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THE BG NEWS

OPEN LATE ESTABLISHED 1920 A daily independent student press serving the campus and surrounding community www.bgviews.com

Thursday, February 11, 2010

Volume 104, Issue 99

Hospital visit for underage drinking can lead to citation Denise Schlea, a charge nurse in the Wood County Hospital emergency department, said After a night of drinking, under- there are two ways individuage students may wake up with als wind up in the emergency more than just a hangover — room for over-intoxication. they might have the paperwork Patients are either brought in to prove they partied a little by ambulance because they’ve been found unresponsive, or by too hard. Whether an individual ends a friend because they can’t stop up with legal troubles for an vomiting or stay awake, she said. Although the hospital is not underage depends on how they concerned with a patient’s legal get to the hospital. By Hannah Nusser Reporter

matters, Schlea said, they must know their age because of privacy issues; if the patient is a minor, parents must be notified. Schlea said most people who are brought to the ER for being overly intoxicated are collegeage students on the weekends. “Very few of the people that Lt. Tony Hetrick | Bowling Green Police Division come into our department for excessive drinking are over the Saturday evenings we see a underage patients any differage of 21,” she said. “Usually higher incidence of it.” ently than of-age patients, and from Thursday through Schlea said they don’t treat if the individual has not already

“If they’re a complete jerk and they’re still disorderly ... that opens up another can of worms for them, because we’re not going to allow the disorderly conduct to continue.”

YEARS

o

DENTS COMMUTED AND BROUGHT THEIR LUNCHES FROM HOME. STUDENTS WHOSE PARENTS DID NOT LIVE IN THE AREA STAYED IN PRIVATE HOMES; MANY DID THEIR OWN COOKING AND ATE IN LOCAL RESTAURANTS, WHICH WAS QUITE INEXPENSIVE.

1916: ALL MEN LIVED OFF CAMPUS, AND ROOM AND BOARD FOR GIRLS TOTALED $4.25 A WEEK ($3 A WEEK). MEN ACTUALLY LIVED CHEAPER THAN THE WOMEN, BECAUSE THEY BROUGHT THEIR OWN FOOD FROM HOME AND DID THEIR OWN COOKING. FOOD COST FOR MEN WAS LOW, AS MOST OF THEIR PARENTS WERE FARMERS.

1918-19: BOARD IN WILLIAMS HALL WAS RAISED TO $3.50 A WEEK, MOSTLY BECAUSE THE WOMEN LAUNCHED COMPLAINTS ABOUT THE QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF THE DORM FOOD. “THE GIRLS SAID THEY WOULD RATHER PAY MORE AND RECEIVE BETTER MEALS. IN FACT THEY SAID THE COST WOULD BE LESS, SINCE THEY WOULD NOT HAVE TO BUY SO MANY SANDWICHES AND OTHER SNACKS.” EARLY 1930: MEN CONTINUED TO LIVE OFF CAMPUS AND CHEAPER THAN MOST OF THE WOMEN BECAUSE THEY BROUGHT FOOD FROM HOME. MILK WAS USUALLY THE ONLY ITEM THEY BOUGHT ON CAMPUS, BUT EVEN IN WINTER THEY BROUGHT FOOD FROM HOME. 1942-43: A STUDENT UNION, DUBBED FALCON’S NEST, OPENED, ADDING A $1 FEE PER SEMESTER. THERE WERE NOW MEN’S DORMS; BOARD WAS STILL $3.50 A WEEK FOR WOMEN, $4 A WEEK FOR MEN.

For more than 100 years, the University has fed students and made changes to meet their needs

LATE 1940S: BUILDINGS WERE MOVED ONTO CAMPUS.

LATE 1960S: MEALS WERE SERVED DURING A TWO-

HOUR WINDOW, THREE TIMES A DAY. IF STUDENTS MISSED A MEAL THEY HAD TO PAY CASH AT ONE OF THE TWO SNACK BARS LOCATED IN COMMONS AND IN HARSHMAN. MALEY SAID PRICES WERE REASONABLE; CHEESEBURGERS WERE 35 CENTS. STUDENTS COULD NOT GO FOR SECONDS OF AN ENTREE, BUT COULD HAVE TWO SALADS OR TWO SIDES. “A TYPICAL SALAD WAS EITHER CANNED FRUIT OR … A JELL-O SQUARE ON A LETTUCE LEAF, WHICH WAS ALWAYS A JOKE,” MALEY SAID. “THAT COULD’VE BEEN A LOGO FOR DINING SERVICES: ‘JELL-O SQUARE ON LETTUCE.’” “I HAD NO COMPLAINTS BELIEVE IT OR NOT, AND BACK THEN IT WASN’T IN THE CULTURE … I NEVER WENT HUNGRY,” MALEY SAID. “THEY WERE MORE HOMESTYLE, YOU KNOW, THERE WAS MAYBE THE MYSTERY MEATLOAF IF YOU WILL, SALISBURY STEAK, BAKED SPAGHETTI, VERY BASIC,” HE SAID.

1971: DINING SERVICES SWITCHED TO AN “A LA CARTE” SYSTEM; STUDENTS USED COUPON BOOKS TO PURCHASE A WIDER VARIETY OR INDIVIDUALIZED ITEMS, LIKE SANDWICHES. LATE 1970S: TOWERS INN RESTAURANT OPENED IN

MCDONALD AND WAS ACTIVE UNTIL THE LATE 1990S. ALSO, THE STRAWBERRY PATCH, A PANCAKE HOUSE IN HARSHMAN, OPENED AND BECAME VERY POPULAR; IT LATER CHANGED TO BERRIES IN THE ‘80S.

1980S: COMMONS DINING CENTER WAS ‘THE TRUCKSTOP.’ IT WAS ESTABLISHED BECAUSE PRIMARILY MEN ATE THERE, AND THEY WANTED HEARTY, LARGER-PORTION MEALS. “THE BIG ‘CB TEN-FOUR GOOD BUDDY’ ERA [WAS] GOING ON,” JOSEPH SAID. “THAT WAS A BIG HIT.”

1947: A WOODEN MESS HALL WAS TRANSPORTED FROM

By Hannah Nusser Reporter

F

See UNDERAGE | Page 2

WAS MEANT TO REPLACE THE OLD WOODEN COMMONS.

1914: DURING THE FIRST YEAR OF CLASSES, MOST STU-

0 0 1 f dining

been cited by police, hospital staff cannot report them due to privacy laws. Paul Cowdrey, firefighter for the Bowling Green Fire Department, said when someone places a 911 call, it goes to the police dispatcher, who determines the type of call and who should arrive on the scene.

rom bring-your-own brownbag lunches to mystery meat and Jell-O squares to the smorgasbord available today, University dining services have evolved during the past 100 years to keep up with students’ changing tastes. In the early years, University students commuted to campus,

CAMP PERRY TO SERVE AS A TEMPORARY DINING HALL; PRESIDENT PROUT RE-CHRISTENED THE HALL COMMONS.

according to Robert Overman’s book “The History of Bowling Green State University.” Food cost was very little for most students, as they did their own cooking and brought food from home. As campus began to expand in the 1940s, wooden buildings were

1950-51: CAMPUS WAS RAPIDLY EXPANDING, AND TEM-

ALSO, TODAY’S OUTTAKES AREA WAS AN EMPTY DINING SPACE STUDENTS COULD RESERVE FOR “BEER BLASTS,” JOSEPH SAID. “THEY WOULD RENT THAT SPACE OUT AND THAT WAS A SPACE ON CAMPUS THAT FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES COULD HAVE ALCOHOL,” JOSEPH SAID. “IT WAS ALWAYS A MESS TO CLEAN UP AFTER ... IT REEKED OF BEER, BUT YES, BACK IN THE ‘80’S THAT WAS A PARTY LOCATION.”

EARLY 1960S: ROOM AND BOARD INCREASED AGAIN, DUE TO AN INCREASE IN FOOD AND SERVICES COST AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEW DORMITORIES.

