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EXTRAORDINARY TEENS | ARE OUR PETS SICK OF US YET? MARCH/APRIL 2021

THE ▲ ▲ ▲

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Where the market is heading Home sales by neighborhood Top-producing agents and teams

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Compass is a licensed real estate brokerage that abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is not guaranteed. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Compass is licensed as Compass Real Estate in DC and as Compass in Virginia and Maryland. 1313 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20005 | 202.386.6330

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Expect more when you’re expecting. With some of the region’s most experienced obstetricians, perinatal specialists, nurses and staff, Sibley Memorial Hospital is committed to providing the best possible care for you, your baby and your entire family. And as a winner of Bethesda Magazine’s Best of Bethesda Readers’ Poll for Best Hospital for Maternity, we believe it’s more than the kind of care you should expect. It’s the kind you deserve. Visit sibleybaby.org to take a virtual tour of D.C.’s top maternity center.

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Bethesda Magazine-Spring2021 -DCPS Final.pdf

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POTOMAC , MARYL AND

MODEL HOME NOW OPEN. SCHEDULE A TOUR TODAY.

LO O KS EV E N B ET T E R I N P E RSO N

MODEL NOW OPEN Introducing the Cypress, the most anticipated new model home in Potomac. This stunning townhome floorplan features 3–4 bedrooms, optional elevator, rooftop terrace with optional fireplace and retractable awning, a chef-inspired open kitchen design with quartz countertops, and 2-car garage parking. All this in an ideal, walkable location that’s just steps to the Cabin John Village shops, restaurants, and Cabin John Regional Park. Reserve your private, in-person model home tour today, or schedule a virtual tour from the convenience of home. Spring move-ins are now available!

New townhomes from the mid $900s | Elevator townhomes from $1.25 million

Schedule tours at EYA.com/Potomac or call 301-477-8890

Imagery is for illustrative purposes only. Features, finishes, and prices are subject to change without notice. | MHBR #8335 References to “EYA” refer to EYA, LLC. EYA, LLC’s development affiliates build homes in the Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, DC metropolitan area. Individual projects are developed and sold by EYA-affiliated entities, and all representations regarding the development, construction, or sale of any project or property refers to those affiliates. Buyers should carefully review their purchase and sales agreement before purchasing. EYA Marketing LLC markets, advertises, and sells each EYA affiliated property as agent for the seller. The Townhomes at Cabin John (Cabin John) is being developed by Cabin John Associates LLC. No representations regarding the development, construction or sale of any portion of the Cabin John community is made by EYA LLC or any EYA affiliate except Cabin John Associates LLC. Sales by EYA Marketing LLC, agent for Cabin John Associates LLC.

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OUR EXTRAORDINARY TEENS

CONGRATULATIONS, FIONA & DANIELLE! At St. Andrew’s, we believe in creativity with a purpose. We encourage our students to explore social problems, understand their root causes, use empathy and interdisciplinary skills to imagine a better world and work to create that future. Fiona Gallagher ’21 and Danielle Peters ’21 epitomize the St. Andrew’s ideals of being open to new opportunities, working hard to excel, and fighting for what you believe in. For Fiona, it means being an active voice for gender equity while juggling numerous AP and honors courses, being a dedicated teammate, chairing the Student Advisory Board, tutoring and mentoring elementary-aged children with learning disabilities, serving as a youth elder in her church,

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and qualifying for the North American Irish Dance Championships. For Danielle, it means co-founding St. Andrew’s Students of Color Association, being named “Student of the Year” by the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society after raising $20,000 in donations, and embracing her entrepreneurial spirit by starting her own online magazine, podcast, photography business, online jewelry store, and cupcake business. At St. Andrew’s, we know why at least one of our students has been named a Bethesda Magazine “Extraordinary Teen” for six years in a row. Because St. Andrew’s students are working to create lasting change in the world. This year, we are excited to welcome two to the club. Congratulations, Danielle and Fiona!

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March/April 2021 | Volume 18 Issue 2

contents

ON THE COVER 102 Moving Out

136 by the numbers

The Bethesda-area real estate market is booming, thanks in part to people wanting more space after being stuck at home for so long

Home sale trends in 456 neighborhoods

BY JULIE RASICOT

162 The top producers

116 Building UP

A list of the real estate agents and teams with the top total sales in Montgomery County and Upper Northwest D.C.

A roundup of major development projects in the Bethesda area that are under construction or recently completed BY AMANDA FARBER

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COVER: Photo courtesy of Sandy

Spring Builders and GTM Architects. Photo illustration by Laura Goode

PHOTO BY MICHAEL VENTURA

Real Estate Roundup

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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W E A R E P L E A S E D TO W E LCO M E

The Alliance TO O U R F I R M

Welcome Home S E B A S T I E N C O U R R E T- K N I G H T 202-615-2401 sebastien.courret@wfp.com

DA N I E L B R E W E R 202-277-9099 daniel.brewer@wfp.com

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contents

P. 232

Countryside Artisan Dalis Davidson’s sheep at Dancing Leaf Farm in Barnesville

FEATURES 232 Escape Artists

Nearly six years ago, a white man walked into a Black church in Gaithersburg hoping to show his support after a national tragedy. Out of that visit came an unexpected gift.

From an accomplished opera singer to an author of a kids book about the pandemic, the winners of our 12th annual Extraordinary Teen Awards are making their marks

BY MIKE UNGER

BY CARALEE ADAMS AND DANA GERBER

Inspired by the scenic beauty in Montgomery County’s 93,000-acre agricultural reserve, the members of the Countryside Artisans include painters, potters, a blown-glass maker, a sculptor, and a farmer who grows tea BY AMY HALPERN

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242 252 A Shameful Past Flirting with Montgomery County Disaster is one of the most progressive and diverse counties in the country—but it also has a long history of racism BY EUGENE L. MEYER

As a 76-year-old widow, I joined a dating website. What I found was anything but love. BY LESLIE MILK

PHOTO BY BREANN FIELDS

212 220 common ground Top Teens

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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FORUM PROPERTIES REAL ESTATE LD

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Paul E. Biciocchi, Principal Broker Bethesda Magazine, Top Producer Over One Billion Dollars in Career Sales paulbiciocchiforum@gmail.com 301-518-6999

Forum Properties Inc.

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Antoinette King, Realtor Associate Bethesda Magazine, Top Producer, 2020, 2021 a.king1agent@gmail.com 301-910-5448

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contents

DEPARTMENTS

P. 86

18 | TO OUR READERS

P. 268

20 | CONTRIBUTORS

26 good

life

28 | BEST BETS Can’t-miss arts events

69

banter

82 | BOOK REPORT New books by local authors, and more

86 | HOMETOWN Outraged over the rising COVID-19 death toll, a Bethesda mom created a stunning display of small white flags last fall to represent each American who had died

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health

etc.

314 | FROM THE ARCHIVES

278 | TABLE TALK What’s happening on the local food scene

266 | BE WELL

In 1918, the Spanish flu caused illness, death and fear in all corners of Montgomery County

318 | PETS

Why sleep matters more than people think

282 | DINING GUIDE

268 | BY THEIR SIDE

Restaurant listings for the Bethesda area

When the pandemic begins to subside, will our pets panic or be happy to see us leave?

310 | WEDDINGS

319 | FLASHBACK

College sophomore Nick Opack has Type 1 diabetes. So does his younger sister and their father. For years they’ve relied on dogs who are specially trained to detect the scent of low blood sugar and alert them when something is wrong.

Amid the pandemic, a Chevy Chase couple who got together more than 40 years after meeting in high school married in a quiet outdoor wedding

The B&O Railroad’s arrival in Bethesda brought more dirt than glamour

320 | OUTTAKES

AD SECTIONS PROFILES: TEST OF TIME 32

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LONG AND FOSTER AD SECTION 90

COMPASS AD SECTION 171

PROFILES: REAL ESTATE AGENTS 197

HOME SHOWCASE 258

SUMMER CAMP AD SECTION 302

TOP PHOTO BY JONATHAN THORPE; BOTTOM PHOTO BY LINDSEY MAX

BY STEVE ROBERTS

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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There are two ways to invest.

This is the other way.

What is Thematic Investing?

Thematic Investing departs from common Wall Street practice. It’s intuitive. It examines how the world is changing. It determines which companies will be advantaged and invests accordingly. Thematic Investing anticipates where the world is going, not where it has been. Call Stacy Murchison at 240.497.5008 to learn more. Or visit ChevyChaseTrust.com

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to our readers

MONTGOMERY COUNTY’S SHAMEFUL PAST IN 1860, NEARLY 40% of Montgomery County’s residents were Black. But the vast majority of them were slaves, working on plantations throughout the county, including where Westfield Montgomery mall, Columbia Country Club and the National Institutes of Health stand today. In the late 1800s, Bethesda was home to an amusement park off Old Georgetown Road, now the site of the Sonoma and Oakmont neighborhoods. Called the “Queen of the Pleasure Grounds,” Bethesda Park drew large crowds, but no Black faces were to be seen. The park was “Catering to White People Only,” according to an ad in a local newspaper. In 1960, John Hiser decided to sell his eponymous movie theater (where the Bethesda Hyatt is now located) rather than integrate it. Hiser was a respected businessman who had been president of the Bethesda-Chevy Chase Chamber of Commerce and later became a county councilman. These days, Montgomery County is one of the most progressive and diverse counties in the country. But through much of its history, the county was overtly racist in its attitudes, policies and laws. The killing of George Floyd last May in Minneapolis sparked nearly 100 protests in the county (all peaceful) and forced local leaders and residents to confront the issue of racism, including legacies of our racist past. The county council is now considering renaming roads named after slave owners, and the school board is doing the same with schools. Many businesses and other organizations are examining their policies and participating in racial equity programs. Given the focus on racism and equity in our community and the nation, I thought the time was right to run a story on the county’s shameful past. And I knew just the writer I wanted to do it. Gene Meyer has been covering Montgomery County for decades, first for The Washington Post and, over the last 15 years, as a regular contributor to Bethesda Magazine. He eagerly accepted the assignment. “So much of the county’s racial history, including the late 19th century lynchings, was not new to me. What struck me,

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though, is how recent the county’s deeply segregationist past was, and that it was just an accepted way of life for both whites and Blacks and within the memory of longtime residents,” Meyer says. “Many newcomers think of Montgomery as historically more progressive...I think readers who are not natives will be surprised, even shocked, by this history, which still haunts us.” The county has come a long way. Most people I know celebrate our racial and economic diversity—and embrace efforts to improve equity. But there’s still a long way to go. “Certainly, Montgomery County and the state of Maryland have changed a lot since the decades of codified segregation in schools, public accommodations, restaurants and real estate,” Meyer says. “But we are still dealing with the legacy, in housing, in schools, in critical services. There exists in this county a great divide, generally between east and west, that has been manifest most recently in controversies over changing school boundaries to assure more equity. The debate has fallen largely along geographical, racial and economic lines. So, the fault lines from the recent and distant past are still very much with us. The great challenge is to overcome them.” Meyer’s story begins on page 242.

IF YOU WANT A sense of just how diverse Montgomery County is these days, turn to page 220 and read about the winners of our 2021 Extraordinary Teen Awards. We received nominations for 145 students, and as always, choosing the winners was difficult. What’s clear is that an extraordinary number of young people in our public and private schools are doing extraordinary things. I hope you enjoy this issue of Bethesda Magazine. Please email me your thoughts at steve.hull@bethesdamagazine.com.

STEVE HULL Editor & Publisher

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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A team built on reputation When McEnearney Associates opened for business, we had one simple goal… attract the best real estate agents in the business so that we could provide the highest level of service to our clients. And for forty years, this goal has remained the same. Our Associates are the reason so many clients trust McEnearney. They are responsible for our enviable reputation. Congratulations to all of our Associates who made Bethesda Magazine’s Top Producer list.

Top Row Left to Right: Anslie Stokes/The Stokes Group, Kathy Byars, Joan Caton Cromwell Bottom Row: Katherine Martin, Mark Hudson, Ann McClure

4910 Mass Ave. NW, Suite 119, Washington, DC 20016 / 3804 Howard Avenue, Kensington, MD 20895 Spring Valley / 14th Street / Kensington / Alexandria / Arlington / Leesburg / McLean / Middleburg / Vienna www.McEnearney.com / 202.552.5600 / Equal Housing Opportunity

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BREANN FIELDS

LESLIE MILK

ROSE HOROWITCH

LIVES IN: Keymar, Maryland

LIVES IN: Rockville

LIVES IN: Bethesda

IN THIS ISSUE: Photographed artists in the Barnesville, Beallsville and Poolesville areas of Montgomery County. “My great-grandparents ran a dairy farm in the Barnesville area, so it was fun to go back to where my farming roots started. I even got to drive past the original farm where the dairy farm was. My greatgrandmother still knows the owner of the farm, and many of the artists were familiar with my family name.” 

IN THIS ISSUE: Wrote about her experience with online dating in her 70s.

IN THIS ISSUE: Wrote about the wedding of Betsy Zeidman and David Kleeman, who had a small outdoor ceremony with COVID-19 precautions in July.

WHAT SHE DOES: She is the owner of B Photography & Designs, specializing in portrait photography, graphic design, videography and social media marketing. Last year she started The Turquoise Trailer Traveling Boutique, selling vintage, gently used and new Western-inspired clothing and jewelry. FAVORITE PLACE: “There is no better feeling than being in the field with my cows, or at a cattle show with my family showing our cattle. If I am not in the field with my cows, I love being at the beach.”

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WHAT SHE DOES: After 32 years as a writer/editor at Washingtonian magazine, she retired in 2019. Now she’s writing some freelance stories, answering the Rockville Help hotline twice a month, studying Spanish at Montgomery College, and moderating monthly book and author discussions on Zoom for Brandeis University supporters across the country. FAVORITE EVENING ACTIVITY: Watching murder mysteries on PBS. “I can stand the sight of blood if it comes with a British accent.” WHY SHE’LL ALWAYS BE A BLONDE: She has a saying: “When your hair is gold, they bring you flowers. When your hair is silver, they bring you a chair.” WHY SHE WRITES FIRST-PERSON STORIES: “Hopefully, readers can identify with my experiences and feel they are not alone.”

WHAT SHE DOES: She’s a sophomore at Yale University who writes for the school newspaper. She recently completed an internship with Bethesda Beat, and writes freelance stories for Bethesda Magazine. FUNNIEST ARTICLE SHE’S WORKED ON: She edited a piece on the rapid proliferation of the squirrel population on her high school’s campus. One year, the numbers exploded and the squirrels, accustomed to and unafraid of humans, began approaching students for food. FURRY FRIENDS: During quarantine, she began fostering cats from high-kill shelters. After a few weeks, the four cats all found homes. “I loved playing with the cats, but my 14-year-old labradoodle was unaccustomed to sharing attention. Now that they’re gone, Trixie is back to running the house.”

BREANN FIELDS PHOTO BY CAROLINE & BRIDGET PHOTOGRAPHY; OTHERS COURTESY PHOTOS

contributors

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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EDITORIAL EDITOR

Steve Hull SENIOR EDITOR

Cindy Rich ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Kathleen Seiler Neary ART DIRECTOR

Jenny Fischer DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR

Laura F. Goode DESIGNER

Kari Mason DESIGN INTERN

Hannah Cisternelli BETHESDA BEAT MANAGING EDITOR

Andrew Schotz BETHESDA BEAT REPORTERS

Briana Adhikusuma, Caitlynn Peetz, Dan Schere WEB PRODUCER

Erin Roby RESTAURANT CRITIC

David Hagedorn CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Eugene L. Meyer, Louis Peck, Julie Rasicot, Carole Sugarman COPY EDITORS

Elisabeth Herschbach, Steve Wilder CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Caralee Adams, Jennifer Barger, Stephanie Siegel Burke, Amanda Cherrin, Dina ElBoghdady, Margaret Engel, Dana Gerber, Michael S. Gerber, Amy Halpern, Melanie D.G. Kaplan, Rachael Keeney, Christine Koubek, Amy Reinink, Steve Roberts, Mike Unger, Mark Walston, Carolyn Weber, Adrienne Wichard-Edds PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS

David B. Hurwitz

CFP®, CRPC®, CRPS®, RICP®, APMA®

Private Wealth Advisor Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and CFP (with flame design) in the U.S. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2018 Ameriprise Financial, Inc., All rights reserved.

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6400 Goldsboro Road, Suite 550 Bethesda, MD 20817 Direct: (301) 263-8509 Email: david.b.hurwitz@ampf.com davidbhurwitz.com

Edgar Artiga, Skip Brown, Ellen Byrne, Goodloe Byron, BreAnn Fields, Erick Gibson, Stacy Zarin Goldberg, Lisa Helfert, Alice Kresse, Deb Lindsey, Liz Lynch, Lindsey Max, Mary Ann Smith, Louis Tinsley, Joseph Tran, Michael Ventura

Bethesda Magazine is published six times a year by Kohanza Media Ventures, LLC. © 2009-2021 Letters to the editor: Please send letters (with your name, the town you live in and your daytime phone number) to letters@bethesdamagazine.com. Story ideas: Please send ideas for stories to editorial@bethesdamagazine.com. Bethesda Magazine 7768 Woodmont Ave., #204, Bethesda, MD 20814 Phone: 301-718-7787/ Fax: 301-718-1875 BethesdaMagazine.com

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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Six years in a row!

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E X C E P T I O N A L R E S I D E N T I A L R E A L E S TAT E

OVER $1 BILLION TEAM CAREER SALES

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Discover Why Your Neighbors are Buying and Selling Their Homes with Galanti Group It has been our pleasure to help hundreds of sellers and buyers in our community with their real estate needs. Put our extensive experience, unparalleled expertise, and outstanding customer service to work for you!

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GALANTI GROUP OF COMPASS

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TOP TIER PRODUCER

301.298.1001 | www.compass.com | 7200 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 100, Bethesda, MD 20814 Compass is a licensed real estate brokerage that abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is not guaranteed. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Compass is licensed as Compass Real Estate in DC and as Compass in Virginia and Maryland.

2/8/21 11:23 AM


ANDREW L. SCHWARTZ

Principal

Business Law

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT:

CREATING A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

A limited liability company is the preferred type of business entity to hold title to a real estate investment property. The limitation of liability, potential tax benefits and overall flexibility make ownership of an investment property through an LLC a desirable option. Some of the benefits and considerations are outlined below.

Limitation of Liability LLCs can protect their members from several risks associated with investment property ownership. The greatest benefit of creating an LLC to own an investment property is that it can shield the member(s) of the LLC from personal liability. While you may have liability insurance, it is possible that someone can sue you for an amount in excess of your policy limits or the insurance policy may contain an exclusion leaving you unprotected and exposed to significant risks.

Taxation

PUBLISHING PUBLISHER

Steve Hull VICE PRESIDENT OF PUBLISHING AND ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Susan E. Hull SALES AND MARKETING DIRECTOR

Jennifer Farkas ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Arlis Dellapa, Erika Litman, Penny Skarupa, LuAnne Spurrell AD PRODUCTION COORDINATOR

Another advantage of investing in real estate through an LLC is the avoidance of double taxation. In a single-member LLC, absent an election to be taxed as a corporation, the IRS classifies the real estate holding company as a “disregarded entity.” This means that income and losses from the LLC are reported on the individual tax return and taxes are paid at individual rates. Absent an election to be taxed as a corporation, multi-member LLCs are taxed as partnerships, meaning that the LLC files an informational tax return but does not actually pay taxes itself.

Management and Ownership

Meghan K. Murphy MARKETING AND EVENTS MANAGER

Amélie Ward DIGITAL MARKETING AND AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT MANAGER

Leigh McDonald CUSTOMER SERVICE MANAGER

Onecia Ribeiro FINANCE MANAGER

Jill Trone ADVERTORIAL WRITERS

Jennifer Beekman, Ann Cochran, Jim Mahaffie

As compared with other entity types, LLCs offer flexibility with respect to decision making including management and member voting rights. With no requirement of having officers or directors, the LLC can be managed by its members or managers. This avoids the need for formal meetings although the decisions of the members and/or managers should still be documented. There are additional items to consider when forming an LLC to own a real estate investment property. Contact a member of our real estate law department at 301-340-2020.

ADVERTORIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS

John Ferris, Lisa Helfert, Darren S. Higgins, Tony J. Lewis, Hilary Schwab, Joseph Tran, Michael Ventura, Stephanie Williams Subscription price: $19.95 To subscribe: Go to BethesdaMagazine.com. For customer service: Call 301-718-7787, ext. 205, or send an email to customerservice@bethesdamagazine.com. For advertising information: Call 301-718-7787, ext. 220; send an email to advertising@bethesdamagazine.com; or go to BethesdaMagazine.com.

301-340-2020 www.steinsperling.com Andrew L. Schwartz is a business, real estate and employment law attorney. He focuses his practice on commercial transactions, employment law, real estate, and successful business growth, management, operation, and succession. 24

For information on events and reprints: Call 301-718-7787, ext. 207; or send an email to marketing@bethesdamagazine.com. Bethesda Magazine 7768 Woodmont Ave., #204 Bethesda, MD 20814 Phone: 301-718-7787 Fax: 301-718-1875 BethesdaMagazine.com

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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SERVING THE BETHESDA COMMUNITY FOR MORE THAN 40 YEARS

Rela xation Is Calling

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art. festivals. culture. day trips. hidden gems.

good life IN THE GLOW

COURTESY OF THE ADVENTURE PARK AT SANDY SPRING

IT’S A BRIGHT IDEA—take the thrill of zip lining through treetops and add a nighttime twist. Neon lights change color and blink to the beat of pop music pumping through The Adventure Park at Sandy Spring’s climbing course for Glow in the Park, an event for ages 5 and older. Laser lights flash and dangling string lights twinkle between treetops, illuminating the park’s 15 aerial courses. Participants—sometimes donning glow stick bracelets and necklaces—buckle into safety harnesses and traverse obstacles such as rope ladders, suspended bridges and zip lines that range from 12 to 65 feet above the ground. The next Glow in the Park events are set for April 9 and 23, and May 7 and 21. For two hours

of climbing and zip lining, plus a 40-minute orientation, the cost is $19 for ages 5 and 6 (must climb with an adult), and $56 for ages 7 and older. Keep it Lit ($49), a similar event for ages 18 and older, is planned for May 1. The park is taking precautions in response to COVID-19, including limiting capacity, screening staff for illness, frequently cleaning and sanitizing equipment, requiring reservations and advanced payment, and making it mandatory that patrons wear masks when they cannot be 6 feet away from other guests. The Adventure Park at Sandy Spring, 16701 Norwood Road, Sandy Spring, 240-226-1768, sandyspringadventurepark.org n —Stephanie Siegel Burke

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good life

BEST BETS

Our picks for things to see and do in March and April BY STEPHANIE SIEGEL BURKE

March 12-21

IMAGINE DRAGONS

8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, $20, virtual event, www. gaithersburgmd.gov/recreation/performing-arts/theater/she-kills-monsters

March 18, 25

WINNING WORDS The Bethesda area is fertile ground for emerging writers. Each year, a number of them are recognized in the Bethesda Local Writer’s Showcase, which honors the winners of the Bethesda Essay, Short Story, and Poetry Contests. The short story and essay contests are sponsored by Bethesda Magazine, the Bethesda Urban Partnership (BUP), The Writer’s Center and The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation, while the poetry contest is sponsored by BUP and The Writer’s Center. You can hear the authors read from their winning work at an online awards ceremony. The essay and short story winners will read on March 18, and the poetry winners, along with former Maryland poet laureate Michael Collier, will read on March 25. 7 p.m., free, virtual event, bethesda.org

April 11

A ROYAL CONCERT With music and dramatic spoken word, the National Philharmonic follows the evolution of Black people in America with its streamed performance of Portrait of a Queen by composer Carlos Simon. The piece aims to tell the story through the lens of a figurative Black woman representing strength, courage and selflessness. The orchestra, playing live from The Music Center at Strathmore, will also perform British composer Ralph Vaughan-Williams’ Flos Campi, featuring viola soloist Julius Wirthis and a wordless accompaniment from the National Philharmonic Chorale. 2 p.m., free, virtual event, nationalphilharmonic.org

March 26

’TIS THE SEASON If you’re missing the thrill of watching a live performance at Olney Theatre Center, you’ll be happy to see familiar faces during the playhouse’s monthly revue, The Olney Home Hour. During each installment, actors Eleasha Gamble, Jessica Lauren Ball, Jay Frisby and Bobby Smith—all of whom have appeared in past Olney productions—perform songs and skits celebrating the current season. Recent shows have included Seasons of Justice to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday in January and Seasons of Love in February. In March, they turn their attention to spring with Seasons of Renewal. Episodes remain online after the release date so they can be viewed at any time. 8 p.m., free, virtual event, olneytheatre.org

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PHOTOS BY GETTY IMAGES

Can someone be a geek and a warrior? In the world of Dungeons & Dragons they can. That’s what Agnes Evans, the protagonist in Qui Nguyen’s play She Kills Monsters, finds out after the death of her teenage sister, Tilly. In this dramatic comedy laced with ’90s pop culture references, Agnes discovers Tilly’s Dungeons & Dragons notebook and finds herself immersed in the fantasy world that offered her sister refuge. The production, in partnership with Montgomery Playhouse, will be livestreamed from the Arts Barn in Gaithersburg and can be viewed on a computer. The play contains mature themes and is best for ages 15 and older.

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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Jacqueline Robbins

Home is where the heart is. When staying safe means staying home, we’re reminded of what matters most. At ANTHONY WILDER, we are in the business of creating spaces that provide comfort when it’s needed. From home repairs to renovations, we mind every

© 2021 Anthony Wilder Design Build. All rights reserved.

detail, so you can simply live—and love—the life you’ve built.

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good life

BEST BETS April 14

ALL ABOUT THAT BASS Aaron Freeman goes by the stage name “ijustplaybass,” but he actually plays everything from bass and guitar to keyboards and brass. He also arranges music and makes films. The recent Howard University grad cleverly combines musical genres including jazz, R&B and classical to create songs that sound both familiar and new, such as his smooth, groovy arrangement of Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Get a taste of the Strathmore artist-in-residence’s talent during his livestreamed concert. 7:30 p.m., pay what you can, virtual event, strathmore.org

April 16

FILM FORUM Each year, the Bethesda Film Fest showcases short documentaries on a wide range of topics made by filmmakers living in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. The festival is virtual this year, which means you can stream and watch each of the films for free starting in late March. The filmmakers will participate in an online discussion and Q&A session in April to talk about their projects. Register online to join the free virtual discussion. 7 p.m., free, virtual event, bethesda.org

SPY KIDS

Part choose-your-own adventure, part virtual escape room, Spy Academy and the Lost Treasure of Atlantis is an immersive theatrical experience from Imagination Stage. In the production, which is designed for children ages 5 to 10, the audience takes on the role of spy academy cadets. They are asked to join a mission to search for the Heart of the Dragon by solving puzzles and problems. “Pat,” a teacher at the spy academy who is played by different improv actors depending on the performance, leads the audience, which is limited to 15 households, through various challenges. The show also includes filmed segments shot at Imagination Stage’s Bethesda theater. 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, $25, virtual event, imaginationstage.org n

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TOP PHOTO BY MARGOT SCHULMAN; ALL OTHERS GETTY IMAGES

Through May 23

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PROFILES

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Fitzgerald Auto Mall JACK FITZGERALD “Transparency and trust are at the core of the “FitzWay,” which emphasizes honesty and respect, fair dealing, best price guarantees and attentive customer service.”

When native Washingtonian Jack Fitzgerald opened his first car dealership in 1966 — Colonial Dodge in downtown Bethesda — there was only one car on the showroom floor, which also served as the office and parts department. In the 55 years since, the Fitzgerald automobile family has grown to include 21 expansive locations and has sold hundreds of thousands of new and used cars. “I often quote a famous baseball player named Lefty Gomez who said, ‘I’d rather be lucky than good,’” says Jack. “The truth is, we are lucky because of our customers. They have allowed our longevity.” Transparency and trust are at the core of the “FitzWay,” which emphasizes honesty and respect, fair dealing, best price guarantees and attentive customer service. Committed to building long-term relationships with its customers, Fitzgerald Auto Malls offers a Lifetime Buyer Protection Plan for any vehicle purchased, new or used. Fitzgerald Auto Malls also strives to be a leader in the communities it serves. The business has implemented several outreach programs that range from consumer safety and education to animal advocacy and environmental issues, and much more. “Serving the community is one of our quality objectives,” says Jack. “We are a process-based company certified to ISO9001 for Quality Management, so we have objectives organized around our customers.” Evidence of their commitment to the community is clear with more than 50,000 child safety seat installations as part of their Child Car Seat Inspection program. Jack says, “My dramatically younger sister Dottie has long been an advocate for animals. When the Humane Rescue partnered up with our Subaru stores, our community responded. We’ve done hundreds of pet adoptions in the early morning hours at those dealerships before we got busy selling cars that day.” 32

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

HILARY SCHWAB

21 Locations in Rockville, Wheaton, Gaithersburg, Germantown, Frederick, Annapolis, Lexington Park, Hagerstown, Chambersburg (PA), and Clearwater (FL) 301-881-4000 www.FitzMall.com


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Top: Adventist HealthCare White Oak Medical Center opened in August 2019 and has since cared for more than 51,000 patients. Below: Adventist HealthCare Shady Grove Medical Center cared for its first patient in 1979. Today, it plans for state-of-the-art updates and a new patient tower that will create all-private rooms.

Adventist HealthCare "Our caregivers have shown tremendous bravery and worked tirelessly to ensure each patient receives compassionate care at a time when it’s needed the most.” 820 W. Diamond Ave., Suite 600 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 www.AdventistHealthCare.com

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As COVID-19 brought unprecedented challenges to healthcare, Adventist HealthCare enhanced its services to meet the needs of Montgomery County and the Washington, D.C., region. Shady Grove Medical Center in Rockville entered its fourth decade in 2020 with a five-star rating from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Less than 9% of hospitals nationwide earn this designation. The hospital has plans to build a tower addition that will create all-private rooms and state-of-the-art replacements for its Intensive Care Unit and Emergency Department. White Oak Medical Center in Silver Spring marked its first anniversary on Aug. 25, 2020, after caring for more than 51,000 patients. Its new Medical Pavilion houses physician offices, outpatient rehabilitation services and a cancer center. The hospital’s heart surgery program is rated in the top 4%-10% nationally by the Society for Thoracic Surgeons. Fort Washington Medical Center, south of National Harbor in Prince

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

George’s County, cares for nearly 40,000 patients a year in its emergency department. Expansion plans include facility improvements, physician practices, outpatient services and advanced diagnostic imaging. In February 2020, Adventist HealthCare began a management relationship with Howard University Hospital. A new D.C. hospital is being planned, along with training opportunities for Howard’s medical students, residents and graduates within the Adventist HealthCare network. Terry Forde, president and CEO, reflects that despite the difficulties of the past year, “Our caregivers have shown tremendous bravery and worked tirelessly to ensure each patient receives compassionate care at a time when it’s needed the most. Each person has lived our Mission to extend God’s care every day and we are honored to be a part of this community for many more years to come.”


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One of the many healthcare heroes at Adventist HealthCare providing compassionate care and living the Mission to extend God’s care.

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JOHN F. BOWIS PRESIDENT & OWNER “To this day, excellent service and customer satisfaction are the backbone of our dealership.” Chevy Chase Cars 7725 Wisconsin Ave. Bethesda, MD 20814 301-657-4000 www.chevychasecars.com

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The history behind Chevy Chase Cars has all the hallmarks of a great American success story: a self-made immigrant spends his life savings to pursue his dream. Through hard work, determination and resilience, the young entrepreneur grows his company into one of the most successful dealerships in the country. Eighty years later, Chevy Chase Cars is the oldest retail business in Bethesda that has operated continuously in the same location. Established in 1939 by Art Bowis in what was then the sleepy little town of Bethesda, Chevy Chase Cars is now run by Art’s grandson, John Bowis. “When my grandfather purchased this property, there wasn’t much out here except for a farm across the street,” says John. Shortly after Art opened his dealership, World War II began and General Motors stopped building new cars. Art kept his business afloat by traveling up and down the East Coast, buying used cars to sell and using spare parts to repair customers’ cars. By the time the war

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

ended, he had built strong relationships and established a solid reputation in the community. “To this day, excellent service and customer satisfaction are the backbone of our dealership,” says John. In 1990, John took the reins from his father, Fred Bowis, who built their iconic five-story building and grew the company through smart business strategies and brilliant marketing. As a family business with deep roots in the community, Chevy Chase Cars has raised funds for numerous local charities, including more than $1 million for The Children’s Inn at NIH. “Community and family are very important to us,” says John. “Over the years, we’ve had multiple people from about 30 different families work on our team. We have a dozen employees who’ve been with us for 20, 30, even 50 years. My grandfather would be proud.” TONY J. LEWIS

Chevy Chase Cars


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TONY J. LEWIS

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The Oval Today: The lighthouse, donated in 2012 by the Slavin Family Foundation serves as a beacon of hope to Bethesda campus residents.

The National Center for Children and Families (NCCF) “NCCF seeks to lead through transformation, diversity, and inclusivity.” 6301 Greentree Road Bethesda, MD 20817 301-365-4480 rspassiani@nccf-cares.org www.nccf-cares.org

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Founded as an orphanage in the District of Columbia in 1915, The National Center for Children and Families (NCCF) has guided the community’s investment in caring for children and youth with unmet needs. In 1931, having outgrown its original home, NCCF relocated to a 140-acre farm in Bethesda and adapted to address the impact of harsh conditions suffered by children through the flu epidemic, the Great Depression and two World Wars. Now, NCCF remains a community beacon, driven by a clear vision of responsibility for the vulnerable children and families who live in the midst of one of the most educated and affluent regions in the world. This flexible and robust community institution has responded to the crisis for children living through community and racial violence, drug epidemics, income inequality, child maltreatment and educational disparities, i.e., emergency shelters, transitional and affordable housing, therapeutic residential care, foster care and adoption, teen parent services, and community and school-based prevention services. As our country focuses on global war, the

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

dominant influence of social media, an explosion of technology, the COVID-19 pandemic, economic instability and widespread societal injustice, NCCF steadily promotes increased attention on and resources for children, youth and their families who require critical support from the larger community, if they are to thrive. NCCF has created a wide continuum of 21 programs that annually propels more than 50,000 children, youth and families into an improved quality of life within the National Capital Region. NCCF seeks to lead through transformation, diversity and inclusivity. Dr. Sheryl Brissett Chapman, NCCF’s executive director, says, “Our 105-year history reflects institutional resilience; yet NCCF has captured the benefit of experience without being held siege to it. With its compassionate vision to inspire the community to care for its most defenseless and dependent children and youth, it continues to innovate and promote health, well-being and a quality of life in our community.”

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Below: The Baptist Home for Children: Boys enjoy a game of baseball on the Oval, the main play space for residents when it was still an orphanage.


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The Youth Activity Center & Louise Duncan Memorial Chapel: Overlooking both the Oval and the lighthouse, NCCF’s newest building includes space for art, music and a chapel for use by clients, staff and volunteers.

BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021 39


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DAVID A. GITTLESON, PRINCIPAL NICHOLAS M. ZUPPAS, PRINCIPAL PETER G. PAPANTONIOU, PRINCIPAL “For more than 30 years, GZ Realty has helped clients buy, sell and lease top-tier healthcare settings and has brokered invaluable relationships between tenants and landlords.” 3 Bethesda Metro Center, Suite 700 Bethesda, MD 20814 301-235-1300 info@gzrealty.net www.gzrealty.net

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When David Gittleson and Nicholas Zuppas began working together in 1988 at a real estate firm in Bethesda, they quickly realized medical professionals were not getting the specialized real estate services they deserved. Two years later, the pair founded Gittleson Zuppas Medical Realty (GZ Realty) to fill that void. In 2007 Peter Papantoniou joined as coprincipal and “has contributed immensely to the firm’s growth,” says David. “Patients see specialists, so why shouldn’t doctors work with a broker who specializes in representing medical clients?” says Nick. “It was David’s brainchild to focus on healthcare, where others were not.” GZ Realty, which represents tenants and landlords, prides itself on unrivaled knowledge of the medical real estate market and the Washington Metropolitan Area healthcare landscape. For more than 30 years, GZ Realty has helped clients buy, sell, and lease top-tier healthcare settings and has brokered

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

invaluable relationships between tenants and landlords. “Our biggest priorities are honesty, integrity, and providing the highest level of individualized service,” says David. “The medical real estate market can be complicated,” says Pete, “but GZ Realty masterfully navigates the common pitfalls and fervently advocates on behalf of its clients from initial meeting through the end of a lease term.” As a testament to its superior service, many of GZ Realty’s clients have been with the company since its inception in 1990. “Having the trust and confidence of our longtime clients for so many years is priceless,” says Nick. “We treat every client as if they are family, and we always strive to negotiate the very best lease terms.” HILARY SCHWAB

Gittleson Zuppas Medical Realty


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Sandy Spring Builders FROM LEFT: TYLER ABRAMS, RAY SOBRINO, PHIL LEIBOVITZ, MIMI BRODSKY KRESS, BRIAN ABRAMSON, TOM BENNETT "We're often told you can tell when you drive by one of our houses because of its beauty, proportion and quality.”

MICHAEL KRESS

4705 West Virginia Ave. Bethesda, MD 20814 301-913-5995 info@sandyspringbuilders.com www.sandyspringbuilders.com

"At Sandy Spring Builders, we're very proud of our 40-year history in the area," says CEO Phil Leibovitz. "We've proven one thing that is very hard to show in the building business – longevity. There are only a handful of true custom builders who are still in business in the area as long as us." Phil and his partner Mimi Brodsky Kress have successfully built the company through hard work, a talented team, a wonderful portfolio of homes and dedication to the customer experience. "Almost 40 years later, our full-service team still loves what we do, and I believe it shows in our homes," says Leibovitz. "We're often told you can tell when you drive by one of our houses because of its beauty, proportion and quality. We build homes for friends, and many of our clients become friends — that’s because we take so much pride in their homes." Sandy Spring Builders is the most experienced builder in the area, not only in construction, but also finding and

developing land, and working within clients’ budgets. "Our data bank of information from years of being in the building business cannot be replaced or duplicated," says Leibovitz. Their vast portfolio of projects and happy clients who love their homes, tell the story of why Sandy Spring Builders is considered the area’s premier custom homebuilder. Sandy Spring Builders is also an active participant in the community, giving back in many ways to numerous non-profits. “Our homes and reputation are built to last,” says Leibovitz.

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St. Jane de Chantal School “Students are inspired to embrace opportunities to develop a positive self-image, leadership skills, and a sense of responsibility towards school, parish and community.” 9525 Old Georgetown Road Bethesda, MD 20814 301-530-1221 ehamilton@dechantal.org www.dechantal.org

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Founded in 1953, St. Jane de Chantal Catholic School is a Christ-Centered educational community with more than 350 students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. Committed to meeting the individual needs of students through a flexible and innovative curriculum, De Chantal has twice earned the prestigious National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence award given by the U.S. Department of Education. “We’re like a family and strive to be a home away from home for our students,” says Principal Elizabeth Hamilton. “Our teachers are all friends and work well together, which trickles down. Most of us have children and grandchildren of our own and treat our students as such, with kindness while still holding them accountable.” De Chantal faculty seeks to provide an environment rooted in tradition that is academically challenging, emotionally nurturing and spiritually grounded in the Gospel message. “Though we are ever-evolving, we’ve held on to the traditions that built this school,” says Hamilton, whose children and grandchildren attended the school as she did. Students are inspired to embrace opportunities to develop a positive self-image, leadership skills, and a sense of responsibility towards school, parish and community. The school prioritizes giving, says Hamilton, and engages in many charitable ventures, including food drives and shoeboxes filled with goods for the homeless. De Chantal students are privy to such a unique and positive experience that many have returned to teach, says Hamilton. “We currently have four teachers who went here; it’s quite telling that they want to come back and continue the tradition.”

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Karp, Wigodsky, Norwind, Kudel & Gold, P.A. “…(the firm) considers its rich history and stability one of the reasons it has served generations of satisfied clients.”

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2273 Research Blvd, Suite 200 Rockville, MD 20850 301-948-3800 rkarp@karplawfirm.net www.karplawfirm.net

Karp, Wigodsky, Norwind, Kudel & Gold, P.A., an esteemed law firm specializing in personal injury, was formed near the end of the 20th century. Originally named Karp Frosh, Brian Frosh left the firm after nearly two decades when he was elected as Maryland’s Attorney General in 2015. Most of the firm’s current partners have been working together for more than 20 years, says Managing Partner Ron Karp. The firm’s newest partner, Andrew Karp, joined the team nine years ago after graduating from American University’s Washington College of Law. As evidenced by his selection (voted by his peers) to Super Lawyers as a “Rising Star,” the younger Karp proudly continues the family tradition of client commitment. The firm has a Tier 1 rating (the highest rating possible) by U.S. News and World Reports for Personal Injury litigation and its partners have regularly been recognized for their accomplishments in virtually all of the top peer-reviewed rating systems. Ron Karp is entering his 50th year at the bar and has had his cases

covered by The Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, NBC network news, The Today Show, People Magazine and the London Times. “I am especially proud of the fact that in many instances, I have represented the second and third generation of the same family,” he says. In an industry where partners jump from law firm to law firm Karp, Wigodsky, Norwind, Kudel & Gold considers its rich history and stability one of the reasons it has served generations of satisfied clients.

FROM LEFT: RONALD KARP, EDWARD L. NORWIND, JACK GOLD, ANDREW KARP, ADRIAN MEZA, ALLIA BOROWSKI, DEMOSTHENES KOMIS, ZACH KING, JOHN PATRICK KUDEL, JEFFREY WIGODSKY, AND STEVE CHAIKIN

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PROFILES

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THE MARKOFF BROTHERS Calleva is dedicated to making the outdoors accessible for all people, no matter their age, interest area or level of experience. Main Office 19936 Fisher Avenue, Poolesville, MD River School 13015 Riley's Lock Road, Poolesville, MD Other Locations Dickerson, MD; McLean, VA & Romney, WV 301-216-1248 www.calleva.org

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For 27 years, Calleva has held true to its mission of providing outdoor experiences that challenge individuals towards personal growth, encourage teamwork and provide enriching relief from the stress of city life. Founded as a small summer camp in 1993 by Nick, Alex, and Matt Markoff, Calleva has built a reputation for excellence and innovation in outdoor education and outdoor adventure. Calleva now works from hubs in Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia, offering a dynamic set of programs that go well beyond summer camp to include weekend and travel programs for adults, overnight wilderness experiences for teens, kayaking lessons and small-scale sustainable farming. The Markoffs’ journey has been full of surprises and adventures that have stretched their imaginations. One such unforeseen circumstance was the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic last winter. Calleva’s team sprang into action, quickly re-imagining their spring, summer,

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fall and winter programming to comply with public health guidance. “Calleva’s Small Group Adventures camp was a big hit in 2020, as were family pizza nights on the farm and adult kayaking tours and lessons, says Matt Markoff, Calleva’s executive director. “Our numbers were smaller, but our participants and staff had a great year of adventure—all while staying COVIDsafe.” Calleva is following a similar model in 2021. “People are meant to be connected with nature,” says Markoff, “and spending time outdoors is especially important during stressful times. Calleva is dedicated to making the outdoors accessible for all people, no matter their age, interest area or level of experience.” MICHAEL VENTURA

Calleva, Inc.


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Boone & Sons Jewelers

MICHAEL VENTURA

5550 The Hills Plaza Chevy Chase, MD 20815 301-657-2144 www.booneandsons.com

Boone & Sons is one of the Washington area’s oldest family-run jewelers. French Boone founded the store in 1966 and today three generations of Boones run the locations in Chevy Chase, Washington, DC and McLean. At any given time, a family member is present to assist customers. A total of 10 Boones work for the company today. “And most of the nonBoone employees have been with the company for 20 years or more – so they might as well be family,” says Darryl, French’s son and current president. Familiar faces make the experience at Boone & Sons very personal. In most cases a client has the advantage of not only working with someone who knows them, but also their jewelry preferences and purchase history. French Boone created the store with the quality and service of the world’s finest jewelers but blended with the intimate, personal feel of a local business. “Not only are we a full-service jeweler, but we strive to have the finest quality at the

most competitive price,” says Darryl. “We’re extremely flexible and serviceoriented, and really do all we can to make sure everyone who makes a purchase is happy.” French taught his family that it’s more important to keep a relationship than to make a sale. There’s also a wonderful generational aspect of the business that coincides with their generations of customers. That’s one of the biggest draws for a family business, according to Darryl. “We’re relationshipdriven. We don’t see people as customers making a purchase as much as they are like friends and family.” Boone & Sons has been voted “Best Jewelry Store” by Bethesda Magazine’s readers several years running.

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Paley Rothman, Attorneys at Law “When you walk through our doors, your goals and objectives are our priority.” 4800 Hampden Lane, 6th Floor Bethesda, MD 20814 301-656-7603 info@paleyrothman.com www.paleyrothman.com

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Paley Rothman is a full-service law firm that provides a wide range of legal counsel to businesses and individuals. As it approaches its 50th anniversary, the firm, which began as a small tax/business venture, now employs 40 high caliber attorneys in more than 25 practice areas and has earned a reputation as one of Maryland’s leading law firms. Personalized and attentive service are the cornerstone of Paley Rothman’s success. The firm offers the clientfocused feel of a boutique law office — Paley Rothman attorneys genuinely care about their clients and are responsive and accessible — while delivering bigfirm results. “When you walk through our doors, your goals and objectives are our priority,” says Co-President Jim Hammerschmidt. “We listen first and talk through the strategy second.” Paley Rothman clients have a broad range of needs and the firm’s diverse workforce, which includes proficiency

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in such practice areas as business corporate transactions, tax, commercial and residential real estate, healthcare, commercial finance and litigation, employment, family law, estate planning and administration, science and more, tackles these issues collaboratively. For nearly five decades, Paley Rothman, which prides itself on providing sophisticated solutions, has cultivated a loyal base of clients by applying the “Paley Perspective,” thinking outside the box and using cutting-edge legal strategies. “Clients rely on us to identify and address key issues, analyze and interpret complex information and develop solution-oriented strategies that protect their interests and ensure their longterm success,” says Hammerschmidt. “Our problem-solving perspective offers favorable results and makes us a leading law firm in Maryland.”

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Bullis School CHRISTIAN SULLIVAN, HEAD OF SCHOOL “Bullis has successfully implemented a hybrid model; families decide if they prefer their children on campus or in remote learning…”

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10601 Falls Road Potomac, MD 20854 301-299-8500 www.bullis.org

Bullis celebrated its 90th anniversary in 2020, and though it was a challenging year as COVID-19 uprooted everyday life, the school, under the tremendous leadership of first-year Head of School Christian Sullivan, has continued to thrive. “Our community has completely embraced him and appreciates his transparency,” says Director of Advancement & External Affairs Sharon Kessler. “His top priority is the safety of our students and faculty, but he always wanted students to be here.” Bullis has successfully implemented a hybrid model; families decide if they prefer their children on campus or in remote learning — and have the option of changing their minds should they need. The school partners with Capital Diagnostics to provide free weekly COVID-19 testing on campus for all students and employees. Founded in 1930 as a small military prep school for boys, Bullis now encompasses more than 800 boys and girls on its pristine 102-acre Potomac

campus. Though ever evolving, the vision of founder Commander Bullis remains the school’s driving force. “He not only believed in a strong education but the merit in teaching students how to learn,” says Kessler. “That extends to our core values such as integrity, respect, and fostering a strong sense of family.” Bullis offers unique programming and challenging opportunities that combine traditional subjects and modern knowledge with an emphasis on skill development, says Kessler. Guided by world-class faculty who take pride in developing caring citizens and creative, critical thinkers, Bullis students are encouraged to explore a wide variety of academics, arts, athletics and service.

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PROFILES

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FROM LEFT: NEAL KURSBAN, CEO, FAMILY & NURSING CARE JEFF ZUKERMAN, PRESIDENT & COO, FAMILY & NURSING CARE NOT PICTURED: SANDY KURSBAN, FOUNDER “We’ve innovated to make in-home care as available and affordable as possible.” 1010 Wayne Ave., Suite 1100 Silver Spring, MD 20910 301-588-8200 info@familynursingcare.com www.familynursingcare.com

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Family & Nursing Care is the region’s premier resource for home care services for older adults. Family owned and operated since 1968, its founder, Sandy Kursban, is widely considered an industry pioneer. Sandy’s son, Neal Kursban, is the company’s CEO. “As a company that’s stronger than ever after 53 years, we consistently find new ways to evolve and grow with the times,” says Neal Kursban. “We’ve innovated to make in-home care as available and affordable as possible to meet our clients’ needs.” Client needs for quality home care range from ongoing caregiver services to temporary situations. Families don’t need to agonize over what they may think needs to be a lifetime decision to initiate care for their loved one. “Seventy-five percent of those who use our services need care within 48 hours, and we are nimble enough to get a caregiver in the door within that immediate timeframe,” says Family & Nursing Care President & COO, Jeff

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Zukerman. “It doesn’t need to be a longterm commitment.” Whether the need for in-home care is short-term or continual, Family & Nursing Care’s long history of success rests in their approach to client care. “We recognize that each client has a team of people involved in their quality of care including family members and other professionals,” says Zukerman. “We seamlessly integrate into this team and work hard to offer the best services and caregivers to fulfill and exceed the expectations of everyone involved.”

MICHAEL VENTURA

Family & Nursing Care


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Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA “We care about you and your case and it shows both in our relationships with clients and the results we get for them.”

JGL Law’s diversity of practice areas coupled with its team-oriented approach makes it a one-stop-shop for attorney needs. “You just finalized your divorce with the guidance of one of our family law attorneys and now need estate planning? Not a problem. We have lawyers who can help,” says Reza Golesorkhi. “This firm is a team in every sense. The examples of multiple JGL lawyers helping a client are endless.” When the law is not in a client’s favor, the firm’s proven advocates are ready to make creative and principled arguments for a change in the law — JGL Law’s forward- thinking strategies have yielded many groundbreaking appellate decisions. From simple to complex needs, JGL Law is prepared to deliver strategic solutions with high standards.

TONY J. LEWIS

111 Rockville Pike, Suite 975 Rockville, MD 20850 240-399-7900 www.jgllaw.com

For more than 50 years, people and businesses facing complex and highstakes legal issues have turned to Joseph, Greenwald & Laake for sophisticated counsel with a personal touch. One of the most trusted law firms serving the Washington, DC, and suburban Maryland area, JGL Law has received widespread recognition for its astounding work. For several years running, JGL has been named a “Best Law Firm” by U.S. News and World Report. “Though JGL Law has expanded from its original small group of lawyers to its current team of 40 attorneys, the heartbeat of the firm remains the same,” says David Bulitt. “We still represent clients in a traditional and uniquely personal way. We care about you and your case, and it shows both in our relationships with clients and the results we get for them.”

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PROFILES

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GAIL LINN, AUD, CCC-A TRICIA TERLEP, AUD Awards & Honors “Best Audiologist,” Best of Bethesda Readers Poll, Bethesda Magazine, 2013, 2014, 2016, and 2018 11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 105 Rockville, MD 20852 240-477-1010 www.PotomacAudiology.com

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A highly respected leader in audiology, Dr. Gail Linn not only built a renowned clinic, but is also a speaker, former Director of Private Practice and Industry at the American Speech Language Hearing Association, and Treasurer of the Maryland Academy of Audiology. A third-generation Washingtonian whose grandfather was second leader of the U.S. Marine Corps Band. Dr. Linn grew up in Beltsville and went to High Point High School. She leads four other top audiologists in her busy practice in Rockville and recently added office space for one of the most highly qualified and experienced teams in audiology. Carrying the latest in hearing aid and other device technology, Potomac Audiology can help with all aspects of hearing problems in patients of all ages. One of the reasons they work so well with families is because they are one. Dr. Linn and Dr. Tricia Terlep are mother and daughter, and Dr. Terlep’s husband, Vince, is Director of Operations. “People are often in denial about

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hearing loss, and we like educating them, and helping them discover what it's like to hear again,” says Dr. Linn. “We’re not just selling hearing aids—we’re helping people hear again and that's amazing. It can have a huge impact on someone’s quality of life and we see that every day.” The practice offers thorough hearing evaluations, state-of-the-art hearing systems and unhurried, personalized care. Specialty care includes custom-made hearing protection for hunters, people who work in noisy environments, and inthe-ear monitors for musicians. Custommade swim molds help children and adults prevent ear infections by keeping water from entering the ear canal. “We can help anyone with hearing issues with the technology and tools we have available today,” said Dr. Linn. COURTESY PHOTO

Potomac Audiology


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Charles E. Smith Jewish Day School “…the school’s mission is centered on both engaging students in a superior education and connecting them with the Jewish community and culture beyond campus.” Lower School 1901 East Jefferson St. Rockville, MD 20852 301-881-1400 Annette M. and Theodore N. Lerner Family Upper School Campus 11710 Hunters Lane Rockville, MD 20852 301-881-1404

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cesjds@cesjds.org www.cesjds.org

Charles E. Smith Jewish Day School (CESJDS) is more than just an outstanding school for students in junior kindergarten through 12th grade; it is a vibrant and dynamic community rooted in Jewish values, says Head of School Rabbi Mitchel Malkus. Established in 1965, the school’s mission is centered on both engaging students in a superior education and connecting them with the Jewish community and culture beyond campus. “Families who choose our school want to provide their children with the very best, academically but know it is just as important to instill them with integrity, genuine concern for others and a passion for making a difference in the world,” says Rabbi Malkus. CESJDS offers a rich curriculum that includes 28 STEM electives across Grades 5-12, and the school’s 8-1 student-teacher ratio fosters individualized attention and increased student engagement. It is also a learning community committed to diversity and inclusion. “We are a much more

diverse community — religiously, socioeconomically and politically — than people expect,” says Rabbi Malkus. “Many of our families care deeply about Jewish culture, history and identity, but aren’t religiously observant. They love CEJDS because of our community and core values.” That sense of community has played a major role in helping CESJDS navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. “The pandemic has shown us that our community is an anchor at times like these,” says Rabbi Malkus. “COVID has also shown the value that independent schools bring as we are nimble and able to teach and structure our learning in ways that larger public schools are not.”

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FROM LEFT: KEN WORMALD, ED WORMALD, AND ROBERT WORMALD “It’s not the sticks and bricks that are exciting, but the creation of spaces people LOVE to live in, where they can build memories for a lifetime.” 5283 Corporate Drive, Suite 300 Frederick, MD 21703 301-695-6614 info@wormald.com www.wormald.com

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In 1964, from a basement office in Potomac, Wormald Homes founder Bob Wormald (whose father-in-law built Bethesda’s Shops at Wildwood as vice president of construction for a local builder) established his new company on two strong pillars: Signature Design and Quality Construction. Now run by Bob’s three sons—Robert, Ed, and Ken—Wormald, in 2020, became the 120th largest home builder in the United States at $132 million in annual revenue, according to Professional Builder. “Our rich history and deep roots in this area mean we are here to stay,” says Ken. “Homes our parents’ generation grew up in, in Bethesda are now in disrepair and obsolete in design; we are rebuilding them to create homes for the next generation of area families to thrive in.” Wormald clients benefit from a fully vertically integrated company with extensive experience in construction management, long-term relationships with high-quality trades partners, awardwinning design, quality materials and

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building methods, and the feel of a small family business with the volume buying power of a top 200 builder in the U.S. Wormald new homes now selling in Bethesda include Wild Oak – a single family enclave on the top of Pook’s Hill, Quarry Springs – luxury elevator townhomes with rooftop terraces between Congressional and Burning Tree Country Clubs, and a collection of customdesigned homes in existing, highly sought after neighborhoods. “It’s not the sticks and bricks that are exciting,” says Ken, “but the creation of spaces people LOVE to live in, where they can build memories for a lifetime.”

DARREN HIGGINS

Wormald Homes


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McMillan Metro, P.C. PICTURED AT THE CONFERENCE TABLE CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: MICHAEL FAERBER, LARRY BURCH, HOWARD METRO, JENNIFER MANLEY-KAPOOR PICTURED ON SCREEN FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP ROW: LAWRENCE JACOBS, GINNY CASCIO BONIFACINO, NATASHA NAZARETH BOTTOM ROW: JOSE ESPEJO, ANDREW FRIEDMAN

HILARY SCHWAB

“...when we combine our love of the community with our knowledge of its laws...we are best suited to serve the legal needs of our fellow residents." 7811 Montrose Road, Suite 400 Potomac, MD 20854 301-251-1180 www.McMillanMetro.com

McMillan Metro, P.C. is a law firm you should know, with attorneys spanning more than three decades worth of expertise across a wide variety of practice areas. They pride themselves on being a locally based team of professionals readily available and motivated by a genuine desire to provide assistance and create positive and lasting relationships. “We know how to navigate the landscape, and when we combine our love of the community with our knowledge of its laws, we find that we are best suited to serve the legal needs of our fellow residents,” says McMillan Metro Partner Michael Faerber. Their 29 years of success can be attributed to their motto, “Knowledge, Strategy, and Results.” By acknowledging that each legal situation is unique, they’re able to tailor their approach to ensure specific needs are met and the best possible outcome is achieved for all parties involved. Although the past year has been challenging due to the pandemic,

McMillan Metro was able to utilize their technological capabilities in order to assist their clients. With remote conferencing and a strong support staff, their dayto-day operations remained intact. As a more in-person approach gradually returns, they continue to prioritize safety with social distancing, smaller meetings, wellness screens and sanitizing stations. Choosing a lawyer can be intimidating. The attorneys at McMillan Metro make it easy. Whether you are seeking counsel for your business or individual needs, you can rest assured that your matters are in capable hands, from start to finish. Their team of experienced professionals welcome all inquiries regarding your current or potential legal concerns.

