Page 1

WhatsUp $5.50

in Disability July/August 2018

Toowoomba and Southern Queensland

Volume 3, Issue 82

Subscription $33 PA

NAIDOC Week 2018 NDIS Price Guide 2018/2019 Disability Information Services by People with Disability Page 1


WhatsUp

Welcome

As promised by the McKinsey Review there are some big changes to the NDIS Price Guide. The good news is that these uplifts in pricing and clarity over some support items, are worth waiting for.

CONTENTS Cover Page

From 1st July there are changes to 10 of the areas that McKinsey recommended:

2018 National NAIDOC Poster

Regional Travel

Page

3

NAIDOC Week

High intensity loading for centre-based activities

Page

4

NDIS Price Guide

Short Term Accommodation

Page

6

It’s Cold

Temporary Support for Overheads (TSO)

Page

7

Devoted to Dachshunds

Cancellation policy for core supports

Page

8

Pitch@Palace

Group supports

Page

9

PWDA

Cancellation policy for therapy

Page 10

NDIS Updates

Reports requested by the NDIA

Page 12

Travel

Page 13

Updates

Page 14

Bowel Cancer

Page 15

Love Out Loud

Page 16

AFL Queensland

Page 17

Scam Alert

Page 18

Every Australian Counts

Page 19

mycommunity directory

Page 20

My Health Record

Page 22

Roll-out Data

Page 23

Aspiring Author

Page 24

Christopher

Page 25

Chloe’s Story

Page 26

What’s Happening

Page 30

Copyright and Disclaimer Notices

Page 31

Advertiser’s Index

Of the 592 line-item services listed in the guide: 

95 have changed price. The largest price increases were for ‘Group Based Activities In The Community’ - some of which are up by 25%. 87 new Supports have been added (74 new Support Items that relate to ‘Group Based Activities in a Centre’ or ‘In the Community’). 21 removed (20 items in the Assistive Technology support category, such as wheelchairs, postural chairs and wheeled walkers are removed. These are now covered by eight new line items).

Steven Paull

JP (Qual) President

WhatsUp In Disability (the magazine) was first published in 1994 to give local people with disabilities and carers, information on a growing multitude of local disability services, local news and issues, with the purpose of not only supplying information to people with disabilities, but of giving choices to people and to give local services a specialist media outlet where they could give information on their services. To obtain a copy of WhatsUp in Disability magazine or to be an advertiser, please contact the WhatsUp office at 4/33 Bell Street, Toowoomba or call on 4632 6678. Page 2

Rear Cover NDIS in Queensland Roll-out Data and Trends


WhatsUp Under the theme - Because of Her, We Can! - NAIDOC Week 2018 will be held nationally from Sunday 8th July and continue through to Sunday 15th July. As pillars of our society, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have played – and continue to play - active and significant roles at the community, local, state and national levels. As leaders, trailblazers, politicians, activists and social change advocates, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women fought and continue to fight, for justice, equal rights, our rights to country, for law and justice, access to education, employment and to maintain and celebrate our culture, language, music and art. They continue to influence as doctors, lawyers, teachers, electricians, chefs, nurses, architects, rangers, emergency and defence personnel, writers, volunteers, chief executive officers, actors, singer songwriters, journalists, entrepreneurs, media personalities, board members, accountants, academics, sporting icons and Olympians, the list goes on. They are our mothers, our elders, our grandmothers, our aunties, our sisters and our daughters. Sadly, Indigenous women’s role in our cultural,

NAIDOC Week

social and political survival has often been invisible, unsung or diminished. For at least 65,000 years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have carried our dreaming stories, songlines, languages and knowledge that have kept our culture strong and enriched us as the oldest continuing culture on the planet. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were there at first contact. They were there at the Torres Strait Pearlers strike in 1936, the Day of Mourning in 1938, the 1939 Cummeragunja Walk-Off, at the 1946 Pilbara pastoral workers' strike, the 1965 Freedom Rides, the Wave Hill walk off in 1966, on the front line of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in 1972 and at the drafting of the Uluru Statement. They have marched, protested and spoken at demonstrations and national gatherings for the proper recognition of our rights and calling for national reform and justice. Our women were heavily involved in the campaign for the 1967 Referendum and also put up their hands to represent their people at the establishment of national advocacy and representative bodies from the National Aboriginal Congress (NAC) to ATSIC to Land Councils

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

and onto the National Congress for Australia’s First Peoples. They often did so while caring for our families, maintaining our homes and breaking down cultural and institutionalised barriers and gender stereotypes. Our women did so because they demanded a better life, greater opportunities and - in many cases equal rights - for our children, our families and our people. They were pioneering women like Barangaroo, Truganini, Gladys Elphick, Fannie Cochrane-Smith, Evelyn Scott, Pearl Gibbs, Oodgeroo Noonuccal, Celuia Mapo Salee, Thancoupie, Justine Saunders, Gladys Nicholls, Flo Kennedy, Essie Coffey, Isabel Coe, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Eleanor Harding, Mum Shirl, Ellie Gaffney and Gladys Tybingoompa. Today, they are trailblazers like Joyce Clague, Yalmay Yunupingu, Evonne Goolagong Cawley, Nova Peris, Carol Martin, Elizabeth Morgan, Barbara Shaw, Rose Richards, Vonda Malone, Margaret Valadian, Lowitja O’Donoghue, June Oscar, Pat O’Shane, Pat Anderson Jill Milroy, Banduk Marika, Linda Burney and Rosalie Kunoth-Monks – to name a few. Their achievements, their voice, their unwavering passion give us strength and have empowered past generations and paved the way for generations to come.

Page 3


WhatsUp 2018/2019 Details That time of year is here again! The NDIA have released the new Price Guides, which will come into effect Sunday, 1st July. This Price Guide update is much more significant than last year's as it comes hot off the heels of the McKinsey Independent Pricing Review. We've known since March/April that the NDIA intended to endorse a huge number of the recommendations but it wasn't until now that we knew to what extent. So here they are - the key changes of this hotly anticipated update: Price Increases 7.6% price increase for standard intensity attendant care (i.e. with daily personal activities and assistance with community participation). This is a combination of: A new 2.5% Temporary Support Overhead (TSO) loading, intended to support providers with their overhead costs during the transition period. This is just

NDIS Price Guide

for 2018/19 and will drop down to 1.25% next financial year. 5.14% increase in prices to take into account increases in the SCHCADS (3.50%) Award and the Equal Remuneration Order (2.27%). 5.14% price increase for high intensity attendant care as the TSO does not apply. 2.1% increase for capacity building support based on national Wage Price Index. This is in line with last years’ increase though unlike last year, this price increase also applies to therapists. $2 per hour increase for centrebased group supports to support providers meeting increased costs associated with delivering care in a facility.