1980S: MCDONALD DINING HALL HOUSED GARDEN TERRACE DELI AND SODA SHOPPE, WHERE STUDENTS COULD GET AN ICE CREAM SUNDAE FOR LESS THAN $2 AND A CREATEYOUR-OWN SANDWICH OR “BAGELWICH” FOR LESS THAN $2.50.

1964: THE HARSHMAN QUADRANGLE WAS COMPLETED, WITH A CENTRAL KITCHEN, DINING ROOMS AND SNACK BAR. IT

See TIMELINE| Page 2

PORARY HOUSING FOR STUDENTS WAS OVERCROWDED. BOARD WENT FROM $81 TO $126 THAT YEAR, AND WENT UP AGAIN THE FOLLOWING YEAR TO $144.

See DINING | Page 2

Former coach tends to University athletic memorabilia By Matt Nye Reporter

home basketball game. Cochrane came to the A signed Orel Hershiser base- University in 1964 when the ball jersey, the first ever Freddie athletic director at the time, Falcon mascot outfit and the Sam Cooper, hired him to start first ever Falcon emblem can soccer and lacrosse programs. only be found in one place, the Before coming to the University University’s archives. For thirty Cochrane was at Johns Hopkins years, Mickey Cochrane has University for 11 years, and he stored old artifacts from every had also coached teams for the sporting season since the early Army in the 1950s. “I came here to teach and coach. 1900s, to create a room full of At that time all coaches were memorabilia. JEFF FLEISCHMANA | THE BG NEWS The archive room is located at FALCON FANATIC: Mickey Cochrane has worked at the University since 1964 and in the See ARCHIVES | Page 2 the west end of Anderson Arena archive department for 25 years. and is open an hour before every

FORUM Black History Month is global

SPORTS Women’s basketball falls at CMU

Columnist Hama Bbela argues that while Black History Month is celebrated in the United States, its effects are farreaching throughout the world | Page 4

The women’s basketball team suffered their second conference loss of the season as Central Michigan pulled off the 67-65 upset win in Mt. Pleasant. SPORTS | Page 6

Program gives experience to those in need of employment By Christie Kerner Reporter

“When hiring older people, you know they will have a strong work ethic ... ”

A national, community-based organization provides training for older adults in the Wood County area to help participants get back into the work Jan Agler | Coordinator force with Experience Works. The program serves more than 50,000 people each year, with job training that we expect has more than 300 employees to lead to employment,” state and operates in 30 states. See EXPERIENCE | Page2 “We train people who are 55 and older and provide them

PEOPLE ON THE STREET Falcons take down Huskies Scott Thomas scored a game-high 26 points, leading the Falcons to a 71-69 win over Northern Illinois last night. SPORTS | Page 6

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Instead of snow, what do you wish the ground was covered with? TARA MIDDLESTEAD Junior, Event Planning

“Jamba Juice.” | Page 4

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FROM THE FRONT PAGE

2 Thursday, February 11, 2010

TUES., FEB. 9 11:22 A.M.

Jodee Figueroa, 33, of Findlay, was arrested for an active warrant and charged with obstructing official business after presenting a fraudulent Social Security number to an officer responding to her call for a vehicle unlock at Barney’s BP on East Wooster. 11:07 P.M.

Resident within the 500 block of N. Enterprise St. was warned for disorderly conduct/loud people.

WED., FEB. 10 1:10 A.M.

Resident within the 500 block of Ridge St. was warned for disorderly conduct/loud music. 1:26 A.M.

Resident within the 900 block of Klotz Rd. was warned for disorderly conduct/loud people.

UNDERAGE From Page 1 If an individual is passed out in public, the call will most likely be deemed medical, in which case both the police and an ambulance will arrive. Police are typically already on the scene when the ambulance arrives for an intoxication call, Cowdrey said. Lt. Tony Hetrick, of the Bowling Green Police Division, said upon arriving, police will attempt to identify the subject and their age. Typically individuals are cited for disorderly conduct, unable to care for self and underage under the influence, he said. An ambulance will take the unconscious person to the hospital if no one is present to take care of them. “If they’re a complete jerk and they’re still disorderly ... that opens up another can of worms for them, because we’re not going to allow the disorderly conduct to continue,� Hetrick said. The subject may even be

taken to jail, Hetrick said. “If there’s no one who can take control of them — no one to watch them, so to speak — we’re obligated to make sure they’re cared for,� he said. Before sending the individual to the hospital, police usually do not place them under arrest, because this may deem police responsible for the medical bills. “We argue that we’re not [responsible] because we didn’t put you in that position,� Hetrick said, “You put yourself in that position.� Hetrick said police deal with intoxication calls several times a week, but an underage scenario, a few times a month. In his experience, he said, when police receive a call of an overly drunk person in public it’s usually someone who’s underage. When an underage student winds up in the back of an ambulance, they are likely to have a run-in with the police. “You’re going to get a ticket at least,� Hetrick said.

2:51 A.M.

Antonio Wittebort, 33, of Bowling Green, was arrested for obstructing official business after attempting to hurry in to his residence following a traffic stop within 200 block of S. Prospect St. ONLINE: Go to bgviews.com for the complete blotter list.

CORRECTION POLICY We want to correct all factual errors. If you think an error has been made, call The BG News at 419-372-6966.

Did You Know... The elephant is the only mammal that can’t jump.

ARCHIVES From Page 1 also professors; at Hopkins I could only coach,� Cochrane said. “It took a little while to get the programs going, but after a while, they both played in the national tournaments.� Mike Wilcox, a three-time All-American under Cochrane in lacrosse, said he was a gifted coach. “I was a two-time captain for him. He always made practice fun. When you think practice is a grind he kept everything alive and took the pressure off of everyone,� Wilcox said. “He expected a lot from everyone. He was a great coach in respect by getting the most out of his players and winning championships.� He has also been influential to coaches today, as women’s soccer coach Andy Richards said that he has the utmost respect for Cochrane. “He is a fantastic guy. I call him The Legend or Mr. Soccer because of the way he started and shaped the soccer program of today,� Richards said. “He has helped me out. He’s so knowledgeable and fascinating to talk to.� He retired from the University in 1985 but was still

associated with the University by becoming an archivist. The archives were formerly in the Doyt Perry Stadium, but when water got into the stadium, it would damage the archives that were placed there. As a result, he and Don Cunningham, also a former University coach, started placing the archives where they are now in Anderson Arena, to better preserve the history here at the University. “I collect things from the campus and all over the country,� Cochrane said. “I’ve always been interested in history and sports, so I combined the two with taking this position.� Cochrane said he works with several Halls of Fame across the nation including: lacrosse, soccer and the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. He collects items from old jerseys and pictures to player cards and even buttons made way back in the early 1900s. “The archives are getting more popular because of the hundredyearsoftheUniversity this year,� Cochrane said. “This is something we thought was really needed. Plus we just love doing it.�

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EARLY 90S: FOUNDERS WAS

TIMELINE From Page 1

GUTTED, REMODELED AND REOPENED WITH THE FIRST RESIDENT DINING FOOD COURT.

LATE ‘80S EARLY ‘90S:

DINING SERVICES HOSTED ELABORATE THEMED DINNERS CELEBRATING EVENTS SUCH AS THE OPENING OF THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME AND THE OLYMPICS TO BREAK MONOTONY FOR STUDENTS. “THEY PULLED OUT ALL THE STOPS FOR THESE DINNERS,â€? JOSEPH SAID. “THERE WERE PROPS, SPECIAL MENUS ‌ IT WAS DONE AS A MONOTONY BREAKER AND SOMETHING FOR THE STUDENTS TO REALLY LOOK FORWARD TO.â€?

ALSO IN THE 80S: RECIPE DEVELOPMENT WAS CONDUCTED TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’ CASUAL DINING EXPERIENCE, INCLUDING STUDENT TASTINGS TO GAIN STUDENT PERSPECTIVES ON FOOD OPTIONS.

