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inside O k t o b e r f e s t 2 0 19 | B l a c k H i l l s P i o n e e r f i l e pho t o

4 8 10 12 14 16 19 20 22 24 25 28 31 32 35 36 38

The Brothel Deadwood A ‘Smashing’ Souvenir Mining History to Universal Mysteries Schedule of Events Gaming Bounces Back Amidst Pandemic Deadwood Main Street Initiative Snowshoeing. Try it. You’ll Like it. Black Hills Trails System Map Black Hills Snowmobile Network Ski Destination: Terry Peak Deadwood’s Guilty Pleasures Attractions Deadwood Word Search and Crossword Puzzle Meet Deadwood’s Legends Lodging Directory Gaming Directory Dining Directory

Destination Deadwood® Staff: Letti Lister, Publisher | Sona O’Connell, Advertising Manager Phoebe Caldwell, Advertising | Amanda Knapp, Design K - 9 K e g P u l l 2 0 19 | Co u r t e s y S D To u r i s m

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estination Deadwood® magazine started publication with the onset of legalized gaming in November 1989. This magazine is owned and produced by the oldest continuously operating business in Western Dakota Territory — the Black Hills Pioneer newspaper, which first published on June 8, 1876. Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

144 YEARS Since 1876

Destination Deadwood® is published by Seaton Publishing, Inc., 315 Seaton Circle, Spearfish, SD 57783 • (605) 642-2761 © 2020-2021 Destination Deadwood. All rights reserved.

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‘the worst-kept secret in town’ For years, Deadwood’s brothels were an active part of the community’s history. That all came to an end May 21, 1980, when federal and local law enforcement agencies raided the brothels and they were closed forever. Un t i l n ow.

The

Brothel

Deadwood Story by Jaci Conrad Pearson

I

n August, Deadwood History, Inc.’s (DHI) The Brothel Deadwood opened for historic tours at 610 Main St., interpreting the story of prostitution in Deadwood from 1876 to 1980 in a 3,000 square-foot space that formerly occupied a “cat house” called the Shasta Rooms, aka, The Beige Door Brothel.

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“It’s a 104-year history of the brothels in Deadwood, from 1876 to 1980, and we have eight rooms that we have curated to represent that 104-year period,” said DHI Executive Director Carolyn Weber, who invested thousands of hours of research into telling The Brothel Dead-

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brothels netted 16 women, including at The Brothel,” Weber said. “One was wood story. “There are rooms that are madams and prostitutes. curated from 1876 to 1900. Then the next a cleaning lady, one was a liquor store The Brothel project was funded with a owner, some were young kids who would working room will represent 1920s and $50,000 loan to DHI from NeighborWorks come up here to sell their raffle tickets the next one will represent 1940s-50s and Deadwood Historic Preservation, as or get money for whatever organizaand then the next one 1960s-70s. Those well as a $400,000 loan to Nugget, LLC tion they were involved with. And then, are the working rooms. There are four from Deadwood Historic Preservation. of those. Then there’s one, what I like to The idea for The Brothel came from call, real bedroom that women could ocDeadwood Historic Preservacupy if the house wasn’t at full capacity … otherwise you had There a re so ma ny t hings people ca n t a ke tion Officer Kevin Kuchenbecker and former Main Street Inito live out of your work room away, but I just li ke t he huma n aspect of tiative Chairman Bill Pearson. all the time.” “They were looking at ways A parlor, a madam’s office, a it . These were rea l people. Li ke a ll of us. to better utilize second-story madam’s bedroom, and a gift Mothers, wives, sisters, friends. levels of historic buildings shop are also part of The Brothon Main Street and then they el Deadwood. brought in a South Dakota State Univera young guy who used to deliver dry “The rooms are good sized, which sity architecture class to get their input lends itself well to the tour,” Weber said. cleaning here to the ladies. So, there are a lot of people with a lot of different sto- on what they thought would be good “The Madame here was Tommie Cox, uses of these buildings and when they ries that we captured and it’s really fun also known as Elsie Irwin.” found out what this one was, they said because they have a lot of good memoA small theater area is also curtained ries. Some of them are funny stories and ‘Why don’t you just turn it into a museoff that features 15 minutes of streamum or a tour related to the brothel as it some of them are really touching.” ing interviews with nine local individused to be?’” Weber explained. “So that’s Employing an estimated eight women uals who interacted where that came from.” at a time, the Beige Door Brothel is one or had first-hand Weber said that, ultimately, when of four “houses” in operation when they experiences patrons finish the tour, she would like were raided and shut down in 1980. with the them to have the following take-away. “You had your slow seasons and your “girls” back “That this was a business that was busy seasons, like deer hunting season in the day. was crazy,” Weber said. “They’d bring in a big part of Deadwood’s economic “They success. They contributed greatly to the had varying extra girls to work during deer hunting community here through their generexperiences season.” osity to charitable organizations. They Weber said that a 1959 raid of all four up here

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Deadwood’s brothel tours gives visitors a look back in time at the profession and the women who worked it.

The

Photo by Jaci Conrad Pearson

Shines On LIVE TABLE GA ME S | SLOT S | BAR & RE S TAUR AN T

67 7 M A I N S T R E E T, D E A D W O O D 6 0 5 . 5 7 8 .15 5 5 | T H E M I D N I G H T S T A R . C O M

SUNDAY–THURSDAY : 10A M – MIDNIGH T | FRIDAY–S ATURDAY : 10A M – 3A M

from page 5 shopped at all the shops here in town,” Weber said. “I also want people to know these were real women. They were in this business because they chose to be in this business. There are a few exceptions to that and we do discuss that. But all in all, I would say most of the people that chose to work here chose do so. Also, 104 years of an illegal operation? I mean, come on. Everybody knew about it. But I always say it was the worst-kept secret in town.” Weber said that, in fact, the community rallied to the women most times. “If they got charged with something, the townspeople were, like, ‘Uh-uh. You’re not shutting the girls down,’” Weber said. “There are so many things people can take away, but I just like the human aspect of it. These were real people. Like all of us. Mothers, 6

wives, sisters, friends.” Tours are for people 16 years and older only. Weber said it’s important to note that during these tours and all of the research and everything that DHI has done, “We do recognize that there’s a difference between sex work and sex trafficking,” she said. “And we do recognize that and we talk about that. We’re not glamorizing or glorifying anything. We’re not condoning or condemning. We’re just telling the narrative of Deadwood’s history and if you have reservations, you should probably come up and take the tour and see what it’s like. Don’t judge it until you’ve seen it.” Weber added she is very happy to have a Main Street presence with the DHI properties, as well. “This is an opportunity to promote our other properties and tell people to go explore all of Deadwood,” she said.

Destination Deadwood©

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Chip Shot Golf offers indoor golf on the worlds #1 simulator. The only simulator endorsed by official on air sim of the PGA and the the Golf Channel.

Over 80

649 Main St., Deadwood • 605-559-0599

courses to choose from !

Deadwood’s Best Place to Shop f f f

Unique Handmade Gifts & Jewelry by Local Artists Large Selection of Cowboy Hats: Stetson, Bailey, & Resistol Twisted X Blowout Sale! All Twisted X $89.99

f f f f f

Wyoming Traders Vests Montana Silversmiths Best Handbag Selection in the Black Hills! Top Quality Men’s Leather Belts Children’s Cowboy Boots starting at $25

Kitty’s 649 Boutique (located upstairs)

Carrying the latest fashion trends for men and women! plus we carry XS-3X Sizes!

Book your dream bachelor or bachelorette party with us! Beer, Wine, and a Full Menu of Delicious Eat s.

Golf Year-Round!

and BBQ

Call 605-321-2613 or 402-430-5988 to make your Par-Tee time today! 306 Cliff St., Deadwood, SD

Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

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‘smashing ’ souvenir

A

Story and Photos by Jaci Conrad Pearson

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mashed penny collectors and penny pinchers, alike, get ready to turn your cranks. Deadwood’s got ‘em, and you can find ‘em in at least four locations that we know of in the Wild West city. A flat cool, fabulously affordable, smashing souvenir from your South Dakota stay, smashed pennies sort of abound in Deadwood, with around 20 different varieties to be had. Smashed, or elongated coins, are made by forcing a coin between two steel rollers that contain an engraving. As the coin passes through these rollers, it is squeezed and elongated under tremendous pressure, transformed from its round shape to an oval shape and the engraving is impressed into the coin, as well. First made during the 1892-1893 World’s Columbian Exposition held in Chicago, Ill. to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Columbus’s discovery

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of America, there were four different designs cast for the event. Following a lull that picked back up in 1932, their popularity has steadily increased and today, the coins are so widely available in various forms and fashions that it’s nearly impossible for a collector to keep up. While some collectors are going for all that is produced, most specialize in one or more fields and collect only those coins. For example, some may focus on political, geographical, seasonal, or special events, while others collect by roller and try to obtain everything produced by one specific roller. A turn of the crank in at least four locations in Deadwood — Miss Kitty’s Mercantile, Gold Nugget Trading Post, Pam’s Purple Door Discount Outlet, and Happy Days Gifts — will stamp out

A t l e a s t 20 smashed penny designs in Deadwood

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at least 20 unique designs. Miss Kitty’s Mercantile features four different designs and shop keeper Bob Fehr said it’s wildly popular. “We’ve had it for about two, two and one-half years in the store, and it’s in daily use,” Fehr said. “What we have is powered by crank. It was made by a couple in Colorado. The fellow is a retired machinist and he actually machines out the gears and everything to drive the penny machine. The lady is an artist and she will make the picture that presses into the coin. She’s in charge of designing the dies for the penny machine.” Wild Bill, Black Hills Gold Rush, Dead Man’s Hand of Aces ‘n Eights, and Miss Kitty’s Mercantile are the four different coins to choose from at this venue. “And, of course, it costs you 50 cents plus a penny to run the machine,” Fehr said. “You think the most popular one would be Wild Bill, but I see a lot of people doing Black Hills Gold Rush because it’s a scene of a gold miner in the creek with his gold pan and he’s holding up a nugget, so that one seems to impress a lot of people.” In the middle of the summer, at the height of tourist season, Fehr said that between 20 and 30 coins are created. “From this time of year, up until spring, it’s one or two a day,” he added. “The adults don’t seem like they collect coins as much as the kids do.” A Penny Passport that resembles a real passport and contains several pages is used to house the collected coins and many venues offer their own versions of this receptacle.

pull that penny out and this is why this is on the penny. And I was there. It’s something you can show to your friends and talk about. I really can’t think of any other reason to do it, except some people want to collect one every place that they go. A coin for every location.” Happy Days Gifts features three designs — stagecoach, buffalo, and Wild Bill — and manager Deb Villebrun said dozens of coins are disbursed from the machine daily. Villebrun, who has her own Black Hills-based collection of smashed pennies said she has a good idea why they’re so popular: “They’re small and easy to transport.” Not to mention, super unique and affordable.

