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Destination Deadwood©

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Destination Deadwood©

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INSIDE 4 6 11 15 17 22 24 26 28 32 34 36 39 40 43 44 46

Gold Panning: there’s still gold in these Hills Fun for the Whole Fam Schedule of Events Smashed Pennies: A flat, cool Deadwood souvenir Deadwood’s Guilty Pleasures Experiencing Deadwood, alfresco Mickelson Trail Map Hit the Trail(s)! Walkable Ways to Enjoy Deadwood Take a Load off at Outlaw Square Sports Wagering in Deadwood nearing Goal Line Days of ‘76 Honors Deadwood’s Roots Attractions Deadwood Word Search and Crossword Puzzle Meet Deadwood’s Legends Lodging Directory Dining Directory Gaming Directory

ABOVE PHOTO AND COVER PHOTOS COURTESY SD TOURISM

Destination Deadwood® Staff: Letti Lister, Publisher | Sona O’Connell, Advertising Manager Phoebe Caldwell, Advertising | Katie Hartnell, Design

D

estination Deadwood® magazine started publication with the onset of legalized gaming in November 1989. This magazine is owned and produced by the oldest continuously operating business in Western Dakota Territory – the Black Hills Pioneer newspaper, which first published on June 8, 1876.

145 YEARS Since 1876

Destination Deadwood® is published by Seaton Publishing, Inc., 315 Seaton Circle, Spearfish, SD 57783 • (605) 642-2761 © 2021 Destination Deadwood. All rights reserved.

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Gold panning:

there’s still gold in these Hills

Story & Photos by Mark Watson

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n 1929, a squat gold prospector struck it rich when he discovered what is believed to be largest gold nugget ever found in the Black Hills. John Perrett, better known as Potato Creek Johnny pulled a 7.43-troy-ounce nugget from his pan and sold it to Deadwood businessman W.E. Adams for $250. Today, that same nugget would fetch almost $13,000. In 1874, Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer led an expedition through the Black Hills. The area had long been rumored to have gold in its streams and the expedition confirmed those rumors when men found gold in French Creek, just outside present day Custer, S.D. News was carried by courier to Fort Laramie, Wyo., and later telegraphed to the press throughout the country. When the news hit the front page of newspapers from coast to coast, the gold rush was on. Thousands of miners flooded to Deadwood Gulch to stake their claim. The majority of miners stuck to the creeks, scooping up the gravel and dirt into their

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pans. This is called placer mining and it is how Potato Creek Johnny found his gold. Through the years, a number of hardrock mines were established sending shafts deep into the earth and creating miles of underground tunnels following the veins of gold. This included the Homestake Gold Mine, located in Lead, which mined millions of ounces of gold from depths of more than 8,000 feet. It closed in 2002. Today, there is only one large-scale gold mine that is active in the Black Hills – the Coeur/Wharf mine, located near Lead. Miners there blast ore from the ground and haul it by the tons in massive dump trucks to be processed. Quite a difference from placer mining. But placer mining still plays a role in the Black Hills. These days, placer mining is conducted for recreation and a chance to get your feet wet while paying homage to pioneers of yesterday. Mike Berg, of Crow Peak Outfitters, is one of those who help others find a little color in their pan. He guides people to the Filmore

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claim and not far from the site that Potato Creek Johnny found his record-breaking nugget. Berg has far better luck now than his first time trying to pan for gold. “It was pretty unsuccessful,” he recalled from that day in 2001. “I did find one flake, the only one to find a flake that day. … Just using a pan, you’re pretty tough to find much of anything.” Since then he has developed his own system using photos from the 1800s as well as modern, yet inexpensive items. “We do it a little different from everybody,” Berg said. He will dig gravel from the creek by the bucketful. He digs until he hits a layer of clay. Gold is very heavy and will sink until it hits a layer of clay or bedrock. And that layer of clay can be six inches down in the gravel, or it can be three feet deep. Those buckets are run through a classifier that allows finer material to pass through while discarding the larger gravel. Berg said for his system, 44 buckets is just right to run through the classifier. “The stuff that comes out really comes out like mud,” Berg said. And the muddier the better. “The muddier stuff, it usually has more gold in it,” he said. The classified material makes around eight buckets that he runs through a rocker sluice. A water delivery system brings water from the

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creek and through the sluice. Those eight buckets get refined to around three gallons of material. Only this material will be panned. “Everybody always says the same thing, ‘the gold panning itself was the hardest work,’” Berg said. “You gotta sit down in the creek and pan that stuff out of there, and you’re bent over,” He described pictures of prospectors panning for gold, knees bent, hunched over looking for gold to appear in their pans. “How long you can stand squatting,” he said with a laugh. “Yeah, a half hour and your legs are ready to go on strike and never talk to you again.” So he developed milk stools to sit on, saving knees from strain. On average, Berg said each person finds between 75-150 flakes in their pans. Some people get a little more, some get a little less. One couple, he said, each found a small nugget large enough to be classified as “pickers,” those you can pick out by hand. “And then the other little bonus is all the garnet gemstones that we get, and we got some really gorgeous ones,” he said. “A number of them are what I call ring quality.” Gone are the days when someone can make a living panning gold from the creek. But that is

not why people continue to try their hand at panning. “Most everybody who does it, does it so they can say they mined for gold,” he said. “There’s been a number of groups that have found enough gold to pay for their trip.” And the gold continues to call to Berg, two decades after he first panned. “It’s the fun of seeing it. The hunt. Just seeing that gold in your pan,” he said “… The gold never goes dull. It always looks bright and shiny. It’s just so cool. It’s always something new that you just don’t know what you’re going to have in that pan.”

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Fun

for the

W

PHOTO BY WWW.TRAVELSOUTHDAKOTA.COM

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Whole Fam! Story by Jaci Conrad Pearson

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hile Deadwood is definitely known for grown-up fun and gambling, in recent years the town has seen an influx of families, driving the demand for family-oriented retail and other businesses. “Every year, Wild West dreams come true for thousands of youngsters from around the world when they spend time in Deadwood,” said Lee Harstad, Deadwood Chamber of Commerce executive director. “Watching their

soon-to-be heroes and villains shoot it out on Main Street, or being immersed in entertaining historical knowledge in one of many places in Deadwood, kids will soon find a dime store cowboy hat, hit the sidewalk and cobblestone, and make memories that will last a lifetime, for them and their families.” Harstad said Deadwood continues to see families spending time here each year and consequently has focused on

finding new ways to entertain all ages. “The past couple years, last year especially, we did see a rise in the number of families that spent time in Deadwood,” Harstad said. “From reenactments on Main Street and historical programming to our attractions, businesses, and so many outdoor and recreational opportunities right here, there’s plenty of ways to check off an activity on any family’s itinerary.”

choose your adventure

Tatanka: Story of the Bison

Historic Adams House

100 Tatanka Dr.

PH

22 Van Buren St. Built in 1892, the Adams House is Queen Anne-style home, well known for its oak interiors, hand-painted canvas wall coverings, stained-glass windows, thoroughly modern 19th century plumbing, electricity, telephone service, and original furnishings. Step inside and step back in time. The house sat silent for more than 50 years after W.E. Adams’ death in 1934. His second wife, Mary Adams, left everything intact, from the sheet music on the piano, the books in the library and the china in the pantry to the patent medicines in the bathroom, and even cookies in a cookie jar. U CO OTO

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Destination Deadwood©

Kevin Costner’s Tatanka is a storied tribute to the 30- 60 million bison that once roamed the Great Plains of North America. “Tatanka was not designed as the white man’s version of the Native American. Rather, it stands as a centerpiece for two cultures, one whose very lives depended on the buffalo, and one who saw it as a means to an end. It recognizes and accepts that this is our mutual history. It can also represent the chance to move forward,” Costner said in a message on the attraction’s website. While at Tatanka, see a larger-than-life bronze sculpture featuring 14 bison being pursued by three Native American riders, Dances with Wolves movie costumes, Northern Plains Peoples Educational Interpretive Center, and Lakota interpretive presentations daily.

BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

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Deadwood’s Most Unique Venue • • • •

Hot Glass Blowing Demonstrations Gallery Gift Items Make Your Own Glass

• • • •

Specialty Coffees Deli Breakfast & Lunch Pastries Domestic & Craft Beer

doogr! t u O atin Se

605-571-1071 73 Sherman Street Deadwood, SD www.mindblownstudio.com 8

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fun for the whole fam! Deadwood Escape Rooms

25 Lee St. Looking for a unique escape in Deadwood? The Deadwood Escape Rooms are a real-life interactive puzzle adventure that tend to build family ties and may even lead to making new friends. Groups are locked into a room and will need to use the elements to solve a series of puzzles and look for clues to escape the room within the hour. Choose your room, teammates, and time to play.

Pump House at Mind Blown Studio

73 Sherman St. Order up beer, wine, coffee, drinks, and light fare while watching live glass blowing demonstrations, where spectators are encouraged. Glass items and souvenirs are available for sale in the gallery or make your own for ages 7+. A variety of hot glass blowing classes are offered, with no experience required. Classes are by registration on the website: mindblownstudio.com and demonstrations are held most days. PHOTO BY ALEX PORTAL

Broken Boot Gold Mine

1200 Pioneer Way Deadwood’s Broken Boot Gold Mine was established in 1878. Tours depart every 30 minutes and the Boot’s experienced guides will help you discover the mysteries and magic of old-time gold mining techniques. Visitors can even try their luck at gold panning the same way countless prospectors did right here in Deadwood more than 100 years ago. You’re guaranteed to strike gold and every guest goes home with a souvenir “share” of stock in this legendary mine.

PHOTO COURTESY SD TOURISM

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Days of ’76 Museum

18 Seventy Six Dr. Want to learn about one of Deadwood’s biggest annual celebrations honoring its founding and continued prosperity? The Days of ‘76 celebration began in 1924 as a way to honor Deadwood’s first pioneers - the prospectors, miners, muleskinners, and madams who poured into the Black Hills in 1876 to settle the gold-filled gulches. Since then, the Days of ‘76 has grown into a legendary annual event with a historic parade and an award-winning PRCA rodeo. The Days of ‘76 Museum began as a repository for the horse-drawn wagons, stagecoaches, carriages, clothing, memorabilia, and archives generated by the celebration. It is now a state-of-the-art facility filled with dynamic and thematic exhibitions.

PHOTO BY ALEX PORTAL

Woody’s Wild West Old Time Photos

641 Main St. Want to truly get into Wild West character? Stop by Woody’s Wild West Old Time Photos, the largest old-time photo studio in the country, and they’ll get you and your entire party outfitted. It takes 20-30 minutes to dress and shoot. Then view all photos in 11 x 14 size. Dress in more than 1,000 vintage costumes to choose from, with more than 25 different settings for an unforgettable take-away keepsake of your time in dear old Deadwood. No appointment necessary. Walk-ins welcome. Woody’s can shoot groups up to 50 people.

