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THE BG NEWS Monday

Goodwill is brand name for students

January 29, 2007 Volume 101, Issue 89 WWW.BGNEWS.COM

By Jessica Spies Reporter

Film tracks child soldiers in Uganda

CAMPUS

ESTABLISHED 1920 A daily independent student press serving the campus and surrounding community

Rows and rows of used clothes, shoes and hats may not inspire most people. But the Goodwill in Bowling Green is always filled with college students. The store, located on Main Street, offers everything from personal football jerseys to never-worn Gap jeans. Mark Harris, marketing and development director for Goodwill of northwest Ohio, said the reason that Goodwill is so busy is because of the extremely low prices. College students are often trying to appear unique and will find a clothing item that they

The University will be showing “The Invisible Children” tonight in Olscamp | Page 3

BG horseback riding classes eliminated Lack of student interest drives the physical education program to cut off-campus equestrian courses | Page 3

wouldn’t normally find anywhere else. Thrift shoppers like Michelle Federici, sophomore, agree. “A lot of the clothes are very inexpensive; there are always a lot of sales on vintage clothing,” she said. “I found some really obscure shirts there too. For me, if I can find things that reflect my own personality, then I’ll buy them.” Consistent business at Goodwill can be attributed to the fact that the store sells namebrand clothes for much less than other stores, said Alice Warner, manager at the Bowling Green Goodwill. Brands like Old Navy,

See GOODWILL | Page 6

By Megan Armentrout Reporter

ECHO VARGAS | THE BG NEWS

THRIFTY: Goodwill offers customers low prices on unique clothes with previous experience.

NATION

Crowds may hurt Yosemite Park, waterways A court battle will decide if the park should limit its number of visitors | Page 11

FCC cable policy change heads to court New rules will create more competition in the cable television market | Page 10

Hockey losing streak continues

SPORTS

Spratt saves 37 shots, but game ends in BG loss to Alaska-Fairbanks | Page 7

Senior class gets first win at EMU Women’s basketball team beats Eastern Michigan, wins 11th consecutive game | Page 7

Phasing out Fridays PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JASON RENTNER | THE BG NEWS

Students kick Friday classes to the curb in favor of three-day weekends By Christy Johnson Reporter

WEATHER

PEOPLE ON THE STREET

WORLD

Insurgent battle kills 250 in Iraq Mortar shells kill five pupils in Baghdad, spurring U.N. to call the incident an “unforgivable crime” | Page 12 Should the national minimum wage be raised to $7.10/hour?

Some want to go home for a three-day weekend, others simply find it too hard to pull themselves out of bed after a Thursday night out, but one thing is clear: Friday classes are not a favorite among students. “Not scheduling class on Friday was just something that worked out for me, and when my brother went here, he didn’t have Friday class,” Daniel Perry, freshman, said. Friday has become a popular day to keep open for students for various reasons. In fact, the University offers significantly fewer classes on Fridays than any other day of the week.

The average number of classes offered Monday through Thursday is 1,349. On Friday, 928 classes are offered, which is 421 less than during the week. Academic departments choose when they want classes scheduled. “Each department develops their schedule online, we check it for errors, and let them do what they want, as long as their schedules fall in line with our scheduling grid guidelines,” said Kathy Dean, Interim Assistant Director of Registration and Scheduling. The different academic departments have reign on whether or not they wish to schedule Friday classes. “I don’t schedule Friday classes to go home if I want to on weekends, because

Multitasking adds to student stress BOBBY WALTZER, Sophomore, Communications

“I would say no. I just think it’s bad for the economy.” | Page 4

TODAY Few Snow Showers High: 25, Low: 18

TOMORROW Snow Showers High: 24, Low: 14

By Christy Johnson Reporter

Stress from school, work and relationships are a problem that most students will face in their years at the University. And after graduation, other obligations will fill the stress void where school and homework once were. Sometimes it takes more than a weekend to get back the balance, control and simplicity that gets muddled up by life’s demands. “Balance, Juggle and Control — Finding your Nanosecond of Zen,” held in Hanna Hall Friday, was a discussion workshop, led by a panel of three women: Ellen

Nagy, director of first year experience at Heidelberg College; Annette Badik, assistant director at the BG Career Center; and Michelle Simmons, the Senior Associate Director at the University. The central message was that most of us are overworked, stressed out and ignoring our basic needs as people. After a briefing about how they found individual balance in their own lives, the panel quizzed the audience on some every day activities a person could engage in that would lead to being overwhelmed. “How many of you have talk-

See STRESS | Page 6

Top choice schools take second

my Monday classes don’t start ‘til 4:30, and because Thursday night is the night everyone goes out,” Maddie Revis, freshman, said. Revis is among many students who try to make their schedules out to nix the possibility of a Friday class. Changes in the Thursday night social scene play a role in this trend. “I have seen an increase of activity on Thursday nights in the 21 years I have been here,” said Campus Police Sgt. Tim James. The Thursday night social scene lures many students into bar hopping, and has even received a clever nickname from students called, “Thirsty Thursday.” Senior Elise Adams

NUMBER OF CLASSES OFFERED ON MAIN CAMPUS PER DAY

Monday-1,521 Tuesday-1,215 Wednesday-1,493 Thursday-1,170 Friday-928

NUMBER OF ARRESTS PER DAY IN 2006

Monday-618 Thursday-737 Tuesday-665 Friday-934 Wednesday-662 Saturday-865 Sunday-801

See FRIDAY | Page 6

There has been a recent trend for students to voluntarily choose to not attend their “top choice” universities because of the troublesome cost factor. A recent article in USA Today reported college students are not going to their first choice school, not because they were not accepted, but due to financial reasons. According to the University’s Web site, 17 percent of the incoming freshman class of 2006 named Bowling Green State University as their second choice or less. The price for the incoming freshmen of 2006 to attend BG for a year was $15,819 for Ohio residents and $23,127 for non-residents. This price includes tuition, room and board, and the basic meal plan. Gary Swegan, the director of undergraduate admissions, said the price will be different for the incoming class of 2007, and it will be set sometime in June. Swegan said admissions tries to help students afford tuition by offering scholarships. “A lot of the time we do not have the information as to who [other universities] we are compared to. We press for scholarships to help those students with financial concerns. The University will not go into ‘bidding wars’ with other schools for that student,” said Swegan. Jessica Kirkham, a junior biology major, was accepted to four universities both in state and out. Clemson University was her “top choice” college because of its reputation and research opportunities. Tuition costs played a large role as to which of the four colleges she chose to attend. “BGSU was the cheapest among the schools that I had been accepted to. Overall, my main reason for choosing BGSU as my undergraduate school was the price, as well as the distance from home and the programs to which my major belongs,” Kirkham said. Emily Piros, sophomore, named Duke as her first pick because of their pre-med program. The cost of college was also a determining factor in which college she chose to attend. “When I looked at the tuition prices, BGSU was the lowest and Duke was over $30,000,” said Piros. According to the University’s Web site, 83 percent of last year’s incoming class listed BG as their “top choice” college. Some of the factors that helped them to decide are the cost of tuition, financial aid offered, location, and the fact that BG graduates gain admission to top graduate schools. Ian Rodgers, senior, said that the University was his top choice school from the beginning for many reasons. “My parents graduated from here, the price, the GeoJourney program and BGSU has a friendliness about it that no other school I visited had,” Rodgers said.

Copyrighted material overwhelms YouTube.com By Stephanie Spencer Reporter

When YouTube.com was born in February of 2005 it was intended to be a place for users to share videos and pictures in an online community setting. In less than a year, YouTube. com boasts that their audience is watching more than 70 million videos daily with more information being added to the site every minute. The draw of companies like YouTube.com is that users can watch videos of their favorite shows and possibly many other copyrighted works, uploaded by users like themselves, any time they have a free second. But luxuries like these are

sometimes too good to be true. Companies that own the copyrighted works are outraged by the fact that they have no control over their product. This is where E. Michael Harrington comes in. Last Friday, Harrington, Professor of Intellectual Property at Belmont University, spoke about the importance of patents, copyright and trademark focusing on companies like YouTube.com for permitting their users to ignore the

rules. The first of three discussions of the Tech Trends Series on campus, Harrington was invited as one of the most recognizable voices on this issue in the nation. Before Harrington spoke, junior Kandra Flowers expected the usual comment on how restrictions on copyrighted materials are necessary for the entertainment business. “I still want them to be able to show what they show while making sure to do things legally,” she said. Harrington had an entirely different approach to the issue of YouTube.com and had planned to show over 25 videos from the

VISIT BGNEWS.COM: NEWS, SPORTS, UPDATES, MULTIMEDIA AND FORUMS FOR YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE

See YOUTUBE | Page 6


2 Monday, January 29, 2007

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CAMPUS

WWW.BGNEWS.COM

GET A LIFE CALENDAR OF EVENTS Some of the calendar of events is taken from events.bgsu.edu

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. I Wish I Would Have Thought of That Day

Documentary on children in Uganda to play in Olscamp Alaina Buzas Reporter

Falcon’s Nest

5:30 - 8 p.m. Computer Science/ MIS Job and Internship Fair 202A Union

5:30 - 8 p.m. Supply Chain Management Job and Internship Fair 202 Union

6 - 8 p.m. NPHC Meet the Greeks 228 Union

7 p.m. - midnight Sail to Barbados @ Destinations Snack Bar Harshman

7:30 - 8:30 p.m. DART Presentation on Recycling 308 Union

9 - 11 p.m. Invisible Children Documentary screening 115 Olscamp

“See this film, you will be forever changed.” It’s a high claim, but it’s the one the Invisible Children advocates make on their Web site about their documentary, which will be shown tonight for free in Olscamp 115 beginning at 9 p.m. According to Lindsey Wilbarger, junior, the claim is true. “It totally changed my life when I saw it the first time,” Wilbarger said. The film, which uncovers the disturbing story of child soldiers in Uganda, has gained national recognition for its raw footage and forward message. “The movie really opened my eyes to what’s going on in Uganda,” Wilbarger said. “The media isn’t really covering it.” The children in Uganda, also called “night commuters,” walk from their villages to nearby towns night after night to avoid being kidnapped and forced to fight as soldiers for the rebel group, the Lord’s Resistance Army. Stephanie Brewer, a former BGSU student who helped bring Invisible Children to the University the past two years,