New Items New ratios The NDIA have filled some gaps in the Price Guide with the introduction of price limits for new ratios: 

1:3 ratios in Short Term Accommodation

1:4 and 1:5 ratios in both standard and high intensive community-based group supports

Community Engagement Assistance A brand new item ($42.59) “Program to empower participants and improve interactions between participants and their social networks. Assistance to engage effectively in the community through a group approach to help achieve goals, gain insight into their lives and make informed decisions.” Travel and Cancellations 45 minutes travel for rural therapists: Therapists may now charge up to 45 minutes of travel time in rural areas (MMM4 or MMM5 area) against the appointment they are travelling to. Outside of rural areas, this limit is 20 minutes. The Agency has also clarified that therapy providers can also claim for return travel from the final appointment in a day

SLOW STARTERS TEN PIN BOWLING LEAGUE for Disabled

SUNSET SUPERBOWL 07 4634 0233

South & Greenwattle Toowoomba

10.00 am every Saturday $20 per session 3 games Sports Registration $32 (membership) Glenda (07) 4614 1136 Kathy (07) 4630 5221 Page 4


WhatsUp Clarifying participants’ paying for cost of own travel The Price Guide also provides what will be a welcome clarification for many providers. Providers can negotiate with participants to pay for the cost of their transport in addition to the support worker’s time. Greater scope cancellations

for

Providers can now charge up to 90% of the service booking price for short notice cancellations (i.e. after 3pm the day before) up to a maximum of 12 per year for Core supports (up from 8) and 6 per hours per year for therapy (up from 4).

Travel and Cancellations

What else? Expansion on Coordination roles

Support

The Price Guide includes the most extensive descriptions of the three types of Support Coordination that we have seen to date. Easy to read Core supports tables The layout of attendant care prices have is now set out as a matrix where all the relevant times and ratios are on one sheet. As is standard practice, participants’ plans will be automatically adjusted to account for the increase in prices. They will not, however,

be adjusted to allow for further travel or cancellations. We await the outcomes of additional complexity loadings in the next McKinsey report.

Editor’s Comment NDIS Price Guide transitions are always incredibly challenging for everyone in the NDIS ecosystem. These events require Vendors and Service Providers alike, to make difficult operational decisions with an insufficient level of guidance from the Agency as to how Providers are expected to operate under these new Price Guide arrangements.

Wellways Healthcall Toowoomba, Brisbane, Roma Mackay and Townsville Providing: 1. In home and out of home disability support and nursing services 2. Day Services 3. Providing respite services through Siena House in Toowoomba Please call 07 4638 7159 or 1300 363 898 99a Russell Street Toowoomba We look forward to discussing your support needs.

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 5


WhatsUp Working in cold conditions isn’t just uncomfortable, it can be dangerous. Frostbite, numbness, dehydration and hypothermia are real concerns from chilly outdoor weather. If you’re working outdoors this winter, be aware of the dangers and stay safe. The following tips will help you and your participants stay safe

It’s Cold

in the cold. Stay well nourished by eating and drinking enough -Make sure to drink enough fluids, we dehydrate faster in cold weather conditions. Dehydration causes headaches, dizziness and fatigue, and it’s important to stay alert outdoors. Eating enough food during the day, especially fats and

carbohydrates, is also important. Our bodies use those nutrients as energy to stay warm in cold temperatures. Stay well rested - Working outdoors can be challenging, and increases risks to our safety. Make sure you and your participant are getting enough sleep to stay alert on the job when conditions are more dangerous. Plan breaks from the cold - Just like we need to take breaks from work throughout the day, our body needs to take breaks from the cold. Plan warm-up times throughout the day to avoid numbness and shivers. Stay dry - Damp clothing can quickly drop our body temperature. It’s more important than ever to stay dry in the cold. Wear a moisturewicking base layer to draw away sweat as we work. Wear waterproof gear as an outer shell to prevent the under layers from getting wet. Remove any wet clothing immediately. Dress for the conditions Dressing in layers is key, as it not only keeps us warm but allows you to adjust to changing temperatures. Proper gloves, socks and footwear are essential. Choose headwear that keeps your head and ears warm. Balaclavas can also help to warm our necks and warm the air we’re breathing.

Page 6


WhatsUp Devoted to Dachshunds WEE little legs trotted around Queens Park Toowoomba as part of the Great Australian Dachshund Walk. The sausage dogs and their devoted owners participated in the inaugural walk to raise awareness for Devoted to Dachshunds Rescue, one of Australia's leading breed specific rescue organisations. The walk was also be an attempt to break the Guinness World Record of largest walk of a single breed. That was set in August 2015 in Mexico, with 783 Yorkshire terriers.

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 7


WhatsUp

Pitch@Palace

The winner of Pitch@Palace Commonwealth is

Control Bionics Australia Australian inventor and former TV anchor Peter Ford has won a prestigious award pitching in a technology competition initiated by The Duke of York. Peter is chief executive of Control Bionics, which develops devices that let almost paralysed people communicate with the world around them, despite their inability to move or talk. Originally known as NeuroSwitch and later as NeuroNode, his device can pick up tiny movements of a muscle and synchronise them with a cursor shining up and down the rows of a virtual keyboard. Motor neurone disease/ALS sufferers and those paralysed by congenital illnesses who still have some small muscle movement can then communicate with the world using text-to-synthesised voice technology. Physicist the late Stephen Hawking was a user of Mr Ford’s technology in its early days. The technology also has seen sufferers email, operate equipment, and even drive a remote presence robot.

10 East St Gatton P: 5462 3272 admin@anuha.com.au Supported Employment * In Home Support * Community Access Diversional Therapy * Counselling * Accommodation Commercial and Domestic Recycling Services Secure Document Destruction We also produce a wide selection of jams, chutneys and pickles made fresh from locally sourced produce

Page 8


WhatsUp The managers of the $22 billion NDIS have been excoriated for being “slow”, lacking transparency and being potentially “bloodyminded” in the way they seek to quash appeals by people with disabilities. In an extraordinary decision, Administrative Appeals Tribunal deputy president Gary Humphries has attacked the NDIA for tearing through legal resources simply because it has such a “haphazard” approach to making decisions.