What is the allure of the smashed penny collecting hobby? “Well, it’s a souvenir you can get of Deadwood that tells the tale of Deadwood, whether you’re more interested in Wild Bill or the Gold Rush or whatever else is going on,” Fehr said. “It tells a story that you can repeat. You know, you Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

A s of “press” t i me, these a re the “det s” on Deadwood’s sm a shed pen ny m ach i nes:

Gold Nugget Tr ading Post 75 main str eet t

designs

t

1 : “St u rg is” with Motorcycle 2 : “Black Hills” with Bu f fa lo 3 : “Deadwood ” with Playing Ca rds

All design s say “South Dakota” on the bottom

Happy Days Gifts 639 Main Str eet t

designs

t

1 : “Dakota Territory” with Stagecoach 2 : “Black Hills” with Bu f fa lo 3 : “Wild Bill 1876”

with Dead ma n’s Ha nd

All designs say “Deadwood, SD” on the bottom

Miss Kitty’s Mercantile 649 Main Str eet t

designs

t

1 : “Miss Kitty’s Mercantile”

with Period Woman

2 : “Black Hills Gold Rush” with Gold Panner 3 : “Dead Man’s Hand” with Card and Gun 4 : “Wild Bill Hickok 1876” with Wild Bill

Pam’s Pur ple Door 637 Main Str eet t

machine 1 designs

t

1 : “Wild Bill, Deadwood, SD” 2 : “Guns, Deadwood, South Dakota, est. 1876” 3 : “Mt. Rushmore, est. 1941, Black Hills, SD” 4 : “est. 1908, Black Hills, SD” with Buffalo t

machine 2 designs

t

1 : “Marshall Deadwood, est. 1876” 2 : “Stagecoach, Deadwood,

South Dakota, 1876”

3 : “Dead Man’s Hand, Deadwood, SD” 4 : “Guns and Playing Cards, Deadwood, 1876” 9


from u

mining history r to universal mysteries

Story by Alex Portal

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ust a short, 3-mile drive up from Deadwood, the city of Lead boasts a rich mining history with the story of the Homestake Mining Company headed-up by the infamous philanthropist George Hearst. But the unassuming small town now hosts what some might say is a far more precious operation below its surface: The Sanford Underground Research Facility. At its height, the Homestake Mine was the largest gold mine in North America, extracting more than 40 million ounces of gold from the hardrock below the Black Hills town. Because the majority of mining takes place underground, relatively little of Homestake’s operations can be seen, but what remains tells a fascinating story. The two and a half-mile diameter, 800-foot deep Open Cut still hangs open as a remnant of the old mining efforts, a fantastic view of which can be seen from the Sanford Lab Homestake Visitor Center. When Homestake closed its facility in 2002 the company town took a major dive; however, in 2007 thanks to the efforts of far-sighted city and state officials, and with a $70 million donation from T. Denny Sanford, another infamous philanthropist, the Sanford Lab was created to fill the gaps left by Homestake.

A bird’s eye view of the covered truss, which will house the conveyor system for the excavation of the LBNF/DUNE. Black Hills Pioneer file photo 10

Destination Deadwood©

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Crews use old mining cars from the Homestake days in pre-excavation for LBNF/DUNE. Black Hills Pioneer file photo

This was not the first time the shafts, and drifts of the Homestake mine were used for advanced science. In 1965, Dr. Ray Davis installed a physics experiment 4,850 feet down inside the mine; cutting edge thinking by Davis at the time. Davis’ experiment set out to detect neutrinos coming from the sun. After nearly 30 years of detecting the tiny particles, his solar neutrino experiment had only uncovered around a third as many neutrinos as it should have; this lead to what was known as “the solar neutrino problem.” In working to solve Davis’ solar neutrino problem, scientists discovered that neutrinos can oscillate, or change their “flavor” as they travel through space. As a result, we now understand that there are three distinct types of neutrinos — electrons, muons, and taus. But why set up an experiment to detect particles from space nearly a mile underground? Neutrinos are part of a group of particulate matter known as WIMPs (Weekly Interacting Massive Particles), which means they are so infinitesimally tiny, that they can pass through solid matter. The dense rock that makes up the Black Hills works as a natural filter, stopping much of the background solar raFall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

diation from making its way to the carved out caverns where the experiments are taking place. Scientists call this filtering process “cutting down the background noise,” and additional layers of filtration are used in the experiments to create the most “quiet” environment as possible to detect the elusive WIMPs. Much like gold panning in the old days, by eliminating all the particles they don’t want, scientists hope to spot the neutrinos they’re after. Davis’ experiment paved the way for what will be the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), which is currently in pre-excavation at the Sanford lab. LBNF will house the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). LBNF/DUNE is a collaboration between the Sanford Lab in Lead, and Fermilab in Batavia, Ill. Once complete, LBNF/DUNE will be the largest neutrino study in the world. Using a particle accelerator, Fermilab will shoot a concentrated beam of neutrinos 800 miles through the earth to massive detectors deep underground at Sanford Lab in Lead. Four massive detectors will be installed 4,850 feet underground at Sanford Lab, consisting of huge cryostats (63 feet wide, 60 feet tall, and over 200 feet long) filled with a total of 70,000 tons of liquid argon and an array of detectors. The argon in the cryostats will “catch” neutrinos from the neutrino beam. Neutrinos interacting with particles of liquid

argon will produce other particles that will ionize the argon atoms and release electrons, which will be picked up by the detectors. Once that process has been studied, scientists at Fermilab will switch to an anti-neutrino beam. The results of the matter, anti-matter research could help scientists to better understand why matter won out over anti-matter at the point of the Big Bang. As you drive along Highway 14 through Lead, you will notice a large, 120-foot section of truss crossing over your head. This truss houses the conveyor system which will carry the more than 800,000 tons of rock excavated from the sight where LBNF/ DUNE will be built, to be deposited into the Open Cut. Excavation of the rock is scheduled to begin in early 2021, and the first detector should be ready to begin taking readings sometime around 2024 and 2025. The lab is home to numerous particle physics, geothermal, and dark matter detection experiments as well as the underground campus for Black Hills State University, which performs low background counts for SURF and other sensitive physics experiments from all over the world. To learn more about the Sanford Lab and Lead’s rich history of ground-breaking industry, visit the Sanford Lab Homestake Visitor Center located at 160, W. Main St.

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Schedule E vents fall-winter of

2020-2021

NovembeR u

ks, Cor ks & K egs 6, For Food Wine Festival a variety of beer and wine from all across 7 Sample the country, as well as your Black Hills favorites, at &

various tasting venues across town. Friday features Wine Around Deadwood and an Appetizer Crawl, while Saturday showcases the Grand Finale and Deadwood Tobacco hosts a cigar tasting.

All event dates are accurate as of press time. Please verify information with the event host.

OctobeR u

Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

16, 7:30, 9:00, & 10:30 p.m. Join a 90-minute 17, 6:00, paranormal investigation of one of Deadwood’s most 23, haunted sites. Learn about the darker stories associated the historic home and search for paranormal 24 with activity. Admission is charged and reservations are Par anor mal Investigations of the Historic Adams House

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required. Psychic readings will be available following each investigation for an additional fee.

Event information: Deadwood Mountain Grand

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Event information: Historic Adams House

& Dolls 23, 7Guys p.m. Friday; 2 p.m. & 7 p.m. Saturday Set in DepressionTimes Square, Guys & Dolls is about a couple of big 24 era city gamblers and the women who love them.

Deadweir d 30, Celebrate Halloween in Deadwood with the 8th annual Monster Ball on Friday featuring a live band, dancing, 31 and prizes; and the annual Costume Contest on

Saturday, with more than $10,000 in cash and prizes. Come in costume or just to watch — Deadweird is a little crazy, a little spooky, and a whole lot of fun!

S n o c r o s s 2 0 19 Co u r t e s y S D To u r i s m

Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

Deadwood’s Big Whisk ey

5 p.m. | Sample from 30 different whiskeys including Rye, Irish, and Bourbons, and enjoy a signature cocktail at each participating location. Sign up for the Scotch Seminar to learn from industry representatives and sample several top shelf Scotch whiskeys. Tickets for each event are limited. Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

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Event information: Historic Homestake Opera House

Hair ball

8 p.m. | Hairball is a rock & roll event you won’t forget, with a 2+ hour mind-blowing, drop-dead accurate homage to some of the biggest arena acts in the world.

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Diamond Rio

8 p.m. | Formed in 1989 in Nashville, Tenn., Diamond Rio independently released their tenth studio album in 2015. Please note: Originally scheduled for Oct. 27, 2019; moved to July 12, 2020; now rescheduled to Nov. 19, 2020. Previously purchased tickets will be honored. Event information: Deadwood Mountain Grand

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Cheech

&

Chong

8 p.m. | Richard “Cheech” Marin and Tommy Chong helped define an era with their irreverent satirical counter-culture, no-holds-barred comedy routines. Event information: Deadwood Mountain Grand

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Brulé

8 p.m. | Now in their 20th season, award-winning Native American music group Brulé is best known for thrilling audiences with a mergence of cultural rock and theatrical instrumentations. Event information: Deadwood Mountain Grand

23 dec. 30 28

Holiday Ho-Ho Horseshoes

Purchase a unique Deadwood holiday ornament (horseshoe) from participating locations to win prizes. Event information:

Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

Williams and R ee

8 p.m. | A music comedy duo from the Dakotas, Williams and Ree bring a message of love and harmony, with an underlying note of deceit and debauchery. Event information: Deadwood Mountain Grand

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Destination Deadwood©

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DecembeR u

Tours of the 3, 4, Christmas Historic Adams House p.m. The historic home will be elegantly dressed 5, 10, 3–7 during the Christmas season for open-house style tours, with a scavenger hunt available for children. 11, 12 Event information: Historic Adams House |

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Communit y Christmas Tr ee Lighting

5:15 p.m. | All are welcome to attend this free event at Outlaw Square. Santa will make an appearance at 5:30 p.m.