CHILDREN OF UGANDA ■ It is estimated that some 300,000

children — boys and girls under the age of 18 — are today involved in more than 30 conflicts worldwide. ■ Children are used as combatants, messengers, porters and cooks and for forced sexual services. ■ Source: www.unicef.org/

WHAT YOU CAN DO: ■ See the film tonight at 9 p.m. in

Olscamp ■ Visit www.invisiblechildren.com to

donate to the cause ■ Subscribe to the “Invisible Children”

Podcast

thinks students should see the film because it does more than just give the facts on the situation in Uganda. “It puts a face to people,” Brewer said. “The movie makes it more real.” Wilbarger and Brewer both agree that seeing the film could inspire students to take action. “Since it’s something happening now there’s a huge window for involvement,” Brewer said. And students are stepping up to the plate. The film has been shown at numerous high schools and universities around the country, and over a hundred Facebook groups exist that support Invisible Children.

Monday, January 29 , 2007 3

Horse riding courses canceled By Meghan Hunt Reporter

For years, the University has offered two horseback riding courses, one in English Horsemanship and one in Western. But neither classes were offered this spring. According to Lynn Darby, the coordinator of the PEG program, the two horseback riding classes were canceled because of the “cost-benefit ratio.” The amount of resources did not measure up to the benefits of such a class. It was this, in addition to the issue of the student liability that comes with having a class that is off campus and dealing with animals, which resulted in the

cancellation of the two horsemanship classes. The loss of these courses hurts a growing interest in this ageless sport. Katie Nixon, a junior who is active on the University’s Equestrian Team, took the western horseback riding class last year. Nixon had only been training for about three years and said the class really helped people like her, as well as beginners. She was upset about the cancellation of the classes. “I think it’s sad that they’re eliminating equestrian activity for students,” she said. Fellow member of the equestrian team Joy Harris disagreed. Harris, the English Horsemanship captain, has

taken both of the horsemanship classes that BG offered. She said, in her experience, they were not taken seriously by either the students or the instructors. The reason for the instructors lack in interest is directly because of the students lack of interest in the subject and the class itself, Harris said. Both of the classes were offered in the morning, and typically morning classes, “don’t fly with students,” Harris said. Like some of her fellow team members, Harris believes that the loss of these classes might hurt the team itself. “[It] might hinder our chances of being supported by the University,” Harris said.

UNC admissions strive to fix a mistake By Jane Stancill MCT

RALEIGH, N.C. — About 2,700 students who applied to UNCChapel Hill got good news this week: They had been accepted for the coming school year. The news was wrong. The admissions staff sent an e-mail message Tuesday

reminding high school seniors to send UNC-CH their midyear grades, which are evaluated to make sure students who have been accepted aren’t falling behind, and those being considered are still making progress. But the message began, “Congratulations again on your admission to the univer-

sity.” The admissions staff spent the better part of Wednesday notifying students and high school guidance counselors of the error. “It’s such a hard feeling to know we let these students down,” said Steve Farmer, assistant provost and director of undergraduate admissions.

UWM makes an effort to aid incoming freshmen A program started this year to help new students through their first year in college is met with mixed results By Megan Twohey MCT

Kendra Patterson, a popular extrovert in high school, clammed up and shut down. Cassie Eller made a sacrifice: her social life. David Weirick discovered his drive. These three freshmen arrived at the University of WisconsinMilwaukee from different backgrounds with different expectations. They faced tough odds: Fewer than half of freshmen graduate within six years. Nearly a third drop out the first year. UWM wants them to succeed. For the second year, it is offering freshmen extra help to keep them on track. Results are mixed: The assistance has served one student well, but the university has let another down, in ways both big and small. And, as the first-semester

experiences of Patterson, Eller and Weirick reveal, success and even academic survival depend as much on the student as the university. The Journal Sentinel is following these three to get a glimpse of what makes or breaks a freshman year. The lessons are important. With an enrollment of about 28,000, UWM educates more Wisconsin students than any other university in the state. The university loses money when a student drops out. Students who drop out lose money of their own. So do state taxpayers, who invest nearly $1 billion in the UW System, about $4,000 an undergraduate. The students’ journeys have just begun. Second semester starts tomorrow. It will bring more difficult courses for Weirick and Eller. Patterson will start over at a new college.

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Shortly into the semester, Kendra Patterson writes a paper for English summing up her attitude toward UWM. “I wrote about how I don’t want to talk to anyone here,” she says, her voice flat, her face stoic. It is a major change for someone who was voted “Most Loud” in high school. But high school was different. Classes were smaller. Everyone knew her. Now, most of her courses take place in large lecture halls where anonymous students spread out over seemingly endless rows and professors stand far away. Patterson wanted to go to the historically black Prairie View A&M University in Texas. But her mother preferred that she stay close to home and urged her to get on track to a nursing degree, even though she is not passionate about health care. Patterson, who commutes from her home on the city’s west side, has little interest in her subjects or classmates. She prefers her life off

campus, working at Home Depot and the YMCA. Most of her friends are not in college. She doodles during a health survey class in November, while an Aurora Hospital administrator in a suit talks about opportunities in the company. The class, she says, is “boring.” But she comes alive that night at a local YMCA as she sits in a folding chair helping with an afterschool program for neighborhood children. Patterson, in fitted jeans and white gym shoes, gossips with other volunteers. Children swirl around her. Familiar faces pop up. “I haven’t seen you forever,” she says, her voice bubbling, to a young man with cornrows who saunters over. “We should hang out.” Bernard Kelly, the program director, thinks Patterson is a hard worker and good with children. But he worries about her. Kelly, a Milwaukee native, earned his bachelor’s degree from UWM. He knows it can be difficult to focus on college when you live off campus. “It’s not a community college,

KRISTYNA WENTZ-GRAFF | MCT

WOODWORKING: University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee student David Weirick works on a model of a chair he designed as a class project, in his dorm room at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Nov. 29, 2006.

but it’s a college in the community,” he says as he stands at the door of the YMCA, ushering children out to their parents. “It’s easy to skip class. If you have friends who aren’t in school, they can bring you down. “Kendra and I have this conversation every day. I say, ‘Are you going to class?’ She says, ‘I wanted to.’” Most of the time, she does. One December morning, a male friend calls to suggest they get tattoos. Patterson is tempted. Her best friend recently has gotten a tattoo of Tinker Bell. Kendra wants one of her own. But she takes a pass. She has class. Still, she does not like to study. And she does not seek help. “I don’t have time for this,” she says as she departs campus after class. “I’m not an academic talker. I’m a social talker.”

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Student expresses dismay for college By Megan Twohey MCT

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OPINION PEOPLE ON THE STREET

“It was miserable; it sucked; it was terrible. Besides that, it was fine.” —Tennis player Andy Roddick, on his Australian Open loss, from Newsweek.com

Monday, January 29, 2007 4

Should the national minimum wage be raised to $7.10?

“Yes, because the price of living has gone up so much these past few years.”

“Sure, I guess because a lot of people don’t make that much.”

“I don’t think it’s necessary.”

CHRIS SOJAK, Freshman, Journalism

EDDIE KIPCHOGE, Sophomore, Environmental Policy

CAROLYN NESLINE, Freshman, Undecided

“Yeah, it should be raised due to inflation.”

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TRAVIS NEUMEYER, Junior, ILA

Have your own take on today’s People On The Street? Or a suggestion for a question? Give us your feedback at bgnews.com.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Competition can only help education initiatives As an Early Childhood Education major, I can concede that No Child Left Behind is flawed on several levels. I disagree that standardized testing is the key to show student progress and learning and I do agree that teachers end up “teaching to the tests.” Mr. Szabelski’s points out that giving families a choice and allowing children of lower socio-economic backgrounds access to private schools through vouchers “will not solve the problem.” I could not disagree more. Perhaps a little healthy competition is needed and would wake up the Public school systems in the United States. Allowing parents to have a choice in their child’s education would make schools take responsibility of how their school performs. They need to step up, instead of complaining about being accountable. Companies compete for our business everyday, as adults we have choices; but we continually tell our children they do not. Throwing more money at the failing public schools will not make the problem go away. Besides, if private schools are good enough for Chelsea Clinton and other liberal offspring (I highly doubt they stepped foot in a D.C. Public School), it should be good enough for my son. — Renee Daley, Senior, Education, ardaley@bgsu.edu

USG depends on student voices to function Please note: I am currently a member of USG, but I am writing on my own behalf, not the rest of USG. It is always great to hear student concerns through the BGNews. Unfortunately, this is rarely happens. Not too much gets accomplished in USG because they do not get student concerns and this is something USG relies on. This has also been a problem over the past few years. Since USG does not get too many student concerns, they

try to educate the undergraduate student body with open forums on issues dealing with the November Election, BG1 Card and Bursar, and Rollover Dollars, which has low attendance. I still often talk to students who still do not know that they are grandfathered in to receive rollover dollars and this only affects incoming freshman next year. So how does USG function without student concerns? USG takes in the concerns of some administrators. This is where the “Orange and Brown” Campaign developed — some faculty do not see enough BG Pride on this campus. Some senators work internally, such as considering a bicameral legislation. These senators might be thinking that this could help USG function even better and get more issues taken care of. Most senators are working on external issues, but it is often not seen nor heard. The Student Welfare Committee is currently working on getting a downtown shuttle service for nighttime and weekends. Others work with the administration by sitting on standing committees within the university. But remember, USG votes based on student concerns — not the senator’s opinions of the issues. So talk to your senator! And if you do not know who your senator is, check out USG’s Web site. It takes the initiative of YOU as a student to make a change at this university. — Coleen Verbus, Senior, Public Relations, cverbus@bgsu.edu