PHOTO COURTESY WOODY’S WILD WEST OLD TIME PHOTO

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fun for the whole fam! Adams Museum

54 Sherman St. Filled with some of the Black Hills’ greatest treasures, 1930 pioneer businessman W.E. Adams founded the Adams Museum in Deadwood, with the purpose of preserving and displaying the history of the Black Hills. Exhibits include: Potato Creek Johnny’s 7.346-troy-ounce gold nugget, American illustrator N.C. Wyeth’s pencil sketch drawing of Western legend Wild Bill Hickok, the mysterious Thoen Stone record of the Ezra Kind party’s discovery of gold in the Hills in the 1830s, and a rare one-of-a-kind plesiosaur (marine reptile).

Outlaw Square

703 Main St. The square was created as part of a community-wide effort to build a local gathering space to accommodate public events. That said, there are daily activities going on at Outlaw Square – shootouts to concerts and family fun nights to family movie nights. A related story in this publication lists the events scheduled as of press time.

Bus Tours to Mount Moriah Cemetery • Alkali Ike Tours, 657 Main St. • Boot Hill Tours, 3 Siever St. • Original Deadwood Tour, 677 Main St.

PHOTO BY ALEX PORTAL

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PHOTO COURTESY SD TOURISM

The city of Deadwood allows three bus tours to operate in town, all three providing tours through the historic streets of Deadwood and up to Mount Moriah cemetery, the resting place of Wild Bill Hickok, Calamity Jane, Potato Creek Johnny, Preacher Smith and other famed Wild West legends.

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SCHEDULE

of

EVENTS

SPRING–SUMMER

Please note: All event dates are accurate as of press time. Please verify information with the event host. Thank you for your understanding.

APRI L

9 FOR K S, COR K S, & K EG S & 10

Sample a variety of beer and wine from all across the country, along with your Black Hills favorites as you make your way to various tasting venues through Deadwood. Then head to the Grand Tasting, which features dozens of beer & wine varieties, and light hors d’oeuvres. Must be 21 to participate.

Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

17PATS Y’ S DAY

Attention dog and cat lovers! Share in this annual celebration honoring Patsy, the beloved terrier of William Emery Adams. Guests who make a donation of dog/cat food will receive free admissions. All donations benefit the Twin City Animal Shelter. Event Information: Historic Adams House

PR E SERVAT ION T H U R SDAY JAMES K. P. MILLER: 22 THE SAVIOR OF DEADWOOD

Author and historian, Dr. David Wolff, will discuss the career of Deadwood businessman, J. K. P. Miller. Event Information: Historic Adams House

M AY

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K EN T UCK Y DER BY

RUN FOR THE ROSES

Come to Deadwood for our very own Kentucky Derby event weekend! This is Deadwood’s Ultimate Indulgence Weekend with plenty of activities for all to enjoy. Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

9 MOT H ER’ S DAY TOU R S

In honor of Mother’s Day, the Historic Adams House and the Days of ‘76 Museum will offer free admission to visiting mothers. Show your mom how much you love her by sharing a tour of the beautifully restored Victorian home and explore vintage wagons and carriages in Deadwood’s newest museum.

Event Information: Historic Adams House

PR E SERVAT ION T H U R SDAY OF THE HILLS: THE UNTOLD STORY 13 KING OF THE REAL AL SWEARINGEN

The presentation will cover the life and times of Al Swearingen, who needs no introduction in Deadwood. Ellis Albert (Al) Swearingen left home at an early age to travel throughout the West, and his family heritage happened to provide some key connections which enabled his many ventures. Event Information: Historic Adams House

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2021

14 L A R RY T H E C A BL E GU Y

Multi-platinum and Billboard award winner, Larry the Cable Guy is one of the top comedians in the country. Event Information: Deadwood Mountain Grand Event Center

H A N N UA L SD STAT E POK ER CH A M PIONSH I PS 14— 10T 16

The 2021 South Dakota State Championship Buy-In is $1000+$100. This event has a $100,000 Guaranteed Prize Pool and is part of the Mid-States Poker Tour. Call the Silverado Poker Room to Sign Up up for a Satellite Tournament or the Main Event at 605-578-3670 x664 Event Information: Silverado Franklin

A DWOOD R ED DI RT M USIC A L F E ST I VA L 15 DE CASEY DONAHEW, IAN MUNSICK, & R ANDY BURGHARDT

Live at Deadwood Mountain Grand

Event Information: Deadwood Mountain Grand Event Center

27 PLANT SWAP GARDEN PARTY

Bring one, take one! Get ready for spring by swapping plants, seeds, and supplies with your neighbors while enjoying pie and coffee in the Welcome Center. Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

30 BACK WHEN THEY BUCKED

Back When They Bucked will be held in Historic Deadwood, SD at the Day’s of ’76 Rodeo Grounds. The event features PRCA and WPRA Women champions and local champions from across the country. Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

J UNE

1 THE TROLLEY ON THE TR AIL

The Trolley on the Trail allows people with impaired mobility to experience the Mickelson Trail. Riders will learn about the history of the former railroad line and the inception of the trail. The rides are about four hours long. Reservations are required. Each person reserving a space on the trolley will be required to have a handicapped parking permit. One assistant is allowed to accompany the person, if needed. The trolley has space available for up to two people who use wheelchairs. Event information: Mickelson Trail Office

Continued on page 12

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From page 11

J UNE

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DEADWOOD ALL IN FREESTYLE MOTOCROSS SHOW

This event is stacked with world-renowned professional riders from the X Games, Nitro Circus, and Red Bull X Fighters. Get all in with Strider bike races, giveaways, meet and greets, beer garden, an after party, and more.

Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce DeadwoodAllIn.com

MICKELSON TR AIL MAR ATHON, HALF-MAR ATHON, AND 5 5-PERSON MAR ATHON RELAY & 6

Discover 26.2 miles of Black Hills beauty during the annual Mickelson Trail Marathon that starts and finishes in Historic Deadwood.

Event information: MickelsonTrailMarathon.com, 605-390-6137

A DWOOD PROF E SSIONA L BU L L R I DI NG 11 DE & 12 18— 4T H A N N UA L W I L D BI L L DAYS 19

J U LY

3 CR AZY DAZE

Shop unique by shopping local in Deadwood. Find amazing sales at participating businesses throughout town during your Fourth of July festivities. Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

3— GOLD CAMP JUBILEE 4 4 I N DEPEN DENCE DAY PA R A DE

Celebrate Lead’s iconic golden history with a fireworks show over the Open Cut, vendors, live entertainment, and family-friendly activities on historic Main Street. Event information: LeadMeThere.org, 605-584-1100

Public is invited to enjoy an Independence Day Parade in Historic Deadwood.

Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

6 THE TROLLEY ON THE TR AIL

The Trolley on the Trail allows people with impaired mobility to experience the Mickelson Trail. Riders will learn about the history of the former railroad line and the inception of the trail. The rides are about four hours long. Reservations are required. Each person reserving a space on the trolley will be required to have a handicapped parking permit. One assistant is allowed to accompany the person, if needed. The trolley has space available for up to two people who use wheelchairs.

Bull riding is one of the most extreme sports known to man and Professional Bull Riding is bringing elite bulls and bull riders to Deadwood’s Day of 76 Event Complex.

Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

Celebrate the life and times of Wild Bill Hickok as you enjoy free concerts, National Dock Dog’s Competition, and learn the tricks of gold panning and sluicing from Northern Hills prospectors right on Main Street! Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

H ISTORY ON T H E L AW N TRUE WEST THANK YOU TOUR 18 THE

Author and Executive Editor of True West magazine, Bob Boze Bell, has some stories to share about how Geronimo become the most famous Native American in the world and why paratroopers call out Geronimo’s name when they jump. Event Information: Historic Adams House

19 W I L D DE A DWOOD R E A DS

A multi-author, multi-genre book signing offers opportunities to interact with authors at The Lodge at Deadwood from 10am to 3 pm! Event information: wilddeadwoodreads.com

20 U N DER T H E ST R EET L A M P

Features members of the Broadway hit Jersey Boys, live at Deadwood Mountain Grand.

Event Information: Deadwood Mountain Grand Event Center

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NORT H ER N H I L LS COM M U N I T Y BA N D CONCERT

Break out the red, white and blue for the Northern Hills Community Band Concert. Enjoy live patriotic music and marches, as well as world-famous show tunes on the Adams House lawn. Event Information: Historic Adams House

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Event information: Mickelson Trail Office

A N N UA L 3-W H EEL ER R A L LY 11— 7DET HA DWOOD 16

Vendors, socials, entertainment, trike show n’ shine, poker runs, awards night trike parade, trike games of skill, charitable fund-raising and more. Event Information: d3wr.com

16— HOM E F R EE 17 H ISTORY ON T H E L AW N: S. MCCLINTOCK 23 JOHN

Home Free in concert at Deadwood Mountain Grand.

Event Information: Deadwood Mountain Grand Event Center

Historic Adams House lawn

Event Information: Historic Adams House

27— 99T H A N N UA L DAYS OF ‘76 RODEO 31

PRCA Rodeo performances are Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights at 7:00 p.m. and Saturday afternoon at 1:30 p.m.

Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

AUGUST

6 15

81ST ST URGIS ® MOTORCYCLE R A LLY T M — This rally is always a roaring good time where anything and everything goes! When you stay in Deadwood you can still be close to the Rally but also enjoy Deadwood’s incredible nightlife, 24/7 gaming, and the many unique promotions and events being held in town through the week.

Event Information: The City of Sturgis Rally & Events, 605-720-0800

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AUGUST

9 L EGEN D’ S R I DE

Join the 50-mile ride from Deadwood to Sturgis to raise money for regional charities. Celebrities lead the ride to the legendary Buffalo Chip, where a private reception is followed by a headlining concert. Event Information: legendsride.com

SITTING BULL AND THE EVENTS LEADING TO 27THE BATTLE OF THE LITTLE BIG HORN

H ISTORY ON T H E L AW N:

Historic Adams House lawn

Event Information: Historic Adams House

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— KOOL DE A DWOOD N I T E S

Car Lovers come together for classic cars, classic music, and classic fun. It’s a ‘50s and ‘60s sock hop – Deadwood style. Enjoy a parade, show and shine, classic car and memorabilia auction, and free concerts on Main Street, featuring the biggest names in rock ‘n roll history. Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

29 H A PPY TOGET H ER TOU R

When Turtles frontmen Flo & Eddie – and the rest of their compatriots that shaped the world of rock ‘n roll in the ‘60s and ‘70s -- step up the microphone, the years melt away as the hits of the Aquarian Age come back around and give audiences a taste of that old-school magic. Event Information: Deadwood Mountain Grand Event Center

SEPTEMBER

7 THE TROLLEY ON THE TR AIL

The Trolley on the Trail allows people with impaired mobility to experience the Mickelson Trail. Riders will learn about the history of the former railroad line and the inception of the trail. The rides are about four hours long. Reservations are required. Each person reserving a space on the trolley will be required to have a handicapped parking permit. One assistant is allowed to accompany the person, if needed. The trolley has space available for up to two people who use wheelchairs. Event information: Mickelson Trail Office

SEPTEMBER

A DWOOD A L L I N F R EE ST Y L E MOTOCROSS SHOW 4 DE

This event is stacked with world-renowned professional riders from the X Games, Nitro Circus, and Red Bull X Fighters. Get all in with Strider bike races, giveaways, meet and greets, beer garden, an after party, and more.

Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce DeadwoodAllIn.com

11 T H E BIG M ICK 2021

Experience the beauty of the Black Hills from the back of your mountain bike on the George S. Mickelson Trail. Ride from Deadwood to Edgemont (109 Miles). Event Information: mickelsontrailaffiliates.com, 605-440-2400

17— 31ST A N N UA L DE A DWOOD JA M 18

Watch live, high-energy acts and electrifying performances by national, regional, and local while bidding on an array of pieces by Black Hills artists. A silent auction will coincide with the live auction and continue through Saturday, when the highest bidders will be announced from the main stage.

Event Information: deadwoodjam.com

PR E SERVAT ION T H U R SDAY JEFF VIKEN AND MICHAEL TRUMP 23 JUDGE Homestake Adams Research and Cultural Center

Event Information: Historic Adams House

HOPS A N D HOG S CR AFT BEER FEST 24— DEADWOOD’S 25

Enjoy craft beer paired with samples of unique bacon dishes. Ticket holders receive an event pass, tasting card, schedule and an open container cup. Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

25 HARVEST JUBILEE

Celebrate the season with scarecrows, pumpkins, and a cornucopia of free, family-friendly activities. Event information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

26 K A NSA S

With a legendary career spanning more than four decades and selling over 30 millions records world-wide, Kansas has firmly established itself as one of America’s most iconic classic rock bands.

Event Information: Deadwood Mountain Grand Event Center

F OR MOR E I N F OR M AT ION A B OU T E V E N TS, PL E A SE CON TAC T T H E E V E N T HOST.

29 TA N YA T UCK ER

Deadwood Chamber of Commerce 501 Main St., Deadwood 605-578-1876 • 1-800-999-1876 • www.deadwood.com

OCTOBER

Deadwood Mountain Grand Event Center 1906 Deadwood Mountain Dr., Deadwood 605-559-0386 • www.deadwoodmountaingrand.com Historic Adams House 22 Van Buren Ave., Deadwood 605-722-4800 • www.deadwoodhistory.com Historic Homestake Opera House 3013 W. Main St., Lead 605-584-2067 • www.homestakeoperahouse.org Outlaw Square Events Schedule on Page 28-29 Destination Deadwood©

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Tayna Tucker in concert at Deadwood Mountain Grand. Event Information: Deadwood Mountain Grand Event Center

1— OK TOBER F E ST 2

Enjoy live German Music at the Polkafest, play games and win prizes at the annual Tour de Oktoberfest, and join us for Beer Barrel games. Bring the whole family and join in dancing, free food, and the famous “Wiener Dog Races.”

Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce DeadwoodOktoberfest.com

7— W I L D W E ST SONG W R I T ER S F E ST I VA L 9 Twenty of the top songwriters and artists come to Deadwood to share their music and their stories. Event Information: Deadwood Chamber of Commerce

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IRON HORSE INN & CASINO

27 DEADWOOD ST., DEADWOOD, SD

14

(605) 717-7530

WWW.IRONHORSEINNDEADWOOD.COM

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605-717-2581

Dine-In • Carry Out • Delivery

AND Great Apps, Sandwiches, Soups & Salads!

Pizza from scratch, using the freshest ingredients, handtossed and stone-baked to perfection.

Casino level of the Iron Horse Inn

(the

ipes & Chef Steve! ec R al in g ri O s” n “Cousi guy in the middle)

• Convenient Location in Downtown Deadwood • Parking On-Site • Historic Victorian Charm • Home of the Wooden Nickel Casino

NEW OWNERSHIP

A BETTER GETAWAY

605-717-7530

21 Deadwood St., Deadwood, SD www.ironhorseinndeadwood.com

Win a trip to Orlando or Las Vegas

Stay in newly renovated rooms with a blend of modern accommodations and old west charm. Enjoy familiar accommodations and staff while on vacation. Member discounts on stays and services. Concierge, valet and delivery services. Member vacation exchange program.

o the Black Hills; t k c a b me ta! Take Black Hills of Dako Th e

at Iron Horse

Beer Wine Cocktails Peanut Bar Three Cousins Menu & FUN!

M U S I C

L I V E

Basement level of the Iron Horse Inn 605-717-2516


S m a sh ed P e n ni e s A flat, cool Deadwood souvenir Story and Photos by Jaci Conrad Pearson

S

mashed penny collectors and penny pinchers alike, get ready to turn your cranks. Deadwood’s got ‘em and you can find ‘em in at least four locations the Wild West city. A flat, cool, fabulously affordable – only 51 cents, and a smashing souvenir from your South Dakota stay, smashed pennies sort of abound in Deadwood, with around 20 different varieties to be had. Smashed, or elongated coins, are made by forcing a coin

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between two steel rollers that contain an engraving. As the coin passes through these rollers, it is squeezed and elongated under tremendous pressure, transformed from its round shape to an oval shape and the engraving is impressed into the coin, as well. Penny-smashing machines can be found at four locations in Deadwood: Miss Kitty’s Mercantile, Gold Nugget Trading Post, Pam’s Purple Door Discount Outlet, and Happy Days Gifts.

Locations NUGGET  GOLD TR ADING POST 75 MAIN STR EET

HAPPY DAYS GIFTS

MISS KITTY’S MERCANTILE

PAM’S PUR PLE DOOR

639 MAIN STR EET

649 MAIN STR EET

637 MAIN STR EET

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DEADWOOD’S

guilty pleasures

From its earliest days as a gold-mining camp, Deadwood has always been a place where men and women could come to seek their fortune; or at least, a hell of a good time. Story by Alex Portal

A

fter a long, hard day panning for gold in Deadwood Gulch or digging away in the mines, the prospectors of old could stop in at any one of the many saloons and dance halls lining Deadwood’s Main Street to Sip, Smoke, Savor, and

marvel at the many Spectacles the frontier town had to offer. From the original cast of characters still here in spirit to the new personalities that guarantee a memorable visit, the true “Wild West” history of Deadwood lives on. Continued on page 18

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SIP

Deadwood was built on the backs of hard working men and women who poured all their skills and guile into doing whatever it took get the job done; and when the day’s work was finally finished, they’d pony up to their watering hole of choice and wash away their troubles with their favorite adult beverage. Although

the rotgut whiskey shots served up by handlebar mustachioed barkeeps have given way to expertly mixed cocktails, eager imbibers can still Sip their way through time and explore the unique history every tavern in town has to share. From martini bars to wine tastings and locally brewed craft beers — Sip your favorite beverage of choice served at various locations throughout town.

SMOKE

Deadwood has something for everyone, and chances are whatever your thing is, it would be enhanced with a good cigar. Traditionally seen as primarily a male hobby, at least one famous Deadwood lady knew the value of a good smoke. Poker Alice Ivers was a mainstay at Deadwood poker tables and was rarely seen without her signature stogie. Even though the seedy saloons, hazy with thick and pungent clouds of tobacco smoke, have been transformed

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into smoke-free honkytonk-style bars and jumping night clubs, passionate puffers can still enjoy a Smoke as they mosey up and down Main Street, or fire up a specialty cigar at the only indoor smoking lounge in Deadwood.

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SAVOR

Deadwood was flooded with homesteaders from all over the world looking to seek their fortune, be it through hard, honest work, or less scrupulous means. These men and women brought with them dreams of striking it rich and settling in the great unknown west; they also brought the food culture from

their native lands, and in so doing, added to the richness of the Black Hills. Without the unseemliness of having their meals quartered and skinned out in the open air of Deadwood’s thoroughfare, discerning diners can still Savor a sensational selection of specialty foods and sweet treats that can only be found in the Black Hills. Whether you are looking for family dining, a buffet, steakhouse, pizza, or specialty treat, you can find it all downtown.

SPECTACLE Deadwood has never had a problem providing its visitors with all the entertainment they could want. Saints and sinners alike can find what they’re looking for on the cobblestone streets of this wild and wooly town. While the bawdy saloon girls no longer hang in the

doorways, beckoning prospectors into the gambling halls to spend their hard-earned money on all manner of rowdy entertainments, those looking for a good time can still find themselves drawn to the Spectacle of Deadwood’s casinos and concert halls, always brimming with world class shows and games of chance. Visit one of the many museums, brothels, or haunted spots in town; step into the past and experience gold panning like prospectors; or grab an oldtime photo keepsake.

Famous Fairmont Hotel

Ghost Tour

This former 1898 Victorian brothel, bar and gambling hall offers ghost/paranormal tours integrated with historical perspectives related to its violent and colorful past to its present-day hauntings and are a historically accurate experience for the entire family.

Tours

Every day at 8:30pm

626 Main St., Deadwood To make a reservation stop in, call 605-578-2205, or visit us on Facebook! Featured on

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SOCIALIZE Deadwood hosts a variety of special events t h ro u g h o u t t h e y e a r t o h e l p y o u i n d u l g e i n a l l o f i t s G u i l t y P l e a s u re s .

deadwood events WILD BILL DAYS : June 18 & 19 CRAZY DAZE : July 3 DAYS OF '76 RODEO & HISTORIC PARADES : July 27 – 31 KOOL DEADWOOD NITES : August 26 – 29 DEADWOOD JAM : September 17 & 18 HARVEST JUBILEE : September 25 OKTOBERFEST : October 1 – 2

WILD WEST SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL : October 7 – 9 DEADWEIRD : October 29 & 30

See more special events on pages 11–13

The

Ca su a l & Fi n e Dining

DE ADWOOD’S NE WE S T RE S TAUR AN T S

Fine Dinning Opening L ate Spring 2021

DINING

L I V E TA BL E GA ME S

SLO T S

Watch fo r u p co m i n g evets!

67 7 M A I N S T R E E T, D E A D W O O D 6 0 5 . 5 7 8 .15 5 5 | T H E M I D N I G H T S T A R . C O M | CASINO HOURS: SUNDAY–THURSDAY : 10AM–MIDNIGHT | FRIDAY–SATURDAY : 10AM–3AM

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Exper iencing Deadwood, Story by Jaci Conrad Pearson

OVID-19 precautions have forced businesses, in tandem with the city of Deadwood, to get creative when it comes to using sparse pockets of Main Street space to spread out. Whether it’s full-on dining outdoors or discovering the perfect little alcove for grabbing an on-the-go ice cream cone break and letting the little ones run off a little steam, outdoor spaces

alfresco

abound in Deadwood for those who know where to look. Deadwood Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Lee Harstad said many businesses offer outdoor seating and Deadwood, by its very nature, offers bountiful outdoor seating opportunities. “Many of Deadwood’s businesses have always offered an outdoor setting to

enjoy food and beverages in the beauty of the Black Hills, and in 2020, we saw even more businesses get involved with outdoor seating arrangements,” Harstad said. “The addition of Outlaw Square and the number of parks and trails with seating in and around Deadwood provide even more space for those preferring the outdoor climate.”