JanuarY 2021 u

Pro Snocross Races 29, The greatest show on snow returns as the ISOC Amsoil Championship Snocross Series hits the Black Hills for the 30 ninth annual Deadwood Snocross Showdown. More than

150 of the top professional Snocross racers will descend on Deadwood’s Event Center for a weekend of high-flying, high-speed, high-octane snowmobile racing.

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Event information: Deadwood Mountain Grand

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Under the Str eetl amp

8 p.m. | The retro rock band delivers an electrifying evening of classic hits from the American Radio Songbook, bringing their unique blend of tight harmonies and slick dance moves to your favorite old time hits. Event information: Deadwood Mountain Grand

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Holiday Gift Wor kshop

10 a.m. | Students in grades K-6 are invited to create homemade gifts for the holiday season including a journal, wooden bracelets, and more. This workshop will take place at the Days of ‘76 Museum. Reservations are required. Event information: Days of ‘76 Museum

Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

K-9 K eg Pull

All canines are invited to test their muscles on the snowy cobblestones of Deadwood’s Main Street. Dogs will wear a harness attached to an appropriately sized keg; the fasted dogs in each class win! Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

FebruarY 2021 u di Gr as Week end 5, Mar Don’t miss the best Mardi Gras party north of the Bayou! Come for a weekend full of free food, a parade, 6 parties, and live music.

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Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

Wine

&

Chocol ate Stroll

Enjoy a Saturday of wine and chocolate while you shop at participating businesses in Deadwood.

Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

MarcH 2021 u

St. Patrick’s Week end 12, Celebrate St. Paddy’s in the Wild West with a pub crawl, the Leprechaun Olympics, a parade, and music. 13 Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

ApriL 2021 u 9

Nitt y Gritt y Dirt Band

8 p.m. | Following a 50th anniversary tour, the ensemble grew to six — and when their voices merge, the harmonies add a powerful new component for the legendary band. Event information:

Deadwood Mountain Grand

ks, Cor ks & K egs 9, For Food Wine Festival a variety of beer and wine from all 10 Sample across the country, as well as your Black Hills &

favorites, at various tasting venues across town.

Event information:

Deadwood Chamber

D e a d w e i r d 2 0 19 | B l a c k H i l l s P i o n e e r f i l e pho t o

For more information about events, please contact the event host. Deadwood Chamber of Commerce 501 Main St., Deadwood 605-578-1876 • 1-800-999-1876 deadwood.com Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Deadwood Mountain Grand Event Center 1906 Deadwood Mountain Dr., Deadwood • 605-559-0386 deadwoodmountaingrand.com

Destination Deadwood©

Historic Adams House 22 Van Buren Ave., Deadwood • 605-722-4800 www.deadwoodhistory.com

Historic Homestake Opera House 3013 W. Main St., Lead • 605-584-2067 homestakeoperahouse.org 13


De a dwood Ga ming

Bounces Back Amidst Pandemic

Deadwood was off to a rip-roarin’ start in 2020 — but just three months later on March 25, the COVID-19 pandemic shuttered every casino in town for six weeks straight. But when Deadwood opened back up May 7, patrons reciprocated with open arms and pocketbooks, bringing numbers back up and over 2019 levels in less than two months.

S

tatistics released by the South Dakota Commission on Gaming (SDCG) showed a 12.14% increase in January, compared to the same period in 2019. Patrons dropped around $93.4 million in machines and on tables. An additional day made all the difference for Deadwood gaming establishments in February, as the Leap Year served to boost gaming revenues and February gaming numbers went on to ‘leap’ 10% prior to COVID-19 quarantine measures, with the SDGC reporting an $83

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Story and Photo by Jaci Conrad Pearson million handle and a 10% increase compared to February 2019 levels. “Even with the extra day because of leap year, February’s gaming results show how strong Deadwood’s economy was before our world changed with the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Rodman. By the end of March and in the midst of reporting another significant month of gaming gains, the DGA had switched its focus to working with Deadwood’s gaming operators to temporarily shut down their operations at high noon March 25, due to the pandemic. March numbers were reported at the end of April when slots and saloons lay silent and the world waited and watched. And what a difference a week makes in the world of gaming. Deadwood gaming took a 20% hit in March, compared to the same period in 2019, according to statistics released by the state gaming commission.

“As the numbers reflect, Deadwood’s economy was on pace with last year until March 25, when our world changed with the COVID-19 pandemic and Deadwood shut down,” said Rodman. “The loss in just gaming revenue for Deadwood’s gaming properties was over $1.5 million for the last seven days in March that we were closed.” April, a month that saw an $89 million handle in 2019, was then an abyss. For the first time in the history of Deadwood gaming, which opened Nov. 1, 1989, there was not a monthly revenue report issued by the gaming commission. Moving on to May, gaming numbers took a pandemic produced 15% hit, as after taking a COVID-19-induced six-week sabbatical. Casinos reopened May 7 and by the end of the month, yearly revenue was down 24% compared to 2019. In response to the pandemic, casinos have implemented various measures to comply with COVID-19

Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


mandates for gaming establishments in Deadwood, including the installation of cubicle walls between machines, making hand sanitizer available, Plexiglass sneeze guards installed at the cage, social distancing players by turning machines off, requiring dealers to wear masks or face shields, among other changes. Then, as summer started to swelter, so did gaming. Deadwood gaming numbers made an impressive 14% jump compared to June 2019 levels, but the strong showing wasn’t enough to boost overall industry numbers back to positive territory, as cumulative numbers remained 17% down compared to 2019. “Deadwood gaming benefited by being one of the first gaming jurisdictions to reopen after the COVID-19 shutdown,” said Rodman. “We were able to benefit by some pent-up demand for gaming play. While this $1.3 million dollar gaming increase is certainly a welcome relief to Deadwood operators, Deadwood still has a long way to go to make up the $11.4 million in previous gaming losses caused by the COVID-19 economic shutdown.” Looking at Deadwood gaming’s pandemic plight, First Gold Hotel & Casino General Manager Steve Schaeffer said the bus cancelations that have taken place over the course of the year will most likely impact the outcomes of the bottom line for many companies. Moving forward, Celebrity Hotel & Casino Owner Ken Gienger believes that some of the lost gaming revenue can be made up. “We saw that with June’s numbers,” Gienger said. “Overall, we will be behind in the lost gaming and hotel revenue. How much we can recover in revenue is something that I don’t have any idea. A lot of it depends on how other states handle their pandemic responses.”

Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Gienger said that in talking with his guests, they are happy to be in Deadwood and are very appreciative of South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem and how she is working with the people and businesses of her state on common sense policies. Rodman said the DGA is hopeful the Deadwood gaming industry continues to see improvement from the COVID-19 economic shutdown throughout the remainder of the year. “However, it will take at least 18 months or longer to hope to recoup the losses that the industry has incurred if there are no unforeseen setbacks for Deadwood,” Rodman said. Gaming officials know that revenue will be down this year. How much has yet to be seen. Rodman said the goal is to experience only an 8% loss for the year. Rodman said that in order to make this happen, Deadwood businesses need additional governmental small business grants and loan guarantees and temporary liability relief provisions like those contained in the “SAFE TO WORK” Act. “Additionally, the potential November passage of sports wagering (Amendment B) will give Deadwood another tool to possibly entice a new customer type to Deadwood,” Rodman said, adding that events and concerts are an important part of the Deadwood allure and until the entertainment industry fully reopens and visitors feel safe to participate, it will slow the rate of recovery. “We are fortunate for the good job that Deadwood operators and employees are doing in following the CDC guidelines which have so far kept COVID numbers low in our area,” Rodman said. “Obviously, no one has a crystal ball, but Deadwood has always faced adversity with cheerful optimism of what the future will bring, and this COVID challenge is no different.”

Destination Deadwood©

Skating Season

Opens Nov. 21st

Please check OutlawSquare.com for rates and hours.

Upcoming Events: Community Christmas Tree Lighting Celebration FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4 Featuring a visit from Santa Claus and Free Skating all weekend long!

Kris Kringles Christmas Market FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11 & 12 Santa will be visiting the Market!

K9 Keg Pull SATURDAY, JANUARY 30

For all events and happenings at Outlaw Square, log on to OutlawSquare.com or check our Facebook page. 15


De a dwood' s

Main Street Initiative

k e e p s on t ruc k i n' Story and Photos by Jaci Conrad Pearson

With its integral influence in the opening of Outlaw Square one year ago and sole mission to improve the Deadwood visitor experience, this volunteer group continues to brighten and bolster the streets of Deadwood, one project at a time.