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PROFILES

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“… in 2021 (ANHS) was the only agency in Montgomery County to win the prestigious Best of Home Care® Leader in Excellence award…” 15800 Crabbs Branch Way, Suite 205 Rockville, MD 20855 240-414-4147 www.advancedhomesupport.com

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Personal experience led Advanced Nursing + Home Support (ANHS) Founder and CEO Samuel Lish to establish the family owned and operated company in 1993. Navigating home care issues for his father, he would only accept the best. This year, ANHS, which in 2021 was the only agency in Montgomery County to win the prestigious Best of Home Care® Leader in Excellence award for exceptional care, client service and employee satisfaction, is celebrating its 28th anniversary. “My 97-year-old mother is also now a client,” says Lish. “I am passionate about constantly improving what we do and how we do it, and in consistently providing expert care, exceptional service, and an extraordinary experience to every client and their family.” Committed to providing unparalleled service from experienced, compassionate care providers, ANHS uses a team approach for every client. From initial contact to a comprehensive needs

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assessment with clients and their families, to designing a plan of care with the best interests of clients and their families in mind, to making the best possible match of care providers for clients’ needs, ANHS staff works to deliver care that allows clients to thrive in place and live with dignity, fulfillment and purpose. For many clients, standard home care is not enough. ANHS, a trusted local leader in the industry, offers levels of care that most agencies do not, says Lish. “From simple companion care to personal care as well as the finest in skilled nursing, we provide services that follow the needs of our clients.”

MICHAEL VENTURA

Advanced Nursing + Home Support


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Altman & Associates GARY ALTMAN, ESQ. “Earning our clients' trust is our top priority and a value that has been essential to our firm's success and longevity.” 11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708 One Central Plaza N. Bethesda, MD 20852 301-468-3220 info@altmanassociates.net www.altmanassociates.net

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Altman & Associates has been helping individuals, families and businesses in Maryland, Washington, DC and Northern Virginia navigate the full spectrum of estate law matters for more than 25 years. Estate planning involves deeply personal and sensitive matters around life and legacy. It requires frank conversations about finances, health, familial relationships and more. Navigating these discussions (and the subsequent decisions that follow) requires more than just a mastery of the law; it requires trust. “Earning our clients' trust is our top priority and a value that has been essential to our firm's success and longevity,” says Founder and Principal Attorney Gary Altman. “We work hard to earn our clients' trust by ensuring they feel heard, understood and respected from their very first encounter with us. Our team understands that no two clients are alike. We craft personalized legal solutions that are unique to your values, goals and life circumstances.” Altman & Associates’ commitment to client service and legal excellence has been acknowledged by peers and organizations in the financial and estate planning community many times over the years. While Altman says he and his team appreciate the accolades, “Nothing is more rewarding or validating than having a client entrust us with a family member or friend. We often have the honor of working with several generations within a family.” Altman says that each of the firm's 10 team members share a similar goal: “We want to do such an outstanding job that every client becomes a client for life."

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PROFILES

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“After more than three decades of success, the entire team remains focused on providing personalized service and intelligent advice through communication, transparency and integrity." 6116 Executive Blvd., Suite 500 N. Bethesda, MD 20852 301-770-9880 mcornelius@burtwealth.com www.burtwealth.com For award details, click on: http://www.burtwealth.com/files/Awards_ List_Metrics_and_Reprint_Matrix_Detailed_versionJan2021.pdf

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Combining years of experience and expertise, the professionals at Burt Wealth Advisors form long-term partnerships with their clients. “Every client relationship is rooted in trust,” says Fred Cornelius, president & CEO of the award-winning wealth management firm. In its 36 years, Burt Wealth Advisors has helped hundreds of families across multiple generations enjoy financial security. “We often work with two or three generations in a family, allowing us to see the big picture and come up with solutions that create value for all,” says Cornelius. “These multi-generational partnerships are a reflection of the high level of trust our clients have in us. We take that seriously.” Using their Growth Through Life Wealth Planning Process, the advisors guide clients through the investment management and financial planning process. They have experience with helping women take control of their finances, particularly after a divorce or other life transition. “It’s crucial for women to work with a financial advisor who

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speaks their language. We strongly believe in educating all our clients, so they’ll be informed and empowered,” says Executive Vice President Maria Cornelius. Though the firm has grown considerably, the client-to-planner ratio remains intentionally low to ensure clients receive the attention they deserve. “We’ve designed our whole client experience around being proactive and following up. We follow through on our promises,” says Cornelius. After more than three decades of success, the entire team remains focused on providing personalized service and intelligent advice through communication, transparency and integrity. Contact Burt Wealth Advisors to learn how they can help you plan for your future.

HILARY SCHWAB

Burt Wealth Advisors


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Georgetown Hill Early School LINDA TECLER “Georgetown Hill school endorses a whole-child approach to teaching and learning that reinforces and expands upon children’s natural competencies.”

HILARY SCHWAB

9905 Counselman Road Potomac, MD 20854 301-284-8144 enrollment@georgetownhill.com www.georgetownhill.com Additional campuses in Bethesda, Clarksburg, Frederick, Gaithersburg, Hyattsville, North Potomac, Darnestown, Riverdale and Rockville, with new location coming to downtown Bethesda in Fall 2021.

“When a long-standing preschool has not only siblings, but second-generation family enrolling, you know you are doing something right and special,” says longtime Georgetown Hill Early School pre-kindergarten teacher and program director Linda Tecler. Founded in 1980 by Ellen Cromwell, Georgetown Hill is a nonprofit with more than 250 employees across 12 campuses and programs serving more than 1,000 children ages 3 months through kindergarten. The school also runs a school age before and after care enrichment program. With an annual turnover rate of less than 10 percent, consistency of leadership has played an important role in Georgetown Hill’s continued growth and success, says Tecler, who has been a member of the teaching staff since the school opened. “We understand early childhood, and we understand the needs of the children and families in our neighborhoods,” says Tecler. Children thrive in educational environments long before kindergarten and early educators play a vital part in “molding children’s attitude toward learning,” says Tecler. “A positive start is a springboard for the educational future of a child,” she continues. Through its trademarked PLAN® (Play, Learning, the Arts, Nurturing) philosophy, Georgetown Hill primes young children for great success. Georgetown Hill Early School endorses a whole-child approach to teaching and learning that reinforces and expands upon children’s natural competencies. Students are provided opportunities for growth and social development, creative and cognitive development and physical and moral development. By pushing creative boundaries, the school’s educators help children PLAN® toward a future full of self-awareness and confidence. “There’s nothing like the wonder of childhood,” says Tecler, “and that ‘aha’ moment when I see a child ‘get it.’”

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PROFILES

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Deb Levy FROM LEFT: DEB LEVY, SENIOR HOME LENDING ADVISOR LISA BENNETT, ASSISTANT NMLS ID:481255 “I am thankful for my 35 years in the same industry, and the people who have invited me into their lives and shared their homeownership dreams.” Chase 1401 New York Ave. NW Washington, DC 20005 301-332-7758 Deb.Levy@chase.com www.homeloan.chase.com/deb.levy

Deb Levy is a Senior Home Lending Advisor with 35 years of experience. A lifelong Washingtonian, she specializes in lending to self-employed clients, vacation home financing, condo and co-op lending, first-time homebuyer programs, and conforming loans and jumbo mortgages. The mortgage industry and housing market have evolved over the past four decades, says Deb, and so has she. Through each phase of life, her perspective has shifted, and by drawing from her own experiences, she finds common ground with borrowers. Currently, Deb, like many of her clients, is navigating the COVID-19 pandemic, virtual learning for her teenagers in the Montgomery County Public Schools system, planning for college education expenses and retirement. “I love getting to know my clients and their families, listening to their stories and guiding them through their evolving housing needs,” says Deb. Mortgage lending is about more than the one transaction of purchasing or refinancing a home; it’s about fitting that home purchase (or refinance) into the bigger picture — long-term life plans — says Deb. She attributes her success to the time she spends getting to know her borrowers and helping them anticipate how best to leverage the transaction. Working for Chase, a full-service national bank, also allows Deb to partner with her associates to present additional bank products and financial services to complement mortgages. “I am thankful for my 35 years in the same industry, and the people who have invited me into their lives and shared their homeownership dreams,” says Deb. “I cannot imagine doing anything else for a career.”

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MICHAEL VENTURA

All home lending products are subject to credit and property approval. Rates, program terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all states or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations apply. Home lending products offered by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. ©2021 JPMorgan Chase & Co.


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Shulman Rogers FROM TOP LEFT: JOINED SHULMAN ROGERS IN 2020: KIMBERLY MANN (FORMERLY WITH PILLSBURY’S DC OFFICE), ERIN AUGUST, CLIFFORD GLOVER III, HUNTER HAINES (MD BAR PENDING) AND LARRY BARD (FORMERLY WITH MORRISON FOERSTER’S VA OFFICE); RECENTLY PROMOTED SHAREHOLDERS FELIX KUSHNIR, LANE HORNFECK, BEN SMITH, JOY EINSTEIN, AARON BLANK AND SARAH CLINE

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“Our extensive network within the public and private sector enables us to be true partners in our clients’ growth, and they frequently attribute their success to connections we made for them.” 12505 Park Potomac Ave. Potomac, MD 20854 301-230-5200 info@shulmanrogers.com www.ShulmanRogers.com

Founded on a commitment to client service nearly 50 years ago, Shulman Rogers has grown from a Montgomery County firm into a regional powerhouse delivering a full range of business and personal legal services. With 26+ practice groups and approximately 90 attorneys, Shulman Rogers serves clients in all 50 states and globally. Shulman Rogers has been fortunate to attract laterals from large national firms, as well as lawyers that are well known in their field. “Joining Shulman Rogers has given me the flexibility to represent clients in a way that feels more personal and impactful,” says Kimberly Mann, recent lateral hire and former chair of Pillsbury’s Investment Funds and Investment Management Practice. Leveraging technology, Shulman Rogers has enhanced the client experience, including the creation of visionary practice groups like NEXT®, a platform offering fixed fees and bundled services for startups and emerging growth companies. The firm supports

clients throughout the life cycle of their companies, and by partnering with companies like Amazon Web Services and Nasdaq, provides the latest tech tools to streamline client organization, communication and collaboration. “Our extensive network within the public and private sector enables us to be true partners in our clients’ growth, and they frequently attribute their success to connections we made for them,” says Managing Shareholder Sam Spiritos. “We look forward to continuing to create positive impact in the future.” Shulman Rogers encourages creativity, promotes diversity and inclusion, and fosters camaraderie among its employees and clients. Involved in its community, the firm has relationships with and is proud to support the efforts of a broad range of charitable organizations.

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“Your child will be known, and not just by their teacher, but by a whole community…” 8821 River Road Bethesda, MD 20817 301-365-2595 info@norwoodschool.org www.norwoodschool.org

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Norwood School was founded in 1952 by Frances Marsh, who was determined to create a “happy place of learning filled with art and music, where each child feels supported and valued.” She wanted it to be a school to which children looked forward to returning each morning. “Today, nearly seven decades later, Norwood is still that kind of school,” says Head of School Matthew Gould. During the most critical years of intellectual, social and emotional development, Norwood provides a loving, nurturing, inclusive, supportive and family like environment where students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade feel safe taking risks, exploring new activities and challenging themselves. The curriculum is designed to be challenging for every student, while providing numerous routes to success and nurturing a love for learning along the way. With a child-centered approach to teaching and learning and a low 6-1 student-teacher ratio, Norwood teachers take the time to understand what each

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child needs to grow, to be challenged, and to feel successful and respected. “Your child will be known, and not just by their teacher, but by a whole community of adults who look out for and support each and every Norwood student,” says Gould. The Norwood community lives by the motto, “How you lead your life matters.” Character education and service learning have always been integral to Norwood’s curriculum. “At the end of their Norwood journeys, our graduates are equipped with the curiosity and confidence, the initiative and drive, and the knowledge, imagination and leadership skills they will need to achieve success and to make positive contributions to our world,” says Gould.

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Norwood School


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TOP PHOTO BY LISA HELFERT; INSERT PHOTO COURTESY PHOTO

JDKatz, PC ISABELLA C. DEMOUGEOT, SENIOR ASSOCIATE CAILIN J. TALBERT, SENIOR ASSOCIATE ELIZABETH J. MCINTURFF, PARTNER KATELYN E. HOLBROOK, ASSOCIATE PHOTO INSERT: JEFFREY D. KATZ ESQ, MANAGING PARTNER “It’s easy to measure our own success by that of our clients.” 3 Bethesda Metro Center, Suite 500 Bethesda, MD 20814 301-913-2948 www.jdkatz.com

When attorney Jeffrey D. Katz launched his solo practice in 2000, he planned to focus on complex tax and estate planning. Within weeks, however, he was investigating circus spy missions on behalf of a Potomac author and managing a construction firm as the court-appointed receiver. Two decades later, an expanded JDKatz, PC handles civil and commercial litigation, business planning and dispute resolution, adult guardianship matters, and estate and trust litigation, as well as tax and estate planning. Katz and his team deliver individualized client attention with big firm results. "We take the time to get to know and understand our clients," Katz said. “This reputation consistently earns praise from the media, clients near and far, and global nonprofit groups.”

“It’s easy to measure our own success by that of our clients,” Katz added. “As we head into the next 20 years, we look forward to raising that benchmark even further.” In addition to making a positive impact on its clients, the firm takes pride in being good corporate citizens by actively supporting Bike to the Beach, Rock & Roll for Children and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

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Councilor, Buchanan & Mitchell FROM LEFT: PETER B. REILLY, CPA, CVA, CHAIRMAN DANIEL L. WEAVER, CPA, PRESIDENT & MANAGING PARTNER “With a 100-year legacy of success, CBM is prepared and passionate about another century of service excellence.” 7910 Woodmont Ave., Suite 500 Bethesda, MD 20814 301-986-0600 dweaver@cbmcpa.com www.cbmcpa.com

HEATHER FUENTES

Councilor, Buchanan & Mitchell is proud to celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2021. The Top 25 Washington, D.C.-area accounting firm has been active in the region since James Councilor of the Bureau of Internal Revenue opened shop in 1921 to help clients manage the new income tax. Since then, CBM’s legacy of providing exceptional financial solutions to ensure its clients’ success has been a pillar on which the firm has earned its reputation as a trusted advisor. “Clients have come to expect unmatched integrity, advice and leadership within our community,” says President and Managing Partner Daniel L. Weaver. More than 100 team members collaborate to deliver first-rate service to a variety of clients including automotive dealerships, not-for-profit organizations, construction and real estate entities, and professional services firms. CBM also offers client accounting services to small and mid-sized businesses, financial planning and investment advisory expertise to individuals, and litigation and divorce planning expertise. “The breadth of knowledge at CBM is such that, no matter your tax, accounting or advisory needs, our professionals will reliably deliver innovative and exceptional solutions,” says Chairman Peter B. Reilly. CBM welcomes all diverse perspectives, experiences, lifestyles and cultures amongst its employees and clients. CBM’s commitment to creating future leaders through training and mentorship ensures unmatched client service. With a 100-year legacy of success, CBM is prepared and passionate about a future of service excellence in the 21st century.

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Meridian Homes, Inc. JONATHAN LERNER, CEO MICHAEL LERNER, PRESIDENT “To have our clients refer us to their friends and families is a testament to our success in designing and building homes that exceed our customers’ expectations.”

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4938 Hampden Lane #330 Bethesda, MD 20814 301-652-4440 info@meridianhomesinc.com www.meridianhomesinc.com

This year, the Meridian Homes family is excited to celebrate 25 years of excellence. Founded in 1996 by brothers Jonathan and Michael Lerner, third-generation Bethesda natives, the luxury renovation and custom home building firm is now one of the Washington metropolitan area’s leading home builders. “We have worked very hard to establish ourselves as a premier residential construction firm in this community,” says CEO Jonathan Lerner. “As owners of our company, we are involved in every project, from small-scale renovations to brandnew custom homes. Most importantly, we show our clients that we have a personal stake in making sure each project is handled with care and expertise. That is what truly sets Meridian Homes apart.” Meridian Homes prides itself on offering uncompromising, beautiful craftsmanship and concierge-level client service. In 2021 the company was named “A Top Vote Getter” for “Best Builder” by Bethesda Magazine readers for the

12th consecutive year. The accolades are appreciated, but it’s the strong and lasting bonds the firm has created with clients that they consider the foundation of their business, says President Michael Lerner. “To have our clients refer us to their friends and families is a testament to our success in designing and building homes that exceed our customers’ expectations,” says Michael. Proactive service and attention to detail come naturally to the Meridian Homes team, which strives to graciously accommodate clients’ every need and personalize the process of design and construction. Exclusive Aftercare Services also assure clients ongoing access to the Meridian Homes team long after project completion.

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PROFILES

Test of time SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Sandy Spring Friends School "What's unique about Sandy Spring Friends School? It hasn't been created yet." This was the copy that appeared in the first SSFS ad in 1960, promoting a school in the process of being built on land donated by Esther Scott, with Founder Brook Moore’s vision firmly rooted in Quaker values, experiential learning, civic engagement, and a balance of mind, body, and spirit. SSFS’s original vision continues to thrive in this progressive, coed, college preparatory Quaker school serving more than 600 students from preschool (age 3) through 12th grade, with optional boarding programs in the Upper School. SSFS provides a transformative learning community for its broadly diverse student body through the school’s challenging, inquiry-based academic program that encourages collaboration, critical thinking and student leadership. SSFS strives to nurture individual talents and foster caring and productive citizens of the world.

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16923 Norwood Road, Sandy Spring, MD 20860 301-774-7455 | admissions@ssfs.org | www.ssfs.org

Andrea Hirsch, J.D. THE LAW FIRM OF ANDREA HIRSCH

Ending a marriage represents a difficult time in people’s lives. Divorce, however, can be completed peacefully, says longtime family law attorney Andrea Hirsch. “When two people are willing to accept that things just didn’t work out, a marriage can be dissolved in a way that allows everyone involved to move forward and lead happy, productive lives,” says Hirsch. A trained mediator, Hirsch handles all family law matters, from divorce and child custody/support, to prenuptial agreements and more. Though her focus has shifted more to out-of-court settlements, she draws from extensive experience as a litigator and has the tools to help clients resolve their most contentious disputes. “Talking about family matters isn’t easy,” says Hirsch. “My clients can trust that I will listen attentively and make sure all their needs are addressed." 64

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COURTESY PHOTO

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PROFILES

Test of time

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Maryland Oral Surgery Associates “In MOSA’s eight locations — covering six Maryland counties — they have successfully performed nearly 1 million procedures over the past 52 years.”

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Bethesda Office 10401 Old Georgetown Road, Suite 206 Bethesda, MD 20814 Additional offices in Annapolis, College Park, Crofton, Frederick, Laurel, Rockville and Silver Spring. 1-844-459-MOSA [6672] bethesda@mosa4os.com www.mosa4os.com

Maryland Oral Surgery Associates (MOSA), the state’s oldest and largest Oral & Maxillofacial Facial Surgery practice, was established in 1969 in Greenbelt, MD. Since 1985, MOSA expanded from two full-time surgeons to 14 surgeons. In MOSA’s eight locations — covering six Maryland counties — they have successfully performed nearly 1 million procedures over the past 52 years. MOSA surgeons believe oral surgery needs must be provided to all members of the community. They have delivered more than $150,000 in free surgical care through the Donated Dental Service (DDS) and Holocaust Survivor programs. MOSA surgeons chaired the Maryland State Dental Association’s Mission of Mercy, providing $1.2 million of free dental care to 1,200 patients over two days. During the last 50 years, MOSA has provided thousands of continuing education hours to the dental community. Additionally, MOSA surgeons annually

participate in hundreds of surgery CE hours to stay fully current. During the initial outbreak of COVID-19, when most dental offices were closed, MOSA offices remained open treating nearly 1,500 emergency patients, relieving inundated hospitals. MOSA maintains the highest standards of infection control for their patients’ protection. MOSA’s most up-to-date surgical technology includes CT scanning to create computer-generated implant placements and “Teeth-in-a-Day” procedures. MOSA utilizes full anesthesia monitoring in their offices, which matches that used in hospital operating rooms for all of their IV Sedation/General anesthesia procedures. Maryland Oral Surgery Associates has been here for 50+ years and with its expanding team of highly trained surgeons will continue to provide first-rate care long into the future.

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PROFILES

Test of time SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Valley Mill Camp EVELYN MCEWAN, CAMP DIRECTOR

As Valley Mill Camp celebrates its 65th season, many campers will be following in the footsteps of their parents, and even grandparents. Serving families in the Washington metropolitan area since 1956, Valley Mill is conveniently located in Darnestown on more than 60 acres of deep woods surrounding a two-acre spring-fed lake. Through fun and challenging open-air activities — kayaking, canoeing, gymnastics, archery, air rifle and more — campers spend days in the rugged outdoors, making friends and learning self-sufficiency and resilience, teamwork and self-confidence. Counselors are chosen for their character and values, says Camp Director Evelyn McEwan, whose parents Bob and May founded the camp. “Many children attend Valley Mill year after year, finding deepened experiences each time. The bonds formed at Valley Mill become lifelong friendships.”

COURTESY PHOTO

15101 Seneca Road, Germantown, MD 20874 301-948-0220 | valleymill@valleymill.com www.valleymill.com

Geneva Day School 11931 Seven Locks Road, Potomac, MD 20854 301-340-7704 | www.genevadayschool.org

LISA HELFERT

Hoops. . . Balls. . . Parachute. . . Go! Geneva Day School’s Physical Education Instructor, Mr. Gordy Anson, is ready at the helm with props, know-how and a heap of imagination. “My goal is for students to have fun and find confidence in themselves as they exercise. . . They might think they can’t do something yet this program reminds them they can do it and they’d be surprised at what they can do!” A private preschool and kindergarten, Geneva Day School excels at its 56 years’ “test of time”... Readers of Bethesda Magazine have awarded it “Best of Bethesda” distinctions, just as the Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education has designated Geneva as a Green School. See you outside!

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PROFILES

Test of time

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Stein Sperling Bennett De Jong Driscoll PC "We recognize that our clients need us now more than ever.”

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1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700 Rockville, MD 20852 301-340-2020 www.steinsperling.com

When Stein Sperling founding partners Paul Stein, Don Sperling and Millard Bennett opened a law firm 43 years ago, they could have never predicted a global pandemic, but the connection and confidence at the cornerstone of Stein Sperling’s culture allowed the firm to acclimate to these unique challenges. Starting in 1978 with just four attorneys plus three staff, the firm has grown to 53 attorneys, 79 additional staff and five offices serving clients in the metropolitan Washington area and beyond. Adaptation to change is a core attribute of a strong and growing business. Some changes can be anticipated and strategically planned for, while others, like those brought on by COVID-19, happen by necessity. The ability to adapt and to acclimate to both is what has allowed the firm to continue to succeed, grow and support our clients. “We recognize that our clients need us now more than ever,” says Managing Partner Jeff Schwaber. “I take great pride in the way our team has worked together

to maintain a client-centered focus as COVID-19 has brought forth many challenges for our clients." Stein Sperling’s ability to pivot to a combination of remote work and new headquarters has permitted us to continue to serve our clients without interruption. With fully versatile remote capabilities, we have been able to maintain a safe office for required in-person meetings. Our courtroom team has developed expertise in remote courtroom technology while adjusting to new setups in live courtrooms. Headquartered in Rockville, Stein Sperling’s areas of practice include business, commercial litigation, construction, tax, family law, estates, trusts & probate, employment law, real estate, personal injury and criminal defense.

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PROFILES

Test of time SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

ANDREW KUTT, FOUNDER & HEAD OF UPPER SCHOOL “We want all of our children to be ‘seen’ each day… to know that they each have a unique contribution to make to the community.” Oneness-Family Montessori School 6701 Wisconsin Ave. Chevy Chase, MD 20815 Oneness-Family High School 9411 Connecticut Ave. Kensington MD 20895 301-652-7751 admissions@onenessfamily.org www.onenessfamily.org

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In 1988, Oneness-Family School (OFS) Founder and Head of Upper School Andrew Kutt set out to create a school built upon Maria Montessori’s philosophy — where the center of the educational process is the student. Three decades later, what began with 10 students in a public school library is now a global family with thousands of alumni students following their dreams around the world Oneness-Family Montessori School, which serves students in preschool through high school, and is home to students from more than 60 countries, is a family focused school that encourages a strong partnership between school and home. The school's learning program combines a traditional Montessori curriculum with an emphasis on wellbeing, mindfulness, community, character and lifelong learning. “The curriculum at OFS focuses on the skills students will need to be successful in the complex world they will be entering,” says Kutt, “and those include conceptual thinking, creative problem

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

solving and communication skills, as well as capacities such as self-awareness, empathy and curiosity.” Student success begins with the quality of the teacher, says Kutt, and Oneness-Family School "has attracted attracted top educators deeply committed to connecting with every student. They foster a community where everyone is a learner and a teacher.” “We want our students to be ‘seen’ each day; we want them to know that they each have a unique contribution to make to the community,” says Kutt. “This has been our recipe for empowering students to be the drivers of their own education, the builders of their own futures.”

COURTESY PHOTO

Oneness-Family School


people. politics. current events. books.

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THE AGENT Rockville’s Doug Neustadt does more than help his clients get signed by NBA teams. He’s played hours of Monopoly with Wizards rookie Deni Avdija.

PHOTO BY ERICK GIBSON

BY MIKE UNGER

THE CHICAGO BULLS WERE on the clock. It was Nov. 18, 2020, and as the drama of the NBA draft was unfolding, Doug Neustadt was at his house in Rockville, pacing between his office and the family room. Normally, Neustadt, an agent for NBA players, would be at the draft, huddled with his clients in the greenroom as they waited for their names to be called. But last year’s draft was virtual, leaving Neustadt to work his phone from

home while his 16-year-old son monitored Twitter and his wife and 11-year-old daughter watched it on TV. They all munched nervously on charcuterie that a friend had dropped off. Neustadt thought there was a chance that his star player, 19-year-old Israeli phenom Deni Avdija, would be selected by Chicago with the fourth pick in the first round, but the Bulls took Patrick Williams, a forward from BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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banter Florida State. Cleveland, Atlanta, Detroit and New York held the next four picks. “Earlier that day I was talking to Detroit and I found out that they had somebody ahead of him,” Neustadt, 49, says. “So about an hour or two before the draft I called Deni and said, ‘Here’s where we’re at. If Chicago doesn’t draft you, and Cleveland doesn’t draft you, there’s a heck of a chance you’re going to go to Washington at nine.’ ” An NBA agent’s primary responsibility is to negotiate their client’s contract with the team that holds the player’s rights, land them endorsement deals, and manage their career. But as Neustadt has learned throughout his 25 years in the business, the job encompasses much more. When a player wants to blow off steam about a coach they don’t like or a teammate who’s hogging the ball, Neustadt listens. When a client calls him to ask for a restaurant recommendation near the team hotel in, say, Denver, he’s supposed to have a place

in mind. He’s tracked down a PlayStation for a player and booked another’s honeymoon to Greece. “Especially with his European clients, he might get calls in the middle of the night, and he just wakes up and deals with them,” says his wife, Shelly Simon, who’s an attorney and owner of Gemini Title & Escrow in Rockville. “When it’s not COVID, he’s traveling all the time. Constant phone calls talking to teams and potential clients. He’s on 24/7.” Neustadt was born and raised in the Cleveland area before his family moved to Pennsylvania when he was 11. Growing up, he was a die-hard Ohio State University fan. “When Ohio State lost the 1980 Rose Bowl, I threw a lamp across the room,” he says, “and I wasn’t at my house.” Neustadt majored in finance at OSU and worked as a manager for the men’s basketball team. (Although he’s 6-foot-5, Neustadt was never a serious player himself.) After graduating from

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the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, he knew he wanted to stay in the world of basketball, so he contacted then-OSU coach Randy Ayers, who helped him land an internship at Advantage International, a major sports agency that’s now called Octagon. He stayed there until 2005, when he founded The Neustadt Group, a “boutique” agency that has three other employees. “I felt I had learned enough on the NBA side, on the international side, on the shoe and marketing side, that I kind of wanted to be the captain of my own ship,” he says. Neustadt’s first major client was Boris Diaw, who played 14 years in the NBA and won a championship with the San Antonio Spurs in 2014. Neustadt, who’s still close with Diaw, has always been selective about who he signs. “We do deep dives on players,” he says. “Are they good people? Are they coachable? Do they love basketball? Because if you don’t love it, the work that you’re going to

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need to put in to maximize your potential is just not going to happen. Finally, we ask what are their expectations. They can have all of these qualities, but you’re destined to fail if everyone’s expectations are different than reality.” Straightforwardness, he says, is a key to successful long-term relationships with players. “To pump someone up with a pipe dream is the wrong move,” he says. “You say to someone, ‘Look, you didn’t have a good year. I’m going to give you best-case, likely-case, and worst-case scenarios. Let’s go through them.’ If they don’t like what they hear and they want different answers, well, we can’t provide that. And we won’t.” Neustadt’s roster of clients includes Darius Miller of the Oklahoma City Thunder and veteran C.J. Miles, currently a free agent. Neustadt focuses much of his efforts on signing European players, working with agents in Israel,

Spain and France. It was through one of those partnerships that he came to know Avdija, now 20, a star player with Maccabi Tel Aviv. “Deni is very bright, very perceptive,” says Neustadt, who met Avdija in 2018. “He picks up on things easily, both basketball-wise and off the floor. He spent three months in Atlanta training for the draft. We put him through strength and agility training, and he would have two basketball workouts a day. Then his idea of a really good time at night would be either going outside to eat at a nice restaurant or having game night. I have played more Monopoly in the last six months, you have no idea.” The time and effort both men invested paid off. On draft night, with the clock ticking on Washington’s allotted five minutes, Wizards general manager Tommy Sheppard called Neustadt and told him the team was taking Avdija. It was Neustadt’s third career top-10 pick. Later,

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when another of Neustadt’s clients, French guard Theo Maledon, was selected in the second round by the Philadelphia 76ers (then traded to Oklahoma City), the Neustadts celebrated with a Champagne toast. Around midnight, Avdija—who signed a reported four-year, $20.34 million contract—called Neustadt from Israel. It was close to 7 a.m. in Tel Aviv, and the two rehashed the night and laughed at the fact that they were going to be neighbors. “I think people get into this industry for various reasons,” Neustadt says. “For me, it wasn’t because I wanted to hang out with superstars or I want the redcarpet treatment. I did it because I truly love the basketball side of it. It allows me, someone who always looked at the NBA from a distance, to be involved in the game. I like helping players make big decisions. I like talking to a general manager about my player. I like a heavy-duty negotiation. Those are the moments I cherish.” n

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REACHING OUT An Olney teen has turned her pain into empathy BY DANA GERBER 72

ABOUT TWICE A YEAR from sixth through 10th grade, Anna Tovchigrechko would take an eight-hour drive with her father to visit a loved one at an upstate New York prison. She stood in line, went through the metal detector, and waited. When her loved one arrived, they’d play Scrabble or cards and talk, correctional officers always nearby.

“I really felt very alone and very ashamed and just very isolated because no one really talks about prisoners,” says Anna, now 16 and a junior at Sherwood High School in Sandy Spring. “No one really cares, honestly, about people in prison or their families. And so I never knew anybody who was going through the same thing that I was.”

PHOTO BY ERICK GIBSON

Sherwood junior Anna Tovchigrechko, founder of Helping Hands

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The person she was visiting—Anna requested that the individual remain anonymous—was released from prison in October 2019, but the memories of shame and solitude have stayed with the Olney teenager. So last April, Anna enlisted her friends—and later their Instagram followers—to start a student-led organization called Helping Hands. She launched projects to support people struggling through periods of loneliness, like the kind she endured as she carried her secret for five years. “I told my very close friends, but nobody knew that I had just been to a prison while I was taking my math test in geometry,” she says. “I would visit my friends’ houses sometimes and I would see these happy families and I just got… really depressed—like, why do I have to go through all this crap?” To combat the isolation brought on by the pandemic, Helping Hands started mailing handwritten cards—over 1,000 of them, with messages such as “We’re in This Together” or “Stay Strong”—to local nursing homes this past April. Last September they organized a fundraiser for the Angel Tree program of the nonprofit Prison Fellowship, which provides Christmas gifts to some of the 2.7 million children in the United States who have an incarcerated parent. “What stuck with me the most was seeing other people [in the prison], especially when I saw kids my age. …I would be like, ‘Dang, they’re going through the same thing that I am,’ ” she says. “It was just very humanizing to see these mothers, sisters, girlfriends, wives of [incarcerated] people have people visit them and love them.” Anna cried when the group, which has about 60 active members, raised $1,000 in one day. Through what she calls “the ripple effect” of supporters sharing the fundraiser via social media, they ended up with almost $7,000, enough to provide presents for more than 300 children. “They deserve attention,” Anna says. “And they deserve love.” She set up a website with an online

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form so people could create their own Helping Hands chapters; there are now 12 of them in schools across the county, and also in Illinois, Michigan and New Jersey. She saw other student-led clubs posting short slideshows, so she began publishing her own on Instagram, including one about the impact on families when a parent is incarcerated. After the Angel Tree fundraiser, Helping Hands made holiday cards to give to homeless shelters and rehabilitation centers, including Stepping Stones Shelter in Rockville. Even though many of the members have never actually met, the virtual community has helped teens forge connections as they wrestle with ways to do their part during the pandemic. “Especially when none of us were allowed to go anywhere, I think it really provided a beacon of hope,” Anna says. Within the organization, Anna has met others who can relate to her experience, and when they share their stories with her, she sends them private messages. “That’s been one of the most rewarding parts of it all,” she says. “I remember feeling so alone, and now…I can actually be the person to provide at least a little bit of support, a little bit of solidarity to people who are still going through it or who have gone through it.” The loved one Anna visited in prison says she was taken aback by the teen’s ability to harness her pain and transform it into empathy. “She’s the proverbial ‘best possible outcome’ person ever,” the woman says. “Yes, she was hurt. Yes, this is something she does not think fondly of. But she managed to make the best of it.” A member of the track and field team, president of the Spanish Honor Society and an avid artist, Anna is considering studying criminal justice in college and hopes to someday make Helping Hands an official nonprofit. Though it was “probably the hardest experience of my life” to have someone close to her in prison, Anna has unearthed a silver lining. “It provided me a really unique perspective on other people,” she says. “[And] Helping Hands came out of it.” n

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HIGH STAKES A Bethesda human rights attorney has spent more than 20 years working to free political prisoners. Now he’s caught the eye of Hollywood. BY CARALEE ADAMS

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Jared Genser at home in Bethesda

Genser says. “Literally the stakes were life and death.” He brought Ajak and his family to stay at his house for five days. On the second night, Genser included Ajak in the family’s Shabbat dinner, along with his wife, Elaine Smith Genser, and his two children, Zachary, 12, and Alexandra, 9. “The cases that I work on are, undoubtedly, circumstances where truth is stranger than fiction,” says Genser, whose clients have included former Czech Republic President Václav Havel and Nobel Peace Prize laureates Elie Wiesel and Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Genser calls them “human rights heroes of our time.”

The real-life drama of Genser’s work recently caught the attention of Hollywood, and the 48-year-old is now developing a television series with Amazon Studios based on his 20-year career. Genser is a co-executive producer of the project, along with actor Orlando Bloom and Bruce Richmond, a former executive at HBO. Aiming for a smart show the likes of Homeland or The West Wing, Genser wants the series to focus on the people he represents and the struggles they face. “My clients take extraordinary risks every day, putting their lives on the line for the sake of their family, community and country,” says Genser, who grew up in North Potomac

PHOTO BY ERICK GIBSON

LAST SUMMER, JARED GENSER was at home on his couch in Bethesda when he got a call from a client in Kenya. The man, Peter Biar Ajak, said a death squad ordered by the South Sudanese president was on its way to abduct or kill him. Genser, an international human rights attorney, had helped secure Ajak’s release from jail in January 2020 after he was arrested in his native South Sudan for speaking out against the government. Now the man’s life was in imminent danger. Genser worked around the clock contacting lawmakers and other U.S. government officials to get emergency visas for Ajak, his wife and three young children so they could escape to the United States. He suggested ways for Ajak to keep a low profile, including the use of encrypted platforms to communicate. Genser was “one of the very few people I could speak to,” says Ajak, an economist who had moved to Kenya because of the threat in South Sudan. “He did his best to calm me down and figure out ways to keep my family safe.” Now living in a townhome in Bethesda, Ajak credits Genser’s tenacity and compassion for helping to get his family out of danger. “The day he arrived at Dulles was one of those airport moments I live for,”

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PHOTO COURTESY OF PERSEUS STRATEGIES

PHOTO BY ERICK GIBSON

Genser (center) spoke at a press conference on Capitol Hill in June 2014 calling for the release of his client Chen Kegui, who was being held in China. Also pictured: New Jersey Congressman Chris Smith (left) and then-House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (right).

and graduated from Landon School in Bethesda. “They inspire me, and I want people to know about their stories.” He’s optimistic that the series will air sometime next year. Genser’s roots in advocacy run deep. He says his mom, Lyne Genser, a social worker, and his father, Dr. Sander Genser, a psychiatrist, instilled in him a commitment to service. As a teenager, Genser served meals to the homeless and volunteered with children who have disabilities. His grandparents on both sides fled Jewish persecution in Eastern Europe in the 1890s, and he often was told how lucky the family was to have freedom in the U.S. After studying policy analysis at Cornell University, Genser went to graduate school at Harvard University, where he helped organize a 5,000-student protest against Chinese President Jiang Zemin’s appearance on campus in 1997. Genser was moved by the people he met who’d suffered under the Chinese regime, and realized that while the event had an impact in Boston, it was not even seen in China. “That experience persuaded me to go to law school to be a human rights lawyer,” he says. Genser was a second-year law student at the University of Michigan when he

spent a semester in London working for a human rights group. He took on a case involving a British man, James Mawdsley, being held in Myanmar (formerly known as Burma) for bringing attention to military atrocities he’d witnessed; the man was sentenced to 17 years in solitary confinement. Genser applied pressure through political and media channels— a strategy that’s proved effective over the years. He won the case at the United Nations and got support from lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Back in Ann Arbor, he got a call in his dorm room that the man was going to be released. Genser flew to Heathrow Airport in London to meet him. “He gave me a handshake and said, ‘Thanks—you saved my life,’ and I was just speechless,” Genser recalls. In 2001, Genser founded Freedom Now, a D.C.-based organization that works internationally for the release of political prisoners. After several years as a partner at a global law firm, he struck out on his own; he’s been managing director of his own public interest firm, Perseus Strategies, since 2011. He also teaches at Georgetown University Law Center, has written three books about human rights law, and devotes about half of his time to pro bono work on behalf of human rights defenders.

Last December, Genser received the 2020 Tällberg Eliasson Global Leadership Prize, one of three winners selected from more than 2,100 nominees. “A lot of what I’ve been doing over the course of my career is about holding people in power accountable for their decisions— whether it be repressing the rights of their people, in the case of dictators, or people in power in this country or around the world failing to do the right thing,” he says. Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, former U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, says Genser is “utterly relentless” when defending a client. “The work is hugely important,” says Al Hussein, who nominated Genser for the award. “To some it may seem glamorous—perhaps on the day the person is released there is a fanfare to it. But a lot of it is very hard work.” Genser is both excited and nervous about being portrayed on TV, and doesn’t know who will be cast to play him. He just wants it to be a high-profile actor who can get the show to a second season. Genser says he hopes the series ultimately will bring exposure to the plight of those he represents: “It’s never about me,” he says. “It’s about the cause or the case.” n

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IN CHARACTER After debuting on Broadway at age 12, B-CC senior Cole Edelstein is looking forward to a future on the stage

COLE EDELSTEIN HAS TOO many interests to stick to one thing. As a 14-year-old, he happened to watch The Wave, a subtitled Norwegian film, with his parents, and to his surprise he became obsessed with learning the language. That kicked off a three-year odyssey to master Norwegian, along with Swedish, Danish, German and French. Now 18, Cole spent untold hours practicing vocabulary using the free Duolingo app on his phone. And he was already studying Spanish at Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School when all things Norwegian—music, food, podcasts— captivated him. “I know, it’s so random,” he says. “Still, to this day, I’ve never even met a Norwegian.” The language pile-on came after Cole debuted on Broadway in Matilda at age 12. The Chevy Chase resident lived in New York City during his 19-month run and decided the stage would be his future career. His mom was with him most of the time (the theater filled in when his parents couldn’t be there, along with child guardians hired by the family), and he went to school with other young actors. As a swing performer, he covered three roles, a more difficult feat than a single part, and his time onstage earned him membership in Actors’ 78

PHOTO BY ERICK GIBSON

BY MARGARET ENGEL

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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Cole in Matilda on Broadway

Equity, which provides a path to Broadway auditions. During the pandemic, he’s been devoting his nonschool hours to voice and dance lessons on FaceTime. “I love the feeling of telling stories,” says Cole, a senior. “You get the strongest emotion for a character who isn’t even real. It’s very overwhelming to me.” When he sang in a Cabaret for a Cause event in New York, Cole chose the musically complex song “Sarah Brown Eyes” because he felt the lyrics—from Ragtime, his favorite musical—tell a haunting story of loss. Cole says he seeks out new experiences not in a résumé-building way, but because one passion leads to another. Musical theater pushed him into learning piano, ballet, hip-hop, guitar and tap dancing. Until voice lessons interfered, he ran varsity track. With a roster of AP classes and a penchant for solving complex math problems with friends, he still finds time to write science fiction stories 80

and wants to delve into screenplays with futuristic plots. Neither Cole’s father, Darryl, who works in commercial real estate and finance, nor his mother, Lynne, a tax attorney-turned-photographer and writing coach, has any experience in the theater. His brothers, Max, 21, and Garrett, 14, are soccer, tech and science enthusiasts. Cole, who says he was “very lazy” as a young boy, was looking for some activity “because all I did was eat and watch TV. ” Friends introduced him to community theater when he was 8, and he quickly became enchanted with the camaraderie and joy of performing. Lessons at Adventure Theatre’s Musical Theatre Camp in Rockville followed, as did performances with Young Artists of America at the Kennedy Center, which required him to audition. He’s been acting regularly since fifth grade, winning parts at Ford’s Theatre, Kensington

Arts Theatre and Woolly Mammoth, and appearing in four school musicals. “He played [the role of ] Hero to great effect,” says William Toscano, media services instructor at B-CC. He directed Cole in B-CC’s production of A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum during his freshman year. “Comedy, drama, silliness, he can do it all.” At 13, Cole won representation by A3 Artists Agency, a New York talent agency, for theater and film projects. He has performed in off-Broadway productions and sung at Feinstein’s/54 Below, a top New York City cabaret venue. When he isn’t in a show, he’s kept up his vocal form by singing in charity cabarets at the Friars Club in New York City, and locally with Community Theatre Thrives. His portrayal of the Artful Dodger in Oliver! at the Kensington Arts Theatre won him a BroadwayWorld nomination and an outstanding performance award by DC Metro Theater Arts. Learning to cope with the roller coaster of the entertainment world has been tough. On Broadway, hundreds of actors audition for some parts. “As a little kid, it’s easier to get roles. Now, you audition and audition and face a lot of rejection. You have to not take it personally.” Adjusting to the change in his clear soprano voice when he hit puberty also threw him. “It takes years for your voice to finally settle,” he says, describing himself as now in the tenor/baritone range. “It freaked me out not to be able to handle songs I knew so well. I won’t be fully there until my early 20s.” Cole is leaning toward a double major in theater and physics next year at Northwestern University, where he won early acceptance. In the meantime, he’s staying occupied with Zoom classes and cracking down on ballet practice, which he finds difficult but necessary for stage work. He’s been cast as Father in Ragtime by Ovations Theatre in Rockville, but the pandemic has pushed back the show’s opening. “It’s so frustrating. You can sort of rehearse via Zoom, but it’s not the same,” he says. “Everyone’s hoping for this summer, but who knows?” n

PHOTO BY DEBORAH ABRAMSON

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MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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BOOK REPORT

As a researcher and analyst with an expertise in Japanese politics, Tobias Harris followed the career of Shinzo Abe, Japan’s longest serving prime minister, for years. Abe inspired both loyal support and strong opposition, says the Bethesda resident and author of The Iconoclast: Shinzo Abe and the New Japan (Hurst, October 2020). Harris says the legacy of Abe’s tenure—despite having a strong electoral mandate and high approval ratings—is about inaction and missed opportunities as much as it’s about positive achievement. “There’s a sobering message about what we should expect democratic leaders to accomplish,” Harris says. “He could really set the agenda in his country, but...our advanced democracies are complex places, and the big sweeping changes...are hard to do.” 82

With a father from Saudi Arabia and an American mother, Eman Quotah divided her time between the two countries while growing up. In her debut novel, Bride of the Sea (Tin House Books, January 2021), the Rockville author uses her knowledge of both cultures to tell the story of a young Saudi couple in Cleveland who get divorced. The wife vanishes with their daughter, leaving the husband to spend years searching while entangling the extended family in the abduction saga. Quotah wrote the book while working full time as a communications professional and raising two children, fulfilling a dream since first grade to be published: “From the moment I fell in love with books, I wanted to impact people with stories in a way that authors had done for me.”

The connections between her life as a pediatrician and a novelist are clear to Nadia Hashimi. “It comes down to having an interest in the human story,” says Hashimi, who lives in Potomac. “Sitting down with people and trying to get some context for what their situation is, their priorities, their decisionmaking. All of those pieces come together to determine their trajectory, the prognosis for their life.” Like her other novels, Hashimi’s latest, Sparks Like Stars (William Morrow, March 2021), draws on her Afghan family background. This book focuses on a young girl who survives the 1978 coup in Afghanistan. It’s a story of how she escapes to the United States, rises above the trauma, and years later reclaims a connection with her homeland.

Katherine Heiny says she psyched herself out of being a novelist for years, convinced she didn’t have the patience or skills. Instead, she cranked out short stories. The Bethesda author says she discovered she wanted to revisit the same characters, so short stories became chapters and then her book, Early Morning Riser (Knopf, April 2021). Set in Boyne City, Michigan, where Heiny vacationed with her family as a child and as an adult, it’s about a teacher who falls in love with the local lothario, but a car accident changes everything she thinks she knows about living happily ever after. “For anybody who thinks they can’t write a novel—it’s just practice,” Heiny says. “The more you write, the realer it gets, until it’s telling you it wants to be written.”

ALL BOOK COVERS FILE PHOTOS

BY CARALEE ADAMS

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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READING LIST

DATA PROVIDED BY

The top-selling books in our area. Data is based on books sold at Politics and Prose’s Connecticut Avenue location in Upper Northwest D.C. and online from Dec. 30, 2020, to Jan. 13, 2021.

HARDCOVER FICTION

PAPERBACK 1. The Truths We Hold: An American Journey, Kamala Harris

1. The Midnight Library, Matt Haig 2. The Vanishing Half, Brit Bennett

2. Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, Richard Rothstein

3. Deacon King Kong, James McBride 4. The Liar’s Dictionary, Eley Williams

3. Shuggie Bain, Douglas Stuart

5. The Prophets, Robert Jones Jr.

4. Interior Chinatown, Charles Yu

6. Hamnet, Maggie O’Farrell 7. Transcendent Kingdom, Yaa Gyasi

5. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration, Isabel Wilkerson

8. Homeland Elegies, Ayad Akhtar

6. The Dutch House, Ann Patchett

9. Piranesi, Susanna Clarke

7. On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, Timothy Snyder

10. Mexican Gothic, Silvia Moreno-Garcia

8. Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants, Robin Wall Kimmerer

HARDCOVER NONFICTION

9. The Water Dancer, Ta-Nehisi Coates

1. Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents, Isabel Wilkerson 2. A Promised Land, Barack Obama 3. Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World, Andrea Pitzer

1. Exploring the White House: Inside America’s Most Famous Home, Kate Andersen Brower

5. I Came as a Shadow, John Thompson 6. Between the World and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates

8. The Best of Me, David Sedaris

3. Sprouting Wings: The True Story of James Herman Banning, the First African American Pilot to Fly Across the United States, Louisa Jaggar, Shari Becker

9. How to Be an Antiracist, Ibram X. Kendi

4. Turtle Walk, Matt Phelan 5. Ambitious Girl, Meena Harris

6. Cat Kid Comic Club, Dav Pilkey 7. Bunheads, Misty Copeland 8. The Snowy Day, Ezra Jack Keats 9. Outside Inside, LeUyen Pham 10. The Light in Hidden Places, Sharon Cameron

ALL BOOK COVERS FILE PHOTOS

2. The Silver Arrow, Lev Grossman

10. Bag Man: The Wild Crimes, Audacious Cover-up, and Spectacular Downfall of a Brazen Crook in the White House, Rachel Maddow, Michael Yarvitz

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CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULT

4. Keep Sharp: Build a Better Brain at Any Age, Sanjay Gupta

7. Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism, Anne Applebaum

10. Best American Short Stories 2020 (The Best American Series), Curtis Sittenfeld (editor)

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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WINNER

READERS’ PICK • BEST BUILDER

YOUR BUILDER FOR LIFE • S A N D Y S P R I N G B U I L D E R S . C O M IMAGES: STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG PHOTOGRAPHY, MICHAEL KRESS PHOTOGRAPHY

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Bethesda artist Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg at her flag installation marking COVID-19 deaths

BY STEVE ROBERTS

LASTING IMPRESSION

GROWING UP IN SOUTH DAKOTA, Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg often visited Dinosaur Park, a tourist attraction outside her hometown of Rapid City that features life-size replicas of seven prehistoric creatures. Those figures had been sculpted by her grandfather, E.A. Sullivan, and, more than 50 years later, Suzanne would create her own public art that attracted worldwide attention—a stunning display of 267,000 small white flags, planted on a sweep of green space next to RFK Stadium in downtown Washington. Each flag represented an American who had died from COVID-19 by the end of November, when the installation was taken down, but it lives on. Suzanne was interviewed by camera crews from about 30 nations. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History will preserve some 86

of her flags as part of an exhibit documenting the impact of the pandemic, and a digital version is in the works where people can create virtual flags in memory of loved ones lost to the disease. “I knew people would bring their anger and I knew people would bring their grief. That was the point of it,” she tells me. “I did not realize that they would bring such appreciation. I was just an artist creating something that I thought needed to be done. I didn’t realize the emotional connection people would have with this art. I touched a nerve that I didn’t even realize was there.” I have known Suzanne for more than 30 years, since she married her husband, Doug—an old family friend and prominent real estate developer—and became our neighbor on Bradley Boulevard in Bethesda. Their middle child, Lindy,

named for my mother-in-law, is my goddaughter, so I am not a neutral observer of “The Firsties,” as they call themselves. Still, I learned a lot from Suzanne when we talked one sunny Sunday afternoon on my back porch. She never took art lessons as a child and was in her 50s when she discovered her talent, but at 61 she now realizes: “Indeed, I had artistic genes in my hereditary line. This is something that had been in me all this time, I just didn’t know it.” Her father, a small-town lawyer, had many Native American clients, and “they would pay with artifacts oftentimes,” she says. “So there were times when we didn’t have food on the table, but we certainly had tomahawks and ghost shirts in the attic.” When he took a job with the federal government, the family moved to Kentucky, where

PHOTO BY JONATHAN THORPE

Outraged over the rising COVID-19 death toll, a Bethesda mom created a stunning display of small white flags last fall to represent each American who had died

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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banter | HOMETOWN

Suzanne attended high school and the state university. Then came a master’s in business and a career marketing pharmaceuticals. She left the workforce to raise her three children and actually took an art class that turned into a disaster. Her first assignment was to draw an apple, but after starting with a circle she was stymied: “The circle on my page stared at me and refused to become an apple. Right? That damn circle just wanted to be a circle. But I didn’t discover myself as a two-dimensional artist. I discovered myself as a three-dimensional artist.” That revelation began when an art teacher at Landon School, where her son, Drew, was a student, offered a summer class in ceramics for school parents. When she

struggled with a potter’s wheel, she asked the instructor, “ ‘Could I just go sit at a table with a lump of clay and try to make something?’ And I did.” The result was the bust of a woman that’s still displayed in her home. “People ask if I was the model for the piece,” Suzanne says. “Absolutely not. I was just trying to make her be a woman of an indeterminate ethnicity who looked like she had something to say. And I fell in love with her in that moment. And yet I was kind of upset with her because she was living proof that I wasted so many years of my life not doing what I should have been doing.” Firstenberg threw herself into art classes—sculpting, drawing, painting, even welding. As she explains: “I knew I

needed to teach my eyes and my hands and my brain what beauty really is.” She focused on projects that contained a political message. In 2016, for instance, she subscribed to the Congressional Record and turned its pages into 10,752 paper airplanes—half striped red, half blue—and installed them at American University in D.C. in an exhibit called “Updraft America,” where a few of the planes crossed paths and turned purple. She did a sculpture of a reclining homeless person, which she called “Surplus,” fashioned with concrete rubble and rebar she scavenged from a Chevy Chase sidewalk. She photographed the eyes of drug addicts and displayed them on glass blocks placed in public fountains because, she says, “Addiction is like drowning.”

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Suzanne’s outrage over the COVID death toll mounted all summer. Her many years as a hospice volunteer “taught me the importance of dignity, both in living and dying,” she says. And her work with drug addicts encouraged her to use art to illuminate “deaths that often happen in isolation” and create public spaces for grieving. “So I knew I wanted to do something. I was just trying to figure out what.” She decided to commemorate individual victims through a common symbol that would convey the scope of the plague and considered various possibilities—Popsicle sticks, bells, wind chimes. “I finally ended up with flags because they’re beautiful,” she says. “They talk in the wind, so that there’s an

auditory part to it. And white flags made a whole lot of sense. They could be written on, so they could be personalized. If I planted them in an array, I could evoke Arlington cemetery.” But the logistics were daunting. She wrestled for weeks with the District government before obtaining permission to use the site. Then she found a company in Nebraska that would sell her small white flags, generally used by engineers, for 10 cents apiece. A Laytonsville business, Ruppert Landscape, donated 400 hours of free labor and helped her create a system of flat boards with holes punched in them at precise intervals so workers could create a symmetrical effect. Suzanne describes the visitors who came to view her work: “They’re struck

by the beauty, but at the same moment horrified that it’s beautiful because it represents something so sad and so incongruent. We as Americans are not typically reflective of our failures. We don’t celebrate them. We don’t discuss them. We don’t create art about our failings, but this struck at one of the most visible failings in our history.” E.A. Sullivan’s granddaughter did not fail. She carried on his legacy, creating a work of art that captured a profound moment in American history and preserved it for the ages. n Steve Roberts teaches journalism and politics at George Washington University. Send ideas for future columns to sroberts@gwu.edu.

Thank You From Your Hometown Lawyers What do entrepreneurial business owners, individuals arranging their estate, couples navigating partnership planning or coping with divorce, leading builders and developers all have in common? They all choose McMillan Metro again and again for personal, practical, and positive solutions to their legal needs. How can we make life easier for you?

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Congratulations to our 2021 Top Producers

Bethesda Magazine Readers’ Pick: Best Brokerage for Luxury Homes 2020

More Top Producing Agents and Teams than any oth er brok erage

$2.3 Billion in s a l es 2

Andy Alderdice Bonnie Barker Lydia Benson Ken Bowers Rocky Bowers Sherry Brennan Teresa Burton Molly Carter Kimberly Cestari Michael Chang Barbara Ciment Mike Colopy James Connolly David Dabbondanza Muller Dessie Silvana Dias Anne Emmett Laura Emmett MaryAnne Fiorita Aryan Frizhandi Sarah Funt Tim Gallagher Adam Gelb Toya Giacomini Trudy Glassman Alexa Goulding Bob Graves Todd Harris Tim Horst Joe Huff Susan Jaquet Steve Katz Krystyna Kazerouni Theres Kellermann Steve Kelley Lauren Kline Toni Koerber Judy Kogod Colwell Max Koteen Linda Lizzio Paul Llewellyn Victor Llewellyn Anna Mackler Anna Masica Laura McCaffrey

Jennie McDonnell Jane McGuire Kathy Morgan Greta Nicoletti Lynda O’Dea George Papakostas Andrew Pariser Philip Piantone Becky Plesset Kellie Plucinski Robyn Porter Pamela Potolicchio Thomas Powers Joshua Pratt Robert Qawar Audrey Romano Brett Rubin Elizabeth Russell Franco Saladino Hamid Samiy Gali Sapir Stacey Sauter Corey Savelson Alecia Scott Michael Seay Jr Michael Seay Sr Ron Sitrin Eric Stewart Trish Stovall Kornelia Stuphan Glen Sutcliffe Rima Tannous Benjamin Tessler Roby Thompson Helen Trybus Nazir Ullah Susan Verner Chip Ward Marci Wasserman Joshua Waxman Bruce Werber Phyllis Wiesenfelder Kody Yazdanipour Yaya Zhang

And Long & Foster Top Producer Teams

Over 3,200 transactions

i n B et h es da a l on e 2

*Based on transactions completed in 2020.

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The Banner Team The Bower Group Jennifer Chow Group Barbara Ciment Team The DC Team The Anne and Laura Emmett Team The Estridge Group The Jane Fairweather Team The Finn Family Group MaryAnne Fiorita Team The Fitzpatrick Group Heller Coley Reed Team Joe Huff Team The Elaine Koch Group Gail Lee Homes The Levin Group

Victor Llewellyn Group Murtagh Properties George Papkostas Group The Pennye Green Team Powers Brothers Team Robert Qawar Group The Roman Group Savercool Team Scott Team International Michael Seay Homes Teams The Sky Group The Souza Group Speicher Group Eric Stewart Group Umanzor & Associates Michelle Yu Team

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TOP PRODUCER 2021

To Anne and Laura Emmett, real estate is more than just about finding a house for you — it’s about finding a home to create memories in a community that fits your lifestyle. Since 2009, this dynamic mother-daughter team have been working together as the Emmett Homes Team to provide best-in-class service to their valued clients. Deeply rooted in the Bethesda and DC area community, Laura and Anne are trusted and knowledgeable professionals who always offer the highest level of personalized service. #1 Bethesda “All Points” Team Top Producer Washingtonian Magazine Top Producer Bethesda Magazine Handled #1 top Long & Foster sale in 2020

ANNE & LAURA EMMETT

Together, they’re a trusted team that’s committed to you.