The decision in the case of FFVQ, handed down on Monday, comes as The Australian can reveal the NDIA spent almost $6 million on internal and external legal teams last year. Documents obtained under freedom-of-information laws show the agency spent $3.8m on external legal advice alongside its

$2.1m outlay on its internal legal department. The Australian previously revealed the agency believed the risk to its -financial stability was “extreme” from unfavourable court and tribunal decisions that had the -potential to “vastly increase the scope of both access and reasonable and necessary supports”.

“It seems to the tribunal entirely inappropriate that a participant, working with finite resources and coping with the added burden of a disability, should need to be left in doubt as to the status of decisions made affecting their entitlement to the benefits conferred by the legislation,” the decision says. “Yet this is precisely the situation many applicants to the tribunal have found themselves in recently.”

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 9


WhatsUp NDIS Updates Quarterly Report Sara Gingold NDIS News The March 2018 Quarterly Report has finally landed. It comes at a tumultuous time for the NDIA, with the countless scandals that seem to plague the Scheme increasingly finding their way into the mainstream media. The Agency would have undoubtedly been praying to the high heavens that this report would herald in some good news. Over the course of the 200-page report there is indeed some good news, some very bad news and enough statistics to satisfy your data needs for the next three months. We have leafed through it all and picked out the bits every provider needs to know. The Good NEWS It's always good to start on a positive note. That way anyone so inclined can knock off early and feel breezy (not you Rob De Luca!). In the context of all the problems plaguing the Scheme, it is important to remember that there are some things that are going right. Namely:  84% of participants are still reporting their experience with the Agency has been

Page 10

‘good’ or ‘very good.’  90% of carers for children aged 0-6 feel that the NDIS had been helpful in their child’s development.  72% of participants said that the NDIS helped them with daily living. And my personal favourite:  54% of participants over 25 said that the NDIS has helped them meet new people. Complaints Complaints are undoubtedly the curly topic of this report. The NDIA received a record 4,146 complaints this quarter, which is considerably higher than previous quarters. Some of these complaints were about service providers, but the vast majority were about the Agency. Of these, 31% were about timeliness, 19% about individual needs, 8% about reasonable and necessary supports and 6% about unclear information. Since inception, the equivalent of 1 in every 10 participants has made a complaint. Undoubtedly, this demonstrates how disappointing the Scheme has been to many participants.

Plan Utilisation Plan utilisation statistics might not have the sex appeal of complaints and satisfaction rates, but it is an important, albeit under-discussed, indicator of the success of the Scheme. Low levels of plan utilisation can be indicative of market failure or participants struggling to navigate the system. The Productivity Commission estimates that plan utilisation should sit at around 80%-95%. Rates are supposed to increase as participants become more comfortable with the Scheme. While the report stresses that the picture for 2017-2018 is still emerging, utilisation rates are still problematically low at 59%, with only one quarter of the year left to go. The report does not dedicate a lot of ink to the issue, but it is an essential marker for us all to watch, as it may be the first indicator of a system under stress. The Market While we are on the fun topic of market failure, there is also a problematic picture emerging in the provider's space. This quarter, only 45% of registered providers were active. More disturbingly still, 7% of providers


who were previously active did not receive a payment this quarter. Hopefully, they have all taken a 3 month vacation, because we cannot afford for providers to be giving up on the NDIS. Participants depend on a strong market to allow them to access the services they need and exercise choice and control. At the end of transition, it is predicted there will be 460,000 NDIS participants across the country. Right now, only 35% of them have entered the Scheme. As the rollout continues, we need a market strong enough to accommodate the next 298,000 people set to come. Funds Management One of the most interesting takeaways from this report is the significant changes in how participants are choosing to manage their funds. The rate of participants who are fully or partly managing their funds has grown from 19% to 22% this quarter. Plan management has undergone an even more dramatic jump this quarter with 21% of participants selecting

this method, compared to 14% in previous quarters. Currently, only 64% of participants are Agency managed, with the number significantly decreasing. If this trend continues, it could have remarkable implications for new providers debating whether or not to register. More importantly, it demonstrates that NDIS participants are electing to have more choice and control over how they use their funds. Bilateral Estimates The bilateral estimates represent the expected number of people with approved NDIS plans at particular points of time. Currently, only 78% of the bilateral estimates for this quarter have been met, so there are fewer people in the Scheme than anticipated. This paints a troubling and confusing picture. There are two potential reasons for the variation: either there have been delays in the transition schedule or the bilateral estimates are an inaccurate representation of how many people will actually be entering the Scheme. The report argues that it is the latter. The

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

bilateral estimates are based on the number of clients in selected State and Territory disability programs prior to the NDIS. As of this quarter, as many as 16,005 former State and Territory clients have been found ineligible for the Scheme, could not be reached, or did not want to enter the Scheme. Therefore, there are obviously significant difference between the NDIS and former State and Territory programs that challenge the accuracy of the estimates. As a side issue- this raises significant concerns about what will happen to people in the programs when they draw to an end. However, even with some inaccuracies in the bilateral estimates being taken into account, there are still undoubtedly delays in the transition rollout. Nearly 29,000 participants who have been confirmed into the Scheme are still waiting for plans. While the Agency might want to avoid talking about the rollout schedule and delays, it is becoming increasingly evident that the speed of the rollout is becoming a problem.

Page 11


WhatsUp

Travel

By Kamie Bartlett and Bec McDermott

I have a picture from the zoo of a Sabin tiger looking directly at the camera. Tigers are very solitary and shy creatures and we were very lucky to witness this beautiful animal showing off to us on the day. Caitlin and Rebecca enjoyed patting a deer at the zoo, the deer shown here was in labour while we were visiting the zoo and we all thought she was really cute.

Page 12


WhatsUp

Updates

Virgin introduces carer fare

Yellow Card System

Virgin Australia is implementing a Disability Assistant Concession fare.

The Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services (the department) wishes to inform you of the upcoming CPI increase to prescribed fees relating to the yellow card system. On 1 July 2018, prescribed fees will increase as follows:

The fare offers a 50% discount (applied to the base fare) for an assistant’s airfare. The fare has been made available in recognition of the many travellers using the airline who require special assistance when travelling. The fare is designed to facilitate the travel of guests who are required by Virgin Australia to travel with an assistant under the airline’s Independent Travel Criteria. Flight crews are obviously there to keep us comfortable and safe but there is a limit to the services they can provide, therefore the airline recognises the need for some travellers to fly with the assistance of a family member or support worker. Tasks like administering medication, assisting with bathroom visits and in the case of an emergency being able to apply an oxygen mask are not the responsibility of a flight crew.

Application fee for a prescribed notice – $92.20 Replacement of a lost/stolen yellow card/yellow card exemption and/or notice – $13.95 Users who wish to pay fees by credit card will be directed to the department’s BPOINT online payment portal. Cheque and money order payment options by post will remain.

Guide Dogs Australia named ‘Most Trusted Charity’ for sixth consecutive year Guide Dogs Australia has been announced as Australia’s Most Trusted Charity Brand, maintaining their exclusive hold on the title for a sixth consecutive year. The organisation received this honour as part of the annual Reader’s Digest’s Trusted Brands survey, which added the charity category in 2013. Guide Dogs Australia spokesperson Michael Kightley said the achievement highlighted the importance of trust now more than ever between the public and brands, especially for those acting in the not-for-profit sector.

87-93 West Street Toowoomba 0420 906 186

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 13


WhatsUp Get behind Bowel Cancer awareness By Marrissa Moore

Typical Bowel cancers occur when tumorous growth develops in your large (lower) intestines. This is the second most common cancer diagnosed in Australia. Symptoms may not occur I the early stages of colon cancer, but if they do, gastrointestinal problems are the most common indicator. Colon cancer begins with polyps in the walls of your intestines, regular bowel screenings are recommended after 50 years of age to diagnosis the condition as early as possible to ensure effective treatment and survival. A healthy lifestyle of high-fiber and low-fat intake can help to prevent colon cancer, limiting smoking and alcohol consumption is another measure of defence. If you are over the age of 50 in Australia, a free bowel screening kit is automatically mailed to you every 2 years. It is a simple process to collect and send away your sample to be tested. If you identify any symptoms in

Health

yourself, or a client you work with however then you can contact your local GP directly to be tested. Treatment will depend on the type and stage of the identified cancer, most commonly this involves surgical intervention, chemotherapy and radiation treatments.

these symptoms to occur, not just bowel cancer. If any of these symptoms are experienced it is important that they are discussed with your Doctor immediately.

For more information you can contact the Cancer Council on 13 11 20 or visit https:// www.cancer.org.au/aboutcancer/types-of-cancer/ bowel-cancer/ Signs and Symptoms • Rectum Bleeding (Blood in your stool) • Anemia Symptoms • A Change in Bowel Habits (Constipation or Diarrhea) • Abominal Pains (Cramping or Bloating) • Unexpected Weightloss and loss of appetite • Unexpected (Unusually tired)

Fatigue

There are several conditions that may cause

Employment Services Supporting people with a disability to gain and maintain employment that is valued by the client, the employer and the community. 3 Finchley Street PO Box 1715 Toowoomba QLD 4350 P: (07) 4688 3900 F: (07) 4688 3911 employment.toowoomba@uccommunity.org.au www.uccommunity.org.au/employmentservices

Page 14


WhatsUp Supporting Clients with Mental Health needs By Marrissa Moore

A Mental Health Symposium held at TAFE has shed light on several issues facing our local community services and health workers in a safe and engaging way that isn’t usually the delivery method for such a tough topic. The sessions were delivered by Dr Maria Pau, of The Coaching with Substance Charity, and Nicole Gibson, Australia’s youngest serving Mental Health Commissioner who together share over 2 decades of relevant industry experience and have worked with 400,000 people struggling with mental health issues worldwide. The Symposium focused on how you can support others by approaching the individual person with heartfelt intent and genuine compassion rather than just focusing on the person’s diagnosis and thus removing the more essential human interaction element from the treatment process. The one-day course broke down the key mental health concerns facing

Australians as we enter an era where psychosocial problems are rapidly becoming the leading health crisis facing the country. The program looked at causation, social stigma, workplace productivity concerns and the comorbidities of mental illness, disability and addiction. The day progressed to discussions around Nicole Gibson’s own journey with a mental health disorder and how learning who she was as a person and working through the real cause of her condition eventually led to her no longer requiring clinical intervention to manage her mental state. Her honest insights into self-care and forgiveness are recorded in her new book ‘Love Out Loud’ and are her key strategies for success when tailoring practicable supports to lead others towards recovery. This approach involves taking the time to understand your own needs and find your own purpose in life which aids in continually managing your emotional well-being and is a powerful message all industry workers need to hear.

Love Out Loud If you can instigate meaningful and regular self-care practices for yourself and for those you support in conjunction with other allied health programs, medications and psychological services the road moving forward becomes instantly brighter. We can take on board this message of love and connectedness in every community services workplace to better prepare industry workers for the intense mental load that supporting struggling individuals can entail. Several other local professionals were in attendance as guest speakers for the Brisbane, Ipswich, and Toowoomba events and were able to add additional insights into meditative and nutritional practices that can further expedite the healing process for the mind and body. The symposiums delivery was innovative and engaging, a one of a kind experience that really allowed the attendees to gain new insights into how human beings experience happiness vs. disengagement and how we can all work together for better outcomes within our workforce and our communities.

Flexible Respite Options * Breakaway Guesthouse- Highfields. Offers short term respite to children and adults with a disability in a comfortable and relaxed environment which is fully staffed. * In-home and/or Community Access Support that is flexible and focused on meeting individual family needs. * Rural and Remote Offers respite support to people with disabilities and their families in rural and remote South West Queensland. * Vacation Care Respite support for children with disabilities and their families during school holidays.

