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honoring our

LOCAL HEROES

FEATURING AREA FIRE DEPARTMENTS, EMTS, & LAW ENFORCEMENT

2019 • SPECIAL SECTION


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HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Our Deepest Appreciation This publication brought to you by these community minded sponsors:

Ainsworth-Benning 345 Industrial Dr., Spearfish, 642-4716

Deadwood Recreation & Aquatic Center 105 Sherman St., Deadwood, 578-3729

Rocket Lube 1718 North Ave., Spearfish, 642-8021

Air Systems Mechanical 305 Seaton Circle, Spearfish, 642-1996 Alecia Hoffman, Broker Associate Realtor Century 21 Spearfish Realty, 123 E. Jackson Blvd. Ste 3, Spearfish, 580-6230 aleciakhoffman@gmail.com

Donarski Lawncare & Landscaping 3227 W. Fairgrounds Lp., Spearfish, 559-1009 www.dlslawncare.com Family Optical Dr. Tammy Hersch & Dr. Eryn Caudill 1420 North Ave., Suite 1, Spearfish, 642-0387

Roundup Building Center 405 Roundup St., Belle Fourche, 892-2094 www.roundupbuildingcenter.com

Alpine Impressions 639 N. Main St., Spearfish, 642-0744

Farm Bureau Financial Services 928 Lazelle St., Sturgis, 347-4407

American Colloid Div. Minerals Technologies Belle Fourche, SD and Colony, Wyo. Operations

Farmers Insurance - Stephanie Lee 807 10th Ave., Belle Fourche, 723-2046

Scott Peterson Motors 30 5th Ave., Belle Fourche, 892-2643 1 Ford Place, Sturgis, 347-3662

AmericInn Belle Fourche 2312 Dakota Ave., Belle Fourche, 892-0900 Belle Fourche Area Community Center 1111 National St., Belle Fourche, 892-2467 Belle Fourche Family Chiropractic Dr. Abby J. Johnson, D.C., 1407 5th Ave., Belle Fourche, 723-3434 Black Hills State University 1200 University St., Spearfish, 642-6343 Black Hills Energy www.blackhillsenergy.com

Farmers Union Insurance - Sabers Agency 2327 Junction Ave., Sturgis, 347-4507 211 Main St., Spearfish, 642-8870 Fast Break Screen Printing & Embroidery 511 State St., Belle Fourche, 892-4930 First Gold 270 Main St., Deadwood, 578-9777 First National Bank - Lead 197 Glendale Dr., Lead, 584-2622 Fisher Sand & Gravel 19730 Red Hill Rd., Spearfish, 642-5760 www.fisherind.com

Black Hills Federal Credit Union 835 Main St., Spearfish, 642-8161

Frontier Glass of Belle 19048 US Hwy. 85, Belle Fourche 892-2052, 1-800-292-2052

Black Hills Mobile Laser Tag PO Box 4162, Sturgis, 490-0796

Hersruds Belle Fourche Hwy. 212, Belle Fourche, 892-2766

Black Hills Vision Care 1830 5th Ave., Belle Fourche, 892-2020 Keeping your Future in Focus

High Plains Physical Therapy & Aquatic Center 614 East Blvd., Rapid City, 348-9530

Bloomers Flowers & Cakes 132 US Hwy. 14A, Central City, 578-7737

Jackson Dental 503 Jackson St., Belle Fourche, 892-6347

Bullwacker’s Saloon 1010 Meade St., Whitewood, 717-1888

Johns and Kosel 203 W. Main St., Lead, 717-2889

Butte Electric Coop. PO Box 137, Newell, 456-2494

Juneks 644 W. Jackson Blvd., Spearfish, 644-7774

Captain Clean 372 Evans Ln., Spearfish, 642-7563

Just for Looks Boutique & Salon 1006 Main St., Sturgis, 720-4247

Carl’s Trailer Sales, Inc. PO Box 98, Belle Fourche, 892-4032

KDSJ 745 Main St., Deadwood, 578-1826

Celerity Networks, LLC High Speed Internet Service Spearfish, Belle Fourche, 340-0641 celerityinternet.com

Lead Area Chamber Of Commerce 160 W. Main St., Lead, 584-1100

Chip Shot Golf 306 Cliff St., Deadwood, 321-2613

Mineral Palace 601 Main St., Deadwood, 578-2036

Countryside Church 625 Woodland Dr., Spearfish www.teamcountryside.com Culver’s 2423 Platinum Dr., Spearfish, 722-4868 Dakota Home & Ranch Real Estate, LLC 1411 5th Ave., Suite B, Belle Fourche, 645-8938 Dakota Lumber 18751 US Hwy. 85, Belle Fourche, 892-4041 Dakota Wellness 1109 N. Main St., Spearfish, 642-7111 Dana Dental Arts 1306 Main St., Spearfish, 642-7727 www.danadentalarts.com Deadwood Area Chamber of Commerce & Visitor Bureau 501 Main St., Deadwood, 578-1876

Lynn’s Dakotamart Lead 145 Glendale Dr., Lead, 584-2905

Minitman 820 E. Colorado Blvd., Spearfish, 642-7555 Motor Service 538 W. Jackson Blvd, Spearfish, 642-7142 Mustang Sally’s 624 Main St., Deadwood, 578-2025 Peaceful Pines Physical Therapy 5610 Peaceful Pines Rd #4, Black Hawk, 716-1300 Pete’s Clothing & Western Wear 500 State St., Belle Fourche, 892-4773 Pizza Ranch I-90, Exit 14, Spearfish, 642-4422 RE/MAX in the Hills 1145 N. Main St., Spearfish, 605-642-2500 www.homesintheblackhills.com Ring Container Technologies 10887 US Hwy 212, Belle Fourche, 892-2300

Sanford Lab Homestake Visitors Center 160 W. Main St., Lead, 584-3110

Sharkey Plumbing 418 S. 32nd St., Spearfish, 642-7423 Smokes N’ Things 343 E. Colorado Blvd., Spearfish, 717-5818 Spearfish Area Chamber of Commerce 106 W. Kansas St., Spearfish, 642-2626 www.SpearfishChamber.org Spearfish Canyon Lodge Hwy. 14A, Lead, 584-3435 Spearfish Forest Products 1510 W. Oliver St., Spearfish, 642-7741 Spearfish GMC Cadillac 1910 North Main, Spearfish, 642-7000 www.spearfishmotors.com Spearfish Rec & Aquatics Center 122 Recreation Ln., Spearfish, 722-1430, www.SpearfishRecCenter.com St. Joseph’s Catholic Church 844 N. 5th St., Spearfish, 642-2306 Stadium Sports Grill 744 North Main, Spearfish, 642-9521 Stadler Industrial 340 Industrial Dr., Spearfish, 642-9950 Stinton Chiropractic 517 Grant St, Belle Fourche, 892-4909 Sturdevants Belle Fourche 1413 5th Ave., Belle Fourche, 892-2658 Sturgis Area Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Bureau 2040 Junction Ave., Sturgis, 347-2556 Sturgis Chiropractic Sturgis, Buffalo, Central City, 347-4003 Sturgis Motor Company 1721 Lazelle St., Sturgis, 347-2277 Sundance State Bank Loan Production Office 725 N. 12th, Spearfish, 559-2265 The Lodge at Deadwood 100 Pine Crest Ln., Deadwood, 584-4800 The Real Estate Center of Spearfish 140 W. Jackson Blvd, Spearfish, 642-2525 www.SpearfishRealEstateCenter.com Twin City Hardware Lumber-Rental-Office Supply 399 Cliff St., Deadoowd, 578-3782 Weimer’s Diner & Donuts 120 Main St., Sturgis, 347-3892 West Tire & Alignment 601 Butte St., Belle Fourche, 892-2001 Wolff’s Plumbing & Heating 614 S. 32nd St., Spearfish, 642-5755


October 2019

HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

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Spearfish Fire Department is October 6-12, 2019

SPEARFISH FIRE DEPARTMENT ANNUAL

OPEN HOUSE

Thurs., October 10, 2019 6-8pm Station 1 • 622 N. Canyon St. Family-friendly fun, demonstrations, door prizes, walking tacos. Proceeds go to Auxiliary Scholarships.