T

his committee led and continued the efforts to see Outlaw Square open up,” said Deadwood Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Lee Harstad. “This committee works hand-in-hand with the chamber and has been instrumental in a number of initiatives that will have lasting, positive effects on the community.” The Deadwood Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau, in concert with the City of Deadwood, formed a Deadwood Revitalization Committee to facilitate discussions and build consensus on developing a series of goals for economic development for Deadwood within the context of historic preservation. This Revitalization Committee then transformed into the Main Street Initiative (MSI). Community revitalization meetings were held in the fall of 2013, and since then the Revitalization Committee/MSI has met regularly and led efforts on a number of projects, including city beautification projects, development of new events and promotions that have increased visitation to the community, economic development initiatives including housing efforts, as well as bringing Outlaw

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Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


Square to fruition. Main Street Initiative Chairman Ken Gienger said the group’s idea has always been to improve the business structure in Deadwood and on Main Street. “We’ve now expanded that to throughout Deadwood,” Gienger said. “We have a gaming section on our committee. We have an economic development restructuring committee, design, which is, of course, the group that is out there for the beautification of downtown Deadwood. And then we also have the promotions committee that put on a variety of events. A lot of them are fundraisers for our committee, but also, we do fundraisers for our committee and charities at the same time. From those monies, we are able to do a variety of outreach and different projects to help out. Our design group supports overall improvement of Deadwood, for the citizens of Deadwood and for the businesses of Deadwood for the guests who come here.” The overall group is governed by an MSI Executive Committee, consisting of 8 volunteers, while MSI as a whole consists of around 25 volunteer members. “It’s a bunch of businesspeople and

citizens of Deadwood who just want to do their best to improve the life for the citizens of Deadwood, the guests who are coming into Deadwood, and do what we can do to make Deadwood the best destination possible,” Gienger said.

locations they frequented. “They’re looking at how to get the proper funding, the artist they want to get, and make the bronzes as lifelike and as appealing as they can,” Gienger said.

Other MSI Initiatives

A fine example of this MSI initiative is The Brothel Deadwood at 610 Main Street and other uses for second story spaces are being explored, as well. “What we’re finding out with second story development is that we do need housing of some sort downtown Deadwood,” Gienger said. “We’re still trying to get those business owners to recognize the need to work on their second stories and hopefully put apartments or some type of office space in their second stories. We’re working on a variety of things to improve the top part of Deadwood, not just the bottom.”

Urban Trails Signage

MSI is working with Deadwood Historic Preservation to identify and clearly mark the urban trails within Deadwood, as well as a few that go outside of the city’s bounds. “It’s part of walking tours through Deadwood,” Gienger said.

Bronze Historic Statues

Wild Bill, Calamity Jane, Sol Starr, Madame Dora DuFran, Seth Bullock, and a couple of other iconic historic Deadwood characters may soon “bust” into Main Street byways, as the MSI design group works to identify a few worthy characters to erect bronze statues of in the appropriate and historically accurate

Second Floor Development

Improving Gold Street Seating

MSI was granted permission by the city of Deadwood to place tables and make an outdoor public gathering space on Gold Street through October.

continued on page 18

Located at the site of the first gold discovery in Deadwood, you will find lodging, dining, gaming and old west hospitatliy. • • • • • • • •

Deluxe Hotel Rooms & Luxury Suites 10 Casinos Filled With All Your Favorite Slots Horseshoe Restaurant USDA Choice Prime Rib & Crab Buffets Friday & Saturday Nights FREE On-Site Covered Parking FREE Wi-Fi Internet Service FREE Beer, Wine or Cocktails for Players FREE Gold Club Players Card - Earn CASH Back While Playing

TRAVELODGE: 605-717-7181 FIRST GOLD GAMING RESORT: 1-800-274-1876 250 & 270 Main Street Deadwood, SD 57732 Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

PLAN YOUR TRIP TODAY AT WWW.FIRSTGOLD.COM 17


from page 17 “People were looking for more outdoor seating in Deadwood,” Gienger said. “It’s been well-received by the public. Just a nice little area to sit down and relax with your family.”

Expanding Horse-Drawn Vehicle Offerings

The current stagecoach ride through Deadwood is wildly popular and its operators are looking at ways to expand offerings, working with MSI to accomplish this. Upon approval by the city, new offerings may include an additional horse drawn vehicle

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that provides a residential tour or sleigh rides. “Around three or four different, new options that are horse-drawn and give visitors a different view of Deadwood,” Gienger said. Display window awards, flowers up and down Main Street, historic banners, utility wraps, and many other projects encourage and incentivize businesses to join the MSI mission of improving Deadwood.

Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


Snowshoeing T r y i t . Yo u' l l l i k e i t .

if someone told you W hat that you could take up

a brand new sport that you'll likely fall in love with, risk free with no initial monetary investment, and with no special skills required? Whether you're a first-time snowshoer or a seasoned veteran, the Black Hills delivers when it comes to this fast-growing snow sport segment. The best part is, there's really no reason to say no because in these parts, South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks takes

care of snowshoers, providing free snowshoes to borrow for the asking.

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Destination Deadwood©

Now the question becomes, why not?

"If you've never done it before, snowshoeing is just like walking. If you can walk, you can snowshoe," said Dana Garry-Reiprich, Mickelson Trail manager, for the South Dakota Game, Fish, and Parks. "The joy of snowshoeing is that you can snowshoe wherever there is snow. You can be in your back yard. You can be in the forest." And, of course, you can take to the Mickelson Trail, a highly sought-after destination for those in the snow. "In my opinion, snow shoeing is very popular," Garry-Reiprich said. "We've got 100 pairs of snow shoes to lend out and 60 to 80 pairs are out on any given weekend." Garry-Reiprich hosts snowshoe walks for those who would like to snowshoe in the company of others. "Typically, they're held at 1 p.m. And between 40 and 60 people attend," Garry-Reiprich said. "The sites are to be determined. Depending on where the best snow is, that's where we hold the walk." Check Facebook for last-minute changes or any other information. Garry-Reiprich begins the walks by making sure everyone has the right fit, with comfort an important part of making any snowshoe adventure enjoyable. "Snowshoe fit begins by weight," she said. "Then we put the straps over the shoes you're wearing. I can fit children as young as two to three and folks as old as 100 years. A good choice for footwear is an insulated, waterproof boot. Tennis shoes are bad for the simple fact that you'll have wet, cold feet by the time you return because they're not insulated and they're not waterproof." For a proper fit, place the ball of your foot over the two screws in front of the snow shoes, right over your grips.

That said, the best way to dress for snowshoeing is in layers. "You might start out cold, but the minute you start working, you don't want to start sweating," Garry-Reiprich said. "You don't want to start sweating, so you can take those layers off as you go and you won't get chilled when you get back." Garry-Reiprich said that the best snow depth for snowshoeing is between 12 and 18 inches. "But you can do it with as little as two to three inches of snow, so that is more like walking," she said. "The Mickelson Trail at the Inglewood Trailhead is non-motorized year round. You only share 15 miles of the entire trail with snowmobiles. From Dumont, south to Edgemont is non-motorized." One of the most surprising and best parts of snowshoeing is the calorie burn those who indulge in the sport will experience. "If you're in deep snow, you can burn a crazy amount of calories," Garry-Reiprich said. "A moderate walk on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon? I always tell people, you'll burn twice as many calories as walking."

T he best place to snowshoe?

"Anywhere on the Mickelson Trail or anywhere in the forest," Garry-Reiprich said. "The Northern Hills are better than the Southern Hills."

So why try this enjoyable, fast-growing snow sport?

"It's easy. It's cheap. And anyone can do it," Garry-Reiprich said. "It doesn't require any special skill sets. We have snowshoes for checkout that don't cost anything." For a list of area trails or more information on borrowing snow shoes from GF&P or to make reservations for a Snowshoe Walk, call (605) 584-3896.

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

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Black Hills

Snowmobile Network:

350 tr a ils miles

of

W inter in the Black Hills means

many visitors will traverse the 350mile Black Hills snowmobile trail network. It features parking, pit stops, and warming shelters and is ranked as one of the nation’s top ten riding places. Very few locations are unavailable

for riding, but there are four restricted areas: wildlife winter ranges/habitat, private property, cross country skiing complexes, and active logging areas. Some trails lead up through deep canyons, weave through pine forests, and ascend to summit lookouts. Others open

onto untracked meadows and play areas. Full-time staff grooms the trails nightly. Snow and trail conditions are available by calling the South Dakota SnoWats phone service at 1-800-445-3474. Trails officially open Dec. 15 and will stay open through March 31. Crews do

Come for the food,

Stay for the fun!

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT & EVENTS

CONCERTS, THEATRE, HISTORIC BUILDING TOURS – YEAR ROUND Tours available by appointment from 11am-2pm Monday-Friday

$10 Adults • $5 Kids 18 & Younger • Saturdays: $15 Adults • $7 Kids 18 & Younger

CALL 605-584-2067 ANYTIME TO SCHEDULE A TOUR

Sports Bar & Grill • • • • •

12 beers on tap Late night food Outdoor dining Trolley stop in front Parking ramp directly behind • Full bar available 634 Main St., Deadwood (605) 578-2025

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Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


not groom the trails until at least 12 inches of snow are on the ground. Grooming stops after March 31. South Dakota Game, Fish, and Parks district park manager Shannon Percy said snowmobilers may still ride on Black Hills National Forest land after that date, but agreements with private landowners expire. Northern routes along the system tend to have the most snow. Southern areas near Moon (close to Hill City) also boast quite a bit of snow. Percy encourages all snowmobilers to pick up a current map, which is free and available at trailheads and vendors listed on the maps. Representatives of the Forest Service, Game, Fish, and Parks, and logging interests meet every year to discuss timber sales and how trails will be affected. Several local retailers offer snowmobile rentals. Local snowmobile service and guides are also available. Snowmobile licenses may be

Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

purchased at any county treasurer’s office. A resident license costs $10 per year, with a temporary five-day permit costing $40. The permits are available at the Black Hills Trails office and vendors listed on the maps. Non-resident snowmobiles that are validly licensed in another state may be legally operated in South Dakota. Residents and non-residents may purchase a special five-day temporary permit for unlicensed snowmobiles. This permit is available online and at many trailside vendors. A motorcycle may be converted to fit the definition of a snowmobile. This permit costs $20 and is valid from Dec. 1 through March 31. Call the Black Hills Trails Office at (605) 584-3896 to purchase a pass. Snowmobilers operating in road rights-of-way and/or public snowmobile trails must show proof of final responsibility (liability insurance).