Emmett Homes 301.466.2515 | anne.emmett@lnf.com 202.422.6374 | laura.emmett@lnf.com Bethesda All Points Office 301.229.4000

TOP PRODUCER 2021

Celebrating her 30th year as an area real estate expert, Gail is consistently ranked among the Top 1% of all Realtors® nationwide. Gail is well regarded by clients and fellow agents because she brings her heartfelt enthusiasm, excellent communication, strong negotiating and strategic marketing expertise to every aspect of her business. It’s these vital skills, coupled with her passion for design, that distinguish Gail and ensure her clients, both sellers and buyers, are well positioned for the competitive market. Gail’s team includes Maureen Gilli, an experienced Buyer’s Agent, as well as leading industry experts in Staging, Lending, Title and General Contracting. Gail’s full service team ensures her clients receive the highest level of representation and service. When seeking real estate expertise, contact Gail for a confidential consultation.

GAIL LEE Gail Lee Homes 301.602.8188 | Gail@GailLeeHomes.com GailLeeHomes.com Potomac Village Office 301.983.0060

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TOP PRODUCER 2021

Thinking of selling or buying a home? Anna Masica will provide you with the highest level of service to ensure that your transaction runs smoothly and make your dream of owning a home a reality. Anna’s plan for success is simple: to constantly strive to be the most knowledgeable agent in the marketplace, to be the most ethical and honest, to provide the best level of service unmatched in the industry and to build long lasting relationships with her clients. Anna would like to thank her clients, family and friends for helping her reach her goals and become a top producing real estate agent.

Mar -Ap r 20

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ANNA MASICA

TOP PRODUCER 2021

240.423.7000 | AnnaMasica@gmail.com www.longandfoster.com/AnnaMasica Park Potomac Office 301.469.4700

A top producer and award-winning member of the Bethesda All Points Office, Pam provides exceptional service which allows her clients seamless and stress free transactions. Specializing in the luxury markets of Bethesda, Chevy Chase, Potomac and NW Washington, Pam also receives satisfaction and positive results working with first time homebuyers in the very competitive DC metro area market.

PAM POTOLICCHIO 301.602.2907 Pamela.Potolicchio@lnf.com Bethesda All Points Office 301.229.4000

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TOP PRODUCER 2021

With an MBA and 20+ years of experience in market research, Lauren is uniquely qualified to understand real estate market data and translate it into powerful marketing strategies for sellers. A native New Yorker, she has lived in the D.C. area since 1977 and raised three daughters here. Her knowledge of area neighborhoods, amenities and schools — in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia — is invaluable to buyers, who are also assisted by her large network of loan officers, inspectors and home contractors. Lauren is a passionate advocate for her clients, tailoring her services to their unique needs and working tirelessly to represent their best interests. With 15 years of real estate experience, she enjoys a steady flow of referrals, repeat business, and many loyal clients “for life.”

LAUREN KLINE 301.518.9005 | lauren@laurenklinehomes.com Bethesda Gateway Office 301.907.7600

It’s also what I want for my clients. Buying or selling a home can be a challenging process in our area, and whether they are first time home buyers or veterans in the real estate market, I’m here to make it as easy and transparent as they need it to be. I’m proud and grateful to have earned a spot in Bethesda Magazine as a Top Producer for 2021. A heartfelt thank you to my clients, colleagues, and family.

TOP PRODUCER 2021

Come Home With a Smile. This isn’t just a motto for my business. It’s what I do every day, knowing my kids are about to tear down the hallway to give me a big hug, knowing I put in solid time working for my clients, and knowing I’m good at what I do.

I’m licensed in Maryland, DC, and Virginia. I’m easy to reach via email, text, or phone, and you can find me on Facebook or Instagram: @maxrealtorlnf

MAX KOTEEN MKOR, LLC 240.805.2400 | Max.Koteen@LNF.com North Potomac/Rockville Office 301.975.9500

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TOP PRODUCER 2021

Licensed in Maryland, Washington, D.C. and Delaware, Cindy offers a full range of real estate services in the D.C. metropolitan area and the Maryland-Delaware coast. A lifelong resident of Maryland, Cindy has lived in Bethesda for 35 years and knows Bethesda, D.C. and its neighboring suburbs with the intimacy of a native Washingtonian. Cindy represents clients buying and selling a variety of homes — from resale, to new construction, to investment and beachfront properties. Her team members, Brett and Marzi, serve clients in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia. Licensed for 26 years, Cindy draws from a wide breadth of experience to position her clients for success in all kinds of markets. Cindy and The Souza Group have received numerous awards over the years and were voted one of the D.C. area’s “Best Real Estate Teams” by readers of Bethesda Magazine.

CINDY SOUZA The Souza Group 301.332.5032 | Cindy.Souza@LNF.com Souza-Group.com Bethesda Gateway Office 301.907.7600

TOP PRODUCER 2021

Although this individual recognition is an honor, I know it would not be possible without my wife, children, and clients. Tiffany is the MVP of our family, making life such a joy while caring for our kids Quincy, Parker, Kendall, and baby boy on the way. Their support allows me to have the energy, drive, and attention this important work requires. After all, my clients deserve the best version of me. Thank you to my dear clients who quickly turn into friends and then family. Your loyalty means the world knowing you have so many options when it comes to real estate. Each of you is a direct answer to daily prayers from the Pratt household.

JOSH PRATT 801.367.1544 | Josh@JoshPrattHomes.com JoshPrattHomes.com Bethesda All Points Office 301.229.4000

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My focus is on building lasting relationships while serving you and exceeding your expectations for many years to come. Please reach out to my direct line today to learn how I can best serve you.

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With over 29 years as a full time Realtor® in the Metro Area Sarah has been able to assemble a skilled and effective team of experts to ensure your home is fully prepared for market and capable of achieving maximum sales potential. Sarah’s approach to home preparation revolves around client service and exceeding expectations. With Sarah managing the punch lists or full room renovations and repairs, it saves her clients excessive general contracting fees, Sarah overseas the jobs and works directly with her team of vendors on the sellers’ behalf. Any agent can sell your home, but a specialist realizes the potential in often overlooked and underutilized areas of the home. Call Sarah today to learn more about her Concierge Services.

“ TOP PRODUCER 2021

You will never meet another agent like Sarah. Sarah has that very rare quality where you realize after working with her, she is absolutely perfect at what she does. Sarah has tremendous knowledge of the area she services. She’s no transplant, her local knowledge has deep roots. I felt completely safe with her has we went through the process of selling and buying our past and current home.” ~ S. Stone

SARAH FUNT, CBR 301.509.1283 | Sarah.Funt@LNF.com SarahFunt.com Bethesda Gateway Office 301.907600

301.785.3474 | bonnie@bonniebarker.com bonniebarker.com Potomac Village Office 301.299.6000

TOP PRODUCER 2021

BONNIE MACK BARKER

Bonnie Barker has been an award-winning, top producing real estate agent for over 30 years. Highly respected among her peers and clients for honesty and knowledge of the real estate market, Bonnie has been recognized with numerous awards. She recently was named the 2020 Top Individual Agent in Long & Foster’s Potomac Village, Maryland office. A native Washingtonian, Bonnie knows the neighborhoods of the metro area well and is skilled at helping her clients find a community that fits their lifestyle. She also knows how to prepare your home to show at its best to potential buyers online and in person. And, she knows how to reach potential buyers through a variety of marketing techniques. Bonnie uses her vast knowledge to navigate the ever changing, highly charged, aggressive real estate market to negotiate and fully accomplish her client’s real estate objectives. Always striving to exceed her client’s real estate expectations, Bonnie is known for her expertise and integrity among her many buyers, sellers and agents in Maryland and Virginia. She values the trust her clients place in her and is focused on her clients’ needs.

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TOP PRODUCER 2021 Juan is passionate about real estate. Dedicated to his clients, he approaches every transaction as if it were his own. Juan is the principal of Umanzor & Associates, one of Long & Foster’s top-producing teams serving Maryland, D.C. and Virginia. With 19 years of experience, Juan ranks among the top half percent of real estate agents nationwide. He has been recognized in numerous publications including the Wall Street Journal, Top Agent, Millennium, Bethesda and Washingtonian magazines.

JUAN A. UMANZOR, JR. Umanzor & Associates 240.606.8294 | Juan@LNF.com Bethesda Gateway Office 301.907.7600

Juan is committed to his work, clients, friends and family. Whether in business or his personal life, he has only one goal in mind: to be the best that he can be — to work hard, set high goals, and to be a source of help and inspiration to others. Active in the community, Juan serves on the board of the Latino Association of Realtors® and was recently elected president of the Salvadoran American Chamber of Commerce. Juan is a member of Long & Foster’s prestigious Platinum Club, a select group of top-producing agents whose annual sales exceed $50 million. In 2020 Umanzor & Associates sold a record 171 homes with over $54 million in sales volume.

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TOP PRODUCER 2021

Front L to R: Brooke Bassin, Emily Moritt, Wendy Banner, Gail Gordon, Ilene West Gordon, Julia Fortin, Sharyn Goldman. Back L to R: Michelle Teichberg, Jody Aucamp, Pat Karta. Not Pictured: Ashley Vonada

BANNER TEAM 301.365.9090 | Info@BannerTeam.com BannerTeam.com Bethesda Gateway Office 301.907.7600

At the Banner Team, we love being part of our community. Whether we’re helping friends, neighbors, or clients buy and sell homes, donating a portion of every commission to local charities through our “Pay It Forward Program”, hosting community events, or serving local organizations, we find joy in giving back and supporting the Bethesda area. As one of the most successful, award winning teams locally and nationally, with 11 experienced agents and 4 full-time staff behind the scenes, we pride ourselves on an unsurpassed level of commitment to our clients. Because we understand that buying and selling a home is exciting but can also be stressful, we strive to make the process seamless and enjoyable. Honored as Top Producers and Top Agents by Bethesda Magazine, Washingtonian Magazine, The Wall Street Journal and more, we’d be thrilled to help you buy or sell your next home!

TOP PRODUCER 2021

After more than 30 years of selling DC real estate, I am proud to now have my son, Calvin, working alongside me! 2020 was another banner year with nearly 50 million in sales, I have been the top agent in my office for 26 years and have been top 1% in the nation since 2005. I have sold nearly a billion dollars in real estate and seen all the ‘ups’ and ‘downs’ throughout my career. I pride myself on having a ‘back of the hand’ knowledge of any jurisdiction in which I show property; this tends to make purchasers and sellers very confident in my ability to represent them. I am a bit of a work-aholic, so just call us at 202.255.2986 or 202.486.2315, and we will get right back to you!

ROBY THOMPSON 202.255.2986 | Roby@LNF.com Woodley Park Office 202.483.6300

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Whether representing first-time buyers or sellers of luxury properties, Phyllis is hands-on and deeply involved. Clients tell her they sleep better at night knowing she will guide them and look out for their best interests — every step of the way.

TOP PRODUCER 2021

Working in the close-in areas of Montgomery County and DC, Phyllis has listed and sold some of the most beautiful homes in the DC metro area. A native Washingtonian, she brings a lifelong knowledge of the area to her work. Clients are drawn to her market savvy and value her as a trusted advisor.

Licensed in Maryland and DC, Phyllis specializes in the Somerset/Chevy Chase West neighborhood, where she is an active community member. A longtime collector of memorabilia, she has a keen eye for finding hidden treasures — rare antiques and very special homes.

PHYLLIS WIESENFELDER 301.529.3896 | PhyllisW@LNF.com phylliswiesenfelder.com Bethesda Gateway Office 301.907.7600

GROSVENOR HEIGHTS Gorgeous EYA Townhomes RECENTLY SOLD HARRISON MODEL Merriam Street 12/30/20 @ $1.4 M EVERETT MODEL Winsome Circle 6/26/20 @ $1.32 M

Deb Harshman REALTOR®, CNE®, ASPM®, RESA® 240.506.3799 debharshman@lnf.com yourhomewithdeb.com Park Potomac Office 301.469.4700

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Deb is a dedicated partner to every client and goes over the top in every aspect of a purchase or a sale. She sincerely feels that a client is like family. She exceeds all expectations for every home she sells. For 16 years, Deb has been providing premier property services with an extensive background in sales and design. She is an expert at making your property show at it’s best uniquely as an agent that is an ASPM® Accredited Staging Professional Master.

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TOP PRODUCER 2021

BANNER TEAM 301.365.9090 Info@BannerTeam.com • BannerTeam.com AWARDS AND HONORS

Front L to R: Brooke Bassin, Emily Moritt, Wendy Banner, Gail Gordon, Ilene West Gordon, Julia Fortin, Sharyn Goldman Back L to R: Michelle Teichberg, Jody Aucamp, Pat Karta

NEW ON MARKET Greenbriar Preserve / Potomac

$1,499,500

Contact Wendy Banner 301.365.9090

5 BR | 5 FBA, 1 HBA | .46 Ac

NEW ON MARKET Avenel / Potomac 5 BR | 5 FBA, 3 HBA | .39 Ac

Bannockburn / Bethesda 6 BR | 6 FBA, 2 HBA | .33 Ac

$1,950,000 Contact Ilene Gordon 301.440.1060

$2,650,000 Contact Julia Fortin 240.603.5760

Over $1.6 Billion Sold & Settled • Top Producer, Bethesda Magazine, 2020 • Best Realtor Team, Washingtonian, 2020 • #1 Group in #1 Long & Foster Office, 2019 • Top 3 Real Estate Groups, Maryland, REAL Trends, 2020 • Top 250 Real Estate Teams, U.S., REAL Trends 2020

“A Team Behind Every Transaction”

NEW ON MARKET Potomac View Estates / Potomac 5 BR | 4 FBA, 1 HBA | 2.08 Ac

NEW ON MARKET Bradley Hills / Close-In Bethesda 5 BR | 4 FBA, 1 HBA | .16 Ac

$2,100,000

Contact Ilene Gordon 301.440.1060

NEW ON MARKET Bannockburn Heights / Bethesda 6 BR| 5 FBA, 1 HBA | .62 Ac

$1,500,000

Contact Wendy Banner 301.365.9090

$3,500,000

Contact Wendy Banner 301.365.9090

Bethesda Gateway Office 301.907.7600

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real estate

REAL ESTATE ROUNDUP 102

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The Bethesda-area real estate market is booming, thanks in part to people wanting more space after being stuck at home for so long

A roundup of major development projects in the Bethesda area that are under construction or recently completed

Home sale trends in 456 neighborhoods

A list of the real estate agents and teams with the top total sales in Montgomery County and Upper Northwest D.C.

PHOTO BY SKIP BROWN

Moving Out

Building Up

by the numbers

the top producers

BY AMANDA FARBER

BY JULIE RASICOT

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Moving Out The Bethesda-area real estate market is booming, thanks in part to people wanting more space after being stuck at home for so long BY JULIE RASICOT | PHOTOS BY SKIP BROWN

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Matt Robertson and his daughter at their home in Potomac’s Merry-GoRound Farm neighborhood

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IT WAS JULY 2018 when Audrey and Matt

Robertson first drove into Merry-Go-Round Farm, a neighborhood of custom-built homes off River Road in Potomac. Planning to move to the Washington, D.C., area from Texas for a job opportunity, they were driving around to get a feel for where they might want to live with their preteen daughter and golden retriever. Matt had suggested they look at a house in the upscale development, where many properties have a view of the Potomac River. The neighborhood is also home to a horse farm and walking trails. “I was like, no way am I living this far out. I’m not doing it,” Audrey recalls telling her husband. The family decided to move into a small twobedroom apartment near Dupont Circle in Northwest Washington, D.C. After living in a house in Dallas for 20 years, they wanted to try true urban living while they figured out where to settle permanently. The apartment was convenient for the Robertsons; it wasn’t far from the financial services firms where Matt, now 46, and Audrey, 45, worked, or from their daughter’s private school in Bethesda. The family agreed that the apartment was “really great,” Audrey says, “because we were only there on nights and weekends.” Then came the pandemic, and the switch to working from home for the couple and online learning for their daughter, now 13. “When it became a 24/7 scenario, both of us working from home, our daughter doing online school, it got a little tighter,” Audrey says. By the summer of 2020, the family decided it was time to find a larger and more permanent home. Enjoying city life, they first looked in Georgetown, but were unwilling to pay what it would cost for the amount of space they wanted. Joining forces with a real estate agent and broadening their search to the Westmoreland Hills neighborhood of Bethesda, the couple still didn’t find anything suitable. Wherever they looked, they ran into the problem that’s plaguing buyers throughout the metro area: There just weren’t many houses for sale. In early October, the couple decided to check out a six-bedroom home with a recently redone kitchen and master bathroom— in Merry-Go-Round Farm. “We drove out and drove up to the house and we’re just like, yes, this is it,” Audrey says. “It was full circle in 2½ years.” Audrey says a combination of factors helped change her mind about moving to a more rural area. “It was a beautiful sunny day. There are

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horse trails in the neighborhood, and you could see horses walking by. I think they planned that as a selling point,” she says, chuckling. “Seeing the house online, driving through the neighborhood, driving up to the house, the feeling we had about being ready for more space, being able to feel more settled in the area—it all just came together.” The 7,500-square-foot house on a mostly wooded lot offered plenty of space for separate work offices and a room for their daughter’s online learning. Audrey and Matt weren’t worried about the commute because Audrey knew she could work from home indefinitely and that the drive wouldn’t be too bad if Matt had to return to his D.C. office. Still, Matt wanted to be sure

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that Audrey was ready to leave behind the convenience of city living. “My husband said, ‘Let’s look at the reality of it. You can’t walk to the coffee shop. You can’t just zip to the grocery store. Are you going to be OK with that?’ And so we had a long conversation and I’m like, ‘I’m ready, I’m so excited,’ ” Audrey says. She clocked the drive from the house to a nearby Starbucks—six minutes—and checked that the local Whole Foods Market would deliver. “I’m like, OK, we’re good,” she says.

WITH THEIR NOVEMBER MOVE into their new home, the Robertsons joined other buyers who have chosen to upgrade during the pandemic

to larger homes in the suburbs, both in close-in communities like Bethesda and downtown Silver Spring and farther-out neighborhoods in places like Potomac and Darnestown. Often motivated by the need for more space and wanting to take advantage of historically low interest rates, according to real estate agents, these buyers ignited a local real estate market that had been bracing for a bad year. For example, Washington Fine Properties, a real estate company that focuses on high-end residences, saw its home sales in the metropolitan region jump from 2,167 in 2019 to 3,087 in 2020— an increase of about 42%, according to agent Marsha Schuman, who specializes in selling Potomac properties.

The Robertsons’ new home in Potomac has six bedrooms on a mostly wooded lot.

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Martine Bernard and Reza Amirkhalili moved from Bethesda to this seven-bedroom house in Darnestown.

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“The real estate market in the D.C. metro area has been highly energetic, which came as a bit of a surprise to us,” says David DeSantis, partner and managing broker at TTR Sotheby’s International Realty in Bethesda and the District. “When the pandemic first hit in March and we went through that first shutdown period, things got really quiet for about four weeks, and we thought, OK. This is going to be the worst year for a long time. And then we bounced right back.” Dana Rice, an executive vice president with the real estate company Compass who was the Robertsons’ agent, says business has been “nonstop” after an initial slowdown last spring. “Even

Upper Northwest D.C., which would be considered sort of like suburbia to some who are in downtown [D.C.]—it just opened up for consideration. And when [buyers] get to that location, they look around and say, ‘Oh my gosh, this isn’t so bad at all. Look, there’s civilization and stores and restaurants that are actually kinda cool,’ ” says Rice, who serves clients in Upper Northwest D.C. and nearby Montgomery County communities. Wendy Banner of Long & Foster Real Estate says the luxury single-family home market in Bethesda and Potomac, where she does most of her business, also shows no signs of cooling down. “I’ve been waiting about 20 years for the market to turn

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around, and almost every big property we have has sold, and at all kinds of price ranges,” she says. “I carry 20 to 30 listings at a time, and now I have five or six. Prices are way up, and demand is way up.” In Montgomery County, the median sales price for 2020 was $482,000, about a 7% increase over 2019, according to data provided by MarketStats by ShowingTime based on listing activity from Bright MLS, a real estate service that provides analytical data. The data shows the average sales price for all types of Montgomery County homes was about $589,400 in 2020, compared with nearly $555,000 in 2019. For detached homes, the average sales price increased more than $59,000, to nearly $775,000.

In the 20814 ZIP code, which includes parts of Bethesda, North Bethesda, Chevy Chase and Kensington, the average sales price was about $1.25 million, a roughly 8.6% hike over 2019. The real estate market, which usually heats up in the spring and then cools down heading into winter, was different in 2020, with high activity continuing through the end of the year, according to Bright MLS. While closed sales in the county were up 6.1% over the same period in 2019, they increased by 26.4% in December vs. the same month in 2019. Real estate agents say most buyers don’t seem to be driven by a fear of living in more densely populated areas during a pandemic. Rather, their experiences during the pandemic made them realize that they wanted more room—indoors and out. “I don’t think that the phenomenon is so much related to, ‘Oh God, we’re afraid to live in the city, so let’s move into the suburbs,’ ” DeSantis says. “Given that we are all spending a lot more time in our homes, a lot of city dwellers who have been living in smaller dwellings, whether it’s a condo or a smaller house, and are now spending 24 hours a day with their significant other and/or their children…it has caused everybody who is able and willing to say, ‘We need more space.’ ” It’s not just single-family homes that are hot. According to Bright MLS, buyers in the Washington, D.C., metro area continued to show strong demand for condos and townhomes, with median prices in November hitting a record $342,000. In Montgomery County, the median sales price for attached homes hit a 10-year high at $352,000 in November, a 6.7% increase over the median price in November 2019. The average sales price for attached homes in 2020 was more than $11,000 higher, at nearly $371,000, than the figure for the same period in 2019. “We’re seeing people move out of one-bedroom condos into two, out of two-bedroom condos into houses,” DeSantis says. “If people can move up, they are moving up. And, of course, really low interest rates are making that possible.” Though financing is favorable for buyers, those who are looking are finding that there aren’t many houses available—a longstanding problem in the county, according to agents and county officials. Although new listings were up just over 49% during December when compared with December 2019, they were down almost 6% over all of 2019. “Inventory has never been as low as it is right BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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now, so the fact that buyers are still out there and want to buy, it is just exacerbating the trend of things going quickly, going with multiple offers, particularly for houses, if you’re kind of in that sweet spot between $700K and a million and a half,” DeSantis says. “It’s the most frustrating thing in the world to be a buyer because you see [a house] on Thursday and if you’re not prepared to get an inspector in there to inspect it in advance, then write an offer by Sunday night, it’s gone.” Long & Foster agent Jay Dahill, a longtime Silver Spring resident who now lives near The Wharf in Southwest D.C., was astounded by the interest in a home he listed in early December for $649,000 in Woodside Park, a neighborhood near downtown Silver Spring where some homes have sold for around $1 million in recent years. Built in 1948, the four-bedroom brick rambler has a wet basement and needs major renovations. “Within three or four hours, it became clear it was going to be a frenzy. By the weekend, agents were calling me angry that they couldn’t find slots to get their clients in to see the property,” says Dahill, who scheduled 84 showings. Seventeen buyers submitted offers, and the house sold for a price that had “escalated significantly,” he says. Liz Brent, founder of the Go Brent brokerage in Silver Spring, says the critical shortage of inventory is partially fueled by homeowners who are choosing to stay put. “People who want a master bath, who want to move up, who want a slightly larger house, very often will end up renovating their house because there simply aren’t any [moving] options,” she says. “So not only does it not open up that house for somebody to move into, but that house is removed from the small house market forever. And then the person that wants to get out of the condo can’t get a house, so all of these issues are interconnected. It’s a vicious circle, and as the housing gets tighter, it gets harder and harder and harder.” Brent says she’s seen as many as 22 bids on a property and also escalation clauses that have led to sales as much as $125,000 over an asking price. “That is not a COVID-driven problem,” she says. “That is a ‘there aren’t any houses’ problem.”

AGENTS SAY THE POTOMAC market got

so hot through the summer and into the winter, especially for houses priced at $1.2 million and under, that buyers were offering hundreds of thousands of dollars above asking price. “This is the craziest I’ve ever seen it,” says Long & Fos108

ter agent Gail Gordon, who has been selling real estate since 2005. In 2020, 642 houses were sold in the Potomac area’s 20854 ZIP code—96 more than in 2019, according to Bright MLS. The average sales price increased from just under $1.1 million to about $1.2 million. The trend reversed a yearslong slump in which homes priced at $2 million and above languished on the market for months, if not years, requiring sellers to drop their prices or take them off the market. Long & Foster agent Brooke Bassin, who grew up in Potomac and began working in real estate when she returned home after college, remembers those years. “I couldn’t believe what had happened. People weren’t actually giving their houses away, but what they thought would sell for $3 million was no longer selling for $3 million,” she says. Banner says some sellers are even recouping money they’ve spent on renovations over the years. “I’ve had more high-end sales over $2 million this year than ever before, including several around $4 million,” she says. “The market didn’t just reverse a trend, it was like a pivot. And I also see the discretionary buyer who is now back in the market— somebody who doesn’t have to move.” Schuman says the number of Potomac homes and condos priced at $2 million or more sold by Washington Fine Properties nearly doubled from 26 in 2019 to 47 in 2020. The company’s sales of homes priced at $4 million and above throughout the county jumped from six to 19—a 217% increase—during the same period, she says. While low inventory benefits sellers, and buyers are likely to pay more for updated homes that don’t need to be renovated, “it’s a savvy market around here,” Schuman says. “People have heard the market has gotten a lot better in Potomac. They want bigger lots, they want bigger houses, so sometimes sellers get a bit…you know, wanting to try a higher price, and if that happens, you have to follow it down to what the market tells you it’s worth.”

IT’S THE DAY BEFORE Thanksgiving, COVID-

19 infections are surging, and Montgomery County Planning Board Chair Casey Anderson is gazing through the windows of his office in downtown Wheaton at the steady traffic passing by, musing about whether the pandemic will have a longterm impact on where and how people want to live in the county.

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“It just looks like everything is normal,” he says. That’s “pretty good evidence” that the pandemic may not permanently change residents’ lifestyles. “People have a very powerful tendency to want to live their lives the way they want to live them, for better or for worse.” During the first few months of the pandemic, when New York City and other metropolitan areas were hit hard by the virus, the national media lit up with stories about people fleeing cities—citing fear of  COVID, the ability to work remotely, a desire to be closer to family, and financial reasons as the top motivators. But by summer’s end, data was showing that narrative to be more myth than reality, according to industry analysts. “By and large, the data show that suburban housing markets have not strengthened at a disproportionately rapid pace compared to urban markets. Both region types appear to be hot sellers’ markets right now,” researchers wrote in the Zillow 2020 Urban-Suburban Market Report published on Aug. 12. A survey released by moving company United Van Lines found that 13.5% of customers who moved in August cited the virus as a contributing factor in their decision. The data, released in October, was collected by parent company Uni-

Group from more than 6,000 United Van Lines and Mayflower customers who moved between March 1 and Aug. 31, 2020. Career change was the major reason people moved in 2019, with about 50% relocating for a new job or company transfer, according to the United Van Lines 43rd Annual National Movers Study released in January 2020. In 2019, Washington, D.C., “saw the largest influx of residents due to a new job/company transfer at 78%,” the moving company reported. According to the survey released in October, the District ranked No. 1 on a list of the “top outbound states” in the percentage of moves away from a location in which the virus was cited by customers as a contributing factor. At 37.5%, the city outranked New York state at 16% and Nevada at 15.7%. Agents who sell in the District say that while some people have left, there are plenty who want to move there and the city is facing its own shortage of housing inventory. “I can’t get over the low inventory in the city, where everyone with high incomes kept those high incomes,” Dahill says. As the arrival of the pandemic approaches the one-year mark, Bassin thinks “people are moving out to the suburbs from the city less and less now than they were in April through July.”

From left: Reza Amirkhalili, Martine Bernard and their daughters—Mina, Lila and Ava—on the 15-acre property they recently moved to in Darnestown

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moving out Anderson and others say it’s too early to know whether the number of people who are moving from Washington or other urban neighborhoods to the Montgomery County suburbs will affect housing patterns and whether there will be ramifications for other aspects of county life, such as transportation and school enrollments. “Will there be some effect? Yes, but is it like the end of cities, or people are going to decide, oh, maybe driving everywhere sounds a lot safer to me than getting on the train or the bus, so let’s forget the whole thing and move as far away as possible from everyone else—I don’t really think that’s likely, either,” Anderson says. “And I certainly don’t think there’s a lot of data to support that.” This spring, the planning board is expected to submit to the county council a draft of Thrive Montgomery 2050, the first comprehensive update of the

1964 general plan. It “envisions a county that is more urban, more diverse, and more connected,” according to planning department documents. The plan, which has been in the works for two years, is expected to move the county away from the car-centric community planning of the past. Its nine themes include providing “attainable housing for all” and rethinking “single-family neighborhoods near transit.” Meanwhile, Anderson says the submission of development applications remains steady, noting that such plans are often years in the making, and developers most likely are anticipating that things will be different when they’re ready to move forward. The situation is similar to the aftermath of the 2008 recession, when approved projects “kind of sat on the shelf” while the economy recovered. “Then you saw a lot of new things happening seemingly over-

night,” he says, especially in places like Bethesda, where construction cranes currently dot the skyline. “There was kind of a hangover from the 2008 crash that didn’t really work itself out until just the last few years.” That construction boom has resulted in a surplus of luxury condos, leading to a softening in that market, real estate agents say. Schuman says the decreased demand led Washington Fine Properties to reduce sales prices in December at Hampden Row, a luxury condo development built in 2017 in downtown Bethesda. In mid-January, a three-bedroom unit listed by the company was priced at just under $2 million, more than $1 million less than when the unit was first listed in January 2018, according to Bright MLS. The softening of the luxury condo market could be compounded by the hesitance of buyers to move into high-

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moving out rises because of virus fears, as well as an inability to enjoy the available amenities, agents say. “It’s been horrible. I hate to be so dramatic,” Rice says. “But I have clients, they have moved into these places so they can be connected to their peer group and have a cohort to share stories and do talks and play bridge, and none of those things are happening. I have one client that moved, and every time I call, he goes, ‘Well, hello from jail.’ ” Anderson says there’s “some evidence there’s some softness” in the market for that type of housing. “Rents are down in Silver Spring and in some of the downtowns in the region and across the country, but I’m not sure that’s so much of an issue” of potential residents not feeling safe in a multifamily building, he says. Rather, it’s more that they don’t want to pay higher rents when they can’t access a building’s amenities because of the pandemic, he says.

Some buyers looking for larger living spaces are seeking the convenience of living closer to D.C. Compass real estate agent Hans Wydler, who sells mostly in Upper Northwest D.C., Bethesda and Chevy Chase, says those clients are recognizing that close-in suburbs offer a “phenomenal” compromise. “You get the benefits of a suburban space, so more space, more accommodations, [and] the luxuries of 21st century living. You might have a car or two, your kids have lots of sports activities—you need space for all the stuff. It’s really a pretty good trade to be in a lot of these neighborhoods. You can walk to the coffee shop. You’re eight minutes in multiple directions to practically anything, and people are starting to figure that out again,” he says. “I don’t think it’s a short-term blip. I think it’s gonna be a longer-term sort of renaissance, but I do think it will be muted as the city starts to reenergize.”

Agents say the pandemic buyer often is looking for a home that can serve several purposes. “People want two home offices. They want a living level or living space for in-laws that they’ve either pulled out of assisted living or don’t want to put into assisted living. People are looking for room to teach kids at home, and recreation space,” Banner says. “If they’re going to have to shelter in place, they want the amenities to be able to have activities— [anything] from billiard rooms to indoor and outdoor pools, tennis courts, a play area, all that now is really sought after.” As of October, the median sales price for single-family homes with a pool in Potomac increased 11% to $1.49 million from 2019 to 2020; in Bethesda, the increase was nearly 19%, to $1.75 million, according to Bright MLS data provided by Rice. “When things ease up with COVID, I still think that people are going to change

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the way they live and commute and work, and I still think there’s gonna be an interest in that and kind of an eye toward, well, if something like this happens in the future, I’m going to set myself up in a place that makes sense and [where] I feel I can live and work and play,” Banner says.

MARTINE BERNARD COULDN’T

take it anymore. Between the constant noise of leaf blowers in her family’s Battery Park neighborhood and the growing urbanization of downtown Bethesda, she was losing inspiration for her work as an artist and ready for a change. She and her husband, Reza Amirkhalili, wanted to find a place with more room and a location where they could slow down the “speeding freight train” of their lives with three active teenage girls. So when she noticed last spring that the listing price had dropped for a sevenbedroom redbrick house in Darnestown

that she’d had her eye on, she suggested to her husband that they take a look. “As soon as we drove in the driveway, before we even saw the house, I think we had a very visceral feeling. And we kind of knew. It just checked all the boxes,” says Bernard, 52. The family bought the property and an adjoining lot, a total of 15 acres, and moved in at the end of May. Although they had started looking for a new home before the pandemic hit, the couple soon realized that the larger house was a “godsend” while the county was restricting activities. And the quiet of the wooded property has provided its own balm. “Once we got out here, I feel like all of our blood pressures just dropped a bit,” Bernard says. During the summer, the girls’ friends often came over to swim in the pool or hike in the woods. And Amirkhalili, 59, who is in charge of operations for a large

commercial construction company and often travels for his work, discovered that he enjoyed being outdoors. Working from home because of the pandemic, he checks out the backyard pond after getting up in the morning. “I thought I’d be bored” moving away from the bustle of Bethesda, he says. But he has enjoyed teaching his daughters to fish and working out by chopping wood. Still, he doesn’t plan to cancel his arrangement with a professional lawn service. “That would be a bridge too far,” he says dryly. For her part, Bernard has found that she also enjoys working in the yard—and using the dreaded leaf blower. “So what I hated listening to in Bethesda, every day I’m doing it here,” she says. “But somehow it’s OK because it’s my satisfaction now.” n Contributing editor Julie Rasicot lives in Silver Spring.

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A project replacing the Apex building in downtown Bethesda includes office space in The Wilson (left) and residences in The Elm, which features two towers (one of the towers is pictured, right). The Wisconsin Avenue development features the highest rooftop pool in Bethesda.

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BUILDING When the coronavirus hit last March, there were already shovels in the ground or plans to begin work on many development projects in Montgomery County. Construction was deemed an essential service, allowing building to continue. Here’s a roundup of major projects in the Bethesda area that were under construction at press time or had recently been completed. BY AMANDA FARBER PHOTOS BY MICHAEL VENTURA BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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BETHESDA 8001 WOODMONT Address: 8001 Woodmont Ave./ 7900 Wisconsin Ave. Developer: JBG Smith This 17-story project was originally approved in 2013 under the previous downtown Bethesda sector plan, but 118

construction was on hold until 2017. Plans initially called for up to 450 apartments, but JBG amended the project in 2020 to instead include 322 larger units. The building will feature a specialty grocer and other retail, and will provide a pedestrian breezeway with mirrored portico connecting Wisconsin and Woodmont avenues. Expected delivery is in early 2021.

AMALYN BETHESDA Address: East of Greentree Road/ North of I-495 Developer: Toll Brothers Consisting of 159 single-family homes and 150 townhomes, this project, which received final approval in 2019, recently got underway with the demolition of four 400-foot-tall, 77-year-old radio towers on the former WMAL site. The sale of the

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This view of downtown Bethesda, including Wisconsin Avenue, taken from the top of the Solaire apartment building shows The Wilson and The Elm (tall buildings, far left), Avocet Tower (with two cranes, right) and Marriott International’s headquarters (in the background with a pair of cranes).

feet of office space and a 220-room AC Hotel by Marriott with a conference center. The site is zoned for 250 feet of height, but the 22-story building is allowed to rise to 290 feet with the inclusion of a 40-foot-tall covered rooftop terrace for tenants. There will also be a large street-level public plaza under the building overhang. “Smart windows” with dynamic tinting glass will control heat and glare. In order to develop this property, Stonebridge built a new 2nd District police station on Rugby Avenue prior to demolishing the former police station on the site. Expected delivery for Avocet Tower is late 2021.

THE EDGE Address: 4885 Edgemoor Lane Developer: Equity Residential The Edge, previously known as the Edgemont at Bethesda II, is a 15-story, 154unit apartment building that curves along Woodmont Avenue, one block from the Bethesda Metro. The project is connected to the neighboring Edgemont apartment building through an underground garage and ground-level hallway. It will include a new public green space along Edgemoor Lane, replacing surface parking for the Edgemont building. Expected completion for the project is in mid-2021.

MAIZON BETHESDA

75-acre property by Cumulus Media to Toll Brothers for $74.1 million was finalized last summer. The project generated legal challenges due to concerns about local traffic congestion, a forest conservation waiver and the amount of development. The project will include a clubhouse for residents and a noise wall adjacent to the Beltway, and is required to dedicate 4.3 acres on the property

to Montgomery County Public Schools for a potential school site. Construction is planned to begin in 2021, and is expected to be completed in at least two phases over several years.

AVOCET TOWER Address: 7373 Wisconsin Ave. Developer: Stonebridge Avocet Tower includes 370,000 square

Address: 4900 Moorland Lane Developers: ZOM Living ; Mitsui Fudosan The Maizon Bethesda is a six-story, 229-unit building offering one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments. The project, which is across from Bethesda Elementary School, spans the block of Arlington Road between Edgemoor and Moorland lanes and will feature a rooftop terrace and pool, and an improved streetscape design with public art in raised alcoves along the facade. Leasing will begin in spring 2021 and expected construction completion is in late 2021.

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Construction on Marriott International’s headquarters building and hotel in Bethesda is expected to be completed in 2022.

MARRIOTT HQ AND HOTEL Address: 7750 Wisconsin Ave. Developers: Bernstein Cos.; Boston Properties In 2017, after receiving a $60 million incentives package to remain in Montgomery County, Marriott International announced the relocation of its headquarters from Bethesda’s Fernwood Road to a more urban and transit-accessible site in downtown Bethesda. Marriott is slated to occupy 785,000 square feet of office space in a 22-story, 300-foot-tall building and to operate an adjacent 12-story, 165-foot-tall hotel with 244 rooms, a conference center and a restaurant. The project includes 800 on-site parking spaces. Marriott also will pay the county for the use of a nearby public garage—the largest in downtown Bethesda with 1,200 spaces—during business hours. The hotel is scheduled to open in the first quarter of 2022, and the headquarters in the third quarter of 2022.

Marriott International’s headquarters building, seen from East West Highway

QUARRY SPRINGS Address: 8101 River Road Developer: Wormald Quarry Springs is at the site of the former Stoneyhurst Quarries, which supplied stones to the D.C. area, including for several landmark buildings. The 13-acre gated development was originally proposed to include 97 luxury condos across four buildings. Two of the buildings and 50 units were completed in 2015 by the developer 1788 Holdings. The remaining project was amended to include 44 four-level townhomes rather than condos and is being completed by Wormald. Community features include a clubhouse, pool and fitness center, and a central green space with a rock garden and waterfall. Sales and delivery of the townhomes are underway, and the project is expected to be finished in 2022.

WESTBARD SELF STORAGE Address: 5204 River Road Developer: Bethesda Self Storage 120

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Marriott International’s 22-story headquarters rises above Tastee Diner in Woodmont Triangle.

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Bethesda’s Avocet Tower project, which includes office space and an AC Hotel by Marriott, will have a 40-foot-tall covered rooftop terrace.

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In downtown Bethesda, a skybridge connects a pair of 28-story apartment buildings called The Elm (left). The landmark project also includes The Wilson (right), a 23-story office building.

Partners LLC This 195,527-square-foot self-storage facility will contain four below-ground and five above-ground levels and a green roof. The project, which began construction last summer, generated controversy because of its location near the Willett Branch stream valley buffer and the future Willett Branch Greenway, as well as a dispute regarding the location of the River Road Moses Cemetery. The developer dedicated the parcel closest to the Willett Branch to Montgomery Parks to become part of the future greenway and also will create a passageway into the new park. Expected completion is in late 2021.

WILD OAK Address: 5415 Beech Ave. and Wildoak Drive Developers: Beech Avenue LLC; Wormald Construction of 17 single-family homes is underway on this formerly vacant and wooded 5.6-acre property, which is inside the Beltway off Beech Avenue in

the Pooks Hill neighborhood and near the Bethesda Trolley Trail and the YMCA. Homes will be on approximately 6,000to 8,000-square-foot lots, and a conservation easement will be placed on about 1.5 acres of the site. The project opened for sales in early 2021 and is expected to be finished in mid-2022.

THE WILSON AND THE ELM Address: 7272 Wisconsin Ave. Developer: Carr Properties Located on the site of the former Apex building, this 290-foot-tall landmark development consists of nearly 1 million square feet across three towers. The Elm features two 28-story residential towers and 456 apartments (including 80 shortterm furnished rental units). The Wilson is a 23-story tower with approximately 350,000 square feet of office space. The project also includes an above- and below-grade parking garage with approximately 700 spaces. The development is on top of the future south entrance to the Bethesda Metro and Purple Line sta-

tion. The building incorporates a portion of the future Capital Crescent Trail tunnel, a skybridge, and the highest rooftop pool in Bethesda. A Tatte Bakery & Café is slated to open adjacent to the plaza area. Reported commercial tenants at The Wilson include Walker & Dunlop and Fox 5, which is relocating from Washington, D.C. Expected completion is early 2021.

CHEVY CHASE CHEVY CHASE LAKE Address: 8507 Connecticut Ave. Developers: Chevy Chase Land Co.; Bozzuto The official groundbreaking for this multiphase mixed-use project was in 2018, following the start of the nearby Purple Line construction. The first two six- to seven-story buildings under construction in the first phase include The Barrett, with 280 apartments, and the Ritz-

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Chevy Chase Lake, a multiphase project, includes apartments, condos and retail.

Carlton Residences, with 65 condos. The project has 86,500 square feet of retail space (including an anticipated anchor grocery store) and a large landscaped plaza. Phase two construction began in late 2020 and includes The Claude, a 12-story building with 186 apartments and more retail space. Condo sales were slated to begin in early 2021. Completion of the first phase is expected in 2021, and the second phase in early 2023.

CREEKSIDE CHEVY CHASE Address: Kensington Parkway and 124

Glenmoor Reserve Lane Developers: Nova Ventures; Haverford Homes Zoning was changed in 2015 to allow for construction of 16 three- and four-level townhomes with two-car garages, elevators and decks on this approximately 1.5-acre site, the previous location of four single-family homes. The project is adjacent to the Beltway and Rock Creek Park. Sales and delivery are underway, and project completion is anticipated in early 2022.

GAITHERSBURG/ NORTH POTOMAC AVENTON CROWN Address: Decoverly Drive and Fields Road Developer: Aventon Cos. This seven-story, 386-unit apartment building with studio to three-bedroom units is the second rental property development for the Crown community. The project includes a resort-style pool, fitness center, firepit, and community space

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in the planning process since 2013, eventually will include 494 townhomes, duplexes and single-family homes located throughout the 150-acre site, which also includes the Cabin Branch stream. When complete, 90 acres will be designated for conservation and recreational use. Ryan Homes is building 177 townhomes in the first phase of the project. Sales will begin this summer, and anticipated delivery of the first homes is late 2021.

master-planned community includes 121 single-family detached homes, 66 singlefamily attached homes, the dedication of land toward Muddy Branch stream valley park and a new 10-acre local park. Construction began in 2019, sales are underway, and the first homes will be delivered in 2021.

THE CHASE AT QUINCE ORCHARD

KNOWLES MANOR

Address: 12311 Darnestown Road Developer: Lennar This development includes 26 singlefamily homes and 80 four-story, two-car garage townhomes on 14 acres across from Quince Orchard High School. The project also will provide a 1-acre park on the site. The property was annexed into the city of Gaithersburg in 2016. Delivery and sales are underway, and the anticipated completion is in 2022.

Address: 3906 Knowles Ave. Developer: Kensington Manor Senior Housing LLC This five-story, 94-unit senior living project is a venture between the developer, state and local housing agencies, and Communities Together, a Maryland nonprofit that provides coordinated resident engagement services for various senior, affordable and family communities in the D.C. area. Ninety percent of the units in the building will be reserved for households earning less than 60% of the area’s median income. Amenities will include activity rooms, a wellness center and outdoor gathering spaces. Delivery is anticipated in late 2021.

CROWN EAST

with a residents-only podcast studio. The community also features a complimentary shuttle to the Shady Grove Metro. The project is expected to be completed in late 2021.

BLOOM MONTGOMERY VILLAGE Address: Former Montgomery Village Golf Club site Developer: Monument Realty Monument has broken ground on the first part of this multiphase development on the former Montgomery Village Golf Club site. The project, which has been

Address: Decoverly Drive and Crown Park Avenue Developer: Crown Farm Owner LLC This phase of the Crown community includes 320 three- and four-bedroom townhomes, including two-over-two stacked townhomes and 21 four-bedroom single-family homes. Home builders for the Crown East community include Pulte Homes, Craftmark Homes, Michael Harris Homes and Lennar. The project includes access to “The Retreat,” a community clubhouse with numerous amenities, and shuttle service to the Shady Grove Metro. Sales and delivery are underway and completion of this phase is anticipated over the next several years.

MT. PROSPECT Address: Quince Orchard Road and Travilah Road Developer: Toll Brothers Located on the former site of the 170acre Hanson Farm in North Potomac, this

KENSINGTON

MODENA RESERVE AT KENSINGTON Address: 10540 Metropolitan Ave. Developers: McCaffery Inc.; Solera Senior Living This five-story, 167,000-square-foot, 135-unit upscale senior living project is the largest development in the town of Kensington in 40 years. The project will include independent living, assisted living and memory care communities, as well as amenities such as restaurants, a courtyard and a therapy gym. It also will incorporate two renovated historic buildings on-site, one of which is slated to house a coffee shop open to the public. The project required a 12-foot sound barrier wall to be erected next to the MARC/CSX train tracks. Delivery is anticipated in mid-2021.

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building up

RESIDENCES AT KNOWLES STATION Address: Knowles Avenue and Summit Avenue Developer: Woodside Builders The Residences at Knowles Station, which broke ground in early 2021, consists of six townhomes with three and four bedrooms, garages and rooftop terraces. The developer is planning an additional six-story multifamily building, The Flats at Knowles Station, with approximately 100 units and retail space located across Knowles Avenue adjacent to the completed Knowles Station retail project. The multifamily phase of the project is currently in the approval process. Anticipated completion of the townhome project is in early 2022.

NORTH BETHESDA

feature up to 614 residential units. The project, which was formerly known as East Village, is on about 5 acres within a half-mile of the White Flint Metro. Originally expected to break ground in 2017, it was on hold until recently. The developer amended the project in 2019 in order to deliver more two- and threebedroom apartments, to convert parking from below grade to aboveground, and to manage rising construction costs. Anticipated completion is in late 2022.

sive Cabin John Village redevelopment, which also includes recent shopping center renovations and retail additions by Edens, the commercial property owner. The townhomes have two-car garages and private rooftop indoor/outdoor living areas. The project is next to Cabin John Regional Park and includes a new trail system and access points to the park. Sales and delivery are underway, with completion slated for late 2022.

NORTH QUARTER

ROCKVILLE

Address: 5120 Longstone Way Developer: Tri Pointe Homes With 104 three- and four-bedroom townhomes, this project just off Randolph Road next to Loehmann’s Plaza is about 1 mile from the White Flint Metro. All townhomes feature two-car garages, and some include rooftop terraces. Sales and delivery are underway, with project completion expected in early 2022.

ARROWWOOD Address: Marinelli Road and Citadel Avenue Developer: LCOR This five-story, 294-unit apartment building close to the White Flint Metro is part of a joint venture between the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority and the developer, and is part of the larger North Bethesda Town Center complex. Arrowwood replaces what had been a pop-up dog park in the area. The building includes a courtyard, firepit, clubroom and fitness center. The project was completed in late 2020.

THE TOWNES AT GROSVENOR PLACE Address: 10296 Grosvenor Place Developer: Madison Homes After receiving site plan approval in 2015, construction has begun on these 46 three- and four-bedroom townhomes with two-car garages, roof terraces and optional elevators. The project is in the Grosvenor Park subdivision on a formerly forested site next to the I-270 east spur; a new sound wall will be constructed to mitigate potential noise. Sales and delivery are underway, and anticipated completion is in late 2022.

HARWOOD FLATS Address: Nicholson Lane and Huff Court Developers: Promark Partners; Foulger-Pratt Demolition of an aging office and medical building next to the White Flint Mall property began in late 2020 to provide space for this six-story, 335-unit apartment building, which is part of a twophase development that ultimately will 126

POTOMAC CABIN JOHN VILLAGE Address: 7825 Tuckerman Lane Developer: EYA EYA is building 48 townhomes with three and four bedrooms as part of the exten-

ANSEL APARTMENTS Address: 45 Monroe St. Developers: Duball LLC; Daiwa House Group; Montgomery County Housing Opportunities Commission (HOC) Ansel is an 18-story mixed-use joint development project that includes 250 market-rate apartment units owned by affiliates of Duball LLC and Daiwa House Group, 150 affordable senior housing units owned by HOC, multiple amenity spaces, 19,000 square feet of retail and 600 parking spaces. It is located on a 1.5-acre site in Rockville Town Center that was previously a surface parking lot. The project broke ground in 2019, and completion is expected in late 2021.

CHAPMAN ROW AT TWINBROOK METRO Address: 1904 Chapman Ave. Developer: Tri Pointe Homes This project was initially approved for 600-plus apartments, but plans were amended in 2015 to replace one of the proposed multifamily buildings with 61 four-story townhomes. The 317-unit, sixstory Escher apartment building phase of this project by developer 1900 Chapman Project Owner LLC was completed in 2018. The project is within walking distance of the Twinbrook Metro and includes a pool and courtyard. The townhome project by Tri Pointe Homes was

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building up

reported to be close to sold out as of early 2021 and construction is expected to be finished in 2021.

GLENMERE AT THE VILLAGE AT ROCKVILLE Address: 9701 Veirs Drive Developer: The Village at Rockville This four-story senior housing project is part of The Village at Rockville, a notfor-profit organization that operates a continuing care retirement community in Rockville. It includes 130 one- and two-bedroom independent living senior apartments, underground parking, guest suites, an aquatic center, a clubroom and several dining options. Glenmere was completed and opened in early 2021.

KANSO TWINBROOK Address: 12503 Ardennes Ave.

Developer: AvalonBay Communities Initially proposed in 2009, this four-story, 238-apartment project is less than a half-mile from the Twinbrook Metro. The building includes studio through threebedroom units and is designed around an interior above-grade parking garage for residents. The building is marketed as a tech-forward automated community with limited on-site staff and amenities, resulting in value priced rental apartments offering “access without excess.” Construction was completed in early 2021, and delivery is underway.

KING FARM TOWNHOMES Address: King Farm Boulevard and Piccard Drive Developers: King Farm Associates LLC; Pulte Homes This King Farm site includes 53 four-

story townhomes with garages that are under construction and at delivery. The townhomes are replacing surface parking lots and a vacant area. According to a Pulte representative, townhomes in this phase are sold out. Additional King Farm townhome projects nearby are in the site plan approval process.

PARC REDLAND Address: 17217 Redland Road Developer: Universal Communities Parc Redland includes 19 three-story, two-car garage townhomes with up to four bedrooms or double master suites. The project, across from Redland Park and less than 2 miles from the Shady Grove Metro, is Montgomery County’s first “Design for Life” community, intended to be inclusive and accessible for residents at different ages and

Dennese Guadeloupe Rojas Principal/Interior Designer

...is a Leading Interior Design Firm www.interiorsbydesignmd.com 128

301-933-7723 • @interiorsbydesignllc

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stages of life. All of the homes offer universal design features such as nostep entries, smart controls, customizable cabinets and oversize elevators and garage doors. Homebuyers are eligible for property tax incentives through the county’s “Design for Life” program. Delivery and sales are underway, and completion of the project is expected in 2022.

THE SENECA ROCKVILLE Address: 55 W. Gude Drive Developer: Silverstone Senior Living This six-story development features 146 senior living apartments, including assisted living and memory care units. The project differs from some traditional assisted living communities in that it is all rental and there is no entry fee for the units. Amenities include a fitness

center, an art studio, massage services, a salon and dining rooms. Completion of the project is expected in mid-2021.

in 2019, sales and delivery are underway, and project completion is expected in late 2023.

TOWER OAKS

WESTSIDE AT SHADY GROVE

Address: Preserve Parkway Developers: EYA; Pulte Homes This 40-plus-acre site, which previously was zoned for office use, is bordered by a woodland preserve. The project will feature 217 three- to five-bedroom garage townhomes developed by EYA, along with 128 two-bedroom elevator condos with underground parking across four five-story buildings, and 30 threeto five-bedroom, two-car garage singlefamily homes developed by Pulte. Central to the project is “The Core,” a large community space with a clubhouse, fitness center, outdoor pool, play area and neighborhood cafe. Construction began

Address: Shady Grove Road and Crabbs Branch Way Developers: EYA; Stanley Martin Homes; Lennar The latest phase of this formerly industrial 45-acre site, within walking distance of the Shady Grove Metro, broke ground in 2020. After acquiring several parcels from owner and developer EYA, Stanley Martin is building 100 twoand three-bedroom two-over-two condos and 80 three- and four-bedroom townhomes, and Lennar plans to build 178 townhomes. The project also includes a community clubhouse with a pool and a dog park. In addition, in early 2021 EYA

architects ■ designers ■ builders

www.gilday.com | 301.565.4600

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building up

is starting construction on a six-story, 268-unit apartment building that will include 20,000 square feet of retail and a 7,000-square-foot Montgomery County Housing Opportunities Commission office. Sales and delivery of the townhomes are underway, and completion of the apartment building is expected in late 2023.

the area. Plans include a four-story building with 68 affordable live/work residential units, 11 two-car garage townhomes with three and four bedrooms (including four workforce housing townhomes and seven market-rate townhomes), 30 affordable artist studios, and an outdoor art display area. Leasing and sales are underway and project completion is expected in mid-2021.

SILVER SPRING

ATELIER

8787 GEORGIA Address: 8787 Georgia Ave. Developers: Bozzuto; Stonebridge Located on the former site of the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC) headquarters and an adjacent county parking lot, this project will include two six- and seven-story buildings with 375 apartments (including nine townhouse-style units along Spring Street), underground parking, a pedestrian and bike connection, and retail space anchored by MOM’s Organic Market. Wood from the black walnut trees that were removed for the redevelopment of the site will be made into furniture for the new M-NCPPC headquarters in Wheaton. Demolition is expected in early 2021, with an anticipated project completion in 2023.

ARTSPACE/THE TOWNS ON GROVE Address: 801 Sligo Ave. and Grove Street Developers: Artspace Projects Inc.; Bozzuto Artspace Projects, in conjunction with a number of development and funding partners, including the Montgomery County Department of Housing and Community Affairs and the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development, is developing the former 3rd District police station and adjacent land on Sligo Avenue into a unique project for 130

Address: 2511 Glenallen Ave. Developers: Elion Partners; Buchanan Partners Atelier is a four-story, 254-unit, HUDfinanced apartment building next to the Glenmont Metro. It is the first new apartment building to be built in decades in the Glenmont area. The project offers a connected five-story parking garage, clubroom, fitness center, rooftop deck, courtyard with pool, and other amenities. Expected completion is in early 2021.

ELAN Address: 700 Roeder Road Developers: Kadida Development Group; SGA Cos. This project is converting an aging office building in a central walkable location in downtown Silver Spring into 35 condominiums—five studio, 25 one-bedroom and five two-bedroom units. The building will include a lobby with package service and co-working spaces. It is the only condo project currently under construction in downtown Silver Spring. Sales were slated to begin in early 2021 and anticipated project completion is also in 2021.

ELIZABETH SQUARE Address: 1424 Fenwick Lane Developers: Lee Development Group; Montgomery County Housing Opportunities Commission (HOC) Elizabeth Square is a nearly 1 millionsquare-foot multiphase redevelopment and renovation project across

three buildings. It is on a block adjacent to the MARC/CSX tracks and two blocks from the Silver Spring Metro. The project is a public-private partnership between Lee Development Group and HOC, and eventually will deliver more than 900 units, including new and renovated apartments, mixed-income housing for senior residents, 25% moderately priced dwelling units and 10% workforce housing units or other approved affordable housing. The first phase of the project includes the new 16-story, 267-unit Elizabeth House III building and the 120,000-square-foot South County Regional Recreation and Aquatic Center, with an Olympic-size pool, a fullsize gym, dance studios, a culinary arts kitchen and a segment of the future Capital Crescent Trail. The second phase includes construction of the 23-story, 334-unit Elizabeth House IV building, and the third phase will be the renovation of the existing 16-story Alexander House apartment building with 305 units. Anticipated completion of the first phase of the project is in late 2022.

SOLAIRE 8200 DIXON Address: 8200 Dixon Ave. Developer: Washington Property Co. This 26-story, 550,000-square-foot building will be the tallest in Silver Spring when it tops out at 270 feet. It will include 403 apartments (75% of which will be one-bedroom or junior onebedroom units), four levels of abovegrade parking, and amenity spaces. A 15,000-square-foot food hall, which would be the first of its kind in Silver Spring, is planned for the ground floor. The project is located on the former site of Progress Place. The developer built a new Progress Place building, which also includes Shepherd’s Table, Interfaith Works and MobileMed, at 8106 Georgia Ave. through a public-private partnership with the county. Expected completion of Solaire 8200 Dixon is in early 2023. n

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Meet Our Top Producers Katherine Buckley

m +1 202 255 6536 katherinebuckley.ttrsir.com

Katherine’s many repeat clients attest to her reputation for integrity and attention to detail she has earned as one of the leading real estate agents in the Washington area. Her clients benefit not only from experience and knowledge Katherine has gained over more than 20 years in the business, but also by leveraging Sotheby’s global marketing and cutting edge digital strategies. Her knowledge of the market helps sellers determine the right price, and her marketing skills guarantee maximum exposure for their homes. Katherine has handled transactions from Rockville to Capital Hill and specializes in NW, DC and close in Maryland.