University needs more security for campus lots The recent vandalism of cars in lot six is an outrage. It makes you wonder how safe are your vehicles in on campus lots? Twenty or more cars were broken into and the police say they are working leads, but in the mean time what are they doing to better the security out in the lots? They are so worried about busting college kids drinking

that they don’t worry about the vehicles and the thousands of dollars in damage that was done. The University prides itself on safety but if it is that easy for someone to break into that many cars in one or two days how safe are we? My car along with two other of my fraternity brothers were broken into along with many other people. They called one of my brothers to tell him about his car but the only reason I found out about mine is because I went out and found it broken into. Then when I called to report they said they already knew and tried to contact me. I may have moved from my previous on campus residence last semester but I filed all the right paper work so you would think they knew I moved. My car just sat out there for two days and anyone could have broken into again. That is serious negligence on the part of the university and I am extremely disappointed in the University. While it is not there fault that the cars were broken into they still hold some responsibility in contacting us about vandalism and providing security if we have to pay to park on campus. — Justin Albright, Freshman, Political Science, ajustin@bgsu.edu

All the statistics on higher education On Thursday, Rev. Jesse Jackson pointed out that doctors in India pay $40,000 to attend medical schools while the doctors in the USA pay $100,000. Rev. Jackson’s remarks draw our attention to the high cost of education here but cost is just one dimension of the picture. He could have also pointed out that the per capita income in India is less than $800 while the per capita income in the USA is more than $41,000, and further compared the two countries on the level of motivation to get higher education. — Sachidanandam Sakthive, Faculty, College of Business Administration, ssakthi@bgsu.edu.

Keep minimum wage down DANIEL LIPIAN COLUMNIST

I’m sure most of you know by now that the Democrat controlled House recently passed a bill to raise the federal minimum wage from $5.15 to $7.25 within the next few years. You’ve probably also heard nothing but high praise for this initiative, which, according to Democrats, would lift the income of 13 million American workers — 5.6 million of which earn the current minimum wage and 7.4 million just above that level

— and help reduce the poverty situation in this country. Well I hate to be the bearer of bad tidings, but you have all been deceived. Increasing the minimum wage will do absolutely nothing to fix poverty in this country and is a completely unnecessary economic aberration for a number of reasons. According to the U.S. Department of Labor: The majority of people earning minimum wage or less tend to be young, single workers between the ages of 16 and 25. In fact, only about two percent of workers over 25 years of age earn minimum wages. But that’s not all. According to the U.S. Bureau

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of Labor Statistics: 63 percent of minimum wage workers receive raises within one year of employment, and only 5.3 percent are from households below the poverty lines. That’s right, only 5.3 percent. And even more surprising is that 40 percent of minimum wage earners aren’t homeless and living on the streets, nor are they McDonald’s workers who sleep in shacks like the politicians claim. Instead these individuals live in households with incomes of $60,000 or higher! Now any rational thinker would realize these facts prove pretty conclusively that low wages aren’t as big a problem as

See WAGES | Page 5

MCT

Catching predators or entrapment? JON BOSSCHER COLUMNIST NBC has struck ratings gold with its series “To Catch a Predator,” now preparing to release a new set of episodes. Working with a (paid) online advocacy group, Perverted Justice, Chris Hansen of “Dateline NBC” humiliates would-be sexual predators on an almost nightly basis. While the show clearly makes for compelling television, it also begs some nagging questions about medialaw enforcement cooperation and the nature of what has been characterized as the “growing threat” of Internet predation. A typical episode proceeds like a nightmarish combination of “Candid Camera” and “COPS.” The staff at the internet watchdog group Perverted Justice lure overweight, 40-something computer programmers into saying explicit things in chat rooms by pretending to be 14 year-olds interested in kinky sex with some old guy they’ve never met. While NBC claims that the men “usually” initiate any talk of sex, it is unclear how often the zealots at Perverted Justice broach the topic. Nor is it known how many of the men for whom this is the first time in a decade a member of the opposite sex — regardless of age — has paid them the slightest attention. Once the potential predator is enticed into making contact with the decoy, often by driving hundreds of miles, he is told to show up at a suburban house rigged with hidden cameras. In the latest season, he is then met by a girl who flirts with him for a bit, heightening the drama. She soon disappears saying, “I just need to get changed. I have a surprise for you.” That’s when Dateline’s Grand Inquisitor

LAREN WEBER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR CANDICE JONES, CAMPUS NEWS EDITOR LISA HALVERSTADT, CITY NEWS EDITOR ALISON KEMP, FEATURES EDITOR DAVE HERRERA, IN FOCUS EDITOR AMANDA HOOVER, OPINION EDITOR TIFFANY GORBY, COPY CHIEF JOHN TURNER, SPORTS EDITOR CHELCI HOWARD, PULSE EDITOR JASON RENTNER, PHOTO EDITOR RACHEL GREENFIELD, DESIGN EDITOR BRANDON NOBLE, ONLINE EDITOR

Chris Hansen appears with a snappy line like, “I’ll bet I’m not the surprise you had bargained for.” As Hansen proceeds humiliating the man, seemingly prodding the audience into forming an impromptu lynch mob, one feels almost sympathetic toward the clueless perpetrator. Even while Hansen attempts to manipulate the audience into revulsion through out-loud recitation of the man’s lurid chat log, a visit to the “To Catch a Predator” Web site, where the full logs are available, reveals that the decoys typically engage in equally explicit conversation. While a highly popular program, “To Catch a Predator” fails in its aim to portray these predators as truly threatening. If anything they are merely pathetic, and clearly frightened out of their minds. In one episode, one of them men hooked by this televised sting operation turned out to be a little person. Hansen jeered in the voice-over because this predator “was only five feet tall.” Scary. Not only is he into young girls but he looks different from the rest of us too. Perhaps the only people on the show competing with the predators for the title of “World’s Most Pathetic Imbecile” are the Keystone Cops that nab the guys after Hansen is done raking them over the coals. While the online predator does his best to let the officers arrest him, they proceed to tackle guy and stand on his trachea as though they had just pulled bin Laden from a Pakistani cave. I wonder who was more excited: the predator at the prospect of sex with a minor, or the cops at getting license to rough-up a suspect? “To Catch a Predator” paints a picture of a growing epidemic of child predation across the country. However, existing data doesn’t seem to bear out this conclusion. Statistics released by the Center for Missing and

Exploited Children indicate that just two teenagers — out of a sample of 1700 internet users — suffered a sexual assault as a result of their online activity. And as Dave Chapelle asked, “How old is 15, really?” Is it old enough to have developed the judgement to handle all of life’s complicated scenarios? No. Is it old enough to know you don’t want to be taught sex acts by a 54 year-old carpet cleaner from Pasadena who knows barely more about sex than you? Yes. As long as ratings remain strong, ‘To Catch a Predator’ will remain on the air and continue to portray itself as though it is providing a public service. Yet one wonders whether this is not a case of a news program creating the news rather than reporting it. How many of these cases would exist if the program and their cohorts in Perverted Justice weren’t trolling for them? For that matter, how many teenagers even visit chat rooms? Didn’t those stop being cool in about 1998? Ultimately, it is important to remember that the program’s ratings depend on there being a great number of sexual predators out there. If there weren’t, they wouldn’t have anyone to humiliate and NBC would be unable to employ fear in order to twist viewer’s emotions. To be sure, the men who foolishly respond to the thinlyveiled scam of the good folks at Perverted Justice — whose idea of a fun Saturday afternoon is fishing for sexual predators online — are wholly indefensible both for their intentions and utter stupidity. Still, the willingness of Chris Hansen and NBC to hold the alleged intentions of their prey as an insurance policy against charges of entrapment and exploitation hardly leave them with a better defense.

Send comments to Jon Bosscher at jbossh@bgsu.edu.

The BG News Submission Policy LETTERS TO THE EDITOR are to be fewer than 300 words. These are usually in response to a current issue on the University’s campus or the Bowling Green area. GUEST COLUMNS are longer pieces between 400 and 500 words. These are usually also in response to a current issue on the University’s campus or the Bowling Green area. The maximum number of submissions for columns is two per month.

POLICIES: Letters to the Editor and Guest Columns are printed as space on the Opinion Page permits. Additional Letters to the Editor or Guest Columns may be published online. Name, year and phone number should be included for verification purposes. Personal attacks, unverified information or anonymous submissions will not be printed.

E-MAIL SUBMISSIONS as an attachment to thenews@bgnews. com with the subject line marked “Letter to the Editor” or “Guest Column.” Only e-mailed letters and columns will be considered for printing. All letters are subject to review for length and clarity before printing. Opinion columns do not necessarily reflect the view of The BG News.