27 Mort Street Toowoomba Telephone: (07) 4639 5100 Fax: (07) 4639 5079 Email: info@breakawaytmba.org Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 15


AFL Queensland

WhatsUp Queensland duo earn All Australian Honours By Barry Gibson AFLQ Footy Ops Manager

State

The AFL Inclusion All Australian Team featured plenty of sunshine state flair in 2018. Two Queenslanders were named in the side at the conclusion of the 2018 National Inclusion Carnival to recognise the best footballers from across the week -long event. Team captain Josh Correa and vice-captain Brad Lawrence both made the side after starring for Queensland who qualified for the challenging division one for the second consecutive year. Correa, a silky outside midfielder, was able to control games through the middle with his renowned ability to anticipate play and used his speed to break lines. Lawrence produced a similarly spectacular carnival, playing through the midfield and across half-back where he showed his uncanny love of tackling against the challenging opposition. AFL Queensland Diversity Coordinator – Talent, Peter Yagmoor, said both players’ selection into the All Australian Team was a reward for their commanding performances throughout the carnival. “Josh leads by his performances in the games. He breaks lines and does all of the little things well. He’s a very good player,” Yagmoor told aflq.com.au.

“His experience and the way he played the game definitely helped the team. “ Queensland Inclusion Head Coach, Daniel Ramage, was pleased with the role both players played throughout the Inclusion Carnival. “We rotated them together so that when one was in the back line, the other was in the midfield just to have a leader in both areas. They both played their role for the team,” Ramage said. The Queensland duo’s nomination into the AFL Inclusion All Australian Team was the perfect footnote to another successful carnival for the side. Dylan Evans was named Queensland’s Most Valuable Player at the carnival as the team’s best and most improved player. Act of kindness as Hermit Park Tigers deliver memorable goal Today our great game in @AFLQ was put into perspective when a young man with a disability playing in the Townsville reserves comp had his shoe laces tied by his opponent mid game. He also kicked a goal and both teams got around him. #AFLQfooty #inclusion #outstanding

ADRA Services Toowoomba Op Shops

29 Bell St Mall 74 vanity St (shed F3)

Counselling service ADRA “Place of Hope” Ph. 0447 166 072 for an appointment Conference room for hire Mob. 0421 335 547

Page 16

112 Russell Street, Toowoomba

Rehabilitation for people who experience mental health issues.

To find out more:

www.toowoombaclubhouse.org.au

Or Phone: (07) 4632 4688

1800 777 723 www.pt2pqld.org.au


WhatsUp

Scam Alert

Scammers have set up a clone of the myGov website to trick you into sharing your login and bank account details, Stay Smart Online says. The scam starts with a phishing email that looks like it is from Medicare, asking you to update your Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) details, so you can start receiving payments for Medicare benefits and claims. If you click on the link in the email you are taken a replica of the real myGov website. You’ll note the URL includes ‘.net’ instead of ‘.gov.au’, which is an indication the website is not a legitimate Australian Government domain! If you input your login details you are directed to also enter your secret security question and answer, before you’re taken to the fake Medicare website to input your bank account details. These emails and web pages feature myGov and Medicare design and branding, making them appear legitimate.

Remember, clicking on the link and sharing your details gives these scammers access to your personal information, which they then use to steal your money and identity!

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 17


WhatsUp attitudes was to see and hear from people with disability. 4. There should always supports outside the NDIS

ABC’s Q&A had their disability special Monday 25th June 2018, and we hope you tuned in! The panel of Dylan Alcott, Kiruna Stamell, Graeme Innes, Bruce Bonyhady and Catia Malaquias were asked lots of great questions by the audience. In fact Q&A tell us they have never had so many questions for one show before! If you’ve still got a question or something from the episode you want to discuss, head on over to the Every Australian Counts Twitter page, where the conversation is still going. The episode had a lot to get through, but here’s a quick summary of the biggest questions and answers we heard from Q&A: 1. The NDIS has given us hope, but there’s still a lot to be done We’re a long way from where we were ten years ago, but we still

have quite a way to go. The scheme is working well for some - we have to get it working well for everyone. To do that we need the Federal Government and the NDIA to get on with sorting out the problems. 2. All our voices are crucial for getting the NDIS right The panel and the audience agreed that the fundamentals of the NDIS are still strong. But to have real choice and control, the NDIA and all the governments involved need to listen to people with disability, their families and carers to really get the scheme right. 3. “Changing attitudes changes lives” – Graeme Innes Everyone agreed that while we have made progress, negative and discriminatory attitudes toward people with disability continue to impact everyone’s lives. Everyone agreed that the only way to challenge these

Quality Lifestyle Support Address: 108 Mort Street Toowoomba Telephone: (07) 4659 5476 Fax: (07) 4659 5452 Email: qlstoowoomba@bigpond.com

Enhancing the Lives of Individuals Respite care, Community Access and In Home Care are provided to people in innovative and flexible ways working within the principles and guidelines of the Disability Services Act. Director: John Hart ABN: 43 092 474 872

Page 18

We encourage client input and control over the service they request.

be

The NDIS was never meant to be an oasis in a desert. People who are not eligible for the NDIS still need programs and supports to help them. There should never be a cliff outside the scheme. We need strong leadership by all our governments to ensure that no one falls through the gaps. 5. Society must be inclusive Everyone agreed last night that we can’t build an inclusive society without everyone getting a fair go. There are still too many barriers standing in the way of people with disability having the same opportunities as everyone else - getting a good education, getting a job, moving out of home. The NDIS should be about enabling these things to happen - not standing in the way. And most important of all – the NDIS is not the answer to everything. We need change in all areas of life so people with disability can enjoy the same opportunities that everyone else simply takes for granted. As Kiruna said, we still have so far to go. So we all need to band together and keep fighting until we get there. And that’s what the Every Australian Counts community is all about!


WhatsUp

mycommunity www.mycommunitydirectory.com.au

Toowoomba Region Community Directory Proudly Sponsored by

Toowoomba Languages and Cultures Festival "One World Many Faces" is the theme of the Iconic Toowoomba Languages and Cultures (TLC) Festival - an annual celebration of the diversity in our community and a showcase of talents and colour from across the world!

 to do this in a fun and caring, safe and entertaining environment; and  to have the opportunity to appreciate the best in those who differ from ourselves, and  to form friendships and build networks that unify the community across linguistic and cultural lines. The Festival also:

 affirms the best and most unifying aspects of our existing Australian culture, including both the wisdom and knowledge of indigenous people and the contributions of all those who have arrived since, and who, together, have built our modern country; and  provides the Region with a joyful annual event that brings contributors and visitors to the Region, further widening the building of friendships and relations.