VJ Derbarghamian

m +1 240 630 1019 | VJDerbarghamian.ttrsir.com

Before joining TTR Sotheby’s International Realty, VJ Derbarghamian’s resume included mortgage origination along with serving as a project manager for one of the area’s top luxury builders. Whether it’s a simple cosmetic renovation or new build from the ground up, his expertise in both home development as well as financing helps bring projects in on time and within budget. Years of experience in the fi eld quickly identifies quality builds if it’s a turnkey solution, or assist in the design/renovation phase for an existing home. Whether it’s a first time home buyer or preparing a current residence for market, VJ is there to guide his clients through a seamless process with the highest return on investment

Will Fastow m +1 202 536 7675 | EnviableHome.com One of the DC area’s foremost brokers, William is known for his drive, passion for real estate, love of architecture, and an uncompromising commitment to customer service. A native Washingtonian and current resident of the Spring Valley neighborhood, William’s knowledge of the region stems from his personal as well as his professional experiences. Being from Washington is a special distinction and makes William more than familiar with the history of the different communities and neighborhoods that make up DC and the surrounding metropolitan area. He has worked with buyers, sellers, investors and developers across the city of Washington as well as Montgomery County, Annapolis Maryland and as far as the Eastern Shore. William also maintains contacts and business interests all across the country within the Sotheby’s network which makes him an ideal resource for clients relocating to and from the Washington DC area.

Top Producers Criteria: Individual agents with total sales of at least $8 million and teams with sales of at least $16 million between 11/1/19 - 10/31/20 in Montgomery County and ZIP codes 20015 & 20016. Bethesda Brokerage 4809 Bethesda Ave., Bethesda, MD | o +1 301 516 1212 | Chevy Chase Brokerage 5101 Wisconsin Ave. NW Suite 100, Washington, DC | o +1 301 967 3344

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Kevin Friend

m +1 202 320 2205 | thefriendgroupglobal.com

Kevin Friend is a multi-year top producer licensed in VA, DC and MD, with experience in managing complex transactions and negotiations. As a resident of the DC Metro area for over 30 years, Kevin has a deep understanding and appreciation for the local landscape. He delivers unmatched service and considers clients’ goals his top priority. Born in Washington, DC, he graduated from Georgetown University and received his MBA in Finance from the University of Maryland. Kevin resides in Chevy Chase, MD with his family. His philanthropic efforts include Children’s National Medical Center, Northwest Washington Little League, Jelleff Recreation Center and GrayBridge.

David Hatef

m +1 202 550 2730 davidhatef.com

Unparalleled marketing, world-class service, a tireless work ethic and a global network have contributed to David’s success in the DC area real estate market. A native Washingtonian and lawyer by training, David grew up in a local real estate family and learned about the region’s residential real estate market from an early age. Now a Chevy Chase, DC resident, David’s deep understanding of the capital region along with his skill, determination and diligence have helped him set the standard for excellence in client representation.

Adam Isaacson

m +1 301 775 0900 | adamisaacson.com

A native Washingtonian, Adam brings over 20 years of experience in real estate, marketing, negotiating, and sales to TTR Sotheby’s International Realty. Adam and his team pride themselves on delivering a 5-star customer experience to their client’s. Their experience, local knowledge, and consultative approach allow them to provide a level of service that is unmatched in the industry.

Bethesda Brokerage 4809 Bethesda Ave., Bethesda, MD | o +1 301 516 1212 | Chevy Chase Brokerage 5101 Wisconsin Ave. NW Suite 100, Washington, DC | o +1 301 967 3344

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Barbara Nalls

m +1 240 602 9035 | barbaranalls.com

An industry leader for almost three decades, Barbara’s style is passionate, strategic and entirely client-oriented. Working across all styles and price points, she brings deep experience, professional recognition, creative marketing, and strong local knowledge to every transaction. More than just a tough negotiator, her goal is always to serve her clients and support their unique needs through a time of transition. As the mother of five grown daughters, she well understands the stress of working parents and the challenges and significance a move brings to every family. Licensed in DC, Maryland, and Virginia.

Barbara Nalls

Home. Let’s get there together.

Catherine Nolley Triantis m +1 301 873 5214 | catherinetriantis.ttrsir.com Catherine Triantis is a preferred realtor in the Bethesda, Chevy Chase and Washington, DC markets. Her referral network and Top Agent status may be attributed to her client commitment, availability, and market knowledge. She spares no expense investing in her listings’ Marketing Plans and media push. Clients agree it was a much easier process with a seasoned professional. “She was EXCELLENT and is very careful about what work or prep needs to happen at a minimal cost. ” Catherine Triantis provides superior service and also supports many neighborhood programs in the community.

Ellen & Courtney Abrams

m+1 202 255 8219 | m+ 1 202 253 0109 | abramsrealestategroup.com

Ellen and Courtney have built one of the most well respected residential real estate businesses in the Washington area with over 40 combined years of selling in the DMV. Courtney and Ellen have a proven track record; their wealth of knowledge ranges from excellent negotiations skills in all markets and price ranges, a keen sense of preparing a home for market and mitigating the stresses that come with buying and selling. These attributes have gained them many repeat clients over the years. “Our goal is to exceed expectations at every turn. Our success is determined by our clients’ happiness, and we do not settle for less than 100% satisfaction on every transaction, every time, with every client.” Courtney and Ellen are consistently recognized as Top Producers and Community Leaders. Licensed in DC, Maryland and Virginia.

Top Producers Criteria: Individual agents with total sales of at least $8 million and teams with sales of at least $16 million between 11/1/19 - 10/31/20 in Montgomery County and ZIP codes 20015 & 20016.

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Burr Group m +1 301 346 3345 | coreyburr.ttrsir.com Led by Corey Burr, one of the leaders of the Washington, DC, region’s real estate community and a 34-year industry veteran, the Burr Group is TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s Top Team in Maryland. The 18-member group with over 300 years of combined experience has forged its unparalleled reputation by being a trusted advisor and delivering outstanding outcomes for thousands of clients since its founding as Burr, Morris & Pardoe in 1968 by Peter Burr.

Finnell Lee Homes Anne-Marie, Kelly, Marge & Eva m +1 202 329 7117 | FinnellLeeHomes.com “There is always light, if only we’re brave enough to see it. If only we’re brave enough to be it.” -Amanda Gorman We are so inspired by these words and very optimistic about the future overall. There are many reasons to be optimistic about our local real estate market as well -- let’s connect and discuss them!

HEIDER

m +1 202 938 3685 | danielheider.com

Our 2020 Highlights… • SOLD the highest recorded home sale in the state of Maryland TWICE • SOLD the highest recorded home sale in Bethesda and Chevy Chase history • SOLD the highest recorded home sale in Bradley Hills Grove of 2020 • SOLD the highest recorded land sale in Potomac – in the last decade If a record was broken in the ultra-luxury bracket, HEIDER was at the helm. HEIDER has become the most trusted name in the upper-brackets of Montgomery County real estate; with your trust, we continue to break records, even our own. Our team has captured the world’s attention on social media, with over 2.5 million followers across all platforms and growing. When given the opportunity, HEIDER has proven to perform. We’re obsessed with service and invest more time and resources into presenting our listings than anyone. We’re leading the market for a reason and eager to show you why. Visit DanielHeider.com

Bethesda Brokerage 4809 Bethesda Ave., Bethesda, MD | o +1 301 516 1212 | Chevy Chase Brokerage 5101 Wisconsin Ave. NW Suite 100, Washington, DC | o +1 301 967 3344

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The Roost Group m +1 202 320 9395 | theroostgroup.ttrsir.com

Lauren Davis Team m +1 202 549 8784 laurendavisteam.com Lauren Davis and her team offer market expertise and real estate services across the Washington DC area, with a specialty in the close-in neighborhoods of Bethesda and Chevy Chase, areas where we not only live and work but have a deep passion and commitment.

Kathryn Schwartz and Laurie Muir understand that the purchase or sale of one’s home is more than a mere financial transaction— it represents a major transition. As seasoned professionals and long-time community members who have learned and thrived through many of their own life transitions, their shared mission is to help their clients expertly navigate the intricacies of the local real estate market by anticipating potential challenges, finding successful resolutions, and doing so with the highest level of integrity. Their clients know that they have a partner who puts their interests first, goes the extra mile, is patient, responsive, and proactive. While your roost may change throughout your life, Kathryn and Laurie will be there to help every step of the way.

• Recognized by RealTrends as the number one agent in the state of Maryland based on individual sales volume in 2017 • Recognized by The Washingtonian as a Top 100 Residential Real Estate Agent and Top Residential Real Estate Producer • Ranked among the top 50 realtors in the region by America’s Best Real Estate Agents presented by REAL Trends and the Wall Street Journal

Premier Partners

m +1 202 669 4083 | PremierPartnersDC.com

Matt McCormick, Lou Cardenas, Honor Ingersoll, Justin Kitsch, Beth Sheehy, Kyle Meeks and Frederick Gibbons are Greater Capital Area real estate veterans. Working together they harness their individual strengths and deliver the highest quality service and results to their clients. Collectively, they have -$1 billion in sales and over 1,000 transactions at all price points and are proud to call Adams Morgan, Chevy Chase, Ledroit Park, Arlington, Logan Circle and the West End home. The partners have been recognized in the Wall Street Journal’s Top 100 Agents, Washingtonian magazine’s Top Agents, Northern Virginia Magazine Top Agents and Real Trends. However, the greatest honor of all is that a majority of their business comes from referrals from past clients.

Top Producers Criteria: Individual agents with total sales of at least $8 million and teams with sales of at least $16 million between 11/1/19 - 10/31/20 in Montgomery County and ZIP codes 20015 & 20016.

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real estate

HOME SALE HIGHLIGHTS A snapshot of last year’s housing market in our area Neighborhoods

Highest Average Sale Price in 2020* # of Sales

KENWOOD Chevy Chase 12

$3,377,500

Potomac

12

$3,193,333

Bethesda

8

EDGEMOOR

Bethesda

LYBROOK

Bethesda

BRADLEY HILLS GROVE

Bethesda

GREAT FALLS ESTATES

Potomac

11 3 7 8 6 45 4 8 7 4 7 8 24 3 6

BRADLEY FARMS BRADLEY HILLS (ZIP CODE 20817 ONLY)

PINEVIEW SPRING VALLEY

Bethesda Upper NW D.C.

WILSON KNOLLS

Bethesda

KENWOOD PARK

Bethesda

MERRY-GO-ROUND FARM BRADLEY VILLAGE POTOMAC FALLS

Potomac Bethesda Potomac

WEST CHEVY CHASE

Chevy Chase

CHEVY CHASE VILLAGE

Chevy Chase

LONGWOOD

Bethesda

PALATINE

Potomac

Chevy Chase

20816

$2,898,563

Bethesda

20817

Bethesda

$2,679,545 $2,325,833 $2,196,000 $2,173,438 $2,059,817 $2,052,534 $2,049,375 $2,015,532 $2,006,857 $1,931,250 $1,906,788 $1,889,875 $1,886,638 $1,855,000 $1,830,833

20015

Upper NW D.C.

20814

Bethesda

20854

Potomac

20812

Glen Echo

20896

Garrett Park

20818

Cabin John

20852

North Bethesda/Rockville

20895

Kensington

20878

North Potomac/Gaithersburg

20850

Rockville

20910

Silver Spring

20902

Silver Spring

Where Houses Sold the Fastest in 2020* Average # of Days on Sales Market

TOWER OAKS North Bethesda/ Rockville GREENWICH FOREST (ZIP CODE 20817 ONLY)

ROSEDALE PARK MILLS FARM FORT SUMNER

2

Bethesda

7 7 3 3 3 5 3

4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Bethesda Silver Spring

PARKWAY

Silver Spring

ROLLINGWOOD TERRACE

1

4

KEMP MILL FOREST COUNTRY PLACE

10

Bethesda

North Potomac/Gaithersburg

Potomac Chevy Chase

20016 Upper NW D.C. 20815

*Minimum of three sales

Neighborhoods

Average Sale Price in 2020

ZIP Codes

ZIP Codes

$1,705,321 $1,540,074 $1,379,807 $1,296,718 $1,291,922 $1,253,510 $1,208,531 $1,198,375 $1,133,600 $887,833 $795,301 $745,723 $737,282 $729,286 $701,704 $490,296

Average Days on Market in 2020

20812 Glen Echo 20015

Upper NW D.C.

20902

Silver Spring

20816

Bethesda

20852

North Bethesda/Rockville

20910

Silver Spring

20895

Kensington

20016

Upper NW D.C.

20850

Rockville

20818

Cabin John

20878

North Potomac/Gaithersburg

20814

Bethesda

20817

Bethesda

20815

Chevy Chase

20854

Potomac

20896

Garrett Park

15 16 16 20 20 22 24 26 28 29 31 31 34 39 42 52

*Minimum of three sales

Data is for single-family homes and was provided by Bright MLS and MarketStats for ShowingTime. Statistics generated on Jan. 7, 2021. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Some numbers have been rounded. 136

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Jill Schwartz

c: 301.758.7224 JillSchwartzgroup@gmail.com www.jillschwartzgroup.com Licensed in DC, MD, & VA

Thank you to our clients, friends and family for supporting us throughout 2020! We are looking forward to a new year & a transformative 2021.

Tamara Kucik

c: 301.780.HOME (4663) tk@tamara4homes.com www.tamara4homes.com Licensed in MD & DC

Real Estate is more than just houses. It's about people too.

Tamara Kucik Team OF RLAH REAL ESTATE

RLAH Real Estate 301.652.0643 4040 N. Fairfax Drive #10C, Arlington VA 22203 12505 Park Potomac Avenue 7th Floor, Potomac MD 20854 4600 N. Park Avenue #100, Chevy Chase MD 20815 11 Dupont Circle #650, Washington DC 20036 1108 H Street NE 2nd Floor, Washington DC 20002 1361 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Washington DC 20007

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The Kensington Group of RLAH Real Estate would like to thank our clients for helping us achieve this honor!

Marilyn Emery

Patricia Kennedy

Karen Eaton

Sherri Earman

Bruce Cotting

Winnie Holbrooke

Wherever you are on your homeward journey, TKG shows up with decades of experience to bring you home, safe and sound. Knowing your home means the world to you, we go to the ends of the earth to deliver.

Ramona Greene

o: 301.652.0643

www.kensingtonregroup.com 4600 N. Park Ave #100 Ave Chevy Chase, MD 20815

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real estate Data provided by Bright MLS and MarketStats for ShowingTime. Statistics generated Jan. 7, 2021. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

HOME SALE TRENDS In 456 neighborhoods

during the last five years and at least one sale in the past year. The totals for each ZIP code reflect all sales in that ZIP code, not just the totals for the selected neighborhoods. Real estate agents may enter sales into the Bright MLS database retroactively; as a result, some of the historical data may vary from what has been published in previous years. Some numbers have been rounded.

2020

2019

2016

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2017

2017

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

1

8

3

2

4

$1,495,000

$927,250

$995,833

$990,000

$1,198,375

32

8

78

10

15

1

8

3

2

4

$1,495,000

$927,250

$995,833

$990,000

$1,198,375

32

8

78

10

15

Alta Vista

18

15

11

11

17

$908,972

$951,468

$982,507

$955,975

$1,071,882

56

55

33

33

19

Alta Vista Gardens

6

7

5

5

3

$1,252,292

$1,416,284

$1,313,000

$976,740

$1,458,300

128

93

83

28

75

Battery Park

7

7

4

5

7

$1,285,429

$1,525,000

$1,092,527

$1,445,500

$1,807,714

126

54

8

43

47

Battery Park Hills

4

2

1

2

1

$1,322,000

$1,292,000

$1,876,000

$1,388,000

$760,000

12

52

0

95

37

Bethesda

2

1

1

0

5

$1,422,500

$790,000

$1,936,000

NA

$1,286,300

78

11

266

NA

15

Bradley Hills

6

3

5

8

6

$1,883,000

$2,086,667

$1,924,000

$1,797,924

$1,600,833

39

82

27

58

71

Bradley Village

1

2

3

0

4

$1,180,000

$2,635,000

$1,504,705

NA

$1,931,250

0

6

32

NA

10

Columbia Forest

8

6

9

5

7

$1,596,250

$1,472,667

$1,375,485

$1,324,750

$1,538,429

72

61

44

12

17

Edgemoor

12

3

12

8

11

$2,846,964

$2,893,333

$2,507,667

$2,940,625

$2,679,545

72

81

74

105

87

English Village

4

8

3

5

6

$1,388,750

$1,469,125

$1,431,333

$1,264,800

$1,640,000

83

47

125

50

47

Glenbrook Knolls

1

2

3

1

3

$1,100,000

$847,500

$931,667

$846,500

$962,867

27

7

11

11

6

Glenbrook Village

15

14

9

10

10

$1,051,260

$927,246

$1,351,111

$981,000

$1,334,997

46

34

28

45

41

Glenwood

5

3

4

2

6

$879,000

$952,333

$957,875

$722,000

$1,249,111

27

9

26

2

49

Greenwich Forest

8

6

4

12

16

$1,327,688

$1,457,317

$1,093,000

$1,292,438

$1,320,056

58

79

43

36

31

Grosvenor Woods

3

1

3

5

2

$1,098,600

$985,000

$1,030,000

$1,113,500

$1,143,363

33

13

26

65

103

Huntington

2

1

1

0

2

$990,500

$2,100,000

$1,275,000

NA

$1,355,000

23

5

33

NA

2

Locust Hill Estates

8

10

9

10

8

$822,800

$807,600

$940,056

$823,000

$861,056

18

39

23

25

15

Lone Oak

1

3

0

4

2

$1,300,000

$927,833

NA

$1,048,750

$1,009,000

21

79

NA

13

5

Longmeadow

2

1

0

2

4

$755,465

$737,000

NA

$822,206

$826,250

65

9

NA

6

9

Maplewood

9

4

9

3

6

$824,556

$1,009,500

$882,667

$945,000

$930,583

33

36

18

31

45

Maplewood Estates

4

7

3

9

3

$749,125

$839,786

$901,667

$839,777

$1,052,853

29

25

18

17

11

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

2018

being sold? Where are homes selling the fastest? The following chart answers these questions with data on the number of sales, the average sale price and the average number of days on the market for single-family homes in 456 Bethesda-area neighborhoods from 2016 to 2020. The neighborhoods included had at least five total sales

2017

ARE HOUSING PRICES RISING? Are more homes

GLEN ECHO 20812 Glen Echo 20812 TOTAL

BETHESDA 20814

140

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FEATURES_BTN.indd 140

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Arlington and Ashburn, VA North Bethesda and Kensington, MD Coming soon to Jessup, MD!

2/9/21 1:59 PM


real estate 2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2017

2017

1

1

1

1

2

$1,377,500

$575,000

$880,000

$1,420,000

$800,500

13

4

19

2

10

Meadowbrook Village

2

1

3

2

2

$865,000

$900,000

$865,833

$760,000

$1,087,500

12

7

12

19

10

North Bethesda

1

2

4

2

2

$820,000

$888,500

$1,107,175

$1,202,750

$1,060,250

116

21

41

32

56

North Bethesda Grove

3

7

5

8

10

$649,667

$859,579

$1,063,200

$1,139,038

$977,550

13

27

60

58

37

Parkview

7

4

7

8

7

$723,929

$689,200

$765,000

$750,188

$766,954

39

59

16

11

36

Parkwood

16

8

15

12

15

$882,869

$693,050

$891,254

$899,325

$891,693

35

43

40

11

9

Rosedale Park

10

12

13

6

7

$730,620

$1,162,492

$1,052,827

$1,003,450

$1,121,714

15

52

25

15

4

West Chevy Chase Heights

6

3

5

4

2

$1,378,500

$908,333

$1,347,000

$1,350,250

$1,657,500

67

18

37

38

6

Westboro

2

5

2

6

5

$1,017,000

$1,495,200

$1,198,580

$1,300,167

$1,244,000

10

89

75

49

40

Whitehall Manor

4

4

8

5

4

$1,282,250

$1,739,000

$1,345,844

$1,716,992

$1,823,347

33

80

36

20

5

Wildwood Estates

4

2

2

2

6

$685,975

$1,167,000

$735,000

$725,000

$993,083

10

11

12

5

37

Wildwood Knolls

3

2

1

0

1

$784,667

$777,000

$810,000

NA

$890,000

18

34

44

NA

16

Wildwood Manor

12

9

14

17

15

$891,147

$769,556

$856,677

$939,853

$778,193

13

12

41

39

7

204 187 193 197 213

$1,148,171

$1,163,757

$1,191,211

$1,154,599

$1,253,510

45

48

43

35

31

Bradley Hills

6

6

2

1

2

$1,173,250

$1,227,000

$1,874,500

$866,000

$1,767,500

41

25

50

6

9

Brookdale

4

3

0

3

1

$1,062,875

$1,152,500

NA

$1,296,667

$1,450,000

7

7

NA

5

0

Chevy Chase

92

85

79

68

62

$1,397,336

$1,459,702

$1,581,404

$1,417,620

$1,651,986

46

50

44

50

49

Chevy Chase Gardens

2

3

4

7

5

$1,510,000

$995,700

$1,511,000

$1,262,000

$1,278,000

131

12

11

33

10

Chevy Chase Manor

1

3

6

5

3

$2,150,000

$1,458,000

$1,070,333

$1,256,000

$1,501,667

37

21

53

28

137

Chevy Chase Park

3

5

2

2

1

$2,064,262

$1,411,080

$1,340,000

$1,554,000

$2,250,000

97

25

8

20

85

Chevy Chase Terrace

7

6

7

4

2

$1,136,714

$1,211,167

$1,159,500

$1,076,250

$1,110,525

25

13

10

14

7

Chevy Chase Village

8

5

10

24

24

$2,263,750

$1,808,000

$1,983,500

$2,085,421

$1,886,638

91

58

43

19

34

Donneybrook

2

3

4

5

2

$625,500

$700,133

$693,500

$737,400

$815,000

18

20

36

26

11

Drummond

1

0

6

1

1

$1,500,000

NA

$1,469,167

$1,000,000

$1,760,000

152

NA

18

2

8

Dunlop Hills

7

5

5

5

6

$894,357

$904,600

$1,098,800

$912,000

$1,212,335

52

9

58

24

38

Farmington

1

3

4

3

3

$1,385,000

$1,089,667

$1,605,000

$1,563,333

$1,466,333

66

30

65

125

21

Kenwood

9

12

8

12

12

$1,997,778

$2,214,750

$2,763,750

$2,641,625

$3,377,500

35

62

46

73

111

Martins Additions

16

20

12

11

17

$1,199,813

$1,181,375

$1,235,103

$1,127,636

$1,632,824

68

59

66

24

43

Meadowbrook Village

1

0

2

1

1

$820,000

NA

$880,475

$1,095,000

$1,620,000

6

NA

14

56

21

North Chevy ChaseKenilworth

15

5

4

4

3

$793,767

$993,500

$898,375

$921,000

$1,078,333

46

16

10

81

27

North Chevy Chase

3

1

1

11

9

$933,000

$909,900

$815,000

$1,051,283

$975,778

26

20

0

22

21

Norwood Heights

6

2

2

6

2

$1,515,583

$1,047,500

$1,167,000

$1,273,700

$1,210,000

87

65

5

37

50

Orchardale

1

3

0

4

1

$934,464

$1,108,667

NA

$1,015,250

$1,850,000

11

5

NA

19

106

Otterbourne/Chevy Chase Section 5

3

2

4

1

2

$1,144,667

$1,790,000

$1,362,500

$1,730,000

$1,422,250

6

39

49

22

11

Pinehurst Village

5

6

4

4

6

$823,700

$886,667

$882,500

$987,904

$1,034,347

80

23

11

17

35

Rock Creek Estates

1

1

1

1

1

$1,150,000

$732,525

$1,200,000

$699,900

$850,000

0

7

11

5

1

Rock Creek Forest

20

12

14

25

10

$701,795

$753,865

$789,393

$876,352

$790,475

17

33

11

24

24

Rock Creek Knolls

4

1

4

3

4

$758,750

$570,000

$747,928

$1,107,167

$752,750

17

104

38

9

11

Rollingwood

10

10

8

19

5

$1,096,950

$1,012,300

$1,404,500

$1,215,291

$1,266,847

44

34

44

35

56

Rollingwood Terrace

2

0

4

2

3

$1,024,500

NA

$1,161,000

$1,104,000

$1,278,583

10

NA

25

7

4

Sacks

1

2

2

2

1

$1,225,000

$2,055,000

$1,212,500

$1,407,500

$2,750,000

7

90

7

170

19

Somerset

0

1

1

5

4

NA

$2,265,000

$1,325,000

$1,484,200

$1,400,000

NA

98

48

13

13

Somerset Heights

7

14

13

13

6

$1,620,087

$1,368,121

$1,805,042

$1,455,571

$1,627,833

23

44

21

56

22

Spring Hill

2

0

3

2

7

$1,022,500

NA

$747,667

$741,750

$923,286

55

NA

48

68

29

Tarrytown

1

2

0

1

3

$1,000,000

$1,188,500

NA

$1,052,000

$1,068,333

5

33

NA

8

62

20814 TOTAL

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Maplewood Manor

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

CHEVY CHASE 20815

142

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Live v ibra ntly. W I T H T H E W O R L D A T Y O U R D O O R S T E P.

At The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Chevy Chase, iconic living extends well beyond your doorstep. Be the first to experience exceptionally tailored homes with legendary service, a vibrant community and unparalleled access to nearby parks and the bustling heart of D.C. 6 5 S T U N N I N G O N E -TO -T H R E E B E D R O O M R E S I D E N C E S I N D O O R & O U T D O O R C U R AT E D A M E N I T Y S PAC E S

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The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Chevy Chase are not owned, developed or sold by The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C. Bozzuto uses The Ritz-Carlton marks under license from The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C.

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2/11/21 8:58 AM


real estate 2020

2017

2019

2016

2018

2020

2017

2019

2016

2018

2020

2017

3

3

5

11

22

$1,868,432

$1,602,000

$981,740

$1,521,627

$1,451,161

63

124

32

23

20

West Chevy Chase

3

6

5

6

8

$1,138,333

$1,279,167

$1,659,038

$1,565,555

$1,889,875

8

43

61

18

60

263 249 244 290 259

$1,256,388

$1,320,747

$1,423,970

$1,356,846

$1,540,074

47

44

39

38

39

Brookdale

3

1

2

4

5

$1,205,667

$674,000

$985,001

$1,008,775

$1,070,350

25

27

6

5

13

Brookmont

4

5

5

6

1

$1,016,500

$1,583,000

$1,288,000

$1,366,750

$1,649,000

37

35

23

44

16

Crestview

8

7

7

6

6

$724,250

$940,286

$921,328

$812,757

$998,650

53

16

16

8

6

Fairway Hills

3

5

2

3

2

$800,667

$811,000

$1,130,000

$685,000

$894,000

52

30

26

27

11

Fort Sumner

6

7

3

1

3

$1,015,000

$1,175,000

$1,034,667

$1,575,000

$1,152,333

23

45

16

18

4

Glen Cove

4

4

3

2

1

$1,267,000

$1,254,031

$1,323,333

$1,634,797

$1,815,000

36

10

19

183

95

Glen Echo Heights

29

32

33

38

23

$1,188,580

$1,093,609

$1,276,846

$1,482,921

$1,311,817

69

48

62

63

44

Glen Mar Park

10

12

8

10

11

$1,116,300

$976,195

$1,013,063

$1,181,100

$1,131,182

34

30

38

35

23

Greenacres

7

5

8

12

9

$817,314

$862,080

$1,170,625

$1,048,750

$934,422

11

17

10

22

22

High Point

2

3

1

1

2

$1,727,500

$909,333

$945,000

$860,000

$929,500

131

6

18

24

4

Mass. Ave. Hills

3

3

2

5

7

$1,108,333

$1,095,000

$1,210,000

$1,245,000

$1,361,186

15

49

7

10

8

Mohican Hills

0

0

0

3

2

NA

NA

NA

$1,410,833

$925,000

NA

NA

NA

44

3

Spring Hill

2

1

2

0

1

$1,562,500

$2,850,000

$1,667,500

NA

$1,920,000

11

64

10

NA

16

Springfield

23

22

15

23

24

$1,034,087

$1,340,091

$1,105,602

$1,125,129

$1,477,517

32

37

43

23

13

Sumner

25

15

15

21

14

$1,121,980

$1,204,000

$1,177,067

$1,198,024

$1,350,009

22

35

12

25

12

Tulip Hill

3

3

5

6

1

$1,141,667

$2,256,633

$1,164,500

$1,094,150

$1,050,000

58

156

41

14

53

Westgate

7

19

7

13

14

$1,049,290

$1,074,526

$1,197,678

$1,088,631

$1,281,777

37

26

31

21

31

Westhaven

5

3

4

2

4

$1,153,800

$1,084,667

$1,102,500

$1,088,500

$1,145,250

18

38

36

50

17

Westmoreland Hills

22

22

20

18

20

$1,261,864

$1,466,852

$1,357,375

$1,242,639

$1,677,350

50

25

37

27

15

Westwood

5

1

3

2

5

$1,137,000

$839,000

$1,581,667

$867,500

$1,463,000

41

7

82

16

16

Woodacres

14

17

21

8

20

$883,561

$954,174

$943,518

$1,012,750

$1,056,826

22

7

16

22

5

196 197 175 190 184

$1,091,650

$1,179,015

$1,164,053

$1,217,242

$1,379,807

39

32

34

33

20

Al Marah

8

3

1

5

5

$998,063

$1,031,667

$1,001,000

$1,135,388

$1,163,600

41

56

33

22

9

Alta Vista

8

5

4

3

4

$977,619

$911,980

$853,250

$1,038,833

$1,013,750

38

56

15

46

5

Alta Vista Terrace

10

14

6

11

8

$1,075,900

$1,011,600

$993,333

$1,140,523

$1,270,500

42

17

8

35

11

Arrowood

1

2

3

0

2

$1,880,000

$1,515,000

$1,166,667

NA

$937,450

8

119

93

NA

207

Ashburton

23

24

22

22

25

$754,857

$748,958

$766,500

$733,798

$763,440

27

16

28

24

16

Ashleigh

6

2

3

7

6

$945,833

$1,032,500

$1,148,667

$1,131,143

$1,429,650

68

36

19

25

53

Avenel

15

6

16

7

17

$1,617,700

$1,442,500

$1,989,484

$1,504,857

$1,382,118

103

175

44

74

54

Ayrlawn

10

6

10

20

15

$1,147,603

$1,053,250

$1,148,350

$1,105,353

$1,228,805

51

17

36

43

44

Bannockburn

13

9

3

15

10

$1,406,423

$1,490,222

$883,333

$1,451,839

$1,282,200

32

53

5

32

49

Bannockburn Coop

3

10

2

6

7

$1,057,000

$1,123,339

$762,500

$1,342,250

$924,333

19

55

54

77

29

Bannockburn Estates

5

7

6

8

8

$1,142,000

$1,464,214

$1,115,833

$1,268,501

$1,659,453

34

69

59

37

23

Bannockburn Heights

4

8

4

1

2

$1,506,250

$1,421,250

$1,384,725

$2,690,000

$1,500,000

38

110

30

31

10

Bethesda

2

2

0

1

6

$1,512,500

$1,105,000

NA

$1,400,000

$1,485,183

106

18

NA

83

46

Bradley Hills

4

7

3

5

8

$996,000

$1,312,143

$1,358,100

$1,446,800

$2,898,563

48

60

49

41

108

Bradley Hills Grove

10

12

14

13

7

$2,057,400

$2,079,000

$2,201,018

$1,390,231

$2,196,000

69

132

86

68

62

Bradley Manor

6

6

2

2

5

$1,137,500

$1,106,383

$1,042,500

$1,178,750

$1,204,000

97

63

76

12

28

Bradley Park

4

6

6

3

3

$1,224,972

$928,333

$1,065,000

$1,236,000

$1,535,000

49

19

52

35

15

Bradley Woods

4

5

0

3

1

$1,545,625

$1,339,980

NA

$1,159,167

$850,000

59

22

NA

53

32

Bradmoor

9

18

24

15

18

$936,967

$1,248,917

$1,030,621

$1,072,499

$1,259,983

49

41

29

23

33

Burning Tree

1

1

1

6

3

$4,800,000

$1,160,000

$1,150,000

$2,474,500

$1,715,000

554

57

0

101

43

20815 TOTAL

2019

2016

Average Days on Market

Town of Chevy Chase

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

BETHESDA 20816

20816 TOTAL

BETHESDA 20817

144

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2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2020

2020

2019

8

10

12

7

14

$1,056,875

$931,150

$815,775

$841,821

$1,145,714

51

32

55

42

Burning Tree Valley

7

8

8

6

7

$1,363,286

$1,289,750

$1,340,625

$1,800,375

$1,477,571

23

32

41

50

39

Burning Tree View

0

0

2

2

2

NA

NA

$1,320,000

$1,392,050

$1,825,000

NA

NA

27

7

11

Carderock Springs

17

22

22

25

27

$941,693

$891,890

$1,000,432

$955,960

$963,056

33

31

20

41

22

Charred Oak Estates

9

10

3

7

9

$889,889

$1,100,300

$1,176,667

$871,714

$1,120,056

54

72

77

19

53

Cohasset

6

6

4

8

5

$1,045,583

$901,483

$848,750

$1,152,063

$1,341,980

32

18

8

55

72

Congressional Country Club Estates

2

5

3

3

6

$887,500

$849,800

$1,065,667

$1,169,667

$1,467,333

9

32

15

49

47

Congressional Forest

4

5

2

1

2

$1,723,125

$1,276,000

$1,510,000

$1,262,500

$1,344,808

34

86

113

18

21

Country Club Forest

2

3

1

1

1

$993,000

$787,333

$871,000

$950,000

$1,200,000

6

34

7

51

7

Country Club Village

3

3

6

1

1

$1,476,667

$906,333

$1,403,459

$825,000

$880,000

158

18

49

71

25

Deerfield

0

2

0

1

5

NA

$1,039,000

NA

$1,190,000

$1,109,500

NA

25

NA

10

26

Devonshire

1

1

0

2

3

$1,262,500

$975,000

NA

$1,392,500

$1,058,000

56

10

NA

41

10

Edgewood

0

4

1

0

4

NA

$1,277,625

$1,860,000

NA

$1,080,500

NA

26

0

NA

6

English Village

5

5

5

2

8

$1,840,900

$945,000

$1,703,000

$1,507,500

$1,755,914

79

27

41

41

37

Fairway Hills

2

0

3

2

1

$1,309,500

NA

$1,256,667

$1,375,000

$1,574,000

5

NA

8

18

6

Fernwood

7

11

8

10

7

$787,857

$733,545

$770,388

$869,250

$827,200

22

47

15

34

10

Flint Hill Community

0

2

0

4

1

NA

$1,019,001

NA

$1,743,750

$1,245,000

NA

15

NA

83

7

Foggys Pasture

1

1

1

1

1

$1,455,000

$1,110,000

$1,340,000

$972,500

$1,625,000

11

187

32

7

1

Georgetown Village

17

9

12

10

8

$760,135

$702,482

$730,396

$775,850

$968,563

40

50

20

42

25

You’ll be ready when your dream home is.

2019

2018

2017

2017

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Burning Tree Estates

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

27

We've got a mortgage to fit your needs. Call us today. Francesca Costello Home Lending Officer 301-919-9308 francesca.costello@citi.com citi.com/francescacostello NMLS# 755930 Mike Kidwell Home Lending Officer 301-370-0738 m.kidwell@citi.com citi.com/mkidwell NMLS# 431321

With a SureStart® Pre-approval1, you’ll benefit from: • Confidence throughout your home search • A competitive advantage over other homebuyers without a pre-approval • The ability to act quickly with a complimentary pre-approval letter

Terms, conditions and fees for accounts, programs, products and services are subject to change. This is not a commitment to lend. All loans are subject to credit and property approval. Certain restrictions may apply on all programs. Offer cannot be combined with any other mortgage offer. This offer contains information about U.S. domestic financial services provided by Citibank, N.A. and is intended for use domestically in the U.S. Final commitment is subject to verification of information, receipt of a satisfactory sales contract on the home you wish to purchase, appraisal and title report, and meeting our customary closing conditions. There is no charge to receive a SureStart Pre-approval. However, standard application and commitment fees will apply for the mortgage loan application.

1

©2020 Citibank, N.A. NMLS# 412915. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender. Citi, Citi and Arc Design and other marks used herein are service marks of Citigroup Inc. or its affiliates, used and registered throughout the world.

Bethesda Magazine 04022020.indd 1

FEATURES_BTN.indd 145

BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021PM 145 4/2/2020 12:53:35

2/12/21 2:31 PM


real estate 2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2017

2017

2

6

2

10

3

$732,500

$862,667

$827,500

$915,099

$799,667

7

63

35

36

5

Greenwich Forest

2

3

2

0

4

$1,748,096

$1,489,667

$1,425,000

NA

$1,042,500

42

25

35

NA

2

Hendry Estates

10

5

4

3

6

$1,044,200

$736,400

$896,125

$1,153,000

$1,097,750

45

51

10

13

12

Hillmead

8

12

17

15

15

$1,187,312

$1,245,417

$1,064,059

$1,057,427

$1,180,200

51

81

40

22

32

Huntington Terrace

4

13

9

13

10

$1,377,820

$1,181,108

$1,190,372

$1,143,156

$1,411,400

42

40

81

44

61

Kafauver Tract

4

3

1

2

1

$1,677,500

$909,667

$1,699,000

$1,672,500

$3,025,000

194

32

45

14

25

Kenwood Park

20

19

17

19

8

$1,186,276

$1,376,158

$1,289,759

$1,272,480

$2,015,532

49

42

50

52

25

Landon Woods

5

3

6

10

3

$1,578,000

$798,167

$1,621,250

$1,415,250

$1,516,667

52

4

75

43

8

Locust Ridge

1

3

0

1

1

$1,500,000

$1,388,333

NA

$1,650,000

$1,545,000

18

26

NA

31

7

Longwood

2

7

4

7

3

$1,712,500

$1,397,214

$1,802,500

$1,542,143

$1,855,000

73

118

52

46

72

Lybrook

4

1

6

2

3

$1,625,625

$1,150,000

$1,474,000

$3,540,000

$2,325,833

95

9

14

309

32

Mary Knolls

5

1

3

0

2

$896,000

$1,065,000

$868,333

NA

$946,250

12

9

6

NA

79

Marymount

2

2

2

5

3

$524,000

$967,500

$774,500

$800,000

$878,000

10

58

5

49

10

Mass. Ave. Forest

3

3

5

2

2

$1,131,333

$1,300,000

$1,289,000

$1,380,000

$1,100,000

25

5

34

67

17

Merrimack Park

8

7

5

9

10

$940,500

$1,262,843

$763,100

$1,016,310

$1,101,275

40

78

22

77

22

Oakmont

2

5

5

6

1

$920,000

$962,800

$998,100

$1,277,167

$729,000

15

26

7

94

113

Oakwood Knolls

11

9

6

10

5

$1,378,864

$1,192,211

$1,251,931

$1,358,900

$1,405,700

129

58

11

30

5

The Palisades

0

5

3

3

3

NA

$1,367,000

$1,161,667

$1,281,333

$1,298,333

NA

135

40

123

25

Pineview

3

2

4

3

6

$1,715,000

$1,427,500

$1,643,669

$1,840,605

$2,059,817

21

76

28

98

83

Sonoma

2

4

6

4

5

$965,500

$1,327,904

$955,500

$873,625

$904,600

10

66

12

25

15

West Bethesda Park

2

1

1

1

2

$1,725,000

$2,145,000

$1,160,000

$1,400,000

$1,157,500

61

77

7

125

7

Wildwood Hills

2

1

1

0

2

$1,450,000

$700,000

$735,000

NA

$1,472,500

49

10

13

NA

68

Wilson Knolls

1

5

5

3

4

$740,000

$1,254,544

$1,044,800

$1,422,500

$2,049,375

1

66

32

68

56

Woodburn

8

3

1

4

2

$914,625

$759,000

$872,000

$1,103,725

$900,000

32

14

10

19

2

Woodhaven

9

8

14

12

9

$1,070,111

$1,168,613

$1,208,830

$1,233,774

$1,317,667

74

26

36

41

28

Wyngate

20

26

22

28

21

$962,915

$1,026,688

$969,877

$1,021,499

$1,107,690

67

39

46

55

14

436 456 429 470 432

$1,160,686

$1,134,967

$1,154,532

$1,189,240

$1,296,718

51

50

43

44

34

Cabin John

0

0

1

6

3

NA

NA

$699,000

$1,064,943

$945,667

NA

NA

23

10

8

Cabin John Gardens

2

1

3

4

2

$643,500

$745,500

$470,667

$643,750

$505,000

14

6

50

31

79

Cabin John Park

9

16

15

9

6

$1,007,778

$1,167,069

$1,245,400

$1,189,722

$992,833

34

54

14

84

28

Evergreen

1

1

1

1

1

$740,000

$780,000

$780,000

$715,000

$850,000

133

46

0

75

5

17

19

24

21

12

$907,706

$1,130,190

$1,133,702

$999,341

$887,833

47

52

17

49

29

Burgundy Hills

0

1

1

4

1

NA

$262,000

$450,000

$393,725

$428,500

NA

117

9

41

9

Burgundy Knolls

4

3

3

5

5

$408,050

$487,633

$413,633

$408,800

$420,000

7

7

29

16

12

Carter Hill

1

2

0

3

2

$665,000

$681,000

NA

$668,333

$721,000

3

49

NA

96

34

Chestnut Lodge

2

1

1

1

2

$1,014,313

$1,070,000

$1,200,000

$1,140,000

$1,332,500

27

3

3

28

71

College Gardens

16

12

8

11

9

$611,144

$622,042

$636,988

$638,727

$632,214

21

21

17

18

18

Croydon Park

4

10

10

6

5

$443,419

$396,790

$425,354

$415,333

$454,200

22

32

18

15

14

Fallsgrove

11

7

11

12

10

$978,948

$1,007,000

$1,012,773

$950,213

$1,052,160

31

62

44

55

63

Fallsmead

2

5

1

1

1

$822,500

$804,000

$825,000

$870,905

$880,000

9

27

8

8

9

Glen Hills

11

10

6

9

8

$809,536

$815,110

$773,000

$853,444

$842,813

56

35

55

25

31

Glen Park

1

5

4

7

4

$649,900

$802,100

$709,975

$748,557

$763,250

115

62

23

24

8

Glenora Hills

1

2

3

2

8

$700,000

$672,450

$586,667

$660,000

$671,863

45

6

24

6

12

Harriett Park

3

1

3

2

2

$357,400

$380,000

$551,367

$334,500

$412,500

18

4

141

8

17

Hunting Hills Woods

4

4

7

5

1

$763,750

$759,750

$815,714

$880,200

$755,000

30

41

7

50

34

20817 TOTAL

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Green Tree Manor

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

CABIN JOHN 20818

20818 TOTAL

ROCKVILLE 20850

146

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

FEATURES_BTN.indd 146

2/12/21 2:31 PM


GAITHERSBURG $5,900,000 15325 Masonwood Drive Corey Burr +1 301 346 3345

WASHINGTON, DC $18,000,000 The Penthouse, Residences at Ritz Carlton, Georgetown Mark C. Lowham +1 703 966 6949 Matt McCormick +1 202 365 5883

GREAT FALLS $14,000,000 Château de Lumière Daniel Heider +1 202 938 3685 Mark C. Lowham +1 703 966 6949

WASHINGTON, DC $9,495,000 4400 Garfield Street NW Russell Firestone +1 202 271 1701

McLEAN $12,000,000 1011 Turkey Run Road Mark C. Lowham +1 703 966 6949

WASHINGTON, DC $6,300,000 2100 Dunmore Lane NW Michael Rankin +1 202 271 3344

McLEAN $6,495,000 8548-A Georgetown Pike Jonathan Taylor +1 202 276 3344

McLEAN $9,500,000 1020 Langley Hill Drive Andre Amini +1 703 622 4473

WASHINGTON, DC $5,550,000 2446 Kalorama Road NW Michael Rankin +1 202 271 3344

BETHESDA UNDER CONTRACT $2,395,000 7604 Westfield Drive Lauren Davis +1 202 549 8784

CHEVY CHASE $1,490,000 5610 Wisconsin Avenue #1104 David DeSantis +1 202 438 1542

WARRENTON $3,800,000 Ridgelea | 8362 Holtzclaw Road Will Thomas +1 202 607 0364

WASHINGTON, DC $615,000 4101 Cathedral Avenue NW #1101 Kirsten Williams +1 202 657 2022 Frank Snodgrass +1 202 257 0978

BETHESDA $775,000 The Darcy | 7171 Woodmont Avenue #704 Lauren Davis +1 202 549 8784

BETHESDA $640,000 4970 Sentinel Drive #11-504 Kirsten Williams +1 202 657 2022 Frank Snodgrass +1 202 257 0978

T T RS I R .CO M | B RO K E RAG ES : B E T H ES DA R OW — 4 8 0 9 B E T H ES DA AV E N U E , B E T H ES DA , M D — + 1 3 0 1 5 1 6 1 2 1 2 C H EV Y C H AS E , D C • A N N A P O L I S, M D • E ASTO N , M D • G EO RG E TOW N , D C • D OW N TOW N , D C • M c L E A N , VA • A L E X A N D R I A , VA • A R L I N GTO N , VA • T H E P L A I N S, VA ©2021 TTR Sotheby’s International Realty, licensed real estate broker. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Equal housing opportunity. All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Price and availability subject to change.

Full page ad template.indd 1

2/11/21 9:01 AM


real estate 2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2

1

1

2

NA

$473,500

$435,000

$240,000

$590,000

NA

1

6

6

4

0

1

0

2

3

NA

$815,000

NA

$877,500

$841,000

NA

5

NA

3

18

King Farm Baileys Common

2

3

3

4

1

$762,500

$734,270

$745,000

$751,250

$759,000

125

48

146

138

1

King Farm Watkins Pond

6

11

3

5

5

$871,667

$839,045

$814,333

$820,980

$856,800

15

24

57

27

27

Lakewood Estates

1

3

3

4

4

$1,550,000

$840,000

$1,211,667

$908,750

$1,279,750

0

49

65

58

18

Lakewood Glen

3

2

2

3

2

$869,967

$1,422,500

$980,000

$1,113,333

$1,001,250

54

17

41

50

23

Lincoln Park

3

10

9

5

11

$294,967

$394,590

$350,722

$385,380

$398,955

93

35

23

20

17

Maryvale

17

14

10

14

21

$310,322

$323,807

$369,700

$347,006

$360,423

33

40

44

58

19

New Mark Commons

8

9

4

4

9

$549,994

$618,056

$658,750

$686,500

$700,044

28

72

13

13

12

Piney Glen Village

3

1

3

5

2

$1,236,267

$1,200,000

$1,228,900

$1,069,000

$1,207,500

18

32

75

45

25

Potomac Highlands

5

4

4

0

2

$773,800

$818,500

$943,250

NA

$765,000

74

69

19

NA

134

Potomac Oaks

3

1

1

4

6

$861,667

$888,800

$843,000

$904,750

$881,150

51

119

11

72

33

Rockdale

2

0

2

0

4

$365,000

NA

$378,500

NA

$410,250

13

NA

27

NA

15

Rockshire

12

11

13

16

14

$663,142

$663,591

$701,769

$712,563

$731,192

41

24

11

27

13

Rockville

0

2

0

4

1

NA

$899,900

NA

$608,875

$670,000

NA

225

NA

63

96

Rockville Estates

11

5

7

7

7

$571,161

$686,000

$647,571

$654,357

$665,071

30

18

17

26

18

Rockville Heights

4

2

3

0

3

$628,750

$617,450

$696,000

NA

$793,750

21

6

27

NA

42

Rose Hill

2

3

2

2

10

$940,000

$976,667

$949,000

$975,000

$921,900

105

25

15

38

98

Rose Hill Falls

3

0

0

4

2

$868,333

NA

NA

$928,750

$910,000

123

NA

NA

75

35

Roxboro

2

7

3

3

7

$605,000

$626,240

$560,000

$507,083

$643,714

37

24

42

17

65

Travilah Grove

2

0

2

1

1

$1,211,500

NA

$1,035,000

$1,180,000

$1,439,000

62

NA

64

72

70

Watts Branch Meadows

1

1

5

2

1

$715,000

$770,000

$693,780

$707,750

$635,500

119

38

41

23

6

West End Park

17

22

20

19

26

$566,093

$603,569

$612,483

$620,395

$723,931

15

64

21

44

37

Willows of Potomac

13

10

10

15

15

$1,065,938

$1,111,000

$1,157,800

$1,003,200

$1,005,200

47

32

34

43

30

Woodley Gardens

6

7

8

6

13

$601,500

$625,357

$636,313

$632,500

$680,173

19

11

10

19

9

Woodley Woods

3

2

1

1

1

$612,833

$632,450

$650,000

$625,000

$655,000

24

26

83

8

6

$681,830

$684,034

$695,580

$709,839

$729,286

38

43

32

39

28

221 238 212 226 262

2017

2017

0

King Farm

20850 TOTAL

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Janeta

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

NORTH BETHESDA/ROCKVILLE 20852 Franklin Park

8

7

4

10

10

$386,750

$420,279

$438,500

$483,798

$561,216

22

20

33

29

13

Heritage Walk

3

7

9

1

3

$820,000

$1,042,857

$953,000

$869,000

$974,000

73

63

32

6

11

Hungerford

22

26

25

23

22

$466,123

$492,138

$510,460

$546,887

$561,336

26

28

15

20

25

Luxmanor

19

12

18

15

18

$1,120,158

$1,382,417

$1,577,789

$1,343,867

$1,397,944

69

47

74

64

18

Montrose

6

8

6

3

8

$574,967

$655,291

$652,333

$664,667

$700,186

34

28

18

39

20

Montrose Park

4

3

5

3

4

$407,250

$484,333

$422,900

$423,333

$526,250

18

14

38

5

5

Montrose Woods

8

4

0

5

3

$777,375

$854,125

NA

$875,200

$845,667

27

25

NA

12

96

Neilwood

1

2

1

2

1

$820,000

$949,500

$1,175,000

$1,415,000

$1,370,000

156

56

1

175

27

North Farm

7

6

10

4

12

$831,571

$826,667

$826,850

$888,625

$914,417

40

24

42

16

7

Old Farm

18

21

19

18

28

$790,611

$819,048

$851,963

$843,878

$867,171

30

25

22

24

12

Old Georgetown Estates

3

2

4

3

1

$1,088,000

$1,205,000

$1,124,750

$1,246,150

$1,409,000

30

17

5

133

4

Randolph Farms

4

3

2

4

3

$395,725

$511,000

$439,000

$494,250

$638,500

18

44

32

18

10

Randolph Hills

36

48

33

42

45

$394,239

$427,201

$455,036

$448,444

$455,032

32

26

22

28

23

Tilden Woods

9

9

11

15

16

$722,222

$772,833

$720,000

$784,161

$763,538

28

33

33

26

12

Timberlawn

4

4

4

4

1

$1,053,750

$1,083,875

$1,040,125

$1,076,875

$1,255,000

48

52

88

34

16

Tower Oaks

0

0

1

0

10

NA

NA

$725,000

NA

$1,379,971

NA

NA

4

NA

1

Wickford

0

1

1

1

2

NA

$1,067,450

$1,200,000

$1,080,000

$1,042,500

NA

86

54

176

5

Windermere

3

4

1

4

8

$908,333

$887,625

$886,418

$1,047,250

$993,250

110

26

15

28

31

$672,708

$716,749

$785,015

$729,857

$795,301

40

31

32

33

20

20852 TOTAL

148

160 176 161 164 203

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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real estate 2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2017

2017

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Avenel

22

18

27

33

33

$1,451,711

$1,537,633

$1,533,000

$1,444,371

$1,597,545

101

62

84

86

83

Beallmount

2

1

4

5

4

$962,500

$938,000

$1,084,125

$1,108,800

$1,328,750

15

14

20

14

113

Beallmount Grove

0

4

2

1

1

NA

$1,191,250

$1,442,500

$1,435,000

$1,800,000

NA

83

92

15

1

Bedfordshire

16

21

19

15

19

$819,250

$857,381

$883,818

$923,180

$941,684

52

32

13

35

39

Bells Mill Estates

2

5

4

3

1

$1,229,500

$1,217,860

$1,255,450

$1,249,967

$1,200,000

176

18

7

19

1

Bells Mill Village

3

3

1

3

3

$790,000

$801,667

$810,000

$777,067

$794,167

77

11

7

15

9

Beverly Farms

4

6

6

2

5

$709,250

$1,020,584

$838,333

$997,500

$864,200

16

36

45

72

38

Blenheim

2

4

2

4

1

$1,257,500

$1,228,750

$1,277,500

$1,161,250

$1,340,000

76

36

36

72

14

Bradley Farms

4

8

4

2

12

$2,581,250

$3,061,250

$2,368,750

$1,000,000

$3,193,333

349

133

94

70

106

Camotop

3

1

1

6

3

$1,817,333

$1,475,000

$875,000

$1,725,000

$1,733,333

77

104

313

136

50

Clagett Farm

3

1

3

4

6

$1,321,000

$1,365,000

$1,360,000

$1,355,000

$1,297,750

27

25

17

4

34

Concord

0

2

1

2

3

NA

$883,000

$935,000

$1,237,450

$1,035,000

NA

26

39

6

28

Copenhaver

14

16

11

12

16

$879,471

$902,658

$876,964

$876,500

$888,618

42

42

36

30

14

Country Place

2

0

3

5

5

$895,000

NA

$953,000

$943,000

$959,000

7

NA

13

17

4

East Gate of Potomac

5

12

14

5

10

$994,860

$885,991

$909,714

$860,600

$922,050

12

61

21

45

22

Esworthy Park

1

1

3

2

3

$964,000

$1,399,999

$996,667

$1,037,500

$1,305,000

112

152

177

89

45

Falconhurst

5

7

4

4

8

$2,409,000

$1,990,357

$2,596,875

$1,789,375

$1,794,375

102

83

143

77

96

Falls Bend

0

0

5

2

1

NA

NA

$977,180

$790,500

$825,000

NA

NA

53

32

31

Falls Farm

4

0

2

0

3

$906,000

NA

$955,525

NA

$913,000

38

NA

10

NA

61

Falls Orchard

2

0

3

1

3

$722,629

NA

$704,667

$940,000

$760,000

15

NA

31

1

23

Fallsberry

1

2

3

3

1

$1,040,000

$989,500

$1,000,533

$979,333

$1,100,000

18

4

35

41

0

Fallsmead

9

6

7

5

14

$734,236

$736,833

$759,914

$802,805

$804,421

23

47

23

45

15

Fallsreach

11

4

7

10

8

$905,818

$933,875

$935,929

$890,190

$918,500

50

67

19

23

11

Fallswood

4

2

3

2

3

$679,325

$692,500

$694,275

$638,000

$766,833

45

9

29

17

6

Fawcett Farms

5

2

6

7

10

$1,073,000

$1,207,500

$1,414,167

$1,267,471

$1,259,800

44

171

31

131

30

Fox Hills

20

25

17

17

20

$806,975

$889,504

$836,475

$876,818

$894,032

33

20

31

14

10

Fox Hills West

4

0

4

7

4

$825,750

NA

$756,375

$722,271

$867,500

38

NA

32

28

83

Glen Meadows

3

2

0

1

4

$1,423,333

$1,192,500

NA

$1,300,000

$1,440,000

20

24

NA

163

22

Glen Mill Knolls

0

0

0

3

3

NA

NA

NA

$869,667

$1,366,667

NA

NA

NA

69

98

Glen Mill Village

1

2

2

4

6

$1,310,000

$1,260,000

$1,124,500

$1,236,250

$1,074,000

32

72

103

44

43

Glen Oaks

5

7

4

5

5

$866,500

$825,571

$1,030,750

$873,600

$997,200

63

19

23

56

11

Glen Park

2

5

3

4

3

$682,200

$797,720

$852,333

$728,500

$733,000

59

20

15

31

33

Great Falls Estates

7

3

7

8

8

$2,169,284

$1,366,641

$1,545,000

$1,447,500

$2,173,438

137

46

42

107

70

Heritage Farm

5

7

5

5

6

$1,078,000

$1,145,000

$985,000

$999,400

$996,167

35

56

17

20

26

Highland Stone

15

7

8

17

14

$688,450

$736,714

$735,250

$716,206

$758,939

28

6

9

22

18

Hollinridge

5

0

0

1

4

$830,180

NA

NA

$829,000

$892,227

62

NA

NA

35

12

Horizon Hill

13

11

16

16

19

$682,201

$720,268

$706,967

$736,556

$746,658

40

49

25

29

32

Inverness Forest

9

7

8

9

6

$849,756

$854,571

$898,050

$862,167

$940,981

43

32

10

28

11

Kentsdale Estates

4

3

2

6

5

$1,563,750

$1,586,667

$1,292,500

$1,632,000

$1,674,400

90

82

11

54

112

Lake Normandy Estates

12

8

8

8

14

$869,500

$762,050

$864,125

$868,375

$1,056,275

65

28

45

15

34

Lake Potomac

2

4

2

2

6

$1,311,000

$1,108,750

$1,217,500

$1,618,944

$1,227,875

151

104

275

77

85

Marwood

5

3

3

6

2

$1,851,000

$1,993,833

$1,708,333

$1,913,333

$2,061,250

141

54

71

42

30

Mass. Ave. Highlands

1

0

1

2

3

$1,100,000

NA

$1,289,000

$1,174,000

$1,041,667

24

NA

50

37

47

Mazza Woods

1

4

3

1

2

$1,289,000

$1,536,750

$1,151,500

$1,252,500

$1,150,000

35

70

93

5

33

McAuley Park

8

8

14

11

16

$1,100,125

$1,305,613

$1,392,750

$1,336,818

$1,582,563

46

74

36

55

53

Merry-Go-Round Farm

2

3

8

4

7

$937,500

$1,585,000

$1,715,625

$1,667,500

$2,006,857

429

147

97

79

26

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

POTOMAC 20854

150

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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real estate 2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2017

