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THE BG NEWS

Covering up art: Firelands controversy

Wednesday March 25, 2009

Volume 103, Issue 123

CAMPUS

WWW.BGVIEWS.COM

By Freddy Hunt Editor in Chief

Retention rates high

The removal of a sculpture from a Firelands campus art exhibit that administrators deemed “inappropriate” has raised questions surrounding First Amendment rights and academic freedom, prompting outrage in the University community and the attention of a national censorship watchdog organization.

Despite thet recession, the Univeristy’s retention rates remain high | Page 3

FORUM

Support for Stroh Center

What happened:

As USG’s decision on the Stroh Center goes to a vote this Friday, letters to the editor urge students to look toward University’s future | Page 4

Last Wednesday when Art Professor David Sapp showed up to work at the Firelands campus, he was informed that a sculpture was removed from his gallery. The removed sculpture, titled “The Middle School Science Teacher Makes a Decision He’ll Live to Regret,” depicts a girl wearing a backpack, on her knees, performing oral sex on a standing male middle school science teacher. It was one of 13 sculptures in the exhibit. Sapp, the director of the Little Gallery, had been asked by Fireland’s Interim Dean James Matthew Smith to remove the sculpture on Tuesday of last week. The interim dean’s main concern was that the sculpture was in view of the nearby children’s theater. Sapp refused to censor. After receiving a thumbs up from the University provost, Matthew Smith went ahead and removed the sculpture without Sapp’s consent. The University stood by its decision to remove the sculpture in a press release sent out Friday. “As an institution of higher education, Bowling Green State University strongly supports the right of free speech and artistic expression. However, we also have a responsibility and obligation to not expose the children and families we invite to our campus to inappropriate material,” according to the release. In protest of censoring, Sapp closed the exhibit entirely. “That’s [Sapp’s] right as the gallery director, that certainly wasn’t our intention,” said Dave Kielmeyer, director of Marketing and Communications at the University. “Our intention was to remove that one piece we thought was inappropriate for children and families visiting campus.” The name of the exhibit is “A Bakers Dozen.” If one of the 13 sculptures is removed, the exhibit is incomplete, Sapp said.

NATION

Federal agents sent to border In an effort to prevent the fighting in Mexico from crossing into the U.S., federal agents have been sent to protect the border | Page 10

ECONOMY

WORLD

France bows to pressure

After nearly 50 years, the French government has offered to pay compensation to victims of nulear tests in Algeria and the South Pacific | Page 9

‘We will recover’ President Obama tried to turn the nation’s attention away from AIG outrage to the progress being made | Page 11

SPORTS

Lauren Prochaska has only a 25 percent chance of playing in tomorrow’s WNIT game, meaning other players will have to help fill her time on the court | Page 7

By Thresa Scott Reporter

THE BG NEWS FILE PHOTO

NOT ALL TRASH: The Wood County Landfill has been recycling many items that have been thrown out, in order to help build roads and be more eco-friendly.

Landfill has long-standing Earth-friendly practices

PEOPLE ON THE STREET

By John Payne Reporter

KRISTIN CARVER Junior, Graphic Design

“I don’t think art ever crosses the line.” | Page 4

Pornographic vs. artistic The exhibit isn’t easy to look at. The subject matter is gritty. The University’s legal council allowed the removal of the science teacher sculpture because they were afraid it could qualify as child pornography, Kielmeyer said. Sapp never saw any porno in the gallery. He saw art. “There’s no genitalia, it’s made in such a way that you can’t see any sort of sign of ecstasy on the man’s face and you cant tell the exact age of the person but the title tells that it’s a young teen,” he said. “It’s not pictorial graphic. Is it disturbing? Well sure. Is it hard to look at? Well sure. But it’s not explicit.” Other sculptures in the exhibit include, “The Man Who Hasn’t Seen His Genitals in Years,” “Sami Drops a Deuce,” “Bobbie Put Her Gun in Her Mouth” and “John Put His Head in the Oven.” The artwork is based off experiences of artist James Parlin’s friends, family, casual acquaintances, pets and colleagues. Although the material may be

See FIRELANDS | Page 2

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS WEST | THE BG NEWS

Economy down, library popularity up

Falcons filling in

At what point does art cross the line?

ESTABLISHED 1920 A daily independent student press serving the campus and surrounding community

“Going green” might be a relatively new phrase, but the Wood County Landfill has been doing it for years. Under the supervision of Ken Rieman, the solid waste district director, the landfill has sought new ways to make storing trash a lot less wasteful. For instance, instead of carelessly discarding the grass and leaves collected by the city of Bowling Green, the brush is composed and ground into mulch, which later serves as fertilizer for growing grass on the slopes of the landfill itself. The landfill’s service roads are made of old asphalt, rebar and the glass that the city no longer picks up at the curb. Even part of nearby Route 6 is made of thousands of recycled tires thanks to a 2006 grant awarded to the landfill. But Rieman isn’t done yet. His next project involves harness-

ing the gases emitted by the landfill and turning it into energy. As the garbage in the landfill decomposes, Rieman explained, gas that is half methane and half carbon dioxide is released. Methane is a commonly bemoaned greenhouse gas that many believe has contributed greatly to global warming trends. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, municipal landfills are the second greatest source of methane emissions, accounting for more than 20 percent of such emissions in the United States. “It’s not just disposal going on at the landfill,” Rieman said. “It’s a recovery facility as well. We have to give people a proper place not only for disposal but also recycling.” If captured, the methane — or LFG, landfill gas — could provide a source of clean energy for the city,

See LANDFILL | Page 2

On Monday morning a few people quietly browsed through the stacks at Wood County Library, others sat down with a cup of coffee and read last week’s issue of Newsweek. TheWood County Library, which went through a major renovation in 2003, has become a space for people to enjoy a book, listen to some music or just loiter, said head of adult services Michael Penrod. “We wanted to become a place where people want to go,” Penrod said. “We really try to be a community center for the city.” In the middle of an economic cri-

STROH BRIEF

Students have an opportunity to have any questions concerning the Stroh Center and Friday’s referendum vote to be clarified at tonight’s town hall meeting. The Coalition for USG Reform has invited leaders directly involved with the planning and promoting of the Stroh Center project to take part in a question and answer session. Athletic Director Greg Christopher, Vice President of Student Affairs Ed Whipple and USG President John Waynick will all be fielding questions from the audience. Members of the coalition felt it was necessary to give students one last opportunity to voice any concerns they might have before Friday’s vote. WHAT: Q&A with campus leaders on the Stroh Center. WHO: Sponsored by the Coalition for USG Reform WHEN: 7 p.m. tonight WHERE: 095 Overman Hall

sis people seem to need the library more than ever, Penrod said. In the past year the staff at the library has seen more people entering the doors to write their resume, look for jobs over the internet or get their G.E.D. than ever before. Mark Ryan said he has been visiting the library more often to use the internet and look for work. Dressed in a tie and a white, button-down oxford, Ryan said he had a job interview later that day and RACHEL RADWANSKI | THE BG NEWS was making sure he had everyCOMMUNITY RESOURCE: The thing together. “I like this place,” Ryan said. county library has become a more popular place for community members looking to better their education and search for jobs. See STACKS | Page 2

Last Lecture encourages students to live ‘life of consequence’ Paul Moore

By Ira Sairs Reporter

Paul Moore, a biology professor and director of the University Honors Program, received a standing ovation following his Last Lecture speech last night in the Union. The speech was not literally Moore’s last lecture, but was a part of the University Activities Organization’s and the Mortar Board’s annual Last Lecture series, which is now in its third year. The event is an opportunity for students and staff to nominate a professor to share his or her acquired knowledge and philosophies on life to students, Victoria Yates, director of Comedy and Speakers for

Last Lecture speaker and Director of Honors Program UAO, said. The Last Lecture was based on a lecture given by Carnegie Mellon University Professor Randy Pausch after discovering he was dying of Pancreatic Cancer, Yates said. The event is primarily geared towards students who had the opportunity to nominate the

VISIT BGNEWS.COM: NEWS, SPORTS, UPDATES, MULTIMEDIA AND FORUMS FOR YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE

See LECTURE | Page 2


2 Wednesday, March 25, 2009

WWW.BGVIEWS.COM

BLOTTER

LANDFILL From Page 1

MONDAY, MARCH 23

either on-site at the landfill or through the power grid. Indeed, Bowling Green has been purchasing LFGs from other landfills for several years, Mayor John Quinn said. “We’re not producing the gas here in this community, but we still buy it from other landfills through AMP-Ohio,” Quinn said. “The ability to do something like this locally would obviously be great. We’re certainly as supportive of these efforts as we’ve always been.” As of late 2008, 469 municipal landfills were operational for capturing LFGs. The EPA reported that 19 of these were in Ohio. Capable landfills are outfitted with a series of wells and a kind of vacuum system among other equipment. Once collected, the gas can be used instead of fossil fuels in industrial operations. It can also be upgraded to be used in pipelines, or to generate electricity. All that stands in the way of making this gassy dream a green reality is money, Rieman said. In order to remove moisture and other contaminants from the LFGs, a special combustion engine is needed. Vents will also need to be installed to funnel the gas. “We’ve done the research,” Rieman said. “We have the system and we’ve looked at all the studies. If we had the money we could get this done tomorrow.” Rieman applied for a grant from the Department of Natural Resources and has already received $100,000 in grant fund-

10:33 A.M.

Complainant reported that sometime overnight unknown subjects coated his vehicle with whipped cream, flour, ketchup and sanitary napkins. 1:34 P.M.

Complainant reported a female employee from BP sole $200 in cash from one of the registers. 1:35 P.M.

Complainant reported that sometime overnight his vehicle’s rear passenger window was shattered by unknown subjects, causing $100 in damages. 2:16 P.M.

Donald Lampley, 37, of Bowling Green, was arrested for disorderly conduct with persistence after repeatedly contacting the victim even though he had been advised by officers several times to leave her alone. ONLINE: Go to bgviews.com for the complete blotter list.

CORRECTION POLICY We want to correct all factual errors. If you think an error has been made, call The BG News at 419-372-6966.

STACKS From Page 1 “Nobody bothers you and you can relax and get work done without having to worry about someone coming along and kicking you out.” On the first floor of the library the chairs were set up in rows, in anticipation of a voice recital later that afternoon. Over the past six years the library has hosted 1,200 programs and seen 29,000 people attend those programs. The Wood County Library is more than just a place to store books, said Penrod, it is a cultural center for the Bowling Green community. “We aren’t your grandmother’s library,” Penrod said. “We are a vibrant, growing, lively place.”

Lisa Kyle, who was browsing through the library’s large mystery collection, said she enjoys what the dynamic library has brought to the city. “It is more than just a place to come and get a book, it is a place to connect with people and listen to music and have an experience,” Kyle said. TheWood County Library strives to give its visitors a unique experience. The library hosts a variety of musical guests, authors, and theater performances, welcoming those in the community to see the library as a hub of artistic talent in Bowling Green. The library has always reflected the needs and

New at BGSU:

ing from the Solid Waste District. Now he’s looking for funds to connect generating equipment to the specialized electrical lines already in place for the nearby wind turbines. The turbines make the prospect of methane-collection much more cost-effective. Special threephase power lines are already in place and will not have to be installed. “We’ve always been ahead of the curve when it comes to green power,” Quinn said. “We’re very much in favor of these things, and have made more of an effort than any other city I know of in Ohio.” The EPA is providing aid in the form of the Landfill Methane Outreach Program, which helps with logistics. Two years ago, the LMOP’s Rachel Goldstein visited theWood County Landfill as part of their decade-long effort to promote the use of LFGs. She assessed feasibility and benefits of the project and liked what she saw. “The benefits are many,” Goldstein said two years later. “It’s a great step toward methane reduction. It generates electricity, fuels local industry, offsets the use of fossil fuels and creates jobs. And what may have looked promising two years ago looks much better now.” For the moment, Rieman would be happy with one generator to get things moving. He’s “been working closely with the city,” according to Mayor Quinn, and is eager to get started. “We’ve got a lot going on,” Rieman said. “It’s never perfect, but we try. And in the end there are things there’s no use for. But we care as much as anyone could.” unique wants of its community, Penrod said. “This is a completely diverse, educated community,” Penrod said. “It is very unique to Bowling Green and a very exciting one to live in.” In a digital age, where e-books are available from an iPhone and print media struggles to stay afloat, the Wood County Library is actually gaining visitors, Penrod said. “The internet does not have me worried,” Penrod said. “There is still this tangible desire to browse and be there with the books. The physical experience of being in the stacks: it’s wonderful and it can’t be compared to anything else.”