Spearfish Fire Department and their families. Pictured from Left to right: John Tollison, Dylan Reiners, Jacob Paul, Bill Wenzel (Battalion Chief), Levi Kessler, Trent Walters, Slade Ladson (Explorer), Travis Ladson (Division Chief), Johnna Ladson (Auxiliary), Tommy Mead, Nic Pappas, Melissa Pappas (Auxiliary), Cody Jolovich, Loni Geffre, Avery Geffre (Explorer), Nathan Deitschman (Captain), Tara Deitschman (Auxiliary), Thomas Hageman, Misty Hageman (Auxiliary), Gerald Drain, Robert Mathis (Assistant Fire Chief), Curtis McGuigan, Glen Lewis, Cole Heser, Susan Zeigler (Auxiliary), David McClure, Brian Zeigler (Captain), Anna Olson (Auxiliary), Scott Deaver (Fire Chief), Tyler Wolf Not pictured: Adam Zeigler (Battalion Chief), Dalton Baker, Shawn Bawden, Heath Brown, Brayden Ashworth, Rick Clark, Patrick Daugherty, Justin Davis, Larry Deibert, Brandon Earl, Christopher Gengler, Cristian Hernandez, Kimmy Hicks, Jake Jansevics, Patrick Klatte, Jeremy Lyons, Mike McGuigan, Troy Mullaney, Jon Raevsky, Micah Schiller, Tanner Tadra, Josh Thurmes, Jackson Walbye, Donald Werner, Stuart Williams. (Auxiliary) Mandi Lyons, Hanna Mead. (Explorers) Liam Runyan, Micah Wilson, Kaley Johannesen, Jacob Pettit

Spearfish Canyon Volunteer Fire Station Left to right kneeling: Adam Altergatt, Gerry Bennett, Mike Kain, Steve Butsco Back row: Andrew Clem, Don Harvey, Paul Thomson, Ryan Brannan. Not shown: David Brueckner, Doug Dexheimer, JD Geigle, Kelly Hitson, Mike Kyte, Ray Rossi, Blair Thomson, John Walk, Bob Freyensee


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HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Deadwood Volunteer Fire Department

FIRE CHIEF

Jason Rakow

VICE PRESIDENT

Rylan Rakow

FIREFIGHTER

Phil Arellano

1ST ASST. CHIEF/PRESIDENT

Bill Glover

2ND ASST. CHIEF

Jeff Millard

SECRETARY/TREASURER TRAINING OFFICER

Jerry Pontius

FIREFIGHER/SUPPORT

Pat Eastman

Ken Hawki

FIREFIGHTER

Toby Edstrom

CAPTAIN

Paul Robitaille

SAFETY OFFICER

Trent Mohr

FIREFIGHTER/PIO

Sandy Glover

CAPTAIN

Frances Iverson

FIREFIGHTER

Randy Addington

FIREFIGHTER

Alex Hamann

FIREFIGHTER

Mike Klamm

FIREFIGHTER

Dustin Nelson

Not Pictured: FIREFIGHTERS Melanie Bond & Melissa Rodgers

JR. FIREFIGHTER

Cody Rakow

FIREFIGHTER

FIREFIGHTER

Mike Runge

Rich Stanger

FIREFIGHTER

FIREFIGHTER

FIREFIGHTER

Paul Thompson

Anne Wieringa

Justin Vought

1947 Dodge has come home to Deadwood through Volunteers’ efforts, for use in parades, funerals, etc. She has served in St. Onge and Pine Haven WY, was found in DeSmet SD.


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

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Lead Volunteer Fire Department

Left to right: Chuck Carter - Firefighter, Don Sanders - Honorary Member, Cody Griffee - Captain, Nathan Allen - Asst. Chief/President, Rob Carr - Captain/Vice President, Tim Eggers - Chief, Allyssa Gregory - Treasurer/Firefighter, Jared Gregory - Firefighter, Summer Stoltenberg Firefighter X (Junior Program), Jeremy VanTassel - Support Personnel/IT, Courtney Stoltenberg - Firefighter X (Junior Program), Erin MaGee Firefighter, Alan Williams - Captain/Secretary, Taylor Ballert - Inactive Member,Ray Black - Asst. Chief FIRE CHIEF: Tim Eggers

VICE PRES./CAPTAIN 2: Rob Carr

ASSISTANT CHIEF1: Ray Black

SECRETARY/CAPTAIN 3: Alan Williams

PRESIDENT/ASSISTANT CHIEF 2 Nate Allen

TREASURER/ FIREFIGHTER: Allyssa Gregory

CAPTAIN 1: Cody Griffee

FIREFIGHTERS: Chuck Carter

FIRE DISTRICT BOARD PRESIDENT: Oz Enderby

Fred Raubach Seth Stewart Jared Gregory Erin Magee

PROBATIONARY MEMBERS: Skylar Thorsen Joseph Perdue

SUPPORT PERSONNEL: Jacob Eggers Mark Everett Jeremy Van Tassel Brigham Williams Brad Johnson

FIREFIGHTER X: Pratt Williams Courtney Stoltenberg Summer Stoltenberg Jeremiah Fredricksen Jr.

FIRE DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS: Jerry Apa Kay Rear Tom Carr Sierra Ward

Newell Volunteer Fire Department Back row left to right: Andy Anderson, Larry Parker, Robbie Vansickle, Jeremiah Heath, Verl Tifft, Dereck Anderson, Don Tishmack Front row left to right: Kimberly Jaukkuri, Tom Swan, Randy Jaukkuri, Bailey Bauer

RT WE SUPPO L OUR LOCA

HEROES

Howdy’s Whitewood Plaza

THANK YOU for your service and dedication

Full line of grocery, produce, meat, & deli. We’re just a competitive small town grocery.

1319 Laurel St., Whitewood • 605-269-2648

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 6 am-10 pm • Sat. - Sun. 7 am - 9 pm

512 National Street, Belle Fourche 605-723-1610


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HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Belle Fourche Volunteer Fire Department Personnel photos not provided.

is October 6-12, 2019

BELLE FOURCHE VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT Annual Pancake Feed Sunday, Oct. 13, 8am-1pm The Moose Lodge 406 Summit St., Belle Fourche

School Visitation

Monday, Oct. 7 - Friday, Oct. 11 The Belle Fourche Fire Department will be visiting schools and daycares to show the youth what firefighters look like in gear so that the children won’t be afraid of them in an emergency. Tours of the fire trucks and fire safety information will be provided to students.

BFVFD Roster: Chief Aaron Thramer, Asst. Chief James Moross, Asst. Chief Andy Anderson, Captains - Jim Groseclose, Ted Jeitz, Ryan Reeves, Cory Carmichael; Luitenants - Trenton Bush, Jerod Lutter, Don Ward, Nicolas Loper; Firefighters - Ronald Fickbohm, Jayson Doyle, Bob Jonasen, Bailey Lawrence, Nicki Stearns, Dustin Waugh, Dillon Giacometto, Melissa Rodgers, Donald Salazar, PJ Sloan, Nate Wiedow, Gary Kemp, Zane Adolph, Shane Waugh, Nate Tarno, Hunter Vissia, Brigette Waugh, Devin Wright

Contact Assistant Chief Andy Anderson at 605-210-1492 or bfvfd.fireprevention@gmail.com for scheduling and details.

Honoring Firefighters Firefighters are brave, loyal and dependable members of your community. They sacrifice themselves to a cause that benefits yourself and your family. Do your part by showing your local fire department the gratitude they deserve. Losing your home to a fire is one of the most devastating occurrences a person can experience. Think of all the personal belongings that may be left behind while you are ensuring you and your family make a safe escape. Fires can create total losses, but firefighters do their part to diminish the amount of damage caused.