2017

Montgomery Square

15

5

14

13

6

$644,993

$676,900

$690,393

$737,752

$742,433

38

24

14

40

24

Oldfield

6

3

1

3

2

$889,167

$813,267

$1,100,000

$862,667

$1,041,500

23

22

4

42

7

Orchard Ridge

8

9

6

8

8

$730,000

$763,600

$710,983

$817,488

$799,937

36

25

14

12

24

Palatine

3

4

8

4

6

$1,646,333

$1,738,750

$1,529,688

$2,199,375

$1,830,833

80

45

108

73

81

Pine Knolls

4

5

3

4

4

$1,121,500

$933,600

$1,102,667

$920,625

$925,000

23

22

54

48

21

Piney Glen Farms

4

4

1

1

3

$1,651,250

$1,038,750

$3,000,000

$1,031,000

$1,139,000

125

189

903

103

29

Piney Glen Village

5

10

10

4

5

$941,960

$1,054,478

$1,081,550

$1,022,750

$1,086,400

24

43

43

41

62

Potomac

3

5

1

5

20

$1,018,333

$1,470,600

$1,049,500

$933,300

$1,479,352

62

135

18

42

65

Potomac Commons

19

11

10

11

12

$817,837

$832,024

$874,800

$827,445

$917,985

31

33

31

40

21

Potomac Falls

2

3

4

2

7

$3,730,000

$1,801,000

$1,622,250

$2,150,000

$1,906,788

355

108

213

114

49

Potomac Glen

1

0

3

2

6

$950,000

NA

$1,091,667

$1,124,000

$1,087,500

78

NA

12

20

23

Potomac Manor

5

5

4

7

8

$1,797,778

$1,621,650

$1,625,000

$1,600,000

$1,577,625

48

139

107

35

98

Potomac Ranch

0

6

4

3

3

NA

$1,547,890

$1,184,750

$1,547,500

$1,815,833

NA

59

146

59

105

Potomac View Estates

4

5

2

7

6

$1,105,625

$1,456,020

$1,296,450

$1,538,571

$1,469,417

102

91

53

120

51

Potomac Village

11

14

11

10

14

$1,106,364

$1,200,071

$1,391,273

$1,180,950

$1,545,321

65

33

39

55

55

Potomac Woods

17

15

10

17

16

$664,235

$692,629

$677,480

$678,429

$726,475

34

20

33

26

19

Potomac Woods East

4

4

3

4

4

$795,000

$748,975

$750,000

$780,500

$773,250

22

69

51

26

15

Red Coat Woods

6

4

4

2

2

$784,083

$747,505

$892,500

$842,500

$1,017,500

31

12

23

0

2

Regency Estates

26

21

35

24

32

$662,038

$678,493

$723,974

$692,975

$756,766

33

28

33

27

24

Regent Park

2

6

6

9

7

$715,000

$662,500

$729,333

$717,822

$777,357

81

15

22

14

10

Ridgeleigh

2

2

1

3

1

$1,065,000

$912,500

$800,000

$960,000

$979,000

11

76

4

5

104

River Falls

15

23

20

18

23

$1,128,700

$1,220,537

$1,213,700

$1,303,861

$1,297,174

38

56

40

57

25

River Oaks Farm

2

2

2

4

1

$1,332,500

$1,305,000

$1,525,000

$1,336,000

$1,429,900

102

73

141

70

40

Rivers Edge

1

4

7

4

4

$1,285,000

$1,078,500

$1,164,286

$1,091,750

$1,371,375

29

50

83

9

10

Roberts Glen

3

2

5

5

1

$695,000

$799,500

$854,800

$839,100

$825,000

54

9

51

37

89

Saddle Ridge

3

5

5

3

7

$1,097,667

$1,684,500

$1,377,000

$1,358,333

$1,564,250

37

102

85

80

27

Saddlebrook

0

7

4

3

3

NA

$653,857

$633,750

$654,000

$762,333

NA

27

45

8

6

Stoney Creek Estates

5

0

0

1

1

$998,367

NA

NA

$1,335,000

$1,150,000

141

NA

NA

61

302

Timberwood of Potomac

2

3

3

3

1

$837,000

$790,000

$881,167

$865,000

$915,000

34

6

16

11

28

Travilah Meadows

5

1

3

6

1

$1,181,000

$1,150,000

$1,031,500

$1,312,917

$1,590,000

54

64

43

35

17

Willerburn Acres

5

10

9

5

16

$869,200

$915,318

$893,556

$778,200

$921,477

64

54

28

46

37

Willowbrook

1

2

5

1

5

$830,000

$761,119

$823,900

$699,000

$818,200

9

9

45

97

43

Windsor Hills

5

1

2

1

5

$1,005,000

$865,000

$972,500

$800,000

$967,000

24

6

21

71

21

Winterset

6

4

3

1

3

$1,289,098

$1,127,500

$956,000

$1,370,000

$1,063,000

16

28

18

27

84

Woodrock

1

2

2

1

2

$1,187,600

$1,177,500

$1,048,745

$1,125,000

$1,219,450

29

17

21

93

4

$1,038,547

$1,099,746

$1,081,050

$1,085,742

$1,208,531

62

49

46

47

42

47

511 490 536 546 642

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Subdivision

20854 TOTAL

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

NORTH POTOMAC/GAITHERSBURG 20878

152

Ancient Oak

13

12

9

9

14

$567,838

$615,546

$634,722

$602,656

$652,564

46

34

28

51

Belvedere

2

2

2

2

1

$1,161,000

$1,157,000

$1,244,250

$1,288,500

$1,175,000

46

7

38

48

138

Big Pines Village

2

0

0

1

3

$1,027,500

NA

NA

$1,050,000

$1,098,300

6

NA

NA

87

27

Bondbrook

2

5

2

3

2

$707,450

$743,960

$667,000

$728,300

$748,550

33

39

45

41

4

Crown

3

1

2

1

3

$1,663,093

$1,754,940

$1,400,595

$1,896,364

$1,475,233

0

1

176

505

217

Crown Farm

1

1

0

2

1

$1,617,870

$1,156,000

NA

$1,524,598

$1,805,760

0

121

NA

163

0

Darnestown Hills

2

2

2

3

4

$645,000

$717,500

$600,000

$733,000

$782,697

42

112

108

92

14

Diamond Courts

8

3

6

5

6

$467,250

$458,167

$454,467

$515,050

$520,167

32

13

21

7

7

Dufief

14

15

14

20

17

$626,829

$638,249

$635,243

$624,595

$650,206

41

45

27

38

8

Dufief Mill

12

13

17

17

8

$813,199

$720,277

$734,100

$742,406

$781,113

40

28

31

18

13

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real estate 2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2017

2017

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Dufief Mill Brook

1

4

3

0

2

$790,000

$673,911

$627,633

NA

$799,500

10

45

26

NA

17

Dufief Mill Estates

3

7

5

4

10

$763,333

$744,414

$753,500

$712,625

$771,350

15

15

36

16

21

Farmlands

1

4

4

5

5

$699,900

$838,225

$850,000

$1,019,980

$1,010,320

12

17

63

94

59

Fernshire Farms

5

5

5

2

6

$526,878

$515,200

$543,556

$542,000

$577,818

11

9

28

11

11

Haddonfield

1

1

1

5

3

$930,000

$940,000

$938,000

$965,300

$910,000

9

30

15

48

18

Harvest Hunt Farm

2

1

3

1

2

$710,000

$799,000

$893,333

$762,500

$835,000

50

10

35

15

9

Highlands of Darnestown 6

5

1

3

10

$711,000

$703,400

$944,000

$658,333

$769,649

36

48

0

89

23

Hunters Trace

1

3

3

1

2

$500,000

$595,833

$540,333

$608,000

$570,000

21

15

73

11

13

Kentlands

18

9

20

12

27

$796,150

$903,211

$913,293

$889,625

$897,559

59

28

46

47

43

Kentlands Gatehouse

4

5

6

4

3

$912,250

$908,200

$841,917

$938,887

$966,667

44

39

33

33

16

Kentlands Hill District

2

4

6

3

3

$622,500

$797,475

$676,000

$781,500

$846,667

16

58

55

45

36

Kentlands Midtown

1

2

1

0

1

$615,500

$707,500

$525,000

NA

$850,000

16

13

155

NA

3

Lakelands

24

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

13

25

22

25

$807,296

$913,577

$840,440

$746,659

$814,660

49

30

38

50

30

Lakelands Great Seneca 3

3

2

1

1

$584,333

$631,500

$647,500

$665,000

$750,000

11

13

19

4

13

Mills Farm

8

5

8

6

7

$577,238

$582,178

$620,363

$586,667

$649,786

44

60

18

27

4

Mission Hills

1

1

3

1

3

$655,000

$641,000

$706,833

$770,000

$717,667

33

10

27

10

62

Mountain View Estates

3

4

7

5

7

$851,833

$599,750

$686,286

$759,300

$699,214

61

17

66

50

26

Natalie Estates

3

4

5

3

2

$937,667

$913,500

$957,020

$944,967

$810,000

54

48

27

31

44

Orchard Hills

5

1

7

7

2

$628,400

$531,100

$644,700

$676,114

$685,000

65

24

25

20

30

Owens Glen

4

4

4

2

1

$698,125

$738,500

$739,947

$655,000

$715,000

30

25

9

27

46

Parklands

1

0

0

2

2

$944,036

NA

NA

$758,750

$687,500

79

NA

NA

74

28

Parkridge

3

6

2

2

7

$523,300

$493,500

$518,750

$540,000

$502,794

41

37

17

17

23

Parkridge Estates

1

3

0

1

5

$617,000

$557,667

NA

$625,000

$633,800

57

79

NA

112

31

Pheasant Run

7

9

4

7

7

$493,200

$516,950

$564,975

$495,025

$552,843

22

22

9

8

13

Potomac Chase

20

20

17

15

31

$696,613

$691,456

$669,456

$768,127

$699,907

61

39

50

61

33

Potomac Grove

0

6

2

2

3

NA

$718,233

$716,944

$684,000

$849,333

NA

12

18

35

19

Potomac Ridge

13

16

14

8

7

$600,708

$611,769

$613,457

$603,454

$626,743

33

22

18

16

14

Quail Run

1

4

4

5

5

$1,200,000

$780,000

$738,500

$766,000

$917,000

335

33

14

8

45

Quince Haven

3

3

5

3

7

$651,967

$684,133

$725,245

$640,000

$784,857

58

16

27

49

11

Quince Orchard Estates

5

1

6

2

5

$694,000

$655,000

$659,086

$616,500

$660,758

44

6

23

34

6

Quince Orchard Knolls

12

18

13

11

18

$543,542

$570,794

$697,231

$612,598

$655,733

44

37

36

25

48

Quince Orchard Manor

7

12

12

6

13

$477,786

$475,440

$504,283

$529,250

$544,569

33

26

35

23

41

Quince Orchard Park

8

6

9

11

8

$597,862

$599,833

$616,361

$645,173

$648,850

33

65

59

17

49

Quince Orchard Valley

5

14

13

9

15

$474,500

$515,921

$547,994

$504,767

$521,603

71

24

23

24

27

Relda Square

2

5

1

4

1

$455,500

$382,180

$420,000

$436,225

$466,500

22

27

23

9

8

Roberts Landing

0

1

1

5

1

NA

$1,210,000

$910,000

$1,045,000

$918,888

NA

22

147

49

46

Seneca Highlands

3

1

3

0

6

$709,167

$996,184

$810,450

NA

$1,152,917

31

12

30

NA

89

Stonebridge

19

8

13

9

13

$824,600

$816,500

$815,835

$830,778

$845,385

29

14

28

43

14

Washingtonian Woods

19

12

12

18

11

$666,001

$663,292

$720,450

$728,817

$774,673

74

48

20

22

21

Watkins Mill Town Center 2

3

3

0

1

$622,250

$698,667

$601,333

NA

$485,000

50

44

51

NA

2

West Riding

4

6

4

6

3

$445,725

$470,483

$452,250

$485,567

$476,333

94

68

23

8

8

Westleigh

20

21

25

19

17

$660,650

$646,401

$638,155

$650,695

$667,235

39

33

30

21

17

Willow Ridge

6

7

4

3

8

$694,167

$689,843

$625,250

$631,600

$718,431

56

41

63

7

23

Woodlands

1

2

3

4

2

$940,600

$1,037,500

$1,010,000

$943,125

$1,022,500

21

43

19

31

6

359 352 377 344 414

$695,390

$675,996

$704,843

$724,299

$737,282

48

35

36

38

31

7

$790,286

$760,000

$769,375

$809,429

$939,200

18

27

5

16

19

20878 TOTAL

KENSINGTON 20895 Byeforde

154

1

2

7

5

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2017

2017

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Chevy Chase View

9

20

23

18

17

$1,035,000

$915,394

$1,057,293

$1,076,078

$1,178,612

50

26

68

32

15

Garrett Park Estates

11

18

13

17

17

$619,685

$631,875

$638,636

$668,815

$724,824

37

28

13

19

9

Homewood

30

16

22

23

30

$491,756

$496,818

$547,090

$530,447

$550,320

27

36

33

11

24

Kensington

28

21

19

24

29

$826,524

$725,943

$952,258

$754,473

$775,437

43

48

31

31

27

Kensington Estates

9

21

21

18

13

$788,833

$841,448

$879,929

$929,750

$960,000

45

40

25

50

17

Kensington Heights

25

25

17

28

26

$475,802

$530,926

$584,841

$506,140

$571,283

75

35

42

43

27

Kensington Knolls

2

10

3

5

2

$437,500

$447,235

$491,500

$501,800

$587,500

17

43

43

11

10

Kensington Orchids

0

0

0

4

2

NA

NA

NA

$765,750

$808,750

NA

NA

NA

14

8

Kensington Park

0

0

0

1

6

NA

NA

NA

$1,010,000

$1,103,500

NA

NA

NA

3

45

Kensington View

4

7

6

6

13

$603,725

$526,214

$528,917

$612,583

$608,623

64

32

15

102

11

Larchmont Knolls

2

1

2

1

1

$935,000

$925,000

$825,000

$1,099,000

$900,000

72

7

54

9

4

Newport Hills

7

11

6

7

6

$443,478

$463,455

$478,500

$508,557

$493,042

18

46

51

19

20

North Kensington

19

15

7

11

12

$456,590

$495,150

$418,429

$510,538

$531,667

46

22

57

33

21

Oakland Terrace

6

9

4

12

11

$428,558

$425,267

$469,125

$470,108

$733,727

19

20

23

30

52

Parkwood

24

22

20

26

32

$833,617

$719,409

$797,418

$918,206

$914,597

31

42

24

53

20

Rock Creek Highlands

7

7

2

5

4

$898,786

$980,374

$956,050

$945,984

$870,100

14

16

4

12

46

Rock Creek Hills

18

22

23

27

26

$847,083

$887,864

$873,185

$945,292

$924,281

41

24

21

27

22

Rock Creek Palisades

35

43

37

32

37

$435,761

$474,208

$493,108

$508,434

$563,584

42

29

25

25

23

Warners/Kensington

5

5

6

4

1

$659,000

$951,378

$727,317

$875,000

$1,266,635

87

64

39

56

203

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

20

O AT

PV OT

21

RANKED TOP 1%

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real estate 2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

5

2020

4

Average Days on Market

2019

4

Average Sale Price

2018

2020

5

2017 2015

2019

2

2016

2018

White Flint Park

2017

Subdivision

2016

No. of Homes Sold

$666,500

$709,300

$697,725

$646,625

$731,550

6

7

10

28

34

259 282 242 290 305

$639,575

$650,222

$717,238

$712,436

$745,723

42

34

33

33

24

14

8

17

14

11

$774,707

$888,434

$868,855

$858,929

$1,133,600

48

19

60

36

52

14

8

17

14

11

$774,707

$888,434

$868,855

$858,929

$1,133,600

48

19

60

36

52

Arcola

8

7

8

4

8

$444,110

$459,571

$444,000

$512,750

$547,750

51

33

23

197

11

Arville

1

0

3

2

2

$291,500

NA

$399,633

$406,000

$448,000

205

NA

35

7

6

Blueridge Manor

5

2

2

3

1

$398,800

$395,500

$448,330

$484,000

$518,000

19

71

17

14

7

Cameron Heights

13

7

11

11

5

$375,660

$365,700

$397,491

$416,709

$464,450

42

54

33

52

7

Carroll Knolls

24

22

29

28

22

$375,454

$413,345

$446,732

$445,095

$489,428

39

30

27

29

25

Chestnut Hills

9

8

5

9

8

$325,500

$400,163

$384,800

$386,711

$416,938

74

53

56

44

21

Chestnut Ridge Manor

11

11

11

8

11

$380,614

$395,091

$436,082

$421,875

$450,627

26

41

23

17

13

College View

4

3

2

1

6

$510,475

$438,330

$419,500

$435,000

$460,167

52

43

7

11

40

Conn. Ave Estates

18

20

12

16

12

$324,056

$328,530

$353,058

$336,519

$375,242

13

18

18

22

22

Conn. Ave Hills

0

3

5

4

11

NA

$406,032

$401,754

$386,250

$431,000

NA

56

57

15

19

Conn. Ave Park

1

9

1

0

3

$295,000

$339,767

$412,900

NA

$375,333

7

20

65

NA

16

Connecticut Gardens

15

10

12

16

6

$380,193

$394,728

$400,750

$437,551

$466,650

32

42

42

33

20

Evans Parkway

2

1

5

5

3

$395,500

$449,000

$391,280

$439,240

$563,300

244

10

5

9

14

Forest Estates

20

16

25

15

20

$434,214

$463,481

$505,740

$526,096

$526,481

28

13

17

17

6

Forest Glen

6

3

2

5

2

$423,583

$524,000

$495,625

$521,780

$594,495

16

5

15

12

5

Forest Grove

4

6

2

4

3

$600,000

$585,817

$688,750

$712,138

$615,014

20

19

13

7

5

Forestvale

4

5

0

0

3

$418,125

$508,200

NA

NA

$577,333

42

7

NA

NA

7

Glen Allen

0

2

2

2

1

NA

$623,000

$626,275

$667,450

$469,000

NA

26

10

13

88

Glen Haven

3

4

5

3

2

$373,333

$414,000

$443,100

$469,666

$387,500

7

21

27

46

49

Glenfield Manor

9

5

5

9

10

$436,778

$436,000

$444,200

$466,261

$525,030

37

16

25

12

12

Glenmont Forest

17

9

12

14

6

$346,870

$361,156

$363,000

$392,993

$396,500

47

26

19

39

15

Glenmont Village

3

4

4

0

4

$309,000

$280,952

$337,100

NA

$306,500

72

63

35

NA

23

Glenview

4

6

6

7

15

$422,588

$486,833

$456,015

$467,114

$580,233

40

34

98

22

10

Grays Estates

1

1

2

0

1

$725,000

$701,000

$531,000

NA

$600,000

4

10

38

NA

0

Hammond Wood

4

8

2

1

4

$476,188

$458,750

$561,000

$400,000

$429,750

3

12

4

9

6

Highland Woods

4

6

3

2

1

$347,938

$358,900

$373,333

$400,000

$390,000

29

97

12

5

23

Kemp Mill

4

1

0

7

1

$591,125

$571,500

NA

$537,000

$460,000

7

11

NA

59

24

Kemp Mill Estates

39

42

31

42

40

$423,583

$437,853

$487,810

$488,552

$535,776

31

22

29

28

17

Kemp Mill Farms

6

3

6

0

1

$608,333

$593,667

$562,000

NA

$675,000

51

2

78

NA

0

Kemp Mill Forest

1

2

2

3

3

$458,099

$540,000

$531,250

$572,833

$707,833

36

16

13

32

4

Kemp Mill Hills

2

2

1

3

2

$417,950

$409,500

$430,000

$423,000

$495,000

15

11

38

18

42

Kingswell

3

7

7

4

2

$372,667

$368,429

$357,786

$409,000

$452,450

24

38

11

14

4

McKenney Hills

16

11

6

8

14

$472,478

$530,932

$467,646

$520,125

$571,643

14

57

20

16

22

Montgomery Highland Estates

3

0

1

0

2

$333,633

NA

$410,000

NA

$378,000

22

NA

4

NA

4

Northbrook Estates

7

6

3

6

6

$431,156

$463,817

$453,333

$451,167

$530,083

38

11

12

20

10

Oakland Terrace

1

2

3

3

2

$470,000

$536,000

$476,000

$508,633

$573,500

13

20

30

19

7

Parkway

3

7

5

3

3

$331,963

$440,507

$453,900

$419,667

$486,667

12

26

12

29

4

Plyers Mill Estates

2

3

1

1

3

$440,000

$452,000

$470,000

$525,000

$528,703

36

88

123

8

5

Rock Creek Palisades

1

4

3

2

1

$619,000

$643,775

$680,000

$691,500

$685,000

7

13

14

6

0

Springbrook Forest

5

4

3

1

2

$544,004

$597,500

$895,000

$920,000

$496,000

176

37

31

136

34

20895 TOTAL

GARRETT PARK 20896 Garrett Park 20896 TOTAL

SILVER SPRING 20902

156

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2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2020

2020

2019

2019

2018

2017

2017

3

2

11

4

3

$329,667

$361,250

$418,264

$380,500

$523,000

75

56

14

33

Weismans

7

3

7

2

6

$290,714

$356,000

$329,000

$364,500

$364,167

63

34

46

29

13

Westchester

0

2

5

2

6

NA

$350,000

$427,780

$512,500

$465,000

NA

34

18

7

21

Wheaton Crest

0

0

0

5

4

NA

NA

NA

$340,400

$424,000

NA

NA

NA

41

46

Wheaton Forest

4

7

5

5

2

$400,625

$419,271

$421,180

$414,960

$462,750

11

15

55

13

5

Wheaton Hills

31

30

34

40

27

$345,676

$366,351

$395,085

$404,225

$438,059

27

20

34

20

19

Wheaton View

2

6

1

2

7

$406,000

$469,250

$427,000

$670,000

$525,000

36

31

7

29

8

365 348 337 344 332

$404,365

$423,980

$442,792

$448,967

$490,296

38

30

29

28

16

Blair

21

11

13

10

13

$567,793

$560,797

$708,238

$622,310

$637,031

39

29

21

64

23

Capitol View Park

18

9

11

18

14

$439,522

$629,889

$488,695

$639,851

$612,679

62

33

28

43

17

Carroll Springs

3

1

2

5

2

$480,000

$599,000

$535,750

$559,000

$503,750

36

6

27

38

55

Forest Glen

5

3

3

4

3

$446,400

$607,833

$677,500

$565,463

$555,737

9

18

25

26

24

Forest Glen Knolls

5

4

2

1

3

$544,600

$432,750

$629,000

$505,000

$486,667

51

48

12

69

5

Forest Glen Park

2

8

8

6

6

$480,500

$556,313

$583,550

$684,667

$610,500

31

23

46

52

65

Forest Grove

1

0

1

0

3

$542,000

NA

$532,000

NA

$588,000

135

NA

14

NA

49

Linden

2

2

3

1

1

$584,000

$675,500

$642,467

$599,900

$870,000

8

97

7

12

3

McNeills

3

5

3

4

4

$499,333

$613,900

$634,667

$630,714

$738,125

19

19

17

18

6

Montgomery Hills

2

3

2

5

5

$683,800

$658,333

$657,000

$543,200

$639,400

23

7

5

13

15

20902 TOTAL

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Stephen Knolls

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

9

SILVER SPRING 20910

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real estate 2020

2019

2018

2017

1

$561,500

NA

$505,000

$582,500

$555,000

23

NA

9

13

7

10

5

$640,583

$533,978

$599,556

$760,600

$652,200

32

32

48

29

18

Northmont

7

4

7

5

9

$528,071

$523,725

$557,071

$494,700

$564,387

28

27

16

14

8

Rock Creek Forest

3

6

3

7

4

$633,167

$584,333

$621,333

$614,200

$661,750

22

20

71

8

47

Rosemary Hills

7

3

6

5

6

$666,000

$536,667

$609,875

$639,000

$620,833

14

15

22

12

11

Rosemary Knolls

1

3

0

3

3

$389,000

$476,333

NA

$421,600

$644,083

13

16

NA

17

14

Saratoga Village

4

2

0

0

5

$576,000

$546,250

NA

NA

$650,200

25

7

NA

NA

16

Seven Oaks

9

6

3

4

5

$623,456

$618,817

$750,000

$716,100

$861,900

29

21

13

53

6

Silver Spring

20

20

21

15

11

$559,891

$581,851

$711,440

$810,232

$841,523

25

20

20

26

64

Sixteenth Street Village

3

2

3

1

2

$494,667

$519,888

$629,000

$701,000

$877,500

24

40

14

4

10

Sligo Park Hills

30

18

18

22

11

$593,410

$539,722

$607,167

$581,092

$676,467

23

33

39

33

20

South Woodside Park

2

4

5

2

1

$991,500

$814,750

$672,400

$582,500

$530,500

35

21

22

6

6

Takoma Park

9

8

8

6

10

$523,111

$575,335

$653,625

$630,167

$775,700

19

63

27

9

22

Woodside

12

8

8

12

4

$615,158

$639,688

$634,338

$684,002

$702,375

25

25

76

21

7

Woodside Forest

14

11

13

21

16

$655,830

$660,591

$699,915

$702,590

$785,172

30

20

28

32

28

Woodside Hills

3

4

6

3

3

$655,000

$591,875

$548,175

$670,000

$738,369

46

22

12

5

24

Woodside Knolls

4

1

6

1

4

$508,614

$525,000

$518,333

$500,000

$593,500

8

9

36

71

12

Woodside Park

22

24

24

26

22

$764,068

$820,678

$819,736

$804,335

$872,773

74

26

42

20

10

$586,896

$614,002

$645,967

$664,309

$701,704

35

29

30

30

22

Loan Officer, NMLS ID # 1960506 ph: 800.333.3004 x3585 | c: 301.518.6619 800 King Farm Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20850 ishemer@embracehomeloans.com embracehomeloans.com/ian-shemer

2016

2020

2

9

Ian Shemer

2020

2019

1

9

Meet your new neighborhood lender.

2019

2018

0

6

233 198 200 216 193

2017

2017

4

North Woodside

20910 TOTAL

2016

2016

Average Days on Market

Montgomery Hills Forest

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

N E W L U X U RY A PA R T M E N T S CONVENIENT TO DC & BETHESDA. S P E C I A L P R I C I N G AVA I L A B L E F O R L I M I T E D T I M E O N LY, C O N TAC T U S TO DAY F O R D E TA I L S .

VI RTUAL & I N - PE RSO N TO U RS LindleyChevyChase.com Embrace Home Loans, Inc. NMLS ID # 2184; 25 Enterprise Center, Middletown, RI 02842, Phone 800.333.3004, www.NMLSConsumerAccess.org.; Licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act; Georgia Residential Mortgage Licensee # 12848.

158

8 4 0 5 C H E V Y C H A S E L A K E T E R R AC E CHEVY CHASE, MD 20815 833 . 204 .9993

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2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

8

2020

2020

8

Average Days on Market

2019

2019

1

2017

2018

0

2016

2017

2016

Subdivision

2018

Average Sale Price

No. of Homes Sold

UPPER NORTHWEST D.C. 20015 Barnaby Woods

1

$1,375,000

NA

$995,000

$1,125,656

$1,062,500

18

NA

18

10

Chevy Chase

148 147 134 151 129

$1,105,176

$1,139,453

$1,242,486

$1,305,535

$1,300,609

22

19

20

18

13

Friendship Heights

0

0

0

2

4

NA

NA

NA

$947,500

$1,276,250

NA

NA

NA

6

23

Hawthorne

7

4

5

11

8

20015 TOTAL

156 152 140 176 153

12

$999,124

$789,350

$1,146,000

$1,014,231

$1,485,313

18

16

13

27

64

$1,102,147

$1,130,408

$1,237,272

$1,269,131

$1,291,922

22

20

19

18

16

12

UPPER NORTHWEST D.C. 20016 American University Park 63

80

84

66

69

$1,114,358

$1,102,434

$1,127,721

$1,238,868

$1,316,127

16

16

26

16

Chevy Chase

8

10

9

6

10

$1,129,934

$1,287,050

$1,462,544

$1,472,542

$1,337,500

21

19

10

7

9

Spring Valley

34

49

36

41

45

$1,812,029

$1,989,397

$1,718,329

$2,133,500

$2,052,534

64

69

45

43

28

Tenleytown

1

2

1

3

3

$800,000

$853,500

$1,200,000

$878,333

$1,271,667

112

8

77

35

20

Wakefield

5

4

8

4

10

$1,003,578

$1,047,179

$1,378,125

$1,096,250

$1,496,600

16

15

17

6

14

$1,610,575

$1,572,406

$1,568,925

$1,675,530

$1,705,321

36

37

32

32

26

20016 TOTAL

211 246 235 219 252

Data for this section was provided by Bright MLS—the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) for the D.C. Metro area—and ShowingTime.

ABOUT BRIGHT MLS

ABOUT SHOWINGTIME

The Bright MLS real estate service area spans 40,000 square miles throughout the mid-Atlantic region, including Delaware, Maryland, Washington, D.C., and parts of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia. As a leading Multiple Listing Service (MLS), Bright serves approximately 85,000 real estate professionals who in turn serve more than 20 million consumers. For more information, visit brightmlshomes.com.

ShowingTime is the leading showing management and market reporting technology provider to the residential real estate industry. Its showing products take the inefficiencies out of the appointment scheduling process, while its analytics tools help subscribers generate interactive, easy-to-read local market reports.

Since 1978 A full service kitchen and bathroom company dedicated to quality workmanship and customer satifcation. C H E SA P E A K E K I TC H E N.CO M 301- 652-7880 8001 Wisconsin Ave Suite 102, Bethesda, MD 20814

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THE TOP PRODUCERS A list of the real estate agents and teams with the top total sales in Montgomery County and Upper Northwest D.C. Residential real estate is big business in Montgomery County and Upper Northwest D.C. Last year, 8,965 detached single-family homes were sold in those areas for a total of about $6.3 billion, according to Bright MLS. Not surprisingly, a large number of real estate agents live in Montgomery County—8,909 associate brokers, brokers and salespeople, according to the Maryland Real Estate Commission. But real estate agents don’t all perform equally. A small percentage of the agents sell a large percentage of the homes. On the following pages we list the top producers—the individual agents with total sales in the county and Upper Northwest D.C. (ZIP codes 20015 and 20016) of at least $8 million from Nov. 1, 2019, through Oct.

31, 2020; and teams with at least $16 million in sales during the same period. Agents are eligible to appear on the list individually and as part of a team. In the list, we tag an elite group of agents and teams as “top tier producers.” Agents with that designation generated at least $15 million in sales, and teams recorded average sales of at least $7.5 million per licensed team member. Top tier producers are designated with the symbol . The agents and teams are listed in alphabetical order under the offices where they work. The list reflects the brokerage affiliation for the agents/teams and includes any changes that were reported to Bethesda Magazine by Jan. 26, 2021. The sales data was provided by the real estate brokerages and offices that are listed.

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= TOP TIER PRODUCER

THE TOP PRODUCERS 2021 THE AGENCY DC TEAM Team Nurit

ALLIED REALTY CORP. AGENT Mary J. Murphy

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES PENFED REALTY—BETHESDA

AGENTS Rebecca Lewis Natalya Ogorodnikova Cathy Paulos Sunno Sahani-Jhangiani TEAM The Sandoval Group

COMPASS—ANNAPOLIS

AGENT Stacie Hatziyannis

AGENT Betty Batty

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES PENFED REALTY—ROCKVILLE

COMPASS—BETHESDA

AGENTS Jamie Boone Donna Gibson

CENTURY 21 REDWOOD REALTY AGENTS Jeff Ganz Jeannie Nguyen

COAKLEY REALTY AGENTS Lori Maggin Chris Nagel Michael P. Rose

COLDWELL BANKER REALTY— BETHESDA AGENTS Marlene Aisenberg Elisa Bragale Lorin Culver Joyce Gardner Brad Griffin Dalys Keith Marjorie Dick Stuart 164

COLDWELL BANKER REALTY— POTOMAC/ROCKVILLE

AGENTS David Abramson Alana Aschenbach Mike Aubrey Steve Baumgartner Kelly Bohi Annabel Burch-Murton Judi Casey Kristy Deal Mike Delp Arthur Dunning Tammy Gruner Durbin Peter Ferguson Leslie Friedson Avi Galanti Margie Halem Gretchen Koitz Chris Koons-Byrne Traudel Lange Cheryl Leahy Deirdre Lofft Brian Lumpkin Carrie Mann Nancy Mannino Michael Matese Amy Maury Brian Maury Denise McGowan Matthew Murton Richard Prigal Amanda Provost

Top tier producers are agents with at least $15 million in sales, and teams with average sales of at least $7.5 million per licensed team member.

Kyle Richards Pam Ryan-Brye Stacey Styslinger Kathy Whalen Steve Withrow TEAMS Atlas Group Clé Group DC The Friedson Group Galanti Group The Jeweler Burton Group Laura Steuart Team The Margie Halem Group Maury Home Team The Prigal Brothers and Associates The Rozansky Group Smart Living Experts The Withrow Group

COMPASS—CHEVY CHASE AGENTS Casey Aboulafia Koki Adasi Brittany Allison Christy Bakaly Jan Brito Erich Cabe Susan Cahill-Tully Allison Carle Elysia Casaday Chad Dudley Peggy Ferris Marc Fleisher Carmen Fontecilla Shelley Gold Shari Gronvall Sarah Howard Maya Hyman Cathy Johnson Karen Kelly Jennifer Knoll Rina Kunk Cheryl Kurss Lindsay Lucas Meredith Margolis Mary Noone Suzanne Parmet Cara Pearlman

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Lisa Resch Dana Rice Daniel Schuler Ellie Shorb Sam Solovey Susan Van Nostrand Maureen Weaver Rebecca Weiner Mary Lynn White Hans Wydler

The P&rtners Rebecca Weiner Group The Reishman Group Sam Solovey Group The Synergy Group Taylor Agostino Group Team Koki Trent & Co. Wydler Brothers

TEAM The Mandy & David Team

COMPASS—POTOMAC AGENTS Jennifer Eckel Carlos Espinoza Lynne Tucker Irene Wertheimer

COMPASS—GEORGETOWN TEAMS Brito Associates Carmen Fontecilla Group Casaday Allison Group Dana Rice Group The Donovan & Wye Group The Dudley Group Erich Cabe Team Ferris Levin Collaborative The Fleisher Group

TEAM The North Collection

AGENT J.P. Montalvan

FORUM PROPERTIES COMPASS—LOGAN CIRCLE AGENTS Toni Ghazi Lukas Iraola Jenn Smira

AGENTS Paul Biciocchi Antoinette King

Discover what sets us apart and why our clients return to us again and again! A consistent top producer at Compass, Margie is ranked among the top 1% of real estate agents nationwide by The Wall Street Journal and was named one of the DC area’s “Best Realtors” in Bethesda and Washingtonian magazines 2010-2021. Margie Halem and her team are extraordinary Realtors serving the Washington, DC metropolitan area. They have the real estate experience, marketing prowess, and in-depth local knowledge to help you buy or sell your dream home. Additionally, Margie is the DMV representative associated with the Compass Private Client Network, an exclusive network of luxury residential brokerage professionals.

2020 STATS

$96M 125

In Sales Transactions

Margie Halem Senior Vice President, Margie Halem Group of Compass M: 301.775.4196 | O: 301.804.8444 margie@compass.com margiehalemgroup.com Compass is a licensed real estate brokerage that abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is not guaranteed. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Compass is licensed as Compass Real Estate in DC and as Compass in Virginia and Maryland. 7200 Wisconsin Ave, Suite 100, Bethesda, MD 20814 | 301.304.8444

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THE TOP PRODUCERS 2021 GREYSTONE REALTY

LONG & FOSTER BETHESDA

AGENTS Jill Balow Jacqueline Band-Olinger

AGENTS Adam Gelb Todd Harris Anna Mackler Becky Plesset Bruce Werber TEAM The Sky Group

TEAM Balow Band-Olinger Group

KELLER WILLIAMS CAPITAL PROPERTIES—BETHESDA/ CHEVY CHASE AGENTS Amy Embrey Mynor Herrera Dana Scanlon Martin Signore Theresa Taylor

LONG & FOSTER BETHESDA ALL POINTS AGENTS Andy Alderdice Lydia Benson Anne Emmett Laura Emmett Toya Giacomini

= TOP TIER PRODUCER

Susan Jaquet Jennie McDonnell Robyn Porter Pam Potolicchio Joshua Pratt Hamid Samiy Michael Seay Jr. Michael Seay Sr. TEAMS The Anne and Laura Emmett Team Michael Seay Homes

LONG & FOSTER BETHESDA GATEWAY AGENTS Sherry Brennan Sarah Funt Tim Gallagher

Simply the Best IN BETHESDA REAL ESTATE

Andy Alderdice Jessica Alderdice

READERS PICK, TOP VOTE GETTER, TOP REAL ESTATE AGENT, 2019 TOP PRODUCER, 2019, 2020 & 2021 READERS PICK, WINNER, LONG & FOSTER, BEST REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE FOR LUXURY HOMES, 2020

11/21/2019

LOGO%20LF%20RE%20CIRE%20Box%20White%20bBox.jpg

Contact Andy today for a free consultation and customized list of available properties 301-466-5898 | 301-229-4000 | andy4homes.com https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=rm&ogbl#inbox/FMfcgxwGBmxNphtxqcBZDFzKTPcrVBbW?projector=1&messagePartId=0.1

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Alexa Goulding Lauren Kline Linda Lizzio Jane McGuire Kathy Morgan Glen Sutcliffe Helen Trybus Phyllis Wiesenfelder Yaya Zhang TEAMS The Banner Team The DC Team The Estridge Group The Fitzpatrick Group The Jane Fairweather Team Levin Group The Pennye Green Team The Souza Group Umanzor & Associates

LONG & FOSTER BURTONSVILLE

Ron Sitrin Rima Tannous

TEAM Savercool Team

LONG & FOSTER GEORGETOWN AGENT Kornelia Stuphan

LONG & FOSTER CHEVY CHASE CIRCLE

LONG & FOSTER LFC @ BETHESDA

AGENTS Kimberly Cestari Silvana Dias Laura McCaffrey Benjamin Tessler

AGENTS Greta Nicoletti Lynda O’Dea

LONG & FOSTER CHEVY CHASE UPTOWN

TEAMS Elaine Koch Group Heller Coley Reed Team Murtagh Properties Speicher Group

AGENTS Elizabeth Russell

Craig Strent

Readers' Pick, Best Mortgage Broker

Chief Executive Officer D. (301) 610.5480 cstrent@apexhomeloans.com www.apexhomeloans.com/craig-strent NMLS #6342

Local. Experienced. Independent. Apex Home Loans, Inc. NMLS #2884. For more information regarding state and branch licensing, please visit the NMLS Consumer Access Website at http://nmlsconsumeraccess.org. Corporate office location: 2400 Research Blvd., Suite 400, Rockville, MD 20850 301.610.9600 BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2020

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THE TOP PRODUCERS 2021 LONG & FOSTER NORTH POTOMAC/ROCKVILLE

LONG & FOSTER PARK POTOMAC

AGENTS Michael Chang Mike Colopy Aryan Frizhandi Trudy Glassman Bob Graves Steven Katz Max Koteen Philip Piantone Kellie Plucinski Audrey Romano Franco Saladino Trish Stovall Kody Yazdanipour

AGENTS Teresa Burton Anna Masica Stacey Sauter Susan Verner

TEAM The Roman Group

168

TEAM Michelle Yu Team

LONG & FOSTER POTOMAC VILLAGE

AGENTS Bonnie Barker Krystyna Kazerouni Theres Kellermann Toni Koerber

= TOP TIER PRODUCER

TEAMS Gail Lee Homes Jennifer Chow Group

LONG & FOSTER ROCKVILLE CENTRE AGENTS Ken Bowers Rocky Bowers Molly Carter Barbara Ciment Dave Dabbondanza Muller Dessie MaryAnne Fiorita Tim Horst Joe Huff Steve Kelley Paul Llewellyn Victor Llewellyn George Papakostas

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Thomas Powers Robert Qawar Brett Rubin Corey Savelson Alecia Scott Eric Stewart Nazir Ullah Chip Ward TEAMS The Barbara Ciment Team The Bowers Group Eric Stewart Group George Papakostas Group Joe Huff Team MaryAnne Fiorita Team Powers Brothers Team Robert Qawar Group Scott Team International Victor Llewellyn Group

LONG & FOSTER TAKOMA PARK

MCENEARNEY ASSOCIATES

AGENTS Judith Kogod Colwell Gali Sapir Marci Wasserman

AGENTS Kathy Byars Joan Caton Cromwell Mark Hudson Katherine Herndon Martin Ann McClure

TEAM The Finn Family Group

LONG & FOSTER WOODLEY PARK AGENTS Jim Connolly Andrew Pariser Roby Thompson Josh Waxman

TEAM The Stokes Group

PREMIER PROPERTIES AGENT Carl Becker

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THE TOP PRODUCERS 2021 RE/MAX REALTY SERVICES AGENTS Mike Altobelli Melinda Butterfield Ana Dubin Larry Gibbons Alex Goumilevski Jackie Humenik Jeremy Lichtenstein Frances McGlaughlin Helena Pulyaeva Marcel Ratnavale Suzanne Reynolds Miguel Ruiz John Williams Paul Yanoshik

TEAMS The Kensington Group The Kilner Group The Llerena Group Tamara Kucik Team The Washingtonian Group

STUART & MAURY REALTORS AGENTS Robert Jenets Matthew Maury Kate Slawta

TEAMS Alex Stefan & Helena Pulyaeva The Butterfield Group Carolyn Homes Team Dart Homes The Gibbons Group The Myers Team Ross | Residential Rudden | Bobruska Team

RE/MAX TOWN CENTER AGENTS Donna Pfeiffer Saji Sebastian TEAM Ken Abramowitz Group

RLAH REAL ESTATE AGENTS Melissa Bernstein Anh Boesch Russell Brazil Andrew Essreg Amalia Morales Garicoits Lisa LaCourse

170

Jeffrey Reese Jill Schwartz

TTR SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY AGENTS Katherine Buckley VJ Derbarghamian William Fastow Kevin Friend David Hatef Adam Isaacson Barbara Carnemark Nalls Catherine Triantis TEAMS The Abrams Group Burr Group Finnell Lee Homes Heider Lauren Davis Team Premier Partners The Roost Group

WASHINGTON FINE PROPERTIES

= TOP TIER PRODUCER

Kira Epstein Begal Nancy Taylor Bubes Kerry Fortune Carlsen Carrie Carter Alyssa Crilley Kellyann Dorfman Mary Grover Ehrgood Ellen Hatoum Chuck Holzwarth Cynthia Howar Chris Itteilag Nancy Itteilag Kathy Kiernan Anne Killeen Kay McGrath King Lori Leasure Florence Meers Lee Murphy Adaline Neely Lauren Pillsbury Joanne Pinover Tom Riley Lenore Rubino Kara Sheehan Liz Lavette Shorb Jennifer Sproul Lisa Stransky Jennifer Wellde Kari Wilner TEAMS Anne & Nate Hatfield Weir Gale Team HRL Partners Keane & Bertinelli The Kimberly & Daryl Team The Meg & Alison Team Robert & Tyler The Roth Team The Schuman Team

AGENTS Boucie Addison Jaci Appel

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L E T O U R T O P R E A L E S TAT E AG E N T S G U I D E YO U H O M E By pairing knowledgeable agents with intuitive technology, Compass delivers a modern real estate experience in Maryland and beyond. Contact one of our agents today to get started on your real estate journey. 301.304.8444

|

compass.com

Individual Agents

Erich Cabe

Mike Aubrey

Erich Cabe Team

Alana Aschenbach

Gretchen Koitz

Mike Delp

Ferris Levin Collaborative

Allison Carle

Hans Wydler

Nancy Mannino

Galanti Group

Amanda Provost

Irene Wertheimer

Pam Ryan-Brye

Laura Steuart Team

Amy Maury

J.P. Montalvan

Peggy Ferris

Maury Home Team

Annabel Burch-Murton

Jan Brito

Peter Ferguson

Rebecca Weiner Group

Arthur Dunning

Jenn Smira

Rebecca Weiner

Sam Solovey Group

Avi Galanti

Jennifer Eckel

Richard Prigal

Smart Living Experts

Betty Batty

Jennifer Knoll

Rina Kunk

Taylor Agostino Group

Brian Lumpkin

Judi Casey

Sam Solovey

Team Koki

Brian Maury

Karen Kelly

Sarah Howard

The Donovan & Wye Group

Brittany Allison

Kathy Whalen

Shari Gronvall

The Dudley Group

Cara Pearlman

Kelly Bohi

Shelley Gold

The Fleisher Group

Carlos Espinoza

Koki Adasi

Stacey Styslinger

The Friedson Group

Carmen Fontecilla

Kristy Deal

Steve Baumgartner

The Jeweler Burton Group

Carrie Mann

Kyle Richards

Steve Withrow

The Mandy & David Team

Casey Aboulafia

Leslie Friedson

Susan Cahill-Tully

The Margie Halem Group

Cathy Johnson

Lindsay Lucas

Susan Van Nostrand

The North Collection

Chad Dudley

Lisa Resch

Suzanne Parmet

The P&rtners

Cheryl Kurss

Lukas Iraola

Tammy Gruner Durbin

Cheryl Leahy

Lynne Tucker

Toni Ghazi

The Prigal Brothers and Associates

Chris Koons-Byrne

Marc Fleisher

Traudel Lange

The Reishman Group

Christy Bakaly

Margie Halem

Dana Rice

Mary Lynn White

Teams of Compass

The Synergy Group

Daniel Schuler

Mary Noone

Atlas Group

David Abramson

Matthew Murton

Brito Associates

Deirdre Lofft

Maureen Weaver

Carmen Fontecilla Group

Denise McGowan

Maya Hyman

Casaday Allison Group

Ellie Shorb

Meredith Margolis

Clé Group DC

Elysia Casaday

Michael Matese

Dana Rice Group

The Rozansky Group The Withrow Group Trent & Co. Wydler Brothers

Compass is a licensed real estate brokerage that abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is not guaranteed. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Compass is licensed as Compass Real Estate in DC and as Compass in Virginia and Maryland. 7200 Wisconsin Ave, Suite 500, Bethesda, MD 20814 | 301.304.8444

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@ C O M PA S S D M V

L I N D S AY L U CA S m: 301.467.4090 | o: 301.298.1001 lindsay.lucas@compass.com

When it comes to real estate, Lindsay Lucas—a reputable Bethesda Realtor—will always find a way to deliver the best results for her clients. By pairing unrivaled expertise with a relentless tenacity, Lindsay is known as a trusted advocate committed to uncovering creative solutions that make every clients’ dreams a reality. Whether you’re a first-time buyer or a seasoned seller, Lindsay leverages a full-service, strategic system that puts your interests first. As a lifelong resident of the DC area, Lindsay offers extensive insight into its many vibrant neighborhoods—from the bustling streets of Downtown, to the scenic pathways of Bethesda, where she calls home. She loves helping others find their next home, just as she loves being there for clients as they navigate such a transformative life milestone. Get in touch with Lindsay today to discover the real estate solution that’s right for you.

SA R A H H OWA R D m: 703.862.7181 | o: 301.298.1001 s.howard@compass.com

Why do you love being a Realtor? I love that real estate is fast-paced, and constantly evolving. No day is the same, and each one brings a new chance to guide others through such a transformative, life-changing moment. What price range do you work in? I meet my clients at every milestone and price range— from $400,000 to $5M. I tailor my strategy as every transaction requires, but my mission is always the same: to help my clients achieve their goals.

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COMPAS S

THE FLEISHER G RO U P m: 202.438.4880 | o: 301.298.1001 marc.fleisher@compass.com

Led by Marc Fleisher, an industry icon of over 40 years,

$4B+ Total Volume Sold

40+ Years of Experience

The Fleisher Group is the go-to choice for clients who demand the very best. With over $4 BILLION in career sales, our team of ten professionals offers agent expertise across the DC metro region with the support and creativity of dedicated marketing, listing and contract professionals. Whether selling or buying, our clients receive a standard of service that is simply unparalleled.

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3,000+ Total Homes Sold

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BRITO A S S O C I AT E S m: 301.646.5774 | o: 301.298.1001 jan.brito@compass.com

After working collaboratively for years, in early 2020, Jan and Laura decided to make it official creating Brito Associates and have quickly become top producers in the region! Their focus is on ethically caring for their clients. Whether this is your first real estate move, your move-up home or you are downsizing, their thoughtful, detailed approach ensures a stress-free, enjoyable experience. Anyone purchasing or selling what is likely to be their largest asset deserves the utmost respect. Jan and Laura have also become the go-to Realtors for family law, elder law, and trust attorneys to assist their clients with their special circumstances. Easing their clients and their families through what can be life challenging events is their passion. Work with them and prepare to be overjoyed, not overwhelmed!

D E N I S E M C G OWA N m: 240.472.4526 | o: 301.298.1001 denise.mcgowan@compass.com

Denise realizes that buying or selling your home is one of the most notable milestones in your life, both financially and personally. She offers professional knowledge and local expertise of the market, specializing in Kensington, Bethesda, Chevy Chase, and Potomac. Denise uses her 30 years of sales & marketing experience, data analytics, and strong market knowledge to develop a marketing plan specific to each seller to maximize the sales price while minimizing time on the market. For her buyers, she leverages her market knowledge and negotiates in their best interest to ensure they are thrilled with the purchase of their new home! With an unyielding dedication to their clients, The McGowan Group goes above and beyond to deliver an exceptional experience from start to finish. Discover the difference Denise can make in your next home purchase or sale.

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COMPAS S

NA NCY M A NN I NO m: 301.461.1018 | o: 301.298.1001 nancy.mannino@compass.com Why do you love what you do? What I love most about my real estate business is meeting new people of all ages from different places and backgrounds. Finding my clients just the right place to call “home” never gets old. Why do you love where you live? The DC Metro area is home to me. I’ve spent most of my life living in or around DC and it’s been exciting to contribute to the vast growth in Bethesda and DC over the years. I love our sports teams (Go Nats!), restaurants, and cultural scene - all of which make this area a wonderful place to call home!

T H E T O N I A . G H A Z I G RO U P Senior Vice President | Team Principal m: 571.216.1075 | o: 202.386.6330 toni.ghazi@compass.com International and Domestic Buyers and Sellers have always sought out the Toni A. Ghazi Group for their multicultural perspective, unparalleled service, and attention to detail. Whether you are seeking a luxury condo in the city or a spacious property for entertaining, Toni and his team will put their combined 60+ years of experience to work for you. With more than 14 years in the Real Estate arena from commercial development to residential sales in the Washington Metro Area, Toni has excelled — especially in the residential field and has proven over and over again that this niche of business is ‘his’ home and his passion.

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ALLISON CA R L E m: 202.905.5401 | o: 301.298.1001 allison.carle@compass.com

What sets you apart from other agents?

sellers, that means working with an agent

I’m a second generation Realtor from Chevy

to cost effectively prepare your home for

Chase, MD who has lived all over DC and

market, thoughtfully price your home, and

Montgomery County. Prior to real estate, I

expertly position your home in its best light.

practiced law for more than a decade and

For buyers in this fast-paced market, it is

worked on Capitol Hill for two United States

more important than ever to work with an

Senators. Today, I leverage my strategic

agent who knows the market, to be open to

negotiation skills and hometown expertise to

a variety of neighborhoods, and to tour as

benefit my clients and bring them the highest

many homes as possible so that you are

level of service. I also recently moved myself

ready to make the strongest offer when

-- so I personally know the challenges and

the time comes.

rewards of buying or selling a home in this competitive market.

Tell us how you and your team give back. When my partner and I formed the Clark &

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What advice would you give to someone looking to navigate the market today or in the near future?

Carle Group at Compass in 2019, we knew

Prepare. Your home is likely your biggest

campaign where every one of our sales

financial investment, so whether you’re

results in a donation made to a cause that

buying or selling, preparation is key. For

moves us and one that moves our clients.

that one of our team’s tenets would be giving back. So, we created What Moves You, a

2/11/21 9:53 AM


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COMPAS S

A NNA B E L BU RC H-MU RT ON m: 202.285.7166 | o: 301.304.8444 annabel.burchmurton@compass.com

Why do you love what you do? I can’t imagine ever wanting to do anything else. I get the privilege of being front row, center to some of the most important moments in the lives of my Clients. It is a tremendous responsibility to be the navigator of the Selling and Buying process and words can’t describe the feeling of accomplishment when you know you have given your people the best possible outcome.

What advice would you give to someone looking to navigate the market today or in the near future? Like with any major life event, you want to ensure you are positioned for the best possible outcome. Who you choose to represent you and your family absolutely matters and will have an impact. There is no substitute for a consistent and long term record of success, a real grasp of the market and how to best work in it and a strong work ethic.

T H E AU B R E Y | KO S E I A N G RO U P m: 301.873.9807 | o: 301.304.8444 mike.aubrey@compass.com m: 240.533.6990 | o: 301.304.8444 aret.koseian@compass.com The AUBREY | KOSEIAN Group stands out in the real estate industry through the synergy of seasoned experience and cutting edge innovation. Combining Mike Aubrey’s 17+ years of nourishing loyal client relationships with Aret Koseian’s tech-savvy ability to acquire new clients in today’s digital world, all while streamlining the home buying & selling process in the pursuit of customer satisfaction. The AUBREY | KOSEIAN Group operates in The District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia while maintaining local expertise, redefining what it means to be “mass-market”. The AUBREY | KOSEIAN Group Built on relationships. Powered by innovation.

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46 Happy Sellers

H A NS W Y DLER m: 301.523.6313 | o: 301.298.1001 hans@wydlerbrothers.com

Hans is one of the very highest producing agents in the region. In fact, his team, Wydler Brothers, is #1 in Maryland, and top 3 in the Washington DC area. Personally, Hans, along with his teammates, Dina Miller

35 Happy Buyers

81 New Friends

and Eliot Jeffers, set a new sales record this year. He is passionate about protecting his clients’ interests, yet always fair-minded and professional when working with his peers. Hans has a B.A. from Yale and an M.B.A. from Harvard.

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$135M New Personal Record

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COMPAS S

CA R A PE A R LM A N m: 202.641.3008 | o: 301.298.1001 cara@dcsuburbhomes.com

Cara takes a consultative, compassionate approach to helping people find their place in the world by leveraging her extensive experience and endless empathy to guide them home. She genuinely cares about her clients, putting their needs well before her own so they are positioned to make smart and heartfelt decisions. Cara gives her clients the same advice that she’d give her own family. When a buyer or seller is making the most important financial and emotional decision of their life, Cara believes there is no substitute for quality and generosity.

M I C H A E L M AT E S E m: 301.806.6829 | o: 301.304.8444 mike@michaelmatese.com What sets you apart from other agents? Creating a hands-on, superior customer experience is the foundation of my business. What does superior customer service mean to me? Always being there for my clients—whether they need advice, market intel, or simply a shoulder to lean on. Buying or selling a home can be an overwhelming process, but when you’re working with me, you’ll never have to feel like you’re in it alone. What is the best career advice you’ve ever received? My former basketball coach once told me that a positive attitude can change everything...and that kindness goes a long way! I find these words to live by to be particularly meaningful in real estate, an industry that’s built on personal connection and momentous life milestones. When you’re navigating a home purchase or sale, sometimes, the right attitude (and a helping hand) can make all the difference.

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KY LE R ICH A R DS m: 301.675.3677 | o: 301.304.8444

kyle.richards@compass.com

Why Hire Kyle? Kyle is not your typical Realtor! She is a multi-lingual Yale graduate, trusted adviser, and go-to resource for all things real estate. Over her 20 year career, Kyle has developed a unique skill set to serve her clients. She is a former NYC bank VP, a certified Smart Home Technology expert, and an accredited home stager with an eye for design and smart home renovation. She is also a historic home and luxury property specialist. Kyle helps her clients downsize, upsize, and right size to find their ideal home. When you hire Kyle, you work with her one on one every step of the way. She provides the highest level of personal service dealing with your largest asset, your home — where you build wealth and make memories. Kyle is consistently a top producer and ranks in the top 1% of Realtors nationwide. Call Kyle, you will be glad you did!

T R AU D E L L A N G E m: 240.463.6918 | o: 301.304.8444 traudel.lange@compass.com What sets you apart from other agents? I am devoted to my clients and do everything in my power to earn their trust. In return, they receive a premium level of service, consistent communication, and a results-driven strategy that together yield the target end-result. When you list with me, you can rest assured that your home (and future) is in the best hands. What advice would you give to someone looking to navigate the market today or in the near future? Work with an experienced, honest agent who is there to safeguard your best interests and help you accomplish your ultimate goal of selling or buying a home. Best career advice you’ve ever received? The client is always right!

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COMPAS S

KO K I A DA S I m: 240.994.3941 | o: 301.298.1001 koki.adasi@compass.com

Koki Adasi is the Team Leader of a diverse

and absorption rates for a seller in order

and dynamic group of Realtors, serving

to get their initial list price just right,

residential real estate clients throughout

or leading a first-time buyer through their

DC, Maryland, and Virginia for 15 years and

home purchase, Team Koki always puts

counting. Growing up in Rockville, MD and

the unique needs of each individual client

attending Mount St. Mary’s University before

first. Team Koki also prioritizes community

returning to DC to build his career, Koki has

service and contributed over $30,000

watched the DC Metro area transform over

in support of non-profit organizations

the past several decades.

throughout the DMV in 2020.

Team Koki prides itself in providing their clients with a first-class real estate experience. Whether breaking down comps

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J ENN I F ER K NOLL Senior Vice President m: 202.441.2301 | o: 301.298.1001 jennifer.knoll@compass.com

As a Senior Vice President at Compass,

In addition to being recognized by Bethesda

Jennifer Knoll has been a leading, highly

Magazine both this year and last, Jennifer

respected real estate agent in Washington

has been a Washingtonian Very Best Agent /

for nearly 20 years. With sharp focus,

Platinum Top Producer for the last six years

exceptional negotiating skills, and targeted

in a row. Jennifer has also been voted Best

marketing, she produces sales totaling over

Agent in the Washington City Paper.

30 million a year, attributed largely to referrals.

