American Bicyclist - Spring 2021

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Looking back at 2020... Ri di ng together i nto 2021

>> IN THIS I S S U E . . . T HE B FA P RO GRAM : PAST, PR ES E NT & F UTUR E

R ID IN G, RECOVERIN G & R ES P O N DI N G TO GE T H E R • BUI LD I NG O N THE BI KE BO O M CE N T ERIN G EQ U ITY • H OW 202 1 LO O KS DI F F E R E NT FO R BI KES I N WAS HI NGTO N K EEP IN G SMA RT CYC L I N G RO L L I N G • HOW C LU BS RO D E THRO UG H 2020


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AMERICAN BICYCLIST SPRING 2021

Main Menu 02

VIEWPOINT

Riding, Recovering & Responding Together

HIGH SCORE BIKE LOVE

17 How 2021 Looks Different for ADVOCACY

Bikes in Washington

by Bill Nesper, Executive Director

by Caron Whitaker

We can ensure the future is bright and better for bikes.

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Centering Equity by League Staff

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The Bicycle Friendly America Program: Past, Present, and Future by Amelia Neptune

POLICY IN ACTION

Building on the Bike Boom

SMART CYCLING

Keeping Smart Cycling Rolling by Alison Dewey

Can’t stop, won’t stop educating. Learn how we went digital to keep League Cycling Instructors, community advocates, and local students connected through virtual learning to ensure bike safety education for all.

BICYCLE FRIENDLY AMERICA

The League’s Bicycle Friendly America program guides communities, businesses, and universities across the country in turning a vision for a bikeable community into reality. See what some of our Bicycle Friendly America award honorees have to say about the program’s impact and what the program plans to achieve in 2021.

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With a new administration comes new opportunities to promote the interests of people who bike in Washington, DC. Read more about how the League is pushing lawmakers to prioritize bike-forward policy on Capitol Hill.

POLICY IN ACTION

The road to safe, accessible, and inclusive biking for people of all races, ethnicities, genders, ages, religions, and sexual orientations is an uphill climb and while the League continues to take action to embed equity throughout our work, we must acknowledge that we have miles of climbing ahead of us.

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CLUBS

How Clubs Rode Through 2020 by Kevin Dekkinga

Bike clubs had to get creative to make sure the “Bike Boom” wasn’t a bust.

CREDITS 01 • INSERT COIN

by Ken McLeod

If 2020 taught us anything, it is that biking brings us together and neither the League nor our members have slowed down in our efforts to build a Bicycle Friendly America for everyone during the pandemic. Take a peek at some of the ways the League will continue teaming up with community advocates and decision-makers to keep the movement for better biking going.

Choose Character P L AY E R 1

Editor: Lauren Jenkins, Communications Director Design: Paul Halupka (ha-lup-ka.com) & Brandon Clark

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VIEWPOINT

RIDING, RECOVERING, & RESPONDING TOGETHER BY BILL NESPER

E

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VERY YEAR, WE ARE THRILLED and honored to bring together advocates from across the country to the National Bike Summit. In March, we had the largest Summit yet, with more than 1100 advocates from every state, and we were once again humbled by their passion for making bicycling better for all. This was the most accessible and inclusive Summit ever thanks to the generous support of our sponsors, who made it possible for us to keep the price low and offer many scholarships. Thanks to the wonders of online meeting technology and a year of practice, we offered a Summit experience that was engaging, informative, and even fun! I hope you will join us next year if you weren’t able to this year.

their age and ability. We can’t say it enough: the bicycle isn’t just the best vehicle ever invented — bicycling is part of the solution to many of the biggest challenges we face in our communities, country, and world. It’s our vehicle for change.

Our movement is people-powered in every way. The Summit is a time when bike advocates’ hard work is showcased and shared with others in our movement. These changemakers showed up once again to share best practices, to listen and learn, and to represent the people of their home communities and states in workshop sessions and on Capitol Hill. We weren’t able to be together in person again this year, but we are working together and riding together because we believe everyone should have access to safe, comfortable biking and access through biking to the places they want to go.

Right now, we are in a moment where momentum is critical: if we work together to keep up the momentum of the bike boom, we can build back bicycle-friendly. Building back bicycle-friendly means addressing the mistakes of the past for a better future. It means prioritizing people’s health and wellbeing. It means prioritizing the planet over congestion relief. It means prioritizing each others’ lives over cars’ speed. Building back bicycle friendly means happier, healthier people, more equitable and resilient communities, and fighting climate change.

We believe that everyone should have a real opportunity to bike for transportation, for well-being, or the pure joy of it no matter their income level, their neighborhood, their race, or

To build back bicycle-friendly we have to focus on building political will. We see what happens when advocates like you create political will: actions and investments in better biking improve

We have a historic opportunity before us. We have seen bike booms before and we’ve made progress in those times because of your work...


Above: Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg joined the League at the 2021 National Bike Summit and shared the Biden Administration’s vision for the future of transportation.

lives and communities - and not just for the people riding. Right now, 28% of Americans live in Bicycle Friendly Communities and 11% live in communities rated Silver or better. Those are communities that have committed to making bicycling safe, comfortable, and accessible to all, and the results are striking: Bicycle Friendly Communities have twice the bicycle ridership of the average American community, and Silver or better Bicycle Friendly Communities have three times as many people riding. If we work together building this political will and bigger commitments for better biking, we can raise that 11% to 20% of Americans living in a Silver-level or better Bicycle Friendly Community by 2030. Just think for a minute about what this effort would mean in connecting communities, creating jobs, improving health, and reducing carbon emissions. By using this historic moment to invest more energy and resources into building better Bicycle Friendly Communities, we’re acting at the local level to have a national and global impact. I’m very hopeful for what we can accomplish this year. At the Summit we listened, learned, and grew stronger to build the political will to build back bicycle-friendly — to take what we learned and put it into practice through advocacy and action. We all continue that work in our communities.