PUTTING THEIR LIVES ON THE LINE

Firefighters use scientific calculations to determine the best way to contain and extinguish fires. These precise calculations can be thwarted in an instant by changing wind conditions or the introduction of precipitation. Even a small fire can grow into a wide-

spread frenzy of destruction without much warning. Bravery may not be a strong enough word to describe a firefighter. It is a profession that requires running into burning buildings while the rest of its occupants scurry out to safety. Ensuring that no citizens are still inside a structure fire is just one of the dangerous aspects of the job. This act of heroism is no less than amazing

PREVENTING HOME FIRES

The greatest step you can take to protect your local firefighters is to do your part in preventing fires. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has some great tips on steps to prevent fires in your home. • Cooking: When cooking, never leave the room while using a heating appliance. Don’t cook while you are feeling drowsy or tired and wear close-fitting clothing when near heating appliances. • Electrical safety: Inspect your appliances for

VOLUNTEERS

In the United States, many highly dangerous jobs are rewarded with extraordinary benefits and high pay. According to the National Fire Protection Association, in 2014, 69 percent of US firefighters were unpaid volunteers. This figure should speak volumes to the fact that these special people sacrifice themselves for the lives of others.

For your strength, service and sacrifice, we thank you.

Salute to Our First Responders

THANK YOU 711 S. Main St., Lead, SD (605) 584-1324

frayed wires on their power cords. Only purchase electrical appliances that are noted as UL listed, meaning they are nationally recognized by official laboratories. • Fireplaces: Annually inspect and clean chimneys and check for damage every month. Never use a screen that is too small to cover the entire opening of your fireplace.

1740 Ryan Road, Spearfish 605-642-7367

(605) 641-5194


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

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Sturgis Volunteer Fire Department Personnel photos not provided.

Corey Aga Shawn Barrows Shane Barrows Todd Bartels Craig Beaubien Zweit Bruch

Roy Casteel Shawn Fischer Adam Grubl Chris Grubl Dan Grubl Zach Hess

Cody Heupel Mike Koch Josh Kusser Dravan Lensegrav Scott Lensegrav Dan Mayer

Chris Meland San Monahan Micky Montanio Andrew Nelson Corey Nelson Tom Nelson Brad Olson Scott Oyen Parker Peterson Jeff Potter Tom Price Ron Roth Seth Schwartz Warren Shaulis

Rachel Sirignano Lee Stroschine Derek Swain Cindy Swenby Tom Trigg Pat Urbaniak Tanner Urbaniak Jarrod Vandewater Clint Walker Tanner Walz Adam Weisz Kalen Zook Tristan Zook

Brownsville Volunteer Fire Department Personnel photos not provided.

Dennis Anderson Mike Anderson Shane Croft Shannon Croft

Loren Dobyns Rob Mattox Greg Palmer Fred Pearson

Suzanne Pearson Bryce Quaschnick Jared Quaschnick Lynette Quaschnick

Paul Thompson Rich Uhl Loren Brem Jason Wichterman

Donnie Quaschnick Scott Reis Frank Stamp Steve Thomas

Black Hills National Forest - Northern Hills Ranger District Vale Volunteer Fire Department Members: Chief - Mike Grubl, 1st Assistant Chief - Jim Hansen, 2nd Assistant Chief - Britton Blair, Secretary - Crystal Eaton, Chad Blair, Ed Blair, Bruce Bruch, Mark Bruch, Brett Eaton, Mark Hespe, Ryan Stark, Jim Davis Not Pictured: Treasurer - Joel Brunner, Zach Grant, Mike Casteel, Cole Kettleson, Lane Lamphere, Brad Olson, Charles Tennis, Jake Karrels, Greg Wetz Jr., Colby Crago, Jesse Cibic Fallen Firefighter: Tyler Trohkimoinen Pioneer file photo

Thank You First Responders!

2423 Platinum Dr., Spearfish

605.722.4868

Recognizing our local EMS, Fire Fighters & Law Enforcement for their caring 10 Pine St., Deadwood & protection 605-722-9914

WE IATE C E R P P A YOUR ! SERVICE

605-578-9777 1-800-274-1876 WWW.FIRSTGOLD.COM


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HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Nisland/Arpan Volunteer Fire & Rescue Back row: Tom Lewis, Bill Noziska, Calvin Fickbohm - Asst. Chief, Randy Vallery, Fred Wells Front row: Josh Kitzan, Ronald Fickbohm - Asst. Chief, Stan Lewis - Chief Not pictured: Maynard Yule, Colleen Brunner, Bill Heidrich, Jeremy Butcher, Ken Seieroe

Nemo Volunteer Fire Department Personnel photos not provided.

Jerry Hood - Chief Justin Hendricksen - Asst. Chief Jeff Bechard - Secretary Patsy Hood - Treasurer Jeremy Avezado - Training Officer Virginia Clark - Information Officer Janna Bechard Josh Welke Cindy Solaas Melissa Eggers Gary Phillips

Create a fire safety plan

F

ire safety protocol gives people the ability to get out of a building promptly and safely in the event of a fire.

Fires are unpredictable and can cause devastating loss of life and property. The U.S. Fire Administration states that, in 2017, there were 1,319,500 reported fires that resulted in 3,400 deaths and 14,670 injuries in the United States. Travelers Insurance company advises people to

For Your

BRAVERY SERVICE & STRENGTH

John Laframboise Megan Eggers Greg Nepstad Mica Nepstad

develop a comprehensive fire safety plan, which can help save lives when used in concert with functioning smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. However, the National Fire Protection Association says only about one-quarter of households actually have developed and practiced a fire-escape plan or have taken measures to prevent fires around their homes. Here are some ways to stay safe. • Repair or replace malfunctioning kitchen appliances promptly. Keep them clean and always use them according to manufacturer’s instructions. • Do not leave a room while cooking. The Consumer Product Safety Commission says that most kitchen fires, which can ignite in as little as one minute, start after someone left the room. • Keep a fully charged and functioning fire extinguisher on the premises, preferably one on each floor of a home or business. • Do not overload power strips with plugs, and have a licensed electrician inspect and suggest updates to antiquated wiring systems.

Thank you for all you do!

We Thank You!

• Teach children about the dangers of playing with fire. Keep matches and lighters away from children. • Pull together all members of an office or household to come up with an effective evacuation plan.Walk through the building and inspect all possible escape routes. Mark two ways out of each room. If a window exit is recommended, have a functioning ladder that can provide safe egress. • Choose an outside meeting place that is far away from the residence or building, but close enough that it can be easily reached by all. • Set up a buddy system so that certain members of the family or company will be responsible for helping elderly, young or disabled people exit the premises. • Practice identifying escape routes, and institute regular evacuation plans so that everyone can function quickly should a fire occur. Fires can spread quickly and easily claim lives. By addressing fire risks and implementing safety plans, people can save lives.

Book your Christmas Party With Us at the Buffalo Steakhouse! Perfect for office parties or small groups! From appetizers to entrees, with great wait service staff! Call Destiny at 605-578-9993

19730 Red Hill Rd., Spearfish • 605-642-5760 • www.fisherind.com

AMERICAN COLLOID MINERALS TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

Historic Main Street Deadwood


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

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Piedmont Volunteer Fire & EMS Department Personnel photos not provided.

Robert Puhlman, FF/EMT Mike Weig, FF/EMT Roy Kottwitz, FF/EMT Will Hover, FF/EMT Bill Neuschwander, FF Tom Hook, FF/EMT John Berglund, FF/EMT Josh Sawyer, FF/EMT Colleena Abbott, FF/EMT Randy Albright, FF/EMT

Craig Baumiller, FF Beth Bachand, EMT Trevor Berg, FF/trainee Kelsey Cline, EMT/FF Jenna Corrin, EMT Austin Cummings, FF/Trainee Crystal Deurloo, EMT Kevin Fischer, FF Christina Faatz, EMT Patrick Gerdes, EMT/FFtrainee

Enning Volunteer Fire & EMS Department

James Giacometto, EMT Corey Jonas, FF Robena Klein, EMT Cameron Kor, EMT Lisa Langdeau, EMT Afton Leichtnam, EMT Derek Lothspeich, FF/EMT Chris Misselt, EMT Steven Monteforte, FF/EMT Jaren Puhlman, FF/Trainee

Christine Roseland, EMT Brandon Snyder, EMT Cody Uran, FF Jarod Vandewater, FF/EMT Becky Walters, EMT/FF Tim White, EMT/FF Blake Williams, FF Payton Winsor, EMT Jevin Worthington, FF/Trainee Jason Yeary, FF

Fort Meade VA Medical Clinic Fire Department

How to survive a fire

S

urviving a fire takes a well-executed plan that you have practiced multiple times.