PHOTO BY JACI CONRAD PEARSON

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Dining outside

The following establishments are a few which offer full-service outdoor seating for drinks and/or dining: • Buffalo-Bodega • Mustang Sally’s • Silverado and Outlaw Deck • Franklin Hotel and Veranda • Deadwood Mountain Grand • Jacob’s Brewhouse • Deadwood Social Club • Lee Street Station “And more, plus many of the lodging properties and our attractions and museums offer outdoor space for their guests, and Deadwood has many great parks and trail areas,” Harstad said. “Also, in the fall of 2020, we worked on permission to close a portion of Gold Street for outdoor seating, and provided seating for it. That was very well received,” Harstad said. This summer’s visitor season is likely to see this area available for outdoor seating once again. As guests express interest in more outdoor seating, the above list is likely to grow.

Public outdoor seating spaces to peruse Outlaw Square

Designed as an outdoor gathering space, when it comes to taking a load off or taking in Deadwood’s unique and

charming hillsides and historic structures, Outlaw Square delivers. Several seating areas await visitors and the outdoor water fountain near the gallows is sure to fit the bill for younger members of your clan. For those who need a little bit of space to run off energy, there’s the “green space” that seemingly ambles on and on, just in front of the stage area. Public restrooms are available.

Powerhouse Park

Just off the Mickelson Trail and just past the Sherman Street trailhead is Powerhouse Park, neatly tucked between the hillside and immediately adjacent to Whitewood Creek. A 330-foot-long wooden-beam boardwalk is the path to the little oasis and perfect place to have a picnic. One of the city’s newest green spaces, Powerhouse Park was named in honor of a coal-fired electric power plant that once stood near the area. The area was once home to an electric coal-fired power plant that provided electricity for the electric trolley that ran from Deadwood to Lead from 1902-1927. Today, the remnants of foundation are all that’s left. Public restrooms are available.

Gordon Park

With playground equipment that was recently updated, Deadwood’s most popular and oldest park is situated along Sherman Street next to the Deadwood Recreation Center, on the way up to Mt. Moriah. Plentiful picnic tables and a bandshell are on site, as well as a fair

PHOTO COURTESY DEADWOOD MOUNTAIN GRAND

amount of green grass to frolic in. Public restrooms are available.

Deadwood Welcome Center

The Deadwood Welcome Center has several sites outside the facility that lend themselves well to taking a load off, with Whitewood Creek running nearby and several walkways down to the water from the nearby walking path. Public restrooms are available.

Whitewood Creek

Winding its way through Deadwood, Whitewood Creek affords visitors and locals alike several areas along its banks to sit and enjoy the water and view. A good place to pick up the creek’s path are the Pluma entryway to Deadwood, the Sherman Street parking lot, the Welcome Center parking lot, and the event complex parking lot.

Pluma South Gateway Entrance Welcome Center

A small bit of greenspace and a place to plop down and enjoy Whitewood Creek and a bit of Black Hills beauty, the Pluma South Gateway entrance to Deadwood features covered picnic shelters, parking, public restrooms, and a cantilevered wood viewing deck.

PHOTO BY SONA O'CONNELL

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HISTORIC MAIN STREET OUTLAW SQUARE TRAIL

1.5 miles; easy; out and back Originates at Lower Main Visitor Center

FOREST HILLS TRAIL

1.5 miles; easy; loop, steps Originates at Deadwood Public Library

HITthe ( S) ! TRAIL walkable ways

13 U

Historic Deadwood

to enjoy

Story and Photos by Jaci Conrad Pearson

rban trails and backwood byways, Deadwood’s got a little bit of both, and there’s no better time than the present to take them in. “The close proximity of the various walking trails throughout Deadwood provide residents and visitors the opportunity to explore all aspects of the city and surrounding area, including numerous historical viewsheds and sites,” said Deadwood Historic Preservation Officer Kevin Kuchenbecker, whose staff is enhancing ways to promote Deadwood as a “walkable city” and encourage more trail usage. Currently there is a 13-track trajectory identified by city officials which is presently in the process of being marked. The track weaves its way through the

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city, and includes the trails on the right of this page, along with known mileage, ranging from one-quarter of a mile to just under six miles, and difficulty level. “Historic Deadwood offers a multitude of trails to navigate via a variety of transportation options,” Kuchenbecker said. “The National Historic Landmark offers an abundance of interpretive panels to learn about Deadwood’s rich and colorful past. Several trails traverse through the charming neighborhoods and the historic core of Deadwood with buildings dating back to the late 19th century. Other trails lead you into wooded areas where you may encounter wildlife up close and personal or have a spectacular panoramic view of the gulch below.”

SAINT AMBROSE CEMETERY BURNHAM TRAIL:

0.6 miles; moderate; loop Originates at Highway 85 & Burnhamp Ave.

DEADWOOD WHITEWOOD BIKE TRAIL

1.5 miles; easy; out & back, connected trails Originates at event complex

DAYS OF ’76 LOOP

0.6 miles; easy; loop, connected trails Originates at event complex

MT. MORIAH BULLOCK TRAIL 0.9 miles; easy; loop, connected trails Originates at Mt. Moriah Visitor Center

PRESIDENTIAL URBAN TRAIL Easy; loop, connected trails Originates at Sherman St.

WHITEROCKS TRAIL

2.4 miles; moderate; loop, connected trails Originates at Sherman & Harrison Streets

POWERHOUSE PARK TRAIL 0.2 miles; easy; out and back Originates at Mickelson Trailhead

MICKELSON TRAIL

109 mile trail — 1.3 miles to Deadwood city limits from Mickelson Trailhead in Sherman Street parking lot

RAILROAD GRADE TRAIL Deadwood portion easy; Out and back or point to point

HOMESTAKE TRAIL

3.2 miles; moderate; out and back Originates near mile marker 109 of Mickelson Trail

CLEVELAND URBAN TRAIL 0.9 miles; easy; out and back, loop Originates at Sherman & Miller Streets

RAILROAD AVENUE URBAN TRAIL

0.7 miles; easy; out and back, loop connected trails Originates at event complex Destination Deadwood©

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7 6

8

10

9

G AT E

5

MI NE S T.

4 2 1

3 WA

IN SH

N GRA

N G TO

DVI

EW

S T.

S T.

1) Lead City Dog Park/Lead Kiosk 2) Open Cut Overlook 3) B&M #2 Headframe Story 4) Homestake Mills 5) Railroad History 6) Historic Cleveland Area Overlook 7) Deadwood Fires Story 8) McGovern Hill 9) Deadwood Kiosk 10) Deadwood Trailhead W W W. NOR THERNHILL SREC .ORG

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BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

Take a load off at

Outlaw Square

I

Story by Jaci Conrad Pearson

t was put there just for you. With the goal of providing guests with a space to take it all in or take a load off, Deadwood’s largest public gathering space is working hard to get the job done.

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Outlaw Square Executive Director Bobby Rock said that once again, the Square will be hopping, with a wide variety of free events scheduled daily throughout the visitor season.

Outlaw Square summer programming for 2021 is as follows: Mondays are... made for movies, as May 26 marks the beginning of Monday Movie Night, which runs through Sept. 6. The movie is free and begins at 7 p.m. You can log on to Outlawsquare.com for all the movie scheduled to be shown.”

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Tuesday is...

for getting fresh, as it’s Farmers Market Day from 3-7 p.m. June 29 through Sept. 28 at Outlaw Square. Vendors from around the area bring their fresh produce or artisan products.

Thursday mornings...

Thursday evenings...

are made for “me time.”

PHOTO COURTESY OUTLAW SQUARE

Wednesdays are...

made for music, as May 26 marks the beginning of Wednesday’s Summer Concert Series. “Our Summer Concert Series features a variety of national, regional, and local bands and musicians performing on the Sue Lundberg Memorial Stage,” Rock said. “We also have David Livingston hosting sidewalk chalk art for the kids during the shows.” Free live music starts at 6:30 p.m. each week, featuring local and regional acts of all styles and genres, lineup subject to change.

May 26 Tie Dye Volcano with Sean Baxter June 2 Tanner Johns & The Canadian Tuxedos with Tiffany Johnson June 9 The Garage Boys with Marty Nelson June 16 Dueling Pianos with Anna Robins June 23 Rascal Martinez with Heath Johnson June 30 Mad Hats with Jack Daniels

July 7

July 14 July 21 July 28 Aug. 4 Aug. 18 Sept. 1

John Roberts y Pan Blanco with Von Varagon Society Young Dubliners with Mark Joseph Mae Simpson with High Rise Dakota Country with Ja’net Eastman David Grahm & The Eskimo Brothers with Devon Sants Jasmine Cain with Chris Huseinga Brandon Jones with Lacy Nelson

are fabulous for family time.

“Thursday starts early with our sunrise yoga session taught by a local yoga instructor starting at 8 a.m., and following that is our Zumba class at 9 a.m.,” Rock said. “Participation in these fun and healthy activities is free to all.

PHOTO COURTESY OUTLAW SQUARE

Deadwood History Family Fun Night starts at 6:15 p.m. with interactive games until 7:15 p.m. and family fun games from 6:15-8:30 p.m. “Staff from Deadwood History come to Outlaw Square and bring with them fun, interactive activities for locals and visitors to come and enjoy and even partake in the events,” Rock said. “Deadwood History will also be scheduling a few speakers throughout the summer. Outlaw Square also provides fun family games out in the square for everyone to enjoy from cornhole boards, hula hoops, connect four, and Giant Jenga – a lot of fun for the whole family.”

Weekends are...

for city-wide or private events. Rock said weekends at Outlaw Square are combined with different city-wide or private events. Utilizing a big screen, Suare officials plan to simulcast the Main Street concerts on the screen at Outlaw Square. “So guests can spread out and enjoy listening to the show,” Rock said. During the Days of ‘76 Rodeo, July 30-31, Native American dancers will perform at Outlaw Square from 4-6 p.m. Two new events are in the planning stages for this summer: • June 25-26 Moonshine Festival • July 23-24 Woman’s Expo Vendor Market, featuring woman-owned businesses. A Fourth of July family celebration including music on the stage will feature the Sophia Beatty Band from 4-5:30 p.m.

Then, Camp Comfort takes the stage from 6-8 p.m., and if Mt. Rushmore holds its fireworks display this year, the production will be rebroadcasted on the big screen at 8:30 p.m. “August will be filled with Sturgis Motorcycle Rally activities, including the Legends Ride on Monday, Aug. 9, hosted at Outlaw Square,” Rock said. September features the Deadwood Jam on the 17-18, and the second annual Cornhole Tournament on the 2425.

BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

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Ava

APPAREL Custom

Stagecoach Gifts Souvenirs • Custom Designed

Hoodies • Shirts • Shot Glasses •

Stickers • Mugs • & More

Summer Hours: 9am - 10 pm

FASHIONS SOUVENIRS • High Quality Boots • Custom Made: - Shirts - Hoodies - & More

Summer Hours: 9 am - 10 pm

614 Main St. Deadwood, SD 57732 | 1-386-453-3330

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651 1/2 Main St. Deadwood, SD 57732 1-386-453-3330

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Enjoy a

Specialty Drink with Delicious

Baked Goods!