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sk i dest inat ion:

Terry Peak

Peak Ski Area, T erry located near Lead,

Open Daily 8am-8pm Restaurant: Rentals Include: (Serving all 3 meals) Cabins, UTVs, and Snowmobiles Bar On/Off Sale Beer Gas on Site•Plenty of Parking No Rate Hike during Rally 22075 US Highway 85 • Lead, SD 57754 605.584.3464 • www.trailsheadlodge.com 24

serves as a winter destination for downhill enthusiasts from around the region. Terry Peak, topping out at 7,100 feet, features five lifts. Gold Express, Kussy Express, and Surprise Express are high-speed quad. The Stewart Lift is a triple-chair lift, and the Snow Carpet is a surface lift on the beginners’ slope. Terry Peak also offers the highest lift service between the Rockies and the Alps. Almost 30 trails cater to skiers of all experience levels, from beginner to advanced. Snowmaking equipment can produce enough to cover about 60% of the mountain with man-made power in case of a lean winter. Stewart Lodge and Nevada Gulch Lodge each house a bar and cafeteria. A rental department inside the Stewart Lodge offers ski and snowboard rentals. The snowboarding terrain park is located on Snow Storm and accessible by the Surprise Express. Snow Sports School staff consists of highly trained members. Ski lessons are available for individuals ages four and up. Snowboards lessons are available for those ages seven and up.

Terry Peak’s origins date back to 1936. The Bald Mountain Ski Club used a rope tow on Stewart Street to give individuals a ride to top. The start of World War II cut this activity short, as several club members were drafted and assigned into the 10th Mountain Division. The Black Hills Chairlift Company was formed in 1952, and a wooden chairlift was installed. Black Hills Chairlift did business as Terry Peak Ski Area as a summer chairlift ride only. Terry Peak first operated as a ski area during the winter of 1954. A ski season normally begins the first weekend in December. It runs through the last weekend of March or the first weekend in April. To reach Terry Peak Ski Area, go south on Highway 85 at Lead and turn right at the Terry Peak billboard. Visit the website terrypeak.com for more information including rates for equipment rental, hours of operation, and ticket prices.

Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


Deadwood's guilty pleasures From its earliest days as a gold-mining camp, Deadwood has always been a place where men and women could come to seek their fortune; or at least, a hell of a good time. Story by Alex Portal

A

fter a long, hard day panning for gold in Deadwood Gulch or digging away in the mines, the prospectors of old could stop in at any one of the many saloons and dance halls lining Deadwood’s Main Street to

Sip, Smoke, Savor, and marvel at the many Spectacles the frontier town had to offer. From the original cast of characters still here in spirit to the new personalities that guarantee a memorable visit, the true “Wild West” history of Deadwood lives on.

continued on page 26

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Destination Deadwood©

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Smoke

Sip

Deadwood has something for everyone, and chances are whatever your thing is, it would be enhanced with a good cigar. Traditionally seen as primarily a male hobby, at least one famous Deadwood lady knew the value of a good smoke — Poker Alice Ivers was a mainstay at the Deadwood poker tables and was rarely seen without her signature stogie. Even though the seedy saloons, hazy with thick and pungent clouds of tobacco smoke, have been transformed into smoke-free honkytonk style bars and jumping night clubs, passionate puffers can still enjoy a Smoke as they mosey up and down Main Street, or fire up a specialty cigar at the only indoor smoking lounge in Deadwood.

Deadwood was built on the backs of hard working men and women who poured all their skills and guile into doing whatever it took get the job done; and when the day’s work was finally finished, they’d pony up to their watering hole of choice and wash away their troubles with their favorite adult beverage. Although the rotgut whiskey shots served up by handlebar mustachioed barkeeps have given way to expertly mixed cocktails, eager imbibers can still Sip their way through time and explore the unique history every tavern in town has to share. From martini bars to wine tastings and locally brewed craft beers — Sip your favorite beverage of choice served at various locations throughout town.

DEADWOOD SOCIAL CLUB

75 DIFFERENT

BEERS & WINES

300 SQ. FT.

WALK-IN HUMIDOR

MANY RARE & LIMITED CIGARS

INCLUDING THE

EXCLUSIVE SWEET JANE

Live blues every Friday & Saturday night 628 Main Street Basement | 605.722.1510

CIGA R S | PIPE S | BE E R | W I NE | M USIC WWW.DEADWOODTOBACCO.COM

DEADWOODTOBACCO

--------------------------------

SUNDAY-WEDNESDAY : 10AM–8PM | THURSDAY : 10AM–10PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY : 10AM–12AM

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Extraordinary Steakhouse with Italian, New American and Farm to Table influences, all complimented with an award winning wine list with over 170 selections from all around the world. As always, Saloon No. 10 remains the “go to” experience for locals and visitors alike. Enjoy live nightly music, unique gift shopping, live action gambling, and South Dakota’s largest whiskey selection, offering over 250 Bourbons, Scotchs, and Whiskeys.

SALOON 10 NO.

Saloon No. 10 • 657 Main St., Deadwood • saloon10.com Well-Behaved Dogs Are Welcome Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


Savor

Deadwood was flooded with homesteaders from all over the world looking to seek their fortune, be it through hard, honest work, or less scrupulous means. These men and women brought with them dreams of striking it rich and settling in the great unknown west; they also brought the food culture from their native lands, and in so doing, added to the richness of the Black Hills. Without the unseemliness of having their meals quartered and skinned out in the open air of Deadwood’s thoroughfare, discerning dinners can still Savor a sensational selection of specialty foods and sweet treats that can only be found in the Black Hills. Whether you are looking for family dining, a buffet, steakhouse, pizza, or specialty treat you can find it all downtown.

Spectacle

Deadwood has never had a problem providing its visitors with all the entertainment they could want. Saints and sinners alike can find what they’re looking for on the cobblestone streets of this wild and wooly town. While the bawdy saloon girls no longer hang in the doorways, beckoning prospectors into the gambling halls to spend their hard-earned money on all manner of rowdy entertainments, those looking for a good time can still find themselves drawn into the Spectacle of Deadwood’s casinos and concert halls, always brimming with world class shows and games of chance. Visit one of the many museums, brothels, or haunted spots in town; step into the past and experience gold panning like prospectors; or grab an old time photo keepsake.

Socialize

Deadwood hosts a variety of special events throughout the year to help you indulge in all of its Guilty Pleasures.

deadwood events

2020

featuring • Drinks made with Full Throttle S’loonshine •Live Music

Forks, Corks & Kegs

November 6 & 7

Deadwood's Big Whiskey November 14

2021

THE PIZZA FACTORY

K-9 Keg Pull January 30

featuring Made to Order Brick Oven Pizza

Mardi Gras Weekend February 5 & 6

St. Patrick's Weekend March 12 & 13

Forks, Corks & Kegs April 9 & 10

Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

featuring Full Throttle S’loonshine Moonshine Tasting

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Destination Deadwood©

See more special events on pages 12-13

645 Main Street Deadwood • 605-645-6419 27


Adams Museum

54 Sherman St., Deadwood | (605) 578-1714 www.deadwoodhistory.com The Adams Museum once served as a cabinet of curiosities but has evolved into the premiere history museum in the Black Hills. Featuring a collection of artwork and artifacts reflecting the natural history and pioneer past of the northern Black Hills., the museum was founded by W.E. Adams in 1930. Step Photo courtesy Deadwood History into the past and discover a rare plesiosaur, the mysterious Thoen Stone, impressive collections of paintings, guns, photos, minerals, and Native American artifacts.

The brothel Deadwood

610 Main St., Deadwood | (605) 559+0231 www.brotheldeadwood.com Brothels were a fixture on the second story of several Deadwood Main Street buildings from 1876 until 1980. In an effort to best tell this narrative, visitors will be transported through the 104-year time period with a guided tour of the rooms at the original site of the Shasta Rooms, or the Beige Door brothel.

Photo courtesy Deadwood History

October – April Wednesday–Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Au g u s t – S e p t e m b e r Daily 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Winter Hours (through April) Tuesday–Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Monday & Sunday. Su m m e r H o u r s (May – S e p t e m b e r ) Daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Black Hills Mining Museum

323 W. Main St., Lead | (605) 584-1605 www.blackhillsminingmuseum.com Share the thrill experienced by the old time prospectors by panning your own gold! Walk through time with “miner” tour guides in timbered passages of a simulated underground gold mine. View historic mining artifacts and local history exhibits. This museum includes a historic video presentation of mining in the Black Hills, a gift shop with gold panning books and supplies, and more.

Black Hills Pioneer File Photo

Winte r Hours By reservation only. Call (605) 722-4875 or (605) 584-1326 Su m m e r (May – S e p t e m b e r ) Monday – Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 12 to 4 p.m.

Broken Boot Gold Mine 1200 Pioneer Way, Deadwood www.deadwoodhistory.com

|

(605) 722-4800

In the spring of 1876, the call of gold led a flood of miners, merchants, muleskinners and madams to sweep into Deadwood Gulch. The intriguing story of one of America’s last great gold rushes comes to life at Deadwood’s Broken Boot Gold Mine, established in 1878. The mine sat vacant for 36 years. In 1954, a group of Deadwood businessmen re-opened it as a tourist attraction. Step into the Black Hills' best underground mine tour and return to a time when the powerful punch of a miner’s pick and the roaring boom of dynamite signaled the ongoing search for Black Hills Pioneer File Photo the richest veins of gold on Earth.

Days of ‘76 Museum

18 Seventy Six Dr., Deadwood www.deadwoodhistory.com

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(605) 578-1657

The Days of ‘76 Museum began informally, as a repository for the horse drawn wagons and stagecoaches, carriages, clothing, memorabilia, and archives generated by the Days of ‘76 Celebration. The newer 32,000-squarePhoto courtesy Deadwood History foot museum is home to collections of Western and American Indian artifacts, archives, photos, and artwork. It houses one of the nation’s most significant collections of American Western history. The four important collections are Wagons & Vehicles, Rodeo Collection, Clothing Collection, and Clowser Collection. Winter Hours (Through April) Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Monday, Sunday, and winter holidays. Summer Hours (May – September) Daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Deadwood Alive Shows (800) 344-8826

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www.deadwoodalive.com

Witness the Thrill of a Main Street Shootout! The Deadwood Alive Gunslingers are looking for trouble – and they find it every day with historically accurate reenactments of Deadwood’s past. O c to b e r 2 – N ov e m b e r 21 Free show Fridays and Saturdays from 12:00 to 4:30 p.m. May 23 – S e p t e m b e r 26 Free shows daily (except Sunday) on Historic Main Street from 1:45 to 6 p.m.