The vision of the Toowoomba Languages and Cultures (TLC) Festival is a celebration of the diversity of languages and cultures that exist within the Toowoomba region. Over 22,000 people attend the event. The TLC Festival brings together over a hundred community groups, service organisations, businesses and partners within the Toowoomba region to support and encourage a sense of belonging and community harmony in our area. The TLC Festival is an opportunity for families to have a fun day out that offers something for everyone. The philosophy and purpose of the Toowoomba Languages and Cultures Festival is to provide an annual opportunity for all community members:  to learn about, and grow to understand, other cultures, religions, nationalities, languages, backgrounds, and ethnic groups;  to explain one’s own culture, language, background, or religion to others who express an interest;  to meet others of different background(s), whom one might not encounter in one’s everyday routine; Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 19


WhatsUp

My Health Record

Your health record in your hands My Health Record is an online summary of your health information. More than 1 in 5 Australians already have one. Over time, My Health Record will bring together health information such as medical conditions, medicine, allergies and test results in one place. This means safer and more efficient care for you and your family. It’s your choice who sees your My Health Record and what’s in it. You can choose to share your information with the healthcare providers involved in your care. By allowing them to upload, view and share documents in your My Health Record, they will have a more detailed picture with which to make decisions, diagnose and provide treatment. My Health Record has various safeguards in place to protect your information including encryption, firewalls and secure login. This year, you will get a My Health Record unless you tell us you don’t want one. If you don’t want a My Health Record, let us know by 15th October by visiting www.MyHealthRecord.gov.au or the Help line on 1800 723 471.

Meet Donna My children and I have always been very close as I’m a single mum. The eldest is now 21, Marnie is 20, and I have another daughter who is just about to turn 18. One afternoon, my youngest daughter phoned me to say Marnie’s collapsed – she can’t walk. After Marnie’s brain haemorrhage, she spent nearly three months in intensive care –

but she just kept meeting every little milestone. She had the base of her skull removed, and a tracheostomy placed because the implication was, if she survived, it was going to be a very long journey. She spent 15 months in total in the hospital during this time. It was really important for Marnie that she had a My Health Record. It was also really important for me as her carer. With others participating in Marnie’s care, if I’m not around and if they need to take Marnie to the doctor, or if she is hospitalised, the information is there for her. At the age of 16 or 17, most people don’t consider having a My Health Record. But sometimes, things happen unexpectedly. For Marnie, she’s been a complex case – we had a number of interactions with the health system and visited Westmead hospital over 400 times. In that period, the procedures and blood tests she’s had are numerous. My Health Record provides me with the security and confidence that Marnie will be managed appropriately by all healthcare professionals.

Page 20


WhatsUp

Title

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 21


WhatsUp Toowoomba

Queensland

Participant transition achieved 67% of estimate to date

Total Participants achieved 56%

Target 3395 achieved 2268 Other participants 33% of estimate

achieved

Target 3610 achieved 1178 Total participants achieved 49% overall for Toowoomba Target 7005 achieved 3446

Bilateral estimates 27,213 achieved 15,277 including ECEI Top 4 Disability Groups Autism

3,808

26%

Intellectual

4,041

28%

Psychosocial

1,119

8%

815

6%

Cerebral Palsy

Warrina Services is a specialist support agency that has been providing individual support to people of the Darling Downs since 1986. We support people with a diverse range of needs and also provide mental health services to assist personal recovery.

Individual Lifestyle Support Service

07 4639 4026

We can help you to achieve positive outcomes in your life. These may be related to choice and independence, education or training, attending social activities, increasing skills, getting a job or contributing to your community. If you would like further information please visit our website www.warrinaservices.org.au

Providing Disability Support and Assistance Increased Social & Community Participation Living and Lifestyle Skills and Support Accommodation Support Capacity Building

or Contact us Phone: 07-46 380 399 Email: warrinas@warrinas.com.au or visit our new office at 172 Bridge Street Toowoomba Office hours Mon-Fri 9-5pm

Page 22


WhatsUp Ipswich's Rohan wants to be a writer, the Prime Minister of Australia, and a fighter pilot–lofty goals for any 10 year old. In this short animation Rohan explains his story and how he's planning on reaching his goals.

Aspiring Author With a combination of Asperger's Syndrome, muscle dyspraxia, sensory issues and central sleep apnoea, Rohan struggles with everyday tasks but, according to Mum Shelley, is "the most positive, optimistic, hilarious kid you'll ever meet". "He's got a real cando attitude and, even when something is hard, he'll give it a go. He always sees the cup half full," Shelley said. "Rohan tells me he loves me every day, he hugs me every day, he tells me I'm awesome every day." Rohan is home-schooled where he is able to concentrate on therapy and his beloved writing.

"My biggest heart's desire is for people to be able to read and enjoy my stories. I want my name to be beside J.K Rowling, Steve King, Roald Dahl, Dr. Seuss and all of the greats," Rohan said. "I have many dreams and I am so excited because the help I get will propel me towards those dreams so that I can make them real."

Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre 256 Stenner STREET TOOWOOMBA QLD 4350 Providing information, support and emergency / short term respite to Carers of people who may be elderly, have a disability and chronic or terminal illness.

Information:

1800 052 222

"At school they couldn't support him as much as he needed to be supported, so even though he's crazy smart he was failing and he was being bullied," Shelley said. "He got beaten up at school and lost a tooth when he was in kindergarten after being punched and kicked in the face. Because he was failing his school work, he was also starting to think that he was stupid and label himself in a way that wasn't helpful." Before Rohan and Bryn entered the NDIS last year, the family received only three hours a week of carer support which left single mum Shelley at breaking point. "2017 nearly killed us all. There was too much for one person to cope with and really I was at the point of a complete breakdown. Physically and emotionally I was done and I could see my family breaking down," Shelley said. Rohan and Bryn now receive considerably more carer support hours through the NDIS, in addition to funding for speech therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy. "The carer support that we're receiving affects the whole household. By having someone who can take Bryn to an appointment, it means that I can be here with Rohan writing stories." Rohan is now able to go to the gym three days a week to help manage the pain and low muscle tone from his muscle dyspraxia and hyper-mobile joints. "He's got a lifetime of weak muscles through his hips and his back, so he gets a lot of back pain. He's only a little kid and he can't walk around without having a sore back and sore feet. Being able to go to the gym is building all that up, so he can have less pain and move more, and it's working." Shelley said whilst Bryn would always need a lot of support, the potential outcome for Rohan from his NDIS-funded therapy could be life-changing. "It's making a big difference. If Rohan didn't have the physiotherapy, there's the potential that he would have physically become less and less capable and become depressed and completely dysfunctional. But instead, he's gaining confidence and he's proud of himself and he's gaining physical ability."