Best Place to Shop in Deadwood f Unique Handmade Gifts & Jewelry by Local Artists

f Montana Silversmiths f Best Handbag Selection in the Black Hills! f Top Quality Men’s Leather Belts f Children’s Cowboy Boots and Hats

f Large Selection of Cowboy Hats: Stetson, Bailey,& Resistol f Wyoming Traders Vests

• Espresso • Smoothies

• Lattes & Cappuccinos • Ice Cream • Shakes

• Scones • Coffee Cakes • Rolls

• Pockets & Balls

Meet Kodi the Bear!

Men’s, Women’s, and Juniors Clothing Boutique! (located upstairs)

Carrying the latest fashion trends for men and women! plus we carry XS-3X Sizes!

Open 7 days a week 10am - 9pm 649 Main St., Deadwood • 605-559-0599

Destination Deadwood©

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(605) 717-3354 | 652 MAIN ST. | DEADWOOD

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SPORTS WAGERING in Deadwood nearing GOAL LINE Story by Jaci Conrad Pearson

M

aking a legal sports bet in Deadwood is nearing the finish line, as gaming officials work to get the new gaming offering up and running with the goal of making it available to bettors by the fall football season. Moving the ball down the field has been steady thus far, as voters approved sports betting on the November 2020 election ballot 58% to 41%, and the South Dakota legislature soon followed up by passing support for the bill in February. “Sports wagering can start no sooner than July 1; however, the gaming commission must first promulgate rules, which the legislative rules committee must approve and then begin the licensing procedures and background investigations for the sports wagering service providers, which could take

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several months,” said Deadwood Gaming Association Executive Director Mike Rodman. “So there is no clear time that sports wagering will begin in Deadwood, but hopefully in time to bet on the fall football season.” While the decisions of the operators to include sports betting in their gaming mix will be determined by the final rules, operators that have discussed their interest with Rodman include: The Lodge at Deadwood, Cadillac Jacks, Tin Lizzies, Mustang Sally’s, Silverado/Franklin, Deadwood Mountain Grand, Deadwood Gulch Resort, and Midnight Star. Weston Pleinis, casino general manager of The Lodge at Deadwood, said his establishment will be opening “BetLodge Sportsbook” at the Lodge as soon as legally allowed.

“Sports betting will have a ripple effect for Deadwood. Major sporting events will make Deadwood even more of a travel destination than it is now. In addition to larger gaming revenues, more rooms, meals, and drinks will be sold,” Pleinis said. “That inevitably will lead to more jobs through the gaming establishments themselves and all the vendors throughout the state that help service those establishments. I think it’s going to be a lot a fun and may start off small, but will grow and will be a positive. We look forward to the addition of sports wagering in Deadwood.” Rodman explained the parameters of sports wagering. Importantly, a sports wagering bettor must place their wager in person inside the premises of a licensed gaming facility in Deadwood. “It will be conducted inside the premises of a licensed gaming facility in Deadwood through wagers on sporting events placed in one of the following ways: at a betting window with a casino employee, at a kiosk, or on a mobile device,” Rodman said. “Most sports wagering bettors will probably open sports wagering accounts with an advance deposit and bets will be subtracted and their winnings deposited. You will not be able to bet on high school sporting events, South Dakota collegiate contests, and minor league sporting events.” According to a study by Oxford Economics, sports wagering would likely generate $6.1 million in direct sports wagering income and create a total of $22.1 million in overall gaming increases. “The same Oxford Economics study estimated sports wagering would create an additional 152 jobs here in Deadwood,” Rodman said. “Individual properties will not only need employees in their newly-created sports lounge areas, but also in areas of accounting, marketing, and customer service. Additional employees will be needed for additional gaming traffic, hotel stays, and food and beverage sales.” With the goal of remaining competitive in the gaming environment, especially considering neighboring gaming jurisdictions and their varied offerings, the addition of sports betting will give Deadwood one more edge in remaining relevant to gamers. “Sports wagering will be another tool in Deadwood’s toolbox to keep us a competitive gaming destination. Dead-

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wood needs to provide the products our customers ask us for. It will give us more marketing opportunities to promote Deadwood at times that have been historically slower for Deadwood,” Rodman said. “As the Oxford Economics study alludes, sports wagering could bring an overall increase of approximately 15% to Deadwood’s gaming numbers.” Gambling in Deadwood brings in tax revenue that gets distributed across the state through the general fund and finances grants for historic preservation. The state assesses a 9% tax on Deadwood gaming revenues. Casinos are also charged a $2,000 fee per device or table. From those revenues, 1% goes to the state general fund, 40% to the state Department of Tourism, 10% to Lawrence County, and the rest to the South Dakota Gaming Association until its expenses are met. Following Deadwood’s revenue, excess funds are distributed to cities and school districts throughout Lawrence County. Gaming has been good for Deadwood’s economy, transforming the town with a failing infrastructure in the ‘80s into a premier tourist destination today, with $1.1 billion wagered in 2020 in the 26 casinos lining the streets.

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In 2014, 57% of South Dakota voters approved an amendment to the state’s constitution allowing keno, craps, and roulette be added to Deadwood’s gaming lineup. Those games were placed on the casino floors on July 1, 2015, and resulted in about 10% of the table revenue – about $10 million. Rodman believes Deadwood would see similar gains with the addition of sports betting, as well as additional spending. “This would result in more hotel stays, retail sales, and food and beverage sales. We see the traditionally off-season time periods positively impacted by events like the Super Bowl, March Madness, and the World Series,” Rodman said. “Deadwood needs to continue to grow as a visitor destination that has an enormous impact on the Northern Hills and all of South Dakota’s tourism industry. Betting on sporting events gives us just one more option to attract additional visitors.”

Neighboring states like Iowa rolled out sports betting after the U.S. Supreme Court paved the way for legal wagering three years ago. “South Dakotans, like the rest of Americans, want to wager on sporting events in a safe, legal, regulated environment and Deadwood will provide them that opportunity,” Rodman added.

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D

ays of ’76 celebrations began in 1924, to honor the Deadwood mining camp’s history from its establishment in 1876. Almost a century later, hundreds of riders and thousands of fans will converge on Deadwood and the Days of ’76 Rodeo Grounds July 27-31 to celebrate the 99th annual observance. Five Professional Rodeo Cowboys

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Story and Photos by Jason Gross Association (PRCA) rodeo performances are the featured portion of the slate. PRCA steer roping and two installments of timed event slack also will be held during the event. Two historic parades are slated for Friday afternoon and Saturday morning. Excellence serves as a Days of ‘76 hallmark, as the rodeo has received 19 national awards. They include four PRCA

Small Rodeo of the Year honors from 1998 to 2001, which preceded 14 consecutive Medium Outdoor Rodeo of the Year awards from 2004 to 2017. This rodeo moved into the Large Outdoor Rodeo category in 2018, and received nominations for the top honor in 2018 and 2019. It received top honors in this category in 2020. Ted Thompson is the Days of ’76 com-

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mittee chairman this year. He has aided the committee for 35 years, including serving as the chute boss for the last eight or nine. “It has a huge economic impact for not only Deadwood but also the Northern Hills and the Black Hills,” Thompson said of the celebration. He added many travel from around the nation to take part in the celebration as spectators or contestants. Celebration staples have grown to include pageants, parades, queen contests, community involvement, and the PRCA rodeo. Reenactments, carnivals, chariot races, and mining demonstrations have also been featured. Days of ’76 celebration records prepared by Jessica Michak and Jenna Himsl indicate the first Days of ’76 took place Aug. 15-16, 1924, which included a parade, historic reenactments, horse riding, and racing exhibitions. Deadwood leaders wanted to emphasize the town’s origins, honor its first residents, and increase its importance as a tourist destination. The rodeo was firmly established in 1929. Early celebrations featured horse riding and horse racing exhibitions, with the

Destination Deadwood©

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gradual addition of rodeo-style events. For many years, the Days of ‘76 featured many specialty acts and adjudicated competitions. The rodeo had become the celebration’s premier event by the 1950s. Many strong Days of ’76 memories are part of Thompson’s past.

July 27-31 will mark the 99th annual Days of '76 The rodeo was once held during the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, during August’s first week. “We were broke,” Thompson said of the rodeo. “We just couldn’t sell tickets during that Rally.” Thompson helped produce a bullriding event on the edge of Sturgis during the Rally. He recalled thousands of bikers rode by, with not many stopping. After that, the rodeo was moved to July’s final week to avoid rally conflict.

Thompson said the rodeo has been a great success since then. While the dates represented the biggest change, Thompson recalls other tweaks taking place over the years. “We keep adding money. We keep bringing more people in, making the event bigger and longer,” he said. The Days of ’76 previously lasted for only three days. Now, it spans five. The event was inducted into the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame in 2011 marking a noted milestone. “A lot of it would be hard-working committees from not only now, but from the past,” Thompson said when asked what contributes to the event’s popularity. He added sponsors and the city of Deadwood also play a large role in helping put on the event. The rodeo has its eyes on it's centennial celebration, which is only one year away. “Rodeos and fairs do two things,” Thompson said. “They get bigger and better; that’s what we strive to do. If we don’t do that, pretty soon you’re going backwards.”

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ADAMS MUSEUM

54 Sherman St., Deadwood | (605) 578-1714 www.deadwoodhistory.com

The Adams Museum once served as a cabinet of curiosities but has evolved into the premiere history museum in the Black Hills. Featuring a collection of artwork and artifacts reflecting the natural history and pioneer past of the northern Black Hills., the museum was founded by W.E. Adams in 1930. Step PHOTO COURTESY DEADWOOD HISTORY into the past and discover a rare plesiosaur, the mysterious Thoen Stone, impressive collections of paintings, guns, photos, minerals, and Native American artifacts.

THE BROTHEL DEADWOOD

610 Main St., Deadwood | (605) 559+0231 www.brotheldeadwood.com

Brothels were a fixture on the second story of several Deadwood Main Street buildings from 1876 until 1980. In an effort to best tell this narrative, visitors will be transported through the 104-year time period with a guided tour of the rooms at the original site of the Shasta Rooms, or the Beige Door brothel.

PHOTO COURTESY DEADWOOD HISTORY

OCTOBER – APRIL Wednesday–Saturday 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. M AY – S E P T E M B E R Daily 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

WINTER HOURS (THROUGH APRIL) Tuesday–Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Monday & Sunday. SU M M E R H O U R S (M AY – S E P T E M B E R ) Daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

BLACK HILLS MINING MUSEUM

323 W. Main St., Lead | (605) 584-1605 www.blackhillsminingmuseum.com

Share the thrill experienced by the old time prospectors by panning your own gold! Walk through time with “miner” tour guides in timbered passages of a simulated underground gold mine. View historic mining artifacts and local history exhibits. This museum includes a historic video presentation of mining in the Black Hills, a gift shop with gold panning books and supplies, and more.

BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

WINTE R HOURS By reservation only. Call (605) 722-4875 or (605) 584-1326 SU M M E R (M AY – S E P T E M B E R ) Monday – Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 12 to 4 p.m.