Black Hills Pioneer File Photo

Sh o otout s 2 p.m., Oyster Bay, . 626 Main St.; 4 p.m., Buffalo Bodega, 658 Main St. • 6 p.m., Silverado, 709 Main St. Sh o oti ng o f Wi ld B i ll Daily • 1 p.m., 3 p.m., 5 p.m. & 7 p.m. inside Saloon #10, 657 Main St.

M e m o r i a l Day w e e k e n d to La b o r Day w e e k e n d 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


George S. Mickelson Trail

Homestake Adams Research & Cultural Center

11361 Nevada Gulch Rd., Lead (605) 584-3896 www.mickelsontrail.com

The 109-mile-long Mickelson Trail follows the historic Deadwood to Edgemont Burlington Northern rail line and contains more than 100 converted railroad bridges and 4 rock tunnels. South Dakota’s first rails to trails project is enjoyed by bicyclists, hikers and horseback riders. Its gentle slopes and easy access allow people of all ages and abilities to enjoy the beauty of the Black Hills. There are 15 trailheads, all of which offer parking, self-sale trail pass stations, vault toilets, and tables.

150 Sherman St., Deadwood www.deadwoodhistory.com

Black Hills Pioneer File Photo

|

(605) 722-4800

The Homestake Adams Research and Cultural Center (HARCC) houses, preserves, and provides public access to one of the nation’s largest collection of Black Hills archival materials. Dating from the 1870s to present, these materials provide a better understanding and appreciation of the people, places, and events that shaped the unique history of the Black Hills. The extensive collection includes historic photos, maps, city directories, personal diaries and journals, gold exploration and production reports, and many other historic materials. M o n day – Fr i day 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. or by appointment

High Plains Western Heritage Center

825 Heritage Dr., Spearfish | (605) 642-9378 www.westernheritagecenter.com

The High Plains Western Heritage Center was founded to honor the old west pioneers and Native American of five states. This museum features western art, artifacts and memorabilia. It houses the completely restored “original” Spearfish to Deadwood Stagecoach that was bought in 1890 and last ran in 1913. A 200-seat theatre features many historic proCourtesy photo grams, entertainment, Mo n day–Satu r day 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and special events. Su n day 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

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Historic Matthews Opera House & Arts Center 612 Main St., Spearfish | (605) 642-7973 www.matthewsopera.com

In 1906, the new Matthews Opera House was the center for entertainment in the Northern Hills, hosting touring companies and vaudevillians. Time seems to have stood still, for today the ornate woodwork, murals and brightly painted advertising on the art curtain are throw-backs. Courtesy photo Currently, The Matthews consists of a fine arts gallery with 48 regional artists and upstairs, the theatre continues to provide community plays, national performance acts and music concerts. A r t Ga lle ry Au g u s t – May Tuesday – Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. J u n e – J u ly Monday – Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Historic Adams House 22 Van Buren Ave., Deadwood

Black Hills Pioneer File Photo

(605) 578-3724

The Adams House recounts the real tragedies and triumphs of two of the community’s founding families. Following the death of W. E Adams in 1934, his second wife closed the house. For a half-century, time stood still, nothing was moved. Painstakingly restored and preserved by leading experts in historic preservation, the Adams House was reopened to the public in 2000, revealing a time capsule in a place where legends still live. Tour rooms and grounds of this elegant Victorian mansion and learn why it was once Deadwood’s social center. Black Hills Pioneer File Photo

O c to b e r & A pr i l Tuesday – Saturday 10 a.m. to 4p.m.; closed Monday and Sunday W i n t e r H o u r s Closed November – March Open for specialty tours and group tours Su m m e r H o u r s (May – S e p t e m b e r ) Daily 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Historic Homestake Opera House

313 W. Main St., Lead | (605) 584-2067 www.homestakeoperahouse.org

This incredible building was constructed in 1914, and boasted a theater that sat 1,000 people and also housed a swimming pool, billiard hall, library, bowling alley, smoking room, and social hall. It was built by Homestake Mining Company superintendent Thomas Grier, and Phoebe Apperson Hearst, widow of George Hearst, the owner of Homestake Mining Company. Courtesy photo In 1984, the theater was nearly destroyed by fire — and it sat empty for 11 years. In 1998, work on restoration and structural improvements began, and in 2008, the first community theatre production in 25 years was celebrated by the Gold Camp Players. To u r s Ava i l a b l e Monday – Friday 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday by appointment

See More Attractions on Next Page Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood

©

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Mt. Moriah Cemetery 2 Mt. Moriah Rd., Deadwood

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Sanford Lab Homestake Visitor Center

(605) 578-2600

Mt. Moriah Cemetery was established in 1878, because of the increasing demands at Ingleside Cemetery which was down the hill. Mt. Moriah has numerous sections: Chinese; Jewish; Masonic; Civil War and Indian War veterans; and Potters’ Fields, final resting places for early day indigents and prostitutes. Some of the well-known residents of Mt. Moriah are: James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok (1876); John “Potato Creek Johnny” Perrett (1943); Martha “Calamity Jane” Canary (1903); Henry Weston “Preacher Smith” Smith (1876); Seth Bullock (1919); and W.E. Adams (1934) . Photo courtesy SD Tourism

Mt. Roosevelt Memorial

2.5 miles from Deadwood on US Hwy 85 Mt. Roosevelt is home to the “Friendship Tower” monument, created by Seth Bullock in memory of the friendship he had with President Theodore Roosevelt. After a short hike up to the tower, visitors are able to take in the sights of the beautiful Black Hills. To get to Mt. Roosevelt from Deadwood, take US Hwy 85 north for 1.5 miles, then turn west on FSR 133. There are five picnic sites and a bathroom located in the picnic area. The hike to the Friendship Tower and overlook is less than one mile from the trail head, but moderately uphill.

703 Main St., Deadwood | www.outlawsquare.com Outlaw Square is a public gathering place where families can come and enjoy fun events that take place throughout the year – From family fun days to ice skating, music events, history presentations, book readings and more! Outlaw Square is a place for you to enjoy some outdoor family time in the heart of Deadwood. Open daily. Ice skating begins November 21.

9 a . m . to 5 p. m . da i ly Tours available.

Tatanka: Story of the Bison (605) 584-5678 | www.storyofthebison.com

Kevin Costner, attraction founder/owner, invites you to visit Tatanka. 60 million Bison once roamed the Great Plains of North America. By the end of the 19th century, it was estimated that less than 1,000 bison survived. This is their story. Courtesy photo While at Tatanka, you’ll enjoy larger than life bronze sculptures featuring 14 bison pursued by three Native Americans riders; the Northern Plains Peoples Educational Interpretive Center; Native American gift shop; Sweetgrass Grill and Snack Bar; and Dances with Wolves movie costumes.

Trial of Jack McCall Tickets: (800) 344-8826

Black Hills Pioneer File Photo

Trolley Schedule

t

September - May

Sun. – Thurs. 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. | Fri. – Sat. 8 a.m. – 2 a.m.

Memorial Day - Labor Day

Sun. – Thurs. 8 a.m. – Midnight | Fri. – Sat. 8 a.m. – 2 a.m. Trolleys run at regular intervals between all hotels, motels and other key points throughout Deadwood. Cost is $1.00 per ride. Hours are subject to change. The hourly trolley schedule is posted on the back of the Main Street Trolley stop signs.

For more information, contact:

30

Black Hills Pioneer File Photo

May 17 – O c to b e r 31 Monday – Saturday 9 a.m to 4 p.m. N ov e m b e r 1 – May 5 Friday – Sunday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Weather permitting. Closed holidays.

Outlaw Square

t

The exhibit hall has exciting information about Sanford Underground Research Facility and the history of Homestake. Exhibits include photographs, videos, science and mine artifacts, and a 3D model of the underground- from the surface down to the 8,000 ft. level! From the deck, view the 1,000-foot-deep Open Cut. Tours include a trip through historic Lead and a surface tour of Sanford Lab. In the Yates room, you’ll see hoists that have been in operation since 1939. You’ll learn a little bit about the mining process and the state-of-the-art Waste Water Treatment Plant designed by Homestake.

Mt. Moriah is first and foremost a cemetery and should be afforded the respect any final resting place deserves.

W i n t e r H o u r s Open with limited maintenance Memorial Day to Mid - October Hours Daily 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Photo courtesy SD Tourism

160 W. Main St., Lead | (605) 584-3110 www.sanfordlabhomestake.com

City of Deadwood Trolley Dept. | 605-578-2622

Photo courtesy SD Tourism

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www.deadwoodalive.com

The Trial of Jack McCall has been performed in Deadwood since the mid-1920s, making it one of nation’s longest running plays. The play is based on the actual trial which took place in the mining camp of Deadwood after Jack McCall murdered James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok. This is a family-friendly show where the selected members of the audience participate in the performance serving as jurors in the trial.

May 23 – S e p t e m b e r 26 Monday – Saturday 7:35 p. m . Shooting of Wild Bill and the Capture of Jack McCall, Main Street in front of Old Style Saloon #10 8 p. m . Trial held at Historic Masonic Temple Theatre, 715 Main St.

Attraction hours and schedules are subject to change. Please confirm information with the venue. Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


deadwood

crossword

across

3. Once complete, the Underground Research Facility will house LBNF/DUNE — the largest neutrino study in the world. 7. The 350-mile Black Hills

1

2 3

trail network is ranked one of the nation's top riding places.

8. The MSI design group is working to erect bronze of some of Deadwood's most noteworthy characters. was shut down after a federal raid. 9. In 1980, Deadwood's last remaining 10. There are three distinct types of

Down

­­— electrons, muons, and taus.