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 23


WhatsUp

Christopher Curran’s Challenge My name is Christopher Curran, I am 27 years old and have an acquired brain injury due to a car accident in 2009 which my family was told I would not survive my injuries. I have been very fortunate that my family do not believe in giving up and helped me to not only survive but return to a normal life as much as I can, I am also partially paralysed on my left side. I had stated to the NDIA that one of my goals was to climb Table Top Mountain. They have been wonderful in their support

Down Syndrome Support Group Inc. (Toowoomba & District)

Offers people with Down Syndrome and their families an opportunity to make contact with, and to meet other people in a friendly and inviting environment. Contact: President Kara Wren Mobile: 0439 661 349 Page 24

Christopher

of me in not only providing funding for support workers but for also providing funding for training through a neurological physiotherapist and for providing the funds for the assistive technology I have required to achieve my goal. As part of my training and assessment to see if I am ready to climb Table Top Mountain, my physiotherapists, support worker (who is also my personal trainer) and family members (Mum & Uncle David) on the 14th June 2018 climbed Mount Kingsthorpe. I have attained a personal goal of making it to the top in 20 minutes when it was believed

that it could take me all if not half a day. I would like to say a HUGE Thank You to everyone who believed in me and provided support and encouragement, my support coordinator, NDIA, Breakaway, ANUHA, Filtered Fresh, My Family and the staff at Reclaim Physiotherapy. Without everyone together I would achieving my goals.

working not be

Please find attached photos of Christopher Curran’s Mount Kingsthorpe Climb. Which has been accomplished with NDIS support. A huge thank you to NDIA.


WhatsUp

Chloe’s Story

Chloe with Ian Thorpe, Jo Ellevsen, Brody Morgan, George Mason

My Name is Chloe By Chloe Ellevsen

My name is Chloe Robyn Ellevsen and in November I will turn eighteen. My parents noticed when I was 18 months old that there was something not right and they decided to take me to the hospital and found out what was wrong. I was diagnosed with a rare condition called Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (MPS Type I Hurler -Scheie Syndrome). There are seven different types of MPS and I am one of around 200 people in Australia with a type of MPS and one of roughly 20 in Queensland with a type of MPS BUT I’m the only one in Queens-

land that has Hurler-Scheie Syndrome. I have to go to the hospital to put enzymes back in my bodyMPS means a person doesn’t make enough or any of enzyme that lives in cells which are needed to break down waste products of cells. 2 years after I was diagnosed my little brother was born and he completed the family- but I am the only person in my family who was born with MPS two of my siblings are carriers I have two sisters and 1 brother. I lived in Roma for about 12 years and went to both schools that they had. I was on TV for a documentary about bullying which was called Bullied. It was hard to do but in the end, I got

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

to meet one Bronze Medallist Ian Thorpe. I don't go to school anymore due to all the bullying. I left in grade eleven, but I have been out of school for a year. I’m now Studying Cert 3 in business Administration. Not long ago my family moved from Roma to Toowoomba but it was a slow process because we had to make sure the new hospital in Toowoomba could give me my enzyme properly, so we had to wait for them to be trained. The best thing about moving to Toowoomba is that I’m not just closer to my family but I'm also closer to my best friend and my nephew and who is the cutest nephew ever. There is a lot more to do in Toowoomba then there ever was in Roma.

Page 25


WhatsUp

in July

Toowoomba’s Civic Square will be transformed into a Winter Wonderland and provide a magical experience for young and old. Get your winter woollies on, strap on your skates and glide across the outdoor ice skating rink. Activities include: Outdoor Ice Skating (11 x 45 min sessions per day), tickets on sale now, free Outdoor Movies Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights, Entertainment , Library events, Art Gallery Tours

NAIDOCC Baillie Henderson Hospital Wednesday 11th July 11am - 1pm Contact Pat Murphy 0414 261 280

Page 26

Toowoomba Show Grounds Saturday 21st July 10am - 4pm


HELP Toowoomba 5 Bell Street Monday 9th July 1:30pm - 3:00pm 5 - 6 July 2018 Brisbane QLD

Source Kids will be hosting the first disability expo in Brisbane focused on children, youth and young adults – bringing together the latest products, services and technology, alongside some incredible speakers under one roof for two days.

Grand opening of our new Toowoomba Office to be officially opened by Paul Antonio Mayor Toowoomba Regional Council

My Son Pinocchio Empire Theatre Toowoomba Saturday

14th July 7:00pm Featuring the beloved classic songs, When You Wish Upon a Star and I've Got No Strings, alongside a host of new songs by Oscar and Grammy Award winner and master melodist, Stephen Schwartz, tackling timely issues about what it means to be "the perfect child" - and what it means to be "a real father. Tickets: Adult $25, Concession $19

Email: whatsupindisability@bigpond.com

Page 27


WhatsUp

Saturday 25th August 2018 9:30am - 8:00pm Toowoomba Library

Page 28

in August


WhatsUp

New to disability?

First Points of Contact Centrelink Payments and Services

132 468

Carers

132 717

Disability Support Pension

132 717

Health Care Card

132 490

Family Assistance

136 150

Indigenous Call Centre Emergency Crisis Payment

1800 136 380 132 850

NDIS General Enquiries

1800 800 110

NDIA Toowoomba Office

07 4592 4057

Local Area Coordinator

07 4646 2800

Medicare General Enquiries

132 011

Pharmaceutical Benefits

132 290

MyGov Help Desk

132 307

Queensland Government

Toowoomba Disability Information Office Open 5 days

(core times 10am to 1.00pm) A question on disability or a service you require? Try us, most of our Information Officers have a disability themselves and will be glad to assist you. If we can’t help, we will refer you elsewhere. Shop 4 / 33 Bell St Mall Toowoomba (07) 4632 6678

Child Safety

07 4699 4255

Disability Services

07 4615 3900

Toowoomba Hospital

07 4616 6000

Department Housing

07 4699 4400

Community Groups Carer Advisory Service

1800 242 636

Carer Respite

1800 059 059

Lifeline Darling Downs

1300 991 443

Relationships Australia

1300 364 277

There are a number of support groups for most disabilities available in this region. To change or add details to the ‘WhatsOn’ pages contact WhatsUp on: Phone: 07 46326678 Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