1991-92: MEAL PLAN COSTS WERE A MINIMUM OF $575 AND THE SUPER PLUS PLAN COST $1,055 PER YEAR.

MID 90S: DUE TO A BUDGET

CRISIS, STUDENTS BEGAN TO MAKE AN APPEARANCE ON THE DINING EMPLOYMENT SCENE, FILLING POSITIONS OF FLEETING DINING STAFF.

1995: KREISCHER RECEIVED A “MODIFIED REMODEL,� WITH DIFFERENT DINING VENUES, JOSEPH SAID.

EARLY 2000S: UNIVERSITY

STARTED BRANDING WITH EATERIES LIKE BGSUB AND MAMA MARGIE’S PIZZA.

MCDONALD REOPENED AS CAMPUS CORNERS.

2002: BOWEN-THOMPSON STUDENT UNION OFFICIALLY OPENED ITS DOORS. JULY 2009: CHARTWELLS CAME IN AND “RESOURCES BLOOMED,� MALEY SAID. CHARTWELLS ENHANCED THE UNIVERISTY’S NATIONAL BRANDING ABILITY, BRINGING IN ENTITIES LIKE DUNKIN’ DONUTS AND JAMBA JUICE. SOURCE: DAVE MALEY, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES AND PLANNING FOR DINING SERVICES NANCY JOSEPH, DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS FOR DINING SERVICES. “THE HISTORY OF BOWLING GREEN STATE UNIVERSITY,� BY JAMES ROBERT OVERMAN.

MID 2000S: TOWERS INN IN

EXPERIENCE From Page 1

Experience Works and working her way up. Finding a job at an older age proved to be difficult. “When unemployed at our age we are viewed as getting staler,� Agler said. “You have to do something to advocate for yourselves.� Once interested participants are found eligible, they are placed in one of the host agencies. Host agencies must be nonprofit local agencies such as the YMCA, Red Cross and government offices. “The host agency is essentially getting a free person,� Agler said. “When hiring older people, you know they will have a strong work ethic, and they’ve learned the value of the dollar.� Other host agencies include Job and Family Services, Wood County’s Committee on Aging, the University, Wood Haven, United Way, Court House and more. Training assistants in the program talk to employers and advocate for the participants in order to find job openings. Participants also receive webbased training and job-club classes that walk each individual through interviewing, resume writing and more. “Many people in our program have never touched a computer,�

Agler said. The amount of time in the program depends on the individual and their training plan. “We’ve had people in the program for days and exited them into employment,� Agler said. Experience Works participant Carol Marlow worked for a factory for 13 years before it closed. She returned to school and graduated from Firelands in health information technology and is searching for a permanent job position. As a receptionist at Agler’s office she has enjoyed the opportunities the program has provided. “After being away from office work I had to quickly refresh my skills,� Marlow said. She also helped open the Wood County office. “It’s been a good challenge because we just started with an empty office in July,� Marlow said. The greater numbers of unemployment have allowed for a rewarding experience for participants. “I can relate so much to the people I’m reaching out to,� Agler said. Interested participants can call 419-353-2600 or 877-496-6439.

were more structured than today; students were designated to eat in one dining area. Maley said the social scene in dining brought in, including a tempo- halls was very lively in the ‘60s rary mess hall called Commons. and ‘70s. Food options were very Campus continued to expand limited until the 1970s, he said. Nancy Joseph, director of through the 1950s and into the ‘60s, according to Overman. operations for Dining Services, Dave Maley, assistant director has worked at the University for of facilities and planning for more than 38 years. She said the Dining Services, attended the food was very different when University from 1965 to 1970 and she first began her career here. In the 1980s, restaurants cirhas worked at the dining services for 37 years. Maley said in his culated through dining halls college experience meal times across campus, and students

began to work more in the dining halls in the 1990s. Throughout the years dining halls and restaurants have come and gone, names have changed and buildings have been remodeled, but the University’s determination to please each generation’s food tastes has not swayed.

director Kent Kahn said. The program began in 1965 and was known as Green Thumb and provided work for poor farmers. It has since grown into a leader in providing work and training for seniors. Interested participants must be unemployed in order to qualify. “We like folks that are interested to call us to determine eligibility,� Kahn said. “We have a software that assesses their abilities.� Those eligible will have 20 hours of training per week at minimum wage, funded through the U.S. Department of Labor and the Senior Community Service Employment Program and funded under Title V of the Older Americans Act. The older workers appreciate receiving a paycheck while in training, Kahn said. The program operates in 34 counties in the state with 536 people enrolled. Coordinator Jan Agler was a participant in the program and opened an office in Wood County in July. Agler was searching for a job and lived with her mother and daughter before finding

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To all of the Faculty, Staff, Students, Community Members, and Businesses who participated in the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service,

Victims Services would like to extend a very big thank you to those who donated their time to help our clients, victims of crime. Thirty volunteers spent the whole day collecting donated items for our Domestic Violence Storeroom, and the turn out was incredible! The volunteers collected 205 tubes of toothpaste, 101 toothbrushes, 166 rolls of toilet paper, 150 Band-Aids, 38 boxes of Kleenex, and hundreds of other items!

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Victims Services would also like to send a big thank you to those who donated all of the collected items, the businesses, community members, and students. Without your generosity, this successful day would not have been possible! You have all helped make the lives of many domestic violence victims better!

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3

Professors perform for students at Bryan Recital Hall Photos by Courtney Stellar | Photographer DUET: Staff members perform for students at the Moore Musical Arts Center last night. The artists, Ann Corrigan, Tina Sandor Bunce, and Kevin Bylsma played a number of different pieces throughout the evening. The program included pieces such as “A Woman of Valor” by Samuel Adler and selections from “Moravian Duets.”

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FORUM

“Very few of the people that come into our department for excessive drinking are over the age of 21.” — Denise Schlea, Wood County Hospital nurse on binge drinking [see story, pg. 1].

PEOPLE ON THE STREET

Instead of snow, what do you wish the ground was covered with? “Vera Bradley bags.”

“Money.”

AMBRE DZICZEK, Sophomore, Creative Writing

When we think about Black History Month, we think of things like civil rights leaders and slavery and reflect on the cultural impact of black American culture. The defiance inherent in the counterculture and Civil Rights movements of the 50s, 60s and 70s reverberated around the world. People oppressed by the yoke of colonialism and racism began to reassert themselves. The world was watching with amazement as icons like Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Hue P. Newton and numerous others demanded fair treatment from society. This call for equality by people in America became a way downtrodden peoples around the world mustered the strength to pull themselves up. In that way, King’s civil rights struggle became one people from everywhere identified with. People around the world tapped into the call for liberation inherent in the music, dress and culture of black America. Any scholar of history knows the continent of Africa and parts of Asia and the Americas were in the clutches of colonial rule for decades. In this colonial period, Africans lost much in terms of culture, land and political autonomy. Colonizers from the West came with a philosophy

informed by racism and a craving for imperial glory. Once on the continent, these powers greedily carved the continent without the knowledge or participation of African leaders. The spoils went to the greedy European nations of France, Britain, Portugal and Belgium. Each colony was run in a different way, but each colonial power had similar motives. They gave Africans a sense of cultural inferiority. Then, in the midst of the Cold War, a reawakening began in America as people of all races became disillusioned with a political system and society that sanctioned racism. People of color around the world began to reconstitute their ideas of themselves. Black artforms like music, dance and film reverberated widely and still do today in third world countries. Far-flung corners of the world still have images of pan-African icons like Muhammad Ali and Malcolm X. Icons like King and Malcolm X inspired young thinkers and revolutionaries in parts of Africa. The ‘60s and ‘70s were a time of countercultural change in America and the West. This movement also had effects on Africa, as nations began to free themselves from the clutches of colonization. African people began to identify with and acquire a new sense of their own identities through the examples of civil rights figures from America. In a way, the people of the world reconstituted their views

of themselves by watching brash, confident icons like Ali stand up for their beliefs. Icons like James Brown sang songs about unity and pride for all people around the world. Black History Month has ramifications for people around the world. It’s an important time for people to bare testament to the resilience of the human spirit. The civil rights struggle informed and advanced protest traditions around the world. Thinkers and philosophers in different parts of the world were inspired to question and prod at the question of civil rights, race and society because of the brave acts of black Americans. Thinkers like Kwame Nkrumah, Fela Kuti, Steve Biko and Nelson Mandela were inspired by the civil rights marches and protests in the 60s. The speeches and exploits of Malcolm X and Huey P. Newton became essential information for armed liberation struggles in colonial Africa and parts of the Americas. That’s why I feel it’s important Black History Month be put in its global perspective. It’s important that people realize the civil rights struggle in America is inextricably linked to civil rights struggles around the world. It’s a time when we celebrate the human spirit’s inert need for freedom and justice, reflected in the bravery of the heroes of the civil rights era. Respond to Hama at thenews@bgnews.com