BROKEN BOOT GOLD MINE 1200 Pioneer Way, Deadwood www.deadwoodhistory.com

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(605) 722-4800

In the spring of 1876, the call of gold led a flood of miners, merchants, muleskinners and madams to sweep into Deadwood Gulch. The intriguing story of one of America’s last great gold rushes comes to life at Deadwood’s Broken Boot Gold Mine, established in 1878. The mine sat vacant for 36 years. In 1954, a group of Deadwood businessmen re-opened it as a tourist attraction. Step into the Black Hills' best underground mine tour and return to a time when the powerful punch of a miner’s pick and the roaring boom of dynamite signaled the ongoing search for BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO the richest veins of gold on Earth.

DAYS OF ‘76 MUSEUM

18 Seventy Six Dr., Deadwood www.deadwoodhistory.com

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(605) 578-1657

The Days of ‘76 Museum began informally, as a repository for the horse drawn wagons and stagecoaches, carriages, clothing, memorabilia, and archives generated by the Days of ‘76 Celebration. The newer 32,000-squarePHOTO COURTESY DEADWOOD HISTORY foot museum is home to collections of Western and American Indian artifacts, archives, photos, and artwork. It houses one of the nation’s most significant collections of American Western history. The four important collections are Wagons & Vehicles, Rodeo Collection, Clothing Collection, and Clowser Collection. WINTER HOURS (THROUGH APRIL) Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Monday, Sunday, and winter holidays. SUMMER HOURS (MAY – SEPTEMBER) Daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

DEADWOOD ALIVE SHOWS (800) 344-8826

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www.deadwoodalive.com

Witness the Thrill of a Main Street Shootout! The Deadwood Alive Gunslingers are looking for trouble – and they find it every day with historically accurate reenactments of Deadwood’s past. M A R C H 19 – M AY 15 Free show Fridays and Saturdays from 12:00 to 4:30 p.m. SH O OTOUTS 2 pm & 4 pm Outlaw Square M AY 22 – S E P T E M B E R 21 Free shows daily (except Sunday) on Historic Main Street from noon to 6 p.m. SH O OTOUTS 2 p.m., Outlaw Square 4 p.m., Buffalo Bodega • 6 p.m., Wild Bill Bar

BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

M E M O R I A L DAY W E E K E N D TO L A B O R DAY W E E K E N D 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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GEORGE S. MICKELSON TRAIL

HOMESTAKE ADAMS RESEARCH & CULTURAL CENTER

11361 Nevada Gulch Rd., Lead (605) 584-3896 www.mickelsontrail.com

The 109-mile-long Mickelson Trail follows the historic Deadwood to Edgemont Burlington Northern rail line and contains more than 100 converted railroad bridges and 4 rock tunnels. South Dakota’s first rails to trails project is enjoyed by bicyclists, hikers and horseback riders. Its gentle slopes and easy access allow people of all ages and abilities to enjoy the beauty of the Black Hills. There are 15 trailheads, all of which offer parking, self-sale trail pass stations, vault toilets, and tables.

150 Sherman St., Deadwood www.deadwoodhistory.com

BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

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(605) 722-4800

The Homestake Adams Research and Cultural Center (HARCC) houses, preserves, and provides public access to one of the nation’s largest collection of Black Hills archival materials. Dating from the 1870s to present, these materials provide a better understanding and appreciation of the people, places, and events that shaped the unique history of the Black Hills. The extensive collection includes historic photos, maps, city directories, personal diaries and journals, gold exploration and production reports, and many other historic materials. M O N DAY – FR I DAY 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. or by appointment

HIGH PLAINS WESTERN HERITAGE CENTER

825 Heritage Dr., Spearfish | (605) 642-9378 www.westernheritagecenter.com

The High Plains Western Heritage Center was founded to honor the old west pioneers and Native American of five states. This museum features western art, artifacts and memorabilia. It houses the completely restored “original” Spearfish to Deadwood Stagecoach that was bought in 1890 and last ran in 1913. A 200-seat theatre features many historic proCOURTESY PHOTO grams, entertainment, MO N DAY–SATUR DAY 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and special events. SUN DAY 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

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HISTORIC MATTHEWS OPERA HOUSE & ARTS CENTER

612 Main St., Spearfish | (605) 642-7973 www.matthewsopera.com

In 1906, the new Matthews Opera House was the center for entertainment in the Northern Hills, hosting touring companies and vaudevillians. Time seems to have stood still, for today the ornate woodwork, murals and brightly painted advertising on the art curtain are throw-backs. COURTESY PHOTO Currently, The Matthews consists of a fine arts gallery with 48 regional artists and upstairs, the theatre continues to provide community plays, national performance acts and music concerts. A R T G A LLE RY AU G U S T – M AY Tuesday – Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. J U N E – J U LY Monday – Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

HISTORIC ADAMS HOUSE 22 Van Buren Ave., Deadwood

BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

(605) 578-3724

The Adams House recounts the real tragedies and triumphs of two of the community’s founding families. Following the death of W. E Adams in 1934, his second wife closed the house. For a half-century, time stood still, nothing was moved. Painstakingly restored and preserved by leading experts in historic preservation, the Adams House was reopened to the public in 2000, revealing a time capsule in a place where legends still live. Tour rooms and grounds of this elegant Victorian mansion and learn why it was once Deadwood’s social center. BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

O C TO B E R & A PR I L Tuesday – Saturday 10 a.m. to 4p.m.; closed Monday and Sunday W I N T E R H O U R S Closed November – March Open for specialty tours and group tours SU M M E R H O U R S (M AY – S E P T E M B E R ) Daily 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

HISTORIC HOMESTAKE OPERA HOUSE

313 W. Main St., Lead | (605) 584-2067 www.homestakeoperahouse.org

This incredible building was constructed in 1914, and boasted a theater that sat 1,000 people and also housed a swimming pool, billiard hall, library, bowling alley, smoking room, and social hall. It was built by Homestake Mining Company superintendent Thomas Grier, and Phoebe Apperson Hearst, widow of George Hearst, the owner of Homestake Mining Company. COURTESY PHOTO In 1984, the theater was nearly destroyed by fire — and it sat empty for 11 years. In 1998, work on restoration and structural improvements began, and in 2008, the first community theatre production in 25 years was celebrated by the Gold Camp Players. TO U R S AVA I L A B LE Monday – Friday 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday by appointment

SEE MORE ATTRACTIONS ON NEXT PAGE Destination Deadwood

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MT. MORIAH CEMETERY 2 Mt. Moriah Rd., Deadwood

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(605) 578-2600

Mt. Moriah Cemetery was established in 1878, because of the increasing demands at Ingleside Cemetery which was down the hill. Mt. Moriah has numerous sections: Chinese; Jewish; Masonic; Civil War and Indian War veterans; and Potters’ Fields, final resting places for early day indigents and prostitutes. Some of the well-known residents of Mt. Moriah are: James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok (1876); John “Potato Creek Johnny” Perrett (1943); Martha “Calamity Jane” Canary (1903); Henry Weston “Preacher Smith” Smith (1876); Seth Bullock (1919); and W.E. Adams (1934) . PHOTO COURTESY SD TOURISM

Mt. Moriah is first and foremost a cemetery and should be afforded the respect any final resting place deserves.

W I N T E R H O U R S Open with limited maintenance MEMORIAL DAY TO MID - OCTOBER HOURS Daily 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

STAGECOACH RIDES 621 Main St., Deadwood

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(605) 580-1900

One of the most recognizable and historic Old West icons in existence is the famous Deadwood Stagecoach. Deadwood Alive continues the legacy and romanticism of the Deadwood Stagecoach still notorious throughout the globe today. You can experience the same mode of transportation used during the Black Hills Gold Rush which brought men and women of all types and characters into the gulch while traveling up and down Historic Main Street. Riders need not fear being filled with buckshot but we encourage you to stay aware of desperadoes and bandits who may search the coach for gold and treasures. THE STAGECOACH OPER ATES DAILY DURING PEAK SEASON AND ON WEEKENDS DURING THE SPRING AND FALL SEASONS. Stagecoach boards next to the Celebrity Hotel at The Lucky Horse Stage Stop every half hour starting at 12:00PM with the last ride at 4:30PM on Historic Main Street. (Weather permitting).

MT. ROOSEVELT MEMORIAL

2.5 miles from Deadwood on US Hwy 85

PHOTO COURTESY SD TOURISM

Mt. Roosevelt is home to the “Friendship Tower” monument, created by Seth Bullock in memory of the friendship he had with President Theodore Roosevelt. After a short hike up to the tower, visitors are able to take in the sights of the beautiful Black Hills. To get to Mt. Roosevelt from Deadwood, take US Hwy 85 north for 1.5 miles, then turn west on FSR 133. There are five picnic sites and a bathroom located in the picnic area. The hike to the Friendship Tower and overlook is less than one mile from the trail head, but moderately uphill.

OUTLAW SQUARE

703 Main St., Deadwood | www.outlawsquare.com Outlaw Square is a public gathering place where families can come and enjoy fun events that take place throughout the year – From family fun days to ice skating, music events, history presentations, book readings and more! Outlaw Square is a place for you to enjoy some outdoor family time in the heart of Deadwood. Open daily. Ice skating begins November 21.

TATANKA: STORY OF THE BISON (605) 584-5678 | www.storyofthebison.com

Kevin Costner, attraction founder/owner, invites you to visit Tatanka. 60 million Bison once roamed the Great Plains of North America. By the end of the 19th century, it was estimated that less than 1,000 bison survived. This is their story. COURTESY PHOTO While at Tatanka, you’ll enjoy larger than life bronze sculptures featuring 14 bison pursued by three Native Americans riders; the Northern Plains Peoples Educational Interpretive Center; Native American gift shop; Sweetgrass Grill and Snack Bar; and Dances with Wolves movie costumes. M AY 17 – O C TO B E R 31 Monday – Saturday 9 a.m to 4 p.m. N OV E M B E R 1 – M AY 5 Friday – Sunday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Weather permitting. Closed holidays.

TRIAL OF JACK MCCALL BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

Tickets: (800) 344-8826

SANFORD LAB HOMESTAKE VISITOR CENTER 160 W. Main St., Lead | (605) 584-3110 www.sanfordlabhomestake.com

The exhibit hall has exciting information about Sanford Underground Research Facility and the history of Homestake. Exhibits include photographs, videos, science and mine artifacts, and a 3D model of the underground- from the surface down to the 8,000 ft. level! From the deck, view the 1,000-foot-deep Open Cut. Tours include a trip through historic Lead and a surface tour of Sanford Lab. In the Yates room, you’ll see hoists that have been in operation since 1939. You’ll learn a little bit about the mining process and the state-of-the-art Waste Water Treatment Plant designed by Homestake. 9 A . M . TO 5 P. M . DA I LY Tours available. BLACK HILLS PIONEER FILE PHOTO

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PHOTO COURTESY SD TOURISM

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www.deadwoodalive.com

The Trial of Jack McCall has been performed in Deadwood since the mid-1920s, making it one of nation’s longest running plays. The play is based on the actual trial which took place in the mining camp of Deadwood after Jack McCall murdered James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok. This is a family-friendly show where the selected members of the audience participate in the performance serving as jurors in the trial.