FIRELANDS From Page 1

inappropriate for children, the National Coalition Against Censorship expressed to the University that it is appropriate for a public university. In an e-mail addressed to University officials, the NCAC Director Programs Svetlana Mintcheva said the sculpture’s removal “is an unacceptable violation of the academic freedom to openly discuss ideas and social problems in a public university, whether these ideas are expressed in books, in the classroom, or in visual form in the gallery. ...” “As a public educational institution, BGSU Firelands is bound by the First Amendment obligation not to discriminate against particular ideas, no matter how controversial they might be. The United States Supreme Court has repeatedly defined a university as a ‘quintessential marketplace of ideas’ that warrants heightened First Amendment protection.” The e-mail was addressed to Sapp, University President Carol Cartwright, Director of the School of Art Katerina Ray and Provost Mark Gromko. The University has not responded to the NCAC nor has it fulfilled its request to restore the exhibit to its entirety. “At this point I’m still hoping the University realizes they responded pretty hastily,” Mintcheva said. “It’s a topic that’s disturbing but on the other hand that’s why we have academic freedom and freedom of speech.”

LECTURE From Page 1 professor they thought most fitting, said Terry Streetman, president of Mortar Board. Moore’s speech, “To Suck the Marrow Out of Life: Leading a Life of Consequence,” inspired by a quote from Henry David Thoreau, was equal parts selfmotivation and philosophy lecture, peppered with quotes from Pink Floyd. Moore warned students to be weary of anyone attempting to sell them their ideas. That being

PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE LITTLE GALLERY

CENSORED: An art exhibit at BGSU’s Firelands campus was shut down by its director after University officials allowed censorship of one of its sculptures.

Parlin, an art professor at Edinboro University, said he couldn’t understand why his exhibit was being challenged nearly two weeks after it opened, and with only two weeks left to go. “There are galleries, college galleries, all over the country, in big cities and small towns, that show a whole range of artwork,” Parlin said. “And if they think there’s going to be a problem with, say, children seeing it, it’s very easy to set up a protocol to avoid that situation, and a lot of places do that.” Two possible remedies proposed by Sapp and echoed in the NCAC e-mail were to post signs warning visitors the gallery contains mature content and to close the gallery during children’s theater performances. Kristie Foell, director of the International Studies Program at the University, is mainly worried about any precedent the censor may have set. “Academic freedom is an absolute central value of the

University and when you chip away at it at one corner, what will be the next thing to go?” Foell said. “If an art gallery is fair game, is a classroom fair game? Is a film series fair game?” Sapp said he threatened to resign if the gallery was censored, but didn’t because a permanent dean will soon be replacing Interim Dean Matthew Smith. Three candidates for the Firelands dean position were announced earlier this week. “We’ll see what the new dean brings. If I see this again then I will resign. No hesitation,” Sapp said. “But I hope it doesn’t come to that. I hope the University learns from this incident, that there are other alternatives other than censorship.” The exhibit was on display at Lock Haven University, of Pennsylvania, in October. Parlin said there have never been problems with the exhibit before. Each sculpture in “A Bakers Dozen” is valued at approximately $6,000.

said, Moore confessed that his ideas were shamelessly stolen from previous thinkers, including Plato and Socrates. Students should make sure they are living lives of consequence rather than continuing in quiet desperation, Moore said. “Often you come to our University and we tell you, ‘Here’s your life. You need to pursue money or a career. You need to pursue prestige or fame or comfort.’” Moore said. “I don’t think these are a life of consequence. I think these are fleeting.”

Moore also shared his personal three-fold path: Inspire the mind, train the body and feed the soul. At one point, Moore said everyone must decide what their tombstone is going to say. “I want my tombstone to say basically, ‘He thought,’” Moore said. “That’s actually changed. Now I want a tombstone that says, ‘He taught people how to think.’” Following the 40-minute lecture, Moore was awarded a plaque from Streetman granting him honorary membership into the Bowling Green chapter of the Mortar Board.

3rd Conference on Student Global Competitiveness

No Paper. No Lines. No Problem.

eBill, ePayment & eRefund coming April 6, 2009

Saturday, March 28, 2009

8am-5pm 201 &206 Bowen-Thompson Student Union Bowling Green State University

Students Intiative for Global Competitiveness Presents

Social Netwo Networking rking for

eBill: monthly bursar billing notification will be sent to your BGSU email account. Sign up your parent for billing information access.

ePayment: new enhanced Web site for payment services, payment search, payment history. Enroll your parent as an authorized payer.

Speakers

eRefund: from in line to online enroll in

Good Ed Brill IBM

electronic banking direct deposit for your financial aid refunds! To enroll: log onto my.bgsu, click “Bursar Bill View/ Pay” for your new services page.

Ivan Boothe

Genocide Intervention

For information: go to www.bgsu.edu/ offices/bursar

To Register Office of the Bursar 132 Administration Bldg. Phone: 419-372-2815 Fax: 419-372-7665 bursar@bgsu.edu www.bgsu.edu/offices/bursar

Go to completeglobally.org For more information, email Jake at jakemg@bgsu.edu

Robyn Tippins Yahoo!

Anthony Fontana BGSU Second Life

Special Thanks To Graduate College College of Arts & Sciences College Of Business Administration Also Thanks to

Free & Open to Public

University Honors Program Graduate Program in Policy History College of Education American Marketing Association


CAMPUS

WWW.BGVIEWS.COM

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Retention rates high despite recession By Ira Sairs Reporter

Retention rates have been on a slow decline at the University since 2006, but are still well above the national average, according to figures gathered by University Offices of Institutional Research. The University has an overall retention rate of 66 percent, according to ACT Inc.’s annual study on college freshmen retention rates. While retention rates have been decreasing at four-year colleges they have been on the increase at two-year colleges, according to the study. The poor economy seems to be the most obvious cause behind the decrease. “So you could probably make the educated statement, that families are experiencing tight economic trials and if you have children in college it’s going to be less expensive for them to send [their children] to the local two-

GET A LIFE

year community college for their first two years,” Jill Carr, dean of students, said. The financial factor seems to be increasingly integral to a freshman’s decision on whether to return to their current school. More and more students with higher income families and more financial aid are returning to University, said William Knight, assistant vice president for Planning and Accountability. However, finances are only a part of what motivates most students to return to college. “I think number one is academics,” Carr said. “Do we have the programs, the majors, the classes that they want?” In addition, Carr said co-curricular activities and the residence hall experience are also contributing factors. “I think, all of those things help guide a decision on whether or not they are going to stay,” Carr said. “But the bottom line is how well they do in their first semes-

ter and what are the economic conditions their families face.” This is the case for freshman Neil Kraft, whose academic performance this semester will determine whether he stays or goes to another college next year. But some might disagree that academics are the most important factor. “I think the assumption from a lot of people tends to be that students just drop out because they get bad grades,” Knight said. “Well, a larger percentage of students who go away and don’t come back until the next year are on good standings or the Dean’s list than are on probation or suspension. So I don’t think by any means it’s only about their academic performance, although that’s certainly part of it.” Despite decreasing retention rates, the University uses many programs and methods to secure returning freshmen. The University puts tremendous effort into learning communi-

ties, residential communities, President’s Leadership Academy, freshman seminar and similar programs, Knight said. On top of previously established programs, the University has been communicating with other universities in order to improve processes and has recently collaborated with Noel-Levitz, an enrollment-management consulting firm, Knight said. “The University has been working with the Noel-Levitz company since last fall and we have several teams working on several different aspects. One is improving advising, one is improving course availability,” Knight, said. “I’m part of a group that’s working on the early alert program, where if you’re doing poorly in your classes first semester, freshmen and faculty have a way to go to a Web site to share some information about you with advisors and to hopefully keep people from getting lost fairly early on.”

EXTREME TASTING

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Some events taken from events.bgsu.edu

9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sustainability U A free and open conference discussing the leading role of universities in meeting sustainability challenges. Union Theater

10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. BG Bares it All UAO will allow students to write their biggest secrets on the postcards they are distributing. Union Multi-Purpose Room

Noon - 1 p.m. Bring Your Favorite Professor/Mentor to Lunch Women’s Center 107 Hanna Hall

9 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays in the Pub: Bingo Black Swamp Pub

RACHEL RADWANSKI | THE BG NEWS

COURAGE: Libbie Dobbs (left), Chad Rzymek (center), and Kelly Reid (right) try out Great Lakes Blackout Stout - an “extreme” beer - in the Black Swamp Pub during a beer tasting event. Beers are considered extreme when their alcoholic content rivals spirits, they use lots of hops (that increases the bitterness of the beer), have been aged in bourbon barrels, or use exotic ingredients. Beer tasting at the Pub was started when the Union was re-opened in 2002 to attract people to the pub and to instruct on the intricacies of beer.

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Library to offer special help for research needs By John Buckingham Reporter

To the staff of the Department of Library Teaching and Learning, the acronym IRA is about research, not retirement. Individual research appointments — IRAs — are hour-long consultations offered by the Department of Library Teaching and Learning to help undergraduate students learn to better use and find resources for papers or projects. IRAs are offered year round, but advertised only during the “peak project time” of the semester when a majority of class assignments are due, said Katherine Najacht, an associate with the Department of Library Teaching and Learning. The peak session began this semester on March 16 and will continue through April 10. Students can sign up for an IRA by simply calling the research and information desk at the Jerome Library. “It’s something that anybody can come to us at any time and schedule [an IRA],” Najacht said. Although there are a plethora of on-campus resources available to help students with writing and researching assignments, IRAs allow one-on-one coaching on the particulars of research. Najacht said she loves helping students on an individual basis. “If a student comes to us at the desk and they’re really struggling, you have to fight the inclination sit down with students for an hour or more, especially if there are others students who need help,” she said. “[IRAs] give me and the rest of the librarians a chance to devote at least an hour of our time to help one student and allows for a much deeper level of service.” Learning to research is an ongoing process, said senior Tiara Farley, who has worked at the research desk in the Library for three years. “I think the IRAs are a great resource for students,” she said. “It takes the research a step fur-

ther than just stopping at the desk with a question for a few minutes. And even people with background in research can still learn more.” But what does an average individual research appointment entail? As the purpose of IRAs is to help students, the library staff tries to tailor every appointment to meet each individual students’ needs and expectations. Librarians show students how to use databases, where to go for articles and even how and where to locate books and other resources within the library. “We really want [IRAs] to be student centered,” said Najacht. “We want the student to get what they want out of [IRAs]. And students may have a very different idea of how the time will go than we do as librarian.” Najacht said researching a paper or project isn’t as simple as just typing a string of words into Google and coming up with all the results; searches have to be tailored to find relevant information. “There’s an element of teaching students on how to formulate searches,” said Najacht. “Once they grasp that concept there’s this moment that they’re like ‘Wow, I’m finding exactly what I was looking for!’ And those moments are really validating.” Despite the fact that most students — graduate and undergraduate alike — wouldn’t mind a little help with researching a project every now and then, IRAs are specifically targeted toward undergraduate students with little experience researching assignments. Although the library staff does offer a similar service for graduate students, they are required to schedule an appointment with a librarian trained in their specific discipline. “These IRAs are heavily used by English 112 students where topics kind of run the gamut,” said Najacht. “[Their topics] are more generic than in graduate

See LIBRARY| Page 12

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PLANS FOR BGSU’S STROH CENTER BGSU students will begin and end their college careers at the Stroh Center. BGSU’s new 4,700-seat arena will be the site of graduation ceremonies, student orientation, concerts and other campus events, and serve as the new home for Falcon basketball and volleyball.