People should be proud of who they are, not who they want to be KRISTEN THIEBAUD COPY CHIEF *Editor’s Note: This column is a response to yesterday’s column, “We are all guinea pigs in a social self-esteem experiment” by Mike Thurau. As a future teacher, I know I will have to deal with the generations who have been raised on the idea they are each truly unique and extraordinary. Children are allowed to know each of their personalities are unique. There is nothing wrong with taking pride in the fact that you know how to turn your tongue into a three-leaf clover, have been deemed the psychologist amongst

a group of friends or know how to fix a computer in five minutes flat. These are wonderful talents to possess and help define who we are as people. As Thurau points out, our elders went overboard providing us with praise to empower us and make us believe we can do anything. What the empowerment movement has not taken into account is the fact that we are not capable of achieving anything we can possibly imagine. Not everyone who desires to be a rockstar can accomplish that dream. This applies to people who wish to be astronauts, neurosurgeons and many other jobs. The sad thing is our elders never informed us of this. They always encouraged and pushed us to feel anything is possible but we are truly only capable of what abilities allow.

Some people are meant to be teachers, others plumbers and some politicians. These are not jobs everyone can fill. This is one thing we must always keep in mind for future generations — we should encourage children in what they are naturally good at. If someone has a way with people, think about mentioning a career where you know they will be around people. If they have issues dealing with stress, it may be wise to steer them clear of careers that would obviously be high stress. Each human is innately different and special because we were created to be that way. However, there is a line that should be drawn between fantasy and reality. Keep in mind each person is meant to fill a specific societal role, be it glamorous or not.

SPEAK YOUR MIND Got something you want to say about an opinion column or news story? Here’s how to get in touch with us for letters to the editor: ■ ■ ■ ■

E-mail us at thenews@bgnews.com. Drop a note into our new comment box at the Union Information Center. Call us at 419-372-6966. Come to our newsroom in 210 West Hall.

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THE BG NEWS GINA POTTHOFF, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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Black History Month’s broad history spans beyond America’s borders HAMA BBELA COLUMNIST

Thursday, February 11, 2010 4

THE LEGEND OF BONES MALONE

KEITH PAKIZ | THE BG NEWS

News networks should consistently hold public figures accountable By Kevin Sullivan The Daily Collegian (Penn State) The College News Network

In case you don’t follow these things, one of the biggest stories in American politics this week involved Sarah Palin and the word “retard.” No, it’s not what you’re thinking. But a few weeks after bemoaning “politically correct”-ness in an interview with Glenn Beck, Palin called for the resignation of White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel for his use of the “Rword” at a private meeting. Later in the week, when radio broadcaster Rush Limbaugh used the word to describe “liberal activists,” Palin shot right back at the host like the maverick she is. The context Limbaugh used the word in was acceptable, she said, arguing that liberal groups “are kooks, so I agree with Rush Limbaugh.” When will the media hold Palin to her own word? It is absurd that no one has called the former governor out for not decrying the political correctness of the Black Eyed Peas 2003 hit, “Let’s Get Retarded.” Why the news outlets love this sort of stories I don’t know. Wasn’t anything else happening this week other than some politician turned television personality playing tattletale? C-SPAN broadcasts what happens inside the chambers of Congress. Doesn’t anything go on there? I guess these stories aren’t

really all that shocking. They’re like the “Jersey Shore” equivalent for the concerned class. Easily packaged, effortlessly consumed, slightly edgy and pretty much pointless. Here is your check, Snooki, now enjoy these messages from our sponsors. Another great aspect of these little stunts is how they are essentially open-ended. People don’t watch the news to get information. They watch the news to have their opinions and beliefs adulated. You can really get whatever you want out of a situation like this. If you think Palin and the Republicans are as infallible as Dr. Gregory House, Limbaugh was just being “satirical,” or something. If you think this group is as idiotic as some “Borat” sketch, then congratulations, you cultural warrior you. Either way, there is a news network there waiting to be proud of you. For example, in this particular scenario, Fox News would probably be the former and MSNBC the latter. And for the free-thinking and civil, there’s CNN, who can’t touch an issue with a six-foot pole. That the major news networks are set up in this manner isn’t really that shocking as viewed in hindsight either. In their 1988 book, “Manufacturing Consent,” Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky put forth that news outlets are fighting for profit against one another, essentially, by having a scoop. Because these stories require politicians and corporate figures for legitimacy, coverage

is constantly distorted in their favor. To be relevant, they must make those they report on happy to ensure future relations with sources whose words become the news. Fox News, for example, recently has taken such a strong aim at Barack Obama that the president attempted to deny the network interview privileges. The tactic failed when the other networks stood up for Fox News, realizing that government could theoretically do the same to them in the future. But Fox News has been built out of conservative commentators and former Republican political insiders. As such, it has a solid base of viewership among conservatives. According to a poll by Public Policy Polling, while 74 percent of Republicans trust the network, only 30 percent of Democrats do, which is quite a discrepancy. The fact remains: Fox News is the only network brave enough to stand up against the Chomskyan propaganda model. This is something that all networks should be doing; however, Fox seems to be the only one in the position to do so. Now if only it wasn’t paying Sarah Palin to launch a promotional operation for her electoral campaign, didn’t give disproportional soapboxes to “independents” like Bill O’Reilly who always side with conservative principles and took shots at Republicans on occasion as well. At least there is always “Jersey Shore” season two to look forward to.

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KATE SNYDER, MANAGING EDITOR BECKY TENER, CAMPUS EDITOR ELLA FOWLER, CITY EDITOR KRISTEN THIEBAUD, COPY CHIEF TAYLOR RICHTER, DESIGN EDITOR ALAINA BUZAS, PHOTO EDITOR SEAN SHAPIRO, SPORTS EDITOR KYLE SCHMIDLIN, FORUM EDITOR HEATHER LINDER, PULSE EDITOR HANNAH SPARLING, IN FOCUS EDITOR ANDY OURIEL, SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR COLE EUTZY, WEB EDITOR CHRISTINA MCGINNIS, MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

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The BG News Submission Policy LETTERS TO THE EDITOR are generally to be fewer than 300 words. These are usually in response to a current issue on the University’s campus or the Bowling Green area. GUEST COLUMNS are generally longer pieces between 400 and 700 words. These are usually also in response to a current issue on the University’s campus or the Bowling Green area. Two submissions per month maximum.

POLICIES: Letters to the Editor and Guest Columns are printed as space on the Opinion Page permits. Additional Letters to the Editor or Guest Columns may be published online. Name, year and phone number should be included for verification purposes. Personal attacks, unverified information or anonymous submissions will not be printed.

E-MAIL SUBMISSIONS as an attachment to thenews@bgnews. com with the subject line marked “Letter to the Editor” or “Guest Column.” All submissions are subject to review and editing for length and clarity before printing. The editor may change the headlines to submitted columns and letters at his or her discretion. Opinion columns do not necessarily reflect the view of The BG News.