Fire is dangerous, but smoke may be your biggest challenge in an emergency situation. That’s because it can cause you to pass out or seriously damage your lungs. Every second is precious when it comes to surviving a fire in your home or office.

Incorporate these tips into your home or office fire emergency plan today.

STAY COOL

If facing a fire at your home or office, there are steps you can take to stay cool under pressure. The best way to remain calm is to understand your emergency plan. Work with your children to make sure they know where to go and what to do if a fire breaks out. If you run a business, your employees should have a grasp of where emergency exits are in the building. Practice drills both at home and

the office to keep everyone in the know in case disaster strikes.

STAY LOW

When a fire ignites, rooms fill up with smoke quickly. Your exit path will likely be blocked with smoke, so it’s crucial that you avoid breathing it in. Cover your nose and mouth as you escape. Smoke rises, so stay low to the floor. Get on your hands and knees. Crawl toward the door. This will improve your chances of surviving the fire while also minimizing your exposure to dangerous smoke.

While rushing ou you go t, g to those ru ive thanks shing in! Expressing our sincerest appreciation to our first responders.

1010 Ball Park Rd, Ste 1, Sturgis, SD | 605-381-3068

323 West. Main St., Lead, SD • 584-1605

DOOR SAFETY

Things can be dark and confusing during a fire. As you pass from one room to another, remember to close doors behind you. This helps prevent the fire from spreading any faster. If you have to open an interior door to escape, be sure to look for any smoke that might be coming through the cracks. Feel the door for heat. If the door is hot, there is likely a fire raging on the other side. If the door feels normal, open it a crack and move through the room.


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HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Whitewood Volunteer Fire Department Pictured right to left: Jerry Davidson, Ryan Aldren, Jon Toth, Dan Schmidt, Vaughn Smith, Aaron Arehart, Jarred Schmidt, Anthony Nicolli, Mike Beyer Not Pictured: David Werlinger, Travis Barker, Derek Daniels, David Dyer, Jerity Krambeck, Ted Rath, Darrell Smith, Jameson Tebben, Steve Tebben

Rochford Volunteer Fire Department

Elm Springs Volunteer Fire Department Personnel photos not provided.

Board Members are:: Chief Rod Anders Philip Wilson Larry Gravatt Margaret Nachtigall Jacob Linn Tyler Wilson Al Trask Tomilyn Trask Also numerous volunteers in our community who sacrifice their time whenever needed.

From Left: John Hopkins, Chief Dan Harn, 1st Assistant Chief Jason Steele, Jeff Hohle Not Pictured: Dean Robertson, Ed Hague, Melanie Bond, Carrie Riesberg, Neal Drury, John Folkerts, CJ Riesberg, Fred Schwaneke, Sue Schwaneke, Chuck Summers, Jeff Willet, Jim Wolff, Dan Erickson, Lindsay Brown, Alexa Harn. Some people spend their whole life wondering if they made a difference.

A few don’t have that problem.

THANK YOU!

The helpful place.

145 Glendale Drive, Lead, SD 605-559-1110 www.acehardware.com


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES Pg 11

October 2019

Wildfire heroes Sometimes the unsung heroes in our world face great danger and risk in their valiant efforts. The firefighters that battled California’s Camp Fire in 2018 are an example. Other heroes take to the Internet to help from afar. The historic wildfire began its havoc on Nov. 8, 2018. The catastrophe was responsible for at least 88 deaths and the destruction of over 14,000 residential structures. Through charitable contributions and volunteering, America has pulled together to help, where they can, those who have been displaced by the deadliest wildfire in California history. Here are some inspiring statistics from the American Red Cross, regarding how they put your dollars to work and make a difference: • The organization has served over 84,600 meals and snacks to displaced citizens and the crews working to contain the fires. • Over 27,600 mental health and spiritual care volunteers were connected to families in need of support and comfort. • More than 21,600 people were offered refuge with overnight stays in over 40 Red Cross community shelters. These eye-popping statistics underscore the importance of communities rallying around their unsung heroes who put their lives on the line when unthinkable disasters strike. Research shows that firefighting organizations are fighting funding issues

©ADOBE STOCK

within their own municipalities, making it more critical than ever for them to receive support from citizens and donors in their hometowns.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

When disasters like wildfires occur, you can now be involved on

the frontlines thanks to technological advancements in the giving sector. Technology has made it easier than ever to support your local unsung heroes. Look at crowdfunding. In the last decade, crowdfunding has become a popular method people use to get the help they need. If you’re in the giving mood, check out

THANK YOU to all the first responders that selflessly protect us every day!

Thank you for serving our communities!

Thank you to all of the dedicated first responders who serve to keep our community safe! 633 Main St., Deadwood 605-578-1745

For as long as people show valor in their actions to protect others, there will be HOPE.

Deadwood Elks Lodge #508 696 Main St., Deadwood

Hwy 14A and 85 at the upper entrance to beautiful Spearfish Canyon

605-584-3510 • www.cheyennecrossing.org

sites like JustGiving.com or GoFundMe. They are filled with citizens who are in desperate need for funds to pay for expensive surgeries, sponsor charity events and support necessary community upgrades. Technology has made it simple to connect and help important causes that may otherwise go unnoticed.

115 N 7th St #6, Spearfish • 645-0100

Honoring those who stand ready when we call for help 109 N. Main St. Spearfish • 605-642-2757

Open 5 pm to ? • Thurs - Sat. 605-578-1333

We thank you and appreciate you for your services!

115 E Hudson St, Spearfish • 717-7325


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HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Black Hawk Volunteer Fire Department Personnel photos not provided.

Kurt Klunder, Fire Chief Drew Klunder, Deputy Chief Josh Moulton, Captain David Cahoy, Lieutenant Jaden Mitzel, Lieutenant Justin Stiefvater, Lieutenant Josh Williams, Lieutenant Drake Anderson, FF Mac Armstrong, FF/EMT Troy Carling, FF April Cullison, FF Brandon Gifford, FF Alan McMillin, FF/EMT Tony Patterson, FF Shane Richardson, FF Laura Schmidt, FF/EMT Mike Scott, FF/EMT

Tabithia Scott, FF/EMT Chad Solaas, FF Taylor Sorensen, FF Nicky Thomson, FF/EMT Jeff Twite, FF/EMT Sean Weber, FF Wes Feringa, Trainee Nicole Prescott, Trainee

Anita McMillin Crystal Moulton Matt Moulton Rebecca Moulton Jaci Solaas Stephanie Sorensen Jim Tolley Marion Tolley

Fire Corps: Jordyn Bass Margaret Carling Nevada Cahoy Lisa Cosand Wendy Donaldson Nancy Klunder Kathy Lewis

St. Onge Volunteer Fire Department Personnel photos not provided.

President Nick Stadler Chief Scott Merrow Deputy Chief Woody Hover Blake Burtzlaff Justin Crago JD Geigle Cliff Jensen Ray Kinghorn Scott MacDonald James Merrow Neilon Millar

Russell Millar Kelly Moe Brent Olson Curt Olson Devin Stephens Tim Tetrault Cody Tupper Justin Tupper Taylor Tupper Justin Williams

Faith Volunteer Fire Department Left to right: Joe Taylor, Lee Mortenson, Fred Hulm, Glenn Palmer, Justin Haines, Glen Haines, Wade Nelson, Scott Gray, and Elson Fischbach Not Pictured: Brian Berglund, Clay Brown, Jeff Brown, Lenae Haines, Shara Haines, Jade Mortenson, Wylee Nelson, Jarvis Palmer, Jerry Spencer, Brock Williams

HEROS ON THE HOMEFRONT THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE!

THANK YOU To Those That Put Our Community First

NORTHERN HILLS EYE CARE

est. 1944

Professional L.L.C.

910 Harmon St. • Sturgis, SD 57785 605-347-2666 • northernhillseye.com

I-90, EXIT 48, BLACK HAWK, SD • WWW.LIECHTYHOMES.COM

THANK YOU TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN!