We have a historic opportunity before us. We have seen bike booms before and we’ve made progress in those times because of your work, including seeing a fourfold increase in federal bicycling and walking investments over the last 20 years. We’ve seen our advocacy asks bear fruit and transform lives and communities. But this time is different — and it needs to be, it needs to be more inclusive and equitable than in the past. We have a better team than ever before, from the changemakers you see in these pages to mayors and members of congress, all aiming to meet the biggest challenges of our time. We have a first family that bikes and a Secretary of Transportation who bikeshares to work. We have members of Congress that have been leading to make bicycling safe and accessible for years, including the Chairpeople of the two most important committees for our issue in Congress. We must meet this moment, to shift up together as part of the solution - to raise our voices in support for lasting change that benefits everyone, to be good partners in this recovery, and building a stronger, healthier, more connected, and sustainable future.

CHECK OUT OUR INCREDIBLE LINEUP OF SPEAKERS AND SESSIONS FROM #BIKESUMMIT21 ON THE LEAGUE’S YOUTUBE CHANNEL:

YOUTUBE.COM/BIKELEAGUE

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POLICY IN ACTION

CENTERING EQUITY B Y L E AG U E STA F F

IN

O RDER TO MEET T H E P RO M I SE

of a nation where bicycling is safe, comfortable, and open to all we must address systemic disparities, build a more diverse movement that truly represents our communities, and speak with one voice for a Bicycle Friendly America for Everyone. “Safe streets for everyone” is at the heart of the League of American Bicyclists’ mission. “Safe streets” means more than slow streets, bike lanes, and sidewalks. It means that everyone is free to move on our streets, in our neighborhoods, and throughout our cities without fear of violence, racial profiling, or police brutality. In 2020, we reflected on the deep inequities in our society and what we can do as an organization to address these in our work to make bicycling safe, comfortable, and accessible to all in 2021 and beyond. Breonna Taylor. Ahmaud Arbery. George Floyd. Each of them, and the too many Black Americans killed before, deserved the freedom to live. Because Black lives matter. Their names

are among the countless victims of racism and exclusion that has plagued our country’s history since its founding. The League played our part, too, most notably by banning Black people from our membership in the 1890s and not owning up to this fully until the 1990s. We also can’t ignore the less-overt exclusion that has been fostered throughout the 20th century and to today in bicycling events and programming. We, as a movement, must do more than make statements and simply say the doors have been opened, people of color are welcome, and that policies are changing. There is more work to do in service of true equity, diversity, and inclusion. It means going out and welcoming people in and making a place at the table. It means being quiet and letting other people talk, and then moving forward together fully acknowledging there will be bumps. The first step is acknowledgment. We have been part of the problem. If we truly believe in leading the movement to create a Bicycle Friendly America for Everyone we need to be representative of America’s diversity. If we are going to truly improve lives, communities, our world, we must be riding together.

We are asking ourselves the questions posed by Tamika Butler, starting with, “Do I understand that not being racist isn’t the same as being anti-racist?” Tamika Butler is leading advocate for equity in the bike community. She was also our 2021 Kittie Knox Award winner.

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AS THE LEAGUE CONTINUES TO TAKE ACTION IN 2021, PLEASE VISIT BIKELEAGUE.ORG/EQUITY TO SEE WHAT CONCRETE STEPS WE ARE TAKING TO EMBED EQUITY THROUGHOUT OUR WORK.

This is why the League condemns racism, aims to practice anti-racism, and stands with the communities of color demanding an end to racial inequities on our streets and in our culture. We are asking ourselves the questions posed by Tamika Butler, starting with, “Do I understand that not being racist isn’t the same as being anti-racist?” Based on our surveys, League members and supporters are overwhelmingly white and male. To improve in our understanding and effectiveness, we must increase representation and the diversity of perspectives in our organization and movement. The League is thankful for the women and BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and people of color) advocates who have pushed us to do better. We have much more work to do to welcome, to listen, to learn, and to act to make our organization better and more effective through partnership and action. We must do this work so that as an organization, we can participate authentically in building a future where streets truly are safe for everyone. How do we do that?

“WE MUST DO THIS WORK SO THAT AS AN ORGANIZATION, WE CAN PARTICIPATE AUTHENTICALLY IN BUILDING A FUTURE WHERE STREETS TRULY ARE SAFE FOR EVERYONE. HOW DO WE DO THAT?“ We don’t want these to be just words. The League put Equity, Diversity and Inclusion objectives and strategies into its Strategic Plans of 2015 and again in 2018, and updated our Mission and Vision statements to reflect the commitment that everyone should be able to bike - for transportation, for well-being, or for the pure joy of it. While the League has made progress on equity, diversity, and inclusion since we launched the Equity Initiative and Women Bike Program in 2013, we could have done much more. We should have. There is still much that needs to be done.

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B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY A M E R I C A

THE BICYCLE FRIENDLY AMERICA PROGRAM:

PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE BY AMELIA NEPTUNE

2 0 2 0 wa s a c h a l l e n g i n g y e a r fo r e v e ryo n e , including the communities, businesses and universities that participate in our Bicycle Friendly America program. But what we saw at the League was that bicycling was an outlet – a way for so many places and people to find joy in a tumultuous and tragic time.

Photo: A new section of the Fulbright Spring Greenway shines bright in Bronze-level Bicycle Friendly Community Springfield, MO.