A volunteer disability service organisation run by people with disabilities

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 29


WhatsUp Executive Team

PUBLISHER: Disability Media Association Inc (Australia) (DMAA) TELEPHONE: (07) 4632 6678 OFFICE:

Shop 4 /33 Bell St Mall Toowoomba (Bell St Mall) (open Monday to Wednesday 10:00am-1:00 pm)

POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 3621 Toowoomba Qld 4350 E-MAIL: admin@whatsupindisability.org MANAGEMENT BOARD: Steven P aull (P resident) W endy Adams (Editor) Jeremy Scamp (Secretary) Ann Paull (Treasurer) ADMINISTRATION: Alyssa Storm, Bec M cDermott, Chloe Ellevsen and Sandra Wiseman REPORTERS / WRITERS: W endy Adams, Alyse N elligan, Bronw yn Herbertson, Sharon Boyce, Marrissa Moore, Steven Paull and many more. PUBLISHED: J anuary/ M arch/ M ay/ J uly/ September/ N ovember ABN: 72 821 350 911 PRINT POST APPROVED: P P 424022/ 1811

STEVEN PAULL President

DISCLAIMER/INDEMNITY: Articles and adverts reproduced on these pages are accepted and published in good faith. It is a condition of acceptance that advertisers and article writers accept full responsibility for their advertisements and articles, and will fully indemnify the producers in the event of any claims or legal proceedings against them. Articles published are not necessarily the view of the publishers. Advertisements are also accepted on the basis that they do not conflict with any discrimination laws or other laws currently in force. ADVERTISING: Although we are a volunteer and non profit organisation, we are not funded in any way, and have to cover costs of this publication by charging for advertising. Please request a quote by ringing (07) 4632 6678 or by email. All new adverts must be received 4 weeks preceding month of publication.

WENDY ADAMS Editor

WhatsUp reserves the right to adjust, resize or move advertisements when necessary to allow for editing WHATSUP IS AVAILABLE FROM: 1) SUBSCRIPTION (In advance) $33 per year (includes postage). 2) A single edition of WID can be bought at the WhatsUp office and selected outlets. You may also subscribe by using the form on the outside cover. 3) Reference copies are held in the Tourist Office and Commonwealth Carer Respite Centre.

JEREMY SCAMP Secretary

COPYRIGHT: Copyright Protected. All pages are subject to copyright law and may be copied only with the permission of DMAA. Copies are not to be used commercially or for profit or for personal financial gain. Permission may be granted to copy only if the purpose is to give it away to others for their personal interest but not to any other organisation or service. DISCLAIMER: All articles are accepted in good faith and are not necessarily the view of the Editorial team or Management. Articles are accepted on the understanding that in the event of any claims against WhatsUp, the writer of the article will take full responsibility and indemnify WhatsUp in the event of legislation against it. Articles are also accepted on the understanding that the contents do not breach any Disability laws or other legislation currently in use. ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY/ COPYING

ANN PAULL Treasurer

Page 30

WhatsUp In Disability is provided as a Master Copy to individuals and organisations. We are environmental friendly, we do not print any more copies than is absolutely necessary. We prefer and encourage the practice of passing the magazine from person to person or copying the whole magazine to pass on to others. Permission is needed to copy (see Copyright above) When copying the magazine we require that the pages be marked ‘copy’.

DMAA PO Box 3621, Toowoomba, QLD 4350


WhatsUp

Advertiser Index

Accommodation / Respite

Holiday / Transport

BigDog Respite House

Page

29

‘Regatta’ Noosa

Page

25

Breakaway Toowoomba

Page

15

Sunshine Coast Supported Holidays

Page

25

Commonwealth Carer Respite Centre

Page

23

Information Services

Support Services 8

Auslan Sign Language Course

P age 24

Commonwealth Carer Respite Centre

Page 24

Anuha Services (Gatton)

Page

BigDog Support Services

Page

4

Down Syndrome Support

Breakaway Toowoomba

Page

15

(Toowoomba and District)

Page 24

CPL (Choice Passion Life)

Page

10

Epilepsy Queensland Inc.

Page

Quality Lifestyle Support

Page

19

Every Australian Counts

Page 18

Salvation Army

Page

24

Parent To Parent

Page 16

Spyro Solutions

Page

6

The Advocacy & Support Centre (TASC) Page 11

St Vincent de Paul

Page

9

Toowoomba Disability Information

Warrina Services

Page

24

Wellways Healthcall

Page

5

Yellow Bridge

Page

7

Employment

Page

29

Slow Starters Tenpin Bowling

Page

4

Toowoomba Sunset Superbowl

Page 14

Toowoomba Region

Page 19

Recreation

Toowoomba Clubhouse

Page

16

Uniting Care Community Employment

Page

14

MedTech Mobility Equipment

Page

20

Reben Mobility

Page

11

Therapy

My Health Record

Page

21

Scott Street Pharmacy

Page 17

Equipment /Adaptations

Medical

9

Other Services BigDog Cleaning Services

Page

8

BigDog Lawn Mowing Services

Page

13

ParisiAnn Patisserie

Page

13

ADRA Services (Counselling)

Page 16

www.whatsupindisability.org To contribute to the next edition please send your article to

WhatsUp In Disability

admin@whatsupindisability.org

is proudly printed by the Community Development and Facilities Branch of the Toowoomba Regional Council

by the 20th February/April/June/August/October/December or reserve a space

Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

Page 31


WhatsUp In Disability PO Box 3621 Toowoomba Qld 4350 Phone: (07) 4632 6678 Email: admin@whatsupindisability.org

WhatsUp In Disability APPLICATION FOR SUBSCRIPTION ($33 per year including postage) NAME ADDRESS

Post Code

TELEPHONE SUBSCRIPTION

E-MAIL $33

MEMBERSHIP

SUBSCRIPTION + MEMBERSHIP

$5

$38

“Please make cheques payable to Disability Media Association Inc. (Australia)” Page 32

Please cut out and post to: PO Box 3621, Toowoomba 4350 with your cheque

WhatsUp Jul/Aug 2018 Magazine  

Issue 82

WhatsUp Jul/Aug 2018 Magazine  

Issue 82