Leave a Legacy Undergraduate students are being asked to invest in the future of the University like previous generations of students who helped pay for student-centered buildings, including:

Construction of the state-of-the-art facility will begin this fall and be completed in 2011.

> The Ice Arena

A Great Time to Build

> The Student Recreation Center

While Ohio and the nation are currently in a recession, it is actually a very good time for the University to launch major building programs. One of the results of the tough economy is historically low costs for construction.

> The Perry Field House > The Bowen-Thompson Student Union The student fee will not begin until the building opens in 2011. Among current students, only this year’s freshman class will pay the new fee.

Be Green The Stroh Center will be the most environmentallyfriendly building on campus. The building is being designed to meet specifications for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. LEED certification is one of the most prestigious and recognized ratings for “green buildings” in the world.

$14 million of the cost of the Stroh Center will be paid for with private donations, including a nearly $8 million gift from the Stroh family. The other $26 million will be borrowed. That debt will be paid off over time through a student fee of approximately $50 a semester.

Explore Inspire Achieve

B O W L I N G

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S T A T E

U N I V E R S I T Y

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FORUM

“Academic freedom is an absolute central value of the University and when you chip away at it at one corner, what will be the next thing to go?” — Kristie Foell, director of International Studies program, on censoring the Little Gallery art exhibit at the Firelands campus [see story pg. 1].

PEOPLE ON THE STREET “When it violates someone’s morals.”

DANIEL WILLIAMS, Junior, Journalism

LETTERSTO THE EDITOR

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 4

At what point does art cross the line? “When idiot liberal students try to make a point by being naked.”

“Art can never go too far, it’s what the artist wants it to be.”

“When it becomes offensive.”

KEVIN BREDEL, Freshman, Journalism

COREY FESTER, Junior, English

EMILY MAYS, Sophomore, Education

VISIT US AT BGVIEWS.COM Have your own take on today’s People On The Street? Or a suggestion for a question? Give us your feedback at bgviews.com.

WALKING IS STILL HONEST

Stroh family involved with University for many years BGSU is truly a family place. We just have to remember why we are at this fine institution— to change the world by degrees. That is why the Stroh Center is so important. My dad, mom and family didn’t give the money for the Stroh Center to have our name on a building. My dad has been involved with the University for four decades. He was a trustee and proud to serve our fine institution. But Bowling Green has been a part of our lives longer than many people know. My family’s start with the University began when I was in grade school. My dad started announcing local basketball games on the weekends for a new local radio station. Being the noisy child who turned into a noisy woman, my mother was glad to send me along with Dad. He taught me how to keep score, chart fouls (individual and team) and basically, I was his sidekick. After a while, Dad would turn the mic over to me and I would give the halftime and final scoring so he could have some water. He even had to read commercials then, and I got to help with that also. Imagine a third or fourth grader on the radio—that was me! The University has always been a regional site for teams from West Central Ohio to meet in high school basketball tournaments. Whenever a team from our area made it to BG, which was the greatest honor, Dad and I would have to cover them. So off we went to BGSU. In between, we were befriended by Glenn Sharpe and Ken Schoeni. They had two guys holding the ropes—the Michael brothers. These men were the reason our relationship started. We would be invited back to the equipment room for pizza between games. Over the years, I got to be a rope holder myself when the Michael brothers were busy elsewhere. I loved going to BGSU with Dad, because our Anderson Arena family was there to visit with. When I got into high school, I was a cheerleader and had to leave Dad up in the press box with a new color commentator. I still got to go to the University for tournament games. I distinctly remember where I was sitting when Ken Schoeni sat down with me and asked where I was going to college in a few years. I told him I’d been to Journalism camp for two summers at Ohio University at the urging of my English teacher (too hilly) and Cincinnati didn’t have a journalism department (where my uncle went and wanted me to go). The next Monday, Dad and I had appointments to meet with many people in the J-School as

we called it then. My dad told me I could go to any school in the nation I could get into. I only wanted to apply to BGSU. I was accepted, I enrolled and the rest, as they say, is history. So Anderson Arena—that basketball place—changed my life. I came to the University because of the people inside. My Dad became more involved while I was there, and my sister started the year I finished. I met my husband Van at the University and he became part of our family because of the University. Years later our children and their spouses would also attend and meet at the University. Other students are better off today because of the family of people that ran tournaments in Anderson Arena. They showed us the true character of this fine University and our lives were all changed because of it. Fast forward to today. My family is proud to sponsor scholarships to help others come to BG. My mother died last May from terminal brain cancer. She wanted very much to be in Anderson Arena for the announcement of the Stroh Center gift on March 1, and she made it. That trip to the University was her last big trip. But the day would not have been possible for her, without so many University people and their help to accommodate her. Anderson Arena was a nightmare to navigate for someone disabled. My mother was very interested in education and was glad to be able to donate additional funds to the Stroh Scholarship through the Stroh Center Gift. It is in her memory that we as a family wish the Stroh Center to go forward as planned. Anderson Arena is tired and isn’t able to accommodate all our fans and events. We need to make the Stroh Center a reality. I tell people that just as Anderson Arena changed my life, the Stroh Center will change others’ lives. Someone will come for a camp. Someone will come because their team makes it to BGSU. Someone may come on a campus tour. Someone will choose to accept a scholarship there and get an education that may have been out of reach. Maybe the correlation won’t be as clear cut as mine was, but it will happen. Please vote on March 27 and help pay it forward for future Falcons. Be Pro Stroh and vote no. Help make the Stroh Center a reality. — Tracey Stroh Wright is the daughter of Kermit and Mary Lu Stroh, and a contributor to the University donation. Respond to Tracey at thenews@bgnews.com

SPEAK YOUR MIND Got something you want to say about an opinion column or news story? Here’s how to get in touch with us for letters to the editor: ■ ■ ■ ■

E-mail us at thenews@bgnews.com. Drop a note into our new comment box at the Union Information Center. Call us at 419-372-6966. Come to our newsroom in 210 West Hall.

Be sure to read the submission guidelines at the bottom of this page.

THE BG NEWS FREDDY HUNT, EDITOR IN CHIEF 210 West Hall Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, Ohio 43403 | Phone: (419) 372-6966 E-mail: thenews@bgnews.com Web site: http://www.bgviews.com Advertising: 204 West Hall | Phone: (419) 372-2606

KEITH PAKIZ | THE BG NEWS

LETTERSTO THE EDITOR Wolfe Center for the Arts and Stroh Center will invest in students future As an active University alumnus, I am excited about the future of my alma mater. A couple projects that will greatly enhance the campus and student life are the Wolfe Center for the Arts and the Stroh Center. As someone who supports academics, the arts

and athletics, I’m confident these facilities will benefit both students and alumni for many years to come. When I was an undergraduate student at the University, part of my general fees went to retire the debt on the Student Rec Center. This facility was built and the funding approved before I ever set foot on campus. However, it has gone on to be used by thousands of students, faculty, staff and alumni

since I was a student. I’m proud of this much-used facility and its impact on campus life, as well as the investment I made in it though my general fees. As current students, you now have before you the opportunity to support a facility that will also be an important part of your BGSU experience: the Stroh Center. Whether attending an athletic event, concert, or, most importantly, commencement, this facility will be

one from which everyone can benefit. Just as I have invested and am investing in the future of the University, I encourage all students to support the Stroh Center (and the existing USG vote) and vote “no” on the referendum this Friday. — Jeffrey D. Rader, Alumnus, Finance and an MBA graduate. Respond to Jeff at thenews@bgnews.com

Meghan McCain needs to realize just how lucky she is and stop complaining By Laura Donovan Arizona Daily Wildcat

The number of people that got hired in January 2009 could probably be counted on two hands, but one of those people was Meghan McCain, daughter of 2008 presidential candidate Sen. John McCain. Meghan has been running the McCain Blogette since 2007, but earlier this year, she landed a blog on the online Daily Beast, and she isn’t broadcasting GOP pride. The 24-year-old Columbia University graduate began writing about her experiences on the campaign trail in her personal Blogette, and now she uses the Daily Beast as a sort of online diary. In her March 2 blog, McCain confessed that “the election killed (her) personal life. (She feared) the election had destroyed (her) ability and desire to date.” McCain wrote about the many relationship obstacles she faced as a result of her dad’s career choice, some of which seemed legitimate, but as shown below, she didn’t seem to have a clear idea of what she was looking for in a man. It sounds like she has something in common with many recent college graduates. On dates, McCain says her “mind wandered” if the guy expressed a strong interest in President Barack Obama, but she also mentioned having a

“Meghan McCain doesn’t have a reason to sulk so much ... People are losing jobs and homes, and McCain is disappointed that she’s single in her early twenties, and it’s all because of her father.” “problem with men who voted for (her) dad.” She went on to say, “When I find my father’s face staring back at me on a potential date’s Facebook page I am equally put off.” I am empathetic and understanding toward McCain’s dating woes, but this sounds less like therapeutic venting and a lot more like whining. A week later, McCain went on to say Ann Coulter is an embarrassment to the Republican Party. Because so many Republicans are put off by Coulter’s shocking statements, McCain had a point, but then she said that Republicans don’t know how to use the Internet. And she wondered why conservative pundit Laura Ingraham had harsh words for her, calling young McCain “a Republican bashing the GOP.” Meghan McCain has no obligation to conservatives, and she is strong-willed for speaking her mind, but she fails to realize how much the GOP has done for her. Without the

Republican Party, Meghan McCain would be living off her mother’s inheritance and fighting to find work like most people. Would Meghan McCain have gotten her own personal blog at The Daily Beast had it not been for her father’s profession? In tough economic times, McCain would have struggled alongside other aspiring journalists and writers, but because she is the daughter of a senator and past presidential candidate, she has the privilege of complaining about her problems on a well-established blog, while the rest of us are forced to use LiveJournal.com or personal journals. Meghan McCain doesn’t have a reason to sulk so much. Laura Ingraham was cold and insensitive to call her a “plussized model,” but judging by the countless dates McCain alluded to in her blog, her curvier shape hasn’t scared the men away. People are losing jobs and homes, and McCain is

disappointed that she’s single in her early twenties, and it’s all because of her father. If it weren’t for the burden of her father’s candidacy and other political successes, young McCain would not have had the opportunity to bemoan on a trendy blog, which is published by former editor of Vanity Fair and The New Yorker. “It’s all about who you know,” many say, and it’s true. Did she really have all the qualifications to get into an Ivy League university? As a Xavier Preparatory alumnus, she must have studied hard up north, but like George W. Bush, she had a political parent, not to mention a wealthy mother, and these things have to count for something. McCain can agonize over all the troubles of her father’s political profession, but she doesn’t appreciate or recognize that her family connections have benefited her writing career. McCain is not a bad daughter for being less than a right-wing nut. The former Newsweek intern also writes well, but so can many jobless Americans. If McCain is going to take advantage of her political status, she should at least recognize that it was the reason for her employment and not publish articles that make her seem like a spoiled, unappreciative, poor little rich girl.

FIND OUT WHAT BGVIEWS.COM HAS TO OFFER YOU! TOP NEWS STORIES The site is updated daily with stories from the paper and online extras.