M AY 22 – S E P T E M B E R 21 Monday – Saturday 7:35 P. M . Shooting of Wild Bill and the Capture of Jack McCall, Main Street in front of Old Style Saloon #10 8 P. M . Trial held at Historic Masonic Temple Theatre, 715 Main St.

Attraction hours and schedules are subject to change. Please confirm information with the venue. Destination Deadwood©

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Spring • Summer 2021


DEADWOOD

CROSSWORD

ACROSS

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1. In 1980, Deadwood's last remaining ____ was shut down after a federal raid. 7. An archaeological dig at Tin Lizzie unearthed artifacts from Deadwood's ____ district. 8. Deadwood Historic Preservation is enhancing ways to promote Deadwood as a "____ city."

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9. Gov. Bulow gave a ____ to Poker Alice in 1928, as he was reluctant to send a "white haired old lady to prison."

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2. The Days of '76 Rodeo has received ____ national awards. 3. Founded in 2003, ____ is a safe haven for horses and other animals. 4. This year's ____ ____ will be held for free in Outlaw Square. (2 words) 5. ____ Square offers skating in the winter, and concerts in the summer.

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6. The Black Hills ____ was the first business West River Dakota

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Territory, and is still in operations today. 7. Approximately $100 million is spent annually in Deadwood's ____.

GAMING CASINO PRESERVATION DEADWOOD TOURISM BLACK HILLS HISTORY TRAILS Destination Deadwood©

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Spring • Summer 2021

SPORTS BET REVITALIZE RESCUE BROTHEL ARCHAEOLOGY DOWNTOWN EVENTS OUTLAW 39


Seth Bullock

James Butler Hickok

“Wild Bill”

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1837 – 1876

side from images of the Black Hills gold rush and the Sioux Indian wars, Deadwood is famed in the public’s mind as the place where “Wild Bill” Hickok was murdered while playing poker in Saloon No. 10. Hickok joined a flood of miners, shopkeepers, prostitutes, card players, bunco artists, and outlaws invading the raw and just-formed town of Deadwood in June of 1876. His intent was to separate prospectors and miners from their gold – not at the point of a gun, but at the poker tables with a winning hand and two pistols at hand for any sore losers in the bunch. Hickok was a newlywed with a wife to support. His bride, the former Mrs. Agnes Thatcher, was waiting for him back in Cheyenne. Hickok had a couple of habits that served him well in the rowdy bars of the West. He’d pour his drinks with is left hand, leaving his best gun hand at the ready. When gambling he wanted to sit with his back to a wall. On August 2, 1876, during a card game in the No. 10 Saloon, Hickok walked in and noticed a poker game was in progress, but the only empty seat at the table faced away from the saloon’s doorway. Hickok failed to persuade others at the table to trade seats with him, then decided to take the open seat. Hickok never saw a loafer named Jack McCall walk up within three feet, pull a .45 out of his coat, and pull the trigger. Hickok spilled his hand – pairs of black aces and eights – known forevermore as “Deadman’s Hand.” Quickly apprehended, McCall said he’d killed Hickok because “Wild Bill” had killed his brother. A miners’ court figured that was an acceptable defense and let him go. McCall bragged one too many times that he’d killed Hickok and was arrested, tried in Yankton and hung on March 1, 1877.

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1849 – 1919

eth Bullock is a notable Westerner, not only here in the Black Hills, but in Montana and

Wyoming as well. Before coming to Deadwood, Bullock was a member of the 1871 Territorial Senate of Montana, during which he introduced a resolution calling upon the U.S. Congress to set aside Yellowstone as the nation’s first national park. The measure was approved and Yellowstone National Park was created in 1872. Bullock entered into partnership with Sol Star in the hardware business in Helena, Mont. And the two ventured to Deadwood in 1876 and opened a highly successful hardware store in the booming gold camp. The hardware store was remodeled and turned in to the historic Bullock Hotel, with luxury accommodations for those days. The murder of Wild Bill Hickok sparked a loud demand for law and order and Bullock was quickly tapped to serve as the town’s first sheriff. Bullock was soon appointed as one of the first U.S. Marshal of the Dakota Territory. He ranched on the Belle Fourche River and was the first in the territory to plant alfalfa. His leadership led to building a federal fish hatchery for the Black Hills, in Spearfish. Bullock founded the town of Belle Fourche. A lifelong friend of Theodore Roosevelt from the 1890’s Bullock was appointed by “Teddy” as the first Forest Supervisor of the Black Hills Forest Reserve, predecessor of today’s Black Hills National Forest. Roosevelt’s death in 1919 shattered Bullock. Despite his own frail condition, Bullock quickly built the Roosevelt Monument on Mt. Roosevelt across the Gulch from Mt. Moriah. Months later Bullock died of cancer at the age of 70 and was buried, at his request, on the hill-side above Mt. Moriah.

Destination Deadwood©

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Spring • Summer 2021


Martha Jane Canary

Charles H. Utter

“Calamity Jane”

“Charlie”

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1838 – 1912 (est.)

olorado” Charlie Utter is known locally as a good friend to “Wild Bill” Hickok. Indeed, Utter saw to it that his good “pard” was properly buried. A notice was posted around town, alerting citizens that funeral services would be held “at Charlie Utter’s camp on Thursday afternoon, August 3, l876, at three o’clock p.m. All are respectfully invited to attend.” Utter even wrote Hickok’s epitaph for a grave marker. It seemed like the least he could do, seeing as how Utter brought Hickok to the Black Hills. Utter organized a wagon train in Georgetown, Colorado, which swung through Cheyenne, Wyoming, on the way to the gold strike. That’s where Hickok joined the wagon train. A Colorado newspaper described Utter as a “courageous little man” wearing fringed leggings and coat, and sporting gold and silver decorated revolvers. After Hickok’s murder, Utter reportedly turned his entrepreneurial spirit to letter and freight delivery, mining and gambling. The Lead newspaper “Black Hills Times,” on June 24, 1879 reported: “Charlie Utter, nuisance, keeping a dance house. To Mr. Utter the Court delivered a very severe lecture, condemning all such practices in unmeasured terms. But in consideration that Mr. Utter had closed the place (Judge Moody) sentenced him to one hour’s confinement and a fifty dollar fine and costs.” Utter departed Deadwood after a fire swept through and destroyed much of the town on September 26, 1879. He was later rumored to be practicing medicine in Panama.

Johnny Perrett

“Potato Creek Johnny”

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1866 – 1943

otato Creek Johnny” or Johnny Perrett, was one of the Old West’s most respected and peaceable men. Full grown, the Welshman stood an impish 4 foot, 3 inches. He searched the West for adventure and dabbled in many pursuits before settling down to prospecting. Potato Creek Johnny staked his claim in Deadwood’s Potato Creek. That’s where he stayed until his death in 1943. Johnny found what is believed to be the largest gold nugget prospected in the Black Hills. The nugget weighed 7.75 ounces. He sold the nugget to W.E. Adams, and a replica is on display at Deadwood’s Adams Museum – the real nugget safely tucked away in storage. Johnny became a local and national hero, loved for his warm personality and magical way with children. He was a favorite of all those who visited his diggings or met him on the streets of Deadwood. After dying at the age of 77 after a short illness, his body was buried at Mt. Moriah Cemetery, near Wild Bill and Calamity Jane. When his funeral procession rolled past the Adams Museum, the carillon chimes tolled 77 times.

© ©| | DestinationDeadwood Deadwood Spring• Summer • Summer2021 2021 Destination Spring

1852 – 1903

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alamity Jane was born Martha Jane Canary near Princeton, Missouri, in 1852. She was married a number of times and had a daughter about whom little is known. Noted for dressing, most of the time, in men’s clothing and for wild behavior, she was also known by the early miners and settlers for her kind and generous nature. She was the lady bullwhacker whose language was so strong that brave men feared it more than her gun – which nearly always hit its mark. Calamity Jane came to Deadwood during the spring of 1876. The gulch region became her permanent home for the rest of her life, although she ventured elsewhere many times. She whooped it up with the prospectors and the gamblers on nearly a nightly basis in the saloons and gambling halls. She always got what she wanted, a sack of groceries for a sick miner or a ticket home for a wayward saloon girl … all at the point of a gun. Calamity Jane was said to be in love with Wild Bill Hickok. Maybe she was, but the romance was apparently one-sided. Wild Bill never strayed and never forgot the lovely Agnes, his bride of only a few weeks whom he had left in Cheyenne before traveling to Deadwood to seek his fortune in the gold rush. When smallpox broke out in the Deadwood gold mine camp, she devoted herself to caring for the sick men. Many a pock-marked old man of the Black Hills in later years called her “an angel”. Every person who knew her told a different story about her. She was good and kind, she took care of the less fortunate, she was drunk and disorderly, she was a renegade, but none ever said she stole or committed a serious crime. The end came for Calamity Jane in a boarding house in Terry, an upper Hills mining camp. A combination of pneumonia and alcoholism carried her off on August 1, 1903. Her funeral was the largest ever held in Deadwood. One writer declared that “10,000 persons with not one mourner among them” attended the funeral. She was buried at Mt. Moriah Cemetery, as was her request, beside Wild Bill, forever close to him in death but never in life.

A Weekend Away

MILES TO DEADWOOD

Belle Fourche, SD...........................28 Cody, WY........................................421 Crazy Horse Mountain.................57 Custer State Park...........................65 Denver, CO.....................................395 Devils Tower, WY...........................90 Edgemont, SD................................112 Harney Peak....................................60 Hill City, SD......................................45 Hot Springs, SD..............................95 Keystone, SD....................................55 Mt. Coolidge....................................76 Mt. Rushmore.................................60 Newcastle, WY................................68

Orman Dam.....................................30 Pierre, SD.......................................220 Rapid City, SD.................................42 Rapid City Regional Airport...............................................52 Sheridan, WY................................211 Sioux Falls, SD..............................395 Spearfish, SD...................................15 Spearfish Canyon..........................16 Ivan Lake..........................................62 Wall Drug..........................................96 West Gate Yellowstone..............557 Wind Cave........................................83 Terry Peak Ski Resorts..................8

Please note mileage is estimated

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Destination Deadwood©

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Spring • Summer 2021


CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWERS ACROSS: 3. Sanford; 7. Snowmobile; 8. Statues;

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LARGE GROUP SP.

INTERNET ACCESS

GUEST LAUNDRY

EXERCISE ROOM

PETS ALLOWED

KITCHENETTE

HANDICAP ACC.