OPINION

WWW.BGNEWS.COM

University Bookstore must keep students/customers in mind BRENDAN KEEP COLUMNIST

Would you shop at the University Bookstore if there was another store close by that sold the same mix of items? I sure wouldn’t. The Bookstore’s policies are not at all designed to attract customers, but many students still shop there because they have few or no alternatives. It isn’t only the bookstore’s poor policies that are a disservice to its customers. Many of the bookstore’s employees seem to have given themselves over to the belief that since there isn’t anywhere else for students to go, they don’t need to worry about treating them with the respect they deserve as customers. Let me illustrate with a few examples of students’ experiences at the bookstore. One student, needing to buy some binders, took the time to get bundled up and make the trek from Harshman to the bookstore at about 8 p.m. She arrived, only to find that the bookstore was closed. Upon asking the cashier working in the Peregrine Shop why the bookstore was closed, the cashier replied that they had gone back to their normal hours on the Sunday after the spring rush. This makes sense, but the paper sign displayed right outside the bookstore still read the bookstore hours were 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. This happened the Thursday after rush was over; the hours had gone back to normal on Sunday, yet the sign had still not been changed. Simply printing a new sign displaying the correct hours would not exactly have been difficult. When she suggested to the cashier to change the

sign, the cashier merely kept repeating “we close at 7:30.” And the plight of yet another unsatisfied customer. This student ordered his books ahead of time online. He purchased the books on his bursar account, but he wanted to use a gift card so he could pay for his own books, rather than his parents getting billed for them. Regrettably, the online system doesn’t allow purchases to be made on gift cards. At the time, registers in the Multipurpose Room were the only ones able to do returns. He told the woman working there that he wanted to return the books and then buy them again using the gift card. The only registers available to make purchases were located in the bookstore. The cashier refused to carry the books over to the bookstore after doing the return so he could buy them back. This trip takes a grand total of 10 seconds, 15 seconds if you walk slowly. When the student asked the cashier if there was any way to buy the books using the gift card, the cashier responded “I can’t help you,” and “I don’t know.” Both of these phrases are cardinal sins in the world of retail. Of course, the bookstore and its employees don’t have to worry about these sins, since many students have no choice but to shop there. Disheartened and disgruntled, the student was forced to make another trip a week later, when returns and purchases were once again united in the singular location of the bookstore, to do what should have taken five minutes. Perhaps you think that the bookstore makes up for this lack of service with cheaper prices? They are, after all, partially subsidized by the University. I realize that it’s probably unfair to compare the bookstore’s prices to those on the Internet since Internet compa-

nies are a completely different kind of business, so I didn’t bother doing that. Instead, I took a short walk over to the Student Book Exchange. I picked five typical freshman, general-ed classes, GEOL 100, ENG 112, CS 100, MATH 115, and IPC 102, and found out how much they cost, new and used, at the University Bookstore and SBX. The results were pretty shocking. If all the books were bought new, the total from the bookstore was $586.15. At SBX they only cost $492.54. That’s a difference of $93.61. Think that used book prices are any different? At the bookstore the total came to $439.80 for used books, as compared to only $364.30 at SBX. Even used books were $75.50 cheaper at SBX. Shouldn’t our bookstore be able to offer cheaper prices, since it buys books in much larger quantities than SBX? Isn’t the bookstore supposed to be on the students’ side? I don’t want you to think that every cashier at the bookstore is rude, or that no one working there is willing to help. But the experience of many students has been that generally the employees are not very eager to help the customer. Additionally, they should be willing to offer competitive prices to their loyal customers. At the very least, they should treat students with the respect they deserve as customers, and not as if they have no other option. I didn’t even have room to mention the fact that students are forced to leave their bags on the floor in the lobby (making ourselves vulnerable to theft) because they think we’re going to rob them blind. As if they aren’t already doing that to us.

Send comments to Brendan Keep at keepb@bgsu.edu.

Monday, January 29, 2007 5

WAGES From Page 4

WEB SITE POLL

Q A

we have been led to believe. But apparently the Democrats and a few rogue Republicans have chosen to ignore reality in passing this ridiculous bill. The term “minimum wage increase,” while seemingly noble on the surface, is nothing more than a manipulative deception created by politicians who use the unemployed and underprivileged as ammunition to leverage their insatiable, sycophantic belief that the current $5.15 minimum wage is to blame for poverty. The fact is, poor people are not poor because of low wages. In actuality, they are poor because of low productivity, and wages are directly connected to productivity. Wages are determined (unless your name is Howard Stern) by how much a worker contributes to society and overall economic growth. Essentially, this means people should only get paid what they are worth, period. So if someone is only worth $5.15 economically, then that’s all they should get paid. Why should an employer have to pay $7.10 an hour plus required benefits that could potentially bring worker cost to $9 an hour if that worker’s productivity and skills only permit him to produce $5 worth of value per hour? Answer: He shouldn’t, and any rational entrepreneur would view the above scenario as a losing economic proposition. . But now that the government has obtruded on the economic picture yet again, we can expect even more situations like this, resulting in a substantial hike in the unemployment rate. If you can’t see how this is possible, you needn’t look any further than at small businesses, who will be crippled the most by this minimum wage increase.

Q: Who do you want to win the Super Bowl?

Indianapolis Colts: 47% (148 people) Chicago Bears: 29% (91 people) I don’t care: 14% (45 people)

I don’t like NFL football: 10% (33 people) The BG News poll is not scientific and reflects the opinions of only those Internet users who have chosen to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of Internet users in general, nor the public as a whole.

These owners -— many of whom pay a higher tax bracket than large corporations — may have to offset their losses by laying off some of their personnel, culminating in a net loss of jobs around the country. This is a shame when you consider that, according to the Small Business Administration, small businesses account for two out of every three new jobs and represent nearly half of America’s overall employment. Well, they probably won’t anymore. In two surveys conducted by the American Economic Review, roughly 85 percent of economists state that jacking up the minimum wage also increases the problem of unemployment among youth and low-skilled employees working for small businesses. But with this new wage increase, you can expect these numbers to further dwindle along with a portion of our national economic picture. Luckily the Senate can still shoot this bill down, so write your Senators and ask them to help put a stop to this lunacy, or at the very least push for an attachment of tax breaks to businesses so that losses can be offset. There’s no question we have a poverty problem in this country which must be addressed, and as humans we are called to help our fellow man. But aside from working in a shelter and giving money or food, if you really want to help the poor and the homeless, advocating for a raise in the federal minimum wage is probably not the best course of action. If you do support the increase, I hope you’re prepared, because the poor and the homeless are about to have more company.

Send comments to Dan Lipian at dlipian@bgsu.edu.

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6 Monday, January 29, 2007

WWW.BGNEWS.COM

BLOTTER THURSDAY 3:58 P.M.

Man reported being assaulted outside an East Wooster Street bar on Sunday. 6:51 P.M.

Burglary reported at a South College apartment. A surround sound machine, iPod, laptop computer, wired Xbox controllers, games and a HD plasma TV, with a total value of $4,400, reported missing.

FRIDAY 1:28 A.M.

Clint R. Damman, 22, of Bowling Green, and Lucas D. Traucht, 23, of Findlay, Ohio, arrested for disorderly conduct/fighting after they were seen fighting on East Court Street. 1:56 A.M.

East Wooster Street resident reported a large man wearing a black beanie entered her house and then her bedroom. She came to the station and told police she’d fallen asleep watching TV and when she woke up, it was off and she saw someone in her room. When she called out, the man came closer to the bed and she grabbed her glasses and keys and fled the home. Police found no fingerprints on any items or any items missing but did find that one door looked like it had been forced open at some point. More blotter action available on our Web site | bgnews.com

STRESS From Page 1

GOODWILL FRIDAY From Page 1 From Page 1

ed on a cell phone, driven and drank a beverage at the same time?” Simmons asked. Every hand in the room went up, showing that doing too many things at once is a habit which society has geared us to accept as normal. “We think, here is an obligation, something I have no choice over, but we do make choices on that all the time,” Badik said. Taking a few moments out of a day for “me time” is one way to restore order and a sense of control in a busy life. “When I was in graduate school, me and my friend would go to the gift shop and look at greeting cards and have a good laugh whenever we would have a small break,” Nagy said. In a society where having it all is a common goal, having it all at once is a misconception. “You can’t have it all at the same time, think of having it all as a buffet,” Nagy said. So if multitasking has become habit, and there are crumbs in the keyboard from a night of cramming, take heart — there are things that can be done to bring back the balance.

The Gap and Tommy Hilfiger can be found at Goodwill, some that still have their original price tags. Warner and Harris both agreed that Halloween is the busiest time of year for Goodwill. “Halloween is our Christmas,” Warner said. He added that business has increased since Salvation Army left Bowling Green a year ago in the way of both sales and donations. Among the daily crowd of people who shop at Goodwill, approximately 60 percent of those people are college students, Warner said. Although most shoppers of Goodwill don’t realize it, they are helping a great cause by buying clothes for themselves. “Most people don’t understand where the money goes,” Harris said. “They are shopping here to get a deal, but the money goes into job training for those who need to get back into the job market or to those who want to get started. We don’t want to give a hand out, but rather a hand up.” About 84 percent of Goodwill’s proceeds go toward that mission, Harris added. “Workforce development is the primary goal of Goodwill,” Warner said. “We want to help people get back into the workforce and to make them feel better about themselves.” Even though Federici didn’t know the mission of Goodwill, she continues to shop there. “I go to Salvation Army and stores like that because they benefit those who are less fortunate,” she said. “I know that I’m spending a little money but I like knowing that what I spend will help others.”

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YOUTUBE From Page 1 site during his presentation. The speech also focused on the idea of “mash-ups,” where a DJ takes two already existing pieces of music and “mashes” them together to make a different composition. DJ Danger Mouse is one of these “mash-up” artists and combined The Beatles “White Album” with rapper Jay-Z’s “Black Album” to make his own music, cleverly titled “The Grey Album.” Harrington’s job

is to debate what is allowed and what isn’t, with his definition being far more relaxed than others. “The recording industry is doing all kinds of wrong things, like suing their customers… music has to adapt,” he said. Harrington also spoke about SecondLife.com, Harvard’s version of online learning, where students create a virtual version of themselves and attend a virtual interactive class. “Every technology threatens business as usual then becomes business as usual,” he said.

