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THE BG NEWS Tuesday August 21, 2007

Campus Corners

Volume 102, Issue 3

n Students in dire need of a sit down dinner a part from the dining hall can enjoy a meal at Campus Corners on their meal plan. Carryout orders are available. Open for service on Sept. 4 n Wait can be long so call ahead.: 419-372-2235.

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CAMPUS

USG focuses on student safety on the tracks Hoping to work with CSX security, the group discusses recent citations | Page 3

Carbon monoxide strikes VA Tech

WORLD

Five roommates were hospitalized after a faulty gas valve struck a leak | Page 3

Hurricane Dean heads for Mexican coast Thousands evacuate the area in preparation for the imminent threat posed by the storm | Page 5

FORUM

Columnist Brian Kutzley explains how new members tend to drop out quickly from organizations | Page 4

On Campus Sunday brunch at Commons

New kids on the University block

OSU readies for a fresh season

The Bowling Greenery

Falcon football is ‘in the game’ Between practice and class, BG players spend their time playing a different kind of game | Page 6

n Located on the second floor of the Union, the Greenery provides students with a place to sit and veg out for lunch. Customers can order from the menu or take their chances at the buffet. n 11:30a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

n 419-372-5555. This is a number everybody living on campus should have in his or her phone. Zza’s at Night has pizza, subs, pastas, salads and more. Although the quality is nothing to boast about, the location and convenience is unrivaled. Being located in the heart of the Union, Zza’s is as easy as it is greasy to swoop up a pie.

Mama Margie’s

See SAFETY | Page 2

n Comfort food is only a phone call away. The Cookie Jar delivers ovenfresh cookies and ice-cold milk to cookie cravers until midnight. Be sure to ask about the cookie of the day. n Call 419-354-8780

South Side 6

n South Side, next to National City Bank on South Main Street, South Side 6 party store and more is the best place in town to find authentic Middle Eastern food such as gyros that are shaved right off the lamb’s leg and sweet Baklava. n www.southside6.com

TRAINING: Campus police during active shooter training this summer.

Conklin provides multi-cultural home By Amy Dillon Reporter

This year marks the official opening of the Global Village — a learning community that has been in the making for nearly four years. The Global Village is located in the Conklin units and is the home of 36 students from 11 different countries including the United States. The University offers learning communities that are specific to different cultures such as La Maison Francais and La Comunidad, but the Global Village is the first multi-cultural community. Director of Global Initiatives, Dr. Jeffery Grilliot and the Director of the International Studies program, Dr. Kristie Foell became co-directors of the learning community after sharing a vision to create a multi-cultural housing program at BGSU. “It’s not only the international students that bring diversity to our community but also our American students who come from various backgrounds,” said Dr. Foell. Grilliot said the learning community is at 90 percent occu-

pancy, which is excellent for its first year. In addition, five student groups and three classes utilize the Global Village as their place to meet. The Global Village is only open to international and freshman University students, but due to the good response so far, Grilliot says they’re considering future expansion. “The goal of this community is to expose American and International students to each others’ culture,” Grilliot said. “The more students we have, the more cultural exposure.” While most American students are roomed with an international student, it isn’t uncommon for students from the same

See VILLAGE | Page 2

Retail sales of painkillers see increase over the last eight years By Frank Bass The Associated Press

WEATHER

ACT House

n God Dogs and Jesus Burgers! A few times each year the Active Christians Today house, ACT, hosts a Friday night cookout. The best part of the cookout is that it is absolutely free and open to anybody who may be passing by the East Wooster address right across from Founders. n Next events: Sept. 28 and Oct. 12.

Campus Pollyeyes

“Yes, because I have alcohol and public policy class, and I think it’s going to be fun.” | Page 4

Keeping campus safe has always been a top priority for the University, but in the wake of the Virginia Tech tragedy last spring, pressure has been put on the advancement of campus safety procedures. This summer, members of the campus community, including faculty, staff and students evaluated the University’s emergencyresponse plan. This plan is reviewed regularly and involves the ways in which the campus is alerted to emergency situations. Thus far the campus community has been warned about emergencies through the BGSU Web site, by blast e-mail mes-

sages that can be sent within minutes, campus and city police communication, resident and Greek hall advisors and campus media. Suzy Atchison, a senior who lives off campus, said that while these security messages should still be in place, a calling system would be more beneficial to her, and many other students living off campus. “I’m not always on campus or by my computer, but I always have my cell phone on me,” said Atchison. Plans are also in the works for a reverse 911 system on campus, said University Police Chief Wiegand.

Taco Bell

n Pollyeyes’ breadsticks. Pollyeyes has great pizza, but their breadsticks loaded with cheese and toppings is the feather in their cap. The breadsticks will leave any customer stuffed and satisfied with a side of jalapeño cheese, ranch, barbecue or pizza sauce for dipping.

BRITTNEY PECORARO Senior, Special Education

By Christy Johnson Special Sections Editor

n The Taco Bell in Bowling Green is not just any other Taco Bell. It has nestled its way into Bowling Green tradition. Waiting in line for half an hour for a “fourth meal” at 2 a.m. is what being a Falcon is all about. Also, this T-Bell serves breakfast.

The Cookie Jar

n For students who don’t feel like trekking to Zza’s for a taste, Mama Margie’s is delivering pizza pies via golf cart to the Harshman and Kriescher Quadrangles. Mama Margie’s is also available for pick-up at Founders and the Union. Mama Margie’s will start delivering on Aug. 24. n Order at 419-372-7586.

Would you have come to classes, even with the rain, if it weren’t the first day?

University safety procedures get a second look as officers train in preparation for the coming year

JORDAN FLOWER | THE BG NEWS

Zza’s at Night

Lack of senior leadership has the team wary of the coming year | Page 6

Keeping campus safe

Off Campus

n No weekend is complete without an all-you-can-eat trip to Commons Sunday morning. Biscuits and gravy, pancakes, an omelet bar and just about any other breakfast dish imaginable.

Students from around the globe adapt to foreign customs and language barriers in the United States and on campus | Page 4

SPORTS

Story by Freddy Hunt | Illustrations by Geneva Hodgson

For new and returning students trying to familiarize themselves, here are a few tasty little jewels on campus and around Bowling Green that all students should know about.

Campus clubs need more participation

PEOPLE ON THE STREET

FEAST LIKE A FALCON

ESTABLISHED 1920 A daily independent student press serving the campus and surrounding community

TODAY Scattered Storms High: 77, Low: 66

TOMORROW Isolated Thunderstorms High: 87, Low: 69

Administration figures. More than 200,000 pounds of codeine, morphine, oxycodone, WASHINGTON — Retail sales hydrocodone and meperidine of five leading painkillers nearwere purchased at retail stores Robert Walker | Researcher at University of Kentucky ly doubled over the last eight during 2005, the most recent years, reflecting a surge in use year represented in the data. by patients nationwide who are oxycodone usage is migrating borhoods around the country. That is enough to give more than living in a world of pain, accord- out of Appalachia to areas such The amount of five major 300 milligrams of painkillers to ing to a new Associated Press as Columbus, Ohio, and Fort painkillers sold at retail estab- every person in the country. analysis of federal drug pre- Lauderdale, Fla., and significant lishments rose 90 percent Oxycodone, the chemical scription data. numbers of codeine users are between 1997 and 2005, accord- used in OxyContin, is responThe analysis reveals that living in many suburban neigh- ing to Drug Enforcement sible for most of the increase.

“What we’re seeing now is the rest of the nation catching up to where we were.”