GINA POTTHOFF, MANAGING EDITOR KELLY METZ, CAMPUS EDITOR KRISTEN VASAS, CITY EDITOR JEFF HOUNSHEL, COPY CHIEF CARRIE CRANE, DESIGN EDITOR ENOCH WU, PHOTO EDITOR ANDREW HARNER, SPORTS EDITOR KYLE SCHMIDLIN, FORUM EDITOR SARAH MOORE, PULSE EDITOR KYLE REYNOLDS, IN FOCUS EDITOR SCOTT RECKER, SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR CRAIG VANDERKAM, WEB EDITOR

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The BG News Submission Policy LETTERS TO THE EDITOR are generally to be fewer than 300 words. These are usually in response to a current issue on the University’s campus or the Bowling Green area. GUEST COLUMNS are generally longer pieces between 400 and 700 words. These are usually also in response to a current issue on the University’s campus or the Bowling Green area. Two submissions per month maximum.

POLICIES: Letters to the Editor and Guest Columns are printed as space on the Opinion Page permits. Additional Letters to the Editor or Guest Columns may be published online. Name, year and phone number should be included for verification purposes. Personal attacks, unverified information or anonymous submissions will not be printed.

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ODD NEWS

WWW.BGVIEWS.COM

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Parrot saves girl’s life, hailed as local hero DOUGLAS HEALEY | AP PHOTO

BAD BREAKUP: Helen Sun, right, is arraigned in Bridgeport, Conn. Superior Court yesterday. Police said that Sun handcuffed herself to her her estranged as he slept and then bit him.

Woman attempts reconciliation with husband, handcuffs FAIRFIELD, Conn. (AP) — A woman attempting to reconcile with her estranged husband handcuffed herself to him as he slept and then bit him on his torso and arms as he phoned for help, police said. Helen Sun, 37, told police she wanted to have a conversation with Robert Drawbaugh without him leaving. She changed the locks on their bedroom door and, while he was sleeping Monday, handcuffed herself to him, authorities said. Drawbaugh was able to dial 911 from his cell phone. Nearly out of breath, he told dispatchers he woke up handcuffed, was still bound to his wife and was holding her down, according to a recording released by police. Dispatchers heard Drawbaugh scream in agony, apparently as his wife bit him. “Ow w w w!” Drawbaugh shouted repeatedly. “Are they almost here? Oh God. I need help!” Asked by dispatchers why his wife was attacking him, Drawbaugh said he divorced her. He also said she has a history of violence. Officers who went to the home in Fairfield heard Drawbaugh screaming for help and forced their way in through the front door.

Drawbaugh was treated at a hospital, police said. Sun told investigators that restraining Drawbaugh was the only way she could get him to speak to her, authorities said. Police charged Sun with third-degree assault, disorderly conduct, reckless endangerment and unlawful restraint. She was being held on $15,000 bond after an appearance yesterday in Bridgeport Superior Court, according to a court clerk. Sun was represented by a public defender who did not immediately return a message left by The Associated Press. Drawbaugh, 32, has been living in Los Angeles and came back to Connecticut about a week ago, police said. He told police his wife is obsessive and a danger to him and his friends and family. He said his wife hired private investigators to follow him, according to police. Police said they were called to the house on Valentine’s Day last year when the couple got into a fight and in December 2007 when they got into an argument over a Christmas tree. The status of their divorce is unclear. Sun’s mother said the couple had been married about eight years.

DENVER (AP) — A parrot whose cries of alarm alerted his owner when a little girl choked on her breakfast has been honored as a hero. Willie, a Quaker parrot, has been given the local Red Cross chapter’s Animal Lifesaver Award. In November, Willie’s owner, Megan Howard, was baby-sitting for a toddler. Howard left the room and the little girl, Hannah, started to choke on her breakfast. Willie repeatedly yelled “Mama, baby” and flapped his wings, and Howard returned

By Brian Witte

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Maryland lawmakers are thinking maybe it’s time to find a way to scrub “Northern scum” — and a few other sensitive pre-Civil War phrases — from the official state song. “Maryland, My Maryland,” set to the traditional seasonal tune of “O, Tannenbaum,” was written in 1861 and adopted as the state song in 1939. But now some lawmakers are pushing for a change

to the warlike language in what was originally a poem that doubled as a call to arms. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller wants a new commission to examine the song and consider changing some stanzas to reflect the state’s diversity and remove offensive phrases. “I love history, but there comes a time when you have to adjust,” Miller, a Democrat, told senators yesterday. A Maryland House of Delegates committee voted down a bill to change the song because mem-

THE BG NEWS SUDOKU

in time to find the girl already turning blue. Howard saved Hannah by performing the Heimlich maneuver but said Willie “is the real hero.” “The part where she turned blue is always when my heart drops no matter how many times I’ve heard it,” Hannah’s mother, Samantha Kuusk, told KCNC-TV. “My heart drops in my stomach and I get all teary eyed.” Willie got his award during a “Breakfast of Champions” event Friday attended by Gov. Bill Ritter and Mayor John Hickenlooper.

SUDOKO To play: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3 x 3 box contains the digits 1 to 9. There is no guessing or math involved. ust use logic to solve

STEW MILNE | AP PHOTO

JOB FAIR: Diane Hatch, stands in line outside the Foxy Lady strip club in Providence, R.I., to apply for a waitress job. The gentleman’s club is looking to fill around 30 positions.

Strip club holds job fair in spite of poor economy PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Scores of people have applied to work at a Rhode Island strip club — but the vast majority don’t need to show any leg to get the job. Providence’s Foxy Lady held a job fair Saturday, seeking to fill about 35 positions for dancers, masseuses, bartenders and bouncers. But The Providence Journal reports the vast majority of

the more than 150 job seekers were men looking to work at the door — and most of the women said they were looking for work that didn’t involve taking their clothes off. Foxy Lady co-owner Tom Tsoumas (SOO’-muhs) says a recent promotion to cut prices has helped the club regain business lost due to the bad economy, forcing it to hire more employees.

Lawmakers discuss makeover of Maryland state song The Associated Press

bers were reluctant to tinker with history. That bill — and another still making its way through the Senate — would have replaced the words written by James Ryder Randall in 1861 with ones penned by John T. White in 1894 describing the state’s natural beauty.

NATION BRIEF

BG NEWS WIRE SOURCES

Senator moves out of trailer into new office WASHINGTON (AP) — Nebraska Sen. Mike Johanns is abandoning his doublewide trailer for a proper Senate office. Johanns has been using the trailer as his office since being sworn in early this year. It’s parked in the courtyard of the

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Russell Senate Office Building. Now, he’s getting an office inside the building. Senate office space is allocated based on seniority, and Johanns is a freshman senator — he replaced fellow Republican Chuck Hagel, who didn’t seek a third term. Johanns will move into the new space today after nearly three months in the trailer. He said the trailer was cramped and it was easy to hear through the walls.

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SPORTS SIDELINES

WNIT Free WNIT tickets available to students

Giving back

The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, has made 200 free tickets available to students for tomorrow night’s third-round WNIT game against Indiana. The tickets will be first come, first serve at the Memorial Hall Ticket Office from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. until tomorrow or they are sold out.

VOID TO FILL: With Lauren Prochaska hurt, several Falcons will need to step up.

Prochaska’s chances of playing not great

Be sure to log on to The BG News Sports Blog for continued news and updates on your favorite Falcon teams. We’ll have continued coverage of tomorrow night’s women’s basketball WNIT game against Indiana, as well as updates regarding the status of Mid-American Conference player of the year Lauren Prochaska. www.bgnewssports.com

Today in Sports History 1972—UCLA wins its 6th

consecutive national basketball title. 1958—Sugar Ray Robinson is first boxing champ to win 5 times. 1896—Modern Olympics began in Athens, Greece.

The List

With the first weekend of the NCAA Tournament behind us, we’re taking a look ahead at the Sweet Sixteen/Elite Eight. Here are the five most important names that will be in action this weekend. 1. Ty Lawson: He has the most famous toe on the planet right now, and for good reason. If he can play at 100 percent, UNC will be fine, but if he’s not playing well, UNC won’t be either. 2. Blake Griffin: He should win the player of the year award. By most estimates, Oklahoma would be a No. 1 seed had he not been hurt earlier in the season. 3. Johnny Flynn: The Syracuse point guard is starting to get the recognition he deserves as one of the nation’s top floor generals. 4. DeJuan Blair: If the Pittsburgh big man can stay out of foul trouble as he did against UCONN twice this season, the Panthers will march on to the final four.

5. Hasheem Thabeet: The

Connecticut big man is a force down low, plain and simple. With a matchup against undersized Purdue and the possibility of a game with Memphis or Missouri, Thabeet should do well.

7

CHRISTINA MCGINNIS | THE BG NEWS

ONLINE The BG News Sports Blog

OUR CALL

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

By Andrew Harner Sports Editor

younger kids is because of the situation he grew up in. Vrvilo was born in Bosnia in 1985, but his family moved to Germany in the mid-1990s to escape the Civil War. And because of that, Vrvilo tries his hardest to show children that with hard work, anything is possible. “When I lived back in Bosnia and Croatia during the war, I didn’t have the opportunity to do the things the kids have here in America,” Vrvilo said. “I just want to be one of the guys that can show them ‘OK, you have this opportunity, if you want it, you can go get it.’” The reason he chose to get his

Lauren Prochaska’s knee injury was described as a severe hyperextension and a bone bruise by coach Curt Miller yesterday. Miller also said surgery isn’t likely, and there was no indication of ligament or meniscus damage. However, Prochaska was not ruled out of tomorrow’s night WNIT game but was given just a 25 percent chance of playing. Despite that, Miller and the team are preparing to play Indiana as if she will not play and will make the necessary game time adjustments if she can play. “You have to plan for the worst and hope for the best,” Miller said. Part of that preparation will be figuring out who will play in place of Prochaska, who averages 36.2 minutes per game and has played a full 40 minutes more than once this season. Miller said Niki McCoy and Tracy Pontius will likely spend more time on the wings while Sarah Clapper and Victoria McGowan will also take some of her minutes. And while Prochaska’s teamhigh 17.2 points per game, 6.5 rebounds per game and defense will be missed, the minutes are the hardest thing

See VRVILO | Page 8

See INJURY | Page 8

ONE GOOD GUY: Former BG football kicker Sinisa Vrvilo has continued to give back to the Bowling Green community even after his playing days have passed.

PROVIDED BY SINISA VRVILO

Vrvilo continues to give back even after football career By Andrew Harner Sports Editor

school program with their homework and teach them life lessons. As an intern with the Wood “The main thing that we tried County Educational Service to focus on was to hopefully Center, former Falcon kicker be representatives of good role Sinisa Vrvilo wanted to find a models that the kids could look way to help elementary chil- up to,” Vrvilo said. “As well as dren and involve his former talk about good sportsmanship teammates. and as well the importance of Knowing spring football higher education.” practice was just around the While at Glendale, the playcorner and that players have ers helped children enrolled in busy schedules, Vrvilo knew he the after-school program with needed to find an opportunity homework, played a catch with sooner than later. footballs and had a short talk And last week that opportu- about sportsmanship and edunity came forth. cation. As part of a three-week stint The latter was the most with Glenwood Elementary in important part of the three Rossford, Vrvilo invited some hour session for Vrvilo. Falcon football players to help “What I would like to do now is children enrolled in an after- hopefully to keep this going so

WINSLOW TOWNSON | AP PHOTO

HISTORIC: Lebron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers are having a season to remember.

