LE M Bike Funding Is Weak and Hard for Some Communities to Access

Under the current Transportation Alternatives program, funding is limited to a dollar amount and does not increase even as other transportation programs increase. Areas with small populations often can’t get enough funding for projects and don’t have the technical capacity to put together strong applications and navigate the implementation process.

P RO B LE M Bike/Ped Fatalities Are Growing As Safety Funding Is Shrinking

Pedestrian and bicyclists fatalities have been on the rise in the United States and are now at their highest level in almost 20 years. Nearly 1 in 5 people who die in traffic crashes are people biking, walking, or using mobility devices like wheelchairs. States report spending less than 1 percent of their federal highway safety funding on vulnerable user safety.

VISIT BIKELEAGUE.ORG/ TAKEACTION TO SHOW CONGRESS THAT THE LEAGUE’S MEMBERS WANT THESE BILLS TO PASS. 32


SOLUTI O N

RESU LT

Bicycle Commuter Act

+ Reinstate bike commuter benefit

H.R. 1507, the Bicycle Commuter Act, would make up to $53/month in tax benefits available to bike commuters, including those using bikeshare and e-bikes. Bike commuters would also be able to combine the benefit with parking and transit benefits for more freedom of choice.

+ Allow combining with parking and transit benefits

SOLUTI O N

RESU LT

Transportation Alternatives Enhancement Act

+ Big impacts on how well local governments can access and utilize federal funding to build better infrastructure for biking and walking

In April, Senators Ben Cardin (D-Md.) and Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) introduced S.1098, the Transportation Alternatives Enhancements Act, which would make a number of improvements to Transportation Alternatives that would empower local leadership to direct spending on bike and pedestrian projects.

SOLUTI O N

RESU LT

SAFE Streets Act

+ Improve safety funding

In May, following the League's congressional testimony and lobbying, Representatives Julia Brownley (CA-26) and Adriano Espaillat (NY13) introduced H.R. 3040, the Safe and Friendly for the Environment Streets Act, or the SAFE Streets Act. This would create a special rule for Highway Safety Improvement Program funding to require places with an above average number of crashes impacting people who bike, walk, or roll to spend those safety funds on reducing the danger faced by vulnerable road users.

+ Require states’ spending on safety to match the rates of fatalties on their roads + Improves infrastructure for vulnerable road users

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ATURDAY IN SEPTEMBER LAST S

bikeyourparkday.org


LOCAL HERO

PELOTON

CLIMBER

SPRINTER

BREAKAWAY

ELITE

THANKS TO OUR 2019 CORPORATE SPONSORS


OUR MISSION is to lead the movement to create a Bicycle Friendly America for everyone. As leaders, our commitment is to listen and learn, define standards and share best practices to engage diverse communities and build a powerful, unified voice for change.

STAFF Bill Nesper

Lorna Green

Operations Director

Executive Director

Matthew Green

Caron Whitaker

Vice President, Government Relations

Membership Assistant

Kevin Dekkinga

Communications Director

Lauren Jenkins

Director of Membership & Development

Ken McLeod

Policy Director

Alison Dewey

Amelia Neptune

Education Director

Bicycle Friendly America Director

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Ralph Monti

Mark Thomas

Ken Podziba

Nicole Preston

Max Hepp-Buchanan

Danielle Arigoni Dave Belde Maria Boustead

Chair

Vice Chair Secretary

Treasurer At Large

Harry Brull Bob Oppliger Mike Sewell Torrance Strong Karin Weisburgh A.J. Zelada

American Bicyclist magazine (ISSN 0747-0371) is published by the League of American Bicyclists, Inc. to help the organization achieve its mission to educate the public and promote awareness of bicycling issues. Š2019 League of American Bicyclists. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Article queries should be addressed to communications@bikeleague.org. Your submission of manuscripts, photographs or artwork is your warranty that the material in no way infringes on the rights of others and that the material may be published without additional approval. Opinions expressed by writers are their own and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the League.


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American Bicyclist - Summer 2019  

American Bicyclist - Summer 2019