Oxycodone use jumped nearly six-fold between 1997 and 2005. The drug gained notoriety as “hillbilly heroin,” often bought and sold illegally in Appalachia. But its highest rates of sale now occur in places such as suburban St. Louis and Fort Lauderdale. “What we’re seeing now is the rest of the nation catching up to where we were,” said Robert

See DRUGS | Page 2

VISIT BGNEWS.COM: NEWS, SPORTS, UPDATES, MULTIMEDIA AND FORUMS FOR YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE


2 Tuesday, August 21, 2007

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SAFETY From Page 1

phones that are seen along side campus walkways. Members of the campus police force, as well as most A reverse 911 system calls all members of the city police listed subscribers if a threat- force also worked with the Ohio ening 911 call is made, and a Highway Patrol this summer to specific message pertain- participate in active shooter ing to that threat is sent out. training, Wiegand said. This active shooter training The University is not ready for provided all participants the reverse 911 calls yet. Wiegand explained that find- opportunity to become preing a reverse 911 system that pared for different emergenis right for the University may cies involving physical threats take some time, since so many to campus, such as an armed different companies sell the person. systems. In addition to active shooter However, the University is training, general improvelooking to reverse blue light ments to campus security

VILLAGE From Page 1

were made. Police continually look for ways to improve campus lighting and all around student safety measures. “Colleges and universities are all looking at their security measures to see what they can improve, even without the Virginia Tech tragedy, we would still be looking to improve security. We are always looking at how to improve,� Wiegand said. The University’s emergency procedure guidelines can be found at: www.bgsu.edu/ downloads/finance/file34676. pdf

a freshman studying International Studies, living in the Global Village offers experience that can’t country to room together. be found in a classroom. Junior English major Albertson shares her room Sayaka Kawami says that she with a student from Japan. enjoys living in the Global “I’ve learned more about Village because it has eased culture here in three days her transition from Japan to than I did studying four years America. of foreign language in High “All day I have to try to keep School,� she said. up with people speaking The Global Village plans English and here I can relax to hold special events, social at the end of the day. It’s nice gatherings and field trips over to have a Japanese friend,� the school year. Their Opening Kawami said. Ceremony by Candlelight will For some American stu- be held this Wednesday, Aug. dents like Molly Albertson, 22 and is open to the public.

BLOTTER SUNDAY 6:01 A.M.

A man reports being assaulted by three unknown males earlier in the evening, suffering cuts to his left elbow and hand. 8:50 A.M.

A white mailbox was taken from a home on South College Drive last night. 9:48 A.M.

An 18-year-old was charged with underage intoxication and disorderly conduct for urinating in the street. 10:19 A.M.

A stop sign was taken from the intersection of Thurstin and Frazee Avenues. 11:31 A.M.

DRUGS

by hospitals, retail pharmacies, doctors and teaching institutions. Federal investigators From Page 1 study the same data trying to identify illegal prescription patWalker, a researcher at the terns. An AP investigation found University of Kentucky Center on Drug and Alcohol Research. these reasons for the increase: • The population is getting The world of pain extends beyond big cities and involves older. As age increases, so does the need for pain medications. more than oxycodone. In Appalachia, retail sales of In 2000, there were 35 million hydrocodone — sold mostly as people older than 65. By 2020, Vicodin — are the highest in the Census Bureau estimates the nation. Nine of the 10 areas the number of elderly in the U.S. with the highest per-capita will reach 54 million. • Drug makers have embarked sales are in mostly rural parts of West Virginia, Kentucky or on unprecedented marketing campaigns. Spending on drug Tennessee. Dr. Jeffrey Gordon, director marketing has zoomed from of the blood and cancer cen- $11 billion in 1997 to nearly $30 ter at Day Kimball Hospital in billion in 2005, congressional Putnam, Conn., said Vicodin investigators found. Profit maris a popular painkiller to give gins among the leading compapatients after surgery, and many nies routinely have been three and four times higher than in doctors are familiar with it. “Over the past 10 years, there other Fortune 500 industries. • A major change in pain manhas been much better education in the medical community agement philosophy is now in to ... ask if people are having its third decade. Doctors who pain and to better diagnose and once advised patients that pain is part of the healing process treat it,â€? Gordon said. Suburbs are not immune to began reversing course in the early 1980s; most now see pain the explosion. While retail sales of codeine management as an important have fallen by one-quarter ingredient in overcoming illsince 1997, some of the highest ness. Retired Staff Sgt. rates of sales are in communities around Kansas City, Mo., James Fernandez, 54, of Nashville, Tenn., and on New Fredericksburg, Va., survived two helicopter crashes and Gulf York’s Long Island. The DEA figures analyzed War Syndrome over 20 years in by the AP include nationwide the Marine Corps. He remains sales and distribution of drugs disabled from his service-relat-

CORRECTION POLICY We want to correct all factual errors. If you think an error has been made, call The BG News at 419-372-6966. Clarification: A letter to the editor yesterday by Matt Clark, “USG needs to take an issue and run with it,� should have noted that Clark is a former member of both Undergraduate Student Government and The BG News.

TOBY TALBOT | THE BG NEWS

PAINKILLERS: OxyContin tablets are seen at Brooks Drugs in Montpelier, Vermont.

ed injuries and takes the equivalent of nine painkillers containing oxycodone every day. “It’s made a difference,â€? he said. “I still have bad days, but it’s under control.â€? Such stories should hearten longtime advocates of wider painkiller use, such as Russell Portenoy, head of New York’s Beth Israel pain management department. But they have not. “I’m concerned and many people are concerned, that the pendulum is swinging too far back,â€? he said. Consider: • More people are abusing prescription painkillers because the medications are more available. The vast majority of people with prescriptions use the

drugs safely. But the number of emergency room visits from painkiller abuse has increased more than 160 percent since 1995, according to the government. • Spooked by high-profile arrests and prosecutions by state and federal authorities, many pain-management specialists now say they offer guidance and support to patients but will not write prescriptions, even for the sickest people. The increase in painkiller retail sales continues to rise, but only barely. There was a 150 percent increase in volume in 2001. Four years later, the yearto-year increase was barely 2 percent. • People who desperately need

strong painkillers are forced to go long distances — often to a different state — to find doctors willing to prescribe high doses of medicine. Siobhan Reynolds, widow of a New Mexico patient who needed large amounts of painkillers for a connective tissue disorder, said she routinely drove her late husband to see an accommodating doctor in Oklahoma. Perhaps no place illustrates the trends and consequences for the world of pain better than Myrtle Beach, S.C., a sprawling community of strip malls, hotels and bars perched along a 60-mile strip of sand on the Atlantic Ocean. The metro area is home to 350,000 people but sees more than 14 million tourists annually, drawn to its warm water, golf courses and shopping. During the eight-year period reflected in government figures, oxycodone distribution increased 800 percent in the area of Myrtle Beach, partly due to a campaign by Purdue Pharmaceuticals of Stamford, Conn. The privately held company has pleaded guilty to lying to patients, physicians and federal regulators about the addictive nature of the drug. Use of other drugs soared in the area, too: Hydrocodone use increased 217 percent; morphine distribution went up 180 percent; even meperidine, most commonly sold as Demerol, jumped 20 percent.

A toy John Deere tractor, valued at $150, was taken from a Robinwood Lane home. 11:42 A.M.

John C. Streetman, 40, of Bowling Green, was arrested for domestic violence and taken to the Wood County Justice Center. 12 P.M.

Kellie Higgins, 21, of Springfield, Ohio, was charged with assault for hitting another woman at One-49 the previous night. 4:37 P.M.

A car parked on Fairview Avenue was keyed overnight. 6:25 P.M.