James, Cavaliers having a historic 2008-09 season By Tom Withers The Associated Press

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio — Owners of the NBA’s best record and a second Central Division title, the Cleveland Cavaliers are making jumpers. And history. They’re leading the Boston Celtics by four games for the Eastern Conference’s best record and hold a 1-game advantage on the Los Angeles Lakers for crucial home-court advantage throughout

the playoffs. They’re riding a ninegame winning streak, and with their next victory — No. 58 — they will set a franchise record for most wins in a season. The Cavs, so bad before LeBron James arrived, have never been better. Ben Wallace had no idea. “Ever?” Wallace asked after practice yesterday when told of the impending wins mark. “Ever-ever?” Ever. “Well, then that’s probably going to happen,” Big Ben predicted.

PLAYERS INVOLVED

that the other schools experience the same thing because Willie Geter good role modAaron Pankratz Brandon Jackson els are needed,” Chris Wright Vrvilo said. Freddy Walker “The players Nick Iovinelli that were there Neal Dahlman were those Mark Stevens role models Lewis Parks that I wanted Marquese Quilles the children to Gerald Phillips meet and talk Sinisa Vrvilo to.” Among the 11 players who attended were projected starting running back Willie Geter, receiver Chris Wright and punter Nick Iovinelli. Part of the reason Vrvilo is so willing to reach out to the

ENOCH WU | THE BG NEWS

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS: BG proved they have depth by throwing four pitchers and having 15 fielders throughout the game.

Baseball team shows depth in win over Findlay By Chris Sojka Reporter

Schmitz’s goal of getting a lot of players in the game paid off as the Falcons (8-11) scored at Coach Danny Schmitz’s num- least one run in every inning ber one goal in yesterday’s but the seventh in a 10-5 victory baseball game was to try and over Findlay at Steller Field. get as many guys in as he could In the three-hour and 15 minand get the kids in who have ute, somewhat sloppy game, not played a lot this season. there were 17 walked batters (13 He did just that when he by Findlay), 23 men left on base went to his bench in the top and seven combined errors. of the sixth inning and made “I can’t say it was the prettiest seven changes in the field and game in the world, but it is a W,” throughout the game when See BASEBALL | Page 8 four different pitchers took the mound.

SPORTS BRIEFS

More trouble for the men’s soccer team.

Byard Ebling, of Naperville,Ill., was cited for underage under the influence of alcohol in Compton Hall Friday night. Ebling is a freshman at the University and a member of the men’s soccer team. Eblings citation marks the second violation from the mens soccer team from over the weekend. Freshman forward Vuk Krkeljic was arrested Saturday night for assault and obstructing official police business. The athletic department is aware of the incident and will be handling it internally, according to one athletic department spokesperson.


SPORTS

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

7

SIDELINES

Giving back WNIT Free WNIT tickets available to students The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, has made 200 free tickets available to students for tomorrow night’s third-round WNIT game against Indiana. The tickets will be first come, first serve at the Memorial Hall Ticket Office from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. until tomorrow or they are sold out.

CHRISTINA MCGINNIS | THE BG NEWS

VOID TO FILL: With Lauren Prochaska hurt, several Falcons will need to step up.

Prochaska’s chances of playing not great

ONLINE The BG News Sports Blog Be sure to log on to The BG News Sports Blog for continued news and updates on your favorite Falcon teams. We’ll have continued coverage of tomorrow night’s women’s basketball WNIT game against Indiana, as well as updates regarding the status of Mid-American Conference player of the year Lauren Prochaska. www.bgnewssports.com

By Andrew Harner Sports Editor

younger kids is because of the situation he grew up in. Vrvilo was born in Bosnia in 1985, but his family moved to Germany in the mid-1990s to escape the Civil War. And because of that, Vrvilo tries his hardest to show children that with hard work, anything is possible. “When I lived back in Bosnia and Croatia during the war, I didn’t have the opportunity to do the things the kids have here in America,” Vrvilo said. “I just want to be one of the guys that can show them ‘OK, you have this opportunity, if you want it, you can go get it.’” The reason he chose to get his

Lauren Prochaska’s knee injury was described as a severe hyperextension and a bone bruise by coach Curt Miller yesterday. Miller also said surgery isn’t likely, and there was no indication of ligament or meniscus damage. However, Prochaska was not ruled out of tomorrow’s night WNIT game but was given just a 25 percent chance of playing. Despite that, Miller and the team are preparing to play Indiana as if she will not play and will make the necessary game time adjustments if she can play. “You have to plan for the worst and hope for the best,” Miller said. Part of that preparation will be figuring out who will play in place of Prochaska, who averages 36.2 minutes per game and has played a full 40 minutes more than once this season. Miller said Niki McCoy and Tracy Pontius will likely spend more time on the wings while Sarah Clapper and Victoria McGowan will also take some of her minutes. And while Prochaska’s teamhigh 17.2 points per game, 6.5 rebounds per game and defense will be missed, the minutes are the hardest thing

See VRVILO | Page 8

See INJURY | Page 8

PROVIDED BY SINISA VRVILO

OUR CALL Today in Sports History 1972—UCLA wins its 6th consecutive national basketball title. 1958—Sugar Ray Robinson is first boxing champ to win 5 times. 1896—Modern Olympics began in Athens, Greece.

The List With the first weekend of the NCAA Tournament behind us, we’re taking a look ahead at the Sweet Sixteen/Elite Eight. Here are the five most important names that will be in action this weekend. 1. Ty Lawson: He has the most famous toe on the planet right now, and for good reason. If he can play at 100 percent, UNC will be fine, but if he’s not playing well, UNC won’t be either. 2. Blake Griffin: He should win the player of the year award. By most estimates, Oklahoma would be a No. 1 seed had he not been hurt earlier in the season. 3. Johnny Flynn: The Syracuse point guard is starting to get the recognition he deserves as one of the nation’s top floor generals. 4. DeJuan Blair: If the Pittsburgh big man can stay out of foul trouble as he did against UCONN twice this season, the Panthers will march on to the final four.

5. Hasheem Thabeet: The Connecticut big man is a force down low, plain and simple. With a matchup against undersized Purdue and the possibility of a game with Memphis or Missouri, Thabeet should do well.

ONE GOOD GUY: Former BG football kicker Sinisa Vrvilo has continued to give back to the Bowling Green community even after his playing days have passed.

Vrvilo continues to give back even after football career school program with their homework and teach them life lessons. “The main thing that we tried As an intern with the Wood County Educational Service to focus on was to hopefully Center, former Falcon kicker be representatives of good role Sinisa Vrvilo wanted to find a models that the kids could look way to help elementary chil- up to,” Vrvilo said. “As well as dren and involve his former talk about good sportsmanship and as well the importance of teammates. Knowing spring football higher education.” While at Glendale, the playpractice was just around the corner and that players have ers helped children enrolled in busy schedules, Vrvilo knew he the after-school program with needed to find an opportunity homework, played a catch with footballs and had a short talk sooner than later. And last week that opportu- about sportsmanship and education. nity came forth. The latter was the most As part of a three-week stint with Glenwood Elementary in important part of the three Rossford, Vrvilo invited some hour session for Vrvilo. “What I would like to do now is Falcon football players to help children enrolled in an after- hopefully to keep this going so By Andrew Harner Sports Editor

WINSLOW TOWNSON | AP PHOTO

HISTORIC: Lebron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers are having a season to remember.

James, Cavaliers having a historic 2008-09 season By Tom Withers The Associated Press

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio — Owners of the NBA’s best record and a second Central Division title, the Cleveland Cavaliers are making jumpers. And history. They’re leading the Boston Celtics by four games for the Eastern Conference’s best record and hold a 1-game advantage on the Los Angeles Lakers for crucial home-court advantage throughout

the playoffs. They’re riding a ninegame winning streak, and with their next victory — No. 58 — they will set a franchise record for most wins in a season. The Cavs, so bad before LeBron James arrived, have never been better. Ben Wallace had no idea. “Ever?” Wallace asked after practice yesterday when told of the impending wins mark. “Ever-ever?” Ever. “Well, then that’s probably going to happen,” Big Ben predicted.

PLAYERS INVOLVED

that the other schools experience the same thing because Willie Geter good role modAaron Pankratz Brandon Jackson els are needed,” Chris Wright Vrvilo said. Freddy Walker “The players Nick Iovinelli that were there Neal Dahlman were those Mark Stevens role models Lewis Parks that I wanted Marquese Quilles the children to Gerald Phillips meet and talk Sinisa Vrvilo to.” Among the 11 players who attended were projected starting running back Willie Geter, receiver Chris Wright and punter Nick Iovinelli. Part of the reason Vrvilo is so willing to reach out to the

ENOCH WU | THE BG NEWS

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS: BG proved they have depth by throwing four pitchers and having 15 fielders throughout the game.

Baseball team shows depth in win over Findlay Schmitz’s goal of getting a lot of players in the game paid off as the Falcons (8-11) scored at Coach Danny Schmitz’s num- least one run in every inning ber one goal in yesterday’s but the seventh in a 10-5 victory baseball game was to try and over Findlay at Steller Field. get as many guys in as he could In the three-hour and 15 minand get the kids in who have ute, somewhat sloppy game, not played a lot this season. there were 17 walked batters (13 He did just that when he by Findlay), 23 men left on base went to his bench in the top and seven combined errors. of the sixth inning and made “I can’t say it was the prettiest seven changes in the field and game in the world, but it is a W,” throughout the game when See BASEBALL | Page 8 four different pitchers took the mound. By Chris Sojka Reporter

SPORTS BRIEFS

More trouble for the men’s soccer team. Byard Ebling, of Naperville,Ill., was cited for underage under the influence of alcohol in Compton Hall Friday night. Ebling is a freshman at the University and a member of the men’s soccer team. Eblings citation marks the second violation from the mens soccer team from over the weekend. Freshman forward Vuk Krkeljic was arrested Saturday night for assault and obstructing official police business. The athletic department is aware of the incident and will be handling it internally, according to one athletic department spokesperson.


SPORTS

8 Wednesday, March 25, 2009

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“I love to volunteer, go to schools and hang out with kids and hopefully show them what a good role model is.�

VRVILO

to have some fun. Vrvilo said several of the children expressed interest in playFrom Page 7 ing sports and some wondered teammates involved was to give when the team would be able to the football team some positive come back again. publicity and for them to get a Geter took an opportunity to taste of what he loves doing. race one of the better athletes “I love to volunteer, go to in the class while they were schools and hang out with kids outside. Obviously, Geter could and hopefully show them what have easily won, but he took it a good role model is,� Vrvilo easy to give the child a moment said. “So they can grow up and he wouldn’t forget. Sinisa Vrvilo follow that and become good And while Vrvilo’s playing people themselves.� days with the Falcon football But it was also an opportu- program are gone, his involve- his role model legacy afloat for nity for the kids and the players ment in days like this can keep years to come.

INJURY From Page 7

utes, and that is a lot of minutes to soak up from a bunch of people. “We can’t take someone off for Miller to replace. the bench who’s been aver“It’s not just your star player aging eight to 12 minutes a that you have to figure out game and expect them to play who’s going to sub in for her,� 40.� Miller said. “It’s 40 full minSenior Lindsey Goldsberry

has seen many injuries in the past, and this team to overcome them like all the other past injuries. “It is difficult when you lose a player, especially Lauren, but it’s just something else we’re going to have face and overcome,� Goldsberry said.

BASEBALL From Page 7

came in for his first appearance of the season and gave up just one unearned run to the Oilers. “I thought Steve Barrett came in and did a great job,� Schmitz said. “To come in with bases loaded and nobody out, in his first appearance of the year, that’s kind of a tough situation to come in.� The Falcons, who had ten hits on the afternoon, put the game out of reach in the bottom of the eighth inning when Jon Berti walked, stole a base and then scored on a wild pitch, making the score 10-5. In the 10-5 victory, the Falcons had ten hits, but left 15 men on base. They had a lot of opportunities to score even more runs than they did, but didn’t take advantage of all the scoring opportunities. “We need to make positive things happen and get runs when we get the chance to,� Schmitz said. Today at 3 p.m., the Falcons are scheduled to take on Cleveland State at Steller Field.