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Bicycle Friendly

Communities

485 115 BFC Awards

BFC Applications received in 2020

1,916

BFC Applications received since program relaunched in 2003

Baltimore, a Bronze BFC in the program since 2008

BFA IN 2020 AT-A-GLANCE

1,406 146 2,791 BFB Awards

BFB Applications received in 2020

BFB Applications received since program relaunched in 2008

Bicycle Friendly

Universities

212 43 BFU Awards

BFU Applications received in 2020

512

BFU Applications received since program launched in 2011

Riders at Stanford U., a Platinum BFU since 2011

Businesses

Language Dept., a Gold BFB since 2014

Bicycle Friendly

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B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY A M E R I C A

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT THE BFA PROGRAM

Virginia Commonwealth University We realize that biking is bigger than us. Rather than focus solely on the university population, VCU recognizes that it is an urban campus able to impact the Richmond area. VCU’s bike program has taken special steps to make sure that it encourages not only its university community to bike more, but also to influence youth and diverse populations across the city to bike more. We hope this will influence the culture of the city and Richmond as a whole will become more bike friendly. — Virginia Commonwealth University (Gold BFU)

Gulf Shores, AL Since Bronze Level designation there has been a mindset change among the citizens and city leaders as it relates to the importance of bicycling to Gulf Shores. Citizens now expect bicycle infrastructure to be included in city projects and city leaders are proactively planning for future bicycle and pedestrian improvements throughout the city. — Gulf Shores, AL (Bronze BFC)

CRW Engineering, LLC We have hired at least 3 people in the last five years who sought out CRW because of our reputation for being a bicycle friendly business. — CRW Engineering (Platinum BFB)

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B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY A M E R I C A

BFA IN 2021

This year, the Bicycle Friendly America program is looking forward to:

Continuing to develop and expand the BFA Equity Fellowship program. This program, launched in late 2020, aims to diversify the judging panel for BFA applications and brings in new perspectives to inform the future of programmatic and application updates.

BFC Report Card updates. We’ve heard feedback about our BFC Report Cards from applicants and local bike advocates who don’t fit the mold of a typical BFC. In the next year, we are rolling out a new Report Card that showcases a more complete snapshot of communities’ strengths and weaknesses for BFCs of all shapes and sizes. We always strive to meet communities where they are and to provide the roadmap and blueprint to improve for everyone.

Visit bikeleague.org/bfa to keep up to date with program deadlines and award announcements!

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B I C Y C L E F R I E N D LY A M E R I C A

HOW WE KEEP THE BFA PROGRAM OPEN TO EVERYONE

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Local input is key. Your voice matters in the BFA program!

As part of the Bicycle Friendly America application process, we invite League members to weigh in when their community applies to the BFC program. We also provide all BFA applicants with a survey link to distribute to the general public, whether that’s employees, customers, and guests (BFB); students, staff, and faculty (BFU), or residents and visitors (BFC).

Quick stats on BFA survey results by program:

11,000+

2,050+

3,000+

62,000+

22,000+

13,000+

BFC Public Survey Responses in 2020

Total BFC Public Surveys Responses since 2016

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BFB Employee/Customer Survey Responses in 2020

Total BFB Employee/Customer Surveys Responses since 2016

Our applications keep up with the times.

We’re always evolving the process behind our BFA applications. We do our best to make sure the criteria for a BFA designation is not a moving target. But as technologies advance, safety standards improve, trends evolve, and national guidelines are updated, the BFA program must adapt and make sure our program participants are keeping up with the times. This is part of why BFA awardees are required to renew their designation every four years, and why some communities, businesses, or universities may remain at a given award level for years even though some improvements have been made. 2020 saw a number of new questions and answer options on all BFA applications. For example, the following new questions were added to the BFC application last year:

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BFU Campus Surveys Responses in 2020

Total BFU Campus Survey Responses since 2016

B FA A P P L I C AT I O N U P D AT E S

B26 What, if any, biking-related infrastructure changes has your community implemented in response to the COVID-19 pandemic? Are these changes temporary or permanent? How did your community address or incorporate equity into these changes? Please describe in as much detail as possible.

F24 What, if any, policies or practices does your community have in place to measure and eliminate racial bias in traffic law enforcement, including in-person and automated enforcement practices?


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We love applicants of all sizes! You don’t have to be a big city, business, or campus to qualify for a BFA award. 44% of all current Bicycle Friendly Communities have fewer than 50,000 residents. Three BFCs have populations under 1,000 people. 63% of all current Bicycle Friendly Businesses have 50 or fewer employees One-third of all current BFUs have a student population below 10,000 students.

BFU SPOTLIGHT

Three BFUs have fewer than 1,000 students, including Lees-McRae College in Banner Elk, NC, which moved up and renewed in 2020.

Lees-McRae College offers the nation’s only academic-based Cycling Minor degree program in the country (not physical performance oriented). The curriculum is available for all students interested in supplementing their college degree with a core understanding of bicycling planning, advocacy, design and history. Course materials are supplemented with field trips and guest speakers, including participation in the League’s annual National Bike Summit and Lobby Day.

Mayor of Fergus Falls Ben Schierer is a tireless champion for biking in Fergus Falls, MN, which is a Silver-level BFC. Schierer is also the owner of Silver-level BFB Union Pizza & Brewing Co. and in 2020 the City Hall of Fergus Falls became a Bronze-level BFB. Photo by Andrew Bremseth.