A car parked on Campbell Hill Road had both side mirrors knocked off and its roof dented. Damage is estimated at $750. 7:14 TO 9:51 P.M.

Three residents from Varsity Square Apartments report specks of paint on their cars. The paint came accidentally from a contractor painting the Mid-Wood silos near by.

MONDAY 3:20 A.M.

An unknown object was thrown through the rear passenger window of car parked on South Main Street. Damage is estimated at $100 and nothing was taken from the vehicle. 3:28 A.M.

Police notice another car parked on South Main Street with its rear passenger window broken out and dome light on. Police notified the owner. Nothing was taken and damage is estimated at $100.

Officials discuss border safety with U.S. neighbors By Deb Riechmann The Associated Press

at crossings after the Sept. 11 attacks. Bush, Mexican President MONTEBELLO, Canada — Felipe Calderon and Canadian President Bush and the leaders Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Mexico and Canada worked want their homeland security Monday to craft a plan to secure experts to figure out the best their borders in the event of a way to protect citizens in an terrorist strike or other emer- emergency, perhaps an outgency without creating traffic break of avian flu, without tie-ups that slowed commerce snarling business among the

trading partners. More broadly, the goal of the North American summit was to seek middle ground on shared concerns about the border and a host of other issues ranging from energy to trade, food safety to immigration. The three-way meeting at a highly secured red cedar chateau along the banks of the Ottawa River focused on

administrative and regulatory issues, not sweeping legislative proposals for North America. Few, if any, formal announcements were expected. The meeting served to address thorny problems between the U.S. and its neighbors to the North and South and bolster a compact — dubbed the Security and Prosperity

Partnership of North America — that serves as a way for the nations to team up on health, security and commerce. Several hundred demonstrators protested on issues such as the war in Iraq, human rights and integration of North America. One carried a banner that said: “Say No To Americanada.�

Come in for lunch or see us after the bars! We only use the Finest Hot Dog Sauce We use Roots Chicken Hot Subs Available Daily Specials

425 E. Wooster (Behind the Circle K) Open Monday thru Saturday: 11am-4am

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CAMPUS

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GET A LIFE

USG focuses on security issues

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Some of the calendar of events is taken from events.bgsu.edu

Recent deaths on railroad tracks have the group concerned

8:00 a.m to 11:00 p.m Muslim Student Association Prayer Room

By Kristen Vasas Reporter

“I am not afraid of a fight with the corporations.”

Campus safety and security is one of the main goals of the Undergraduate Student Government this year. At last night’s general assembly meeting, President Johnnie Lewis discussed USG’s plans for ensuring that all students living both on and off campus are safe at all times. One of USG’s main concerns involving campus safety and security is to make sure students are safe when crossing the railroad tracks. After two pedestrians were hit by trains in Bowling Green this summer, local police have begun ticketing anyone who crosses the train tracks at an undesignated location. Lewis said simply ticketing students who cross the train tracks at illegal spots is not enough to protect BGSU students and is willing to fight the railroad companies to ensure safety by providing more accessible railroad crossings for pedestrians. “I am a firm believer that I can tackle anything if I have the support of the people,” Lewis said. “I am not afraid of a fight with the corporations, but the safety of the students is more important than a battle.” But Michael Ginsburg, a USG

Johnnie Lewis | USG President

204 Olscamp

12:00 to 1:00 p.m Weight Watchers Union room 316

8:00-11:00 p.m RSA Casino Night Union Grand Ballroom

8:00 a.m- 9:00 p.m Textile Expression: The Movement of the Line: Act, Metif and Idea Expansion Union 131 Gallery Space

CAMPUS BRIEFS BG NEWS WIRE SOURCES

Stickers on student IDs no longer necessary Students will no longer need to have a white validation sticker indicating class rank and credit hours on the back of their BGSU ID’s to gain access to campus facilities or events. The magnetic strip on the back of BG1 cards will now determine whether students are permitted to access facilities like the Students Recreation Center, Perry Field House, University Libraries and athletic events.

faculty advisor and the Assistant Dean of Students, said it could be difficult for USG to work with large corporations to make the changes Lewis suggested. “Railroads are private companies which means that railroads are private properties,” Ginsburg said. “Crossing the railroad tracks at undesignated locations is therefore trespassing and against the law.” Because it is against the law to cross the railroad tracks anywhere that is not a marked crossing, both Lewis and Ginsburg feel that it is an inconvenience for students who live and walk near the tracks. “However, a little inconvenience is better than not being alive at all,” Ginsburg said. Chief of Staff, Erin Darnely, said she understands how the new law can make it more difficult to get to and from campus, and is in support of trying to make a change. “Even though it may be a big fight, [we] do hope we get our voices out there,” she said. USG also hopes to assist the University in their efforts to increase communication on campus should a security crisis

arise. The University is already developing a plan to collect students’ cell phone numbers to send out warnings if needed. For next year’s incoming freshman, cell phone numbers would be collected when first accessing their BG Net account. Along with a home address, a cell phone number would be requested, but all students would be given the option to decline. Current students would be asked to give their cell phone numbers when registering for classes next semester and would also have the option to decline. “In the case of a scenario like the one that occurred at Virginia Tech, [students] would be connected through cell phones and be able to avoid any areas that would be considered dangerous,” Lewis said. Along with safety and security, USG also plans to ask the Board of Trustees to give voting privileges to student trustees who are only permitted to voice their opinions at meetings. USG is also working to make instructor evaluations public to assist students in selecting classes each semester.

College students continue under parental guidance The proliferation of cell phone use on campuses has caused many students to continue on an ‘electronic leash’ “electronic leash,” as some teens call it, assures that the kids have little excuse for not informing parents of their whereabouts. And mom and dad are quickly reachable if something goes awry. But young adults in college are supposed to practice and prove their independence. All that contact, used the wrong way, can impede those goals, student affairs experts say. Waddell said about half the

GO GREEK!

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — All those cell phones on college campuses aren’t just talking to each other. They’re speed-dialing home. A lot. Got a problem with university bureaucracy? Mom and dad will know what to do. Time to kill between classes? Chat up mom or dad. Think you just blew a chemis-

try exam? Unload on the folks. Not to mention the calls going the other direction. “One mom mentioned that she calls her son to wake him up in the morning,” said Sandy Waddell, assistant dean of students at Rockhurst University. “She said if she didn’t, he might not make it to class. I told her I thought that was a bit over the top.” Cell phones are a godsend for parents of high schoolers. The

Greek Carnival Wednesday, August 22, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Union Oval Meet all of BGSU’s 44 fraternities and sororities and get more information about joining Register for Panhellenic Sorority recruitment at www.greekbgsu.com by Wednesday, September 5

NPHC Meet the Greeks Monday, September 10, 6 - 8 p.m. Lenhart Grand Ballroom, Union Meet the members of BGSU’s seven historically African-American NPHC fraternities and sororities

www.greekbgsu.com

By Edward M. Eveld MCT

Tuesday, August 21, 2007 3

students on campus had cell phones a few years ago. Now, nearly every student does. At orientation sessions, Waddell tells parents the college years are a time for emancipation, when young adults learn to handle matters on their own.

STEVE HELBER | AP PHOTO

EVACUATION: Virginia Tech students, Lauren Steel and Matt MacCormack, carry items out of an apartment where several students were overcome by carbon monoxide.