Also discussed in the presentation were parody rights and copyright violations, all explained using videos on YouTube.com. Lori Liggett, telecommunications instructor, said she thought YouTube.com could be a valuable resource for everyday mediasavvy teaching in the classroom.

“This is applicable to everything and wasn’t your typical lecture. I would use this method to help teach my classes,” she said. Harrington closed the discussion by answering questions from the audience, explaining that even those who help to make the rules have no problem bending them.

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RYAN EVANS | THE BG NEWS

JAZZ: Susan Poirier, second year grad student at BGSU, plays the saxophone in the Bryan Recital Hall in the Musical Arts Center Saturday night at 8 p.m.

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doesn’t go out on Thursday nights, but she is aware of the craze. “I know a lot of people that go out on Thursday nights, its like a college phenomenon — ‘Thirsty Thursday’,” Adams said. And according to Bowling Green Police Division records, police get more calls on Thursday nights than Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. The total number of arrests on Thursday nights for 2006 was 737, total arrest averages for Monday through Wednesday was 648. “Thursday[s], Friday[s] and Saturdays are the busy times for us,” BGPD Lt. Tony Hetrick said. A variety of bars, including Kamikaze’s, Ziggy Zoomba’s, Skybar and Nate and Wally’s, offer drink specials on Thursday nights, which may persuade some students who are on the fence about going out to head to the bars. “Typically, we are very busy on Thursday nights, that’s the night we have our best drink specials,” said Adam Cordes, Nate and Wally’s manager. Next door at Kamikaze’s, $1.50 pitchers attract a busy crowd from 6 to 9 p.m. “I think bars target students to go out Thursday nights, especially overage guys and girls of all ages,” Mike Ohlemacher, a bouncer at Kamikaze’s said. Students who don’t use Friday to recover from a case of ‘Thirsty Thursday,’ may go back home to work, or just relax from a stressful week. “For me, it’s nice to have a three day weekend, to recuperate from a week’s worth of classes,” Adams said.

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SPORTS

Monday, January 29, 2007

SIDELINES

7

FALCONS 72 | EAGLES 55

NBA BASKETBALL Cavs make a case but fall to mighty, streaking Suns.

JASON RENTNER | THE BG NEWS

FINDING ANSWERS: Coach Dan Dakich huddles his team around in a losing effort on Saturday as the Falcons turned the ball over 24 times.

Turnovers ruin men’s chances

Lebron James’ 30 points were not enough to cool off the Suns as they cruised to a franchise-record 17th straight win. See more | Page 9

PGA TOUR Woods makes weekend comeback for seventh straight tour victory

By Bill Bordewick Reporter

The number 24 has various meanings to different people. It is a hit show on the FOX network. It’s the time allowed per possession in the NBA. In the BG men’s basketball case, it was how many times they turned the ball over on Saturday in their 71-68 loss to Central Michigan. “Twenty-four turnovers is ridiculous,” said BG coach Dan Dakich. “At halftime, we’re winning but we’ve given up 13 turnovers and a ton of offense boards. I thought rebounding and turnovers along with [Giordan] Watson’s play really hurt us.” Central Michigan’s Watson came into the game ranked second in the Mid-American Conference in scoring averaging 18 points per game behind only BG’s Martin Samarco’s 20.1 points per game. But at halftime, the Falcons held a nine point lead and held Watson to just six points on 2-11 shooting. “I was forcing the issue a lot

Tiger Woods moves one win closer to Byron Nelson’s record of 12 straight tour victories after trailing the leader by seven strokes after Friday’s round. See more | Page 9

QUOTABLE “I thought it was funny because if I have the chance to go back to college, I’ll give up one NBA season to play against Duke. One college game that’s five fouls, right? ... 40-minute game at Duke, they got soft rims I’d probably score 84 or 85. I wouldn’t pass the ball. I wouldn’t even think about passing it. It would be like a NBA Live or an NBA 2K7 game, you just shoot with one person.” Gilbert Arenas, on playing against Duke.

OUR CALL The List

Bowling Green football coach Urban Meyer (below) gives his top five best places in college football to tailgate:

1. North Carolina-

They spanked Arizona in their house without Brandon Wright, that’s saying something. 2. Stanford- They beat No. 2 UCLA, that’s saying something more. 3. Virginia- A comefrom-behind win at Clemson has the Cavaliers in good shape. 4. Ohio State- They held off a late charge by MSU and moved to 18-3.

5. Wisconsin-

Holding Iowa to 46 points at home proves their Big Ten alpha-dog status. Bulldog games. goes absolutely crazy

RYAN EVANS | THE BG NEWS

FLYING HIGH: Kate Achter (20) scored 22 points in their 72-55 victory as she flys over two Eastern Michigan defenders. Falcons remain the number 16 team in the nation and dominance over the MAC conference.

Keepin’ it going

Falcons continue their winning streak, roll over MAC opponents By Colin Wilson Assistant Sports Editor

YPSILANTI, Mich. — Believe it or not, there was something the BG women’s basketball team’s senior class did yesterday that they had never done — win at Eastern Michigan. The No. 16 Falcons moved to 8-0 in the MAC and won their 11th consecutive game by a score of 72-55. “We hadn’t won here since I’ve been [at BG] so it’s a big win for us,” said BG forward Ali Mann. “It’s about time right?” Mann, who grew up in nearby Chelsea, Michigan, led the Falcons by scoring 19 points, pulling down seven rebounds and going 8-of-10 from the freethrow line. “This is my backyard pretty much and it was my last game in my BG career in Michigan, so it’s good to go out with a win,” Mann said, smiling. “I think half the town of Chelsea was here.” The Falcons had plenty of

support, of the 924 people in attendance, a great deal wore orange clothing. The crowd gave both Achter and Mann ovations as they left the court and seemed to share the emotion of the seniors who finally won in Ypsilanti. Kate Achter poured in 22 points and went 10-of10 from the free throw line. She also had three steals; as a team the Falcons forced 20 turnovers. “Kate has stepped it up on the offensive end tremendously,” Mann said. “It’s great to have a point guard who can get in there and penetrate the way she does.” Most of Achter’s points came as a result of dribble drives where she was either fouled or converted the field goal. The Falcons have gained plenty of respect around the league with their national ranking and their 33game conference win streak. “That senior class — they’ve got a fire within them. It doesn’t matter if they’re playing in here, if they’re playing outside on the playground, they’re playing at home it doesn’t matter,” said EMU forward

See WOMENS | Page 8

in the first half,” Watson said. “I just wanted to lead my team so bad and try and turn this thing around to try and get off this losing streak. It sort of hindered us in that I was kind of out of synch — I was rushing myself.” The Chippewas rallied from down 35-26 at halftime and went on a 16-6 run to start the second half and held a onepoint advantage at 42-41 with 15 minutes to go in the game. The Falcons refocused and were able to take a seven point lead at 60-53 with 5:36 left in the game. Unfortunately for the Falcons, the Chippewas once again rallied and finished the game on an 18-8 run to close out the game. The Falcons had the ball with a three point lead and about two minutes to go, but a pass to Erik Marschall was knocked away and Watson made a 3pointer on the other end to tie the game at 64. “Giordan tries to play so hard — he knows he’s a lead-

See MENS | Page 9

Tennis bounces back after weekend By Jordan Cravens Reporter

After a two-week road stand, the women’s tennis team was able to “defend their own turf,” part of the team’s motto, rolling to a 7-0 victory over Youngstown State yesterday. The Falcons lost 7-0 to Ohio State University on Saturday, but were able to bounce back and claim all matches yesterday with the lone exception of the second doubles flight. “Our team played hard in both matches,” said BG coach Penny Dean. “They played hard at OSU and we came away short, but we still got a lot out of it.” Kelsey Jakupcin and Jenna Nussbaum were able to claim the number one doubles match from the Buckeyes, an extremely competitive flight in college tennis, especially against a team with a caliber like OSU, according to Dean. “We were really aggressive and ready to play — we stayed up the whole time, with no down time,” Jakupcin said. “We defended our turf and that is what we wanted to do.”

“We defended our turf and that is what we wanted to do.” Kelsey Jakupcin | Women’s Tennis

The netters also received wins from Ashley Jakupcin, Samantha Kintzel, Jenna Nussbaum, Kelsey Jakupcin, Katia Babina and Stefanie Menoff in singles action, along with a doubles victory from Kintzel and Menoff against Youngstown State. “We came ready to play singles and doubles,” Dean said. Coach Michele Grim of the Youngstown State Penguins was impressed with the level of play BG brought to the table. “On every court everyone was ready — they were focused and ready to go out there and play their game,” Grim said. The team improved on last year’s win over the Penguins, which was 5-2. BG will have a weekend off before returning to play on its home court on Feb. 9 against Duquesne.