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POLICY IN ACTION

THE BICYCLE

FRIENDLY AMERICA PROGRAM IS BUILDING ON THE BIKE BOOM BY KEN MCLEOD

f all that 2020 threw at us, it’s the Bike Boom that the League would love to see continue into 2021 and beyond. To accomplish that, we worked on policies last year that would enable more people to bike, and to lay the foundation for better biking in the future.

2020 showed us:

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Bikes are essential

Data moves mountains

A virtual summit is effective

The League campaigned to keep bike shops open during initial covid-19 protective orders

The League launched data.bikeleague.org to highlight data on public health and policy

Connecting advocates across the country can be accomplished even in the most difficult times


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ADVOCACY

HOW 2021 LOOKS DIFFERENT FOR BIKES IN WASHINGTON B Y CA R O N W H I TA K E R

n 2020, the League, our members, and the many thousands in our movement for better biking did so much to elevate the safety and accessibility of biking at the national level. We did so during a time of great challenges and we did so during a time of incredible promise – the Bike Boom was unfolding before us. Photo: The Phyllis Tilley Memorial Bridge in Fort Worth, Texas, provides a connection along the Trinity Trails. The bridge was funded through federal grants and public-private partnerships.

Here’s how the League is pushing Congress and the administration to prioritize bike-forward federal policy

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W

e knew, too, that America was with us. In September 2020, the League released the results of a poll conducted with Ipsos on the general public’s support for funding better biking and walking. What we found was that 60 percent of those surveyed supported increasing federal investments in biking and walking. Plus, 78 percent of people said their community would be a better place to live if bicycling were safer and more comfortable. But Washington being the place it is, and 2020 being the year it was, while we achieved a lot of potentially impactful policy proposals, Congress did not follow through on voting. So, we ended 2020 looking ahead at 2021 knowing we will have to once again rally our movement around massive changes. 2021 is already proving to be a busy year in Washington, DC, especially for transportation! Between the reauthorization bill, talk of a stimulus and a new administration with a Secretary of Transportation who bikes for transportation, there’s a lot of opportunity for improving bicycling and walking.

Whether your community is a Gold-level Bicycle Friendly Community like Palo Alto, CA, (below) or Honorable Mention status like Wauwatosa, WI, (above, left and right) infrastructure like protected bike lanes, bike parking, and bike share are essential to making bicycling more accessible for all ages and abilities.

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Transportation

1 Reauthorization This is still our priority. The Transportation reauthorization bill comes up once every 5-6 years and makes long term policy changes, and affects over $50 billion dollars a year. The League’s focus on reauthorization is to: Transportation Alternatives Protect and improve this program which provides 50 percent of all federal funds for bicycling and walking. It is critical in states slow to take up complete street policies and implementation. Core Programs Promote changes in core programs so that a higher percentage of funding from core programs (safety, congestion, climate, etc.) goes to bicycling and walking, and designs that make biking more accessible to everyone. Policy and Procedure Changes Change policies and practices to prioritize the safety and access of bicyclists, pedestrians and other vulnerable users. This includes complete streets, the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices, fix it first policies, etc.


2 Administration The Biden Administration’s Department of Transportation, led by Secretary Buttigieg, has been discussing shifting the goals of our transportation system to be less auto-centric and more people-centric. It’s hard not to be optimistic, but the Department of Transportation is a big ship, and turning it will take some time, so the League is advocating for four focus areas: Leadership We encourage Secretary Pete to use discretionary grant programs to prioritize bicycling and walking projects to meet safety, climate change and equity through improving access for everyone. We will advocate for this leadership to also ensure existing programs, regulations and initiatives take an equity approach (for example, addressing how federally funded 402 Highway Safety Grants have resulted in inequitable enforcement.)

Reduce the Burden Another way the USDOT can promote better infrastructure is to shorten the permitting process on small projects built on paved surfaces and the disturbed right of way. This doesn’t mean reducing environmental protections, but rather allowing small projects to be treated differently than larger projects.

Another way the USDOT can promote better infrastructure is to shorten the permitting process on small projects built on paved surfaces and the disturbed right of way.

Integrate biking and walking within FHWA The Federal Highway Administration should do more to promote and incentivize safe bicycling and walking infrastructure to state DOTs through better complete streets guidance, design flexibility, and Proven Safety Countermeasures, as well as initiatives like Every Day Counts. Promote a Safe Systems Approach Promoting a safe systems approach throughout the USDOT means improving guidance on setting speed limits, invest in infrastructure design that reduces speeding, and testing new car technologies to reduce crashes and injuries with bicyclists and pedestrians.

Installation of green lane markings on a bikeway in Bronze-level BFC Fort Worth, TX.

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3 American Jobs Plan

4 Being Opportunistic

This year there may be a unique opportunity to promote bicycling and walking through President Biden’s American Jobs Plan. The League is working with partners, and allies in the Administration and on the Hill to ensure that themes in the American Jobs Plan such as Safe Streets for All, Fix it Right and people-centric design, result in bicycle friendly investment. Our primary goal, either through a stimulus package or a reauthorization, is a shift to a transportation system that plans for all users.

Finally, the League will continue to take advantage of opportunities to affect legislation or administrative initiatives to promote the interests of bicyclists. For instance, should Congress or NHTSA move forward with regulation on automated vehicles or to update the New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) the League is prepared to advocate for a vision test to ensure these vehicles can detect, identify and respond to vulnerable road users of all races and ethnicities.

League staff and Board were on Capitol Hill in 2019 to testify about road safety.

The League is working with Congress to improve the ability of technology in cars to detect people biking.