614 S. 32nd Street Spearfish, SD 605-642-5755 www.wolffph.com


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES Pg 13

October 2019

Maintaining smoke detectors According to the National Fire Protection Association, three out of five home fire deaths result from fires in buildings without working smoke alarms, and 37% of home fire deaths result from fires in which no smoke alarms are present. Alarms typically detect smoke before a sleeping person would and allow additional time to escape before the flames take over a home, so their maintenance is key to fire survival.

PLACEMENT AND TESTING

Officials recommend homeowners install a smoke alarm in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area, and on every level of a home, including the basement. This is to protect your family from fires that may start in unsuspecting areas, as well as to give your home a shield of protection if it spans multiple levels. Smoke alarms should be installed on either the ceiling, or as high as possible on a wall. Installation is a simple process, but if you’re unsure of how to install smoke detectors, ask a friend or family member with experience doing so. To ensure smoke alarms are functioning properly, the NFPA recommends checking each alarm at least once per month by pressing the test button typically found on the front of the device. Check the owner’s guide to understand what sounds you’re looking for during testing.

KNOW YOUR DETECTOR

There are several different types of smoke alarms, and experts recommend using both ionization smoke alarms and photoelectric alarms. Ionization alarms are typically quicker to recognize flaming fires, while photoelectric alarms typically react faster to smoldering fires. In recent years, interconnected fire alarms that trigger every alarm in the house have become popular and are recommended by the NFPA. Alarms powered from your home’s electrical system usually have a back-up battery that need to be replaced yearly. New smoke alarm products can be accessed via the Internet to keep a constant check on your home. Officials say these newer devices can provide an extra level of security and connectivity to monitor potential fires, giving you peace of mind even when you are away from home. Some fire departments offer reduced-price or free smoke alarms. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency line for more information.

K all our local heroes that THANU to YO keep our community safe!

Deadwood Recreation and Aquatic Center 105 Sherman St., Deadwood, 578-3729

Grateful to all the First Responders that selflessly give of themselves day after day.

520 Canyon St, Spearfish • 642-7996


Pg 14

HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

A great escape plan The National Fire Prevention Association recommends families work together to create an escape plan that can keep them safe in the face of danger. There are multiple facets to a great escape plan, including your pre-drill, drill and post-drill action steps. Read on for an easy way to make sure your family is ready to react if a fire disaster were to strike.

PRE-DRILL

Before performing your drill, take these steps to ensure a solid plan. Walk through the home to inspect all possible exits and escape routes.

Draw a floor plan of the home. Mark two clear routes out of each room, including windows and doors. Ensure your smoke alarms are strategically placed outside of bedrooms, inside the kitchen, and inside laundry rooms. Make sure your windows have release devices inside to ensure they can be opened immediately in the event of an emergency.

DRILL

It is vital that you run through periodic drills to ensure all members of the family understand the plan. Pick a day when all of your family members are home.

Have your family members take their positions in their own beds. Sound one of your smoke alarms to begin your drill. Encourage your family members to move quickly through your home, feeling doors for heat and staying low to the floor to avoid rising smoke. Practice closing doors on your way out of the home; a closed door will help slow the spread of the fire. Select and convene at your outside meeting place (such as a neighbor’s house or mailbox). Take mental notes during your drill so you can address any potential flaws in your escape plan.

POST-DRILL

Once your drill is complete, sit down at the table to discuss your family’s performance. Encourage questions from your children to ensure they are clear on all the details of your escape plan. Offer positive feedback and critique any behavior that went against your escape plan; it’s important to save this information for after the drill to prevent slowing down your practice evacuation. If you have security cameras within your home, you can also record your drill and watch it back as a family.

How to show support for local police

P

olice officers put their lives on the line every day they show up for work. But in spite of the sacrifices officers routinely make, their contributions often go unnoticed. Police officers’ jobs might be thankless, but that does not mean people cannot express their gratitude to the men and women in blue who keep their communities safe. The following are a handful of ways to show support for the police officers who work hard to protect and serve your community.

SUPPORT POLICE FUNDRAISERS

Police departments fundraisers support various causes. Some might aim to raise funds for sports programs designed to help local youth, while others might hope to raise money for the families of fallen officers. Whatever the motivation for the fundraiser, by supporting the event you are donating to a good cause and showing the police they and their efforts are being supported.

TEACH KIDS TO RESPECT POLICE OFFICERS

Police officers have come under considerable scrutiny in recent years, and youngsters may not know how to respond to news stories that do not paint police officers in a positive light. Parents can show their support for police officers by teaching their kids to respect police at all times. Encourage children to come to you if they read or hear stories that depict police officers negatively so you can help them process the story and encourage them to maintain the respect they have for police officers.

THANK A POLICE OFFICER WHEN GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY

Though it seems simple, saying “Thank you” to police officers can reassure them that the communities they work so hard to protect support and appreciate their efforts. Thanking police officers may only take a few seconds, but such a gesture can help police officers better cope with the stress of their jobs.

PICK UP A POLICE OFFICER’S TAB

Police officers work in your community and, therefore, they likely break bread in your community as well. When you see police officers ordering meals at a local restaurant or sitting down to lunch at a neighborhood diner, offer to pay for their meals or arrange payment with their waiter or waitress without letting the police officers know. Picking up police officers’ tabs is a simple gesture, but it’s one they will appreciate and it will let them know they’re supported in the community they’re working hard to protect. Police officers have difficult jobs that require them to make considerable sacrifices to protect the communities where they work. But it doesn’t take much to show your support for local police officers and express your gratitude for the sacrifices they make every day.

15% OFF at Latchstring Restaurant for first responders

21046 US Hwy 14A • 605-584-3333

When you are running away from an emergency, they are running towards it,

THANK YOU TO ALL FIRST RESPONDERS.


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES Pg 15

October 2019

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Offering SUPPLIER PRICING to Paid or Volunteer Firefighters, Police Officers, Sheriffs and Sheriff Deputies, State Troopers, 911 Dispatchers, ETMs/Paramedics, and Federal Law Enforcement Officers.

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Pg 16

HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

Deadwood Police Department

October 2019

SERGEANT

DETECTIVE

Ken Mertens

Tony Bradley

Justin Lux

CHIEF

LIEUTENANT

Kelly Fuller

SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER

SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER

COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER

COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER

COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER

COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER & PT OFFICER

Kip Mau

Sonya Papousek

Casey Nelson

Marie Vansickel

Teresa Tomford

Andrew Larive

FIELD TRAINING OFFICER

FIELD TRAINING OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

Braxton Mckeon

Cory Shafer

Dylan Bell

Eric Jandt

Jason Huber

Sally Sprigler

Lead Police Department Not Pictured: PT OFFICERS Joshua Stoltenberg Doug Parrow

CHIEF OF POLICE

SERGEANT

John Wainman Jr.

Jeremiah Fredericksen

Thank You 86 Charles Street Deadwood 605-578-3975

SENIOR PATROL OFFICER

Robert Williams

OFFICER

OFFICER

Joshua Bridenstine

Jeffrey Rodriguez

ORDINANCE ENFORCEMENT OFFICER Dawn Allen

To all the first responders who selflessly give of themselves day after day...

Thank u o Y g and r servin fo ng our protecti nities commu

101 US Hwy. 14A, Central City 605-578-3552

THANK YOU!

SpearfiSh foreSt productS Spearfish, South Dakota (605) 642-7741


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES Pg 17

October 2019

Spearfish Police Department

CHIEF

LIEUTANANT

SERGEANT

SERGEANT

SERGEANT

CORPORAL

DETECTIVE

Curt Jacobs

Boyd Dean

Darin Pedneau

Mark Weber

Steve Hofmann

Verla Little

Collin Smith

DETECTIVE

DIR. OF PUBLIC SAFETY

ANIMAL CTRL. OFFICER

Jason De Neui

Patrick Rotert

Jackalyn Paul

OFFICER

Aaron Jurgensen

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

Andrew Pearson

Austin Drapeaux

Candi Birk

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

Christopher Woods

Colin Simpson

Dustin Bush

Hunter Bradley

Jacob Raap

Jacob Westover

Jason Gellett

OFFICER

DISPATCH SUPERVISOR

DISPATCHER

DISPATCHER

DISPATCHER

DISPATCHER

DISPATCHER

Shawn Fox

Judith Warner

Dawn Berger

Laurel Stock

Samantha Gustafson

Samantha Simon

Tyler Reurink

ADMIN. ASSISTANT

ADMIN. VOLUNTEER

ADMIN. VOLUNTEER

ADMIN. VOLUNTEER

Kayla Sprigler

Doug Henwood

Pamela Burley

Robert Furrow

THANK YOU FOR YOUR COURAGE AND DEDICATION!