4

5

6

7

1. The Black Hills Chairlift Company was formed in 1952, and a chairlift was installed on Terry Peak. 2. Generally, the Northern Hills are better than the Southern Hills for .

8

Mine was the largest 4. At its height, the gold mine in North America. was the first business 5. The Black Hills West River Dakota Territory and is still in operation. Door Brothel employed an estimated 6. The eight women when it was shut down in 1980. 8. Smashed souvenir coins are made by forcing a coin between two rollers that contain an engraving.

9

Answer s on Page 36

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Black Hills Brothel Casino Coins Deadwood Gaming Historic Mining Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

Neutrino Physics Preservation Revitalization Skiing Snowmobile Snowshoe Souvenir 31


Ja m e s B utle r Hic k ok

“Wild Bill” 1837 – 1876

from images of the Black Hills Aside gold rush and the Sioux Indian wars,

Deadwood is famed in the public’s mind as the place where “Wild Bill” Hickok was murdered while playing poker in Saloon No. 10. Hickok joined a flood of miners, shopkeepers, prostitutes, card players, bunco artists, and outlaws invading the raw and justformed town of Deadwood in June of 1876. His intent was to separate prospectors and miners from their gold – not at the point of a gun, but at the poker tables with a winning hand and two pistols at hand for any sore losers in the bunch. Hickok was a newlywed with a wife to support. His bride, the former Mrs. Agnes Thatcher, was waiting for him back in Cheyenne. Hickok had a couple of habits that served him well in the rowdy bars of the West. He’d pour his drinks with is left hand, leaving his best gun hand at the ready. When gambling he wanted to sit with his back to a wall. On August 2, 1876, during a card game in the No. 10 Saloon, Hickok walked in and noticed a poker game was in progress, but the only empty seat at the table faced away from the saloon’s doorway. Hickok failed to persuade others at the table to trade seats with him, then decided to take the open seat. Hickok never saw a loafer named Jack McCall walk up within three feet, pull a .45 out of his coat, and pull the trigger. Hickok spilled his hand – pairs of black aces and eights — known forevermore as “Deadman’s Hand.” Quickly apprehended, McCall said he’d killed Hickok because “Wild Bill” had killed his brother. A miners’ court figured that was an acceptable defense and let him go. McCall bragged one too many times that he’d killed Hickok and was arrested, tried in Yankton and hung on March 1, 1877.

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Seth Bullock 1849 – 1919

Seth Bullock is a notable Westerner, not

only here in the Black Hills, but in Montana and Wyoming as well. Before coming to Deadwood, Bullock was a member of the 1871 Territorial Senate of Montana, during which he introduced a resolution calling upon the U.S. Congress to set aside Yellowstone as the nation’s first national park. The measure was approved and Yellowstone National Park was created in 1872. Bullock entered into partnership with Sol Star in the hardware business in Helena, Mont. And the two ventured to Deadwood in 1876 and opened a highly successful hardware store in the booming gold camp. The hardware store was remodeled and turned in to the historic Bullock Hotel, with luxury accommodations for those days. The murder of Wild Bill Hickok sparked a loud demand for law and order and Bullock was quickly tapped to serve as the town’s first sheriff. Bullock was soon appointed as one of the first U.S. Marshal of the Dakota Territory. He ranched on the Belle Fourche River and was the first in the territory to plant alfalfa. His leadership led to building a federal fish hatchery for the Black Hills, in Spearfish. Bullock founded the town of Belle Fourche. A lifelong friend of Theodore Roosevelt from the 1890’s Bullock was appointed by “Teddy” as the first Forest Supervisor of the Black Hills Forest Reserve, predecessor of today’s Black Hills National Forest. Roosevelt’s death in 1919 shattered Bullock. Despite his own frail condition, Bullock quickly built the Roosevelt Monument on Mt. Roosevelt across the Gulch from Mt. Moriah. Months later Bullock died of cancer at the age of 70 and was buried, at his request, on the hill-side above Mt. Moriah.

Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


C h a rle s H. Ut te r

“Charlie” 1838 – 1912 (est.)

Utter is known locally as a good Charlie friend to “Wild Bill” Hickok. Indeed,

Utter saw to it that his good “pard” was properly buried. A notice was posted around town, alerting citizens that funeral services would be held “at Charlie Utter’s camp on Thursday afternoon, August 3, l876, at three o’clock p.m. All are respectfully invited to attend.” Utter even wrote Hickok’s epitaph for a grave marker. It seemed like the least he could do, seeing as how Utter brought Hickok to the Black Hills. Utter organized a wagon train in Georgetown, Colorado, which swung through Cheyenne, Wyoming, on the way to the gold strike. That’s where Hickok joined the wagon train. A Colorado newspaper described Utter as a “courageous little man” wearing fringed leggings and coat, and sporting gold and silver decorated revolvers. After Hickok’s murder, Utter reportedly turned his entrepreneurial spirit to letter and freight delivery, mining and gambling. The Lead newspaper “Black Hills Times,” on June 24, 1879 reported: “Charlie Utter, nuisance, keeping a dance house. To Mr. Utter the Court delivered a very severe lecture, condemning all such practices in unmeasured terms. But in consideration that Mr. Utter had closed the place (Judge Moody) sentenced him to one hour’s confinement and a fifty dollar fine and costs.” Utter departed Deadwood after a fire swept through and destroyed much of the town on September 26, 1879. He was later rumored to be practicing medicine in Panama.

Joh n ny Pe r ret t

“Potato Creek

Johnny” 1866 – 1943

Ma r th a Ja n e C a n a r y

“Calamity Jane” 1852 – 1903

Jane was born Martha Jane Canary near Princeton, Calamity Missouri, in 1852. She was married a number of times and had a

daughter about whom little is known. Noted for dressing, most of the time, in men’s clothing and for wild behavior, she was also known by the early miners and settlers for her kind and generous nature. She was the lady bullwhacker whose language was so strong that brave men feared it more than her gun – which nearly always hit its mark. Calamity Jane came to Deadwood during the spring of 1876. The gulch region became her permanent home for the rest of her life, although she ventured elsewhere many times. She whooped it up with the prospectors and the gamblers on nearly a nightly basis in the saloons and gambling halls. She always got what she wanted, a sack of groceries for a sick miner or a ticket home for a wayward saloon girl … all at the point of a gun. Calamity Jane was said to be in love with Wild Bill Hickok. Maybe she was, but the romance was apparently one-sided. Wild Bill never strayed and never forgot the lovely Agnes, his bride of only a few weeks whom he had left in Cheyenne before traveling to Deadwood to seek his fortune in the gold rush. When smallpox broke out in the Deadwood gold mine camp, she devoted herself to caring for the sick men. Many a pock-marked old man of the Black Hills in later years called her “an angel”. Every person who knew her told a different story about her. She was good and kind, she took care of the less fortunate, she was drunk and disorderly, she was a renegade, but none ever said she stole or committed a serious crime. The end came for Calamity Jane in a boarding house in Terry, an upper Hills mining camp. A combination of pneumonia and alcoholism carried her off on August 1, 1903. Her funeral was the largest ever held in Deadwood. One writer declared that “10,000 persons with not one mourner among them” attended the funeral. She was buried at Mt. Moriah Cemetery, as was her request, beside Wild Bill, forever close to him in death but never in life.

otato Creek Johnny” or Johnny Perrett, was one of the Old P West’s most respected and peaceable men.

Full grown, the Welshman stood an impish 4 foot, 3 inches. He searched the West for adventure and dabbled in many pursuits before settling down to prospecting. Potato Creek Johnny staked his claim in Deadwood’s Potato Creek. That’s where he stayed until his death in 1943. Johnny found what is believed to be the largest gold nugget prospected in the Black Hills. The nugget weighed 7.75 ounces. He sold the nugget to W.E. Adams, and a replica is on display at Deadwood’s Adams Museum – the real nugget safely tucked away in storage. Johnny became a local and national hero, loved for his warm personality and magical way with children. He was a favorite of all those who visited his diggings or met him on the streets of Deadwood. After dying at the age of 77 after a short illness, his body was buried at Mt. Moriah Cemetery, near Wild Bill and Calamity Jane. When his funeral procession rolled past the Adams Museum, the carillon chimes tolled 77 times.

Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

A Weeke n d Away

miles to deadwood

Belle Fourche............................... 28 Cody, Wyo................................... 421 Crazy Horse Mountain.............. 57 Custer State Park........................ 65 Denver, Colo............................... 395 Devils Tower, Wyo...................... 90 Edgemont.................................... 112 Harney Peak................................. 60 Hill City......................................... 45 Hot Springs.................................. 95 Keystone....................................... 55 Mt. Coolidge................................. 76 Mt. Rushmore.............................. 60 Newcastle, Wyo........................... 68

Orman Dam.................................. 30 Pierre........................................... 220 Rapid City..................................... 42 Rapid City Regional Airport ��� 52 Sheridan, Wyo........................... 211 Sioux Falls.................................. 395 Spearfish....................................... 15 Spearfish Canyon........................ 16 Ivan Lake...................................... 62 Wall Drug...................................... 96 West Gate Yellowstone............ 557 Wind Cave..................................... 83 Terry Peak Ski Resorts................ 8

Please note mileage is estimated

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IRON HORSE INN & CASINO

27 DEADWOOD ST., DEADWOOD, SD

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(605) 717-7530

WWW.IRONHORSEINNDEADWOOD.COM

Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

605-717-2581

Dine-In • Carry Out • Delivery

AND Great Apps, Sandwiches, Soups & Salads!

Pizza from scratch, using the freshest ingredients, handtossed and stone-baked to perfection.

Casino level of the Iron Horse Inn

(the

ipes & Chef Steve! ec R al in g ri O s” n “Cousi guy in the middle)

• Convenient Location in Downtown Deadwood • Parking On-Site • Historic Victorian Charm • Home of the Wooden Nickel Casino

NEW OWNERSHIP

A BETTER GETAWAY

21 Deadwood St., Deadwood, SD www.ironhorseinndeadwood.com

Stay in newly renovated rooms with a blend of modern accommodations and old west charm. Enjoy familiar accommodations and staff while on vacation. Member discounts on stays and services. Concierge, valet and delivery services. Member vacation exchange program.

o the Black Hills; t k c a b me ta! Take Black Hills of Dako Th e

at Iron Horse Basement level of the Iron Horse Inn


Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

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Large Group Sp.