Carbon monoxide leak hits Virginia Tech campus By Sue Lindsey The Associated Press

BLACKSBURG, Va. — A Virginia Tech campus still reeling from the deaths of 32 people at the hands of a student gunman last spring began its fall semester yesterday amid another tragedy: a carbon monoxide leak at an off-campus apartment left five roommates hospitalized, two in critical condition. The leak appeared to be from a faulty valve in a gas water heater in the apartment the students shared, Blacksburg Police Capt. Bruce

Bradbery said. It was discovered Sunday morning after a neighbor complained of fumes, just as Virginia Tech was preparing to dedicate a memorial to the 27 students and five faculty members killed April 16 by Seung-Hui Cho. Bruce Bradbery was at the dedication ceremony when he got the call. “Enough’s enough,” he said. Last fall, an escaped fugitive on the loose near campus had forced the university to shut down on its first day of classes.

Come Visit the Ladies of Alpha Phi August 22 & 23 Alphi Phi House 8 to 10 p.m.

Must be at least a sophomore


FORUM

“I’ve learned more about culture here in three days than I did studying four years of foreign language in High School.”

PEOPLE ON THE STREET “Probably not, I’ll be honest. It was a total downpour ... and I have 8:30 a.m. classes.” MIKE BRETELSON, Sophomore, Physical Education

Would you have come to classes even with the rain if it weren’t the first day?

JEREMY FOSKITT, Graduate Student, College Student Personnel

EMILY EVERLY, Junior, CDIS

Each year from mid-July to late August, Bowling Green welcomes a sizeable number of foreign students. With students coming from diverse countries in Africa, Europe, South America and Asia, the University is certainly home to an eclectic mix of cultures, nationalities and outlooks. And that is the crux of the matter: something both the University and the community are proud of. This mix of students stimulates a lively and diverse campus atmosphere and gives students the opportunity to learn from each other, making them better citizens of the world. For most international students, arrival in Bowling Green almost invariably marks the start of their first visit to the United States. The initial experiences in Bowling Green therefore embody and inform their perceptions and expectations of this great nation. Bowling Green becomes the crucible upon which the first lessons into the American way of life are assimilated. With its beautiful and complex history, the U.S. is also the world’s poster child of capitalism. To the new international student, this much-acclaimed American way they must adapt to is not only unique, but also confusing and staggering. Common courtesy calls for people to smile to everyone (when I came, I thought most Americans had twitches in the face!), and people say “hi” so fast you wonder whatever happened to shaking hands. Even for those who speak English, the accent is another story altogether. Then there are the societal cleavages, mostly along race. A lot of international students learn to their amazement that race is clear and present in the United States.

Don’t even get me started on the food; the American menu is truly varied, extensive and mouth-watering. That, however, does not help hapless international students who have to make do with the strange sounding names and food that is so much different than it is back home. They slowly become accustomed to burgers, pizza, hush puppies and pop! It took me some time to swap “soda” for “pop” and to think of puppies as food! The stores are another thing altogether. You know, the rest of the world has stores, but the United States has STORES. The merchandise in those stores is mind-boggling. One international student once observed that Americans have so many choices in the stores it takes a lot of willpower to decide even which cheese to buy. That is what an unabashed market economy does. A lot of countries in the world have mass transit systems; not the United States and certainly not northwest Ohio. International students then have to make do with rides from friends, colleagues and people on the road until they can buy their own cars. To the credit of the community in Bowling Green, both on campus and off, its efforts at welcoming international students is always appreciated and regarded. Certainly many place long-distance calls to farflung homes across the world to marvel at the wonder and grace that is their welcome to Bowling Green. Going to another country far, far away from home and family, away from one’s usual way of life, is never easy. Coming to America, for most people, is a dream. The United States, truth be told, is highly admired by everyone — well almost everyone — in the world. It evokes in many people the ideals of liberty, the rule of law, pursuit of happiness, glamour and all those beautiful ideals expressed in the immortal Declaration of Independence. It is these ideals and many others that enthrall

people all over the world about the United States. Cheers to the nation of nations. When new international students come to Bowling Green each fall, they are usually eager to live, even in a miniature sort of way, in an American fashion. Anything that Bowling Green presents to these students becomes the lenses with which they look at the United States. It shocks many foreign students when they realize how little some Americans know about the rest of the world. So next time you meet an international student, strike up a conversation with them, get to know their home country and what it is like to live there. To international students, soak up as much as you can about the American way — it makes assimilation and living here easier. Above all, we should all, whether American or international, appreciate, treasure and nourish diversity. We are living in a global village, and interdependence is the key to this globalized world. Welcome to Bowling Green, all new students. Welcome to Bowling Green and to America, all of you from foreign nations coming to study at the University. Send comments about this column to thenews@bgnews.com

SPEAK YOUR MIND Got something you want to say about an opinion column or news story? Here’s how to get in touch with us for letters to the editor: ■ ■

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MCT

THE BG NEWS LISA HALVERSTADT, EDITOR IN CHIEF 210 West Hall Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, Ohio 43403 | Phone: (419) 372-6966 E-mail: thenews@bgnews.com Web site: http://www.bgnews.com Advertising: 204 West Hall | Phone: (419) 372-2606

“No ... I don’t like getting rained on.”

“Yes, I definitely would because I only have class once a week.”

“It would depend on what class ... probably [yes for] the classes that pertain to my major.”

A long list of lifestyle changes awaits new international students MWENDAH M’MAILUTHA COLUMNIST

Tuesday, August 21, 2007 4

— Molly Albertson, a freshman living in the new Global Village learning community [see story, p. 1].

VISIT US AT BGNEWS.COM

JORDEN MEADOWS, Junior, Political Science

STAFF EDITORIAL

Have your own take on today’s People On The Street? Or a suggestion for a question? Give us your feedback at bgnews.com.

LOOK MA, NEW NAME!

A note of thanks for the rain-soaked

You’re looking at what used to be called the Opinion page. We’ve changed the name this year to “Forum.” The name reflects our belief that the page should serve as place where everyone on campus and in Bowling Green should have a chance to have his or her views seen, not just our regular columnists.

We all owe a thank-you to the BGSU staff who braved hours of rain to help students move into their residence halls on Sunday. Parking and traffic employees, RA’s, residence hall staff and more worked so students could get into their dry rooms as soon as possible. They helped students and parents for hours on end, despite what were most likely many pairs of drenched socks. Being a staff employee here is often a thankless job. When we leave half-finished pop bottles in classrooms and scribble on bathroom walls, they don’t just take care of themselves. Someone puts their labor into making this place run as smoothly as it can — lots of people do, actually. But at the rate at which we continue to litter and scribble, you’d be hard-pressed to notice that we care. So let’s take Sunday as a starting point. Don’t just thank staff today, thank them every day by keeping their jobs in mind as you go about campus.

What do you think? Look at the “Speak your mind” box on this page for details on how to contact us.

TOMMOROW IN FORUM Jason Snead on raising the drinking age to 25. Dave Herrera on the journalism class we need, now.