Schmitz said. “We definitely have to do a better job when we get the bases loaded. We’ve been kind of struggling so far early in the season that way.� The Falcons got off to a good start, scoring a run in the first two innings of the game. Two Findlay errors in the bottom of the third helped BG score two runs in the inning and gave them an early 4-1 lead. A solo homerun by Findlay’s third basemen Bruce Whittington in the top of the fourth made the score 4-2 and it looked as if the Oilers were going to make a comeback, but pitcher Kacy Dwornik (10.13 ERA) got the Falcons out of the inning, giving up only one run. BG put two more runs on the board in the bottom of the fourth when Tyler Elkins reached first base on a fielder’s choice and Mark Galvin stroked a triple, bringing Elkins in. A wild pitch to Clay Duncan

then scored Galvin, giving the Falcons a 6-2 advantage. After Dwornik gave up a run in the top of the fifth inning, Phil Hettlinger came out of the bullpen with two outs and retired the next batter. In the bottom of the sixth inning, four walks by Findlay’s Brent Edmonds and a sacrifice bunt and sacrifice fly by BG batters, helped the Falcons score two runs and gave them a 9-3 lead. Hettlinger (10.29 ERA) threw the ball well as he retied the side in both the fifth and six innings, but got himself in a bases loaded jam with no outs in the top of the eighth. “[Phil] did a good job,â€? Schmitz said. “I’m not sure if he tired there in the eighth inning, but he came in the fifth inning and got us out of a jam a little bit, and put up zeros the next two innings ‌ then he must have been running out of gas there in the eighth.â€? With the bases loaded and no outs in the top of the eighth, Steve Barrett, who got the save,

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Big East Conference flexing its muscles By Dan Gelston The Associated Press

The three No. 1 seeds were only a start. The bruising, behemoth Big East has lived up to the hype as the beast of the NCAA tournament. The Big East tournament officially ended two weeks ago in New York. Take a look at those office brackets, and the teams still standing entering the NCAA tournament’s second weekend make it seem like the party is still going long after the lights were dimmed at Madison Square Garden. Five teams still playing and a shot at placing four teams in the Final Four have put the rest of the field on notice that the path to a national championship goes through this overpowering conference. “I would have been really shocked if some of these guys got upset,� Villanova coach Jay Wright said. Connecticut, Louisville and Pittsburgh are the three top seeds still playing. Villanova and Syracuse are No. 3 seeds as a record five teams from one conference in the Sweet 16 have given the tournament a decided Big East flavor. The Panthers and Wildcats could meet in the East Regional final, while the Orange (South), Cardinals(Midwest)andHuskies (West) are spread among the other three regionals, making a rugged all-conference Final Four a legitimate possibility. “There’s no other league in the country like the Big East,� UConn forward Jeff Adrien said. “We just go out there every game and try to take each other’s heads off. I’m for real when I say that.� The Big East, which has 16 basketball members, could send three teams to the Final Four for the first time since Villanova, Georgetown and St. John’s got there in 1985. Memphis State was the only party crasher that season. Led by coach Rollie Massimino and his appetizing use of pasta and clam sauce as a motivational tool, the 1985 Wildcats beat Georgetown in “The Perfect Game� for their only national championship. Massimino said on Tuesday that he was rooting for another Big East battle in Detroit. “It very likely could happen,� Massimino said. “I think it’s very comparable. Back in ‘85, there were just some really great players that were playing. There are great players now, but we had (Chris) Mullin and (Patrick)

Ewing and (Ed) Pinckney and (Harold) Pressley and that kind of group. Just a great conglomerate of people. It would be a tremendous tribute.� The ‘85 Final Four remains the benchmark for any conference. “The standard for the tournament right now is what we did in 1985 and until someone surpasses that, I would have to say that ‘85 is the best that we’ve ever been,� said Big East commissioner Mike Tranghese. Still, Tranghese was quick to note that sending anything less would not diminish the season. “It’s only happened once in the history of college basketball, so why should we all of a sudden be held to that standard? It’s ridiculous,� he said. “I just want us to play well and if we play well, we’ll get a team there.� Louisville coach Rick Pitino called the 2008-09 season the best in the Big East’s 30-year history. “You have so many teams that potentially could get to the Final Four and win a national championship,� he said. Unlike UConn’s lopsided smackdown of Chattanooga, this week’s Big East showdown is no slam dunk. With three teams left in three regionals (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma), the Big 12 has a 93 record and a shot at sending three to the Final Four. Both the Atlantic Coast and Big Ten conferences started with seven teams and each has two still playing. Kansas coach Bill Self, who led the Jayhawks to the national championship last season, believes other contenders are ready to crash the Big East party. “In order for our league to really put a stamp on it and not have everybody talking about other leagues going into next year, we need to go ahead and validate that by performing well this weekend,� Self said. The Big East was nearly as flawless as Villanova was in that ‘85 title game. Marquette was knocked out in the second round and West Virginia was bounced in the first, making the Big East a sparkling 11-2. Eight of the Big East’s 11 victories have been by double digits. “This year, rightfully so, the talk has been Big East, and it should be the Big East,� Self said. “It was by far the superior league in our country, no question.� It’s not just the number of wins the Big East racked up, but how they’ve mostly romped. Take a look at all those “W’s� marked in ink on your brackets and you’ll

see scores more appropriate for non-conference tuneup games than “One Shining Moment� highlights. UConn dominated its two games by a combined 82 points and blasted Chattanooga in the third-largest blowout in tournament history. Villanova was threatened by American before turning on the pressure and taking two games by 43 points. Syracuse also won both games by double digits to advance into the round of 16. Of the Big East teams left playing, only Pittsburgh and Louisville survived major scares. The Panthers were nearly shocked by No. 16 seed East Tennessee State in the first round and beat Oklahoma State by eight points. The Cardinals, the overall No. 1 seed, had to work to hold off a talented Siena team in the second round. Pitino believed the close call only made Louisville more tournament tough the rest of the way. “You never know with the teams that are getting (blowout wins) how they’re going to feel in a close game and that’s why I thought Siena was good for us,� Pitino said. Slugging it out every game in the Big East was almost like trying to get through a regional. The Wildcats are a three seed, but went 1-3 against the other conference top seeds. They knocked off Pittsburgh, lost twice to Louisville and lost to Connecticut. Still, they haven’t had a two-game losing streak all season. “Going in every night, knowing that if you don’t come out ready to play you could go on a big-time losing streak, it gives you that elimination mentality,� Villanova guard Scottie Reynolds said. That mentality also worked for the Cardinals, who won the regular season and conference tournament championship. “It was sort of like NCAA play for two months instead of just three weeks,� Louisville guard Andre McGee said. All the teams left will need that reasoning if they want to play in Detroit — or even Saturday and Sunday. Louisville might have the easiest path with a game against 12th-seeded Arizona, Pittsburgh has fourth-seeded Xavier, and the Huskies play fifth-seeded Purdue. The marquee games involving Big East teams in the regional semis are the pair of 2 vs. 3 matchups: Villanova vs. Duke and Syracuse vs. Oklahoma.

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POWER OF FIVE: The Big East has five teams in the sweet sixteen, by far the most of any one conference.

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Wednesday, March 25, 2009

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March by Jewish extremists sparks Arab reactions, protests By Sebastian Scheiner The Associated Press

UMM EL-FAHM, Israel — Jewish extremists marched yesterday through an Israeli-Arab town to demand residents show loyalty to Israel, setting off stone-throwing protests by Arab youths that police dispersed with stun grenades and tear gas. The clashes in the northern Israeli town of Umm el-Fahm came at a time of increasing tensions between Israel's Jewish majority and its Arab minority, and residents said the march was a provocation. The leader of the Israeli demonstrators, settler activist Baruch Marzel, has been involved in violent attacks against Palestinians. No serious injuries were reported. Dozens of Arab youths, their faces covered with checkered Palestinian scarves, heaved rocks at heavily armed black-clad police holding up shields, who responded by lobbing back tear gas. AP Television News footage showed a riot policeman firing a tear gas canister at a rooftop where a group

AP PHOTO

FRANCE NUCLEAR TESTS COMPENSATION: This Sept. 1971 file photo shows of a nuclear bomb detonated at the Mururoa atoll, French Polynesia. The French government is offering compensation to thousands of people who suffered health problems as a result of nuclear tests in Algeria and the South Pacific, the French Defense Minister Herve Morin said.

BERNAT ARMANGUE | AP PHOTO

PALESTINIAN PROTESTS: Israeli Arab youths throw rocks at police during an Israeli right-wing extremists march in the northern Israeli Arab village of Umm El-Fahm. Police dispersed rock-throwing Israeli-Arab youths with stun grenades and tear gas.

of women were shouting proPalestinian slogans. Some of the protesters carried large Palestinian flags, running and weaving between cars. Police spokesman Mickey Rosenfeld said 16 policemen were lightly wounded and ten protesters were arrested. Another 15 protesters were lightly wounded, said the town's deputy mayor, Mustafa Suheil. The violence erupted after

French government offers reparations to nuclear test victims

police tried to push back protesters attempting to block a bus filled with the Israeli demonstrators, Suheil said. Hardline Jews carrying large Israeli flags and flanked by security forces marched on the outskirts of the town, apparently targeted because it is one of Israel's largest Arab communities and is known for Arab nationalist sympathies and as a stronghold of the radical Islamic Movement.

By Angela Charlton The Associated Press

PARIS — The French government offered for the first time yesterday to compensate victims of nuclear tests in Algeria and the South Pacific, bowing to decades of pressure by people sickened by radiation — and seeking to soothe France’s conscience. “It’s time for our country to be at peace with itself, at peace thanks to a system of compensation and reparations,� French Defense Minister Herve Morin said in presenting a draft law on the payouts. Victims cautiously welcomed the move, nearly 50 years after France conducted its first atomic tests. But they say it’s still too stingy, and is only a first step toward healing wounds left by explosions that sent blinding white flashes cascading over French Polynesia and the Sahara Desert. The French government will set aside some 10 million ($13.5 million) for the compensation for the first year, Morin said. The U.S. government, by comparison, has

Station manager arrested for refusing to censor images By Heidi Vogt and Amir Shah The Associated Press

KABUL — The manager of an Afghan television network who refused to censor images of women dancing in short skirts and plunging necklines was arrested in what appeared to be a new sign of the government's struggle to define the role of Islam in a country once led by extremists. The government has previously censured television stations and taken others to court, but the arrest of Emrose TV's Fahim Khodamani on Monday was the first for airing overly salacious content, the Afghan deputy attorney general said yesterday. The debate over television in

this conservative Muslim country heated up after U.S.-led forces toppled the Taliban in 2001. The militant group, which practices an extreme version of Islam, banned television and other forms of entertainment that it deemed un-Islamic when it ruled the country in the 1990s. It also required women to cover themselves under an all-encompassing burqa. Since the Taliban fell, television stations have flourished, pitting the issue of freedom of the press against conservative norms in a country where most women wear clothes that cover everything but their face and neck. The issue has become even more complicated with the

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resurgence of the Taliban in southern Afghanistan in the past few years — gains that President Barack Obama hopes to counter by sending an additional 17,000 U.S. troops to the country this year. Afghanistan's culture minister has warned that the Taliban use racy broadcasts like those on Emrose as a tool in their culture war — recruiting villagers who feel that the government is too influenced by Western morals. Aggressive Afghan government attempts to censor TV programs could be part of a strategy to temper conflict with the Taliban. Or it could be an attempt to siphon support from Afghans drawn to the Taliban's conservative style of Islam.