NATION

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BG NEWS WIRE SOURCES

3 Seattle bus tunnel guards watch brutal beating

Ohio veteran attacks shelter director, is killed

Report: Hundreds forced into labor, sex in Ohio

SEATTLE (AP) — Three unarmed security guards stood by and watched last month as a 15-yearold girl was punched, knocked to the ground, kicked in the head and robbed in a downtown Seattle bus tunnel. The guards’ actions during the brutal attack — captured on surveillance video — have prompted a review of the policy that unarmed, civilian guards call police and not try to stop fights or crimes. Surveillance video first aired by Seattle’s KING-TV this week shows the attack at Westlake Station on Jan. 28. The victim appears several seconds before her attackers and sidles up to the three guards, who are standing together and talking. When a group of teens and young adults approaches the girl, she appears to seek refuge by moving around to the other side of the guards.

CLEVELAND (AP) — Officials in Cleveland say a homeless veteran attacked and killed the director of a homeless shelter before he was fatally shot by police. Officials say the 48-year-old U.S. Air Force veteran had recently been told that he had to move out of the shelter at the Volunteers of America Veterans Resource Center. Dennis Kresak, president of the Volunteers of America of Greater Ohio, says the man and director are both dead. He says the man walked into the director’s office yesterday morning and started attacking her. Police say officers saw the man holding an ax and a knife over the woman. Police spokesman Sammy Morris says the officers ordered the man to drop the items, and when he did, he charged at them.

COLUMBUS (AP) — An Ohio task force investigating human trafficking in that state says nearly 800 immigrants a year are forced into the sex trade or sweatshop-type jobs. The report by the Trafficking in Persons Study Commission released yesterday also finds that more than 1,000 children born in Ohio are forced into the sex trade each year. The commission estimates that hundreds more immigrants and Ohio children are at-risk of being forced into sex trafficking or to work against their will in fields, restaurants, sweatshops or construction sites. Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray formed the commission. Its report says Ohio’s human trafficking laws are weak and police agencies often don’t recognize human trafficking.

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SAN FRANCISCO — An instructor at a public community college in Fresno has been improperly presenting his religious views on homosexuality, abortion and global warming as fact to students in an introductory health science class, the American Civil Liberties Union alleged Monday. ACLU staff attorney Elizabeth Gill said at least two students at Fresno City College have complained that instructor Bradley Lopez quoted the Bible as proof

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SPORTS

Thursday, February 11, 2010

6

SIDELINES

Women’s basketball drops second conference game of the season at Central Michigan By Sean Shapiro Sports Editor

MEN’S HOOPS Photos from BG’s win against Northern Illinois See more photos from BG’s game with Northern Illinois on page 8.

ONLINE Become a BG News Sports fan on Facebook The BG News sports section has a Facebook fan page. Log on to your Facebook and search for “BG News Sports” to become a fan and receive instant BG sports news. www.facebook.com

ONLINE The BG News Sports Blog Be sure to log on to The BG News Sports Blog for continued news and updates on your favorite Falcon teams. www.bgnewssports.com

Prochaska struggled and only scored six points on 2-for-7 shooting. Prochaska wasn’t the only player After starting off the Mid-American Conference play with a perfect 7-0 to struggle, as Tamika Nurse scored record, the BG women’s basketball 10 points on 3-for-7 shooting and team dropped their second game Jen Uhl only played 10 minutes, in four opportunities as they fell 67- scoring five points in the loss. Despite their team struggles, BG 65 at Central Michigan last night. Central Michigan’s Shonda Long led Central Michigan at half time, scored a go-ahead layup with 27 30-25, and they didn’t trail in the seconds remaining and Britni second half until Long’s lay-in late Houghton made a steal 11 seconds in the game. The win improved Central later. This led to a trip to the foul line, where she improved the lead Michigan to 9-14, 6-5 MAC record while BG’s record dropped to 19-6, to 67-65. BG did have one last chance with 9-2 MAC. The loss could also prove detrithe ball, but Tara Breske’s 3-pointer as time expired didn’t find it’s way mental to BG’s chances of their fifth straight MAC regular season title, home. Kaihlay Szunko had a game- as they are now tied with Toledo for high 21 points, while Long and the top spot in the conference. However a 66-63 loss to Toledo Houghton also finished with double figures, scoring 16 and 10 points on Jan. 30 gives the Rockets a tiebreaker that could give them the respectively. Tracy Pontius led BG with 16 ENOCH WU | See CHIPS | Page 7 points, but the other half of BG’s BG coach Curt Miller walks off the court after a loss earlier this season. BG’s road record dropped to 8-6 with the loss. junior offensive duo, Lauren

THE BG NEWS

Falcons hold off Huskies

ONLINE The BG News Sports Twitter The BG News sports section has a Twitter feed. Be sure to log on while your favorite team is playing. We may have in-game updates. www.twitter.com/bgnewssports

OUR CALL Today in Sports History 1997—Bill Parcells becomes head coach of the New York Jets. 1928—Second Winter Olympics open in St. Moritz, Switzerland. ALAN PIRACHA | THE BG NEWS

The List With both the BG men’s and women’s basketball teams in action last night we take a look at the top performers from last night. 1. Thomas: Scott Thomas had a game-high 26 points and grabbed six rebounds in BG’s 71-69 win over Northern Illinois. 2. Polk: Otis Polk posted a double-double for the Falcons, grabbing 11 points and 11 rebounds, while controlling the paint in the BG’s win. 3. Brown: Dee Brown was one of three Falcons to score in double-figures as he added 12 points and grabbed four steals. 4. Pontius: While her teammates struggled in a loss to Central Michigan, Tracy Pontius scored 16 points to lead the Falcons. 5. Nurse: Tamika Nurse only scored 10 points, but her eight assists proved to be essential to the Falcons holding a lead before losing in the ball game.

ESCAPE: Scott Thomas slips out of the grasp of a Northern Illinois defender in BG’s win over the Huskies.

Thomas leads the way with a game-high 26 points in win By Paul Barney Assistant Sports Editor

Scott Thomas scored 17 of his game-high 26 points in the second half and Otis Polk posted a double-double as the BG men’s basketball team fought off Northern Illinois in a 73-69 win last night. It looked as if the Falcons were going to run away in the first half of play, as they

Notes: McElroy reinstated for game with Northern Illinois

started the game on a 5-0 run and quickly had the Huskies facing an 11-4 deficit just under five minutes into the contest. However, NIU kept battling back and eventually took a 26-25 lead, their first lead of the game, at the 2:48 mark. In fact, the Huskies never looked back in those final 2:48, finishing on a 12-2 run to

See HUSKIES | Page 7

the suspension and started practice on Monday. However, he didn’t get into the game against the Huskies. “Hopefully he’ll learn to make better Since being suspended on Jan. 31 after decisions,” BG coach Louis Orr said. “He’s a being arrested with possession of marijua- young guy and we hope that this was a life na according to police records, BG fresh- lesson for him and he can go on to be a proman forward Danny McElroy has been ductive Bowling Green student-athlete.” reinstated and made his return to the court See NOTES | Page 7 last night against Northern Illinois. McElroy missed three games during By Paul Barney Assistant Sports Editor

Late Tuesday:

Wolverines shutout Falcons to complete sweep of series By Ryan Satkowiak Reporter

BG was unable to parlay their two-game win streak at Yost Ice Arena into a win Tuesday night, as they fell 4-0 to Michigan. After two periods, it looked like BG was once again in good position against the Wolverines, trailing only 1-0. However, there was one small issue. Earlier in the period, starting goaltender Nick Eno left the game with a lower leg injury and could have returned

Nick Eno

Andrew Hammond

Stopped 12 shots before leaving with an injury

Allowed four goals on 28 shots in the loss to Michigan

if needed. He stopped all 12 shots he faced before leaving. Andrew Hammond took his place in net and stopped 24-of28 shots. “I thought Andrew played very well,” interim coach Dennis Williams said. “He’s been off the last two days sick

with the flu.” “He wasn’t even going to make the trip; I was told at two this afternoon that he would make it.” After losing 2-1 last Thursday,