BGeX is useful, but freshman need more to keep them here BRIAN KUTZLEY COLUMNIST

Bowling Green has a rather infuriating problem. Apparently a large number of our incoming students never make it to graduation. When I was first recruited by a political science professor to be a peer facilitator at the end of my sophomore year, she explained to me the purpose of the BGeX program is presumably to encourage freshman interaction by giving them a small class and a role model. They then can take that to their fellow students so well that they will keep their grades up and never even consider transferring away. While I applaud the intent of this program — it has been recognized in various publications as an innovative outreach — I feel like we are essentially blaming the waiter because we ordered the wrong dish. Let me explain. It is possible that the University’s retention rate is poor because the faculty and administration have somehow failed incoming students. However, I am more inclined to believe that the bulk of the responsibility falls on, surprisingly, the incoming students. BGeX has attempted to create a shortcut by giving students an early group of friends with, ideally, the same interests. Unfortunately, however, unless BGeX becomes outright invasive and requires outside get-togethers on regular occasions, it is up to the students whether they will ever make anything of this network. So while it might be too early to tell, I have a suspicion that very few of these future graduating seniors will accredit their success to BGeX. That said, please note that I am not trying to tear down the program itself. I think it is a great idea with a lot of benefits, but I also think it cannot function

DAVE HERRERA, SENIOR EDITOR CANDICE JONES, SENIOR EDITOR KELLY DAY, CAMPUS EDITOR TIM SAMPSON, CITY EDITOR STEPHANIE GUIGOU, DESIGN EDITOR BRIAN SZABELSKI, WEB EDITOR KRISTEN MOONEY, COPY CHIEF COLIN WILSON, SPORTS EDITOR ADDIE CURLIS, PULSE EDITOR CHRISTY JOHNSON, SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR JORDAN FLOWER, PHOTO EDITOR

alone. Potentially, it has a great deal of help. There are literally hundreds of student groups on campus. They range from intramural sports to common interests, politics, special interests, religious pursuit and quite a few I have undoubtedly forgotten. Every year at Campus Fest these groups give their sales pitch to anyone who will listen, and hope desperately that someone new will show up at the next meeting, event or outing. Here is the kicker though: They are rarely successful. Even those that acquire new members often lose them within a month to apathy or time conflict with a favorite TV show. Obviously there is some aspect of speculation to that statement, however I personally have tried out or worked with something in the ballpark of a dozen groups before finding the one I could really get involved in, and in each one I saw the same trend. A large group of freshmen would bolster the ranks and then quickly lose interest, and the club would dwindle to its stoic veterans and maybe a handful of its more passionate newcomers. Last fall, an outside representative explained to my club that at most schools, a prominent organization should be able to recruit 1 percent of their student body, which at Bowling Green came out to 161 members out of 16,100 undergraduates. Yet time and again, my organization and the others I have kept in touch with have to struggle to get 25 members to show up at a meeting. So here is some slightly suspect math to consider. If we have approximately 300 organizations on campus, with

“[BGeX] is a great idea with a lot of benefits, but I also think it cannot function alone.” perhaps 20 members per meeting — and assuming no overlap — there are only 6,000 students active in clubs. That’s barely over one-third of the campus. So perhaps the reason we have such a problem with students dropping out and transferring is more a fault of the students than the University. I guess the moral of the story is be careful whom you blame. The University provides access to every activity you could ever want — all you have to do is find it. For a shortcut, go to the school’s Web site and use the pull-down bar to go to the Student Organization page [under “Student Life”] and call the Office of Campus Involvement to figure out when the next meeting is. Also, do not be afraid to walk in halfway through a semester. You might not get an immediate job, but I can guarantee a new member is always a welcome sight. So please, help BGeX make Bowling Green more than a series of classrooms and bars. Take the time out of your TV schedule — invest in a VCR if you must — and try out a few new things. You might just figure out why it is called a campus community. Send comments about this column to thenews@bgnews. com

CHECK THIS OUT! The BG News is still looking for opinion columnists and editorial cartoonists!

Everyone on campus is welcome to apply — students, faculty and staff. E-mail thenews@bgnews.com for more information.

The BG News Submission Policy LETTERS TO THE EDITOR are to be fewer than 300 words. These are usually in response to a current issue on the University’s campus or the Bowling Green area. GUEST COLUMNS are longer pieces between 400 and 500 words. These are usually also in response to a current issue on the University’s campus or the Bowling Green area. The maximum number of submissions for columns is two per month.

POLICIES: Letters to the Editor and Guest Columns are printed as space on the Opinion Page permits. Additional Letters to the Editor or Guest Columns may be published online. Name, year and phone number should be included for verification purposes. Personal attacks, unverified information or anonymous submissions will not be printed.

E-MAIL SUBMISSIONS as an attachment to thenews@bgnews. com with the subject line marked “Letter to the Editor” or “Guest Column.” Only e-mailed letters and columns will be considered for printing. All letters are subject to review for length and clarity before printing. Opinion columns do not necessarily reflect the view of The BG News.


WORLD

WWW.BGNEWS.COM

Many changes approved by City Council By Megan Armentrout Reporter

MONDAY’S BOWLING GREEN CITY COUNCIL MEETING ACTION:

VOTE:

Next Meeting: Sept. 3

WHAT THIS MEANS TO YOU:

A resolution was adopted which authorizes Mayor John Quinn to enter into a coordination agreement between the City of Bowling Green and the Ohio Historic Preservation Office.

5-0

An ordinance was adopted to authorize the Utilities Director to execute an agreement between the University and the City of Bowling Green. This will be for the installation and maintenance of certain composite communications cable.

5-0

These communication cables have the capacity to carry a broad range of telephonic, video and data signals.

An ordinance was passed authorizing the Utilities Director to advertise for bids and enter into a contract or contracts for the Poe Road and Lafayette Boulevard sewer improvements.

5-0

Sewer improvements will bring construction to a major road leading to campus, Poe Road.

The city will be working with the Ohio Historic Preservation Office.

Illegal immigrant continues to fight U.S. policy By Elliot Spagat The Associated Press

Elvira Arellano, 32, became an activist and a national symbol for illegal immigrant parTIJUANA, Mexico — An illegal ents as she defied her deportaimmigrant who took refuge in tion order and spoke out from a Chicago church for a year to her sanctuary. She announced avoid being separated from her last week that she was leavAmerican-born son was deport- ing the Adalberto United ed from the United States to Methodist Church to try to Mexico, where she vowed yester- lobby U.S. lawmakers. She had just spoken at a Los day to continue her campaign to Angeles rally when she was change U.S. immigration laws.

arrested Sunday outside Our Lady Queen of Angels church and deported, said the Rev. Walter Coleman, pastor of Adalberto United Methodist. “They were in a hurry to deport me because they saw that I was threatening to mobilize and organize the people to fight for legalization,” Arellano said.

Tuesday, August 21, 2007 5

People escape potentially fatal crash

THE BG NEWS SUDOKU

By Debby Wu The Associated Press

NAHA, Japan — Taiwan grounded its fleet of Boeing 737-800 jetliners after a China Airlines plane exploded in a fireball yesterday on the tarmac in Okinawa, and officials said a fuel leak may be to blame. All 165 passengers and crew scrambled down emergency chutes or jumped from cockpit windows — some just seconds before the blast. Passengers described a normal landing after Flight CI-120 landed on the resort island of Okinawa from the Taiwanese capital of Taipei. But as the jet came to a stop near the terminal, they said that the left engine began smoking, followed by the right one. Okinawa Airport traffic controllers had received no report from the pilot indicating anything was wrong as the plane came in to land and even as it stopped near the terminal to unload passengers, said Japanese Transport Ministry official Akihiko Tamura. When the smoke started billowing outside the plane, the cabin crew already was standing by the doors, said a passenger who gave his surname as Tsang and identified himself as a guide for Taipei’s Southeast Tours.

SUDOKU To play: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3 x 3 box contains the digits 1 to 9. There is no guessing or math involved. Just use logic to solve.