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“We were 19, 20 years old. They told us, ‘There are no risks...’� Pierre Leroy | French army veteran approved more than $1.38 billion in compensation to victims of nuclear tests since the enactment of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act in 1990. French army veteran Pierre Leroy recalled being present when a nuclear test explosion blasted through its containment structure and sent a radioactive cloud over the Sahara in 1962. “We were 19, 20 years old. They told us, ‘There are no risks, it’s not dangerous,’� he said. “There were no precautions.� He described being worn down by years of subsequent government denials of negligence and refusals to compensate victims. “We’re not asking for the moon,� Leroy said.

Some 150,000 people, including civilian and military personnel, were on site for the 210 tests France carried out, both in the atmosphere and underground, in the Sahara Desert and the South Pacific from 1960-1996. But Morin said only a few hundred were likely to be eligible for compensation, which would be decided on a caseby-case basis and granted only to those who suffered health problems related to the tests. The bill will be presented in the coming months to parliament, and while it is likely to pass, victims’ groups are pushing to add amendments to broaden the number of people eligible. Descendants of victims who have since died would be entitled to apply for payouts, Morin said. Morin said anyone with health problems who resided near the test sites would be eligible to seek payouts under the bill — including Algerians, whose country won independence from France in 1962, after the nuclear test program had started.

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10 Wednesday, March 25, 2009

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Florida anti-discrimination laws, possible repeal By Ron Word The Associated Press

GUILLERMO ARIAS | AP PHOTO

REINFORCEMENTS: A Mexican marine stands guard along the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico. The administration of President Barack Obama is preparing to send federal agents to the US-Mexico border as reinforcements in the fight against Mexican drug cartels.

Federal agents sent to border to contain drug suppliers By Devlin Barrett and Eileen Sullivan The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Hundreds of federal agents, along with hightech surveillance gear and drugsniffing dogs, are headed to the Southwest to help Mexico fight drug cartels and keep violence from spilling across the U.S.Mexico border, Obama administration officials said yesterday. The border security initiative, which expands on efforts begun during the Bush administration, is aimed at drug traffickers who have wreaked havoc in Mexico in recent years and are blamed for a spate of kidnappings and home invasions in some U.S. cities. The plan was announced as Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton prepares to travel today to Mexico for the start of several weeks of highlevel meetings between the two countries on the drug violence issue. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and Attorney General Eric Holder are expected to meet with Mexican officials in early April. Violent turf battles among the cartels have wreaked havoc in Mexico in recent years and led to a spate of kidnappings and home invasions in some U.S. cities. The Obama administration’s multi-agency plan includes nearly 500 agents and support personnel. However, officials did not say where the additional agents would come from or how long they would stay at the border. Napolitano said officials were still considering whether to deploy the National Guard to the Arizona and Texas borders

with Mexico, which the governors had requested. Deputy Attorney General David Ogden said the combined efforts of the U.S. and Mexican governments would “destroy these criminal organizations.” Rep. Lamar Smith, the senior Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, said he was happy to see the administration getting more aggressive with the cartels, but he worried about what would see less attention in the U.S. “I am concerned that when you’re taking almost 500 law enforcement agents from one place to another, wherever place they’re leaving is going to be understaffed and will mean that some laws are not being enforced,” said Smith, R-Texas. Authorities said they will increase the number of immigrations and customs agents, drug agents and antigun trafficking agents operating along the border. The government also will allow federal funds to be used to pay for local law enforcement involved in southwestern border operations, and send more U.S. officials to work inside Mexico. Prosecutors say they will make a greater effort to go after those smuggling guns and drug profits from the U.S. into Mexico. Napolitano acknowledged that the fight against the drug cartels is not just in Mexico but in the U.S. where the drugs are sold. “This is a supply issue, and it’s a demand issue,” she said. To address the demand, she cited funding set aside for drug courts in the recent stimulus package. She said these drug courts “have been very effective in reducing recidivism among

drug offenders.” The administration is also highlighting $700 million that Congress has already approved to support Mexico’s efforts to fight the cartels. Officials said President Barack Obama is particularly concerned about killings in Ciudad Juarez and Tijuana, and that he wants to prevent such violence from spilling over into the United States. Among the moves the government is making: —Sending about 350 additional personnel from the Homeland Security Department for a host of border-related work, including doubling the border enforcement security teams that combine local, state and federal officers. —Adding 16 new Drug Enforcement Administration positions in the southwestern region. DEA currently has more than 1,000 agents working in the region. —Sending 100 more people form the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to the border in the next 45 days. —Boosting the FBI’s intelligence and analysis work on Mexican drug cartel crime. —Increasing the inspection of rail cargo heading from the U.S. into Mexico and putting Xray units in place to try to detect weapons being smuggled into Mexico. Napolitano said her department has already seen success with stepped-up efforts. “For example, the communities — the border towns themselves — some of them are actually reporting a decrease in violent crime,” she said.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Voters went to the polls yesterday in an election that could strip the local government’s anti-discrimination protections for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender residents. The fight began after the city commission last year revised Gainesville’s anti-discrimination ordinance to protect transgender people — those who are born one sex but identify with the other. That allows the city’s approximately 100 transgender residents to use the public restroom of their choosing, along with protecting them from job and housing discrimination. The charter amendment on yesterday’s ballot would void

Florida. “This is about attacking the gay, lesbian, bisexual community and repealing protections that are in place,” said Joe Saunders, a spokesman for Equality is Gainesville’s Business. If passed, the measure would also prohibit the city from enforcing anti-discrimination laws that protect other categories of people not specified by the Florida Civil Rights Act, which recognizes race, color, creed, religion, gender, national origin, age, handicap, martial and familial status. A steady line of students were casting ballots yesterday at the Reitz Student Union. Jeanette Paulino, 20, a political science major from Miami, voted to keep the city’s policy in place.

the city’s ordinances barring discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Jim Gilbert, a spokesman for Citizens for Good Public Policy, said the message of those supporting repeal has remained consistent: “Keep men out of women’s restrooms!” “That’s our motive, plain and simple,” Gilbert said. On the other side, a group known as Equality is Gainesville’s Business is campaigning for a “no” vote on Charter Amendment 1. It argues that the city ordinance does not need amending and that the transgender argument is really a screen for a larger attack on sexual minorities. Home to the University of Florida, Gainesville is generally considered a gay-friendly city surrounded by conservative north

Judge, prosecutor face charges By Ed White The Associated Press

DETROIT — Michigan’s attorney general filed charges yesterday against a judge and a prosecutor he said worked together to allow two police officers to lie on the witness stand in a drug trial, allegations that he said “undermine the credibility of our justice system.” The police officers were charged along with retired Wayne County judge Mary Waterstone and Karen Plants, who last year left her job as an assistant prosecutor handling drug cases in Wayne County. Atthe2005drugtrialofAlexander Aceval, Plants is accused of allowing the officers, from the Detroit suburb of Inkster, to lie about their relationship with a paid informant and the informant’s role in the seizure of 47 kilograms of cocaine. Transcripts of the private talks between the judge and prosecutor helped Attorney General Mike Cox bring charges. Plants told Waterstone that lies were necessary to protect the identity of the informant, who was a trial witness, according to a report by state investigator Michael Ondejko. Waterstone also signed an order forbidding companies from releasing the informant’s cell-phone records to defense lawyers, further concealing his relationship with police, Ondejko wrote. “It is a sad day because law enforcement professionals are involved as defendants,” Cox said. “Nonetheless, this case is important because the allegations here undermine the credibility of our justice system.”

ROGER ALFORD| AP PHOTO

TAXED: Scott Harper, a former helicopter mechanic now living on Social Security benefits, buys a pack of Swisher Sweet cigars from Lecy Elovipz at Bo’s Smokeshop.

Higher taxes on alcohol, tobacco infuriate consumers By Roger Alford The Associated Press

LAWRENCEBURG, Ky. — Faced with huge budget holes, states from Connecticut to Arkansas are eyeing higher taxes on cigarettes and booze, infuriating consumers who say the goods are the last vices they’ve got to help cope with lost jobs, a deepening recession and overall economic misery. In Pittsburgh, protesters dumped beer and liquor into a river after county officials approved a 10 percent tax on poured drinks. Patrons in Oregon bars downed brews while writing lawmakers to oppose a proposed beer tax increase. And in Kentucky, protesters poured bourbon on the Capitol’s front steps to demonstrate their opposition to a 6 percent sales tax on all booze. “The way things are going right now with the economy,

the first thing people want to do is go get a bottle or a beer, and soak their sorrows,” said Jack Weaver of Louisville, who gathered with other Teamsters in a union hall last month to rail against Kentucky lawmakers who voted to raise the taxes as of April 1. Sin tax increases to help balance budgets are nothing new, but the economic meltdown has legislators proposing them even in states like Kentucky, where alcohol and cigarettes have long been sacred cows. After all, it is famous for its bourbon whiskey and is a leading producer of tobacco used in cigarettes. “Sin taxes have quickly emerged — as they did in the last recession — as one of the popular tactics that states have adopted to bring in the extra revenue in an environment where raising most other taxes are still pretty politically radioactive,” said Sujit Canagaretna, a senior fiscal analyst for the Council of State Governments.

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asked the judge for leniency. He could have received up 30 years in prison. Yesterday, Palm Beach County Circuit Judge Jeffrey Colbath sentenced Skehan to 14 months in prison, followed by seven years probation. Skehan also forfeits a $366,000 condo, about $381,500 worth of rare coins and $40,000 cash. Another priest convicted in February of stealing from the same church faces sentencing today.

Priest charged with stealing from Church WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — A Florida priest who pleaded guilty to stealing more than $370,000 from his church has been sentenced to 14 months in prison. The Rev. John Skehan, 81, acknowledged taking the money from St. Vincent Ferrer Catholic Church in Delray Beach during his 40 years as a priest there. At his sentencing hearing last week, Skehan and supporters

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ECONOMY

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Wednesday, March 25, 2009

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Obama supports financial regulation By Tom Raum and Jeannine Aversa The Associated Press

GERALD HERBERT | AP PHOTO

ECONOMIC PROGRESS: President Barack Obama addresses the economic troubles facing the United States and declares there are signs of economic progress.