Spratt’s strong performances helps Falcons over weekend By Chayse Held Reporter

It was a tale of two very different nights for the BG hockey team over the weekend as the Falcons were able to scratch out a point against AlaskaFairbanks, but failed to end their current eightgame winless streak. Special teams play dominated the weekend, with Alaska (8-13-5, 6-10-4) and its top-ranked power play in the CCHA (.208)

scoring four power-play goals on Friday en route to a 5-2 win. BG (5-22-2, 3-17-1) responded on Saturday, stopping 11 of 12 Nanook power plays, earning a hard-fought 2-2 tie in a game with 30:39 of total power play time. “It was a very physical game that capped off a physical weekend,” said BG coach Scott Paluch. “Despite the tie and one point at home on the weekend, I thought it was an important game for our team with the way we stayed with things.” Falcon goaltender Jimmy Spratt (4-15-1) saved 37 Alaska shots in each game. The sophomore was a big reason BG stayed in the

game on Saturday, providing the backbone for a penalty-kill that stopped three different 5-on-3 advantages for the Nanooks. “Unbelievable,” said BG forward Ben Geelan of Spratt’s play. “I’ve played with [Spratt] for two years and this was probably the best hockey game I have seen him play. He’s been giving a 110 percent every game he’s played this year — it’s good that we can finally give him some support.” The support that the BG offense provided Spratt on Saturday came in the form of two powerplay goals. Forward Brandon Svendsen tied the game at 1-1 in

See HOCKEY | Page 8

JORDAN FLOWER | THE BG NEWS

CHECK YOUR MAN: Alaska Fairbanks’ Brandon Walls, number 23, skates passed BG”s Tommy Dee as the two teams battled over the weekend resulting in a BG loss and a tie.


SPORTS

8 Monday, January 29, 2007

WWW.BGNEWS.COM

THE BG NEWS SUDOKU

SUDOKO To play: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3 x 3 box contains the digits 1 to 9. There is no guessing or math involved. Just use logic to solve

DENIS POROY | AP PHOTO

DOMINANCE: Tiger Woods reacts to just missing an eagle putt on the 13th hole during the final round of the Buick Invitational golf tournament in San Diego. Woods made his birdie.

Woods’ magic guides him to win the Buick Invitational By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Tiger Woods resumed his improbable pursuit of Byron Nelson with a result that was all too predictable. Woods caught up to the pack with an eagle, buried the hopes of his final challenger with a birdie and closed with a 6under 66 yesterday to win the Buick Invitational for his seventh consecutive PGA Tour victory, the second-longest streak in history. Nelson set the record in 1945 with 11 in a row, a record long thought to be out of reach. The way Woods is playing — no worse than second in stroke play anywhere in the world since July — that might no longer be the case. Woods won six in a row in 2000, a streak that Phil Mickelson stopped at Torrey Pines. But against a cast of challengers short on experience and victories, the world’s No. 1 player met little resistance in

“Anytime you try to win a tournament against that guy, it’s tough. I played well down the stretch. He just never flinched.” Charles Howell III | PGA Golfer winning the Buick Invitational for the third straight year. Woods doesn’t consider this a true winning streak because he lost once in Europe and twice in Asia since September. But it still counts in the PGA Tour record books, and the only question is when it will resume. Woods was headed for the Dubai Desert Classic last night, and he was not sure if would play his next PGA Tour event at the Nissan Open on Feb. 15 in Los Angeles or the Accenture Match Play Championship in Arizona a week later. “To somehow sneak out with the win is a cool feeling,” Woods said. He got some help from Andrew

Buckle and Jeff Quinney, both of whom had at least a share of the lead on the back nine until stumbling in a span of about 15 minutes on a cool, breezy afternoon at Torrey Pines. Charles Howell III provide the final challenge with three birdies in a four-hole stretch, but Woods answered with an approach to 2 1/2 feet on the 17th hole for birdie that allowed him to play it safe on the par-5 closing hole. Woods finished at 15-under 273 for his 55th career victory, the fifth time he has started a new season with a trophy. Howell had a 50-foot eagle putt on the 18th that could have forced a playoff, but he played

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it too high over the ridge and wound up three-putting for par to close with 68. “I gave him a run,” Howell said. “Anytime you try to win a tournament against that guy, it’s tough. I played well down the stretch. He just never flinched.” The same couldn’t be said for Buckle and Quinney, who each took double bogey along the back nine on the South Course to quickly take themselves out of contention. Brandt Snedeker, tied for the 54-hole lead with Buckle, closed with a 71 and finished third. Woods’ streak resumed after a nearly four-month break from the PGA Tour, when he won by eight shots in the American Express Championship outside London on Oct. 1. He skipped the season-ending Tour Championship and the season-opening Mercedes-Benz Championship, and learned that his wife was pregnant for the first time. One thing that hasn’t changed is his golf.

From Page 7

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the first period on a one-timer from Todd McIlrath for his fourth goal of the season. Alaska forward Curtis Fraser, who scored three goals on the weekend, put the Nanooks in front 2-1 in the third on a shot Spratt was able to get a piece of, but still found the back of the net. BG answered in dramatic fashion with McIlrath wristing a shot past Alaska goalie Wylie Rogers to tie the game with just over four minutes left in regulation. The goal would come just over a minute after a James Unger rebound appeared to tie the game, but after video review, was disallowed and Alaska would keep their slim onegoal lead for the time being. The Falcons held a 2-1 shot advantage in overtime, but both

RYAN EVANS | THE BG NEWS

RYAN EVANS: The team huddles after a one-and-one situation in Sunday’s victory.

WOMENS From Page 7 Sarah Van Metre. “They’re a very emotional group. You’re going to get their best game every time no matter what.” Van Metre was a victim of an always tenacious defense that seems to play particularly well against the opponent’s best player. “We’re a very scout-heavy team. We have to do everything by grinding it out with team defense,” said BG coach goaltenders denied any serious scoring chances for the 2-2 final. “I thought [Bowling Green] was a much more spirited team [Saturday]. Their intensity and speed was far better,” said Alaska coach Travis MacMillan. “The difference between us and them was that we didn’t match that on our part.” Friday’s contest again was dominated by penalties, but this time the Nanooks showed why they have the best power play in the CCHA. Alaska converted on four of nine chances with the man-advantage and outshot the Falcons 42-18 for the 5-2 win. Jonathan Matsumoto (10) and Tommy Dee (2) provided the scoring for BG on the game, and the Falcons found themselves tied 2-2 in the third period. Alaska responded by scoring three power-play goals in a span of just over 10 minutes to put the game out of reach and end their

Curt Miller. “They like the film room, they like to learn about their opponent.” The Eagles got 14 from Van Metre and 10 from Patrice McKinney. Kelly Watts came off the bench to score 17 points and pull down eight rebounds. She was also an efficient 6-of-7 from the field. For the sixth straight game, Lindsey Goldsberry logged more than 20 minutes of playing time, and held Patrice McKinney to 4-of-14 shooting and added three steals.

“ I’m really pleased with the way our team stayed with it mentally.” Scott Paluch | BG coach own nine-game losing streak. After the single point earned by BG, the Falcons remain in the cellar of the CCHA with conference leader Notre Dame coming to the BG Ice Arena for a pair of games this weekend. For Paluch and the Falcons, Saturday’s tie is a positive in a season that has seen plenty of negatives in terms of wins and losses. “I’m really pleased with the way our team stayed with it mentally and that allowed us a point,” Paluch said. “[Points] haven’t been very easy for us to get and I think it’s a step in the right direction.”


SPORTS

WWW.BGNEWS.COM

Monday, January 29, 2007

9

MENS From Page 7 er on this team but sometimes he gets hurried,” said Central Michigan coach Ernie Zeigler. “But he stepped up like most All-MAC performers do when we needed him most.” Watson’s play was crucial to the Chippewas success down the stretch. He added 12 of his game high 27 points in the final four minutes to key the CMU comeback. After Erik Marschall’s layup brought the Falcons within two with four seconds to go, Eddie Spencer converted one of two free throws to give the Falcons one last chance. It was not to be for BG, as Martin Samarco’s 40foot heave fell short and the team fell 71-68. “The last few games we have had a lead with five minutes to go and gave it up,” Samarco said. “We just got to figure out a way to win down the stretch. There are no moral victories — it’s not good being there. We just got to figure out a way to execute.” Samarco finished the game with 18 points largely due to him getting to the free throw line 10 times in the second half, making nine of them. Nate Miller also added 18 points to go along with six rebounds. Watson led the way for the Chippewas because he took advantage of BG being in the bonus early in the second half. He converted 10-of-13 free throws in the second half. “[Watson] did whatever he wanted in the second half,” Dakich said. “We tried to put people on him — we tried different guys. We just couldn’t stop him.” The Falcons will return home this Wednesday to take on Ball State as they look to snap their six game losing streak.

MARK DUNCAN | AP PHOTO

PASSING ON BY: Phoenix Suns’ Steve Nash, left, from Canada wheels past Cleveland Cavaliers’ Drew Gooden (90) on his way to the basket in the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game Sunday, Nash scored 23 points and had 15 assists in leading the Suns to a 115-100 win.