Thank You for your bravery, hard work, sacrififfifi ice and dedication to our community.

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We appreciate the work and dedication of our EMT’s, Fire Departments, & Law Enforcement.

MOTOR SERVICE Open Mon. – Fri., 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. 538 W. Jackson Blvd., Spearfish

605-642-7142


Pg 18

HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Belle Fourche Police Department CHIEF OF POLICE

Marlyn Pomrenke

LIEUTENANT

OFFICER

SERGEANT

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

Ryan Cherveny

Jocule Jones

Joshua Gallagher

Tony Garcia

Lance Patenode

William DuBry

OFFICE MANAGER

CODE ENFORCER

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

Barry Rodgers

Asher Pikula

Wallace Eddy

Brad Johnson

Clint Haffner

Mardi Reeves

Faith Police Department Chief, Matthew Schackow & Part-time Patrolman Ryan Serr

Whitewood Police Department

POLICE CHIEF

DETECTIVE

SERGEANT

OFFICER

OFFICER

OFFICER

Paul Witcraft

Bryan French

Josh Bach

Greg Meyer

Jack Booker

Shaina Carbone

Thank you for helping our communities!

“Genuine Hospitality”

Wake up to a complimentary hot homestyle breakfast (gluten-free items available), enjoy our indoor pool & hot tub and keep in touch with complimentary high-speed internet access. Enjoy your stay!

2312 Dakota Avenue, Belle Fourche, SD 57717 605.892.0900 800.634.3444 americinn.com

Our Sincere Gratitude To Our First Responders THANK YOU FOR YOUR HONORABLE SERVICE

Good for one perfect hair cut for $11 Regular price $16. Must present coupon.

605-642-8603

114 W. Hudson Street, Spearfish

May God bless you and keep you safe


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES Pg 19

October 2019

Sturgis Police Department

Summerset Police Department

Personnel photos not provided.

Personnel photos not provided.

Chief Geody VanDewater Asst. Sean Briscoe    Sergeant Mark Alley Sergeant Nate Borg          Sergeant Chris Schmoker Detective Joe Leveque School Liaison Benny Page Patrolman Dylan Siscoe Patrolman Josh Whitford    

Patrolman Jameson Tebben            Patrolman Dylan Goetsch Patrolman Danny Stacy Patrolman Jerred Hegstrom Patrolman Matthew Jacobs Patrolman Tanner Weaver Animal Control Pam Nash Shelter Tech Katryn Wood Records/Office Admin. Paula Basker

Chief of Police – Don Allen Senior Officer – Justin Taylor School Resource Officer – Brandy Palmer Part-Time Officers: Tracy Wiest Marc Boddiker John Walker

Mark Alley Scott Johnson Jeff Twite Adam Geigle

Benny Page Jerry Moore Nicolis Forbes

School Resource Officer Car. The wrap was designed by Stagebarn Middle School ISS Coordinator, Brian Palmer.

Meade County Sheriff’s Office Front row: Deputy Nic Forbes, Deputy Quinn Regan, Deputy Dan Morgan, Deputy David Moore, Deputy Jarrod VanDewater Middle row: Deputy Branden Torres, Deputy Corey Jonas, Deputy Nick Spencer, Sheriff Ron Merwin, Reserve Deputy Sam Fish, Deputy Tess Bedford, Sergeant Caleb Deyo, Investigator David McCarthy Back row: Deputy Jon Tish, Sergeant Steve Reimer, Sergeant Ron White, Reserve Deputy John Harmon, Investigator Chris Williams, Deputy Michael Scott, Deputy Cody Brua, Deputy Scott Johnson

THANK YOU

We thank YOU!

for protecting our community

395 Glendale Drive, Lead 605-584-2000 Blackstonehotel.com

WELLS PLUMBING AND SUPPLY LLC

1700 5th Avenue, Belle Fourche, SD | O: 605.892.2613 | F: 605.892.6093 wellsplumbingsupply@rushmore.com


Pg 20

HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

Butte County Sheriff’s Office

October 2019

DEPUTY

SHERIFF

DEPUTY

DEPUTY

Fred Lamphere

Tristan Clements

Miles Burhenn

Casey McKenzie

Eric Richardson

ADMIN. ASSISTANT

CIVIL DEPUTY

CIVIL DEPUTY

RESERVE DEPUTY

RESERVE DEPUTY

Heidi Jensen

William Monahan

Jesse Strickland

Ragine Hendrickson

Colin Hanzlik

DEPUTY

Not Pictured: RESERVE DEPUTIES

Michael Lawson Jesse Cibic 24/7 TECHNICIAN

RESERVE DEPUTY

RESERVE DEPUTY

Christopher Brill

Gary Brunner

Brandylynn Flaigg

ADMIN. ASSISTANT & 24/7 TECHNICIAN

Whitney Bridgers

BHSU Campus Security Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office

SHERIFF

SERGEANT/DETECTIVE

CAPTAINS

SERGEANTS

Brian Dean Tavis Little Patrick Johnson Tom Derby

Rodney G. Bechtold, FIC LUTCF, FSS, CFFM P.O. Box 994, Spearfish, SD 57783 B 605-722-7700 • rodney.g.bechtold@mwarep.org PR00414

Registered representative. Securities offered through MWA Financial Services Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Modern Woodmen of America. Member: FINRA, SIPC.

DEPUTIES

Sam McCue Kyle Anderson Lance Palmer Stephen Muller Ritchey Walk Alex Clover Chelsea Lindsey Mary Kate Stevens

ThankYou Seth Brennan

From the bottom of our hearts,

BRAVE

DUTY

KIND

SERVE AND PROTECT

WILLING

HERO

ENFORCER

HONORABLE THANK YOU ROLE-MODEL DEDICATED LOYAL

Life Insurance Retirement Planning Financial Services

Matthew McCroden Megan Merwin Matt Hardin

LIEUTENANT

Personnel photos not provided.

THANK YOU FOR KEEPING US SAFE!

Dustin Schumacher

CARING PEACEMAKER

HARD-WORKING

DETERMINED

INTEGRITY

ALLY

for all you do to keep our community safe.

PUBLIC-SERVANT HONEST

HEINZERLING CONCRETE 605-210-2320

605-580-5769


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES Pg 21

October 2019

NOAA Weather Radio FAQs A great way to stay on top of the chances of severe weather in your area is by utilizing a specialized weather radio offered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Make sure to keep extra batteries on hand or purchase a hand-crank model to receive updates if electricity is out. Check your local area for workshops on programming and a demonstration on using the radio properly. Here are some frequently asked questions about weather radios.

WHAT IS A NOAA WEATHER RADIO?

It is nationwide network of stations which broadcast weather information directly from the National Weather Service. As an all-hazards warning system, the radio releases warnings and post-event information on both natural and technological emergencies.

HOW DO I TEST MY RADIO TO ENSURE IT IS PROGRAMMED CORRECTLY?

The National Weather Service schedules a weekly test for each of its Weather Radio transmitters. Typically, they occur every Wednesday, between 11 a.m. and noon, local time. Keep in mind, tests will be postponed during a live emergency.

School Resource Officers

CAN I PROGRAM MY RADIO FOR A DIFFERENT AREA IN THE UNITED STATES?

Yes, when you’re moving or visiting another location, use the map offered by the National Weather Service’s website. It is easy to find the frequencies for different areas.

HOW CAN I RECEIVE ALERTS IF I’M VISUALLY OR HEARING IMPAIRED?

Specially designed weather radios can be easily connected to other warning devices like strobe lights, bed shakers and even text printers.