Mexican coast prepares for Hurricane Dean strike in Yucatan Peninsula By Mark Stevenson Associated Press

and urged residents to leave. was evacuating all of its more ashore early Tuesday. than 14,000 offshore workers Dean already had winds of The storm - which killed at least in the southern Gulf of Mexico, 150 mph as it brushed past the 10 people across the Caribbean TULUM, Mexico — Tens of thou- which includes the giant Cayman Islands on Monday, was expected to slash across the but the U.S. National Hurricane Yucatan and emerge in the Gulf sands of tourists fled the beaches Cantarell oil field. of the Mayan Riviera on Monday Cancun seemed likely to be Center said the storm could of Campeche, where Petroleos as monstrous Hurricane Dean spared a direct hit, but visitors grow even stronger - into a giant de Mexico decided Monday to roared toward the ancient ruins abandoned its swank hotels Category 5 hurricane - before shut down production on the and modern oil installations of to swarm outbound flights. striking Mexico. At 2 p.m. EDT, offshore rigs that extract most of Officials evacuated more rustic Dean was centered 330 miles the nation’s oil. the Yucatan Peninsula. Mexico’s state oil company, lodgings farther south, where east of Belize City, where Shutting the 407 oil wells in the Petroleos de Mexico, said it Dean was expected to smash authorities closed all hospitals Campeche Sound will result in

The Enclave

a production loss of 2.7 million barrels of oil and 2.6 billion cubic feet of natural gas a day, Pemex said. Of that, about 1.7 million barrels of oil a day is exported from three Gulf ports, where Pemex was loading the final tankers Monday morning before shutting them as well. Central Mexico was next on the storm’s path, though the outer bands were likely to bring rain

and gusty winds to south Texas, already saturated after an unusually rainy summer. At the southern tip of Texas, officials urged residents to evacuate ahead of the storm. “Our mission is very simple. It’s to get people out of the kill zone, to get people out of the danger area, which is the coastline of Texas,” said Johnny Cavazos, Cameron County’s chief emergency director.

®

706 Napoleon Rd | Bowling Green, OH 43402 | 419-353-510

Enclave l

Enclave ll

Stop by, take a tour, sign a lease and be entered to win a 2008 spring break trip worth $500 *trip offer only valid at the Enclave II

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lll#XdaaZ\ZeVg`lZW#Xdb


SPORTS

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

6

SIDELINES

Just like the real thing MAC players enjoy starring as themselves in EA sports’ college football title BASKETBALL 2007-’08 Men’s and Women’s Basketball schedules announced The official schedule has been released for Louis Orr’s first season at the helm for the Falcons. His first game will be in familiar territory.

MEN’S SOCCER Falcons fall to CSU Cleveland State managed two late goals to get past BG in Sunday’s game. Jacob Lawrence scored the lone Falcon goal. He was assisted by Ryan Perea. The Falcons play another exhibtion game at home Friday before going on a fourgame road trip to start the season.

OUR CALL Today in sports history: 1986 - With 2 outs in the 6th inning of a game. The Boston Red Sox score 11 runs. 1982 - Rollie Fingers of the Milwaukee Brewers becomes the first Major League pitcher to to get his 300th save. 1967 - Ken Harrelson becomes baseball’s first free agent. 1953 - Baseball player reps Ralph Kiner (NL) and Allie Reynolds (AL) hire John Norman Lewis at $15,000 to give legal advice to players in contract negotiation. 1929 - The Chicago Cardinals become the first pro football team to train out of town. 1926- Chicago White Sox pitcher Ted Lyons no-hits the Boston Red Sox 6-0 in just 67 minutes at Fenway Park. 1922 - Curly Lambeau and Green Bay Football Club are granted NFL franchise.

PHOTO BY BRANDON HEISS | ILLUSTRATION BY SCOTT PARTRIDGE

AROUND THE MAC

The summer months don’t exactly bring excitement to the casual sports fan. Baseball is in the dog days of its season. There is no football or basketball until the fall. There isn’t much for people to do except await the arrivals of two of EA Sports’ best selling video games – Madden for NFL and NCAA for the college game. Madden is a popular game that allows the user to play as his or her favorite team and have the ability to build a dynasty with them. But unless your name is Clinton Portis, Chad Johnson or any other pro football player, you are not actually playing as yourself in the game. The NCAA game is unique to the college game because the athletes in the game are the same people you and I have class with on a day-today basis. They are students like the rest of us, but they actually get to have their likeness embodied in a video game. The athletes eagerly await the arrival of the game because it gives them something to do at their various training camps at night. The competition the game brings is a needed break from the mundane nature of

MAKING AN IMPACT: BG’s impact players are Diyral Briggs on defense and Chris Bullock and Anthony Turner on offense.

training camp in the dorms. “Everybody went out and got it and started playing it the first night of training camp,” said Central Michigan linebacker Ike Brown. “Tournaments go on all the time – everybody’s always playing it whenever there’s free time.” Brown is one of the various players who expressed distaste in his rating in the game. Brown believes he is faster and stronger than the game gave him credit for. “I’m mad about my strength and I’m mad about my speed. I’m way stronger than they give me credit for, and I’m way faster than they give me credit for,” Brown said. “I just base it off the other players on my team — how their speed is rated. They got me rated the same as some of the guys on my team, and I’ll blow them out.” The speed and strength attributes were hot-button issues for the players who recently gathered at the MidAmerican Conference Media Day in Detroit, Mich., during which representatives from

See GAME | Page 7

Were you happy with your ratings on EA Sports’ NCAA Football ’08?

“They got me rated the same as some of the guys on my team, and I’ll blow them out.”

“I think I’m faster, and I didn’t even get the impact player – but I’m not mad about it.”

“It’s a lot more fun than last year – I’m not the worst quarterback on the team anymore.”

“[In the game] I’m a small guy that’s not very fast, that can’t throw far.”

IKE BROWN, Linebacker, Central Michigan

JACK WILLIAMS, Cornerback, Kent State

DAN LEFEVOUR, Quarterback, Central Michigan

JULIAN EDELMAN, Quarterback, Kent State

Vick reaches plea agreement according to lawyer Faces up to five years and $250,000 fine for offenses

The List

By Larry O’dell The Associated Press

The BG News breaks down the top five sports video games of all-time.

1. Madden football: It’s hard to believe this phenomenon began as a way to teach kids how to learn and read plays. It has also revolutionized NCAA Football. Tecmo deserves an honorable mention here. 2. NBA Jam: Thankfully no one ever rips this game off on SportsCenter. The only game that would ever make a virtual Mark Price that can dunk. 3. Tiger Woods: Ever play that game and then think you can golf better? Usually it follows with a very bad day on the links. 4. RBI Baseball: MLB players still play this game to this day.

TRUE MEASURE?

By Bill Bordewick Reporter

TONY DEJAK | AP PHOTO

HOLDING IN DOWN: NFL commissioner Roger Goodell answers questions about Michael Vick during a visit to the Cleveland Browns training camp, Thursday in Berea, Ohio.

RICHMOND, Va. — Michael Vick’s lawyer said yesterday the NFL star would plead guilty to federal dogfighting conspiracy charges, putting the Atlanta Falcons quarterback’s career in jeopardy and leaving him subject to a possible prison term. The offense is punishable by up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, although federal sentencing guidelines most likely would call for less. Vick’s plea hearing is Aug. 27. Lead defense attorney Billy Martin said Vick reached an

agreement with federal prosecutors after consulting with his family over the weekend. “Mr. Vick has agreed to enter a plea of guilty to those charges and to accept full responsibility for his actions and the mistakes he has made,” Martin said in a statement. “Michael wishes to apologize again to everyone who has been hurt by this matter.” Martin later told The Associated Press he could not divulge any specifics of the plea agreement or how much time Vick can expect to serve in prison. NFL commissioner Roger

Goodell has barred Vick from the Falcons’ training camp, but has withheld further action while the league conducts its own investigation. “We totally condemn the conduct outlined in the charges, which is inconsistent with what Michael Vick previously told both our office and the Falcons,” the league said in a statement. The NFL added that it has asked the Falcons “to continue to refrain from taking action pending a decision by the commissioner.” Martin said salvaging Vick’s NFL career was never part of the discussions.