Here’s what we’re seeing in the American Jobs Plan:

Fix It Right. The major infrastructure plan released by President Biden proposes $115 billion to modernize roads, highways and bridges proposing not just a “fix it first” policy but a “fixing them right” one that addresses safety and access for all users – that should mean people walking, biking, or using mobility devices as well as people driving. This is incredible. For a decade, the League has been supporting our allies and working with government officials to define “fix it first” as “fix it to complete streets standards.” Having the White House trumpet this language is a serious move forward for bicycling, walking and all roadway users.

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Safe Streets For All In the same proposal, the Biden Administration also unveils a $20 billion dollar program to improve the safety of all road users, and specifically calls out pedestrians and bicyclists, including funding local safety plans. This makes the safety program 17% of the overall proposal - a much higher percentage for safety funding than we see in yearly allotments in the transportation bill. This approach would do two things: it would fix specific unsafe infrastructure through the Safe Streets for All program, but it would also redesign existing streets to meet higher safety standards.


SUPPORT THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN BICYCLISTS

THROUGH PLANNED GIVING Many of our members express their

commitment to our long-term sustainability by naming the League in their wills or trusts.

With a planned gift, you can balance your personal financial goals with your interest in supporting the bike movement...

for generations to come.

Founded in 1880, the League has the longevity and national reach to add value to your planned gift, delivering the freedom and independence that only bicycling can bring.

Reach out today to learn how your estate can help further the League's mission—and build a prosperous future for American bicycling. Contact Kevin Dekkinga

Director of Membership and Development Kevin@bikeleague.org | 202.621.5449


SMART CYCLING

KEEPING SMART CYCLING ROLLING

ating How do you keep educ during a ty folks about bike safe gue Cycling pandemic? Leave it to Lea

ing people to ride! Instructors to keep inspir cation program In 2020, the League’s edu instructors. We had to be as flexible as our the commitment made it work—thanks to . of so many bike educators

BY ALISON DEWEY

SMART CYCLING IN 2020 LOOKED DIFFERENT: A BC

A

QUICK CHECK

FOR AIR  Infla te tires to rated pressure as the tire.  Use listed on the sidewall of a proper pressure pressure gauge to ensure . tread and side  Check for damage to tire wall; replace if damaged.

B

IS

IS FOR BRAKES

Inspect pads for wear; repla inch of pad left. ce if there is less than 1/4  Check pad adjustment; make sure they do spokes.  Che not rub tire or dive into ck brake lever trave one inch betw een bar and lever l; at least when applied.

C

BIKELEAGUE.O

IS FOR CRANKS

, CHAIN &

CASSETTE  Check to make sure ther debris in your e is no crank, chain, or n should be prop cassette. erly lubed and not carrying a lot of grit.  If your when shifting, chain skips it might require or a replacement. an adjustment  Your chai

RG

QUICK IS FOR QUI

RG BIKELEAGUE.O

CK RELEASES  Hubs need to your quick relea be tight in the frame; se should enga  Your hub ge at 90°. quic to ensure that k release should point back nothing catches  Inspect brak on it. e that they have quick releases to ensure been re-engage d.

CHECK IS FOR CHE

CK OVE

Take a quick ride R to check if dera brakes are work illeurs and ing properly.  bike for loose Inspect the or or fix them.  broken parts; tigthen, replace Pay extra atten tion to your bike during the first few miles of the ride. 

The Smart Cycling Quick Guide went digital! We made the Quick Guide—in English and Spanish—available on Amazon as an e-book.

Brand New Youth Skills Kits Released! Host the best bike rodeo or clinic your community has ever seen with the new Youth Skills Kit. The kit includes ten of each: • Youth Progress Check Card • Fun Bike Sticker Sheet (shown above) • Certificate of Completion • Bike Pins

• ABC Quick Check Bookmarks • Smart Cycling Quick Guide (for the adults in the family to carry the torch)

Hosted first LCI Virtual Trivia night

during Bike Month with partner group Bike Cleveland 22


WHAT WE’RE DOING IN 2021

ALREADY LAUNCHED IN 2021: OUR ONLINE LEARNING CENTER!

• LCI scholarship program: Thanks to Quality Bicycle Products and the Be Good Foundation, the League will be able to offer more scholarships to the LCI seminar (Visit bikeleague.org/

Visit learn.bikeleague.org for FREE access to interactive education lessons!

LCIscholarships to learn more!)

• Older Adults Smart Cycling Module added to our online courses in partnership with AARP • Bicycle Friendly Driver training for Uber Drivers • Updated our Smart Cycling Quick Guide—now with tips on e-bikes

Our Youth Skills Instructor Manual Got an Overhaul!

Smart Cycling Youth Skills Instructor’s Manual

ZONE I: Basic Handling Skills

ZONE I ››

Station 4 Turning & Yielding

Station 2 Hazard Avoidance

4 FT WIDE LANE

Figure 8

10 FT DIAMETER

4 FT WIDE LANES

Figure 8

1 80 FT

100 FEET

Station 2

STARTING

Have children line up in the “parking lot” and instruct them to wait until you touch their helmet before they go. Instruct them on the proper starting procedure, one pedal in an up position (about 2 o’clock) so they can push down hard to start. This will be hard for youth with coaster brakes, so remind them about stopping with the pedal in the correct position when braking properly.

Remind bicyclists of the proper starting procedure: one pedal in an up position (about 2 o’clock) so they can push down hard to start. This will be hard for youth with coaster brakes, so remind them about stopping with the pedal in the correct position when braking properly.

Instruct them to ride as straight as possible down to the end with the STOP sign and come to a complete stop and put their foot down. Let riders go one at a time and leave enough space between riders so they don’t stack up in the course.

STOPPING

SETUP

10 FT

ZONE I ››

STARTING

Encourage the children to come to a complete stop with their pedals in the correct starting position. Have them start again and return through Station 2.