Prior to her successful career in real estate, Jennifer worked as a journalist covering

Known as smart, hardworking, and

news and politics from Washington, DC and

exceedingly loyal, she patiently guides

Tel Aviv, Israel. She resides in Northwest DC

clients through each step of the process –

with her three children who attend Deal

from renovating to staging, and pricing to

Middle School and Wilson High School. In

marketing. Jennifer works with buyers,

addition to being a sponsor of the schools’

sellers, developers, and investors at every

theater productions, Jennifer proudly

skill level, specializing in upper-bracket

donates a portion of each commission to

homes in Bethesda, Chevy Chase,

organizations that fight hate, as well

Northwest Washington, Capitol Hill, and

as others that support environmental

DC’s other neighboring suburbs.

protection, civil rights, voting rights, and women’s rights.

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COMPAS S

C H E RY L KURSS, ESQ. m: 301.346.6615 | o: 301.298.1001 cheryl.kurss@compass.com

A mind for law. A passion for real estate. With over 21 years of experience as a Realtor, Cheryl’s legal training makes her an outstanding advocate for her clients. She is well-versed in contracts, titles, title insurance, and the transfer of property rights. She is detail oriented, diligent and thorough in her research, and a great problem solver. You can always count on her tenacious negotiating skills, yet she is a seasoned mediator as well.

$ 3 6 6M+

L AU R A S T E UA RT m: 202.288.8010 | o: 301.304.8444 laura.steuart@compass.com

Total Sales Volume

Why do you love what you do? This is a personal business, and just like my clients, each and every transaction is unique. Buying or selling a home in the DC area is a complex, sophisticated, and deeply personal endeavor, and it is my privilege to help my clients achieve the results they deserve. The fulfillment I experience in my job every day is due not only to my passion for homes and the DC area, but more importantly, to the relationships that I have built throughout my career. What sets you apart from other agents? Buying or selling a home today can seem daunting, perhaps even overwhelming. That’s why my goal is to make your experience as seamless, worry-free, and enjoyable as possible. Given that we live in one of the most dynamic housing markets in the country, the twenty-four years of experience, expertise, and service that I bring to the table is often what makes all the difference. Above all, my clients know that I am motivated, dedicated, and singularly focused on providing them with the best service and result possible — all while having some fun along the way!

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M AU RY H O M E T E A M Brian and Amy, Team Leaders MauryHomeTeam.com m: 301.325.4914 | o: 301.304.8444

Real Estate is a Maury Family Tradition.

Brian and Amy, along with team members

John F. Maury served as President of

Don McGlynn, Becky Day, and Alison

the Washington Real Estate Board in

McDowell will celebrate 100 years of

1927. His son, Deane Maury, started his

collective real estate service this year.

own brokerage in the 1950’s and passed the family real estate tradition onto his

“We are honored to receive Bethesda

son, Brian. The Maury Home Team with

Magazine’s recognition for the help we’ve

Compass, led by Brian and Amy Maury,

provided our clients this past year and

continues that proud family tradition of

are truly humbled by the faith, trust and

serving the local Bethesda area community.

confidence placed in our hands. Thank you to all who made such a successful year possible.”

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C H R I S T Y B A K A LY & C H R I S KO O N S -B Y R N E Christy Bakaly m: 301.412.8830 | o: 301.304.8444 christy.bakaly@compass.com Chris Koons-Byrne m: 240.672.6628 | o: 301.304.8444 chris.byrne@compass.com

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“Selling Bethesda, Chevy Chase and Potomac. Where Washington’s Most Influential People Call Home!”

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125 Transactions in 2020

$96M Sales Volume in 2020

64 Sellers Helped in 2020

50 Buyers Helped in 2020

M A RG I E HALEM m: 301.775.4196 | o: 301.304.8444 marjorie.halem@compass.com

This year Margie and her team

service to their clients and fellow

are ranked #1 in the Bethesda

agents. They strive for a seamless

Compass Office. The team has

experience and work hard to

also been ranked among the top

ensure that each transaction

vote recipients by the readers of

runs smoothly. Together a team

Bethesda Magazine for the last 11

of highly motivated and tech

years in a row. Regardless of the

savvy marketers crafts an all-

number of homes sold or awards

inclusive plan for each home

won, the people matter most.

they market. The Margie Halem

Their relationships with clients

Group’s extensive knowledge of

run deep and they treat each and

real estate is beyond comparison

every client as if they are their

and brings a combined 80+

only client.

years of practice in the industry with thousands of completed

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The team prides themselves on

transactions and nearly a billion

providing the highest level of

dollars in real estate sold.

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COMPAS S

CA R L O S E SPI NOZA m: 240.426.8627 | o: 301.235.2647 carlos@espinozahomes.com

As a current Bethesda resident, Carlos Espinoza’s deep local knowledge along with his insight into today’s evolving real estate market has made Carlos a go-to-resource in the industry. He is a leader in real estate-related research innovation and consumer education. His knowledge and experience also applies to buying & selling investment properties. Additionally, Carlos’s excellent negotiation skills help to get his clients top dollar for their homes. Carlos has a passion for connecting his clients with the ideal home to suit their family.

K E L LY B O H I m: 301.580.4991 | o: 301.304.8444 kelly.bohi@compass.com

What sets you apart from other agents? Being licensed in DC, Maryland and Virginia allows me to go above and beyond for my clients. With my vast knowledge and expertise of the area and market, I’m able to give them excellent support — no matter where their home buying or selling journey takes them. Why do you love what you do? I love being a part of a milestone moment for all my clients. Whether it’s a 1st time homebuyer, veteran buyer/seller or a relocation move I understand the challenges and excitement that can be a part of this experience. I enjoy the process and love being a part of all my clients’ journeys!

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AT L A S G RO U P m: 240.401.4720 | o: 301.304.8444

alana.aschenbach@compass.com

Members of our team not pictured: 9 kids, 3 dogs, 1 cat, and 1 fish

If you don’t believe that real estate can be fun, then you’ve never worked with the Atlas Group. Atlas creates tailored experiences for every client

$50M Sales Volume in 2020

they serve, while infusing each part of the process with just the right amount of humor and cheer. For Atlas, clients quickly become lifelong friends who they support and guide through each of life’s most notable real estate milestones—from a first home purchase, to the decision to downsize years later.

65+ Families Served in DC, MD, and VA in 2020

Characterized by an unrelenting poise and deep sense of professionalism, the team is revered—by both clients and industry professionals—as leaders and experts in the communities they serve, a role they don’t take lightly. Wherever your next real estate goals may take you, you can count on Atlas to help you navigate it with ease while guiding you to the results you deserve.

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$2.35M Largest Sale of 2020

$328K Smallest Sale of 2020

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COMPAS S

E R I C H CA B E m: 202.320.6469 | o: 301.298.1001

erich.cabe@compass.com

What sets you apart? The Erich Cabe Difference When I meet with someone who is selling their home, I really listen. Not every home is the same. Not every person is the same. We are not a cookie-cutter operation. It is never one-size-fits-all. I look at the home. I look at the property. I consider the neighborhood. I Erich knows (and loves) Bethesda

learn about the sellers. I find out their timeline

Erich moved to Bethesda with his wife in 2013

and their necessities in the transaction. Some

when they were just beginning their family.

homes should be sold as-is. Some should have

Having spent the previous 14 years in the

substantial renovation and staging before going

heart of Mount Pleasant, Erich was resistant

on the market. We, at the Erich Cabe Team,

to leave the city, along with its conveniences

always consider the return on investment for

and unmistakable energy. They chose Bethesda

staging and prepping. A full analysis of each

because of the great public schools, the abundant

approach is given. I create a unique marketing

outdoor spaces and the charm of the growing

plan for each home, a detailed and specific

urban center. Remaining in close proximity to

formula to achieve our outlined goals. Over

Washington DC was essential. “Our criteria and

time, this approach has proven to be very

expectations were easily met and exceeded in the

successful for me and my clients.

winding streets of this suburban gem. We found embracing neighbors and a sense of community that makes calling Bethesda our home-forever simple,” says Erich. Since that time, Erich has helped many other families move from DC to Montgomery County and he easily can attest to its desirability, especially for families.

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$10 0M+

Total Sales Volume in 2020

TOP 1%

Of Realtors Internationally

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CAT H Y JOHNSON m: 301.980.5242 | o: 301.298.1001 cathy.johnson@compass.com As a former interior designer, Cathy understands how important home is to her clients. With a wealth of experience in sales, contract negotiations, home staging, and home renovations she guides her clients seamlessly through the home buying and selling process. Working with first time home buyers to clients downsizing, Cathy’s secret to her success is evident through her strong base of loyal repeat clients and referrals.

S TAC E Y STYSLINGER m: 240.351.7635 | o: 301.304.8444 stacey.styslinger@compass.com

Knowledgable, Patient, Tenacious and Fun! It matters who you work with! Let’s face it, 2020 was a really strange year. Stacey was hard at work (in mask, gloves and booties) selling a whopping 29 homes! It’s never been more important to work with an agent that knows the market. You need a knowledgable, trusted ally to help you secure the home of your dreams. Stacey is your girl!

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$13 4 M+ $ 17 M + 29

Career Sales Volume

2020 Sales Volume

Buyers & Sellers Helped in 2020

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COMPAS S

TA M M Y G RU N E R DU R BIN m: 301.996.8334 | o: 301.304.8444 tammy.grunerdurbin@compass.com

What sets you apart from other agents?

What advice would you give to someone

In the words of my clients, “I am a steadfast

looking to navigate the market today or in

and persistent advocate for my [clients’] best

the near future?

interests”, and “my professionalism, integrity,

Hire a professional to discuss the steps to

dedication, responsiveness, and tremendous

a successful transaction. There are many

knowledge of the real estate market are key

factors that can impact the outcome of a

to a successful, pleasant experience.”

sale, and it’s my job to ensure my clients understand the implications of every

Tell us about a charity you support.

possible decision. I accomplish this by

For years, my family and I have volunteered

sharing my 30 years of experience and

at and supported “A Wider Circle”, an

knowledge and guiding each client through

organization that helps our fellow humans to

the process with compassion so they can

rise out of poverty with dignity. The majority

make the right choice for their future. I’m

of people in poverty are there because they

always there to offer my expertise, but my

were born into it, and as citizens, I feel it is

clients are the ultimate decision-makers.

our duty to help.

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DEIR DR E LOFFT m: 571.213.5056 | o: 301.304.8444 deirdre.lofft@compass.com

Why do you love what you do? I was a police officer in the area before I became a real estate agent. I loved serving my community, helping people, and solving issues. And I relished knowing that I could make a positive impact in someone’s life. And believe it or not, being an agent is similarly rewarding. Buying or selling a home is an emotional experience. It’s my mission to make life easier, to fix problems, to manage even the smallest detail, and to negotiate aggressively - and to do it with positivity and a sense of humor. The only drawback is not being able to drive fast with lights and sirens! What do your clients think of you? “She is quite simply the BEST REALTOR EVER. I’ve often thought that fees to realtors can sometimes be excessive, given the work put in. However, with DeeDee, I honestly thought we got the bargain of the century. Work with DeeDee. You will not be disappointed and you will never want to work with another realtor.” – Mark Naman

C H E RY L LEAHY m: 301.370.2484 | o: 301.304.8444 cheryl.leahy@compass.com

The Bethesda real estate market is moving at a record pace. Working with a knowledgeable, savvy and experienced agent has never been more important. Cheryl has a track record shared by few individual agents in the DMV. She understands the importance of having a trusted advocate to guide you through the real estate process. With a reputation for great client service, Cheryl has built her career on referrals from happy clients.

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$275M+

$39M+

Career Sales (Individual)

2020 Sales Volume

20

57

Years Experience Selling Bethesda Real Estate

Rides Left to Earn a Peloton Century Shirt

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COMPAS S

TRENT & CO m: 202.210.6448 | o: 301.298.1001 trent@compass.com m: 240.461.3928 | o: 301.298.1001 mary.noone@compass.com

What advice would you give to someone

Any home decor/design tips or inspiration you

looking to navigate the market today or in

want to share?

the near future?

We take pride in our staging specialty.

Talk to someone sooner rather than

Buyers’ expectations are high, especially

later! On the sellers’ end, Compass offers

in this region, and we know people work

Compass Concierge — which allows you to

hard and don’t have time to renovate or

make updates without paying a dime until

redecorate. Buyers are looking for move-

closing. For buyers, work with a lender now

in ready the minute they walk in the door.

to navigate a bridge loan that will allow

Therefore, bathrooms and kitchens should

you to smoothly transition to your next

be neutral, light, and airy. Replace your

home. When you go to sell, minor changes

granite counters with a white quartz and

like de-cluttering will allow the biggest

you’ll get a whole new, trendy look!”

return. That’s why we are here: to support your success!

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DA N A R I C E G RO U P m: 202.669.6908 | o: 301.298.1001

dana.rice@compass.com

How did you overcome the challenges of 2020? 2020 was not the year we anticipated, but boy oh boy do we feel fortunate to have been with so many in their 2020 housing journey. We are

1 3 7+ Happy Clients

grateful to be healthy, working in an industry that changes lives, and have the ability to build an award-winning small business together. Thanks to all of our clients for allowing us to walk alongside you - virtually or at six feet - this

$ 147 M Volume Sold

year. Whether you’re interested in exploring your real estate options or simply want to know more, contact us today.

50+ Complimentary Staged Homes

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COMPAS S

LY N N E TUCK ER m: 301.404.0464 | o: 301.235.2647 lynne.tucker@compass.com

Best career advice you’ve ever received? Real estate isn’t about sales, it’s about service. At the end of the day, it’s all about connecting with people. That’s what creates the most joy. What does home mean to you? Home is the place we go to recharge and rejuvenate so we can go into the world and give generously, create confidently, and contribute to a better community.

K R IST Y DEA L m: 954.673.7109 | o: 301.304.8444 kristy.deal@compass.com Through her genuine passion, Kristy brings her client’s dreams to life! Affectionately known as a dynamic powerhouse and one of the best in her field; her intimate knowledge and enthusiasm for the rich and charming communities within the Maryland, DC, and Virginia real estate market are very present as she caringly shares her valued counsel. In helping her clients find or sell their residence, Kristy is truly dedicated to providing her clients with an impressive real estate experience. Her clients trust her integrity and insight, and value her timely guidance in addressing all aspects of the transaction with professional competence. Ultimately, clients become family and Kristy highly values the friendships that continue well after the keys have exchanged hands.

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@ C O M PA S S D M V

77 Homes Sold in 2020

$ 49. 8M+ Volume Sold in 2020

HELLO HOME m: 301.832.7609 | o: 410.280.1646 betty.batty@compass.com

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PROFILES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

real estate agents

MICHAEL VENTURA

PROFILES

The Balow Band Olinger Group of Greystone Realty See Profile page 204 BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021 197


PROFILES

real estate agents SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Ben Fazeli LONG & FOSTER | CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE “Having lived and traveled on three continents, I have a multicultural background that allows me to work with a highly diverse clientele.” 4650 East West Highway, Bethesda, MD 20814 M: 202-253-2269 | O: 301-907-7600 Ben.fazeli@LNF.com Q: What makes your clients’ experience unique? A: I was raised overseas, attended boarding school in Switzerland and received a master’s degree in international law from American University. My clients are from all over the world and buy and sell properties in all price ranges. I have a deep-rooted appreciation for different cultures and can put clients from very diverse backgrounds at ease. Q: What other credentials do you have that are

important to your clients? the economy. Clients look to me not only for buying and selling strategies, but to help them understand real estate as an investment. I can list and sell in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia – a significant advantage for clients who own – or are looking to buy – on both sides of the river.

TOP PRODUCER

MICHAEL VENTURA

A: As a former bank executive, I understand financing and

Allison Carle PRINCIPAL | CLARK & CARLE GROUP AT COMPASS ASSOCIATE BROKER | DC & MD 5471 Wisconsin Ave., Suite 300, Chevy Chase, MD 20815 C: 202-905-5401 | O: 301-298-1001 Allison.Carle@compass.com www.compass.com/agents/allison-carle Q: What is your background and how does it

JOHN FERRIS

benefit your clients? A: I am a second-generation local Realtor having grown up in Chevy Chase, and I have lived throughout D.C. and Montgomery County. Prior to becoming an agent, I practiced law for more than a decade and worked on Capitol Hill for two United States Senators. I leverage my strategic negotiation skills and hometown expertise to benefit my clients and bring them the highest level of service as they navigate the local real estate market. My prior experience also taught me to be a trusted advisor which I bring to my client relationships. Finally, I recently moved to Potomac, so I personally know the challenges and rewards of buying and selling a home in this market.

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real estate agents

PROFILES SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

Barbara Carnemark Nalls VICE PRESIDENT TTR | SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

TONY J. LEWIS

Awards & Honors: Top Producer, Bethesda Magazine, 20192021 Top Individual Agent, Maryland offices, TTR|Sotheby's International Realty, 2018 - 2020 Top Agent, Washingtonian, 2014 -2020 Top Montgomery County Listing Team, Long & Foster, 2015 4809 Bethesda Ave., Bethesda, MD 20814 M: 240-602-9035 | O: 301-516-1212 bnalls@ttsir.com www.barbaranalls.com

Q: How has “work from home”

Q: How has the real estate market

changed your business?

remained so strong during the pandemic?

A: Full-service real estate sales is a 24/7 job, so I was always well set up at home – both in my office and at the kitchen table on sunny mornings! Today, Zoom brings me into my clients’ homes for initial interviews and strategy meetings. I give presentations over screen share, and we move documents electronically. We’ve all adjusted. But selling homes while clients, their children and extended families work and go to school at home is another thing! I’ve shown houses while families set up online school and business meetings in the backyard, in the car or down at the park. I’ve also settled transactions when the buyer had only seen the house through a video tour.

A: I’m endlessly impressed with the level of creativity and adaptability my colleagues and clients have shown during COVID. Sustaining a high level of service through a record-breaking market while remaining scrupulously vigilant about safety has taken real commitment. We are using video more than ever to allow our clients to tour homes. Agents are following strict CDC guidelines when showing properties in-person. Some meetings and settlements are being held outside. Technology, flexibility and ingenuity have saved the day and allowed us to keep the market strong. I’m so proud of the way we’ve risen to the challenge.

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PROFILES

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TOP PRODUCER

LONG & FOSTER | CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE L-R: ANDY ALDERDICE AND JESSICA ALDERDICE “From searching for a home, to walking us through the contract, to advising on negotiations, they went above and beyond at every stage of the process.” – Julie S. 4701 Sangamore Road, LL1 Bethesda, MD 20816 M: 301-466-5898 | O: 301-229-4000 andy4homes@gmail.com www.andy4homes.com

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Q: What do you feel distinguishes you from other Realtors? A: I’m a 5th-generation Washingtonian – Jessie, my daughter and partner, is a 6th-generation – and we have 42 years of combined experience as local Realtors. We understand the real estate market in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia and what it takes to buy and sell successfully here. We’re committed to our clients and they know that we’ll always work hard to deliver the best results for them. Our colleagues also respect our work ethic, which is very helpful during negotiations. Q: What do you find most challenging about your job?

A: The real estate market is always changing – market conditions, activity, technology. Over the years we’ve witnessed incredible growth in Bethesda, Potomac, D.C. and Northern Virginia and watched area real estate values rise. But we’ve also lived through market downturns. Transition can be exciting, but

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

it’s also challenging. It’s critical to be able to adapt and to provide your clients with the professional guidance they need to be successful in any kind of market. Q: What else is there about you that

potential clients might want to know? A: Both Jessie and I were raised in the D.C. metropolitan area and have strong connections to the community. I’m proud to have served as president of the prestigious Kiwanis Club of Washington and the Potomac Chamber of Commerce, which awarded me Business Person of the Year. Our success in real estate is the result of continued community support over the years. We’re both very grateful for that and are committed to giving back.

COURTESY PHOTO

Andy Alderdice


real estate agents

PROFILES SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

Carolyn Homes FROM LEFT: ISABELLA SCHNIDER, JACQUI QUILA, CAROLYN SAPPENFIELD & SAYDEE SCHNIDER Carolyn has been a top-producing agent for over 17 years. Her online reviews and testimonials tell the important story behind her success. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer, investor, moving-up or downsizing, she and her team are dedicated to their clients' needs and journey as if it were their own.

COURTESY PHOTO

RE/MAX Realty Services 4825 Bethesda Ave., Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 C: 240-353-7601 | O: 301-652-0400 carolyn@carolynhomes.com www.CarolynHomes.com

Q: What services do you or your firm provide? A: We are a full-service, integrated team of real estate professionals serving a wide variety of clients across the D.C. metropolitan region, including buyers, sellers and investors. As native Washingtonians with unmatched market knowledge and resources, our clients rely on our breadth of experience and deep insight into local market dynamics to help them evaluate and achieve their real estate goals. Q: What makes your client experience unique? A: We tailor every transaction to our clients' particular needs, which has been extremely important during these difficult times. Our team is dedicated to providing professional and personal real estate guidance you can trust at every stage of the home buying and selling process. For sellers, our marketing team will design a comprehensive and custom listing plan, including first-rate professional

photography, digital advertising, virtual tours, and compelling print marketing. We also work hand-in-hand with buyers to understand their unique needs and preferences and bring decades of experience in handling real estate negotiations to get deals to the closing table. In this fast-paced market, our vast network and relationships with fellow Realtors is an invaluable resource to our clients. Above all, our goal is to make every transaction as seamless and efficient as possible. Our track record of success stems not only from our decades of experience and the lifelong client relationships we have developed but also our commitment to the community in which we are deeply rooted.

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PROFILES

real estate agents SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

Muller Dessie LONG & FOSTER ROCKVILLE CENTRE Honors & Achievements: Top 10% Zillow Premier Agent Award, 2020 MBA and Ph.D., business and finance Member, Long & Foster's GOLD Team for sales and customer satisfaction Montgomery County resident and proud father of two Fluent in English and Amharic Licensed in DC, MD and VA 795 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 D: 301-366-6058 | O: 301-424-0900 muller.dessie@longandfoster.com www.HappyHomesAmerica.com Q: What are the important things to know about

JOHN FERRIS

you? A: I have some measurable achievements of which I am very proud. I'm a “Top Producer” in Bethesda Magazine. I earned a Top 10% Zillow Premier Agent Award in 2020. And I'm a Gold member of Long & Foster. I accomplished all of this in just five years of serving the DMV area home buyers and sellers, along with a lot of hard work and discipline. I attribute my success to my educational background in finance, real estate—and my likable personality! Purchasing a home is more than a place to live, rather an investment to change one’s financial future. I share lots of great educational content with home buyers and sellers, and many consider me a go-to agent and local expert in the DMV area. Equipping and educating home buyers and sellers to help them make informed decisions is my top priority. More importantly though, I believe character weighs more than qualifications. Serving my clients with integrity, honesty and care had helped me to get more referral business. My relationships are everything to me. My relationships with my clients are more important than the transaction. My clients remain in my circle and my support continues far past the closing table. I believe, "Success is in the extra miles."

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real estate agents

PROFILES SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

Mary Noone & Trent Heminger TRENT & CO. AT COMPASS REAL ESTATE “Since COVID, your home is not only your most valuable asset; it’s where your life is centered. It really is your everything.”

COURTESY PHOTO

5471 Wisconsin Ave., 3rd floor Chevy Chase, MD 20815 M: 240-461-3928 | O: 301-298-1001 mary.noone@compass.com www.trentandco.com

Q: How has COVID changed the

real estate market? A: In 2020, more buyers were competing for fewer homes on the market. The median sales price was up 9.8% in Bethesda due to a drop in inventory of 14.7%. But to us, the bigger message was the way COVID changed our definition of “home.” It’s no longer just an asset, wealth builder or a place to sleep; it’s a place for work, play, school – even vacation. It’s where we can find comfort in a sometimes scary world. It’s the total package. Q: How do you recommend

wins in a multiple-offer situation who wasn’t backed by a strong, seasoned agent fueling a great strategy for their client. For sellers, the best way to gain a competitive edge is by investing in smaller things that will yield larger returns – like updating a light fixture or renting a storage unit to declutter a home. These things can easily add an extra $25,000 to a sales price. Today, more than ever, buyers prefer a home that’s move-inready. Our job is to advise sellers on those things that will attract buyers and add value to their home. We support them throughout the process to make it easier for them.

buyers and sellers navigate this competitive market? A: The best way to succeed is with a well-executed plan. For buyers, this means connecting with an agent early in the process. They may not realize that the seller pays all the commission and in Maryland, buyers must have representation. There isn’t a buyer who BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021 203


PROFILES

real estate agents SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

Jill Balow & Jacqueline Band-Olinger GREYSTONE REALTY, LLC BALOW BAND OLINGER GROUP 3833 Farragut Ave., Kensington, MD 20895 O: 301-244-4705 | www.greystonerealty.net Jill (D): 301-233-5596 | Jacqueline (D): 301.928.4669 jbalow@greystonerealty.net | jolinger@greystonerealty.net

A: We are proud to be a boutique firm with a single-minded focus to exceed the expectations of every client. Our group does this by providing the advantages of a large brokerage with the value-added benefits of a personalized approach. We are a collaborative team of highly professional, experienced and dedicated Realtors. Even more importantly, we are your neighbors and community members with deep roots throughout the area. When we started our firm a decade ago, we knew we wanted to approach each opportunity as more than a transaction but as a relationship. We understood then, and even more so today, that there is nothing more personal than the buying and selling of one's home. That's why we work tirelessly to bring our connections and knowledge to find every client the perfect match. Every client’s needs are unique. But the one constant is our one hundred percent commitment to client satisfaction.

TOP PRODUCER

MICHAEL VENTURA

Q: What makes your team unique?

Brian & Amy Maury MAURY HOME TEAM Compass | 7200 Wisconsin Ave., Suite 100, Bethesda, MD 20814 301-325-4914 | www.MauryHomeTeam.com Brian@BrianMaury.com | Amy@AmyMaury.com Follow on Twitter, Instagram & Facebook @MauryHomeTeam Q: Should I fix that before I sell?

HILARY SCHWAB

A: The answer is often YES! A professional real estate agent is not afraid to tell you what you "need" to hear versus what you "want" to hear. Honest advice, based on decades of experience, will help a client’s home sell faster and for more money. This year, Brian and Amy Maury will collectively complete 50 years of real estate service. The journey has involved many joyous occasions and sometimes the heartbreaking work of helping clients through a loss. Through it all, they have dedicated themselves to do their best work for each client. They look forward to sharing the journey with new clients in the years ahead.

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real estate agents

PROFILES SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

Named the #1 Small Team in Maryland by REAL Trends, Dana Rice Group has sold more than $440 million, in the top 1 percent of residential agents globally. With backgrounds in architecture, staging, marketing, sales and communications, agents serve first-time buyers and those looking in the upper brackets with diligence, care and excellence. 5471 Wisconsin Ave., Suite 300 Chevy Chase, MD 20815 202-669-6908 Dana.Rice@compass.com www.compass.com

Q: What should homeowners know about today’s market? A: The important thing to know is what is universal in any market: Buyers care about overall home maintenance. No matter the pace of the real estate market, homeowners should recognize that good maintenance, fresh paint, impeccable curb appeal, strategic marketing and an excellent pricing strategy will protect you regardless of how the market is doing. Just having a “hot” market does not mean your home is going to sell. In fact, when you do fail to sell, you’ll fail bigger and more publicly than if the market is struggling. This is not the time to skimp on efforts because it’s a “hot” market.

Q: What is your best tip for people looking to sell? A: Work with a real estate agent from your first thought of selling. Especially one who understands market values in your specific area. We Realtors are consistently honing our recommendations based on current market data. The information that we provide one month maybe totally different three months later. It’s important to stay in touch and in tune with the Realtors. They are the front line of any trend.

COURTESY PHOTO

Dana Rice Group

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real estate agents SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

RUDDEN|BOBRUSKA TEAM Honors & Awards: Re/Max Platinum, 2018; Chairman 20192020 Bethesda Magazine Top Producer, 2019, 2020 & 2021 Best Washingtonian, 2018-2020 Real Trends America’s Best Real Estate Professionals, 2019-2020 Top 100 DC Metro Real Producers, 20192020 RE/MAX Realty Services 8937 Shady Grove Court Gaithersburg, MD 20877 O: 240-403-0399 C: 301-351-2247 garyjrudden@remax.net www.ruddenbobruskateam.com 206

Q: What sets your team apart from other real estate teams? A: No team in the market offers what we do. We're all Realtors, but we each have specialized roles, which make our team so unique! After decades of living and selling real estate in the DMV, we've established ourselves as a top team with our market expertise and cutting-edge technology. Our savvy, high-tech marketing is on every website and social media source. Our huge network allows us to premarket for sellers and discover homes for buyers before they reach the open market. Services include professional in-house staging, broker expertise in negotiating and navigating contracts, and buyer representation in all price ranges. Each marketing plan is unique based on your specific needs. Our most distinct feature is our inhouse construction and renovation team. We are literally a full-service, one-stop shop when selling or buying a home!

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Q: How does the in-house construction and renovation team work? A: All work is managed and completed through our licensed and bonded construction crew. No need to call outside contractors. We are like “HGTV,” but we just don’t have a show! Whether it’s a small makeover or major renovation, we do it all. Our sellers love this because we make preparing your home for the market so seamless. Our buyers love the advice and insight we give for future renovations and repairs. Having a licensed Maryland Home Improvement Contractor on our team, along with the knowledge, experience, commitment and services that we offer, truly puts our team on the vanguard of the industry. COURTESY PHOTO

Gary Rudden Lisa Rudden Nick Bobruska


real estate agents

PROFILES SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

The Office of Robert Crawford & Tyler Jeffrey TYLER JEFFREY, ROBERT CRAWFORD, LIZ MANDLE, EMILY SOWER, ALISON LOCKWOOD & PAMELA TOWNSEND

COURTESY PHOTO

Awards & Honors: Arlington Magazine Top Producer, 2019, 2020, 2021 Arlington, Bethesda Magazine Top Producing Real Estate Team, 2019, 2021 Washingtonian “Best of”, 2015-2020; Top Agents, 2018 & 2020 Wall Street Journal Real Trends Top Agent, 2015-2020 Modern Luxury Magazine Top Agent, 2020 Washington Fine Properties 3201 New Mexico Ave. NW, Suite 220 Washington, DC 20016 202-841-6170 www.robertandtyler.com

Q: What is the one thing that your

Q: What are your interests outside

clients should know about you? A: We truly care about what we do. It’s critically important to us that our clients know and feel our investment in the process with them. Buying or selling a home is a major life moment, and we are right there with our clients. When there's work to be done, stressful moments along the way, or the thrill of beating out other bids, we are there. Our clients often become friends, and we treat our friends like family. Teams have become more common in real estate, but we’re extremely proud of the size of ours. The six of us have been able to put up sales numbers that rival teams more than twice our size. We're the best of the best—smart, energetic and passionate about what we do. We share a common goal of elevating the standards of real estate and that commitment has helped us achieve tremendous success.

of work? A: We embrace the mantra, “work hard, play hard.” While we love all things houses, when not selling the DMV we’re playing with our kids, pets, traveling (usually to the beach), taking in the latest and greatest restaurants, hiking, running, Peloton-ing, playing chef at home, getting dirty in our yards, discovering new local hotspots, and contributing to philanthropic efforts around town. Our interests outside of real estate help us better understand and relate to clients, making their experience much more personable.

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PROFILES

real estate agents SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

Susan Verner REALTOR, LONG & FOSTER PARK POTOMAC 12500 Park Potomac Ave., Suite 101S, Potomac, MD 20854 301-469-4700 | D: 240-381-8853 | Twitter @SusanVerner susan.verner@longandfoster.com www.susanverner.realtor

A: For me, it’s all about the people and places we call “home,” especially as “home” has new meaning in this challenging time. Whether helping maximize your sale or find your new nest, being your Realtor requires a unique skillset. While we act as advisors on the important nuts and bolts of each transaction, including marketing, staging, showings, contracts, paperwork and contingencies, home purchases and sales are personal. With years of experience buying and selling homes, I bring my steady hand and strong negotiating skills developed as a California lawyer. I also bring empathy, patience and care to ensure the best possible outcome. Success for my clients is my “why.” In my clients’ own words: “Susan surpassed all our expectations.” “[Her] negotiating skills are second to none.” “[H]ardworking, detail oriented, and highly professional.” “We will never buy or sell another property without Susan as our Realtor.”

TONY J. LEWIS

Q: What makes you different than other agents?

The Kevin White Team FROM LEFT: SORMEH YOUSSEFIEH, MARISSA VERMEULEN, CAROL FEDERMAN & KEVIN WHITE Specialties: Single family homes and condos New construction and redevelopment Investment properties, including 1031 exchanges Historic properties Corporate relocations Probate and trustee sales REOs, short sales and foreclosures RE/MAX Distinctive 1701 Rhode Island Ave., 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20036 301-332-2004 | Kevin@KevinWhiteRealtor.com www.TheKevinWhiteTeam.com

A: Our team is highly proficient, results-driven, designexperienced and socially networked. From all walks of life, our diversity is instrumental for working with some of the most desirable real estate in D.C., Maryland and Virginia. We have represented a wide variety of clients, from top business executives to investors to renters and to first-time homebuyers. We work tirelessly to ensure a smooth real estate adventure, and this is done by taking advantage of our experience, patience and dedication to you. 208

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HILARY SCHWAB

Q: What makes your services invaluable?


PROFILES

real estate agents

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

Carl Becker REALTOR DC | MD | VA PRINCIPAL BROKER, PREMIER PROPERTIES Awards: $50M+ annual volume in 2020 Bethesda Magazine Top Producer 2021 301-873-3221 Carl@PP-DC.com Instagram @CarlBeckerHomes www.PremierPropertiesDC.com Q: What makes you different?

A: Strong communication skills, a comprehensive understanding of the entire real estate process and instincts sharpened by 20+ years of experience are among the assets I bring to bear during negotiations. My experience building custom homes and a degree in mechanical engineering allow me to help buyers navigate the new construction process and advise on floorplan layouts and selections well before the home is complete. I am a taskmaster for details! Q: What special services do you provide? A: I invest the necessary time and resources to present homes in the best possible light. This includes magazine quality photography, furniture staging consultations, sophisticated online presentation and premium floor plan renderings, to name a few. I have experience in every phase of new construction, and I'm able to assist with due diligence, design and construction financing and negotiating with builders. An entire constellation of service providers come into the process, each with their own ideas and approaches. The client needs a partner who can help them navigate the process and ensure quality and value. I know the process inside and out. Last, but certainly not least, securing the best possible outcome for my clients includes negotiating the ideal sales price and contract terms as well as obtaining the lowest mortgage rates, the best title services and more.

DARREN HIGGINS

Q: What brings you the most satisfaction in work? A: That’s easy! I love to exceed expectations and do what others think can’t be done.

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PROFILES

real estate agents SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP PRODUCER

VJ Derbarghamian TTR SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY Awards & Honors: Top Agent, Washingtonian 4809 Bethesda Ave., Bethesda, MD 20814 1206 30th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 6723 Whittier Ave., McLean, VA 22101 D: 240-630-1019 | O: 301-516-1212 vderbarghamian@ttrsir.com www.mydcmetrorealtor.com Q: What makes you different than other real

estate agents? A: I understand construction processes very well, as my resume includes serving as project manager for one of the area’s top luxury builders. Whether it's a simple cosmetic renovation or new build from the ground up, I can help my clients bring projects in on time and within their budget. I can quickly identify quality builds if it's a turnkey solution or assist in the design/renovation phase for an existing home so that my clients maximize their investment. Q: What's a challenge that you've faced in your life and how did you overcome it? A: Prior to joining TTR Sotheby’s International Realty, I was an associate with a Sotheby’s affiliate in a completely different market. The needs of our growing family brought my wife and me back to the D.C. area. Starting over was a bit overwhelming, but I credit my once being a "newbie” in the D.C. area as the proponent for knowing the region so well. That knowledge helps me better assist my clients in the same situation. Years of research and discovery allow me to better understand and exceed client expectations. Q: What brings you the most satisfaction in

your work?

LISA HELFERT

A: Whether you’re buying or selling a home, for most people it's not only a daunting task but one of the most significant financial decisions of their lives. The ability to deliver a successful and seamless result is extremely satisfying for me. For my sellers, it's getting their home sold in the least amount of time for a sales price beyond their expectations. For my buyer clients, it's finding “the one”— the home that checks off all the boxes and they can happily call home.

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real estate agents

PROFILES SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

The Calkins Group TONY CALKINS, TRISH SWEENEY, JULIA LUCAS & TYLER CALKINS Our philosophy is simple: clients come first. We pledge to be in constant communication with our clients, keeping them fully informed throughout the entire buying or selling process. We know they’ll have an amazing experience working with us. 7200 Wisconsin Ave., Suite 500 Bethesda, MD 20814 O: 301-798-9838 D: 240-501-1424 tony@thecalkinsgroup.com www.thecalkinsgroup.com

Q: What's life taught you that you bring to your business? A: Tony: Making bold moves in difficult situations can often be the key to success. As a media executive, I developed the ability to negotiate with a wide variety of stakeholders - both in the U.S. and overseas. Despite the challenges we all faced in 2020, our team was able to help our clients navigate the "new normal", receiving the Best of Zillow award placing us among the top 7% of agents nationwide as determined by client feedback.

HILARY SCHWAB

Licensed in DC, MD and VA

Q: What do your clients say about you and your team? A: "The Calkins Group sold my home so fast and for more than I thought I could get. They answered every one of my million questions… and even helped with extras like scheduling contractors, prettying up landscaping and dealing with Washington Gas. They basically hit it out of the park.” - Matthew C. “Tony is a calm and knowledgeable professional who listens and learns and dedicates the time needed to move on deals in the fast-paced DC market.” - Jason A. “Tony is amazingly honest and listens to your needs... he negotiated a deal exactly how I needed it to be with eloquence, warmth and friendliness to the other parties, which was a win for all.” - Lisa W.

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common

GROUND Nearly six years ago, a white man walked into a Black church in Gaithersburg hoping to show his support after a national tragedy. Out of that visit came an unexpected gift. BY MIKE UNGER | PHOTOS BY SKIP BROWN

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Steve Hudson (left) and Rev. Tim Warner at Emory Grove United Methodist Church

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T

THE RED BANNER CAUGHT

Steve Hudson’s eye on his way home from work. In the nearly two decades that he’d lived in Gaithersburg, the father of three had driven past Emory Grove United Methodist Church thousands of times. He’d stopped in at one or two of the church’s fish fries over the years, but beyond that he had no connection to the congregation and didn’t know anyone who worshipped there. Written in white letters on the roughly 3-foot-high, 25-foot-long sign were the words “Thou Shalt Not Kill. –God.” Below that: #BlackLivesMatter and #PrayersForCharleston. Twelve days earlier, on June 17, 2015, a 21-year-old white supremacist pulled out a gun and murdered nine African Americans gathered for a Bible study at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. “It was horrific on a number of levels,” says the Rev. Tim Warner, who put up the sign that faced Washington Grove Lane. “That it was racially motivated disturbed me to my core. Where it happened was important because Emory Grove, the slave-descending African American church that I pastor, is that kind of a church. It is a small church; the doors are open; everybody welcomes everybody regardless of what you look like. The same thing that happened in Charleston could happen at Emory Grove any day. I needed to make some public witness.” So did Hudson. During a jog that evening, he saw a number of cars in the Emory Grove parking lot, so he thought the church was having a meeting or a prayer vigil related to the mass shooting in Charleston. When he got home, he cleaned up and drove about a mile back to the church. He wanted to show his support. “As soon as I walked in the door, I knew I was in the wrong place,” Hudson says. Inside were about 25 Black women who had gathered for the church’s firstever women’s Bible study. When Hud214

son entered the sanctuary, the meeting stopped and all eyes fixated on him: a tall, slender white man they’d never seen before. “Hello,” one woman said, “may I help you?” “I thought there was a meeting in here,” Hudson replied. “How can we help you? Do you have anything you want to say to us?” another member asked. “Black lives matter,” he said. Then he left. Warner’s wife, Paula, was at the Bible study that evening, and something about the exchange troubled her. She didn’t think they’d greeted the man properly, so she got up and followed him into the parking lot to introduce herself. When she came back in, one woman told her that everybody was worried about her. “Really, why?” Paula asked. “Because [of] the killings at the church.” Rev. Warner was at a Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) Board of Education meeting, about to start a presentation. His phone began “lighting up like a Christmas tree” with texts from parishioners, he says. There’s a white man in the church. Nobody invited him in. What should we do? The horror in Charleston was weighing on churchgoer Rachael Wiley’s mind. After Hudson left, she did, too. “I guess it was just a trigger because it was somebody we didn’t know who just came in,” she says. “I was taken aback. It scared me so bad.” Paula Warner says she hadn’t made the connection to South Carolina. She just assumed this was a nice, curious man coming by to see the church, so before he climbed into his pickup truck and drove away, she told him about Emory Grove’s services and the men’s Bible study. She had no idea if he would ever return.

MORE THAN FIVE YEARS later, Hudson takes a moment when asked what shaped his words that June night. “I thought it was an important thing to

Hudson outside of the Gaithersburg house he purchased in 2020

affirm,” he says in his measured, reserved manner. A man of deep faith, the 59-year-old is a longtime member of Shady Grove Presbyterian Church in Derwood. He relishes religion for, among other things, the bonds it creates. “A church takes it from being something individual to something community,” he says. So the next time he was free for the men’s Bible study at Emory Grove—about a month after he stopped in at the church—he went. He was the only white man there, but that didn’t matter to Hudson, who says he was received warmly by the others, including Rev. Warner. “My initial impression was that he was a courageous and peculiar guy. That he

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came to the church and now he’s back for Bible study is different,” says Warner, who lives in Derwood. “As we continued to study together, we discovered that we are very like-minded around scripture. We have similar intensity around making sure that it’s real for us—that we’re not just reading and studying, but that it means something on the street where we go.” Over time, Hudson, a widower, grew more and more comfortable with the men in the Emory Grove group. In late 2015, he invited the Warners and a few others to his house for homemade chili. “I remember thinking how remarkable it was that I was now having dinner at the home of a guy who people suspected

was a terrorist,” Warner recalls, laughing. “But God does things like that.” From there, a friendship formed between the two men of the same age with similar interests but drastically different backgrounds. Warner was raised in a “suburban ghetto” outside of Philadelphia, where poverty was a constant companion, he says. Unlike many of his childhood friends, he made it out. He had been working in the pharmaceutical industry for about 20 years when he was “called” to the ministry. Before becoming senior pastor at Emory Grove in  2013 and at Mill Creek Parish United Methodist Church in Derwood in 2016, he worked in community development for both MCPS and the county executive’s office. “My call from

pharmaceutical research and development had to do with God intentionally returning me to communities like the one from which I had come,” says Warner, who would go door-to-door to inform low-income residents of government services available to help them. A father of two, he and Paula became grandparents for the first time in May 2019. Hudson grew up in Bath, New York, a primarily white town about 100 miles southwest of Syracuse. He and his wife, Martha, moved to Gaithersburg in 2001, where they raised their three children. He likes his Mill Creek Forest neighborhood for its abundance of walking and running routes and its proximity to the National Institute of Standards and

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common ground

Inside the church were about 25 Black women gathered for a Bible study. When Hudson entered the sanctuary, the meeting stopped and all eyes fixated on him: a tall, slender white man they’d never seen before.

Technology, where he researches the properties of fluids such as liquid soap. Hudson is still a regular at Emory Grove’s men’s Bible study meetings. He and Warner occasionally take walks and discuss their shared appreciation for jazz, science and the Bible. Beginning early last year, their conversations

increasingly turned to Hudson’s desire to make an impact in the community they both call home. It was during one of their strolls that they came up with an idea that has changed the lives of a few young women and their children.

THE WHITE SPLIT-LEVEL house on a

quiet cul-de-sac in Mill Creek Forest has solar panels on the roof, rocking chairs on the porch, and rose bushes and rhododendrons out front. A slide and swing sit on the patio out back. The lawn, though browning in these early days of December, is neatly mowed. Hudson cuts the grass at the house, which he owns but doesn’t live in. Inside, one of Hudson’s tenants, a 24-year-old Ethiopian woman who speaks little English, tends to her baby. A 25-year-old African American woman and her 3-year-old and 4-month-old children also live there, and they’ll eventually be joined by a third family in the 2,200-square-foot home, which Hudson purchased last June for $435,000. Coincidentally, the settlement date was the fifth anniversary of the Charleston shooting. “This venture excites me because it is a

direct investment in our community and it is an opportunity to gather others to work together,” he says. The home, which Hudson named Emanuel House to honor the Charleston church, is part of the Bethesdabased National Center for Children and Families’ (NCCF) Young Adult Rapid Rehousing Program, which helps 18- to 25-year-old housing-insecure parents in Montgomery County find an affordable place to live. The tenants, who are referred to NCCF by the county government, pay 30% of their income toward rent for up to 24 months while they get back on their feet. The program provides housing for up to 20 families and is currently at capacity. (Other families live at sites throughout the county.) NCCF, which runs nine housing-related programs in the D.C. metro region, currently works with 277 young adult families who are housing-insecure; 47 of those are in Montgomery County. Emanuel House is a prototype. It marks the first time a private donor has bought a home and offered it to NCCF to use for the program, says Janice Wellington, NCCF’s family services administrator for

PHOTOS COURTESY OF REBUILDING TOGETHER MONTGOMERY COUNTY

An army of volunteers from three churches— Emory Grove, Shady Grove Presbyterian and Mill Creek United Methodist—banded together to renovate the home, which is now used to help housing-insecure mothers and their children.

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common ground Maryland. It’s also the first time the rapid rehousing program is trying the groupliving model. “In a lot of these cases, these are moms who have experienced trauma who may not have any familial support, may not have friends or may be coming out of a situation with an abuser and just need other folks around,” Wellington says. “In this case where we have these young moms, it is sort of like a college situation where you have these roommates you can kind of depend on. ‘Hey, can you watch my kid while I go on this job interview?’ Or, ‘I just need to do some laundry, maybe our kids can play together.’ ” The project is in many ways a direct result of the brief encounter at Emory Grove in 2015, when Hudson decided to step out of his comfort zone. “He’s very unassuming,” Warner says of Hudson. “He lives very much in his head. He’s deeply committed to community. He’s almost deceptive in that there’s a fire burning inside him that you would not perceive just by looking at him.” The idea for Emanuel House was born on Presidents’ Day in 2020. “Steve said to me that he was interested in helping families. So I began to have ideas about what could be done,” Warner says. He told Hudson about NCCF, where he’s served on the board of trustees for nine years. “Steve related to me at some point that he was interested in buying a house to house some of these folks. I said, ‘If that’s what the Lord is leading you to do, let me see if I can start putting it together to wrap some services around it.’ ” Hudson knew he didn’t want the project to exist in a vacuum. Bringing people together to make it work was vitally important to him. “When I decided that I wanted to do something like this, I knew that it would be a big failure if it was something that I tried to do on my own,” he says. “Different people have different passions, but for me, a passion is bringing Blacks and whites together to work together to develop these stronger relationships or friendship and trust.” Hudson became increasingly inter218

ested in issues of race and community after Martha died of colon cancer in 2014. Following 28 years of marriage, the loss had a profound and multilayered impact on him. “It certainly increased my ability to embrace happiness,” he says. “I’m very fortunate to have many things to be thankful for. The pain of her loss is alongside the happiness of what we could share—both of those things are carried together, and neither one is ever very far from the surface.” Susan Richardson was one of Martha’s closest friends, and has remained close to Steve.  “He’s always been a caring person, but I think he started to look for ways that he could use his time to minister to others,” the Rockville resident says. “You can talk about something and be sad about it, but Steve goes a step further and does something about it.”

WHEN NCCF’S EXECUTIVE director,

Sheryl Brissett Chapman, first heard of Hudson’s plan, she was a bit baffled. “It seemed kind of strange to me,” she says. “Who does that? But nothing successful comes out of taking no risks. When we had our first meeting, I saw he was an extremely humble man with a deep heart who really wants to do good.” After Hudson purchased the house, an army of volunteers from three churches—Emory Grove, Shady Grove Presbyterian and Mill Creek United Methodist—banded together to renovate it. The home was in relatively good shape, but it needed a little TLC. About 20 volunteers and a few professional contractors repainted the walls, installed new laminate floors, fixed up the bathrooms and rebuilt the exterior decks. Workers created three separate units inside the house so that each resident would have a secure door leading to their private living space. The kitchen, main living room and children’s playroom are shared. Most of the indoor furniture was donated by church members and their friends, an effort Emory Grove member D’Mitra Lofton helped lead. “All of the

residents have children, so we wanted to make sure that the mothers felt comfortable with their kids there,” says Lofton, who lives in Gaithersburg. “You don’t want them to feel like it’s just a house. We wanted to make sure it was homely. It’s beautiful. ” The renovation budget was about $18,000. Rebuilding Together Montgomery County, a nonprofit that provides critical home repairs for the most vulnerable people in the community, contributed $10,000 of that. “This project was unique for us because during this time of COVID we had to stagger volunteers and clean in-between shifts,” says Maury Peterson, executive director of Rebuilding Together. “Usually we can toss 25 or 50 volunteers into a job site, but for this we had to rotate folks in. It was amazing, given COVID, that we could even do it. At the end of the day, it’s just great to know that those moms and kids had their Christmas there.” Warner and especially his wife have forged a relationship with one of the residents at Emanuel House—driving her places and helping her around the house—and they plan to organize a mentorship program among the three churches to complement NCCF’s programming. Hudson, who serves as the landlord, would like to get to know the tenants, and hopes that what he did will inspire others to invest in the community. Lofton happened to be at Emory Grove in 2015 when Hudson walked in. She still recalls a sense of nervousness in the room. “At the time, people were afraid, but I see the good in everybody— that’s what people tell me all the time,” she says. “I don’t have a spirit of fear. I didn’t fear that something was not right. Now that I’ve gotten to know him, the sense was correct. He was not there to harm us; he was there to help us. It was like he was an angel that came in.” n Mike Unger is a writer and editor who grew up in Montgomery County and lives in Baltimore.

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s n e e T TOP

From an accomplished opera singer to an author of a kids book about the pandemic, the winners of our 12th annual Extraordinary Teen Awards are making their marks. This year, to be extra careful, we asked the students to send in pictures of themselves rather than come to a professional photo shoot. Meet the 13 winners. BY CARALEE ADAMS AND DANA GERBER

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HEWAN KIDANEMARIAM Senior, John F. Kennedy High School

Having moved to the United States from Ethiopia when she was 5, Hewan Kidanemariam is aware of inequities in the world—especially when it comes to health care. She says her early interest in medicine was influenced by her mother, who was a medical aide during that country’s civil war and would tell stories of bandaging wounded soldiers. “It really comes down to impact. There are other professions where you can help people, but it’s more indirect,” says Hewan, 17, who lives in Silver Spring and aspires to be a physician. “In health care, you have a more intimate relationship with a patient and a direct impact on a patient’s life.” As a junior at Kennedy, Hewan earned her license as a certified clinical medical assistant. This school year she has an internship at Holy Cross Hospital. Though it’s virtual because of the pandemic, she’s learning about the opioid crisis, social determinants of health, and other topics by reading medical journals, writing reports and having online discussions with staff members. She also recently started volunteering

at Holy Cross’ COVID-19 vaccination clinic, administering vaccines. As a participant in the Leadership Training Institute at Kennedy, Hewan has been involved in community service activities. “Hewan is the quiet leader. She doesn’t tell you what she’s going to do, she just does it. And people gravitate to her,” says Kofi Frempong, a teacher at Kennedy and coordinator of the institute. For her senior project in the leadership program, Hewan and two friends hosted a pair of drives they called “Helping Everyone Around,” collecting toiletries, masks and other essential items for donation to A Wider Circle, a nonprofit based in Silver Spring. Hewan got the idea after volunteering there, organizing household items to be distributed to people in need. Hewan is president of her school’s chapter of the National Honor Society and is involved in the Minority Scholars Program, where she has advocated for narrowing the achievement gap in Montgomery County and helped organize a spirit week at Kennedy focused on Latino students. BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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DHRUV PAI

Junior, Montgomery Blair High School When Dhruv Pai went grocery shopping with his grandparents as COVID-19 cases began to emerge in Montgomery County, he noticed the fear in their eyes when other customers didn’t wear masks or socially distance. Dhruv, who’d volunteered with the Difference Makers club in middle school and with the American Red Cross VolunTeen Program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center over the previous two summers, knew he had to do something. “I wanted to find a way to ease their burden, and that’s where Teens Helping Seniors really started,” says Dhruv, 17, who lives in Potomac. Teens Helping Seniors, which Dhruv launched last March with his friend Matthew Casertano, connects older adults or immunocompromised people with teenage volunteers who will deliver groceries for only the cost of the items. What began as an effort among Dhruv and his friends grew through social media. Teens Helping Seniors boasts 800 volunteers in 33 chapters in the U.S. and Canada, and has made more than 2,500 deliveries. “He just contagiously made all these kids to be kind and think outside of themselves,” says Farzaneh Nabavian, the 222

parent community coordinator for Blair, who helped the group achieve nonprofit status. Dhruv, who once delivered groceries to more than 15 people in a week, now makes three or four weekly deliveries. He also sings in four virtual choirs and serves as chief technology officer and brand ambassador for the teen-run nonprofit Arts-n-STEM 4 Hearts, which provides art kits to children in hospitals and to seniors in nursing homes, and STEM kits to underresourced communities. Passionate about what he describes as “STEM with a humanitarian focus,” Dhruv is currently using satellite imagery of crops to analyze disturbances to the food supply chain during the pandemic with a mentor at the University of Maryland. “The entire reason I’m interested in science, it’s the same reason I’m interested in volunteering,” says Dhruv, who is considering expanding Teens Helping Seniors after the pandemic to include other services, such as lawn-mowing. “It’s really to make an impact and to improve people’s lives. So I don’t think one could exist without the other.”

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SAMMER HAJHAMAD Senior, Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School

Sammer Hajhamad left her home in Kuwait when she was 13, immigrating with her mom and siblings to Maryland, where she enrolled in Bethesda’s predominantly white Westland Middle School. There, Sammer, who is Black, says she received backhanded compliments for being “well-spoken” and not looking “fresh off the boat.” These microaggressions, the 17-year-old says, eroded some of the pride she had in her identity. “I had to sort of shut that door to be more accepted into our school environment,” says Sammer, who lives in Silver Spring. “It wasn’t until I actually got into advocacy that I started speaking up more.” Once she started high school, she joined the Minority Scholars Program (MSP). “I realized I was not the only person that felt invisible,” Sammer says. She found a passion for social justice advocacy and now serves as vice president of B-CC’s Black Student Union, financial coordinator for MoCo EmpowHER (a countywide student organization that lifts up young women and offers them space for dialogue), president of MSP, cultural awareness coordinator for the Montgomery County Regional Student Government Association, and diversity editor of The Tattler, B-CC’s student news magazine. The project she’s proudest of, though, is Youth for Equity, which she and student Neha Kohli developed in March of 2020 through the Lazarus Leadership Fellows Program, a community service initiative at B-CC. Youth for Equity, now with 113 student members, strives to create equitable education through monthly town halls that result in “action steps”—such as leading a professional development meeting for teachers to instruct them on how to be actively anti-racist and to develop safe spaces for students. “Adversity didn’t break her—it inspired her,” says Bruce Adams, founder of the Lazarus program. “She lifts up others, and that’s the mark of a true servant leader.” Sammer hopes Youth for Equity expands to more schools and credits the community and her experience as an advocate with helping her emerge from her shell. “I feel like I am developing into the person I...lost awhile ago,” says Sammer, who plans to double major in marketing and international relations in college. BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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ABBY PASHKOFF Senior, Winston Churchill High School

Much of Abby Pashkoff’s life revolves around children. The oldest of many cousins, the Potomac 18-year-old has tutored elementary school ESOL students through Churchill’s Homework Club, volunteered as a camp counselor in Costa Rica, and spearheaded the annual Purim carnival as executive vice president of the Washington Hebrew Congregation Temple Youth Board. “I just think I have a natural inclination towards working with kids,” Abby says. When the pandemic curtailed her in-person, kid-focused activities, Abby fulfilled a longtime goal to write and illustrate a children’s book. A Kids’ Guide to: A Pandemic, self-published through Amazon last April, is meant to help kids through the unusual times. “I just couldn’t even imagine how confusing and scary it was for younger kids who had been taken out of their normal routines and all of a sudden quarantined from everything that they knew,” she says. “Nobody in elementary school is really watching the news, but they do need something that’s still informative that can kind of help them grasp what was going on.” Abby wrote the book on Google Docs, explaining ideas like virus transmission in easy-to-understand language, and drew the illustrations using the iPad Procreate app. It has sold more than 100 copies, with a portion of the proceeds donated to Save the Children’s Coronavirus Response Fund. “I can tell you the number of 224

times I’ve had kids say, ‘Yeah, I’m going to write a book,’ or, ‘I’m going to do some kind of big project,’ and there are very, very few times where those are actually things that happen,” says Ira Miller, youth group adviser at Washington Hebrew Congregation. “The fact that she saw it through…is really great.” She followed up in September with another self-published picture book, Don’t Wait To Advocate, which helps kids promote causes they care about by providing strategies, such as starting petitions. “I really just hope that they learn that they are important and that they have a place in changing the world,” says Abby, who established the Churchill chapter of Girls Who Start, a club that promotes female entrepreneurship, as a junior. “Kids are young, but that doesn’t mean that they’re incapable of making change.” Abby is a lawyer on Churchill’s Mock Trial team and a member of the Spanish Honor Society. She will attend Vanderbilt University and is considering studying sociology or law.