HARAZ N. GHANBARI | AP PHOTO

PLEA AGREED: Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick leaves the federal courthouse in Richmond, Va., following his arraignment on federal dogfighting charges in this July 26 file photo.

Buckeyes’ looking for leaders in ’07 By Rusty Miller The Associated Press

5. California Games: How many games can you skateboard, bike and surf in? TERRY GILLIAM | AP PHOTO

LEADING THE CHARGE: Ohio State football coach Jim Tressel, center, leads his team on the field during the second half against Penn State, Saturday, Sept 23, 2006, in Columbus.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — It’s that time of year when football teams blab on and on about how important their senior leadership will be. You don’t hear that coming out of Ohio State. That’s because seniors are on the endangered list for the Buckeyes. By extension, no one knows for certain if there will be a commensurate shortfall of that

hard-to-measure intangible called leadership. A scan of Ohio State’s roster shows only 12 seniors among the 110 players in fall camp. Compare that with the 40 players who are freshmen in terms of eligibility. “I know on the defensive line, we’ve only got one and that’s Brett Daly,” defensive coordinator Jim Heacock said. “The linebacking corps, we’ve got Larry Grant and Curtis Terry. ... On the back end, we just don’t have that.” And it’s not just on defense. If anything, the offense has even

fewer players entering their final year. Moreover, of that dirty dozen of seniors, only one, offensive tackle Kirk Barton, was a starter a year ago and just two others, Grant and Terry, saw substantial playing time. Daly, long snappers Dimitrios Makridis and Jackson Haas, running back Trever Robinson, receiver Brent Ullery, fullback Tyler Whaley, fullback Dionte Johnson, defensive back De’Angelo Haslam and offensive lineman Daniel Dye have seen some action but to little effect.


SPORTS

WWW.BGNEWS.COM

GAME From Page 6 all 13 MAC teams come together for media meet and greets. Kent State’s two representatives, defensive back Jack Williams and quarterback Julian Edelman, both expressed their opinions on the various attributes they thought were incorrect. “I think I’m faster, and I didn’t even get the impact player, but I’m not mad about it,” Williams said. “It’s just a video game, though; it’s all in good fun.” The impact player Williams speaks of is kind of a status rank in which the top three players on the team are given stars around their names (BG’s impact players are Anthony Turner, Chris Bullock and Diyral Briggs). Edelman is listed as one of

Classified Ads

419-372-6977 The BG News will not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate, or encourage discrimination against any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, creed, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, disability, status as a veteran, or on the basis of any other legally protected status. The BG News reserves the right to decline, discontinue or revise any advertisement such as those found to be defamatory, lacking in factual basis, misleading or false in nature. All advertisements are subject to editing and approval.

KSU’s impact players, but that did not stop him from being unhappy with his rating. “I’m not happy about everything,” Edelman said. “[In the game] I’m a small guy that’s not very fast that can’t throw far.” Fellow quarterback Dan LeFevour of Central Michigan acted as if he was relieved that the game noted his accomplishments from last season. “It’s a lot more fun than last year – I’m not the worst quarterback on the team anymore,” LeFevour said. “Its fun.” While some of the other players at Media Day were not happy with their ratings, BG players Kory Lichtensteiger and Loren Hargrove were a bit more humble with theirs. “I haven’t seen it, but somebody I was talking to said I was ranked pretty well,” Hargrove said.

“I was talking with Briggs – and I guess he’s the impact player in the game, which he definitely deserves because he’s an impact player on the field – and said everybody was ranked pretty well. You know it’s realistic and I can’t wait to start playing it.” Lichtensteiger was perfectly content with his ranking of an 89. He’s a “Halo guy” though. He gets enough football in real life and doesn’t need anymore in the digital world. The game got mixed feelings from players all across the MAC but that just adds to the unique situation that the game puts these players in. They get to play as themselves in a video game – which is a pretty cool feeling if you ask me. As Wayne and Garth would say, “Game On.”

City Events

Help Wanted

On Weds. & Thurs., Aug. 22-23, btwn. hours of 9am to 11:30am & 1:00pm to 4:30pm., the Northwest Regional Library System (NORWELD) will be giving away free computers & peripherals. The office is located at 183 S. Main St. in BG (the northeast corner of Clough & Main Sts. , opposite H&R Block.) Much of the equipment is outdated but still functional. Well be recycling what isnt taken but old laptops, monitors, Macs, PCs, scanners, printers & various other computer equipment will be given away at no charge. No inquiries prior to the giveaway.

BABYSITTER needed to care for girls (1 & 4 yrs.) in our BG home. Flexible daytime hours (AM and/or PM) Good references & credentials a must. Contact Deborah at dschock@bgsu.edu

Wanted Subleaser Needed! Enclave I apt. avail. for sublease. 1 male occup. to fill vacancy of 4 man apt. Furn., $324 mo. plus util. Call Kyle 419-206-0985

Help Wanted !BARTENDING! up to $300/day No exp. necessary. Training provided. Call 800-965-6520 ext. 174. ** Avail. now. Rooms. $225 mo. 4 bdrm. free internet. cartyrentals.com Call 419-353-0325.

11/2 Blocks From Campus

709 5th Street APARTMENTS

Studios & 1 Bedrooms:

Child care center now hiring care givers for days, eves., weekends. Send resume or apply in person. 580 Craig Dr., Suite 2, Perrysburg OH 43551. info@kidzwatch.net. Experienced book keeper One day a week. $7.00 hour. 419-872-6222 Infant/Toddler Teacher -BG WSOS Community Action Commission, a community based organization. focused on the human service needs of the disadvantaged, is seeking a qualified individual to be responsible for the care and supervision of an infant/toddler classroom in compliance with all policies, procedures, licensing and funding requirements. Required Bachelors degree in Early Childhood Education; one to three years experience working with infants and toddlers in a classroom or childcare setting; up to one year experience working with word processing, spreadsheet, internet and database software. Year Round, Full-Time,$11.55/hr. Send resume by August 31, 2007 to: WSOS CAC, Attn: HR-ITT/BG/CT,PO Box 590, Fremont, OH 43420. Affirmative Action Employer-M/F/Vet/Disab. Lifeguards & Swim Instructors Wolf Creek YMCA Ann Lofton 419-866-9622

Studios: from $309 1 Bedrooms: from $435

MIKES PARTY MART

C/A, Pets Welcome On Site Laundry Private Entrance/Patio Short Term Leases Avail 419-352-7691

$525/month Full Year Lease E.H.O.

For Rental Information: Contact Jack at 1-800-829-8638 or Steve at (419) 352-1150

A popular, fun, friendly family owned business in BG has 1 part-time sales clerk position avail. 14-22 hrs./wk. Must be friendly, neat, honest, dependable, good work ethic, desires steady empolyment throughout the year & be avail. weekends & some week nights. Apply Tues. 8-21 - Thurs. 8-23 between 8am-5pm at 834 S. Main, BG (Located in Big Lots Plaza). 419-352-9259.

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

The Daily Crossword Fix 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 22 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 33 34 36 37 41 43 1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 23 24 25 28 31 35 38 39 40 41 42 43

Composer Khachaturian Intrepid Talon Short version of a long car? German gun Top-drawer Verbalize an ache Dress style Lowly worker Jason Robards film D-Day craft Soldering metal Cultural values L.A. hrs. Specialized parties With 43A, Cecil B. DeMille epic __ polloi Towel word Easy gaits Synthesizer man Ike’s arena See 35A

Soprano Gluck Prison uprising Asian nanny Johnny Carson’s forte Gust of wind Actress Lenska Not fer, in Dogpatch Peddle Upright Gangster Al MGM co-founder Marcus Shortly 44 Harmless cysts 46 Old atlas initials 50 London elevator 51 Old anesthetic 52 Greek letter 53 King of Judea 54 Oral statement 55 “Dred” author 56 Rockies range 57 Coast 58 Drinking sprees Spectacle 59 Numerical ending 60 9-digit ID Military equipment Before long

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

For Sale

Counter person needed at local dry cleaners. Must be avail. 2-6 Mon. thru Fri. & some Sats. $8.25 starting Apply at 1204 W. Wooster. 419-3544494.