HOT TUB

POOL

BLACK HILLS INN & SUITES 206 Mountain Shadow Lane South | 605-578-7791 THE BRANCH HOUSE 37 Sherman Street | 605-559-1400 BUTCH CASSIDY & SUNDANCE KID LUXURY SUITES 57 Sherman Street | 605-343-8126 CADILLAC JACKS HOTEL & SUITES 360 Main Street | 605-578-1500 CEDAR WOOD INN 103 Charles Street | 605-578-2725 CELEBRITY HOTEL 629 Main Street | 605-578-1685 CHEYENNE CROSSING 21415 US Hwy. 14A, Lead | 605-584-3510 COMFORT INN & SUITES 225 Cliff Street | 605-578-7550 DEADWOOD DICK’S HOTEL & SUITES 51 Sherman Street | 605-578-3224 DEADWOOD GULCH GAMING RESORT 304 Cliff Street/Hwy 85 | 605-578-1294 | 1-800-695-1876 DEADWOOD KOA CAMPGROUND 11484 US Hwy. 14A | 800-562-0846 | 605-578-3830 DEADWOOD MOUNTAIN GRAND-A HOLIDAY INN RESORT 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 DEADWOOD STATION BUNKHOUSE & GAMBLING HALL 68 Main Street | 605-578-3476 FIRST GOLD GAMING RESORT 270 Main Street | 605-578-9777 | 800-274-1876 GOLD COUNTRY INN 801 Main Street | 605-578-2393 HAMPTON INN AT TIN LIZZIE GAMING RESOR T 531 Main Street | 605-578-1893 HICKOK’S HOTEL & CASINO 685 Main Street | 605-578-2222 HISTORIC BULLOCK HOTEL 633 Main Street | 605-578-1745 HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS HOTEL & SUITES 22 Lee Street | 605-578-3330 THE HOTEL BY GOLD DUST 25 Lee Street | 605-559-1400 IRON HORSE INN DEADWOOD 27 Deadwood Street | 605-717-7530 THE LODGE AT DEADWOOD GAMING RESORT 100 Pine Crest Lane | 605-584-4800 MARTIN MASON HOTEL 33 Deadwood Street | 605-722-3456 MINERAL PALACE HOTEL & GAMING COMPLEX 601 Main Street | 605-578-2036 SILVERADO FRANKLIN HISTORIC HOTEL & GAMING COMPLEX 709 Main Street | 605-578-3670 SPEARFISH CANYON LODGE 10619 Roughlock Falls Road, Lead | 605-584-3435 | 877-975-6343 SPRINGHILL SUITES BY MARRIOTT AT CADILLAC JACKS 322 Main Street | 605-559-1600 SUPER 8 DEADWOOD 196 Cliff Street | 605-578-2535 THUNDER COVE INN 311 Cliff Street | 605-578-3045 TRAILSHEAD LODGE CABINS 22075 US Hwy. 85, Lead | 605-584-3464 TRAVELODGE INN & SUITES AT FIRST GOLD 250 Main Street | 605-717-7181 TRU BY HILTON AT CADILLAC JACKS 372 Main Street | 605-571-1001 WHISTLER GULCH CAMPGROUND 235 Cliff Street | 800-704-7139 | 605-578-2092

BREAKFAST

Your Deadwood experience starts here

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9. Brothel; 10. Neutrinos DOWN: 1. Wooden; 2. Snowshoeing; 5. Pioneer; 6. Beige; 8. Steel

© Destination Spring • Summer Deadwood 2021

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Spring Destination • Summer Deadwood 2021©

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BUFFALO BODEGA SALOON & STEAKHOUSE 658 Main Street | 605-578-1300 BULLY’S RESTAURANT BULLOCK HOTEL | 633 Main Street | 605-578-1745 | 800-336-1876 CHIP SHOT GOLF & BBQ 306 Cliff Street | 605-321-2613 FIRESIDE FOOD & LOUNGE AT DEADWOOD GULCH GAMING RESORT 304 Cliff Street/Hwy 85 | 605-578-1294 | 1-800-695-1876 DEADWOOD GRILLE LODGE AT DEADWOOD, 100 Pine Crest Lane | 605-571-2120 | 877-393-5634 DEADWOOD SOCIAL CLUB OLD STYLE SALOON NO. 10 | 657 Main Street | 605-578-1533 DEADWOOD STATION 68 Main Street | 605-578-3476 DIAMOND LIL'S MIDNIGHT STAR | 677 Main Street | 605-578-3550 EAGLE BAR & STEAKHOUSE 608 Main Street | 605-578-1394 EARL OF SANDWICH CADILLAC JACKS | 372 Main Street | 605-571-1261 FLYT STEAKHOUSE AND NIGHTCLUB CADILLAC JACKS | 372 Main Street | 605-571-1263 GEM STEAKHOUSE & SALOON MINERAL PALACE | 601 Main Street | 605-578-2036 | 800-847-2522 GOLD COUNTRY INN GAMBLING HALL & CAFE 801 Main Street | 605-578-2393 | 800-287-1251 GUADALAJARA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT CADILLAC JACKS | 372 Main Street | 605-571-1234 HORSESHOE RESTAURANT FIRST GOLD | 270 Main Street | 605-578-9777 | 800-274-1876 HICKOK’S PIZZA 685 Main Street | 605-717-6830 HIS & HERS ALE HOUSE & WINE BAR 696 Main Street | 605-717-2455 JACOBS BREWHOUSE & GROCER 79 Sherman Street | 605-559-1895 LATCHSTRING INN SPEARFISH CANYON LODGE | 10619 Roughlock Falls Road, Lead | 605-584-3435 | 877-975-6343 LEE STREET STATION CAFÉ 3 Lee Street | 605-578-1952 LEGENDS STEAKHOUSE SILVERADO-FRANKLIN HOTEL | 709 Main Street | 605-578-3670 | 800-584-7005 MADE MARKET CADILLAC JACKS | 372 Main Street | 605-571-1262 MAIN STREET ESPRESSO/BIG DIPPER 652 Main Street | 605-717-3354 MARCO’S PIZZA CADILLAC JACKS | 372 Main Street | 605-571-1260 MAVERICK’S STEAKHOUSE & COCKTAILS GOLD DUST | 688 Main Street | 605-578-2100 | 800-456-0533 THE MINER DINER 137 Charles Street | 605-578-1611 MUSTANG SALLY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL 634 Main Street | 605-578-2025 THE NUGGET SALOON 604 Main Street | 605-578-1422 OGGIE’S SPORTS BAR LODGE AT DEADWOOD | 100 Pine Crest Lane | 605-571-2120 | 877-393-5634 OYSTER BAY RESTAURANT 626 Main Street | 605-578-2205 PADDY O’NEILS IRISH PUB & GRILL TIN LIZZIE | 555 Main Street | 605-578-1715 PIZZA FACTORY 645 Main St., Deadwood | 605-645-6419 SANTANA’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL DEADWOOD MOUNTAIN GRAND | 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 | 877-907-4726 SILVERADO FRANKLIN: GRAND BUFFET 709 Main Street | 605-578-3670 | 800-584-7005 SIX STRING, CASUAL DINING DEADWOOD MOUNTAIN GRAND | 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 | 877-907-4726 SNITCHES TIN LIZZIE | 555 Main Street | 605-571-2255 THE SPOTLIGHT DEADWOOD MOUNTAIN GRAND | 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 | 877-907-4726 STAGE STOP CAFE CHEYENNE CROSSING | 21415 US Hwy 14A, Lead | 605-584-3510 STARBUCKS TIN LIZZIE | 555 Main Street | 605-653-2920 SUPER 8 PIZZERIA 196 Cliff Street | 605-578-2535 TACO JOHNS 86 Charles Street | 605-578-3975 THREE COUSINS PIZZA IRON HORSE INN | 27 Deadwood Street | 605-717-2581 TRAILSHEAD LODGE 22075 US Hwy. 85, Lead | 605-584-3464

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Destination Deadwood©

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GROUPS

FULL BAR

WINE/BEER ONLY

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DINNER

LUNCH

BREAKFAST

Whether you’re in the mood for something quick or a culinary experience, Deadwood aims to satisfy!

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Destination Deadwood©

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777 CASINO AT HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 665 Main Street | 605-578-3330 BUFFALO BODEGA GAMING COMPLEX 662 Main Street | 605-578-1300 CADILLAC JACK’S GAMING RESORT 360 Main Street | 605-578-1500 CELEBRITY HOTEL & CASINO 629 Main Street | 605-578-1685 DEADWOOD GULCH GAMING RESORT 304 Cliff Street/Hwy 85 | 605-578-1294 | 1-800-695-1876 DEADWOOD MOUNTAIN GRAND CASINO 1906 Deadwood Mountain Drive | 605-559-0386 | 877-907-4726 DEADWOOD STATION BUNKHOUSE & GAMBLING HALL 68 Main Street | 605-578-3476 | 855-366-6405 DEADWOOD SUPER 8 - LUCKY 8 GAMING 196 Cliff Street | 605-578-2535 FIRST GOLD GAMING RESORT 270 Main Street | 605-578-9777 | 800-274-1876 GOLD COUNTRY INN GAMBLING HALL & CAFE 801 Main Street | 605-578-2393 | 800-287-1251 GOLD DUST CASINO 688 Main Street | 605-578-2100 HICKOK’S HOTEL & CASINO 685 Main Street | 605-578-2222 HISTORIC BULLOCK HOTEL CASINO 633 Main Street | 605-578-1745 HISTORIC FRANKLIN HOTEL GAMING 709 Main Street | 605-578-3670 HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 22 Lee Street | 605-578-3330 IRON HORSE INN CASINO 27 Deadwood Street | 605-717-7530 THE LODGE AT DEADWOOD GAMING RESORT 100 Pine Crest Lane | 605-584-4800 | 877-393-5634 MIDNIGHT STAR 677 Main Street | 605-578-1555 MINERAL PALACE HOTEL & GAMING COMPLEX 601 Main Street | 605-578-2036 | 800-847-2522 MUSTANG SALLY’S CASINO 634 Main Street | 605-578-2025 SALOON NO. 10 CASINO 657 Main Street | 605-578-3346 | 800-952-9398 SILVERADO FRANKLIN HISTORIC HOTEL & GAMING COMPLEX 709 Main Street | 605-578-3670 | 800-584-7005 TIN LIZZIE GAMING RESORT 555 Main Street | 605-578-1715 | 800-643-4490 VFW POST 5969 GAMBLING 10 Pine Street | 605-722-9914 WOODEN NICKEL CASINO 9 Lee Street | 605-578-1952

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TROLLEY SCHEDULE

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ROULETTE/KENO CRAPS (R/K/C)

24 HOUR

POKER

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$1,000 BET LIMIT

BLACK JACK

SLOTS

Try your hand at Deadwood’s card tables and slot machines

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RKC

OPENING SOON

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RC

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RC

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RC RKC

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September - May

Sun. – Thurs. 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. | Fri. – Sat. 8 a.m. – 2 a.m.

Memorial Day - Labor Day

Sun. – Thurs. 8 a.m. – Midnight | Fri. – Sat. 8 a.m. – 2 a.m. Trolleys run at regular intervals between all hotels, motels and other key points throughout Deadwood. Cost is $1.00 per ride. Hours are subject to change. The hourly trolley schedule is posted on the back of the Main Street Trolley stop signs.

For more information, contact:

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City of Deadwood Trolley Dept. | 605-578-2622 Destination Deadwood©

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Spring • Summer 2021


DMG #2 FULL

Destination Deadwood©

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Spring • Summer 2021

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Destination Deadwood©

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Spring • Summer 2021

Profile for Black Hills Pioneer

Destination Deadwood Summer 2021  

Destination Deadwood Summer 2021  

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