Sun’s scorch opponents, beat Cavs along the way By Tom Withers The Associated Press

CLEVELAND — Now more than halfway to a once-thoughtuntouchable record, the Phoenix Suns aren’t focused on their winning streak. Steve Nash simply won’t allow it. Nash scored 23 points and kept Phoenix’s high-energy offense purring with 15 assists as the Suns extended their winning streak to 17 games—the NBA’s longest in seven years—by beating the Cleveland Cavaliers 115-100 yesterday. Phoenix’s 17-game streak is tied for the fifth longest in NBA history, and with three more victories the Suns would match the second-best streak, a 20-gamer by the 1970-71 Milwaukee Bucks. And, if they keep it up, the Suns could soon challenge the Los Angeles Lakers’ record of 33 straight wins in 1971-72. “The way they’re playing right now, they’re unbeatable,” LeBron James said. Nash isn’t convinced. “People don’t talk about the 33game streak, they talk about who won the championship that year,” Nash said, noting the Lakers won the league title in ‘71-’72. “I don’t feel unbeatable. We’ve got a lot of improving to do.” Shawn Marion added 23 points, Amare Stoudemire 22 and Leandro Barbosa had 19 for the Suns, who improved to 34-4 since opening the season 1-5. Phoenix, which had a 15-game win streak earlier this season, also matched a franchise record with its ninth straight road win and is 20-1 vs. Eastern Conference teams. The Suns haven’t lost since Dec. 28 at Dallas, and with the way they’re running and sharing the ball right now, it’s going to take a

“No matter how you try to stop him, he’s got the weapons. That’s a heck of a team.” LeBron James | Cavs guard special effort to beat coach Mike D’Antoni’s speedy squad. “No matter what you do defensively, he’s going to find a way to counter it,” James said. “No matter how you try to stop him, he’s got the weapons. That’s a heck of a team.” Jamesscored30pointsandDrew Gooden 19 to lead the Cavaliers, who were within four points going into the fourth. However, they couldn’t match the Suns’ blazing up-and-down pace and managed just 13 points in the final 12 minutes on 5-of-22 shooting. With Nash on the bench getting some rest, the Suns led 91-87 after three periods before opening the fourth with a layup from Marion and consecutive 3-pointers from James Jones and Barbosa to make it 99-87 with 8:09 remaining. The Suns’ quick burst all but finished the Cavs. They went 5:40 of the fourth before scoring their first field goal on a steal and dunk by James, who missed Cleveland’s previous game with a sore right big toe that’s still bothering him. Nash’s made a twisting reverse layup, and moments later, fed Marion for a 3-pointer — Phoenix’s 13th — to make it 107-94 with 3:44 remaining. Nash, the league’s assists leader and the center of the Suns’ universe, didn’t have a turnover in 35 minutes. “He runs the ship,” James said. “He makes shots and gets other

guys great open looks. He’s dangerous.” The Suns were playing their fourth game in a five-game road trip, but they didn’t look tired or bored by their success. Instead, they were focused throughout and will look for their 18th consecutive win on Monday in Minnesota. “We just have the swagger,” Marion said. “I don’t think it’s the streak. This is more about us and the thought that we can’t lose. We’ve got 17. Now we have to focus on getting the next one.” Cleveland got just four points from center Zyrdunas Ilgauskas, who was rendered useless by Phoenix’s speed. Larry Hughes had seven points on 3-of-13 shooting and never got into any rhythm. James injured his toe on Cleveland’s recent West Coast trip, and it was sore enough that he missed his first game of the season on Friday in Philadelphia. James said he may need to sit out a few more.

JASON RENTNER | THE BG NEWS

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NATION

10 Monday, January 29, 2007

WWW.BGNEWS.COM

Cable sparks debate FCC policy loosens competition restrictions By John Dunbar The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The nation’s chief telecommunications regulator stands accused of misrepresenting the facts while pushing through rules that will make it easier for big phone companies to get into cable television. The policy change won approval by the Federal Communications Commission on a 3-2 vote Dec. 20. That angered local government officials who claim the agency overstepped its authority and now promise a legal challenge. The vote also drew the threat of a “legislative fix” from a powerful congressman.

The new rules are meant to spur more competition for cable television providers. They require local governments to speed up the approval process for new competitors, cap the fees paid by new entrants and ease requirements that competitors build systems that reach every home. Consumer groups long have complained about rising cable rates and poor service, blaming the problems on a lack of competition. But opponents of the FCC’s action say the new rules amount to a “federalization” of the cable franchising process. They contend the change will mean a loss of local oversight, fewer dollars for public and govern-

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ment access channels and the possibility of “cherry picking” by companies that choose to serve only the richest neighborhoods. Supporters of the policy change have cited dozens of instances in which local governments have made unreasonable demands of new competitors, effectively blocking them from offering service. It was one of those claims that raised the ire of David L. Smith, the city attorney in Tampa, Fla. He said the FCC chairman, Kevin Martin, made a “blatantly inaccurate allegation” about Tampa’s conduct during franchise negotiations with Verizon

See CABLE | Page 11

JAE C. HONG | AP PHOTO

DISPUTE: Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin, right, speaks with Walter McCormick, left, president and CEO of USTelecom, at the TelecomNEXT convention. David L. Smith, the city attorney in Tampa, Fla. said Martin made a “blatantly inaccurate allegation” while quizzing an agency employee during a commission meeting about Tampa’s conduct during franchise negotiations.

Military to minimize ‘stop loss’ practices By Pauline Jelinek The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — In an action branded a backdoor draft by some critics, the military over the past several years has held tens of thousand of soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines on the job and in war zones beyond their retirement dates or enlistment length. It is a widely disliked practice that the Pentagon, under new Defense Secretary Robert Gates, is trying to figure out how to cut back on. Gates has ordered that the practice — known as “stop loss” — must “be minimized.” At the same time, he is looking for ways to decrease the hardship for troops and their families, recruit more people for a larger military and reassess how the active duty and reserves are used. “It’s long overdue,” said Jules Lobel, vice president of the

YURI GRIPAS | AP PHOTO

REVISED: Defense Secretary Robert Gates gestures during a media roundtable at the Pentagon. Gates is ordering the military to minimize “stop loss” practices that push soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines to retire later than they originally planned. Stop loss is said to create problems in morale and make soldiers feel deceived about their recruitment. Gates is also asking branch chiefs to submit plans showing how they will rely less on this practice.

Center for Constitutional Rights and lawyer for some in the military who have challenged the policy in court.

“It has created terrible problems of morale,” Lobel said last week. “It has in some cases made soldiers feel that they were

duped or deceived in how they were recruited.” Gates has asked the chief of each service branch for a plan by the end of February on how they would rely less on stop loss. The authority has been used off and on for years and was revived by all services to some extent after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. As an example, the Army revived it in early 2002 to keep people with some skills or specialties deemed critical to the fight against terrorism and later used it to retain whole units, according to an Army chronology of the policy. Pentagon officials provided no figures on how many people the policy has affected. Yet just in the Army, it is in the tens of thousands. The Army Times newspaper reported in September that 10,000 soldiers were being held

See MILITARY | Page 11

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WEDNESDAY JAN. 31, 2007 STUDENT UNION: COMMUNITY ROOM IN STUDENT UNION 11:00AM – 5:00PM

FRIDAY FEB .2, 2007 OLSCAMP 101A 11:00AM – 4:00PM

Come to the blood drive and receive a t-shirt! Ultimate Super Bowl Party entrees must be made in January! For more information call the American Red Cross at 1-800-Give-Life!


NATION

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Communications Inc. Martin was quizzing an agency employee during a commission meeting before casting his vote when he asked: “Is Verizon still required to film the tutoring classes for the math classes in Tampa, Florida in order to get a franchise?” Rosemary Harold, a deputy chief in the FCC’s Media Bureau, answered, “Yes, Mr. Chairman.” Harold was put on the spot earlier by commissioner Jonathan Adelstein, who voted against the FCC proposal. Adelstein asked Harold to cite “specific communities” that are “particularly having a problem right now” in gaining a franchise. Smith, who negotiated with Verizon in Tampa, says Martin’s allegation neither was in nor a condition of the franchise agreement. Martin’s characterization, the lawyer said, was “complete and abject fiction.” Smith also said the FCC had

MILITARY From Page 10 in the service at the time. That compared with 25,000 at one point in 2003, according to the account. The Navy stopped a few hundred sailors from leaving in the year after the terrorist attacks and used the policy again after the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. The Marine Corps used it from January through August of 2003 and at the high point had some 3,400 active duty troops and 440 reservists held in service under the authority, said 1st Lt. Blanca E. Binstock, a spokeswoman. The Air Force did not have statistics immediately available. The Defense Department says the main reason for the policy is to keep units whole for deployments, regardless of whether service time is up for some individuals in the unit. “It’s based on unit cohe-

never contacted him about the claim. In an interview Friday, Martin said he probably should not have used the word “still” but largely stood by his argument _ that Tampa was making an unreasonable demand of Verizon. He said he had not responded to Smith’s letter, but would do so. “These are difficult issues,” he said. “I think the commission is trying to find a balance between protecting the local communities’ interest but also making sure they are not effectively pre-empting the ability (of new companies) to get in and compete.” The dispute raises a larger question about whether the agency should investigate specific allegations made by companies that stand to benefit from rules or simply assume that they are true. Adelstein, a Democrat, accused his agency of failing to “conduct any independent factfinding” and said the FCC did not “attempt to verify the allegations made by parties who have a vested interest in the outcome of this proceeding.” sion,” former Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld once said when a soldier questioned him about the policy during Rumsfeld’s visit to the staging area in Kuwait that is used for troops going into Iraq. “The principle is that — in the event there is something that requires a unit to be involved in, and people are in a personal situation where their time was ending — they put a stop-loss on it so cohesion is maintained,” Rumsfeld said. Rumsfeld said the policy was “something you prefer not to have to use in a perfect world.” He said it was basically a sound principle and well understood among soldiers. A half-dozen lawsuits have unsuccessfully challenged the policy. Courts have agreed that the Pentagon involuntarily can extend deployments if the president believes the practice is essential to national security. Though families dislike the policy and some troops oppose it, others accept it as a fact of life in wartime.