Organist/Pianist, First Christian Church 875 Haskins Rd., BG, OH 43402.. Ph:419-354-3989. Accompany Sun. morn. worship services, special services, & Wed. evening choir rehearsals. Send resumes to the church or e-mail fccadmin@wcnet.org.

Sleeper sectional couch. Good cond. Pick up in BG. $300. Call Jenn at 353-2303

Seeking babysitter, 7-9 a.m., weekdays. Please call 419-494-9233 if interested.

1 bdrm. apt. for grad students or mature undergrads. Located close to campus, Avail. in Aug. $360-375. Call Gary 352-5414.

Do you need a home? I need someone to be with me. Possibility of extra job. Room & board includ. Heart patient, double amputee. Please call 419-686-8676 or 419-601-1341, ask for Mike. Nanny 11 am to 7 pm Mon. thru Fri. Some overnights. $7.00 hr plus benefits. Exp. pref. 419-872-6222. Nanny w/ child care exp. needed to care for 1 girl (age 3) in our BG home weekday mornings 9:30 to 12:30 MWF and/or TH. $8.00-$10.00 hr. dep. on exp. Good refs., reliable car & child care exp. req. 419-3535363. Part time wait staff & bartenders wanted. Apply at LaRoes in Grand Rapids, OH. RELIABLE, CARING BABYSITTER needed fall semester, possibly beyond for our 4 yr. old daughter in our Perrysburg home. Tues., Wed. & Fri. afternoons. We are looking for someone who will actively engage in playing with and teaching a sweet, shy girl. $7.50/hour. E-mail : vekstra@bgsu.edu.

For Rent

Sigma Alpha Lambda, a National Leadership and Honors Organization with over 70 chapters across the country, is seeking motivated students to assist in starting a local chapter (3.0 GPA Required). Contact Rob Miner, Director of Chapter Development at rminer@salhonors. org

1 to 2 rmtes. wanted for house in Portage. For 1 person-$325 each, 2-$100 for both & split utilities. Call 509-868-5744. 2 bdrm. apartments avail. immed. Short term possible. Pets allowed. 419-409-1110.

YMCA child care group leaders. Immediate openings. Available shifts, Mon. thru Fri. 6:30-9:00am & 3:00-6:00pm. Contact Sara 419-251-9622.

Efficiency Apts with bath & private entrance. Available now. 419-352-8602 FREE $200 deposit to share house with 2 guys. $270/mo. + shared util. 1-440-967-1396

Youth Team Leader,First Christian Church, 875 Haskins, BG, OH 43402 Ph:419-354-3989. Candidates should have experience developing or working w/ministry to young people & their families. Part-time. Send resumes to the church or e-mail fccadmin@wcnet.org.

Pet friendly! 3 bdrm. apt. $885 mo.. AVAIL NOW!. W/D, air, off st. pkg., 2 blks. from campus. 240 Crim St. Call Kent 419-352-7090. Rent ($300 incl.util.) Ret. teach. Share house w/ prof./grad. stdt. Lg. older BG home. 4 bdrms. 2 w.b.f.p., wooded lot, out bldgs., Pymt. neg. Lv. msg. 419-241-1200, ext. 1214.

Findlay Pike Apts. 111/113 Findlay Pk Portage, OH Large 2 & 3 bdrm Apts. Efficiency Garage for 1 Vehicle Starting at $475/mo. + Utilities Only Moments from B.G.!

Evergreen Apts. 215 E. Poe Rd. Large 1 or 2 Bedroom Efficiencies Laundry on Site BGSU Bus Route Only 15 minute walk to campus!

Heinzsite Apts. 710-652 N. Enterprise 1 & 2 Beedrooms Washer/Dryer in 2 bdrm Walking distance to campus!

3 bdrm. brick ranch. 273 State St. 2 blks. from BGSU. 1 1/2 baths, AC, double garage, appliances. Call 419-352-3478.

Spacious new 4 bdrm. house. 2 1/2 baths, walk-in closet, w/in 5 min. of BGSU. $1200 mo. 732-406-6653.

1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments

Bittersweet Farms, a facility for individuals with autism, is adding to our family of Direct Support Professionals. 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Shifts are available (Whitehouse and Pemberville locations)

•These personally rewarding positions require a strong work ethic with the patience, compassion, and Áexibility a MR/DD environment demands. •You will be joining our residents in their daily activities ranging from vocational tasks, home care and community activities to their hygiene and recreational activities. •We will train the right person, however, your high school diploma or GED is required, as is a good driving record and Ohio Driver’s License and Insurance.

From Only $490! On selected floor plans • Ground floor ranch • Private entrance • Patio • Spacious kitchen • Pets welcome!

F R E E H E AT S. Main St.

Hillsdale Apts. 1082 Fairview Ave. 1 & 2 bdrm Apts. or 3 bdrm Twnh. Dishwasher & Garbage Disposal Washer & Dryers (in 2/3 bdrm) Air Conditioning Carports & BGSU Bus Shuttle *Ask about internet discount

HELP WANTED • HELP WANTED • HELP WANTED

Call 353-5800 or Visit Us Online at www.meccabg.com Have a few places open NOW

Bridge position Dry, as wit Lethal snake Rose’s spine Prop starter? Seed coat ENT word Freshwater duck Calvary inscription Musical club Bus driver on “The Simpsons” Soup veggies __ Stanley Gardner

45 Crystal set, e.g. 47 Writer Deighton 48 Recent event in N. Korea 49 CD-__ 51 “The Waste Land” auth. 52 Fredric March film 61 Elvis __ Presley 62 __ Park, NJ 63 Roman way 64 Virna of “How to Murder Your Wife” 65 Not as cluttered 66 Common list-ender 67 Actor Guinness 68 Visitor on Earth 69 Be vanquished

For Sale

Renting for 2007/2008

Attn: Human Resources 12660 Archbold-Whitehouse Rd. Whitehouse, Ohio 43571.

N

GYPSY LANE PETCO

Please print an application from our website, www.bittersweetfarms.org Send the application or your resume to Kristy Dunlap via email: kdunlap@bittersweetfarms.org fax: 419-875-5593 or mail: Bittersweet Farms

VARSITY SQUARE APARTMENTS

VARSITY SQUARE apartments

419-353-7715

Family Dealerships

SHIFT

Chevy • Toyota • Scion • Ford • Nissan 24 hour on-line showroom is now open at thayerbg.com

Stop by the Office at 1045 N. Main St. or Check Us Out at www.meccabg.com for full listing, prices, & pictures!

• On-line credit approval

419-353-5271 1-888-440-5271

7

• On-line service appointments

www.thayerbg.com

• Car finder

419-353-5751 1-888-989-0194


8 Tuesday, August 21, 2007

WWW.BGNEWS.COM

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�� ������������������������������ ��������������������� �� ��������������������������������� �� ����������������������������������� �� ����������������������������������� �� ������������������������� �� ���������������������������� �� ��������������������� �� ���������������������������������������� �� ���������� �� ��������������������������������� �� ���������������������

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2007-08-21  

The BG News, Bowling Green State University student newspaper.

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