40 FT

Instruct them to ride to the STOP sign, going between the “hazards” but without going outside of the lines. For older children who appear to be competent cyclists you can give them optional instructions to go outside of the markers on a second or third pass. STOPPING Encourage the children to come to a complete stop with their pedals in the correct starting position. Have them start again and direct them back to the parking lot. After three times through the first two stations, direct the children to the parking lot for Station 3.

We Shifted to the Mostly Virtual LCI seminar

Stations 1 and 2 share space and a “parking lot” so they are together in this manual. You should plan on three volunteers: one at the beginning, one at the middle and one at the end of this station.

10 FT

EQUIPMENT Parking Lot 4 FT WIDE LANE

1.5 FT WIDE LANE

Station 1

Remind them to come back to the parking lot when they return. FINISH

Station 3 Station 1 Start/Stop Straight Line

START

Parking Lot

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The Youth Skills Instructor’s Manual is filled with guidance on things like how to run a youth clinic or bike rodeo, tips to organize and facilitate the clinic, learning objectives for each skill station, STARTING & AVOIDING and more. Whether it is kids just starting out on STOPPING HAZARDS a bike or older kids ready to practice riding in traffic, this manual covers it all!

60 FEET

Scan Signal Turn

You will need eight course markers (small cones or halved tennis balls), two at each start and two at each end, placed approximately three feet apart, to keep the children from running over them even with training wheels. Two STOP signs, one for each end placed to the right side of the course as the bicyclists approach. Chalk also helps delineate the space intended for the riders and can be used to help provide directional cues.

Due to the pandemic, the League offered groups the option of hosting a mostly virtual seminar or the option of hosting an in-person seminar while following the CDC’s health and safety guidelines.

 Script & Takeaways for Stations 1 & 2 on Page 21

Photo: City of Grand Junction, CO

USE THE SMALLEST COURSE MARKERS AVAILABLE.

Big cones can be a hazard, and should be placed well away from the children’s line of travel. A great alternative to cones are halved tennis balls. These will not be a hazard if children run over them.

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Metro Atlanta Cycling Club

CLUBS

HOW CLUBS RODE THROUGH 2020 BY KEVIN DEKKINGA

T H E B I K E K E P T M A N Y O F U S G O I N G T H RO U G H O U T 2 0 2 0 .

But it was hard not to miss riding together, and big club events, even as we found respite on the bike. We wanted to hear how our bike club leaders kept going in 2020 and what they are looking forward to about the future.

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Kecia McCullough

Maureen Walker

Shero Black Girls Do Bike – Rochester Rochester, NY

Vice President & Program Chairman West Sound Bicycle Club Bremerton, WA

Bethany Stiltner

Greg Masterson

President Blackhawk Bicycle & Ski Club Rockford, IL

President Metro Atlanta Cycling Club Atlanta, GA

Monica Garrison

Holly Dates

Founder Black Girls Do Bike Pittsburgh, PA

President Sumter Landing Bicycle Club The Villages, FL


How did you encourage biking in 2020? Kecia McCullough, Black Girls Do BIke Rochester: During the summer of 2020, the Black Girls Do Bike Rochester (BGDBR) chapter successfully coordinated and lead the Unity RideEAST, a weekly community slow roll through the city of Rochester’s east side of town. The weekly Tuesday evening co-ed bike ride started and ended at the same city location, biked 6 miles through inner city neighborhoods, and was escorted by the Rochester police department and assisted by volunteer ride guides. BGDBR also coordinated a local Women-only Black Lives Matter Solidarity for Justice and Peace bike ride. Twenty-five women of different races took to the canal path for a 8.46 mile slow ride as we virtually joined other bicycle clubs and groups across the country in honor Black and Brown individuals who have lost their lives to police brutality and/or senseless gun violence. This ride was in dedication to Mr. Daniel Prude, Ms. Jaquayla Young, Mr. Jarvis Alexander, Mr. George Floyd, Ms. Breonna Taylor, Mr. Nazier McFadden, Mr. Amir Starks, and many, many others. Bethany Stiltner, President, Blackhawk Bicycle & Ski Club, Rockford IL: In this era of covid-19, I find less and less to say about the impact of the virus on our communities. However, cycling has been a welcome reprieve for exercise, health, and built-in social distancing. Elected as a temporary fill-in president for Blackhawk Bicycle and Ski Club of Rockford, IL, I quickly learned of the challenges facing social clubs in the beginning of this pandemic. BBSC continued to host local rides for club members while doing our best to work within CDC guidelines for group events. Unfortunately, our annual Country Roads Ride for May of 2020 was cancelled. On the upside, we continued to offer many of our daily rides and other seasonal favorites still occurred, such as a ride to local orchards and rides through beautiful country sides. As we adapted, we encouraged the use of masks at stops, took precautions such as splitting into smaller groups when applicable, brought hand sanitizer on rides, and did our best to ride a decent distance from each other.