See LOSS | Page 9

Strong goaltending may be key to playoff victory Falcons could be poised to pull off a first round upset. SEAN The biggest catalyst toward SHAPIRO BG pulling the upset is goalie SPORTS EDITOR Nick Eno, who proved in the series against Michigan he can steal a game. While the Falcons were The chances of BG hosting a first round playoff game in the swept, Eno stopped 40-of-42 CCHA playoffs were virtually shots in the series, with the eliminated Tuesday night with only goals he allowed coming during a five-minute power a 4-0 loss to Michigan. In fact, in order for BG to play last Thursday. Tuesday night Eno stopped 12 finish in the No. 8 spot in the conference they would have shots before being taken out of to pull off series sweeps over the game with what was called Michigan State, Notre Dame a lower leg injury, while backand the No. 1 team in the coun- up goalie Andrew Hammond try, Miami. See ENO | Page 9 However, while they won’t be hosting a playoff series, the


SPORTS

WWW.BGVIEWS.COM

CHIPS From Page 6 regular season championship and a berth in the postseason WNIT. The Falcons now have five games remaining on their conference schedule, starting with a home game against Ohio this Saturday at 2 p.m. While their next game is in Anderson Arena, three of the final five games on the schedule are on the road. Central Michigan is at home for three of their final five MAC games, including a matchup with Toledo on Feb. 24.

HUSKIES From Page 6 take a 38-27 advantage to close out the game’s first 20 minutes. NIU used a heavy dose of 3pointers coupled with solid bench play to finish the first half the way they did. The Huskies connected on 5-of10 shots from behind the arc and outscored BG’s bench 31-4. Down 11 points at the half, the Falcons managed to cut the deficit to two points in the first five minutes to start the second half, which was the crucial point in allowing BG to climb their way back up. “As bad as we ended the first half, we played as well to start the first five minutes of the second half,” BG coach Louis Orr said. “I commend our guys. The first five minutes in the second half was huge.” The second half was indeed a big half for the Falcons, as Thomas shot 5-of-8 from the floor in the game’s final 20 minutes, making three consecutive shots early in a span of 51 seconds -- capped off by a dunk that brought the home crowd to its feet -- but more importantly, brought BG to within those two points as the Huskies clung to a 44-42 lead. The Falcons were able to regain their first lead of the game since 2:48 in the first half by taking a 5049 advantage at the 10:42 mark in the second half. After a back-andforth final frame which saw nine lead changes and four tied scores, BG was able to take the lead for good with 1:42 remaining as they closed the game, draining 6-of-7 free throws. The Falcons looked like a different team in the second half from where they ended the first half, which is a credit to them taking care of the ball. BG turned the ball over 14 times in the first half compared to just five in the second. “We talked about taking care of the ball and not to panic,” Thomas said. While Thomas led all scorers with 26 points, Polk earned his double-double with 11 points and 11 rebounds before fouling out late in the second half. “Otis was huge,” Thomas said. “We look at him as our leader, in the locker room and off the court.” Dee Brown had another solid outing with 14 points, while Erik Marschall added 10 rebounds. Not to be outdone, NIU’s Sean Kowal finished with 18 points and teammate Michael Patton was right behind him with 17. With the win the Falcons improve to 12-11 overall and 5-6 in the Mid-American Conference, while dropping the Huskies to 815 overall and 4-7 in the MAC. The team will take the next few days off in preparation for their next game, which is a Sunday matinee with Miami. Tip-off is set for 2 p.m.

ALAN PIRACHA | THE BG NEWS

UP AND AWAY: Scott Thomas rises up for two of his game-high 26 points.

NOTES From Page 6

Tight race

BG entered last night’s game tied with NIU and Eastern Michigan for eighth place in the Through 18 games played, Mid-American Conference. After their win, the Falcons McElroy is averaging 1.8 points and 1.3 rebounds per game in are now tied for seventh place with Western Michigan, and 7.3 minutes per game. because the Broncos beat the Dominating the paint Falcons on Saturday, they Coach Orr has stressed all would hold the tiebreaker. The top four teams in the season the importance of wanting his team to attack the MAC will receive a bye through the first round of the MAC basket and draw fouls. The Falcons did exactly that Tournament in March, while against the Huskies, outscoring the next four teams will get a home game in the opening NIU 44-32 in the paint. BG got to the free-throw line 21 round. If the playoffs were to start times in the second half, this comtoday, BG would play Ohio, who ing after just four trips in the first. The Falcons also outrebound- sits in the ninth spot. ed NIU 36-31.

Reversing the trend Prior to last night’s game, the Falcons were just 2-11 when their opponent scored 63 points or more against them. On the contrary, BG is 9-0 when holding the opposition to 62 points or less.

Tough stretch

Games against the MAC West were much tougher for the Falcons this season compared to last season. BG compiled a 5-1 record against teams from the MAC West a year ago, while finishing at 3-3 in cross-divisional play this year.

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SPORTS

8 Thursday, February 11, 2010

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PHOTOS BY ALAN PIRACHA | THE BG NEWS

LESS PAY Y A L P E R =MO �������� �� �� �� � � �� �� � � ����� ������������ ������������ ��� ������������

FALCONS TAKE DOWN HUSKIES: Top Left: Joe Jakubowski rises up for a shot in the second half of BG’s win over Northern Illinois. Top Right: Marc Larson battles a Huskie player for a loose ball under the Falcon’s basket in BG’s win. Bottom Right: Joe Jakubowski slices through a pair of Northern Illinois defenders on his way to the basket. Bottom Left Dee Brown looks for an open teammate. Brown had 12 points, combining with Scott Thomas to lead BG in scoring.

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Thursday, February 11, 2010

9

THE BG NEWS SUDOKU

SUDOKU To play: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3 x 3 box contains the digits 1 to 9. There is no guessing or math involved. Just use logic to solve

ENOCH WU | THE BG NEWS

SAVING GRACE: BG goalie Nick Eno has been a steady force for the hockey team, helping them stay close with Michigan during a two-game series.

having faced two of the top three offenses in the league. Eno has already had starts against Michigan State and Notre Dame this season, playing finished the game allowing particularly well against the Irish four goals on 28 shots. Eno stopping 64-of-70 shots while returned to the ice at the start helping BG pick up their first win of the third period and should in South Bend since 2003. While the win over Notre be ready to go for this weekDame was big for the program, end’s series with Miami. A goalie can prove to be the an away playoff series win would great equalizer between two be even bigger, and consideruneven teams, and with the ing the possible opponent, Eno best of three format of the CCHA would have to have a strong playoffs, back-to-back strong weekend. If the playoffs were to start starts can lead a team to the next today, the Falcons would head round. And with the BG’s next three to Nebraska-Omaha, a team opponents having a combined that is second in the CCHA in 27 conference wins, Eno will be scoring. Other possible oppoprepped for the playoffs after nents include Alaska, Northern

ENO From Page 6

“A goalie can prove to be the great equalizer between two uneven teams...” Michigan, Lake Superior, Notre Dame and Michigan. The Falcons will need more than a strong stretch run of goaltending to pull a potential first round upset, considering they haven’t won an away playoff series since 2001 when former Falcon Tyler Masters stopped 70of-76 shots in a sweep of Miami. However, with Eno hitting his stride at this point in the season, there certainly is a chance.

LOSS From Page 6 BG once again entered the third period trailing by one. However, this time Michigan was able to salt the game away, tallying three goals in the period. Louie Caporusso tallied two goals for the Wolverines, and Chris Brown added two assist. The win puts Michigan into sole possession of fourth place in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association standings. The loss drops BG to 4-20-4 overall and 3-15-4-3 in CCHA play. Despite his injury, Eno should be ready to go for the weekend series with No. 1 Miami.

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$

475-9855

An iguana can stay under water for 28 minutes.