New strategy involves creating jobs, lending money By Jennifer Loven The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama looked to steer the nation’s economic attention to the bigger picture yesterday evening and away from recent days’ micro-focus on outrage over executive bonuses, declaring signs of progress as his administration attacks the crisis “on all fronts.” “It’s a strategy to create jobs, to help responsible homeowners, to restart lending and to grow our economy over the long term,” Obama said in remarks released in advance of his prime-time news conference. During a crowded week for the White House and furious debate that echoed from Main Street to Capitol Hill corridors, the president sought to take a step back. He summarized the steps taken so far by his administration to address the worst economic disaster in a quarter-century, framing them with optimism. “We will recover from this recession,” he said. “But it will take time, it will take patience and it will take an understanding that when we all work together — when each of us looks beyond our own shortterm interests to the wider set of obligations we have to each other — that’s when we succeed.” A day earlier, the Obama administration unveiled a plan to melt a vast credit freeze by helping banks shed bad loans. Under the plan, the government will finance the purchase by private investors of as much as $1 trillion of the $2 trillion in bad assets still held by the nation’s banks, in the hopes of freeing banks to begin lending more freely and churn up economic activity. The proposal led to a huge stock rally on Monday, though stocks slipped back somewhat yesterday as Wall Street digested all the information. The administration also is to outline its proposal for

“This budget ... lays the foundation for a secure and lasting prosperity.” Barack Obama | President a broad overhaul of financial regulations on Thursday when Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies on Capitol Hill. A key request: greater ability for the government to regulate and even take over the kind of complicated financial companies — like American International Group — whose collapse could threaten the entire system. But anti-AIG ferocity threatens to undermine Obama’s efforts to bail out the nation’s deeply troubled financial sector, by possibly scaring investors away from the new program and by making it more difficult to wring more bailout money out of Congress. Obama also is preparing for a European trip next week that includes a London summit on the global economic crisis, while, away from the economy, an announcement is expected by Friday on a revamped U.S. strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan. The president took particular care to defend the $3.6 trillion budget proposal that includes his ambitious, all-at-once agenda of increased health care coverage, higher education spending and a new “cap-and-trade” system on greenhouse gases emissions. The blueprint starts its journey through Congress this week, and is encountering opposition and demands for big spending reductions from fellow Democrats as well as Republicans. “This budget is inseparable from this recovery because it is what lays the foundation for a secure and lasting prosperity,” Obama argued. Today, after taking questions in prime-time television view-

ing hours — to maximize the unfiltered exposure of the president’s message — Obama is heading to Capitol Hill to lobby Senate Democrats. Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell emphasized Republican criticism of the president’s proposed budget as an over-spending, over-taxing disaster. A Congressional Budget Office analysis released last Friday estimates Obama’s budget would generate deficits totaling $9.3 trillion over the next decade “If these plans are carried out, we run the risk of looking like a Third World country,” said McConnell, R-Ky. But Obama repeated his claim that his plans would cut the deficit in half by the end of his first term in 2011 — “even under the most pessimistic estimates.” “At the end of the day, the best way to bring our deficit down in the long run is not with a budget that continues the very same policies that have led to a narrow prosperity and massive debt,” the president said. “It’s with a budget that leads to broad economic growth by moving from an era of borrow and spend to one where we save and invest.” Obama’s job approval rating is 63 percent, according to Gallup polling. That number has been relatively stable recently, down from the 68 percent when the president took office mostly on a loss of support among Republicans. Obama has been in near-constant motion since he assumed the presidency just over two months ago. This week has assumed an especially feverish pitch. In addition to all the announcements, a long interview with CBS’ “60 Minutes” aired Sunday night. An opinion piece written by Obama also ran in 31 newspapers worldwide yesterday, a setup to next week’s meeting of leaders of the Group of 20 largest world economies.

WASHINGTON — Pointing with dismay to the AIG debacle, the nation's top economic officials argued yesterday for unprecedented powers to regulate and even take over financial goliaths whose collapse could imperil the entire economy. President Barack Obama agreed and said he hoped “it doesn't take too long to convince Congress.” Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, in a rare joint appearance before a House committee, said the messy federal intervention into American International Group, an insurance giant, demonstrated a need to regulate complex nonbank financial institutions just as banks are now regulated by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. “AIG highlights broad failures of our financial system,”

Timothy Geithner Agrees that financial giants need regulation Geithner told the House Financial Services Committee. “We must ensure that our country never faces this situation again.” Geithner suggested his Treasury Department's powers be expanded. Bernanke was noncommittal, even suggesting the FDIC. Both officials sought to channel the widespread public outrage over the millions of dollars AIG spent in post-bailout bonuses into support for regulatory overhaul. Dealings between Congress and Geithner have been tense at best. But they were a little more relaxed in the afterglow of Monday's nearly 500-point surge in the Dow Jones industrials, though the Dow gave

back about 116 points yesterday. The rise came in large part in response to the administration's unveiling of a public-private program to buy up to $1 trillion in bad loans and toxic mortgage-related securities clogging bank balance sheets. Geithner is expected to lay out more details on the administration's plan Thursday when he appears again before the committee. Democrats in the Senate say the administration wants the proposal on taking over nonbanks to move separately from the larger financial industry regulatory bill, to get it going more quickly. At the White House, Obama told reporters, "We are already hard at work in putting forward a detailed proposal. We will work in consultation with members of Congress. That will be just one phase of a broader regulatory framework that we're going to have to put in place to prevent these kinds of crises from happening again.”

Health insurance industry may drop risk rating By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The health insurance industry offered yesterday for the first time to curb its controversial practice of charging higher premiums to people with a history of medical problems. The offer from America’s Health Insurance Plans and the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association is a potentially significant shift in the debate over reforming the nation’s health care system to rein in costs and cover an estimated 48 million uninsured people. It was contained in a letter to key senators. In the letter, the two insurance industry groups said their members are willing to “phase out the practice of varying premiums based on health status in the individual market” if all Americans are required to get coverage. Although the letter left

“They have never in their history offered to give up risk rating.” Len Nichols | Health Economist open some loopholes, it was still seen as a major development. “The offer here is to transition away from risk rating, which is one of the things that makes life hell for real people,” said health economist Len Nichols of the New America Foundation public policy center. “They have never in their history offered to give up risk rating.” “This letter demonstrates that insurance companies are open to major insurance reform, and are even willing to accept broad consumer protections,” said Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-N.M., a moderate who could help bridge

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differences on a health care overhaul. “It represents a major shift from where the industry was in the 1990s during the last major health care debate.” Insurers are trying to head off the creation of a government insurance plan that would compete with them, something that liberals and many Democrats are pressing for. To try to win political support, the industry has already made a number of concessions. Last year insurers offered to end the practice of denying coverage to sick people. They also said they would support a national goal of restraining cost increases. Insurance companies now charge very high premiums to people who are trying to purchase coverage as individuals with a history of medical problems. Even if such a person is offered coverage, that individual is often unable to afford the high premiums.

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12 Wednesday, March 25, 2009

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Students educated on brain health awareness By Eric Reed Reporter

Aware of what’s upstairs? Yesterday, the University had three speakers visit campus in celebration of Brain Awareness Day. Brain Awareness Day, which was sponsored by The John Paul Scott Center for Neuroscience, Mind and Behavior and the Graduate Students for Neural and Cognitive Studies, happens every year in March. The visitors included, Diane McClure, an Ohio EPA member and member of Department of Air Pollutants Control, Ted Schetter, science director of the Science and Environmental Health Network and R. Thomas Zoeller, biology professor at the Morrill Science Center at the University of Massachusetts. “Speakers and topics are chosen based on what the community would be interested in learning about,” said Casey Cromwell, associate professor of psychology who organized the event. Environmental toxins that can impair brain development was the topic of this year’s Brain Awareness Day. McClure spoke first mainly about the heavy metal maganese concentrations and the side affects. She said that the heaviest concentration of the

metal occurred in Washington county in Southern Ohio. One of the health affects related to high maganese exposure is a violent temperament. Schetter, who was participating in Brain Awareness Day for the first time spoke next. He focused on how toxins, which include maganese, can affect not only early brain development, such as in fetuses, but can also cause problems later in life for adults. Zoeller spoke last mainly about how the thyroid hormone can lead to improper brain function. “Over 10 percent of people had abnormal thyroid hormone levels and 40 percent of those people that are being treated for it are being treated inadequately,” Zoeller said. The large audience seemed to follow the speakers the entire time, even if some of the material contained lots of medical jargon. “I learned some stuff, and was able to keep up with a lot of the information being given, but there were some terms that were out of my league,” senior Stephen Pfeiffer said. Both Cromwell and the three speakers agreed that Brain Awareness Day was a good way to make people aware of what they were exposed to and aware of their brains in general.

Miami’s attempt to spend $670,000 on chairs denied COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio legislative panel has rejected Miami University’s plan to spend $167,000 on office chairs after learning officials picked the priciest ones available. The 333 Aeron-brand chairs cost $522 each. The Controlling Board, a panel of lawmakers that oversees state spending, voted 6-1 Monday against what normally would be a routine request. Board members say they were

dissatisfied with an architect’s explanation for why staff and faculty needed the expensive chairs. A spokeswoman for the Oxford school didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Jay Hottinger, a Republican from Newark, was one of the lawmakers who opposed Miami’s request. He reminded his colleagues on the panel that they were sitting in $2,000 leather chairs.

LIBRARY From Page 3

services and databases.” Although the intensive session is already well underway, Najacht said there’s still another three weeks in this semester’s session, so students should take advantage of the service. “I encourage people to contact the people to contact the desk, set up an appointment, and come meet with us,” she said. Students can schedule an IRA by calling the research and information desk at 419372-6943.

level courses.” Freshman Corey Jones is one such student seeking a little extra help with his paper about alternate fuels for automobiles. “My last couple papers weren’t really research papers, [the professor] kind of just gave us the information,” Jones said. “I figured I needed to get a really good grade on this one. It’s only gonna help me to learn how to use all the online

Madoff prison number a winner



A lottery spokeswoman says people often play numbers they see on the news. So many people played the flight number of a jet that landed safely in the Hudson River that the lottery had to halt sales.



NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street swindler Bernard Madoff is a lucky charm for one New York City construction worker. Queens resident Ralph Amendolaro says he saw Madoff's prison number in a newspaper and had a good feeling so he played the last three digits of it in the state lottery's Numbers game. It hit March 15, paying $1,500. Lottery officials say other people had the same idea. The number combination 0-5-4 produced 501 winning tickets the Sunday after Madoff's guilty plea, up from 120 winners the previous day. Madoff's prison registration number is 61727-054.

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***1-4 BR apts & houses 09-10 sy, next to campus & downtown, low as $250/mo for each student. See Cartyrentals.com for discounts or call 419-353-0325 9am-9pm. **09-10 SY few remaining houses. 1 lrg house left, 8 allowed on lease, promo 50” HD TV flat screen w/ hse, new hardwood floor, 2 blks campus, cartyrentals.com, 419-353-0325. 1 & 2 BR apts close to campus, $395-550/mo + electric, pet friendly. Avail now & Aug, call 419-708-9981. 1 & 2 BR apts, quiet. Sign up now for fall, save up to $1200. Susan- 419-841-9816, 419-345-4768 1 room efficiency apt, $290/mo, avail 5/15, call 419-601-3225. 12 month leases starting May 2009, 841 3rd - 3BR duplex, $945 + util, 453 S. Prospect A -3BR duplex $690/mo + utilities, 420 S. College - 3BR house $700/mo + utilities, 849 6th C - 1BR, $330/mo + util, 322 E. Court #2 -1BR, $430 incl. util, Smith Apt. Rentals www.bgapartments.com 419-352-8917 2 BR furn, 12 month or 1 yr lease, $510/mo incl. heat, water, sewer, gas & cable. Call 419-494-8208. 2 roommates needed, 3 BR 2 bath house near campus. $385/mo. incl. util, cable & internet. 419-419-9029.





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426 E. Wooster, Lg. 1 Bdrm, avail. Fall 2009, $475/mo, utils incl. Call 419-352-5882 5 & 3 BR houses/apts, available May & August, Call 419-353-2787 & leave message. 6 BR house w/ laundry, 3rd St, BG, pet friendly, $275/mo per person. Call 419-308-2676 Avail now, newly remodeled apt w/ 3 BR, each w/ priv. bath & entrance. Close to campus, $995/mo + elec. Call 419-708-9981. Avail. summer &/or 1st semester only, see Cartyrentals.com Call 419-353-0325 9am-9pm.

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HOUSES - RENT SPECIAL FREE FIRST MONTHS RENT OR $99 SECURITY DEPOSIT May Lease 2 Orchard Circle, 1/2 blck from campus, near windmill, 4 BR, 2 bath, $900/mo, good cond. August 2009 Leases 227 S. College, 3 BR, 1 bath, $900/mo, good condition. 129B S. College, 1/2 block from campus, 1 BR, 1 bath, $375/mo. Call 419-352-6064 or go to www.froboserentals.com

May-Aug. summer subleaser needed at Copper Beech. Furnished, cable, internet, W/D, private bath. Contact Jennifer at 330-507-6311 or email: jenbens@bgsu.edu

Summit Hill 414 / 418 S. Summit St, 2+BR, A/C, garage, W/D, remodeled, spacious, pet friendly, new low price! Avail Now -1 BRs @ The Highlands, Call 419-354-6036.

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3 BR house, 404 S. College. $600/mo plus util. Available Aug, call 419-352-4850.

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