IS THERE A WAY TO IMPROVE MY WEATHER RADIO’S SIGNAL?

Many things can affect the quality of reception your transmitter receives. If you live near large bodies of saltwater, dense forests or hills, you can use an external antenna to improve your signal.

WHAT FEATURES SHOULD I LOOK FOR WHEN PURCHASING A RADIO?

There are several different models available, the most useful feature you should search for is one offering an alarm tone. Also, choose an option that will operates on batteries or with a hand crank in case the power goes out.

If you visit your child’s school, you have likely noticed one or a group of police officers dedicated to keeping children safe. According to the National Association of School Resource Officers, this special type of first responder is federally defined as a career law enforcement officer with sworn authority who works with one or more schools. The next time you see these specially trained unsung heroes, be sure to offer your gratitude and thank them for a job well done.

SPECIAL TRAINING

In addition to receiving their certification as a member of law enforcement, the NASRO recommends school resource officers complete an additional 40-hour block of instruction. This special training discusses tools officers can use to build beneficial relationships with students and staff. Here are the three main topics emphasized during their additional education. Function of law enforcement: Educates on the difference between law enforcement protocols inside a school environment and understanding the teen brain and de-escalation techniques. Mentoring students: Encourages the behaviors of becoming a positive role model for youth by employing counseling methods. Guest speaking: Designed to showcase instructional techniques and classroommanagement resources to educate

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students on law-related material. The lessons school resource officers learn during this specialized training ensures they create a positive influence on students that will leave an impression for life.

A WELCOME PRESENCE

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, during the 20152016 school year, 43 percent of public schools had an armed officer present at least once a week. This statistic is up 10 percent from the previous decade. School resource officers are tasked with upholding the law in their schools and building relationships with the students they protect. As a parent, you should encourage your child to be open and honest with the resource officer in their halls. Relaying information regarding a potential violent situation or other cases of wrongdoing helps create a safe space where everyone feels secure learning.

Thank you area First Responders 605-642-2944 638 E. Colorado Spearfish, SD

To all the first responders -

605-456-2600

www.boomcon.com 202 Girard Ave., Newell

THANK YOU FOR PROTECTING & SERVING!

THANK YOU! 947 E. Colorado Blvd • Spearfish 605-717-5668

Will John Johnson, DC • Kylee Johnson, DC 1001 Meade St, Whitewood P: (605) 717-2428 • F: (605) 717-2491


Pg 22

HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Properly pack a car emergency kit After home and work, the next most common place people spend their time is in their vehicles. Because they spend so much time behind the wheel, drivers need to be prepared for breakdowns. Packing an emergency kit in the car can help people make the best of such situations. A car emergency kit can help drivers get back on the road promptly. Without such kits, drivers may be stranded for hours after a breakdown. Emergency kits also come in handy during weatherrelated events that can sideline cars until roads become passable. Getting caught in a vehicle during a snowstorm and failing to have the proper gear can be a life-threatening scenario under extreme conditions. It is always wise to plan for the worst and hope for the best. The Department

E

of Motor Vehicles and the Department of Homeland Security note that these key items should always be included in a car emergency kit. • durable bags or crates to store supplies • complete first aid kit • small fire extinguisher • jumper cables • rain ponchos

• plastic tarp • flashlights and extra batteries • bottled water • small cache of nonperishable foods • wrench and pliers • local maps • rags • duct tape • multipurpose tool

• ice scraper • automotive fluids • blankets/warm clothing • cat litter for slick roads • tire-changing equipment • spare tire • road flares or caution reflectors • empty, refillable gas canister • cash for gas • phone charger cable Being prepared can make a difference when vehicles are sidelined. In addition to an emergency kit, cars and trucks should be regularly maintained to prevent breakdowns. This includes ensuring all fluids are at proper levels, filters are changed, batteries are in good working order, and tires are inflated correctly. Investing in a roadside assistance service also can help get drivers back on the road quickly.

The role of an EMT

MTs, or emergency medical technicians, play an important role as first responders to emergency situations. They are well trained and should be respected public figures in your community. It is important to understand the hectic work life of an EMT. EMTs are applauded for their calm composure during extremely stressful situations. No matter the emergency, your local EMTs are prepared for any emergency event. They are first responders to scenes of vehicle accidents, home and industrial accidents, medical emergencies or any other situation that requires emergency service.

AVERAGE DAY

Though the length of the average shift performed by an EMT may differ depending on department, many EMTs work shifts from eight hours to two entire days. Luckily for you and your EMTs, they are allowed scheduled nap hours during these long shifts to remain sharp in administering emergency service. EMTs also are responsible for communicating with local hospital staff to prepare for incoming patients. They deliver clear and concise information on the treatment they have already administered to a patient and explain the situation of the emergency event. They also are responsible for keeping accurate records that explain the incident. These records may be called on for legal or medical reasons.

INCREDIBLE SET OF SKILLS

Take a minute to think of times you or people you know have had to dial 911. The reasons may be extremely different each time, but your EMTs were still able to sufficiently administer emergency care. This is due to the strenuous testing and training that is required of EMTs. Here are just a few skills required by EMTs, per the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians: • cardiac arrest management; • patient assessment for trauma and medical; and • oxygen administration.

THANK AN EMT

Your local EMTs do everything in their power to provide the best possible ending to an emergency. Take time to pass along your appreciation of their hard work and dedication. Write a letter of acknowledgment to your local emergency response department explaining your gratitude to the EMTs who assisted you. These letters let your local EMTs know that the long hours and stressful conditions are making a positive difference to those around them.

we support our

LOCAL HEROES

www.teamcountryside.com

THANK YOU for all you do!

West Highway 212, Belle Fourche, SD • (605) 892-4032

©FOTOLIA


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES Pg 23

October 2019

Spearfish/Whitewood EMS Teams

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Brian Hambek

OPERATIONS MANAGER Andy Binder

QA MANAGER Julie Rauscher

PARAMEDIC Laura Anderson

PARAMEDIC Matt Anderson

EMT Elizabeth Barker

EMT Lori Boggs

AEMT Dani Bradley

AEMT Hunter Bradley

PARAMEDIC Brenda Brown

AEMT Hanna Burtt

PARAMEDIC Mark Conboy

PARAMEDIC Jerry Davidson

EMT Glenn Duggin

EMT Nicholas Elston

EMT-I Gerald Frame

PARAMEDIC JD Geigle

MENTAL HEALTH Karen Grifith

PARAMEDIC Thomas Harvey

PARAMEDIC Joe Hinton

EMT Alexis Iverson

PARAMEDIC Henry Johnson

EMT Laura Kloeckl

OFFICE ASSISTANT Aggie Larson

AEMT Brooke Mabey

AEMT Julie Martin

PARAMEDIC Adam Miles

EMT-I Thomas Miles

EMT Andrew Nelson

EMT Dylan Reiners

EMT Mike Roberts

AEMT Christine Roseland

EVOC DRIVER Dan Schmidt

EMT Mona Smith

EMT Lee Stroschine

PARAMEDIC Kingsley Swanson

AEMT Jameson Tebben

PARAMEDIC Elizabeth Verhey

PARAMEDIC Jim Wallace

EMT Tim White

EMT-I Linda Zafft


Pg 24

HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Faith EMT’s

Lead/Deadwood EMT’s

Personnel photos not provided.

Kris Escott Lila Fisher Glen Haines Tracie Henderson

Carmen Fees Jana Johnson Robert Fisher Kristi Medrud

LouAnn Bubbers Holly Spencer Lenae Haines Katrina Collins

Anna Monfred-Wieringa

Brenda Brown

Bill Day

Erica Donovan

CeCe McEwan

Kristene Rancour

Gabrielle Schroder

Joy Wilczynski

Matthew Hardwick

Nicole Skouge

Derek Swain

Joe Hinton

Newell EMT’s Personnel photos not provided.