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SUJAY SWAIN

Senior, Montgomery Blair High School In 2016, while visiting a rural village in India where some of his extended family live, Sujay Swain was shocked to see people drinking water from a contaminated stream. After returning to his home in Gaithersburg, he devoted his eighth grade science fair project to devising a low-cost way to purify water. Sujay continued his research, worked with mentors and developed a simple system to filter water using shredded sugarcane, aluminum foil and sunlight. Early last year he co-founded a company, STEM In Life, with his brother, Sudhish, now 14. Sujay presented the water purification idea at the International Ultraviolet Association conference in Orlando, Florida, where he received the IUVA RadLaunch special student award given for innovation. Sujay, 17, who speaks Hindi, Kannada and Sanskrit, as well as English, hopes to return to India when the pandemic is over to field-test the system and show it to locals for feedback. According to James Schafer, a physics teacher at Blair, Sujay has a genuine interest in using science to solve problems. “He’s very passionate about learning and applying what he’s learned,” Schafer says. As a freshman, Sujay started an intense, 24-hour computer design competition known as BlairHacks, which has continued each year since. “It’s a combination of a cool engineering project and a really interesting idea behind it,” he says of the student-run “hackathons.” “You are not expected to come up with a final product, but a proof of concept.” Among his hackathon projects: a device to remind people to take their medicine, and an app to send personal messages from donors to charity recipients. Sujay is captain of Blair’s history club and a leader with blair3sat, a student group that designs and builds miniaturized satellites. He plans to study electrical engineering in college and credits his father, a physicist, and his mother, an engineer, with inspiring his innovative thinking: “Hearing both of them talk about technology in a way that it is solving problems and addressing a need in the world has been my driving force.”

FIONA GALLAGHER

Senior, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School For her 11th grade oral history project, Fiona Gallagher interviewed Barbara Ives, a U.S. Naval Academy graduate who was admitted in 1976 as part of the first class that included women. “I loved listening to her story,” says Fiona, who drove to St. Mary’s County to talk with Ives in person. “She showed how women can be really successful in the military despite obstacles.” Alex Haight, Fiona’s history teacher at St. Andrew’s in Potomac, admired her ambition in securing the interview with a female trailblazer and says she crushed the 10-page paper. “It speaks to her passion for women’s issues, the military and history,” he says. The day after former President Donald Trump’s inauguration in 2017, Fiona went to the Women’s March on Washington, joining women of all ages from her church who, she says, inspired her feminism. The following year, when her mother, Deirdre McCarthy Gallagher, ran for a spot on the Montgomery County Democratic Central Committee, Fiona helped with the campaign, which she says further ignited her interest in politics

and was a great experience for both of them even though her mom wasn’t elected. Last fall, Fiona, 17, who lives in Rockville, made phone calls for Joe Biden and Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Sara Gideon of Maine. “I had some awesome conversations with people who have very different political beliefs, and I’ve really enjoyed the chance to listen and try to understand them,” says Fiona, who volunteered as a poll worker in November and recruited other area teens to get involved in the election. At St. Andrew’s, Fiona is chair of the student advisory board and runs on the cross-country and track teams. She is also an accomplished Irish dancer, competing for more than 10 years and qualifying for the North American Irish Dance Championships for the past three years. Fiona plans to study political science or government in college. She hopes for a career in which she can make the most impact as a public servant: “It would be a dream to be an elected official in Congress.”

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ANDREW GRAY Senior, Landon School

Andrew Gray began studying the violin before he could properly hold one. At 3, he started training with the Suzuki method, practicing with a cardboard instrument before transitioning to the real thing. Since then, the 18-year-old Potomac resident has brought his lifelong passion for the violin to the Kennedy Center, Strathmore and Carnegie Hall stages. He says that joining orchestras and chamber music groups helped him acclimate when he moved to Maryland before high school. “Being immersed in the music with everyone, and everyone working together—that made me feel at home,” he says. Andrew is the concertmaster (the first violin section leader who helps guide the orchestra) of the 90-person Maryland Classic Youth Orchestras’ (MCYO) philharmonic and plays in Landon’s advanced string ensemble. He also takes weekly private lessons with violin teacher Lya Stern, who compares him to a “kid in the candy store” when he’s asked what he wants to learn next. Andrew’s love of music goes beyond the violin. When the National Symphony Orchestra Summer Music Institute went virtual last summer 226

due to the coronavirus pandemic, he spliced together individual videos of the chamber group he was a part of. For the past two years, he’s played the viola in his Landon orchestra, rather than the violin, because the only violist graduated. He also crafts his own compositions. “One thing about Andrew that stood out was that he had this key sense of musicality,” says Kristofer Sanz, the music director and philharmonic conductor of MCYO. “It was coming from somewhere inside, very, very special, that not a lot of kids his age have yet discovered.” Andrew heads Landon’s Chess Club, Math Club, Science Bowl and It’s Academic teams, and plays varsity squash. He says he enjoys collaborating with others in all of his activities, and that it’s his favorite part of music-making. “It’s like a puzzle when you’re playing with others,” he says. “You’re always making sure that you’re fitting with everyone else, and you can also try and do your part to lead people when it’s appropriate.” In college, Andrew is considering a dual degree in the music and STEM fields.

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ALEX CAMPERO

Senior, Col. Zadok Magruder High School As her Magruder High School girls volleyball team walked into the state finals in November 2019, Alex Campero says it was intimidating to hear the announcer tick off their opponent’s past state titles and to see the size of their crowd. The Rockville school team got off to a shaky start, but after losing the first set, the Colonels managed to come back. “On the last point I was so nervous. I just couldn’t believe we did it,” Alex says of the victory over Northern High School of Owings, Maryland— the first time Magruder won the state championship in the school’s history. Alex’s coach and Magruder social studies teacher Scott Zanni often refers to her as the “rock of the team.” He named Alex captain for the virtual season this year and praises her dedication on and off the court. “When she decides something is important to her, it’s important for her to work hard and do well at it,” Zanni says. Whether it’s sports or academics, Alex, 18, who lives in Derwood, says she tries to prove the skeptics wrong. “I’m someone who likes to help underdogs,” she says. After seeing only a few Latino students like her in STEM classes at Magruder, Alex, whose parents came to the U.S. from Bolivia, co-founded Latinos in Engineering and Science as a sophomore. With trivia games and fun science experiments, she was able to help attract about 30 active participants to the club before the pandemic. Alex is also president of Magruder’s Young Women in Engineering club and the National Technology Honor Society. Since her freshman year, Alex has been part of the school’s Best Buddies program, which encourages friendships among students with and without disabilities. “I know how these kids feel when they can’t make friends easily,” says Alex, whose older brother has an intellectual disability. Last summer, Alex interned virtually with the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg. She worked with artificial intelligence, a field she wants to pursue in college along with computer science. BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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Teens TOP

JD GORMAN

Senior, Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School JD Gorman was about to turn 7 when his father, Michael Blom, died of lymphoma. When JD was 9, he and his family started raising money for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). Since then, he has captained the Wingman Walkers team (Wingman was his father’s nickname) for LLS events, raising thousands of dollars over the years. “You get this broader sense of empathy,” says JD, now 18. “You start to think, ‘What can I do, how can I help? ...How can I play any sort of part to better those around me and make sure that people don’t have to go through the situation that I had to?’” In the summer of 2019, JD cofounded Connecting Cultures, an organization that has hosted about 10 community discussions with the goal of broadening perspectives. He serves as an executive producer for B-CC TV, where he was co-winner of a student production award from the local chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. He has also been class president throughout high school. In February 2020, during B-CC’s annual charity month, JD helped revive the winter dance as a fundraiser for LLS. The event raised about $2,000, and the school received the 2020 Holt 228

Weeks Trailblazer Award, given to a Washington, D.C.- area high school that develops a creative LLS fundraiser. “Every teacher has moments where you’re like, ‘I can’t do this anymore, this is so much, this is overwhelming,’ but then you have kids that come in and make it worth it,” says Jennifer Lloyd, an English teacher at B-CC and senior class sponsor. “JD is one of those kids that makes it worth it.” JD plays bass and guitar and is in the B-CC Jazz Ensemble. When his father, a musician, was in hospice, JD’s family started monthly “music nights” at their Bethesda home, open to anybody to play or listen. After JD’s father died, they continued the tradition and began taking pledges for LLS donations. “It’s been one of the main reasons why my sister and I still play music,” JD says. He’s considering liberal arts as his major in college.

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JULIETTE BOSTROM Senior, The Academy of the Holy Cross

Two years ago, after Juliette Bostrom watched The True Cost, a documentary about the negative impact that mass-produced clothing can have on workers and the environment, she stopped buying “fast fashion” and turned to secondhand clothing and brands with sustainable manufacturing practices. “I immediately decided I didn’t want to participate in an industry like that,” says Juliette, 17. She also shared what she learned with family and friends to encourage them to be responsible consumers. As secretary of the Young Progressives Club at Holy Cross, Juliette hopes to start an awareness campaign at the school about the issue. She has long been concerned about climate change, and in elementary school asked for donations to save polar bears rather than birthday gifts. Last fall, Juliette volunteered through St. John’s Norwood Episcopal Church in Chevy Chase to write letters to unregistered voters in Texas to boost turnout. “Regardless of political affiliation, I think increasing people’s engagement with elections and politics is incredibly important,” says Juliette, who grew up in a military family, moving to Bethesda in 2019. She lived in Germany for almost the first 10 years of her life and is fluent in German. “Juliette has been exposed to a variety of different cultures and lived in many places,” says Anna Dettbarn, who was the teen’s AP human geography teacher during her junior year. “I think all of this has contributed to a very mature understanding of issues in my class—government, religion and socialeconomic factors that influence geography around the world. She is keenly aware of societal problems.” Last March, Juliette was one of about 100 students from the region selected to participate in the 2020 West Point Leadership and Ethics Conference at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. She says the discussions about ways to handle confrontational situations reinforced the importance of communication and being open-minded. Juliette has excelled academically at Holy Cross, and has also played on the school’s field hockey and ice hockey teams. She hopes to use her German language skills in a future career, and may study international business, environmental science or political science in college.

JOLIE ROSENSTEIN

Senior, Walt Whitman High School Before becoming a member of the Cabin John Park Volunteer Fire Department during her sophomore year, Jolie Rosenstein had never set foot in a hospital. Interested in learning more about medicine, the Bethesda teenager began as an observer at the station and then trained to become a probationary member. “I feel like I have to always be doing my best because I’m the youngest,” says the 18-year-old, whose co-workers on her weekly shift are all older. “I just don’t want to do something that is wrong because, obviously, people’s lives are in your hands.” Once, Jolie responded to an opioid overdose call, providing oxygen and Narcan, and helping to carry the patient to a stretcher. She was working until midnight, “and then I had to go to school the next day.” During her junior year, Jolie spent 30 hours a week in a class to become state and nationally certified as an emergency medical technician, earning the Richard B. Thompson Award for finishing at the top of the class. A travel soccer player for many years, she gave up the sport when

it conflicted with the course. “I spent my entire Sundays there every week, and it was a lot of at-home reading and work,” she says. “But it was worth it.” Justin Peel, a sergeant at the station, says Jolie has a command of the technical skills and the mental stamina that the job requires. “She’s definitely more of the unflappable type...if something goes very wrong, you don’t want to be immediately emotionally affected by it,” Peel says. “She’s definitely shown that level of courage and stability.” Jolie took a break from the job early on in the pandemic but is now working toward becoming an EMS Provider 1 (which would include taking the lead on calls). When she’s not on duty, she tutors in math and leads Whitman’s Bracelets for Cheer club, which sends friendship bracelets to patients at St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. Before the pandemic, she volunteered at the Hebrew Home of Greater Washington and played lacrosse. Jolie will attend the University of Michigan and plans to focus on psychology or pre-med studies.

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Teens TOP

ARYA BALIAN

Junior, National Cathedral School Arya Balian performed in her first opera at age 7 at the Lisner Auditorium, playing Gretel in a production of Werther. “I kept on singing and never looked back,” says Arya, who has been cast in nine operas with the Washington National Opera and has performed around the world, including stops at the Sydney Opera House in Australia and Carnegie Hall in New York City. She’s flown above the stage as the Third Spirit in The Magic Flute, and played a boy, Miles, with a dramatic death scene in The Turn of the Screw at the Miami Classical Music Festival. “When I step onstage, there is this burst of energy. I feel like I’m where I’m meant to be in the world,” says Arya, 17, who lives in Chevy Chase. “The fact that I can get up there and teleport audience members to a whole other world and form these bonds with my cast members is so amazing.” Vocal coach and nationally known conductor Michael Rossi says Arya is the most accomplished teen he has worked with in his career. “She has a fantastic voice, a fantastic stage presence and she acts 230

beautifully,” Rossi says. “It’s a combination of natural talent, hard work and enthusiasm that makes her an all-around performer.” At National Cathedral School, Arya sings in the honors choir and is co-president of the glee club. During the pandemic, she has shifted to recording music online and has been teaching free virtual vocal lessons to kids through the One Voice Mentors program. Arya is dedicated to making the arts accessible and promoting opera to young people. She is a member of the Kennedy Center Youth Council, president of Capital Opera Teens and co-president of the National Opera Teens Advisory Committee. Beyond the opera stage, she has sung the U.S. national anthem at a Washington Wizards game in 2019 and a Baltimore Orioles game in 2017 at Camden Yards—with her sister, Sareen, now 19, performing alongside. Arya is from an Armenian American family and has made her voice heard as an advocate for peace as part of the Armenian Youth Federation and performed at various events at the Embassy of Armenia.

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DANIELLE PETERS Senior, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School

Danielle Peters, 18, has a mind for business that rarely shuts off. “If I think of an idea at 2 a.m., I’ll get up, grab my computer and start doing research,” she says. “I’m very aspirational and determined. … Even if I fail. I have to try it out.” One summer, when she was 13, Danielle baked cupcakes every Thursday to sell at a local farmers market near her home in Potomac. At 15, she bought wholesale jewelry and resold it online through DC Kollections, a business she created, doing nearly $5,000 in sales over two years. Danielle was inspired to start Girl-ish Magazine (girlishmagazine.squarespace. com) after attending a leadership conference at Harvard University during the fall of her junior year. “I wanted to give girls a platform to have their voices heard,” she says of the online publication. Danielle put out a call for writers on Instagram and received nearly 200 applications. She selected 22 between the ages of 14 and 20 who provide articles for the lifestyle and fashion magazine on topics including body image and womenowned brands. Danielle has produced 10 episodes for her Girl-ish podcast, interviewing teens about being a beauty pageant queen, racial justice advocacy and how to start a podcast in high school. At St. Andrew’s, Danielle has been an active member of the Black Student Alliance, and last October she co-founded the Students of Color Association. The group was needed, she says, in the wake of George Floyd’s death to encourage Black, Indigenous and people of color to become leaders at her school and stand up for voices that are not heard. “She’s a compassionate leader who has an incredible sense of activism. She’s not just a leader with words; she carries out with actions,” says Lorraine Martinez Hanley, a Spanish teacher and the director of diversity, equity and inclusion at the private school. “And she does it in such a positive and thoughtful way.” Danielle hopes to bring diverse perspectives to a career in marketing and business. n BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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Artist Tina Thieme Brown at Morningstar Studio

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ESCAPE ARTISTS

Inspired by the scenic beauty in Montgomery County’s 93,000-acre agricultural reserve, the members of the Countryside Artisans include painters, potters, a blown-glass maker, a stone sculptor, and a farmer who grows tea BY AMY HALPERN | PHOTOS BY BREANN FIELDS

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E

VERY SPRING, WHEN

Claire Howard’s cherry trees start to blossom, they form a flowering pink canopy that drapes across the private road leading to her home and art studio. Just beyond the 70 trees are wide green pastures, rolling hills and a seemingly endless sky. She even has a wishing well. If not for a hand-painted wooden sign in the grass that warns, “Smile, you’re being recorded,” you might think you’ve wandered into a fairy tale. “I had a dream to move to the country for a very long time—a place I could walk outside at night and see all the stars,” says Howard, a landscape painter who’s lived and worked on Lindenwood Farm, her pastoral 10-acre property in Poolesville, for 20 years. Before that, she and her husband, Frank, lived in Potomac, and before that, Chevy Chase. “We inched our way out here.” These days, the couple has the property to themselves, but their four chil234

Landscape painter Claire Howard (right) has lived and worked on her pastoral 10-acre property, Lindenwood Farm in Poolesville (above and opposite), for 20 years.

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dren and eight grandchildren visit often. When she lived closer to D.C., Howard says, “I was an interior designer who sometimes did oil paintings for my clients. Now I’m an artist who sometimes helps my clients with interior design.” During her first few years “up-county,” as she calls it, she worked out of an old barn built into the side of a hill near her house. Then she repurposed a guest cottage/pool house that the previous owners had converted from an old chicken coop. “It overlooks my husband’s amazing vegetable garden, the incredible nightly sunsets, and those fabulous sweeping clouds,” Howard says. “I think that’s why the sky is such an important part of my work.” One of the first things Howard did after buying her “perfect fixer-upper” and setting up her easels was to join the Countryside Artisans, a group of art-

ists whose work is inspired by the scenic beauty around them. Those who want to join the group must have studios separate from their living space in a “countryside setting” within 30 miles of Sugarloaf Mountain, and their work has to meet the members’ “fine art” standard. Three weekends a year—in the spring, fall, and December holiday season—they hold open houses so visitors can browse their wares and enjoy a day in the country. Before COVID-19, the artists would get together at someone’s studio a few times a year to discuss the tours and vote on any new applicants for their group. “The locations [of the meetings] change, so we all get a chance to visit each member and their work,” Howard, 69, says. She first discovered the Countryside Artisans in the 1990s while looking to move farther out, “free from honking horns and traffic lights.” She read about

the tours in a newspaper and decided to give it a try. “I credit the artists I met for giving me the incentive to pursue my dreams,” she says.

T

ODAY, THERE ARE 19 mem-

bers of the Countryside Artisans, including a craft wine producer, an artisan brewer, a blown-glass maker, potters, mixed-media and fiber artists, a stone sculptor, a photographer, a tea farmer, and a craftsman who makes furniture using raw-edge slabs of wood. Most live in the Montgomery County Agricultural Reserve, a 93,000acre swath of land that winds through the northern part of the county and is tightly regulated by the county council to prevent suburban sprawl and industrial development. With more than 500 working farms in the reserve, the area is rife with vibrant crops, well-kept barns,

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and grazing sheep and goats. In a county of about a million people, the population of the reserve, which occupies about a third of county land, is today estimated at about 36,000, according to the Montgomery County Planning Department. Heather Zindash of Gaithersburg discovered Claire Howard’s art while on a Countryside Artisans studio tour with a friend in the spring of 2018. “I didn’t have space in my home for her paintings at the time,” Zindash says, “but I knew I’d be back.” Now she owns two of Howard’s canvases—both beach scenes the artist painted while at her second home in Bethany Beach, Delaware. “I love how they change throughout the day with the changing light,” Zindash says. Before the tour, Zindash thought she’d “go down the line and see all these artists.” But that’s not the case. “You have to follow a map and prioritize what you want to see,” she says. The group’s free tours are self-guided; its website, countrysideartisans.com, links to a Google map so visitors can plan their 236

route. Several studios are situated within a mile or two of each other, but some are fairly remote. A few of the group’s newer members live in Howard, Frederick and Carroll counties, just over the Montgomery County line. For the regulars who hit all three tours in a year, the drives between the studios—and the bucolic scenes along the way—are part of the charm. “You can always see art in a gallery at the [shopping] mall,” says sculptor David Therriault, a Countryside Artisans member since 2005. “That’s a totally different experience.” In non-pandemic years, the artists put out freshly baked cookies and brownies, along with apple cider from nearby farms, during the tours. They decorate for the season, with music playing in the background, and some offer demonstrations of their craft. Many also sell work from local artists or craftspeople who aren’t part of the group. Therriault and his wife own a bakery in Poolesville called Locals Farm Market; they put out scones and other baked goods from their shop on studio tour days.

David Therriault, a sculptor, grew up in Potomac and for 25 years owned Alden Farms, a garden shop in Beallsville. He transformed it into a workshop, gallery, and landscaped garden where he showcases his pieces. He makes his yard sculptures from remnants of granite and limestone.

P

ROPPED OUTSIDE OF Therri-

ault’s workshop on a sunny afternoon in November is a stone sculpture he created years ago for a couple in Darnestown. It’s about 5 feet tall, several inches thick, and inlaid with bits of teal blue glass. His customers are moving to North Carolina, so Therriault picked up the sculpture and is going to chip off the cement that held it in place. Then he’s going to drive it to Durham. Therriault, 60, delivers and installs all of his pieces himself—except for one recently purchased by a customer in Nova Scotia. “We met at a liquor store on the New Hampshire-Massachusetts line,” he says. Therriault grew up in Potomac and for 25 years owned Alden Farms, a gar-

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den shop in Beallsville. When he decided to become a sculptor, he kept the Alden Farms name but transformed the garden shop into a workshop, gallery, and landscaped garden where he showcases his pieces. He and his wife, Sandy Wright, live on the property. “One of my first customers was a woman in Chevy Chase. Her neighbor saw my sculpture in her yard and really liked it, so he came out here and bought one, too,” he says. “I have a few customers who have a competition going.” His yard sculptures are made from remnants of granite and limestone. Many of the materials are leftovers from federal construction projects, including the information center at the U.S. Capitol. “I have a lot of friends who are fabricators and are happy to give me their discards,” Ther-

riault says. His work is abstract, but he says it’s inspired by Native American and ancient cultures. “I can’t do little bunny rabbits,” he says. “I can’t even tell you how a piece is going to turn out.” Wright works full time as an analyst for a D.C. law firm and has become the artisans’ unofficial marketing maven. “I can’t do the art,” she says, “but I can do everything else.” According to Caroline Taylor, executive director of the Montgomery Countryside Alliance, the Countryside Artisans are the most organized group in the agricultural reserve, but they represent only the “tip of the artist iceberg.” Taylor’s organization advocates for land-use and transportation policies that preserve the reserve’s farmland and natural environment. As part of her job she promotes all of the reserve’s

artists—and she says there are hundreds. “Every day I come across more—musicians, photographers, filmmakers—that I didn’t know existed,” she says. Walter Matia, a bronze sculptor who has lived in the reserve for decades, never considered applying for the Countryside Artisans, though he’s friendly with several members. He shows his work in galleries around the country; some of his pieces command up to $45,000. “For the people on the tours, a lot of the magic is seeing how it gets done,” Matia says. But his Curlew Castings studio is located in an industrial-style warehouse and he uses an off-site foundry and welder. “I wasn’t a good fit.” He sometimes shows his pieces at Therriault’s Alden Farms as a guest artist during a studio tour.

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D

ALIS DAVIDSON, FOUNDER

of the Countryside Artisans, recalls a customer who used to bring her two kids when she visited Davidson’s studio. While the mother shopped, the children went to see the chickens. “One day, the kids asked if they could take home one of my eggs and see if it would hatch,” Davidson says. “I told them it wouldn’t because I didn’t have a rooster to fertilize the egg, but the customer decided to buy an incubator and give it a try.” Turns out the egg did hatch, but weeks later the family returned the chick because it was “pooping all over the house.” Davidson started the group in 1985, shortly after she adopted a sheep named Lucia. “Someone was moving and 238

couldn’t bring her with them, and I said I’d take her,” she recalls. Not sure what to do with the 14 pounds of wool Lucia produced each year, Davidson learned from nearby shepherds how to wash and straighten the wool, spin it and dye it. “Then I had all this beautiful yarn, so I learned how to knit and weave,” she says. Luckily, “there were a lot of female shepherds out here—still are, actually.” She purchased two more sheep and started a business dyeing and selling yarn (some of it came from her sheep, some she bought wholesale and dyed herself ). She expanded it to include her knitted goods, fiber art, and what she calls “lambscapes,” small paintings she texturizes with her wool. Before long, she joined up with nearby artisans to consolidate market-

ing efforts and bounce artistic ideas off each other. Today, Davidson, 66, has two sheep—Delilah and Sunny Bunny. Her business, Dancing Leaf Farm in Barnesville, is thriving, and the group she founded has nearly four times the artists it did when it started, though she’s the only original member still in the group. Just across a field and a gravel driveway from Davidson’s property is Susan Due Pearcy’s home and two-story Sugarloaf Studio. Both artists’ studios overlook Sugarloaf Mountain, about 4 miles north. Pearcy joined the Countryside Artisans in 1997 after moving from Silver Spring with her filmmaker husband, Glen, who died four years ago. “We were looking for a place where we could both have our studios and work,” she says. Pearcy’s

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Susan Due Pearcy’s home and twostory Sugarloaf Studio overlook Sugarloaf Mountain. A member of the Countryside Artisans since 1997, Pearcy opened her studio to visitors during the group’s holiday studio tour in early December.

paintings and prints (she has her own press in her studio) reside in the permanent collections of the National Museum of Women in the Arts and the Library of Congress, both in Washington, D.C., and in museums around the world. The National Gallery of Art has a sketchbook of hers in its rare books collection; she used to sketch on the Metro on her way to help out at her husband’s production studio in Dupont Circle. “The sketchbook is quite small,” she says, “but I’m still thrilled for it to be there.” Tina Thieme Brown’s Morningstar Studio is about a mile from Pearcy’s and Davidson’s, and the three are good friends. Brown works out of a reclaimedwood cabin she and her husband built when they moved from Chevy Chase 21 years ago and she joined the Countryside Artisans. They expanded the studio five years later “using 1780s logs salvaged from an old cabin in Olney.” The studio sits just behind their house, which was a tavern during the Civil War. Brown is from St. Louis, where she did largescale environmental-impact art installa-

tions on subjects ranging from the Costa Rican rain forest to the Exxon Valdez oil spill. She and her family moved to Barnesville when her younger son was in college. These days, Brown’s specialty is detailed pen-and-ink drawings of the plants and flowers indigenous to the region. She designed the “Welcome to the Montgomery County Agricultural Reserve” sign at White’s Ferry, and her map of the reserve is on some preservation group websites. “It’s important that people down-county know we’re here,” she says. “If people understand what’s in their own backyards and have a connection with it, they are more likely to want to protect it.”

O

N A BLUSTERY SATURDAY

in early December, artist Linda Phillips opened her pottery studio to a steady stream of visitors during the Countryside Artisans’ holiday studio tour. Even in the midst of the pandemic, “it was actually one of the busiest days we’ve ever had,” the 55-year-old says. “One of my regulars even brought me a loaf of fresh bread.” Phillips’ studio, Something Earthy Pottery, is in a converted garage in Laytonsville, attached to the gift gallery where, in addition to her pottery, she sells jams, jewelry, housewares and natural soaps made by local craftspeople. “A lot of people who came on the tour told me they haven’t been shopping at all but felt like the studio tour was a safe way to go because we’re all so spread out,” Phillips says. Still, she estimates that business since the pandemic arrived is down about 40%. Phillips also teaches pottery classes, but many of her students have stayed away because they are immunocompromised. Last year, the pandemic forced the Countryside Artisans to cancel its spring tour, but most members opened for the fall event, setting up makeshift galleries outdoors to allow for social distancing. With the surge in COVID cases over the winter, a handful of artists decided against participating in the holiday tour. There’s another tour in mid-April. “We’re looking ahead to [the] spring,” says

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Countryside Artisans founder Dalis Davidson (below) started a business dyeing and selling yarn, some of it from her own sheep. She expanded the business—Dancing Leaf Farm—to include her knitted goods, fiber art, and what she calls “lambscapes,” small paintings she texturizes with her wool.

Brown, who considered the fall tour a huge success. “So many people thanked me and said, ‘I really needed this fix.’ ” Ceramic artist Jennifer Hamilton’s Dusty Road Pottery studio occupies a red dairy barn in Dickerson, near the newly remodeled Comus Inn. A member of the Countryside Artisans for about 10 years, she’s been offering virtual appointments for those wary of in-person visits. “A group came out—they were just driving around—and I held up my phone and took video,” she says. “They bought something and I brought it out to the car for them.” When visitors do come to Hamilton’s barn, she points out where the cement floor tapers downward toward the large doors, an important feature back when the space was used to hose down cows. The floor’s gentle slope makes it easier for her to wash the studio after a day of pottery classes. “Farmers like to sell their farms to artists because they know their barns will be well taken care of,” she says. Hamilton and her husband bought their property 24 years ago from a retired graphic designer and part-time farmer who had sold off his 300 acres in 25-acre parcels. “Ours was the last parcel he was 240

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Tina Thieme Brown (below) works out of a cabin she and her husband built when they moved from Chevy Chase to Barnesville 21 years ago.

selling, and he was reluctant to let it go,” says Hamilton, 60. “So we had a gentleman’s agreement that we’d share the barn with him for the first two years. He only kept a bag of cement there, but it made him feel better.” Now she uses the main space in the barn for her potter’s wheels and equipment, and the old milking parlor attached to it to display her work. About 40 minutes east of Hamilton’s studio on the other side of Interstate 270, Foster Holcombe and his wife, Theda Hansen, own Art of Fire, which they say is the largest state-of-the-art blown glass studio in the mid-Atlantic. Until the pandemic, the longtime Countryside Artisans offered blow-your-own-glass classes and make-your-own Christmas ornaments. Their vases, champagne flutes, ornaments and other items are still for sale, but instead of one-on-one instruction for a fee, Holcombe is offering free livestreamed demonstrations every Tuesday. “More people keep finding us [online] the longer we do it,” he says. “A number of people have asked if they could just sign waivers” and still make their own ornaments, “but we’re not doing that.” They are still taking customer requests, though. “One year, a customer asked if we could

do a cornucopia at Thanksgiving,” Holcombe says. “It wasn’t easy, but we did it.” Cynthia Jennings Field, 57, grew up in Bethesda, studied fashion illustration at Moore College of Art & Design in Philadelphia, and for years had a thriving career as a muralist. She used to paint murals for That’s Amore restaurants in the D.C. area. In 1998, she rented a cherry picker that could reach 20 feet high so she could paint moons, stars and

pizza pies (motifs from the song “That’s Amore”) above the customer counter at the chain’s old FedExField location. Today, Field lives with her husband in a colonial revival home built in 1914 that sits close to the road along Route 109 in Barnesville. It has a separate entrance around back for her Windsong Studio gallery. During her first studio tour as a Countryside Artisan five years ago, “a mother came in with her grown daughter, and the mother was admiring one of my pastels,” Field recalls. “They didn’t buy it then, but the daughter came back out to buy it for her mother for Christmas.” Another customer bought one of her paintings of Sugarloaf Mountain to give to his wife for their anniversary. “They’d gotten married there,” she says. “It’s the most rewarding thing when someone comes to my studio, meets me, and wants to give one of my paintings to someone that they love.” n Amy Halpern is a journalist who has worked in print and television news, and as the associate producer of an Emmy award-winning documentary. She lives in Potomac.

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A SHAMEFUL PAST Montgomery County is one of the most progressive and diverse counties in the country—but it also has a long history of racism BY EUGENE L. MEYER

MONOCACY CEMETERY IN TINY

Beallsville looms large in the county’s past and present. For a century, a granite tablet there has honored 32 men of Montgomery who crossed the Potomac River to enlist in the 35th Battalion Virginia Cavalry to fight for the South under Elijah Viers White, a native of Dickerson who moved to Leesburg in Loudoun County before the war. A small chapel near the tablet was the meeting place for the E.V. White Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy until it folded in 1947. Above the small lectern hung a sign: “Lest We Forget.” Behind it: two flags—the Stars and Stripes and the Stars and Bars—and framed portraits of Confederate icons Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. On a recent visit, I found a plywood board, painted gray, covering the granite 242

memorial. With Confederate statues and monuments being defaced and toppled, a groundskeeper said, the cemetery board had opted to hide the tablet’s face, which displayed the names of the Montgomery men who fought to preserve their way of life, based on human bondage. Montgomery County was not unique, located in a former slave state south of the Mason-Dixon Line and therefore in the “Dixie” of legend and song. Southern families ran the county into the middle of the 20th century, when newcomers—largely Northerners who moved to D.C. to work for the government—began migrating to the suburbs. Seemingly overnight, they changed the county’s political and social complexion, infusing it with new ideas that led to the integration of schools, playgrounds, restaurants and movie theaters, and reframed

Montgomery as a suburban county in the vanguard of progressive change. What came before was a long history of racism. Following emancipation were lynchings and Jim Crow laws that imposed widespread segregation. Racial covenants and redlining were pervasive; segregated Black communities lacked such basic amenities as indoor plumbing and paved roads well into the latter half of the 20th century.

IN 1860, ON THE cusp of the Civil

War, 38% of the county’s 18,322 inhabitants were Black—5,421 enslaved, 1,552 free. The county was agrarian; close-in suburbs had yet to form. Settlers had migrated in the 18th century from southern Maryland, bringing with them slaves who had worked in the labor-intensive tobacco fields. Here, the farmers, find-

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PHOTO BY EUGENE L. MEYER

A granite tablet at Monocacy Cemetery in Beallsville, photographed in August 2006, honors 32 men of Montgomery who crossed the Potomac River to join the 35th Battalion Virginia Cavalry under Elijah Viers White. A plywood board now covers the tablet’s face.

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Above: A small chapel near the granite tablet in Monocacy Cemetery was the meeting place for the E.V. White Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy until it folded in 1947. Above the lectern hung a sign: “Lest We Forget.” This photo was taken in August 2006; all Confederate artifacts have since been removed. Right: The memorial tablet remains, but is now covered by plywood painted gray.

Though there hadn’t been an organized slave revolt in the county, one originating in Charles County in 1845 ultimately reached Montgomery. The runaways—armed with pistols, scythe blades, bludgeons, swords, knives and clubs—were bound for the free state of Pennsylvania. They marched six abreast up today’s Route 355. Two miles south of Gaithersburg, they were confronted by a local militia, the Montgomery Volunteers, and a posse of citizens enlisted by Sheriff Daniel Hayes Candler, who lived in Rockville with his wife and five slaves. The insurrectionists fought back. A report in the Rockville Register reprinted in full on the front page of The Baltimore Sun on July 12, 1845,

blared “GREAT EXCITEMENT. Runaway Slaves.” The report said “these daring negroes” numbered 40, though there were rumors of nearly 200. In the confrontation, 10 were severely wounded. A large number escaped and were never recaptured. The rest—31, according to the newspaper—were led away in chains to the Rockville jail before being sold out of state by their owners. “This is the most daring movement which has ever come under our observation,” the Maryland Journal said. “We have heard of gangs of negroes travelling through parts of the country sparsely inhabited, but never before have we heard of their taking to the public road in open day, within 2 miles of a County town.”

PHOTOS BY EUGENE L. MEYER

ing the Piedmont soil inhospitable to tobacco, grew wheat and other grains, but they continued to depend on slaves to sustain their way of life. Poolesville was second in importance only to Rockville, 17 miles distant. It was the center of the Medley Election District, named for a Seneca tavern owner whose establishment was used as a polling place, and it contained some of the county’s largest plantations. In Rockville, then as now the county seat, Charles M. Price was a slave trader who worried about runaway slaves and slave rebellions. Price placed an ad in the pro-slavery Montgomery Sentinel on Dec. 8, 1855, for Anna Maria Weems, “about 15 years of age; a bright mulatto; some small freckles on her face; slender person, thick suit of hair, inclined to be sandy,” offering $500, nearly $20,000 in today’s dollars, for her return. Aided by Boston transplant Jacob Bigelow, a lawyer for the Washington Gas Light Co., she would successfully escape, eventually to Canada. Another Sentinel ad announced: “Public Sales Four Negroes, 1 man 19 years old, 1 boy 12, 1 girl 13, 1 woman 50—all slaves for life. Five head of horses, 2 cows, 15 head of hogs, sow and shoats.” And yet another Sentinel ad offered “very highest cash prices for negroes that are young and likely.” Hoping to incite a slave rebellion, in October 1859 John Brown staged his daring, if unsuccessful raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. In response, Price was among those with officer rank in a militia newly formed “for the protection of their homes and firesides, in these times of excitement.” At a Poolesville meeting, citizens resolved “that in view of the warlike attitude taken by the North against the South, we pledge our allegiance to the South in support of our constitutional rights, and that all we have of force and means shall be devoted, when required, to protect and defend Southern rights against the aggression of the North.”

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depriving them of that which they are justly entitled to, without a just cause or a just compensation.” There would be no compensation. As for the freedmen, following emancipation, 133 former slaves either enlisted, were drafted or “left with military,” according to the census. While the war raged, control of Poolesville changed hands several times. Both sides foraged supplies from local farms (and farm owners sought government compensation for the raids). Matthew Fields, editor of the Sentinel, was confined to the Old Capitol Prison for his secessionist sentiments.

THE MEN WHO FOUGHT for the

Above: Charles M. Price, a Rockville slave trader who worried about runaway slaves and slave rebellions, placed an ad in the proslavery Montgomery Sentinel on Dec. 8, 1855, for Anna Maria Weems.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MONTGOMERY HISTORY

Left: Anna Weems, who successfully escaped, eventually to Canada

Far better known is the story of Josiah Henson, who escaped from the Riley plantation on Old Georgetown Road. With his wife and children, he fled to Canada, where he founded the Dawn Settlement and was said to have been the inspiration for Uncle Tom in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Not surprisingly, Abraham Lincoln received only 50 of 2,400 votes cast in Montgomery County—2% of the total— in the 1860 presidential election. Lincoln received only one vote in Medley, the rest in Sandy Spring, a largely Quaker community. When war came, many of the planters’ sons headed south; the yeomen tended to join the Union army, though in smaller

numbers. Slavery cleaved the county and its citizens. In the up-county Medley District, a Union draft agent canvassing for eligibles wrote “Gone South” next to every name. Anti-abolitionist sentiment was strongly reflected in an 1864 referendum when Montgomery residents voted 3-1 against a new state constitution that freed the slaves (it passed statewide, but barely, on the strength of absentee ballots from Union troops). During the constitutional convention preceding the referendum, George Peter Jr., son of Montgomery County’s largest slaveholder, declared that “if we desire to render a people unhappy, turbulent and dissatisfied, we can adopt no surer plan than

Confederacy came home from war defeated but unbowed. They would run the county for decades as state senators, judges, county commissioners. With names like Allnutt, Beall, Butler, Chiswell, Dade, Darby, Dickerson and Elgin, down through the alphabet, they were known as the “ABCs” of Montgomery County. As the county recovered from the ravages of war, life for some could still be genteel. On a special day in June— marked throughout the South as Confederate Memorial Day—families gathered at Monocac y Cemeter y. The women brought box lunches, the children marched, politicians spoke. It was a celebration of a lost cause that seemed to live on in Montgomery County and elsewhere in the vicinity. Despite the 1864 emancipation in Maryland—unique among slave states still in the Union during the war— it wasn’t until Jan. 23, 1867, that the Maryland General Assembly outlawed “the sale of negroes into slavery as punishment for crime,” reported The New York Times. “There will hereafter be no distinction in the State in the mode of punishing white and black criminals,” according to the Times article. Then came the lynchings, two in 1880, one in 1896, carried out by “parties unknown,” grand juries concluded,

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idents established their own institutions—churches, benevolent societies, even schools—in segregated Montgomery. For whites, there was Bethesda Park, called the “Queen of the Pleasure Grounds,” now the Sonoma and Oakmont neighborhoods off Old Georgetown Road near the National Institutes of Health. It offered a 150-person steam carousel, free concerts and a show featuring three lions. A June 18, 1893, ad in the Sentinel declared the park was “Catering to White People Only.” Twenty years later, in Rockville, unreconstructed rebels dedicated a statue of a Confederate soldier on a granite base— inscribed “To our heroes of Montgomery County, Md. That we through life may not forget to love the thin gray line.” On June 3, 1913, Confederate Memorial Day, more than 3,000 turned out for the occasion in a county of then only 22,846 (in the 1910 census, 28.8% were Black). That would be the equivalent of 130,000 turning out today in a population of 1 million. While 50 to 70 aged Confederate veterans looked on, the statue, wrapped in Maryland and Confederate flags, was unveiled and the American flag unfurled. Then came the playing of “Dixie,” followed by a gun salute, taps and “The StarSpangled Banner.” The statue stood in a small triangular park in the middle of Montgomery Avenue, at the eastern entranceway to town. It would later be moved, first to the front of the courthouse, then in 1971 around

to the side, and finally, in 2020, in the midst of the Black Lives Matter movement, to White’s Ferry by the Potomac. There, a few miles from Monocacy Cemetery, it was defaced and toppled, and then sequestered by the property owners for safekeeping. For a Black youngster, entering downtown Rockville could be a jarring experience. Pat Tyson, 78, of Lyttonsville, recalls having to navigate past the Confederate statue smack in the middle of Montgomery Avenue at midcentury. “You’d have to go around him to get into the city,” she says. “I’d ask my father, ‘Who is that?’ He’d say, ‘Oh, he’s a soldier.’ ” Around the same time, a 1949 book about Rockville, Western Gateway to the National Capital, still referred to the Civil War as “the War between the States,” as the South preferred to call it. And in a 1960 pamphlet, the League of Women Voters of Montgomery County asserted, “Slavery was never a big issue here, either economically or psychologically. The people took no strong part on either side…”

AS LATE AS 1960, help wanted ads

for jobs in the county routinely specified race. Mrs. K’s Tollhouse in Silver Spring advertised for a dining room manager (white), waitresses (white) and kitchen help (colored). An ad for a dishwasher that appeared in the Evening Star on Jan. 14, 1960, read: “Colored, over 21: good opportunity to take charge of dish room

PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTGOMERY HISTORY

against Black men accused of assaulting young white women in Darnestown, Poolesville and Gaithersburg. “The region around…the capital of the Nation has become notorious for the punishment of colored criminals by Lynch law, and for a public sentiment which supports those who in this way administer what they believe justice demands,” the Times wrote after the Poolesville lynching of George Peck, a man described in The Washington Post on Jan. 13, 1880, as “a disreputable negro.” A second lynching, of John Diggs-Dorsey, occurred in Rockville that June. The last lynch victim in the county was Sidney Randolph, 28, an itinerant worker and one of 78 Black Americans lynched nationwide in 1896, the year the Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson enshrined “separate but equal” as the law of the land. Randolph was accused of attacking a white family in Gaithersburg, leading to the death of 7-yearold Sadie Buxton. Before he could be indicted, a mob dragged him from the Rockville jail and strung him up from a chestnut tree on July 4, the 120th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. His remains are in an unmarked grave in Section 18 of Parklawn Cemetery, off Veirs Mill Road in Rockville. Meanwhile, small Black communities founded by the free and formerly enslaved sprouted up-county. Sugarland, Jonesville, Jerusalem, Mount Ephraim, and Big Woods formed around Poolesville. Others—Scotland, Tobytown, Hawkins Lane, Lyttonsville—sprung up elsewhere. Remnants of these settlements survive: Lyttonsville, founded after the Civil War, shares the 20910 ZIP code with close-in Silver Spring. Some residents’ descendants, but few of the original homes, remain. Sugarland retains its historic church and a few homes in a rural setting a few miles south of Poolesville. Many of the formerly enslaved upcounty became tenant farmers or otherwise worked on the plantations where they’d been held in bondage. Black res-

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TOP PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ALICE KRESSE; BOTTOM PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GLEN ECHO TOWN ARCHIVES

Clockwise from opposite page: The River Road Colored School, pictured in 1942, was built for the segregated Black population; a 100-hour picket by Blacks and whites in front of Hiser’s movie theater on Wisconsin Avenue in July 1960; activist Marvous Saunders (right) was confronted by security guard Francis J. Collins in a demonstration on the carousel at Glen Echo Amusement Park in 1960.

in high-class restaurant. Don’t bother applying unless you are clean, quiet and reliable.” In 1957, the NAACP sent teams to visit 18 restaurants in the county; two groups of six Blacks each were turned away from six restaurants, The Washington Post reported. The segregated establishments were Little Taverns in Bethesda and Silver Spring; Toddle House, Drug Fair and Hot Shoppe in Bethesda; and the Woodward & Lothrop tearoom at Wisconsin and Western avenues in Chevy Chase. “We do not serve Negroes at the Chevy Chase store,” a Woodward & Lothrop statement said. “No explanation is necessary.” Florence Orbach of the county NAACP said she was “rather pleased. We expected to be refused in many more places.” John H. Hiser was president of the Bethesda-Chevy Chase Chamber of Commerce, a founder and president of the Bethesda Rotary Club, a county councilman and a Bethesda businessman who owned a bowling alley and a movie theater—known as Hiser’s—on Wisconsin Avenue near Old Georgetown Road. He was also a staunch segregationist before and after enactment of public accommodation laws. His resistance to integration prompted a 100-hour picket by Blacks and whites in front of his theater in July 1960. Laurence Henry, a Howard University divinity student “who averaged about 20 hours a day on the line,” according to an account in The Washington Post, said the picketing lasted “one hour for each year” since 1860. A sign posted at the theater door during the picketing said, “We shall continue our permanent policy of non-integration in the affirmed belief that it is in the best interests of our loyal and longtime patrons,” the paper reported. Protesters also picketed Hiser’s Chevy Chase home, the Washington Evening Star reported. Under public pressure, Hiser, rather than integrating, sold the theater that fall; it became the Baronet. Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School remained virtually all white at the time,

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Above: Alan Twyman, photographed in the small Black community of Scotland in 1968. The well water pump on the left was used by the entire community in lieu of indoor plumbing. Opposite page: In the greater Silver Spring area, 47 subdivisions had racial covenants; pictured here is a covenant from the Glenmont Hills neighborhood.

the federal government, and is operated by the National Park Service.

THE 1864 STATE constitution man-

dated free public schools—for whites only. The county’s first school for African Americans was founded and funded by Quakers in Sandy Spring two years later. In 1872, the state mandated public schools for Blacks, and in 1876 the county school board approved $600 to purchase a Rockville lot for that purpose. In the 1920s and 1930s, Blacks, local government and a fund established by philanthropist and Sears, Roebuck & Co. President Julius Rosenwald paid for 5,000 new, mostly two-room schools through-

out the South—including 15 in Montgomery County. But many rundown one- and two-room schools with potbellied stoves and outdoor toilets remained. Black students worked with hand-medown textbooks from the white schools, and Black teachers were paid less than their white counterparts. That changed after William B. Gibbs, a teacher and acting principal of Rockville Colored Elementary School, petitioned the county school board in 1936 to equalize pay and then, represented by future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, filed a lawsuit. An out-of-court settlement equalized salaries for the first time. The Supreme Court’s 1954 landmark

PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTGOMERY HISTORY

and few students participated in the protest. “I don’t think many of us gave it much thought,” recalls Barbara Johnson, B-CC class of 1961, who regularly patronized Hiser’s, “because so much was segregated then. There just wasn’t much that wasn’t.” To counter that reality, the county council enacted a law in 1962 that banned racial and religious discrimination in public accommodations. But as a compromise to ensure the measure’s passage, it contained a “tavern exemption,” to remain in effect for five years for establishments selling alcohol as a “prominent part” of their business. Crivella’s Wayside Restaurant in downtown Silver Spring became a test case after it repeatedly refused service to Blacks who worked at the nearby office of the U.S. Labor Department. When the state sought an injunction, a compromise desegregated the restaurant’s dining room but preserved management’s right to refuse service in the bar. That was in 1966, two years after the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed discrimination in public accommodations. Playgrounds had been segregated until 1955, when a federal appeals court ruled the practice illegal. Before then, only seven of the county’s 49 playgrounds were open to Black children (and four of the seven were at Black schools). The desegregation of Glen Echo Amusement Park came only after eight months of picketing, starting in June 1960, by Howard University students and young, white, mostly Jewish mothers pushing baby carriages from nearby Bannockburn, a postwar subdivision that had attracted white liberals who migrated from the North. “End Jim Crow at Glen Echo,” read one of the signs. Five Blacks were charged with trespassing for riding the park’s merry-go-round. The following spring, under intense public pressure, the park reopened for all races. An Easter Monday 1966 riot, “involving thousands of Negro teenagers,” a Black newspaper reported, jarred the community. The park was sold in 1970 to

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTGOMERY HISTORY

decision in Brown v. Board of Education declaring segregated schools inherently unequal promised fundamental change. There was no massive resistance in Montgomery County, as there was elsewhere. But the transition was not as smooth as has often been portrayed. It took seven years to achieve full integration. While the executive committee of the Montgomery County Council of Parent-Teacher Associations and the PTAs at Black schools pushed for immediate compliance, the school board balked. First, it said there must be a state legal opinion, since Maryland law specifically provided for separate Black schools. And 3,000 up-county residents petitioned for “gradual integration.” The school board initially allowed only voluntary transfers of Black students to white schools. Then the proposal was for one grade a year, which would mean full integration would have taken 13 years. A school boardappointed citizens committee said there should be “no deliberate mixing of races for the purpose of creating an integrated school.” The number of Black students at the time was relatively small; in 1960, just 5.5% of the county’s total population of 340,928 was Black. Ultimately, the Black schools were either closed or torn down, but not integrated, their teachers transferred to white schools, their Black principals demoted. A new high school that had been built for Blacks in Rockville to maintain the separate-but-equal fiction became the county’s school administration building. In Poolesville, some white parents picketed and kept their kids home for days. Recalled Phyllis Hebron, the lone Black student riding the school bus to Poolesville, “They used to throw chocolate milk at me.” Her white seat-

mate, the daughter of a woman for whom Phyllis’ mother cleaned house, was called “[N-word] lover” and also doused. But there was also down-county resistance. In Chevy Chase’s Rollingwood section, white parents voted 176-55 to oppose the transfer to their neighborhood school of 32 Lyttonsville children whose dilapidated two-room Linden School was being demolished. School boundaries would continue to generate controversy for decades. In the mid1990s, parents at overcrowded Walt Whitman High School bitterly fought the transfer of students to the more ethnically and economically diverse B-CC. There were perceived racial overtones; the proposal was dropped. The battle would foreshadow recent heated discussions over shifting boundaries to make school populations more diverse in a county still sharply divided.

RACIAL COVENANTS AND redlining

restricted Black access to most established and new subdivisions. Chevy Chase covenants that began appearing in the 1920s and 1930s declared that “no part of the land hereby conveyed shall ever be used, occupied by, sold, demised, transferred, conveyed unto, or in trust for, leased, or rented, or given to any negro or negroes, of any person or persons of negro blood or extraction, except that shall not be held to exclude partial occupancy of the premises by domestic servants of the grantee, his heirs and assigns.” Also excluded were “any person of the Semitic race including Armenians, Jews, Hebrews, Persians, and Syrians.” Jews and Blacks were barred from buying in tony neighborhoods like Kenwood, Mohican Hills and Sumner. In the greater Silver Spring area, 47 subdivi-

sions had racial covenants. Even after the Supreme Court ruled covenants unconstitutional in 1948, they remained on residential deeds and honored in spirit if not in law. Roland Barnes, the Black principal of then new Travilah Elementary School, filed a suit, which he ultimately won in the Supreme Court, after developers in 1962 refused to sell him a house in the Seven Locks Meadows subdivision. Most Black residents were confined to small enclaves such as Lyttonsville, which lacked paved roads and indoor plumbing until the 1960s; water came from a spring where Rosemary Hills Elementary School now stands or from a spigot on Brookville Road, for which users paid the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) $50 a year. “We had outhouses and pumps, and not everybody had a phone,” Pat Tyson recalled in a 2002 interview. “The streets were dirt roads with no street lights, and it was just gravel and dirt.” North Woodside, across the Talbot Avenue railroad bridge from Lyttonsville, was off-limits to Blacks; they could live there only as domestics. “For the purpose of sanitation and health,” a 1923 deed read, “the buyers shall not sell or lease said land to anyone of the race whose death rate is higher than that of the white race.” Developer E. Brooke Lee, celebrated as the father of modern Silver Spring and even today by the WSSC on its website as “an esteemed Montgomery County politician,” saw open housing as a threat. “Since law-enforced opening of homes and home communities is only aimed at White owned homes and White occupied communities,” he wrote in the Bethesda-Chevy Chase Advertiser in March 1967, “the law-enforced open housing statutes are Anti-White laws.”

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a shameful past As a white resident of Silver Spring said in 1967 to Judith Viorst, then writing for Washingtonian magazine, “It’s nice; there’s no colored here.”

THE LEGACY OF SLAVERY is barely

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Locust Grove was the Magruder plantation manor house where Westfield Montgomery mall is now located.

porate “anti-racist” studies in the curriculum. More than 90 protests were held in the county after the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The school board is considering renaming six schools whose namesakes were slaveholders or otherwise complicit in racial discrimination, including Col. E. Brooke Lee Middle School in Silver Spring, which has a student population that is 86% Black or Hispanic. The county council has declared racism a public health crisis and decreed that all future spending be vetted for racial equity. The council has also created a Remembrance and Reconciliation Commission and asked for a study of all streets in the county named for Confederates or slaveholding families—a daunting task as one drives on Veirs Mill Road or Muncaster Mill Road, Dufief Mill Road, Tschiffely Square Road and Tschiffely Mill Road, Chiswell Lane, Elgin Road, and Clagett Drive, Clagett Farm Drive, Clagett Pine Way, Clagett Road, Clagett Crossing Mews or Clagett Crossing Place, even Wootton Parkway or Wootton Avenue— named for families that owned slaves or fought for the South. Confederate memorials and monuments have been defaced and toppled, from Silver Spring to White’s Ferry. The reckoning has not eluded the

Monocacy Cemetery board, whose members have donated all Confederate artifacts—the flag, the portraits of Lee and Jackson, the “Lest We Forget” sign— to the county historical society. The tablet naming the Confederate soldiers will remain covered indefinitely. “I’ve listened to people offended by us having those kinds of things in the cemetery, in the county, in their visual face all the time,” says Mary Elgin Conlon, a cemetery board member whose grandmother was in the United Daughters of the Confederacy and whose great-grandfather was a Confederate soldier. “We were trying to be sensitive to that. We are not trying to change history.” Says Cherri Branson, a vice president of the Montgomery County branch of the NAACP who briefly served on the county council and before that as chief counsel for oversight on the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security, “The county has a long and really nuanced history.” It is a history that cannot be erased. n Eugene L. Meyer, a former Washington Post reporter and editor, is a contributing editor for Bethesda Magazine and the author of Five for Freedom: The African American Soldiers in John Brown’s Army. He lives in Silver Spring.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTGOMERY HISTORY

buried beneath the soil of Montgomery County. Magruder family farmland, worked by 23 slaves, would become the upscale Montgomery Mall. A 600-acre farm with 100 slaves held by the Peter family now encompasses Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health. The plantation of Greenbury Watkins, with 33 slaves, 13 under the age of 10, would become the Columbia Country Club. Meanwhile, a battle has been raging over Black remains said to be buried in the River Road Moses Cemetery under a parking lot and adjacent land slated for storage units. A grassroots group has collected soil from the site of George Peck’s 1880 lynching in Poolesville and plans another such exercise in September in Rockville for the two other lynching victims. The soil is to be displayed at the National Lynching Memorial in Montgomery, Alabama, along with similar collections from other lynching sites. The county, once almost exclusively Black and white, is today a multicultural mix of more than 1 million residents, with a large immigrant population. Whites make up 43% of the population; the county estimates that figure will decline to 27% by 2045. Racial tensions remain. County high schools have been dealing with overt and more subtle acts of racism. Blacks were seven times more likely to be subjected to traffic stops than whites in Bethesda, according to 2019 statistics. Says at-large Councilmember Will Jawando, the son of a white mother from Kansas and a Black father from Nigeria, “I’ve been pulled over many, many times.” But there have been some hopeful signs. Several hundred persons, many white, marched from Rockville down Rockville Pike in a Black Lives Matter protest in June. Then, some 6,100 signed a petition urging the schools to incor-

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As a 76-year-old widow, I joined a dating website. What I found was anything but love. BY LESLIE MILK | ILLUSTRATION BY ELLEN BYRNE

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THE FIRST YEAR OF widowhood, I got sympathy. “Oh, you poor thing, you’re so alone.” The second and third years, I got subtle hints. “Your husband wouldn’t want you to be alone.” By year four, the messages were very clear. “You’re still alone? Haven’t you ever heard of online dating?” So in January 2020 I signed up for Jdate, the site ostensibly for Jewish singles, for three months. It was excruciating. It was humiliating. I turned out to

be a wallflower on the web. I only went on two dates—both with the same guy. I should have known I was in trouble when the age category I was assigned to was 65 to dead. At least that’s how it sounded to me. But even then, the site was very optimistic. The first question Jdate asked as part of my profile was, “Do you want children?” I decided before I started that I would not lie about my age, use an old photograph, pretend to be athletic or adventurous, or claim I was looking for true love.

Here is my dating profile: I’m a 76-year-old widow and, yes, this is a recent picture. I am a mostly retired journalist who still loves a good story. I never covered hard news, but I am an expert on the Washington obsession with hair. I am a blonde for life. I grew up on Long Island but repented in Greenwich Village. I am a reader, a writer, an involved grandmother, a volunteer and a partisan political junkie. No Republicans need apply. I can carry a tune but my kids wish I wouldn’t. I’d rather spend

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flirting with disaster

time at the Delaware beaches than travel to exotic places. I’d rather drink a Mike’s Hard Cranberry Lemonade than a martini. My friends say I’m smart, funny and unlikely to ever totally retire. They are glad that I am trying to be more patient. So far it isn’t working. I’d like to meet an age-appropriate man who shares my passion for staying involved in everything around us. I’m not looking for a husband. I just want a great Saturday night date. My ideal first date would be dinner, no phones allowed. I talk a lot but I promise my date would get a speaking part. As soon as my profile went up, I had seven matches. Jdate rated them based on the site’s compatibility algorithm. The men ranged in age from 59 to 89. (I suspect a few “youngsters” sneaked into this age category for nefarious reasons.) Most of the men in my age group were seeking younger women. Much younger women. Should I have asked for much younger men? My son, Jeremy, just turned 50. Did I want to go out with one of his fraternity brothers? That wasn’t the only issue. My potential dates were all fitness fanatics. They said they loved to hike, bike, swim, ski, golf and otherwise engage in sweat-producing activities on an almost daily basis. The last time I hiked was probably in an outlet mall.