Monica Garrison, Founder, Black Girls Do BIke: Black Girls Do Bike suspended official group rides in 2020. We have encouraged ladies to ride solo and ride often since we believe riding your bike might just be the thing that gives us the mental and physical fortitude to get through this life-altering year. Just make sure to ride in alignment with local authorities and CDC/ WHO guidelines. Maureen Walker, Vice President & Program Chairman, West Sound Bicycle Club, Bremerton WA: March 16, 2020 was the first Washington “stay at home” order. WSCC stopped all club events at that time. Last club ride was 2/27/20 and all WSCC sponsored rides were cancelled. Greg Masterson, President, Metro Atlanta Cycling Club: Officially, we stopped holding rides during the pandemic. Unofficially, people have been still riding and showing up at the Tuesday ride in East Point in bigger numbers that we have ever had. We changed our One Love platform to a Virtual ride this year and it was smaller but still very successful. I was surprised at the sponsorship level we achieved with the virtual platform. Special thanks to RGT cycling and Wahoo Fitness. Holly Dates, President, Sumter Landing Bicycle Club, The Villages, FL: Despite covid-19 and the consequent restrictions in place, the Sumter Landing Bicycle Club (SLBC) in The Villages, Florida (a 130,000+ person active retirement community) has been working hard to keep all of us energized, involved and reaching out beyond our own front door. We are happy that our efforts to keep the club active in this time of covid-19 have been successful. So far this year, 173 of our 1000 members have logged 613,000 miles on Bike Journal, which ranks us number one among the 343 clubs that compete worldwide. Our secret? We are retired so we ride all week, and we live in Florida, so we ride all year. And all that warm weather allows us to stay engaged outside, while minimizing covid-19 risk.

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Black Girls Do Bike Rochester

What modifications were employed to enable riding in club events? Kecia McCullough: Due to covid-19, BGDBR, as the coordinating and sponsoring bike group, was responsible for ensuring all participating cyclists wore masks. If individuals did not bring a mask for themselves, we were mindful to have a pack of disposable masks on stand-by. We attempted to keep a safe distance away from each other (this was very difficult). We also were mindful to limit our communications during rides for safety reasons, again very difficult because cyclists are accustomed to engaging with each other while on community bike rides. Greg Masterson: We hosted virtual rides using RGT Cycling, an indoor trainer platform. We did One Love on there and have recently added several rides from the Atlanta area to the virtual platform. For the people who were still riding outside, we did our best to encourage riders to keep distanced and not hang out before and after the rides in big groups.

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How have you kept club members engaged during the pandemic? Kecia McCullough: BGDBR have been successful at sponsoring several small biking and hiking events throughout the pandemic. We have been very careful to emphasize healthy outdoor activities with an extra layer of safety precautions. Many of the ladies were eager to join in and participate with scheduled events after being homebound for weeks. Bethany Stiltner: Our membership was still active and started using extra time to add events such as hiking and kayaking to our regular cycling schedule. Again, keeping distance and minding CDC guidelines. Kayaking was probably one of the easier activities to stay distant since the kayak itself puts a good amount of distance between people even if bow to bow or stern to stern. Monica Garrison: Locally we have been checking in and engaging with our members on our individual BGDB group pages. In May, we were able to roll our national event into our annual virtual ride. We got ladies inspired to move by setting and reaching cycling goals. And we mailed out actual medals and swag bags to all who participated. In June, we also were able to host the “We’ve Got Your Back” series which consisted of scheduled yoga, meditation, group Zwift rides, and several instructor-led indoor cycling classes.


Maureen Walker: A few individual members organized group rides, limiting the number of riders. These are not sponsored rides by WSCC but helped provide community morale and cohesion. WSCC also implemented a covid-19 document for cycling to keep riders safe and offered protocol to follow. WSCC activated club rides limiting the number of riders to five on September 29, 2020 when things opened up. However, on November 17, 2020 the second Washington “stay at home” order was activated and all club sponsored rides were again cancelled. Greg Masterson: We had some club Zoom meetings. Ordered new kits and had them mailed to each member. (Editor’s note: everyone always loves new bike kit!) Holly Dates: In spite of covid-19 we have kept our members informed, interested and active with five days of club rides every week, monthly club meetings that include educational speakers, a bi-weekly newsletter chronicling club and local biking action, and activities such as the cleanup of our adopted roads and holiday bicycle collections for kids in need. Members of West Sound Cycling club enjoy a day out in 2020 near Sequim, WA.

What do you miss most about ‘normal’ club events? Kecia McCullough: I truly miss the ability to engage in lively conversations and laughter with other cyclists, and getting to know someone’s name and a little about them. It’s always a fun experience before, during and after a bike ride to talk with other cyclists. Pre-covid-19, oftentimes folks would gather at a local restaurant for dinner and drinks, to continue the fun-filled evening. Sadly, the pandemic halted to this. Bethany Stiltner: What people seem to miss most about past events is the freedom in social interaction, sharing food at club meetings, and a more relaxed camaraderie when together. We did host our annual club picnic and offered boxed lunches acquired by Rick Plantz, VP, so we could still connect and honor members with awards and announce new board members. Paul Molloway kept us engaged and updated with current information regarding covid-19 and cycling and happenings with membership through our newsletter. Monica Garrison: We’ve missed meeting new people, riding with friends, and checking out all of the cool bikes. We’ve also missed spreading the word in person. There is nothing like a warm summer cycling event or health fair where we get to set up a table and be the smiling face that introduces folks to who we are and what we do. Maureen Walker: We miss seeing all our members and guests at meetings and on organized bicycle rides. Also, we are missing the meeting potlucks, the annual picnic and holiday party. We have new members joining and it will be nice to meet them in person. Greg Masterson: The hanging out after the group rides. Not worrying about being at ride with a lot of people. Meeting the new riders. Putting the hammer down on hills and showing people the MACC on the back of my jersey.