Casey Baker Bailey Bauer Calvin Fickbohm Sherry Hocking Hope Komes Jesse Komes

Makayla Komes Todd Komes Tom Lewis Hannah Stadum Don Tishmack Dave Zwetzig

Drivers: Brian Culver Kurt Hocking Stan Lewis Tom Swan

Not Pictured: Aaron Zimmiond Amanda Hills Pete Ferguson

Ron Underhill

THANK YOU

FOR YOUR SERVICE AND PROTECTION

No words seem adequate to express our admiration and gratitude for the brave men and women who run towards danger to selflessly save others. Our thoughts and prayers are with you. 1306 Main Street Spearfish, SD 605.642.7727

200 Federal Ave. Rapid City, SD 605.342.6038

Most Insurance Accepted • Care Credit Available

3226 Fairground Loop Rd, Spearfish, SD • 605-641-9095

www.danadentalarts.com

Tanner Geldert

THANK YOU FIRST RESPONDERS

STAY SAFE!

Howdy’s Newmart

219 Girard Ave., Newell • 605-269-2648


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES Pg 25

October 2019

Sturgis EMS Personnel photos not provided.

Casey Baker, EMT Dusty Barker, EMT Shawn Barrows, EMT Justin Boerboom, EMT Donni Bruch, Driver Keri Casteel, EMT Shawn Fischer, Critical Care Paramedic & Ambulance Director James Hale, Critical Care Paramedic Thomas Harvey, Paramedic Cody Heupel, Paramedic Samantha Heupel, AEMT Joe Hinton, EMT Rachel Hobbs, Paramedic Nellie Issacs, EMT-I99 Alexis Iverson, EMT


Lisa Katzenstein, EMT Joshua Kusser, EMT-I85 Scott Lensegrav, EMT LexiManolovitis, Paramedic Dave McCarthy, EMT Tammy McCoy, Paramedic Amethyst Milburn, EMT Adam Miles, Paramedic Micky Montanio, EMT-I85 Cory Nelson, Paramedic Parker Peterson, Driver Tom Price, Critical Care Paramedic Paul Rossum, Paramedic Holly Sabers, Critical Care Paramedic Halli Schulz, Paramedic Heidi Schulz, EMT Jama Shaulis, Paramedic

all ou to y k an Th

of those that ar rive firs t!

Warren Shaulis, Critical Care Paramedic Tallina Spring, Driver Kent Stenson, EMT-I85 Lee Stroschine, EMT Derek Swain, Paramedic Anna Tescher, EMT James Twichell, EMT Hannah Updike, Paramedic Pat Urbaniak, EMT-I85 Tanner Urbaniak, Paramedic Taryn Urbaniak, EMT Clint Walker, EMT
 Courtney Walker, EMT Tanner Walz, Paramedic Chris Woods, Critical Care Paramedic Kaleb Zook, EMT

Bravery is the ability to still perform, even when scared half to death.

Thank you.

The Spearfish American Legion Family Post 164

salutes, honors, and thanks

The Local Heroes

TWIN-CITY HARDWARE Lumber • Rental • Office Supply

309 Cliff Street, Deadwood, SD 57732 • 605-578-3782

Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 am - 6 pm Sat. 8 am-5 pm • Sun. 9 am - 5 pm

Shop online at tchdwe.com

567 MAIN STREET DEADWOOD SALOON10.COM


Pg 26

HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

Belle Fourche EMT’s Photos by Jessica Burhenn

DIRECTOR Donnie Walding

Anne Carter

Barry VanSickle

Bobby Lewis

Brandy VanSickle

Cody Smith

Courtney Venard

Debra Wheaton

Dennis Schmidt

DeRae Bach

Eliza Thompson

Jessica Burhenn

Jim Anderson

Jordan Hanson

Katy Thompson

Kaylee Fischer

Kirsten Kirsch

Michelle Schmidt

Tyrel Lewis

Veronica LaFayette

Lawrence County Search & Rescue Pictured, from left: Jared Quaschnick, Fred Pearson, Suzanne Pearson, Mike Stahl, Andrew Pisciotta, Emergency Management Director Paul Thomson, Lynette Quaschnick, Lynn Davis, Richard Carlson. Not Pictured: Hunter Bradley, Ron Everett, Terry Frederick, Chris Huhnerkoch, Rob Mattox, Fred Raubach, Kay Rear, Jessica Santee, Jeff Schroeder, Bill Weber and Rick Wisser.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE AND COMMITMENT TO OUR COMMUNITIES!

Thank you to the everyday heroes that keep our communities safe.

For Your Strength, Courage & Service

Dr. Brandie Rainboth, DPT, OCS 1420 North Avenue, Suite 5, Spearfish

605.559.0381

info@spearfishpt.com • www.spearfishpt.com

436 E. Colorado Blvd, Spearfish, SD

We Thank You!

709 Main Street • Deadwood, South Dakota 800-584-7005 • 605-578-3670


HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES Pg 27

October 2019

How to prevent curious kids from accessing potential poisons Poisonous substances can be deadly. Many substances found in a typical home can be characterized as poisonous. While adults may know to avoid ingesting potentially toxic substances, curious youngsters rarely do, making household poisons an especially significant threat to young children. The American Academy of Pediatrics notes that roughly three million people swallow or have contact with a poisonous substance every year. Many of those people are under the age of five. Curiosity in youngsters is good, indicating that kids are interested in their surroundings and looking to learn how the world around them works. Nurturing that curiosity is important for kids’ development. But it’s also important that parents take steps to prevent curious kids from accessing any of the number of potentially poisonous substances found in a typical household. • Install safety latches or locks on cabinets and drawers. Safety latches or childproof locks can prevent curious youngsters from accessing cabinets, drawers and other areas where cleaning products, medicines and any substances that are toxic or potentially harmful may be stored. Latches and locks are an inexpensive way to prevent children from accessing harmful chemicals, but parents should periodically check the locks to ensure they’re all still working properly. • Store medications safely out of the reach of children. Young children may see their parents taking medication and mistakenly assume the pills are candy. Storing pills in locked cabinets, top dresser drawers and/or on the top shelves of medicine cabinets can keep curious youngsters intent on mimicking mom and dad from taking adult medications. Make sure medications also are stored in bottles with childproof caps just in case resourceful youngsters manage to find pills or other medicines.

• Take medicines out of kids’ view. When taking pills or medicine, parents should try to do so when children are not looking. Parents also can turn their backs before taking pills so kids cannot see them. • Discard old medications. Many people do not finish their medications. Adults who do not intend to or need to finish their medications should discard the pills once they stop taking them. Consult with prescription information papers to determine the safest way to dispose of unwanted and/or expired medications. Simply placing them in the garbage might not be safe, as curious kids may find old pills in bathroom or bedroom garbage cans and mistake them for candy. If necessary, parents can call their

Our local first responders go above and beyond the call of duty throughout the year with a variety of community activities and programs -- Introducing youth to the sights and sounds of the ambulance and fire trucks, vehicle tours, fire safety, DARE programs, Shop with a Cop, car seat checks, and CPR classes, amongst others. We appreciate all they do for our communities. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer, please contact yourlocal department(s) for more information.

For your Bravery, Courage and Dedication We Thank You!

PYRAMID CONSTRUCTION We Build to Last

816 W McCleallan St, Lead, SD • 605-580-1291

Thanks to those who put our community first. WERLINGER AUTO BODY REPAIR 3441 Whitewood Rd., Sturgis

605-347-5550

werlingerautobodyrepair.com

local police departments to see if they have a drug collection program. • Store lawn and garden items in locked sheds or on high shelves in the garage. Items used to tend to lawns and gardens, such as fertilizers, some plants and gas cans, should be stored where children looking for their toys, tricycles or bicycles cannot find them. In addition, items that are not poisonous but are potentially harmful, such as pruning shears, should be stored beyond kids’ reach. Many substances around the house can be harmful to curious children. Taking measures to safeguard kids from such substances can ensure they are not poisoned.


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HONORING OUR LOCAL HEROES

October 2019

THANK YOU. For the important role you play in protecting our lives and for your brave and selfless sacrifice, we thank you, the dedicated men and women of our communities’ emergency response teams, for all that you do. We gratefully recognize your service to our communities, and we honor the memories of those who have fallen in the line of duty.

YOU ARE ALL HEROES.

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Local Heroes 2019  

Featuring area Fire Departments, EMTs, and Law Enforcement.

Local Heroes 2019  

Featuring area Fire Departments, EMTs, and Law Enforcement.

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