Internet Access

Guest Laundry

Exercise Room

Pets Allowed

Handicap Acc.

Kitchenette

Hot Tub

Pool

Black Hills Inn & Suites 206 Mountain Shadow Lane South | 605-578-7791 The Branch House 37 Sherman Street | 605-559-1400 Butch Cassidy & Sundance Kid Luxury Suites 57 Sherman Street | 605-343-8126 Cadillac Jacks Hotel & Suites 360 Main Street | 605-578-1500 Cedar Wood Inn 103 Charles Street | 605-578-2725 Celebrity Hotel 629 Main Street | 605-578-1685 Cheyenne Crossing 21415 US Hwy. 14A, Lead | 605-584-3510 Comfort Inn & Suites 225 Cliff Street | 605-578-7550 Deadwood Dick’s Hotel & Suites 51 Sherman Street | 605-578-3224 Deadwood Gulch Gaming Resort 304 Cliff Street | 605-578-1294 Deadwood KOA Campground 11484 US Hwy. 14A | 800-562-0846 Deadwood Mountain Grand-A Holiday Inn Resort 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 Deadwood Station Bunkhouse & Gambling Hall 68 Main Street | 605-578-3476 First Gold Gaming Resort 270 Main Street | 605-578-9777 | 800-274-1876 Gold Country Inn 801 Main Street | 605-578-2393 Hampton Inn at Tin Lizzie Gaming Resor t 555 Main Street | 605-578-1893 Hickok’s Hotel & Casino 685 Main Street | 605-578-2222 Historic Bullock Hotel 633 Main Street | 605-578-1745 Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites 22 Lee Street | 605-578-3330 The Hotel by Gold Dust 25 Lee Street | 605-559-1400 Iron Horse Inn Deadwood 27 Deadwood Street | 605-717-7530 The Lodge at Deadwood Gaming Resort 100 Pine Crest Lane | 605-584-4800 Martin & Mason Hotel 33 Deadwood Street | 605-722-3456 Mineral Palace Hotel & Gaming Complex 601 Main Street | 605-578-2036 Silverado Franklin Historic Hotel & Gaming Complex 709 Main Street | 605-578-3670 Spearfish Canyon Lodge 10619 Roughlock Falls Road, Lead | 605-584-3435 | 877-975-6343 Springhill Suites by Marriott at Cadillac Jacks 322 Main Street | 605-559-1600 Super 8 Deadwood 196 Cliff Street | 605-578-2535 Thunder Cove Inn 315 Cliff Street | 605-578-3045 Trailshead Lodge Cabins 22075 US Hwy. 85, Lead | 605-584-3464 Travelodge Inn & Suites at First Gold 250 Main Street | 605-717-7181 TRU by Hilton at Cadillac Jacks 372 Main Street | 605-571-1001 Whistler Gulch Campground 235 Cliff Street | 800-704-7139

Breakfast

Your Deadwood experience starts here

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777 Casino at Holiday Inn Express 665 Main Street | 605-578-3330 Buffalo Bodega Gaming Complex 662 Main Street | 605-578-1300 Cadillac Jack’s Gaming Resort 360 Main Street | 605-578-1500 Celebrity Hotel & Casino 629 Main Street | 605-578-1685 Deadwood Mountain Grand Casino 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 | 877-907-4726 Deadwood Station Bunkhouse & Gambling Hall 68 Main Street | 605-578-3476 | 800-526-8277 Deadwood Super 8 - Lucky 8 Gaming 196 Cliff Street | 605-578-2535 First Gold Gaming Resort 270 Main Street | 605-578-9777 | 800-274-1876 Gold Country Inn Gambling Hall & Cafe 801 Main Street | 605-578-2393 | 800-287-1251 Gold Dust Casino 688 Main Street | 605-578-2100 | 800-456-0533 Hickok’s Hotel & Casino 685 Main Street | 605-578-222 Historic Bullock Hotel Casino 633 Main Street | 605-578-1745 | 800-336-1876 Historic Franklin Hotel Gaming 700 Main Street | 605-578-3670 Holiday Inn Express 22 Lee Street | 605-578-3330 Iron Horse Inn Casino 27 Deadwood Street | 605-717-7530 The Lodge at Deadwood Gaming Resort 100 Pine Crest Lane | 605-584-4800 | 877-393-5634 Midnight Star 677 Main Street | 605-578-1555 Mineral Palace Hotel & Gaming Complex 601 Main Street | 605-578-2036 | 800-847-2522 Mustang Sally’s Casino 634 Main Street | 605-578-2025 Saloon No. 10 Casino 657 Main Street | 605-578-3346 | 800-952-9398 Silverado Franklin Historic Hotel & Gaming Complex 709 Main Street | 605-578-3670 | 800-584-7005 Tin Lizzie Gaming Resort 555 Main Street | 605-578-1715 | 800-643-4490 VFW Post 5969 Gambling 10 Pine Street | 605-722-9914 Wooden Nickel Casino 9 Lee Street | 605-578-1952

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Crossword Puzzle Answers

ACROSS: 3. Sanford; 7. Snowmobile; 8. Statues; 9. Brothel; 10. Neutrinos DOWN: 1. Wooden; 2. Snowshoeing; 5. Pioneer; 6. Beige; 8. Steel

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Destination Deadwood©

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RKC RC

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Roulette/Keno Craps (R/K/C)

24 Hour

Poker

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$1,000 Bet Limit

Black jack

Slots

Try your hand at Deadwood’s card tables and slot machines

R

RC

R

RC RKC

From Page 31

Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

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Destination Deadwood©

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Groups

Full Bar

Wine/Beer Only

Dinner

Breakfast

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Buffalo Bodega Saloon & Steakhouse 658 Main Street | 605-578-1300 Bully’s Restaurant Bullock Hotel | 633 Main Street | 605-578-1745 | 800-336-1876 Chip Shot Golf & BBQ 306 Cliff Street | 605-321-2613 Deadwood Grille Lodge at Deadwood, 100 Pine Crest Lane | 605-571-2120 | 877-393-5634 Deadwood Social Club Old Style Saloon No. 10 | 657 Main Street | 605-578-1533 Deadwood Station 68 Main Street | 605-578-3476 Diamond Lil's Midnight Star | 677 Main Street | 605-578-1555 Eagle Bar & Steakhouse 608 Main Street | 605-578-1394 Earl of Sandwich Cadillac Jacks | 372 Main Street | 605-571-1261 FLYT Steakhouse and Nightclub Cadillac Jacks | 372 Main Street | 605-571-1263 Gem Steakhouse & Saloon Mineral Palace | 601 Main Street | 605-578-2036 | 800-847-2522 Gold Country Inn Gambling Hall & Cafe 801 Main Street | 605-578-2393 | 800-287-1251 Guadalajara’s Mexican Restaurant Cadillac Jacks | 372 Main Street | 605-431-3965 Horseshoe Restaurant First Gold | 270 Main Street | 605-578-9777 | 800-274-1876 Hickok’s Pizza 685 Main Street | 605-717-6830 His & Hers Ale House & Wine Bar 696 Main Street | 605-717-2455 Jacobs Brewhouse & Grocer 79 Sherman Street | 605-559-1895 Latchstring Inn Spearfish Canyon Lodge | 10619 Roughlock Falls Road, Lead | 605-584-3435 | 877-975-6343 Lee Street Station Café 9 Lee Street | 605-578-1952 Legends Steakhouse Silverado-Franklin Hotel | 709 Main Street | 605-578-3670 | 800-584-7005 Made Market Cadillac Jacks | 372 Main Street | 605-571-1262 Main Street Espresso/Big Dipper 652 Main Street | 605-717-3354 Marco’s Pizza Cadillac Jacks | 372 Main Street | 605-571-1260 Maverick’s Steakhouse & Cocktails Gold Dust | 688 Main Street | 605-578-2100 | 800-456-0533 The Miner Diner 137 Charles Street | 605-578-1611 Mustang Sally’s Sports Bar & Grill 634 Main Street | 605-578-2025 The Nugget Saloon 604 Main Street | 605-578-1422 Oggie’s Sports Bar Lodge at Deadwood | 100 Pine Crest Lane | 605-571-2120 | 877-393-5634 Oyster Bay Restaurant 628 Main Street | 605-578-2205 Paddy O’Neils Irish Pub & Grill Tin Lizzie | 555 Main Street | 605-578-1715 Pizza Factory 645 Main St., Deadwood | 605-645-6419 Santana’s Sports Bar & Grill Deadwood Mountain Grand | 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 | 877-907-4726 Silverado Franklin: Grand Buffet 709 Main Street | 605-578-3670 | 800-584-7005 Six String, Casual Dining Deadwood Mountain Grand | 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 | 877-907-4726 Snitches Tin Lizzie | 555 Main Street | 605-578-1715 The Spotlight Deadwood Mountain Grand | 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 | 877-907-4726 Stage Stop Cafe Cheyenne Crossing | 21415 US Hwy 14A, Lead | 605-584-3510 Starbucks Tin Lizzie | 555 Main Street | 605-578-1715 Super 8 Pizzeria 196 Cliff Street | 605-578-3235 T-Grille Restaurant Tin Lizzie | 555 Main Street | 605-578-1715 | 800-643-4490 Taco Johns 86 Charles Street | 605-578-3975 Three Cousins Pizza Iron Horse Inn | 27 Deadwood Street | 605-717-2581 Trailshead Lodge 22075 US Hwy. 85, Lead | 605-584-3464

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Lunch

Whether you’re in the mood for something quick or a culinary experience, Deadwood aims to satisfy!

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021


Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

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Destination Deadwood©

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Destination Deadwood©

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Fall, Winter • 2020–2021

Profile for Black Hills Pioneer

Destination Deadwood Winter 2020-21  

Destination Deadwood Winter 2020-21  

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