Monday, January 29, 2007 11

Court case weighs Yosemite development By Garance Burke The Associated Press

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. — The plunging waterfalls and soaring crags chiseled by the Merced River draw millions of visitors each year, but the crowds are precisely what threatens the waterway and the park. Efforts to safeguard the Merced have spawned a court battle over the future of development in Yosemite National Park’s most popular stretch. The case may come down to the challenge facing all of America’s parks: Should they remain open to everyone, or should access be limited in the interest of protecting them? In November, a federal judge barred crews from finishing $60 million in construction projects in Yosemite Valley, siding with a small group of environmentalists who sued the federal government, saying further commercial development would bring greater numbers of visitors, thus threat-

ening the Merced’s fragile ecosystem. “The park’s plans for commercialization could damage Yosemite for future generations,” said Bridget Kerr, a member of Friends of Yosemite Valley, one of two local environmental groups that filed the suit. The government is appealing, fearing the ruling could force the National Park Service to limit the number of people allowed into Yosemite each day, a precedent it doesn’t want to see echoed in other parks. “I don’t think we’ve ever had a ruling with these kind of implications,” said Kerri Cahill, a Denverbased planner for the park service. “It’s going to have a direct influence on the public who care about these places.” The case has Yosemite’s most loyal advocates sharply divided over how to balance preservation with access to public lands. Even environmentalists can’t agree on how to minimize the human footprint — some believe cars should be kept out entirely; others

Bacon turns game into charity Kevin Bacon American actor and co-creator of sixdegrees.com WASHINGTON (AP) — Kevin Bacon says he used to think the “six degrees of Kevin Bacon” game was a joke that would die out, but since it hasn’t, he is using the notoriety for charity. “I thought it was definitely going to go the way of eight-track cassettes and pet rocks. But it’s a concept that has sort of hung around in the Zeitgeist,” Bacon told George Stephanopolous on ABC’s “This Week” in a show that aired yesterday. Bacon said he was “kind of horrified at the idea” that he could be connected to any

actor in the universe in six steps, but then he started asking people what could be done with the notion. Bacon and the nonprofit Network for Goodw started a Web site, Sixdegrees.org. The site includes a feature to search more than 1 million charities. Visitors also can see which charities celebrities are supporting financially. And there’s a link to an eBay site where people can bid on “celebrity swag” from the Sundance Film Festival. “A lot of people are really, really strongly connected to what celebrities are doing,” Bacon said. “So why not have a place where you could also find out what charities they care about, what causes are important to them, and be able to donate right there?”

DINO VOURNAS | AP PHOTO

WALK IN THE PARK: Hikers pause at Vernal Falls Bridge over the Merced River in Yosemite National Park. Millions flock here to admire a landscape of soaring crags and plunging falls chiseled by the Merced River, but the car-bound throngs and the infrastructure needed to house and feed them are what threatens the federally protected waterway.

say visitors should have to make reservations in advance. Yosemite was the first land in the country set aside for its scenic beauty, declared a public trust in 1864 by Abraham Lincoln. Its 1,200 square miles of granite

peaks and towering waterfalls became a national park in 1890, and with few exceptions its gates have been open to all ever since, though backcountry permits are limited to minimize the human impact on wilderness areas.

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GIVING PEACE A CHANCE: Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams shakes hands with delegates and supporters after Sinn Fein members overwhelmingly voted to begin cooperating with the Northern Ireland police at the Sinn Fein Extraordinary Ard Fheis in Dublin yesterday.

Ireland looks forward to new relations By Shawn Pogatchik The Associated Press

DUBLIN, Ireland — Sinn Fein members overwhelmingly voted yesterday to begin cooperating with the Northern Ireland police, a long-unthinkable commitment that could spur the return of a Catholic-Protestant administration for the British territory. The result — confirmed by a sea of raised hands but no formally recorded vote — meant Sinn Fein, once a hard-left party committed to a socialist revolution, has abandoned its decades-old hostility to law and order. The vote, taken after daylong debate among 2,000 Sinn Fein stalwarts, represented a stunning triumph for Sinn Fein chief Gerry Adams, the former Irish Republican Army commander who has spent 24 years edging his IRA-linked party away from terror and toward compromise.

“Today you have created the potential to change the political landscape on the island forever.” Gerry Adams | Former Irish Republican Army Commander It strongly improved the chances of reviving power-sharing, the long-elusive goal of the 1998 Good Friday peace pact, by Britain’s deadline of March 26. “Today you have created the potential to change the political landscape on this island forever,” Adams told the conference. Earlier, many speakers said for decades they had dreamed of defeating the province’s mostly Protestant police force and forcing Northern Ireland into the Irish Republic. Some IRA veterans recalled beatings inflicted on them by detectives during interrogations. Others noted they had served long

Subleaser needed. Across from campus. Rent negotiable. Call 614-352-8774.

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Renting for 2007/2008 Call 353-5800 or Visit Us Online at www.meccabg.com Have a few places open NOW

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Classroom Aide II WSOS Community Action Commission, a community based organization focused on the human services needs of the disadvantaged is seeking qualified individuals to be responsible for assisting classroom teachers in the operation of an a.m. and/or p.m. session in compliance with national standards for our Bowling Green Center. Required HS diploma or GED with prior experience working with children, infants and toddlers. There are several openings. Year Round, Part Time, the avg. hours vary, 30, 27.5, 25 and 20 hours per week, $7.50/hr. Send resume by February 9, 2007 to: WSOS CAC, Attn: HR-CA11/BG/ CT, PO Box 590, Fremont OH 43420. Affirmative Action EmployerM/F/Vet/Disab PLAY SPORTS! HAVE FUN! SAVE MONEY! Maine camp needs fun loving counselors to teach all land, adventure & water sports. Great summer! Call 888-844-8080, apply: campcedar.com Now hiring dancers. No experience necessary. Must be 18 years old. 419-332-2279 after 8 pm. Bonuses Available.

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!BARTENDING! up to $300/day No exp. necessary. Training provided. Call 800-965-6520 ext. 174. Earn $2500+ monthly and more to type simple ads online. www.DataAdEntry.com Uraku Japanese Restaurant Now hiring servers and cooks. 419-352-7070.

Snack and Soda Locations Member of BBB and Chamber 260-347-5840 Why rent when you can own? For Sale: Mobile home 2 bedroom, 1 bath $180.00/mo. No Money Down! (419) 353-5800 meccabg.com

**Rooms $199.00 Mo. + 2 bdrm. avail. Now low as $399.00 mo. TV. 07-08 Rentals Houses & Apts. going fast. 1 sem. avail. all next to camus. S5 Web, close to downtn. Call 419353-0325 9am-9pm/listing 24/7 316 Merry 3. Updated listing @cartyrentals.com ‘07 - ‘08 School Year 1,2 & 3 bedroom apts. available. For more info call 419-354-9740. 1 bedroom unfurnished. $380 mo. + electric. Short lease, available Feb. 1. For more info, call 354-9740. 1 bedroom, as low as $399.00 419-352-0590. 1 roommate needed now until May. Campbell Hill $325 mo. + utilities. 260-241-1534 2 bdrm. apt. 4th St. $490 month + utilities. Available immediately. & for fall. Call 419-409-1110. 2 BR DUPLEX. PRIVATE PARKING & PATIO. CLEAN, QUIET, CLOSE. $560/MO. + UTIL. 419-352-1104.

Bellydance classes: Mon- 6:30pm (inter.) & 7:30pm (begin.) at Julies Dance Studio, Woodland Mall.Wed5:45pm, at BG Community Center. For more info call Laura Shakti at 419-352-0834.

3 bdm. house. Close to BGSU Off-street parking, W/D, AC. One-2 bdrm. apt. off street pkg. Close to BGSU. All avail. Aug. 15, 2007. 419352-4773. 419-601-3225 (cell).

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Cedar point is looking for dynamic individuals to join our Company Training Department in April. Working in teams, you will be responsible for training new and returning employees, as well as classroom preparation and administrative office work. The individuals we seek must possess a high level of organizational, communication (verbal/written), supervisory and time management skills. (Loving roller coasters and cheese-on-a-stick is a plus, but not required!!) If you are interested, please go to www.cedarpoint.com and apply for Asst. Company Trainer - #915.

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HOUSES! • CLOSE TO CAMPUS • May 2007 Leases • 201 Manville Large, 5 bdm, 2 bath, A/C, Washer & Dryer, 1 block from Campus, $1650/mo. • 824 5th St. 4 bdm, 2 bath Good cond, $1,000/mo.

August 2007 Leases • 826 5th St. 4 bdm, 2 bath good cond, $1,000/mo.

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Apts & Houses 07 -08 419-353-8206 www.fiterentals.com Basement apt., near campus. $325/month, util. inc. 352-5882. Buckeye Studios Student housing available now. Monthly/semester & yr. long leases. Fully furnished, includes all utilities & 25” TV. Free wireless internet Call 419-352-1520. www.buckeyeinnandstudios.com Highland Management 1 & 2 bedroom apartment 2 bedrooms available now 419-354-6036 www.bghighlandmgmt.com Houses/Apts for 07-08 school year 12 month leases only S. Smith Contracting, LLC 419-352-8917 - 532 Manville Ave Office open 10 - 2 M - F www.bgapartments.com Quiet tenants preferred Ivywood Apts. 1 bedroom & studios. First month free. Restrictions apply. 419-352-7691 Lg. 2 br. modern townhouse, spiral staircase, vaulted ceilings,new kitchens & bath, garage, A/C. $700 mo. Call 419-352-1104. Male has a furnished room for rent with freedom of house. $225 mo. $100 deposit. 419-354-6117. MARTEN RENTALS 2 bdrm. apts. on 5th & 7th Large house on Lehman Ave. 352-3445 Newly remodeled house. 4-5 bdrm., 2 bath, close to dntown. & campus. May or Aug. lease. $1500 mo. plus utiities. 419-340-2500.

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Evergreen Apts. 215 E. Poe Rd. Large 1 or 2 Bedroom Efficiencies Laundry on Site BGSU Bus Route Only 15 minute walk to campus!

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prison sentences for attacks on police, more than 300 of whom were killed during the IRA’s failed 1970-1997 campaign. But nearly all speakers said they were voting to dump their party’s anti-police position for the sake of peace. “This shows that the war is over. And if the war is over, we have to build the peace,” Adams said in an interview during an earlier break in debate. OtherSinnFeinleaderssoughtto cloak their vote, arguing that their position as the major Catholicbacked party in Northern Ireland meant they would be able to tell police commanders what to do.

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2007-01-29  

The BG News, Bowling Green State University student newspaper.

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