Sylvania

841-5055 Spring Meadows

866-8655

Open Everyday We Feature

Perrysburg/Rossford

www.tanprousa.com

874-6455

100 T-Shirts

The Coolest Way to Look HOT!

toll free 866-tanpro1

16

99

mo.

Restrictions Apply. Photo ID required. Expires 1/31/2010 cashier code: GOLD6 coupon code: BGNGOLD6

BGSU is celebrating 100 years and we are celebrating Summer Session!

STUDENTS! Stop by the Union Tables Thursday, February 11 or Wednesday, February 17 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

for 100 years

* Hint—graduate on time, lighten course load, smaller class sizes, complete classes in 6 or 8 weeks, and earn credit on campus, online or abroad. ** First 100 students will receive a free T-shirt both days while supplies last.

For more information visit

http://summer.bgsu.edu

KEYCODE 70000210ADV

CenterOfEd_100years_3x4.indd 1

2/8/10 4:23:57 PM

Listings Available On-Line Visit www.johnnewloverealestate.com

by our office & pick up the New Listings!

• We have Efficiencies, 1 Bedroom and 2 Bedroom Apartments. • In most cases, furnished and unfurnished are the same price. • In most cases, water, sewer, and trash are included. • Complete rental listing available on-line and in rental office.

WE HAVE UNITS READY FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY!

JOHN NEWLOVE REAL ESTATE, INC. 319 E. Wooster Street, Bowling Green, OH Located Across From Taco Bell. RENTAL OFFICE (419) 354-2260 Hours- Monday to Friday - 8:30 to 5:30 • Saturday - 8:30 to 5:00 www.johnnewloverealestate.com

White Castle 610 Main

For Rent:

STOP

Great Selection of Houses & Apartments in Good Locations! Available for 2010-2011

1045 N. Main 7B Bowling Green, Ohio 419-353-5800

One 3 Bdrm, Two 1 Bdrms - Close to Downtown

Willow House 830 4th St. 1 Bdrm

Evergreen Apts 215 E Poe Studios, 1 & 2 Bdrms - Close to Campus

Foxwood Manor 839 7th St. 1 Bdrm - Laundry on site, Close to Campus

5% off for all but studios

www.meccabg.com

.


CLASSIFIEDS

10 Thursday, February 11, 2010

The BG News Classified Ads 419-372-6977 The BG News will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate, or encourage discrimination against any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, creed, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, disability, status as a veteran, or on the basis of any other legally protected status.

Services Offered Campus Quarters Sports Bar! WED: FREE pool on ALL 4 tables and HUGE 32oz drafts for only $3!!

Help Wanted !BARTENDING! up to $300/day. No exp. necessary. Training provided. Call 800-965-6520 ext. 174. Direct Care Openings! Wood Lane Residential Services, Inc. is looking for positive, patient people to provide care to individuals with developmental disabilities. Will provide personal care & help w/ daily living skills. Flexible schedules - full time, part time, & sub positions available. $9 -$13.18/hr based on exp. Positions require High School Diploma or GED and valid drivers license, acceptable driving record & pre-employment background screening. Obtain application from WLRS, 545 Pearl St, Bowling Green, Monday-Friday, 8:00am-4:00pm. or download application at: www.woodlaneresidential.org. E.O.E. Play Sports! Have Fun! Save Money! Maine camp needs counselors for all land, adventure & water sports. Great summer! 888-844-8080, apply: campcedar.com Sport Technician - Provide and coordinate appropriate training and competition opportunities in Special Olympics & unified sports. Experience preferred in the field of DD and coaching of athletics, scheduling of events. Salary $9.00-$13.50/hr based upon experience, 30 hours bi-weekly. Application deadline is 2/12/2010 at 12:00 Noon. Application packets available 8:00am-4:00pm at WCBDD, Ent. B, 1921 E. Gypsy Lane Rd. BG, OH. EOE

For Rent

Experienced sitter w/ references in Perrysburg home, 1 day a week. Non-smoker. Call 419-874-8816.

2010-2011, 1 & 2 BR, May or Aug. 1 & 2 BR avail. now, short & long term. For more info call 354-9740 or contact: ghoverson@woh.rr.com

brought to you by

SUMMER OF YOUR LIFE! CAMP WAYNE FOR GIRLS Childrens sleep-away camp, Northeast Pennsylvania. 6/19-8/15. If you love children and want a caring, fun environment we need Counselors for: Tennis, Swimming, Golf, Gymnastics, Cheerleading, Drama, High & Low Ropes, Team Sports, Waterskiing, Sailing, Painting/Drawing, Ceramics, Silkscreen, Printmaking, Batik, Jewelry, Calligraphy, Photography, Sculpture, Guitar, Aerobics, Self-Defense, Video, Piano. Other: Administrative, CDL Driver, Nurses (RNs & Nursing Students), Bookkeeper, Nanny. On campus interviews February 24. Select The Camp That Selects The Best Staff! Call 215-944-3069 or apply at: www.campwaynegirls.com

***Avail now 1 & 2 apts, Eff low as $275. Cartyrentals.com 353-0325 9a-9p. **10-11 s.y. leases/apts, houses, effs 930 E. Wooster avail Again 6 bdrm. Cartyrentals.com 353-0325 9a-9p. 1 & 2 BR apts, close to campus, available NOW, May & August. Call 419-708-9981. 12 month leases starting May 2010: .122 N. Enterprise - 1BR Duplex, $390/mo + util. 322 E. Court - 1BR apt, $440/mo includes all util. 226 N. Enterprise - 2BR Duplex, $730/mo. 525 Manville - 3BR House, $700/mo + util. 837 3rd St - 3BR Duplex, $870/mo +util. www.BGApartments.com Smith Apt. Rentals - 419-352-8917 1BR, 3rd St, $345/mo + elec. No security dep. required. Call 313-523-9887. 2 BR unfurn, half block from BGSU, $600/mo inc. elec & gas. Dep. req. Avail 5/15/10-5/10/11. 419-601-3108 2 rooms for rent in house, utils incl. Furn. rooms w/ TV, W/D, clean & quiet, $250/mo. Larry -419-354-6117

$3.99!

SOUTH SIDE

House for Rent: 225 Palmer Ave, 3BR, 1 bath. Call 419-353-5078.

55 56 57 58

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Give __ rest!â&#x20AC;? Footwear ill-suited for stealth Parisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s __ dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Orsay Volcanic crater feature Graftonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;__ for Nooseâ&#x20AC;? Seismograph stimuli Waltz segment 1844 Verdi premiere Act as lookout for, e.g. Serial ending? Emmy-nominated Charlotte Utility offering Sch. where Buzz Aldrin got a doctorate Castawayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream come true __-pitch 16-Across, e.g. Hand net user, perhaps

Also try our authentic European Goods:

Look for more listings on the BG News website housing directory. www.bgviews.com NEW REDUCED RENT HOUSES! HOUSES! HOUSES! May Lease 2010-2011 133 1/2 S College - 3br 2 ba $950/m, 2 Orchard Circle - 4br 2 ba $1050/m, 824 5th St. - 4 br 2 ba $1000/mo, August Lease 2010-2011 227 S. College - 3 br 1ba $950/mo, 402 S. College - 3 br 1 ba $825/mo, 241 Manville - 4br 2 ba $850/mo, FROBOSE RENTALS 500 Lehman Ave. 419-352-6064 www.froboserentals.com Housing Directory www.bgviews.com

36 37 38 39 41 42 43 47 48 49 50 51 54

A True European Dining Experience

Visit Europe without ever having to leave Bowling Green! 182 S. Main Street | Bowling Green, OH | Phone: (419) 373-6050

www.nasladabistro.com m

For Rent

For Rent

For Rent

Houses & Apartments 12 month leases only S. Smith Contracting LLC. 419-352-8917 - 532 Manville Ave. Office open 10-2, M-F. www.bgapartments.com

Want 1 or 2 roommates, 4BR house, 2 car garage, 2 1/2 baths, W/D, $350/mo ea+ util, call 330-410-4514.

www.meccabg.com Mecca Management, Inc. 419-353-5800

419-806-4728

BIGGEST

BURRITO

â&#x20AC;˘WE DELIVERâ&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Buy Two Burritos â&#x20AC;&#x201C; (get 1 FREE bag of chips)

ALLOWED BY LAW

Located at:

EXPIRES 2-22-10

300 Napoleon Road in Bowling Green

S U N - W E D : 1 1 A M - 1 2 A M â&#x20AC;˘ T H U R - S AT: 1 1 A M - 3 A M

425 E. WOOSTER â&#x20AC;˘ BEHIND THE NEW DOMINOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

No More Space Heaters FREE

Heat!