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What are you looking forward to about 2021, as a club leader? Kecia McCullough: BGDBR is looking forward to encouraging individual group members to take on a more leadership role related to coordinating and leading bike group rides. We are hoping to train a group of ladies to ride their first century. BGBDR is also looking forward to expanding our bike riding experiences to an organized first BGDBR weekend bike camping trip. We are looking to expand and explore our reach with active membership and by spreading the joy of cycling with young girls between the ages of 10-15 years old. BGDBR is looking forward to celebrating our five year anniversary on July 17, 2021 and continuing to serve as an ambassador inspiring other women to catch the bike bug. Bethany Stiltner: As a club, we look forward to hosting our annual Country Roads Ride again. We look forward to getting through this time and returning to hugs, high fives, and fist bumps without the fear of passing on a deadly virus. Ride On! Wash your hands! Wear a Mask! It’s not quite over yet. Monica Garrison: We hope to return to group riding in the summer of 2021. In late 2021, we are looking forward to possibly hosting an inperson national event.

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Maureen Walker: As with many bicycle clubs there is a need to recruit WSCC officers, board members, ride leaders and volunteers. It has been even harder to recruit to fill these positions during covid-19. Also, maintaining our Advocate/Advisory Group by staying involved and attending public meetings with city, county, state government and elected officials for safer streets and greater bicycling accessibility. Additionally, WSCC wants to continue offering week-end and week-long bicycle tours for our members. Greg Masterson: We had an increase in membership during the pandemic. Groups of members have been riding together but not the club as a whole. Hopefully as things get under control, we will be able to get back to having club rides and get back to enjoying riding with all the club members. Holly Dates: Our hopes for 2021 are that we can host and attend more organized rides, reinvigorate our active social event calendar to previous levels, and continue educating our ever expanding community - the fastest growing in the nation for most of the last decade - that we are a League certified Gold-level Bicycle Friendly Community (now working toward Platinum) that is a great place for safe, fun cycling all year.

Above: Bethany Stiltner got creative with a “Backyard Quarantine Loop” to keep it interesting in 2020.


How did you use bikes as a tool for change in 2020? Kecia McCullough: BGDBR has over the years and will continue to use cycling as a way to encourage and promote acceptance of all people, collaboration, community, justice and peace, emotional and physical health and wellness, safety, and unity. The “bike” has been known to bring people together from all walks of life around one common thought: “the joy of cycling”. BGDBR will continue being the beacon of inclusivity, “reaching across the lanes” engaging in and promoting community collaborative cycling for all, with a focus on women, and a specific intent for the overall health and wellness of the Black and Brown women and girls.

Bethany Stiltner, Blackhawk Bicycle & Ski Club, Rockford, IL

Diversity of thought is helping to propel cycling forward in myriad ways. There’s a conscious effort to dispel old images while welcoming new and diverse perspectives. We’re moving away from the outdated line of thinking toward a more modern image of what a cyclist actually is, looks like, and how a cyclist operates and leads in the world of cycling. BGDBR will continue to occupy spaces and sit at tables serving as representation for the Black and brown female and women cyclists, because representation on all levels of cycling matter. Bethany Stiltner: Our group supported local advocacy for adding a bike path between two towns and are pursuing partnering with a local organization to educate youth about cycling and cycling safety. We are also considering partnership with an organization in connection with our next Country Roads Ride. We also made sure to host our road clean-up for roads we adopted in Cherry Valley, IL – complete with masks, gloves, and sanitizer! Not only because of covid-19, but also because we were picking up trash!

Metro Atlanta Cycling Club

Sumter Landing Bicycle Club

I personally participated in a national virtual charity event, The Great Cycle Challenge, raising money for the Children’s’ Cancer Research Fund. These were solo rides but posted collectively so all the individual efforts added up to a large final donation sum for the charity.

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Black Girls Do Bike | Photo: Monica Garrison

BBSC members supported my efforts on an individual basis and helped me earn a Superhero jersey for a young boy, Ashton, who is now surviving cancer. He was thrilled to receive the jersey, framed it, and said he thinks he would like to start riding a bike! Overall, BBSC stayed active, involved, and focused on safety. Many members rode solo, and we look forward to larger group rides next year … pending pandemic pandemonium, of course. Monica Garrison: If nothing else 2020 seems to have given us some perspective on what is important, our loved ones. And, for many of us, we were forced to rethink where we spend our time. Outdoor recreation moved up on the list of priorities. BGDB has tried to help make the connection in our communities between family, cycling, and taking our place

as occupants and stewards of the outdoors. In addition, we’ve worked to gain some valuable partnerships this year that have helped us chart our course going forward. Maureen Walker: Many of our members use their bikes for shopping, going to the post office and attending appointments, as well as getting exercise to maintain their mental and physical health during this unusual time. Greg Masterson: As a bike club we made a statement in support of Black Lives Matter this year. That was our first time addressing a noncycling issue. But as a black cycling club it had to be done. In late 2020, we joined with several other local bike clubs and had a ride for voting awareness. Georgia’s Senate races determined the make-up of the Senate, so it was a very crucial time for democracy in this country.

Blackhawk Bicycle & Ski Club on a cleanup day for their Adopt A Highway location

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS Ken Podziba Chair

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Max Hepp-Buchanan Secretary

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Danielle Arigoni Jim Baross Maria Boustead At Large

Harry Brull Jackie Martin Kecia McCullough Ralph Monti

Bob Oppliger Vivian Ortiz Beth St. John Mike Sewell At Large

Chuck Smith A.J. Zelada

American Bicyclist magazine (ISSN 0747-0371) is published by the League of American Bicyclists, Inc. to help the organization achieve its mission to educate the public and promote awareness of bicycling issues. ©2021 League of American Bicyclists. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Article queries should be addressed to communications@ bikeleague.org. Your submission of manuscripts, photographs or artwork is your warranty that the material in no way infringes on the rights of others and that the material may be published without additional approval. Opinions expressed by writers are their own and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the League.


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