China

2/1/10 3:14:21 PM

Village

On selected floor plans

134 W. Wooster 352-0528 Come Join us for the Chinese New Year

â&#x20AC;˘ Ground floor ranch â&#x20AC;˘ Private entrance â&#x20AC;˘ Patio Now Open â&#x20AC;˘ Spacious kitchen Saturdays 10 - 3! â&#x20AC;˘ Pets welcome!

Catering +++++

Begins: FEB 13th

FREE HEAT S. Main St.

Highland Management Now leasing for 2010-2011 s.y. 1 & 2 bedroom apartments. Call 419-354-6036, M-F, 9am.-3pm.

419-352-6335

From Only $504!

Only Chinese Restaurant Downtown!

N

GYPSY LANE Shoppes On South Main

GREAT FOOD GREAT ATMOSPHERE

VARSITY SQUARE

Perfect for the people you love... and relatives too.

PICK-UP

a p a r t m e nt s

DELIVERY

419-353-7715

DINE IN

3 L O C AT I O N S

1/27/10 5:48:52 PM

30th Anniversary!

THE HEAT 904 E. Wooster | 419- 352-3588 5 beds, 1 booth â&#x20AC;˘ closest to campus

â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

â&#x2DC;&#x2026; â&#x2DC;&#x2026; WINTHROP TERRACE & SUMMIT TERRACE

SOUTHSIDE LAUNDROMAT 993 S. Main | 419-353-8826 5 beds, 2 booths â&#x20AC;˘ appt. available

THE WASH HOUSE 248 N. Main | 419-354-1559 17 beds, 2 booths â&#x20AC;˘ no appt. needed

TanningCenterBG.com

Sale! - 30 Days $30 - Sale! (Standard Beds, 30 Consecutive Days, Visits Must Be 24 Hours Apart)

One Standard â&#x20AC;˘ One Premium EXP. 2/28/10

Avail Aug. 2010, all upgraded, large houses, call 419-308-2458. 3 Bedroom houses: 218 Dill St - $1000/mo, 227 E. Reed - $1000/mo, 127 Georgia Ave - $975/mo, 606 Fifth St - $900/mo, 226 E. Merry - $812/mo, 131 N. Church - $750/mo. 2 BR house: 133 Georgia -$750/mo. 3 BR apt: 443 N. Enterprise -550/mo. 1 BR apts: 112 Ridge St - 350/mo, & 443 N. Enterprise - $300/mo.

1 Winner of five of six A.L. batting titles from 1983 to 1988 6 Produce unit 10 Mil. stores 13 Taking undeserved credit, perhaps 16 Psychotic TV pooch 17 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fully loadedâ&#x20AC;? purchase 18 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bed-in for Peaceâ&#x20AC;? figure 19 Regress 20 Next 21 Barn loft 23 Fish preparation gadgets 25 Like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marley & Meâ&#x20AC;? 26 Place for wallowers 27 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heartlandâ&#x20AC;? autobiographer 28 Joes at a diner 31 Aptly named novelist Charles 32 As well 33 Perched 34 Casual pants, briefly 35 Friday player

Speedy Burritos

BGVillage_Apts_1X3.indd 1

with purchase of standard month

437 N. Enterprise, 2BR house, new inside, clean, avail 5/20/10. $750/mo, call 419-352-5882.

Now Accepts

1-2 Bedroom Apartments

1 WEEK FREE 2 VISITS $500

426 E. Wooster, large 1 BR apt. Avail Fall 2010, $475/mo, utils incl. Call 419-352-5882.

Minutes from BGSU

www.southside6.com

NEW CUSTOMERS

424 E. Wooster, Lg 3 BR apt, great location, avail Fall 2010. $950/mo, utils incl. Call 419-352-5882.

NOW OPEN

419.352.8639 â&#x20AC;˘ 737 S. Main St

Celebrating Our

3BR, each w/ private full bath, close to campus, $950/mo. Call 419-708-9981.

SPECIAL SPRING RATES AVAILABLE!

Beer â&#x20AC;˘ Wine â&#x20AC;˘ Tobacco â&#x20AC;˘ ATM â&#x20AC;˘ Lotto â&#x20AC;˘ Money Orders

VarSq_Only504_1x4.indd 1

3 BR townhouses, lease for 2010s/y, Scott Hamilton St, 4th St & 5th St. Clean and well maintained. Call 419-409-1110 or 419-352-4456.

Pet friendly community Gas included

6

VARSITY SQUARE APARTMENTS

3 BR apts, recently updated! 619 High St, BG. Available May. Small pets OK, call 419-308-3525.

Apartments Available

Thursdays only, must present coupon with purchase

1 Augurs 2 Last year of its kind 3 Neroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successor 4 Serengeti antelope 5 Some chamber works 6 Geography-class mnemonic 7 007â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alma mater 8 Drunkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chaser? 9 Hardly fair-weather friends 10 Some limo sharers 11 Anti-diversity type 12 Popular paperweight 14 Frank __, architect 35 Doormat of L.A.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Walt Disney 37 Plant geneticist, at Concert Hall times 15 Missouri tributary 38 Homemade cassette 22 Thumbs-up with assorted songs 24 Aspiring atty.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hurdle 40 Docsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lobby: Abbr. 25 Courses 41 â&#x20AC;&#x153;__ hath seen such 27 Amalgamate scarecrowsâ&#x20AC;?: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Henry 28 Consequences of IV, Part Iâ&#x20AC;? oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s convictions 43 Red Ryder, for one 29 Communion line set- 44 Word with bore or ting basin 30 Upscale Roman shop- 45 Paperless read ping street 46 Fizzle (out) 31 Corner pieces 48 Not pizzicato 34 Its trill opens 52 That, to Teresa â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rhapsody in Blueâ&#x20AC;? 53 Diminutive suffix

2BR apts, 4th St, pets OK, reduced price, $490/mo +gas/elec, water incl. Call 419-409-1110 or 419-352-4456.

For Rent

2 Gyros for

The Daily Crossword Fix

Help Wanted

Tan for as low as

$17

1616 E. WOOSTER 419.352.7200

Winthrop Terrace & Summit Terrace Apartments are dedicated to providing YOU with the best housing offers in the area! Free Gas (heat, hot water, cooking) Free High Speed Internet | Free Basic Cable Also Offered: Campus Shuttle Service | Off-Street Parking | Visitor Parking 24hr Maintenance Trash Pick-Up | Recycling | Fully Carpeted | Air-Conditioner

LOTIONS UP TO

/month

call for details credit card required - 3 month minimum EXP. 2/28/10

40% OFF EVERYDAY Ă&#x160;

3IXTH3T &IFTH3T &IFTH3T

FREAKYFAST FASTDELIVERY! DELIVERY! FREAKY Š2010 JIMMY JOHNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FRANCHISE, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

.EWLOVE2ENTALS 3-AINOURONLYOFlCE   

WWWNEWLOVERENTALSCOM

Rental OfďŹ ce: 419/352-9135 400 E Napoleon Rd | Bowling Green, OH 43402

s!FFORDABLETWOBEDROOM APARTMENTSSTARTINGAT PERMONTH


2010-02-11  

The BG News - February 11, 2010

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