LOOKING OVER MY PROSPECTS,

I accidentally clicked on the “flirt” icon for Michael Number One. That’s not his real name. Many people on dating sites don’t use their real names. In my mind, I called all the men online “Michael.” I believe that half of the men my age are actually named Michael. The others are David, Steven, Stephen, Stuart, Stanley, Robert, Richard, Barry, Gary and Larry. I signed on as “QWERTY Lady,” using the first six letters on a computer keyboard. As soon as I realized my mistaken flirt, I messaged Michael Number One to say I didn’t mean to do it. Then I mes254

saged him again to say I didn’t mean not to do it either. Michael Number One was a recent widower who’d made a New Year’s resolution to date again. After a few messages back and forth, he suggested we meet for dinner or coffee. I explained I was leaving town for a long weekend but would contact him when I returned. When I got home, I messaged Michael Number One again. He replied that he had been contacted by two other women during my brief absence and had set up two coffee dates that week. He said he wasn’t good at “multitasking” but he would message me again if neither of his coffee dates worked out. That was the end of Michael Number One. Was I surprised that Michael Number One was searching for a date mere months after his beloved wife died? Not really. Shortly after my husband, Benjamin, died, a close friend—another recent widow—and I were having dinner in Bethesda. A man we both knew who had recently lost his wife came over to embrace us. “We’ve all had a tough year,” he said. Then he turned to his table where his new girlfriend was waiting. “Women mourn and men replace,” my dinner companion said. Michael Number Two was from New York. He reached out to me on behalf of a “friend” who was enchanted by my online picture but too battered by failed romance to contact me directly. He offered his lovelorn friend’s email address and urged me to send him a message. Give a stranger my email address? No way. That was the end of Michael Number Two. I had “flirts” from men in Louisville, Kentucky, and Orlando, Florida. Did they want me to travel to meet them? Send them money for a plane ticket to meet me? I didn’t respond. I didn’t feel any connection to any of the other men the site suggested as matches. My daughter, Meredith, told me that I was being too picky. That I should have an open mind. I couldn’t

expect Robert Redford. Even Robert Redford isn’t Robert Redford anymore. So, on my third week of not dating I decided to be proactive. I sent the same message to several potential dates: “I’m probably too old for you. But let’s chat anyway. I’m new at this and I need the practice.” Within hours I had a message from Michael Number Three in Virginia. My age was not a problem, he wrote. But he lived in Mount Vernon, Virginia, was a lifetime member of the NRA and an admirer of the 45th president. He did not think we were a good match. Goodbye, Michael Number Three. Michael Number Four required that I love his cats. He was also adamant about not meeting a woman who was depressed or who had ever been in psychotherapy. Is there a Jewish woman from New York who hasn’t been in psychotherapy? He gave me his cellphone number. I called but he never answered. I like to think that the cats were purring too loudly for him to hear the ring. I actually had a lively online dialogue with Michael Number Five. He was the only one who picked up on my “QWERTY Lady” reference and asked if I was writing about my online dating. Like several of the men I “met” online, he was not a dating app virgin. He was back on Jdate after a breakup with someone he met on the site. “There’s no story here,” he said. “It’s been done.” We were scheduling our first coffee date when I offhandedly insulted his religion—the New England Patriots. I said that Patriots coach Bill Belichick always looks angry. That I had long suspected Tom Brady was partially bionic. Plus, Patriots owner Robert Kraft had been caught in a Florida massage parlor investigation. Charges were later dropped. But I thought Kraft was a sleazy guy. Michael Number Five was not amused. For a coach, winning is more important than smiling, he said. Kraft is beloved by Patriots fans. He is a major philanthropist. (Michael Num-

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ber Five directed me to the Kraft philanthropy website.) He was certain that Kraft had been singled out by lecherous cops in Florida. I apologized several times for not understanding the seriousness of my spurious attacks on the Patriots. Michael Number Five expressed his outrage several times. After several more messages, we agreed that coffee was out of the question. That’s when I consulted Sally Craig, aka “Sally Love,” an online dating “expert” from Takoma Park whose own experience inspired her to do her own standup comedy routine, a riff on senior online dating. She advised me to sign up on multiple sites. She had signed up for Jdate even though she’s not Jewish. She went out with 10 men before she found her soulmate, she reported. Sally sympathized with Michael Number Five. She couldn’t have gone out with a Yankees fan, she said. Sally’s true love really is named Michael. Tell anyone that you are doing “mature” online dating and they have a story to share. It is always about someone else. A friend of a friend who found true love. A cousin who thought she found true love until her granddaughter recognized the picture of her online admirer as that of an Australian movie star. For “silver singles” there are also poignant “in sickness and in health” stories. What happens when two people meet online, fall in love, and then one develops a chronic illness? If you previously cared for a spouse with a devastating illness, you may not be willing or able to do it again. “You don’t want to be a nurse or a purse,” a good friend of mine said honestly. Then there are the painfully honest profiles of men and women whose spouses are in long-term care for dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. I learned of several who found great relationships with people who understood and accepted their situations.

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dating when you are over 70 can make BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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you feel young again—but not necessarily in a good way. All of the insecurities I felt at 16 came rushing back. Before my first trial date, I changed my outfit three times. I met Michael Number Six for coffee at a Panera about 5 miles from my apartment. I followed the safety rules: Always meet in a public place for a short period of time and don’t use your full name. Michael Six was a nice guy, a man close to my age, and a New York transplant with an accent that sounded like home to me. He was balding in a good way—no comb-over. He didn’t know a lot of people in town. We agreed to go out on a “real date” a week later. That’s when I really started to panic. I suddenly realized that I hadn’t specifically stated in my profile that I wasn’t interested in romance. What if Michael Six wanted

to have sex? I wasn’t about to expose my saggy self to anyone. The last time I puppy-sat for my daughter’s Havanese, I freaked out when the dog saw me naked. I sent off a quick email to Michael Six clarifying that I was only interested in friendship, not romance. He replied that was fine with him. Michael Six and I met for our real date at the Silver Diner on Rockville Pike. I thought we would be eating there. My date said he really wanted to go to a nicer restaurant. The place he picked was at Rio in Gaithersburg— much closer to my house than Silver Diner. Michael asked if I wanted to drive myself and meet him there. That felt like un-datelike behavior. I said we could go together in his car and then he could drive me back to mine.

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His car would kindly be called a classic. I am OCD about my car’s interior. Michael did not share this obsession. He said he had given up smoking years ago, but his car hadn’t gotten the message. Since the chosen restaurant was almost in my neighborhood, I offered directions for the quickest way to get there. He said he knew where he was going. After a few wrong turns, while he searched for an elusive traffic circle, I started yelling in a definitely un-datelike manner “turn right, then turn left.” At last, we got to the restaurant. As soon as we were seated, Michael announced that the place was too noisy and he removed his hearing aids. This did not bode well for dinner conversation. But we tried. We made it through dinner, shouting about our histories, our families, etc. He: This restaurant has a great selection of craft beers. Me: I don’t drink beer. He: Oh. Me: Now that you’ve moved here, close to your daughter, you get to see your grandchildren more often. He: They live in a townhouse. I can’t climb the stairs. Me: Oh. When the check arrived, Michael Six insisted that since he invited me, he should pay for dinner. He pulled out his wallet and surveyed its contents. Lots of business cards. His driver’s license. No credit cards. I paid the bill. He wanted to write me a check. I said he could pay the next time. Michael Six was still apologizing about the bill when we got back into the car. He once again assured me that he knew where he was going. This time I waited for only one wrong turn before I started barking directions. Finally, we were on Rockville Pike, a straight shot back to Silver Diner. Michael Six seemed to be having difficulty seeing the white lines. I started praying. My nasty inner self was muttering, “First he can’t hear and now he can’t see.”

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I was overjoyed to get into my own car and drive home alone. Michael Six did text afterward to say he found his credit card and he again offered to pay for dinner. He is a very nice man. He deserves to find a good woman. Just not me.

THAT WAS THE END of my adventure on Jdate. I did have to pay for an additional three months. Like many subscription services, if you don’t affirmatively cancel, you are automatically reenrolled. When I found out, I made sure my membership ended. Sally Love had advised casting a wide net. So I checked out Match. com. I created a profile. I just couldn’t force myself to sign up. There are a lot of fish in the sea, but what if I only caught snakeheads? Match.com was still trying to tempt me with messages from men who wanted to meet me when COVID-19 ended dating as we know it. Match.com offered me a 50% discount. OurTime, an offshoot of Match for people over 50, also sent me emails about possible matches. I deleted them all. Some people would say pandemic dating is the best of all possible worlds— you can “date” without actually having to meet someone in person. However, I haven’t had a pen pal since I was 8 years old. And I hate being on FaceTime and Zoom staring at horrifying close-ups of my face. So I am quitting the game, withdrawing my name, ghosting romance. Maybe I’m selfish. I don’t want anyone asking me, “What’s for dinner?” Maybe I’m spoiled. I had a good marriage for 46 years. Or maybe I’m just not ready. Ask me again when I’m 80. n Leslie Milk was the lifestyle editor of Washingtonian magazine for 32 years. She is the author of It’s Her Wedding But I’ll Cry if I Want To: A Survival Guide for the Mother of the Bride.

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ROCKVILLE INTERIORS 5414 Randolph Road, Rockville, MD 20852 301-424-1900 | www.rockvilleinteriors.com

BIO

Family owned and operated, Rockville Interiors was founded by Tom Fulop. We have been the D.C. area’s premier fabric workroom since 1971. We specialize in the design, fabrication and installation of custom window treatments, re-upholstery, slipcovers, pillows, cushions, bed ensembles and more. OUR WORK

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2020 Winner of Bethesda Magazine Best of Bethesda Readers’ Poll for Best Place for Custom Window Treatments. Customers can meet with interior designers in the showroom or at home for guidance on selecting the perfect fabrics for their projects. We operate in locally owned workrooms where our team of artisan tailors, seamstresses and carpenters pair state-of-the-art technology with old world craftsmanship. Everything is made by hand, using only the world’s finest home fashion fabrics. Factory-trained technicians oversee delivery and installation. Visit our gorgeous showroom or schedule your free in-home design consultation today!

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JACK ROSEN CUSTOM KITCHENS 12223 Nebel St., Rockville, MD 20852 240-595-6732 | www.BeautifulRosenKitchens.com

BIO

Voted “Best Kitchen Design Firm, 2020” by the readers of Bethesda Magazine, Jack Rosen Custom Kitchens, Inc. continues to be one of the most celebrated kitchen design firms in the Washington, D.C. area. Offering award-winning designs and fine cabinetry for culinary, closets, home offices and entertainment with outstanding service. OUR WORK

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Jack Rosen Custom Kitchens is widely recognized for creating captivating home environments. The kitchen at the top shows a more contemporary kitchen with sleek cabinetry and custom island featuring the cooktop and custom hood above. The photo at the right shows a more transitional kitchen offering an eat-in island with custom cabinetry in a pale wedgewood blue and antique glaze, which coordinate beautifully with the beamed ceiling and dynamic backsplash. Jack Rosen Custom Kitchens, Inc., believes every award-winning space should be laid out to fit one’s lifestyle and serve as the central hub for gathering, entertaining or working from home.

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KITCHEN & BATH STUDIOS INC. 7001 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815 301-657-1636 | designnow@kitchen-bathstudios.com kitchenbathstudios.com

BIO

Kitchen and Bath Studios has built a reputation for being the premier design center in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Our showroom features five cabinet lines that provide a vast selection of styles finishes and price points. Contact us today and receive a free design layout with expert consultation from one of our six designers on staff. OUR WORK

Celebrating 28 years!

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Top photo is a beautiful contemporary in custom stain slab door cabinets and lower photo is traditional inset white paint by Christiana Cabinetry. Our spacious showroom displays cabinets from Christiana Cabinetry, Signature, Crystal, Executive and Designers Choice. We have counter tops in stone, wood, stainless steel, Quartz and Corian. Our experienced designers include Nancy Kotarski, NCIDQ; Karen Hourigan, CKD; Jerry Weed, CKD; Fred Grenfel; Peggy Jaeger, CKD, ABD; and Jordan Weed. Call for a free consultation, Monday-Friday 9-5, Saturday 10-3.


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COUNTRY CASUAL TEAK 7601 Rickenbacker Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20879 1-800-289-8325 | info@countrycasualteak.com www.countrycasualteak.com

BIO

Country Casual Teak is the nation’s leading manufacturer of teak outdoor furniture. Our 40+ year commitment to the highest standards of quality, craftsmanship and customer service has earned us the trust of homeowners across the country. We are proud of our Maryland heritage, from our founding in Germantown to our corporate headquarters in Gaithersburg. PROJECT

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Country Casual Teak manufactures beautiful teak outdoor furniture that transforms outdoor spaces. Our pieces range from classic designs, such as our Seneca and Calypso collections, to our contemporary selections, such as the Casita and Summit. Whether a dining set, Adirondack chair or poolside chaise, we take pride in knowing that our Grade A teak outdoor furniture, constructed with time-honored techniques such as mortise and tenon joinery, will last for generations to come.

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YZIGN INTERIOR DESIGN 7315 Wisconsin Ave, Ste 400W, Bethesda, MD 20814 301-718-8774 | Hello@yZiGN.com | www.yZiGN.com

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yZiGN is the Boutique Interior Design Studio specialized in creating signature interior designs. Iwona Petrov and Alex Petrov are co-founders and together run this versatile high-end firm. Their team of designers enjoys working with clients who are looking for something unique. Something different to complement their personality and style. yZiGN's impressive mastery and broad range of style is a reflection of their desire to create beautiful homes that affect your emotional state, your behavior and your overall state of mind. From the most intimate homes to the grandest residences, yZiGN takes bold design concepts and infuses them with style, warmth, sophistication and a sense of home. Seeking out the perfect object, unique work of art, or the desired antique, the yZiGN team creates environments that reflect their clients' lives and personalities. What sets yZiGN apart is their natural talent, collaboration process, attention to detail and their desire to push creative boundaries in ways that respect and redefine traditional design aesthetics. Their designs create spaces where their clients feel moved and inspired. yZiGN's innovative and refreshing approach and ability to visualize and interpret a diverse range of clients' needs are unmatched. 262

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O’NEILL DEVELOPMENT 11 Russel Ave., Gaithersburg, MD 20877 301-877-9310 | www.oneilldev.com

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Since 1975, O’Neill Development has been building and remodeling homes throughout the Metro area and Eastern Shore, including four architecturally themed communities. O’Neill Development’s impressive sustainable building resume includes net zero and net zero ready homes and the first passive house and the first passive modular built in this region.

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O’Neill specializes in custom residential work, providing extensive pre-construction and construction services including help in realistic budgeting, architect selection, design development, and problem solving during early planning stages; management by strict agenda and site control during construction; and thorough after-market service. Since 1975, O’Neill has been known for traditional architectural styling and construction; and recently has expanded its portfolio into sustainable building and design, including passive and net zero ready building and contemporary designs. In all custom work performed, O’Neill stresses transparency and teamwork to achieve a successful project. O’Neill is fortunate to work with some of the best architects in the region and beyond, and selects subcontractors and suppliers for their quality, dependability, and fair pricing. O’Neill’s project managers represent over 80 years of building and management experience. In a high turnover industry, O’Neill is unusual with an average employment tenure of over 20 years. BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021 263


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ELIE BEN ARCHITECTURE, LLC

FISHER LUMBER

An award-winning architecture firm, designing custom homes to promote a timeless, intuitive living experience. We believe that each project should be unique, representing the owner’s lifestyle. Our goal is to cherish client’s expectations and design a living space that is both inspiring and functional.

Family owned and operated since 1947, Fisher Lumber provides top quality building materials. Our selection includes only the best materials from the brands professionals trust. With an enthusiastic and friendly staff, our focus is outstanding service that exceeds customer expectations.

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JACK ROSEN KITCHENS

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Voted “Best Kitchen Design Firm, 2020” by the readers of Bethesda Magazine, Jack Rosen Custom Kitchens, Inc. continues to be one of the most celebrated kitchen design firms in the Washington, DC area. Offering award-winning designs and fine cabinetry for culinary, closets, home offices and entertainment with outstanding service.

Voted “Best in Customer Service”, we provide highquality craftsmanship in wallpaper installation and interior/exterior painting. We work with homeowners or interior designers to complete beautiful projects. Our projects have been featured in Domino, Classic Home and the Washington Post. Your partner in painting and wallpapering!

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RESOURCE GUIDE


fitness. wellness. medicine.

PHOTO BY LINDSEY MAX

health

Rainy, a yellow Labrador retriever, is trained as a diabetes alert dog and assists a Darnestown family. For more, turn to page 268.

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health | BE WELL

TOSSING AND TURNING Why sleep matters more than people think BY CARALEE ADAMS | PHOTO BY LISA HELFERT

SLEEP IS OFTEN THE missing link when people think about their health, says Dr. Asefa Mekonnen, but getting them to pay attention to it can be a tough sell. “The public sees people who don’t sleep enough as heroes. When someone says, ‘I can function on short sleep,’ society thinks they are successful,” says the 52-year-old pulmonologist, who is the founder and director of the Premier Sleep Center at Rockville Internal Medicine Group (RIMG). “We always talk about good nutrition and exercise, but to me, normal sleep is the main pillar of health.” Mekonnen grew up in Ethiopia, where his father was an educator and his mother was a pediatric nurse—she nicknamed her young son “doctor” and took him on rounds at the hospital. After medical school, he moved to Chicago, where he did an internship in internal medicine at the University of Illinois and specialized in pulmonary medicine and intensive care at Northwestern University. Drawn to the field of sleep and its ability to improve lives, he trained at the Stanford Sleep Medicine Center. In 2004, he settled in the D.C. area, where he says the large Ethiopian community made him feel at home. A father of four, Mekonnen works in the same office as his wife, Dr. Belen Tesfaye, a gastroenterologist at RIMG. The family lives in Potomac. Mekonnen says people typically get far less sleep than what research shows is ideal: seven to eight hours for adults; nine for teens. Even a single night of sleep deprivation can reduce brain function and the ability to clear out toxins. As for catching up on sleep, that’s not a substitute for a routine, Mekonnen says. Lack of sleep contributes to accidents and is associated with high blood pressure, stroke, 266

cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, memory issues and depression. Since the arrival of the pandemic, Mekonnen is seeing more patients than usual who are unable to get to sleep or stay asleep, some complaining about bad COVID-related dreams. “There is anxiety, fear about catching COVID, about the economy and work situations,” he says. Instead of waking up early, moving around and interacting socially, many people are staying up late and struggling to get up in the morning. About a third of Mekonnen’s patients are dealing with insomnia; another third have breathing-related issues such as snoring or sleep apnea; and the rest have other sleep disorders, including narcolepsy. Before COVID, patients usually would stay overnight in one of RIMG’s four private rooms with beds so they could be observed and analyzed. These days, they’re more often diagnosed through home-monitoring—a medical smartwatch and forehead device, Mekonnen says. Treatment can involve behavior therapy, medication, oral appliances, or a device to keep the airway open if the patient has sleep apnea. Mekonnen says good sleep habits begin in the morning by waking at a fixed time and using bright lights and physical activity to get going. He advises people to avoid caffeine after midday, and suggests staying off screens for 30 minutes before bed and dimming lights to trigger melatonin, a natural hormone that aids sleep. A woman once told Mekonnen that her husband wasn’t the man she married because of his moodiness in the morning after a poor night’s sleep. After treatment for sleep apnea, the patient thanked Mekonnen for saving his marriage. n

IN HIS OWN WORDS... SNORE NO MORE “Snoring is one of the main reasons people see me. Loud snoring can disrupt the family and bed partners. About 80% of people who snore have habitual snoring with no airflow limitation, but about 20% of people end up having sleep apnea. The family might observe them struggling to breathe, having unrefreshing sleep…and there is also high blood pressure and diabetes—those are clues to possible apnea.”

THE AWAKENING “Insomnia is difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep. Beyond that, it affects your daytime function. Some people toss and turn, wake up a few times at night, but are alert in daytime. But if given the opportunity to get to sleep and you can’t within a half hour, you are awakening two or three times, it’s disrupting your daytime function— and if it’s happening for two or three months—you should have your sleep assessed.”

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DEEP SLEEP “In children, growth happens during sleep, so it’s critical. Kids who are sleep-deprived can have attention deficit disorders and learning disabilities and lower performance at school. It affects the brain function. For adolescents who are short on sleep or have distracted sleep, they have higher incidents of psychiatric diagnoses and higher rates of suicide. When it comes to adults, sleep is a basic physiological function that rejuvenates our whole body.”

CATNAPS “There is a big cultural difference with napping. In some countries, a siesta is normal. If someone has to nap, it should coincide with our natural circadian rhythm. During the day, right after lunch, our natural alertness goes down. Taking a nap at that time and keeping it to less than half an hour is fine, as long as it doesn’t interfere with nighttime sleep.”

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health

Nick, right, with his father, Larry, and their dogs Rainy (blue collar) and Clyde

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By Their Side College sophomore Nick Opack has Type 1 diabetes. So does his younger sister and their father. For years they’ve relied on dogs who are specially trained to detect the scent of low blood sugar and alert them when something is wrong. BY AMY HALPERN | PHOTOS BY LINDSEY MAX

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health Rainy is trained to jump up on Nick with her front paws if she detects a low blood sugar scent.

T

THE ALERT ON Colleen Opack’s cellphone went off around 4 a.m. She grabbed the phone from her nightstand and checked the app that tracks her kids’ blood sugar levels. The sound was warning that her son, Nick, then a freshman at Catholic University, had a glucose reading that was dangerously low. Nick had moved into his dorm in D.C. a month earlier, in August 2019, and was still adjusting to campus life and the eating habits of college students. Colleen knew that with Type 1 diabetes, Nick had more to manage than the average 18-year-old. She feared that if he didn’t wake up soon and take some of the glucose gummies he kept by his bed, he’d fall into a coma, a serious concern for

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those with his disease. “I was panicked. …We were an hour away, and I didn’t know if Nick was even in his dorm room or someplace else,” she says. She called him several times but kept getting voicemail. “I was trying to make noise to wake him up.” Colleen turned to her husband, Larry, who also has Type 1 diabetes. Just keep trying, he said. Finally, Nick picked up. He was eating the gummies and he was fine. He’d slept through the calls and the warnings on his phone, but his diabetes alert dog, Rainy, woke him. Nick had gotten Rainy the summer before his senior year at Our Lady of Good Counsel High School in Olney. He was fine with being “that guy with the service dog,” and his classmates

adored Rainy and knew not to pet her when she was wearing her blue service dog vest. That predawn morning, when the dog’s usual nudges and licks didn’t jostle Nick awake, the 4-year-old yellow Labrador retriever started walking in circles on top of him. “It’s hard to sleep through a 60-pound dog standing on you while trying to keep her balance,” Nick says. “When I got up and checked my phone, I saw the alert and like 12 missed calls from my mom.”

SINCE THE BEGINNING of the pan-

demic, Nick, now 20, has been staying at his parents’ house in Darnestown and taking his classes from the sunporch, which he converted into what the family

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calls “Nick’s lab.” Before his college transitioned to online courses, the biochemistry major brought Rainy almost everywhere—except to the lab, because of the chemical odors, and band class because of the loud noises. He also avoided crowded gatherings so Rainy wouldn’t get stepped on. Luckily, he says, “I’m not a big party person.” On a sunny afternoon in early January, Nick is out on the deck with his dad, Rainy and the family’s older diabetes alert dog, Clyde, a 95-pound goldendoodle they’ve had for nearly a decade. Clyde, who’s mostly retired, is napping. Colleen, who went back to work full time last year for an Annapolis-based nonprofit, is working virtually in the den. Rainy is sitting by Nick’s feet—she stays near him at all times—sniffing every few minutes for the scent he emits when his glucose level drops. She gets a treat and a lot of praise when she detects it and lets him know. On days when his levels fluctuate a lot— more than 40 factors can affect blood sugar in diabetes—she’ll alert him a half dozen times. Other days she may only do it once or twice. When Nick goes inside to get her service dog vest, Rainy runs to him. The vest means they’re going out and she has to be on her best behavior. She stands close to him so they can walk in lockstep, her tail still wagging. Whenever the family is sitting on the couch and Nick, his dad or his 17-yearold sister, Katie—who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in first grade— has a sudden drop in blood sugar, Rainy jumps up on whoever is giving off the scent. Clyde, who’s 12, will also alert them, though “he’s not as apt to jump up

quickly when he smells something from across the room,” says Colleen, the only person in the family who doesn’t have diabetes. “He’ll still do it—he just moves more slowly. He doesn’t have the exuberance of youth.” Colleen first heard about alert dogs in 2009, when she spent a week with Katie at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in D.C. just after her diagnosis. In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone that helps blood sugar get to the cells, where it can be used for energy. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream and can cause health complications. Colleen needed to know how to manage her daughter’s disease—how to test blood sugar levels, which type of insulin to use and when. “I had to learn to give my child a shot—I’d never given a shot before,” she says. “It was traumatic and very sad.” One day at the hospital, an emotional support dog was making the rounds. “Someone said, ‘You know, they can train dogs to alert to low blood sugar,’ so I started researching.” A few years later, Nick started showing signs of the disease, too. One night he kept heading to the bathroom while he and his dad watched the latest Harry Potter release. “When he got up just before the final scene, I said, ‘Dude, it’s the third time you’ve gotten up, and I’ve been watching how much you’ve been drinking. I’m going to have to check your blood sugar,’ ” Larry says. He waited to test Nick until after his wife had gone to bed—he didn’t want to worry her unnecessarily—but when he saw the reading, he woke Colleen and she drove Nick to

the emergency room while he stayed with Katie. Nick’s blood sugar was nearly 600 milligrams per deciliter. For nondiabetics, the normal range is generally between 70 and 140. Nick, then a fifth grader, says he’d known for weeks that he had diabetes— he was thirsty all the time and eating more than usual yet he wasn’t gaining weight. But he didn’t want to tell his parents. “I felt sad for them—it meant they would have two kids with diabetes,” he says. “I knew it would make my mom cry.” After finding out about Katie, Colleen feared it was only a matter of time before Nick was diagnosed, despite doctors’ assurances that the odds were low, even with a father and sister who have the disease. According to Dr. Brynn Marks, an endocrinologist at Children’s National Hospital in D.C., a non-twin sibling of someone with Type 1 diabetes has roughly a 6% chance of getting it. A child has a 4% to 8% chance of developing Type 1 if a parent has it, so it’s “rare, but not unheard of,” Marks says, for a parent and two children to have the disease. While Type 2 diabetes is strongly tied to genetics, the exact cause of Type 1 is not fully understood. A popular theory, according to Marks, is that the disease is triggered by an autoimmune reaction to a virus that destroys the beta cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Though some people have a genetic propensity that makes them more likely to have that autoimmune response, many of those individuals won’t ever develop Type 1 diabetes. Unlike Type 2, which can be avoided or delayed with healthier eating and lifestyle changes, Type 1 isn’t

“It’s hard to sleep through a 60-pound dog standing on you while trying to keep her balance,” Nick says.

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health caused by diet, and no one knows how to prevent it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When Nick was diagnosed in 2012, Larry says his son “took it like a champ.” Both Nick and Katie, who’s now a senior at Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart in Bethesda, started attending Children with Diabetes’ annual Friends for Life conference in Orlando, Florida. They became active fundraisers for JDRF, formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. In high school, Nick served as a JDRF ambassador and spent a day on Capitol Hill speaking to members of Congress to help secure federal funding for Type 1 research. For Colleen, Nick’s diagnosis was different than Katie’s. “I was still sad for Nick that his life would no longer be as carefree as before,” she says, “but I already knew I could manage it.”

WHEN THE KIDS WERE young, each

carried a kit to school so they could test their blood sugar throughout the day. They never complained, Colleen says, “at least to me.” Every morning, she made sure the kits were loaded with snacks, test strips, insulin, syringes, finger prickers and Glucagon, an emergency medicine for extreme episodes of low blood sugar. She’d write down the carbohydrate counts for their lunches so the nurse would know how much insulin they’d have to take before they ate. These days, Colleen says, “We can all look at a plate of food and tell you about how many carbs it has in it.” About 1.6 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association; Type 2 diabetes is far more common, affecting more than 32 million people in the U.S. Though some people with Type 2 are insulin-dependent, many produce enough insulin to manage the disease through diet, exercise and medication. Those with Type 1 require careful monitoring and regular insulin injections to keep glucose levels from staying elevated for long stretches of time. Years of 272

Nick, pictured at his family’s Darnestown home, brings Rainy almost everywhere. He hopes to be back on campus at Catholic University this fall.

improperly controlled high blood sugar can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, amputations and death. “But it’s low blood sugar that scares parents the most,” Colleen says. “It’s the driving force behind getting the dog, because you can go from a normal blood sugar range to a dangerously low blood sugar range in a surprisingly short period of time.” For those with Type 1 diabetes, if low blood sugar isn’t dealt with right away—the Opacks’ go-to is a fun-size pack of Skittles—it can cause seizures and a loss of consciousness. Glucose dips also can be hard to detect, a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness, which is especially worrisome at night. “When you are asleep, you can’t always

feel your low blood sugar—the shaky, sweaty feeling you get that you can feel when you are awake,” she says. Colleen’s introduction to Type 1 diabetes came when Larry was diagnosed at age 27, two months before the couple got engaged. At the time, he was working as a nurse in a private medical practice in Kensington and studying to be a certified diabetes educator. Larry’s father was diagnosed with Type 1 a few years before he was born. When Larry learned he had diabetes, he was able to get the disease under control quickly. “I knew my husband was living a great life with it, and it never affected anything we’d ever wanted to do,” Colleen, 53, says. “At the same time, the last thing you ever want to

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hear is that your child has an incurable, chronic disease. It’s terrifying—and then it’s a whole new normal.” For the first several years after Katie and Nick were diagnosed, the only reliable way to monitor their blood sugar was by a finger prick. “I was up every three hours to check their levels,” says Colleen, who stopped working when Nick was born and decided not to go back after finding out Katie had diabetes. She bought special lighted eyeglasses so she could prick the kids’ fingers, squeeze the blood onto a test strip, feed it into a glucose meter, and see the results without waking them. When their levels were high, she’d give them a shot of insulin. When their levels were low, she’d have them swig down a juice box and then quickly rinse with mouthwash to get the sugar off their teeth. Then she’d tuck them back in and set her alarm for three hours later.

LARRY, 55, WILL NEVER forget the

night he awoke at 2 a.m. to a wet dog nose pressed against his face at an airport hotel. It was 2012, and the family had flown to Texas a week earlier to pick up Clyde and meet the dog’s trainer, Bev Swartz, who’d had him since he was a puppy. They were spending their last night near the airport for an early flight home in the morning. Larry and Colleen were asleep, and the kids were in another room on a pullout sofa. “Clyde was supposed to be in the living room alerting to the kids, but instead he came into the bedroom and was waking me up,” says Larry, a government contracting consultant. “I thought the whole thing—getting this dog and all—was a mistake, but then Colleen said, ‘Why don’t you check your blood sugar?’ And it turns out it was low.” When they got home and started bringing Clyde on errands, they learned

that he could even detect low blood sugar in strangers. “One time, I was with the kids in line at the bank, and Clyde—who never barks—started barking and getting all antsy,” Colleen recalls. “The kids’ levels were fine, so I said to everyone in line, ‘If anyone here has diabetes, they may want to check their blood sugar.’ ” A woman in line rushed to the bathroom, came back and told Colleen, “It was me.” A retired Navy medical technician, Swartz had been working with alert dogs for nearly 20 years when the Opacks contacted her. To be added to her two-year waiting list, the family had to submit four references and a letter from Katie’s doctor asserting that they were properly managing her disease. “If the doctors are saying [a patient’s] diabetes is going up and down like a yo-yo and it’s out of control, I question the attitude a bit,” Swartz, now 80, says. “The dogs don’t replace any

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medical equipment—they are just part of the plan.” A year after they contacted her, Swartz sent photos of a new litter of puppies. “They lucked out with Clyde,” Swartz says. “He was easy to train.” Swartz kept Clyde with her for another nine months, letting him mature and master obedience. Then she asked the family to mail her T-shirts and washcloths that had Katie’s low blood sugar scent on them. She cut the items into strips and carried them around in her pockets in sealed bags. When she discreetly opened a bag and Clyde alerted to the smell, she’d reward him. She says alert dogs can also detect high blood sugar, but she concentrates on low blood sugar training because that’s “the immediate danger.” Swartz trains no more than eight dogs a year and “practices” with them at Walmart, Home Depot, neighborhood restaurants and other public places to make sure the dogs will alert regardless of distractions and other scents. Since “a big dog pawing at a little kid could knock the kid right over,” she trains her dogs to nudge. Only when the dog alerts for low blood sugar with 85% to 95% accuracy—both at home and in public—does Swartz tell the family it’s time to come for their own training. Most families stay at a motel near her property for about a week before bringing the dog home. “Training the dogs is the easy part,” Swartz says. “It’s training the people that’s hard.” Nick found out he had diabetes just weeks before the family got Clyde. He knew back then that he wanted to bring an alert dog with him to college. In middle school and high school, he spent a week every summer with Swartz to learn more about the training process. When it came time for him to get his own alert dog, Nick specifically requested a Labrador. Swartz found a breeder and trained Rainy. “You couldn’t ask for a better teenager to be around a dog than Nick,” she says. “Even when he was 11, he understood right away how and why the training works.” A 2019 report out of the University 274

of Bristol in England found that trained dogs alerted their owners to 83% of their low blood sugar episodes that occurred during the 12 weeks of the study. Nick says Rainy picks up on his drops in glucose 15 minutes ahead of the alert on his phone—the dog detects the subtle change in scent he emits just before his blood sugar level drops, while the alert doesn’t go off until after it happens. Nick says Rainy’s early warnings are particularly helpful before he takes an exam or a long car ride because he can fend off an episode before the symptoms kick in. “For the dogs, it’s the greatest game ever,” Colleen says. “They know when they alert, they get the best treats—whatever we’re cooking, they are going to get.” In recent years, some trainers in the U.S. have been accused of selling expensive, poorly trained pets rather than reliable diabetes alert dogs. Insurance rarely covers the cost of the dogs—which may be as high as $25,000—and if they aren’t doing what they’re supposed to do, their owners have little recourse. Swartz says she’s fielded nearly two dozen calls from people who bought alert dogs elsewhere and want her to retrain them.

TODAY, LARRY AND THE kids each

have insulin pumps that work with the press of a button and reduce the need for injections. They also have CGMs, or continuous glucose monitors, that consist of a sensor under the skin that every five minutes checks their “interstitial glucose level” in the fluid between their cells. The sensor is attached to a transmitter that sends the data wirelessly to their cellphones. The kids’ CGMs also send the data to their parents’ phones. The sensors have to be periodically relocated to a different site on their abdomen or arm, but with the CGMs the Opacks rarely need to prick their fingers. When their glucose levels are high or low, their CGMs send an alert. Colleen programmed her phone’s alert to sound like an ambulance siren. “If we’d had two diabetes alert dogs when the kids were little,

I’d have slept better,” she says. On family trips, they bring a carryon suitcase filled with diabetes supplies. During a vacation in Jamaica a few years ago, Nick, a scuba diver, got his certification in open water diving. “It’s not that I’m living my life completely different,” he says. “It’s just that I have to think ahead.” Each time he dives, he brings a doctor’s note saying he has clearance. The evening before he goes, he eats extra carbohydrates. Before going underwater he checks his levels in case he needs to make last-minute adjustments, and he brings a waterproof bag of fast-acting glucose for mid-dive low blood sugar emergencies. So far he hasn’t had to take any. When classes start in August, Nick hopes to be living in a downtown D.C. apartment with some buddies, including a young woman with Type 1 diabetes whose mom is excited that her daughter will have Rainy around. “When I’m with my friend group and we’re all sitting around together, [Rainy] will go around and sniff everyone and then come back and sit at my feet,” Nick says. “They all think it’s so great that she’s looking out for them, but it’s really that she knows if she finds the low blood sugar, she’ll get a treat.” “She’s invaluable,” Colleen says of the dog. “I don’t need Nick to have a roommate or campus security—I need him to have Rainy.” Katie won’t be bringing an alert dog to college in the fall. “It’s a lot of responsibility,” Swartz says, “and not everyone wants to commit to taking a service dog with them everywhere they go.” It’s the overnight hours that worry her mom most. “I’ll probably want her to check in with me every morning,” Colleen says. “I’ll want her to send me a quick text with a thumbs up so I’ll know she’s on it.” n Amy Halpern is a journalist who has worked in print and television news, and as the associate producer of an Emmy award-winning documentary. She lives in Potomac.

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Kusshi Sushi, a restaurant at North Bethesda’s Pike & Rose, sells more than 300 kinds of snacks imported from Japan, Taiwan and Korea. For more, turn the page.

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The snack mart at Kusshi Sushi is stocked with candy, chips and other items. Themed assortment packs include a Japanese snack mystery box and a Pocky lovers grab bag.

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TABLE TALK BY DAVID HAGEDORN | PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY

Snack Time BEING AT KUSSHI SUSHI in North Bethesda’s Pike & Rose development is like being a kid in a candy store—literally. In April, as the pandemic set in and owner Wesley Yao was looking for ways to expand sources of revenue, he hit upon an idea. He converted 500 square feet of space in the corner of Kusshi Sushi next to its sushi bar into a snack mart and filled it with upwards of 300 kinds of candy, chips and other savory snacks and non-alcoholic drinks imported mostly from Japan but also from Taiwan and Korea. “I 100% would not have done this without the pandemic,” says Yao, who was born and raised in Rockville and also owns Hanaro Sushi in Bethesda. “We were a busy restaurant that seated 148 with a check average of $75 per person. I had tables in that area—a six-top and four-top. Then we went to 25% capacity and I had all this space. We were allowed to sell alcohol to go, but there’s no money in that— people make their own drinks at home. So I went the snack route.” Customers are allowed in the store one at a time to shop for snacks; assortment boxes and select individual items are for sale online. Yao, 33, wanted to bring back memories for everyone, but particularly for Asian people in his age group, and offer things they’ve never tried before. “A lot of these were childhood snacks for me. I joke with my mother that I did this because I wasn’t ever allowed to have any of it,” he says. Ogling colorful packets of candy and snack food—yuzu salt crackers, variously flavored potato chips (including honey butter, steak and sushi), all kinds of Pocky sticks—crammed in racks floor to ceiling really does bring out the kid in you, and that’s what Yao is hoping. He wants people who are picking up takeout sushi to see the snacks and buy them impulsively.

It’s a marketing ploy he was already familiar with. “Pre-pandemic, I used to hand out sushi lollipops to kids even though they cost me $1 each. Why? Because kids dictate where parents eat. The sushi lollipop reminds them that Kusshi Sushi is a fun place.” The next time the family goes out to eat, Yao figures, the kids will ask to return to the place with the candy. Assortment boxes curated by Yao and his staff are the best introduction to the snacks. Among the delights in our candy mystery box of about 40 items ($29.99): long, slender, ice cream cone–like cookies (one matcha flavored, one strawberry); a sushi lollipop and various other suckers; chocolate squares; sour candies; fruit-flavored chews; tart hard candy balls; Pocky sticks; candy ramen; bubble gum; Pop Rocks mixed with tiny Sweet Tart–like candies; Twinkie-like cakes; and a Hello Kitty Mallomar-like cake. A Japanese snack mystery box ($29.99), a Pocky lovers grab bag ($49.99) and a Hi-Chew lovers pack ($39.99) are among the assortment boxes offered. Yao says he’ll continue with the snacks after the pandemic. “We do Insta stories— the snacks are very Instagram and Facebook friendly so they generate interest. Sales are OK, but we give away 25 to 35% of the snacks. If someone orders a bag of shrimp chips in the original flavor, I might throw in some other flavors, like yuzu pepper, hot garlic and wasabi ones, so they try something different. If someone had to wait too long for their takeout, I’ll give them snacks.” It may be the only time you pick up food and hope it’s not ready when you get there. Kusshi Sushi Snack Mart, 11826 Trade St., North Bethesda (Pike & Rose), 240-7700355, kusshisushi.com

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Falafel patties are served in bowl form or as a pita sandwich (opposite) at Dalia’s Falafel in Kensington.

Falafel Find PAY ATTENTION AS YOU drive along Howard Avenue in Kensington so you don’t miss the driveway between the buildings at 4140A and 4132—it leads you behind an antiques store to Dalia’s Falafel, where Ben Assaraf, 27, and Cody Chatham, 26, sell that chickpeabased Middle Eastern staple from tables set up in front of a storage unit that Assaraf’s father owns. The business partners, both from Rockville, have been friends since their days at Walter Johnson High School in Bethesda. “We wanted to start a food business and were thinking about doing a taco truck or stand,” Assaraf says. “We switched because everyone’s doing tacos already and falafel’s more authentic to my family, who’s from Israel. I was the first to be born [in the U.S.].” The business is named after Assaraf’s mother, Dalia, who supplied family recipes for the falafel and its accompanying sauces—tahini and spicy schug (a verdant, spicy puree of cilantro, red chili pepper, garlic and olive oil). For the falafel, dried chickpeas are soaked overnight, then chopped finely in a food processor with cilantro, parsley, onions, garlic and jalapenos. The mixture is formed into large, flat patties that are fried in canola oil and served two to an order, either as a pita sandwich or in bowl form without bread. Both come with tomatoes, carrots, cucumbers, red cabbage, pickles, red onions and the two sauces. Making the falafel into patties instead of balls, Assaraf says, means he can fit more toppings in the sandwiches. (They are truly bountiful.) 280

Dalia’s is a basic operation. Assaraf and Chatham prepare all the falafel components at a commercial kitchen they rent in Rockville, then transport them to Kensington, where they have a refrigerator, a portable fryer and a microwave (for warming the pita) in the storage unit. Chatham’s parents are in on the act, too—they both work for a food distributor and helped track down the pita bread from a bakery in New Jersey. Judging from the small crowd waiting for orders when we visited, word has gotten out about Dalia’s. “What makes Dalia’s better than anyone else’s is that we load our falafel with tons of herbs and spices like they do in Israel, so when you bite into it, it’s bright green and fluffy and really flavorful,” Assaraf says. We concur. Dalia’s Falafel, 4128B Howard Ave., Kensington, 240-447-2977, @daliasfalafel on Instagram

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&

COMINGS GOINGS Announced spring arrivals: Chef and restaurateur Victor Albisu will open the first Maryland location of his Virginia-based fast-casual taqueria Taco Bamba in Rockville’s Congressional Plaza. In Bethesda, D.C.-based Salis Holdings will open a mobile app-based takeout and delivery food hall called Ensemble in the old South Street Steaks space on Cordell Avenue. A Caribbean restaurant, Little Island Kitchen, is slated to open in Montgomery Village in March.

Walter Johnson alums Ben Assaraf (left) and Cody Chatham started their falafel business in August.

Java Nation, which has cafes in Kensington and North Bethesda, will open a location in Gaithersburg’s Kentlands development this summer. Olney’s Al Sospiro Trattoria closed in December. It had been open since 2007. January saw several closings, including Lighthouse Tofu & BBQ, a Korean restaurant that operated in Rockville for 15 years. Nick’s Chophouse in Rockville’s King Farm development made its temporary COVID closing permanent. Krazy Steve’s Comfort Cuisine, which opened in Silver Spring in June 2019, closed the doors of its barbecue restaurant but will continue to offer catering. n

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DINING GUIDE

CHECK OUT THE ONLINE VERSION OF THE DINING GUIDE AT BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM Editor’s Note: Due to the coronavirus pandemic, restaurants may be closed, only offering takeout, or open with limited capacity. We suggest you call ahead to confirm a restaurant's status before going there.

BETHESDA AJI-NIPPON 6937 Arlington Road, 301-654-0213. A calm oasis on a busy street, where chef Kazuo Honma serves patrons several kinds of sushi, sashimi, noodle soups, teriyaki and more. Try a dinner box, which includes an entree, vegetables, California roll, tempura and rice. L D $$

ALATRI BROS. (EDITORS’ PICK) 4926 Cordell Ave., 301-718-6427, alatribros. com. The folks behind Olazzo and Gringos & Mariachis bought Mia’s Pizzas and revamped it with a new name and decor. They kept the Naples-style pies that come from a woodburning oven, but added small plates and healthy options. Sit in the cheery dining room with green, gray and white accents or under an umbrella on the patio.  L D $$

&PIZZA 7614 Old Georgetown Road, 240-800-4783, andpizza.com. Create your own designer pizza from a choice of two crusts (both are vegan and one is also gluten-, soy- and dairyfree), three cheeses (including a vegan option) and five sauces or spreads. Toppings for the thin, crispy crusts range from the usual suspects to Beyond Meat sausage and tater tots. This location of the hip, fast-casual chain has limited seating. L D $

ANTHONY’S COAL FIRED PIZZA 7776 Norfolk Ave., 240-781-6943, acfp.com. A full-service restaurant in Woodmont Triangle serving coal-fired pizzas and other Italian fare, Anthony’s is part of a Florida-based chain. The corner restaurant includes a large bar area with TVs. Voted “Best New Restaurant” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021. ❂LD$

BACCHUS OF LEBANON (EDITORS’ PICK) 7945 Norfolk Ave., 301-657-1722, bacchusoflebanon.com. This friendly and elegant Lebanese staple has a large, sunny patio that beckons lunch and dinner patrons outside when the weather is good to try garlicky hummus, stuffed grape leaves, chicken kabobs, veal chops and dozens of small-plate dishes. ❂ L D $$ 282

BANGKOK GARDEN 4906 St. Elmo Ave., 301-951-0670, bkkgardenbethesda.com. This real-deal, family-run Thai restaurant turns out authentic cuisine, including curries, soups and noodle dishes, in a dining room decorated with traditional statues of the gods. L D $

THE BARKING DOG 4723 Elm St., 301-654-0022, barkingdogbar. com. A fun place for young adults, with drink specials nearly every night and bar food such as quesadillas and burgers. Karaoke night is held weekly. ❂ L D $

Key Price designations are for a threecourse dinner for two including tip and tax, but excluding alcohol. $ up to $50 $$ $51-$100 $$$ $101-$150 $$$$ $151+ Outdoor Dining b  Children’s Menu B Breakfast R Brunch L Lunch D Dinner

BARREL AND CROW 4867 Cordell Ave., 240-800-3253, barrelandcrow.com. Contemporary regional and southern cuisine served in a comfortable setting with charcoal gray banquettes and elements of wood and brick. Menu highlights include Maryland crab beignets, shrimp and grits and roasted trout. ❂ R L D $$

BENIHANA 7935 Wisconsin Ave., 301-652-5391, benihana.com. Experience dinner-as-theater as the chef chops and cooks beef, chicken, vegetables and seafood tableside on the hibachi. This popular national chain serves sushi, too. The kids’ menu includes a California roll and hibachi chicken, steak and shrimp entrees. J L D $$

BETHESDA CRAB HOUSE 4958 Bethesda Ave., 301-652-3382. In the same location since 1961, this casual, family-owned dining spot features jumbo lump crabcakes, oysters on the half shell and jumbo spiced shrimp. Extra large and jumbosized crabs available year-round; call ahead to reserve. ❂ L D $$

BETHESDA CURRY KITCHEN 4860 Cordell Ave., 301-656-0062, bethesda currykitchen.com. The restaurant offers lunch buffet and Southern Indian vegan specialties, served in a spare and casual setting. There are plenty of choices from the tandoor oven, as well as vegetarian, seafood and meat curries. L D $$

BGR: THE BURGER JOINT 4827 Fairmont Ave., 301-358-6137, bgrtheburgerjoint.com. The burgers are good and the vibe is great. Protein choices

include beef, chicken and Beyond Meat. Pick your own toppings or choose from a handful of selected combos, such as the Wagyu Wellington, with caramelized onions, roasted mushrooms, black truffles, blue cheese and BGR’s mayonnaise-horseradish “mojo” sauce. ❂ J L D $

THE BIG GREEK CAFE

4806 Rugby Ave., 301-907-4976, biggreekcafe.com. Owned by the Marmaras brothers, the cafe serves Greek specialties, including a top-notch chicken souvlaki pita. LD$

BISTRO PROVENCE (EDITORS’ PICK)

4933 Fairmont Ave., 301-656-7373, bistroprovence.org. Chef Yannick Cam brings his formidable experience to a casual French bistro with a lovely courtyard. The Dinner Bistro Fare, served daily from 5 to 6:30 p.m., offers a choice of appetizer, main course and dessert for $35. ❂ R L D $$$

BLACK’S BAR & KITCHEN (EDITORS’ PICK) 7750 Woodmont Ave., 301-652-5525, blacksbarandkitchen.com. Customers count on the impeccable use of fresh and local

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Vegetarian tacos at Casa Oaxaca in Bethesda

ingredients and enjoy dining on the expansive patio. The bar draws crowds for happy hour. ❂ R L D $$$

BRICKSIDE FOOD & DRINK

4866 Cordell Ave., 301-312-6160, brickside bethesda.com. Prohibition-era drinks meet Italian bar bites and entrees. Dishes range from fried pork and waffles to short ribs. Try one of the colorfully named punches, which include Pink Murder Punch and Snow Cone Punch. ❂ R L D $$

CADDIES ON CORDELL

4922 Cordell Ave., 301-215-7730, caddieson cordell.com. Twentysomethings gather at this golf-themed spot to enjoy beer and wings specials in a casual, rowdy atmosphere that frequently spills onto the large patio. ❂JRLD$

PHOTO BY DEB LINDSEY

CASA OAXACA

4905 Fairmont Ave., 240-858-6181, casaoaxacamd.com. The focus is on tacos at this family-owned Mexican restaurant, but you’ll also find fajitas, salads, quesadillas and more on the menu. There’s an indoor bar and an outdoor beer garden. ❂ J L D $$

CAVA

7101 Democracy Blvd., Suite 2360 (Westfield Montgomery mall), 301-658-2233; 4832 Bethesda Ave., 301-656-1772; cava.com.

The guys from CAVA Mezze restaurant have created a Greek version of Chipotle. Choose the meat, dip or spread for a pita, bowl or salad. House-made juices and teas provide a healthful beverage option. ❂ (Bethesda Avenue location) L D $

CESCO OSTERIA 7401 Woodmont Ave., 301-654-8333, cesco-osteria.com. Longtime chef Francesco Ricchi turns out Tuscan specialties, including pizza, pasta and focaccia in a big, jazzy space. Stop by the restaurant’s Co2 Lounge for an artisan cocktail before dinner. ❂ L D $$

CHEESY PIZZI 8021 Wisconsin Ave., 240-497-0000, cheesypizzibethesda.com. In addition to the standard offerings of a pizza joint, this spot (formerly Pizza Tempo under different owners) has sandwiches and boat-shaped Turkish pizza known as pide. L D $

CHEF TONY’S (NEW-PROMENADE LOCATION) 4926 St. Elmo Ave., 301-654-3737, cheftonysbethesda.com; 5225 Pooks Hill Road (The Promenade), 240-858-6735, cheftonyspromenade.com. Chef-owner Tony Marciante focuses on Mediterranean fare, offering dishes ranging from fish and seafood to chicken, steak and pasta.

Desserts include cannoli, cheesecake and tiramisu. J R (St. Elmo Avenue location only) L (St. Elmo Avenue location only) D $$

CHERCHER ETHIOPIAN 4921 Bethesda Ave., 301-652-6500, chercherrestaurant.com. The second branch of a D.C. Ethiopian spot, this restaurant and bar took over the space housing Suma. The decor is modern-contemporary and the menu features dishes—from beef to vegan—served on one large platter, meant for sharing, and Ethiopian wine. L D $

CHIKO (NEW) 7280 Woodmont Ave., 301-968-0053, chikodc.com. The name of this fastcasual outpost of a D.C.-based chain is a combination of Chinese and Korean, and so is its menu. Entrees are priced at $15-$20 and include Orange-ish Chicken and Cumin Lamb Stir Fry. Appetizers include Crispy Chicken Spring Rolls and Wok-Blistered Green Beans. J D $$

CITY LIGHTS OF CHINA 4953 Bethesda Ave., 301-913-9501, bethesdacitylights.com. Longtime Chinese eatery serves familiar Sichuan and Beijing fare, including six types of dumplings and seven handmade noodle dishes. Red walls and chocolate-colored booths give the place

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a sharp look. L D $$

COOPER’S MILL (TEMPORARILY CLOSED) 5151 Pooks Hill Road, 301-897-9400, coopersmillrestaurant.com/bethesda. The restaurant showcases a modern, stylish menu with stone-oven flatbreads, homemade tater tots and locally sourced produce. Local beers on draft and by the bottle, plus regional bourbon and gin. Happy hour and private dining are offered. B R L D $$

THE CORNER SLICE 7901 Norfolk Ave., 301-907-7542, thecornerslice.net. New York-style pizza, available by the slice or as a 20-inch pie. Specialty pizzas include the spinach-artichoke white pie with ricotta, mozzarella and parmesan and the Buffalo Chicken Pie with blue cheese and hot sauce. ❂ L D $

CUBANO’S

DAILY GRILL (TEMPORARILY CLOSED) One Bethesda Metro Center, 301-656-6100, dailygrill.com. Everyone from families to expense-account lunchers can find something to like about the big portions of fresh American fare, including chicken pot pie and jumbo lump crabcakes. ❂ J B R L D $$

DOG HAUS BIERGARTEN 7904 Woodmont Ave., 301-652-4287, bethesda.doghaus.com. This fast-casual California-based chain serves hot dogs, sausages, burgers and chicken sandwiches. The hot dogs are all beef and hormone- and antibiotic-free. The industrial-chic space includes picnic tables, TVs, a bar and more than two dozen beer choices. J L D $

DON POLLO 10321 Westlake Drive, 301-347-6175; donpollogroup.com. Juicy, spiced birds and reasonable prices make this Peruvian chicken eatery a go-to place any night of the week. Family meals that serve four or six people are available. ❂ L D $

DUCK DUCK GOOSE (EDITORS’ PICK) 7929 Norfolk Ave., 301-312-8837, ddgbethesda.com. Thirty-five-seat French brasserie owned by chef Ashish Alfred. Small plates include steak tartare, and squid ink spaghetti with Manila clams and Fresno chilies. Among the entrees, look for updates of French classics, such as dry-aged duck with Bing cherries, and halibut with scallop mousse and puff pastry. ❂ L D $$ 284

Elaborately topped hot dogs at Dog Haus Biergarten

FISH TACO 7251 Woodmont Ave., 301-652-0010; 10305 Old Georgetown Road (Wildwood Shopping Center), 301-564-6000, fishtacoonline.com. This counter-service taqueria features a full roster of seafood as well as non-aquatic tacos, plus margaritas and other Mexican specialties. Voted “Best Tacos” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020. J L D $

FLOWER CHILD 10205 Old Georgetown Road, 301-6644971, iamaflowerchild.com. A fast-casual restaurant that’s part of a national chain, Flower Child has an emphasis on vegetarian eating (grain-based bowls, vegetable plates, salads) but also offers protein add-ons such as chicken, salmon and steak. Voted “Best New Fast-Casual Restaurant” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020. ❂ L D $

GARDEN GRILLE & BAR 7301 Waverly St. (Hilton Garden Inn), 301654-8111. Aside from a breakfast buffet featuring cooked-to-order omelets, waffles, fruit and more, the restaurant offers an extensive menu, from burgers to pasta dishes. J B D $$

GREGORIO’S TRATTORIA (NEW) 4611-A Sangamore Road, 301-347-6830, gregoriostrattoria.com. Proprietor Greg Kahn aims to make everyone feel at home at this family-owned restaurant serving a hit parade of traditional Italian favorites, with all the familiar pasta, pizza, chicken, veal and seafood dishes; the gluten-free menu offers pizza, cheese ravioli and quinoa pastas.

J L D $$

GRINGOS & MARIACHIS (EDITORS’ PICK) 4928 Cordell Ave., 240-800-4266, gringosandmariachis.com. The owners of the popular Olazzo Italian restaurants in Bethesda and Silver Spring trade in the red sauce for salsa at this hip taqueria with edgy murals and plenty of tequila. Voted “Best Happy Hour” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021. L D $

GUAPO’S RESTAURANT 8130 Wisconsin Ave., 301-656-0888, guapos restaurant.com. This outpost of a local chain has everything you’d expect: margaritas and chips galore, as well as a handful of daily specials served in festive Mexican surroundings. Perfect for families and dates. JRLD$

PHOTO BY DEB LINDSEY

4907 Cordell Ave., 301-347-7952, cubanosrestaurant.com. Find authentic Cuban cooking with dishes such as ropa vieja (shredded beef in onions, peppers and garlic) and fried plantains. L D $$

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GUARDADO’S 4918 Del Ray Ave., 301-986-4920, guardados.com. Chef-owner Nicolas Guardado, who trained at Jaleo, opened this hidden gem devoted to Latin-Spanish cooking in 2007 and has developed a following with tapas specialties like shrimp and sausage, stuffed red peppers and paella. J L D $

HANARO SUSHI 7820 Norfolk Ave., 301-654-7851, hanarosushi.com. The restaurant’s modern dark woods combined with a light-filled dining room brighten its corner location, and the menu includes sushi and Asian fusion main courses such as pad Thai and galbi (Korean ribs). The bar offers a daily happy hour.

❂ L D $$

HAWKERS 7117 Bethesda Lane, 240-203-8135, eathawkers.com. This Bethesda Row branch of a Florida-based chain features bright decor with neon signs for a fun vibe reminiscent of an Asian street. The menu stars small plates such as baos (buns filled with chicken or pork belly), chicken dumplings, wontons, beef and chicken skewers, wings and coconut shrimp. There are also rice and noodle dishes, and

lighter vegetable-based eats, such as green papaya and shrimp salad, edamame and fivespice green beans. ❂ L D $

HIMALAYAN HERITAGE 4925 Bethesda Ave., 301-654-1858, himalayanheritagebethesda.com. The menu includes North Indian, Nepali, Indo-Chinese and Tibetan cuisines, featuring momos (Nepalese dumplings), Indian takes on Chinese chow mein and a large selection of curry dishes. L D $

HOUSE OF FOONG LIN 4613 Willow Lane, 301-656-3427, foonglin. com. The Chinese restaurant features Cantonese, Hunan and Sichuan cuisine, including chef’s recommendations, low-fat choices and lots of traditional noodle dishes. L D $$

HOUSE OF MILAE 4932 St. Elmo Ave., 301-654-1997. The Kang family, who own Milae Cleaners in Bethesda, bring simple Korean dishes to their first food foray. Chef “M&M” Kang prepares home-style fare such as bulgogi, galbi and bibimbap. The kids’ menu has one item: spaghetti, made from the recipe of owner

Thomas Kang’s former college roommate’s mother. J L D $

THE IRISH INN AT GLEN ECHO 6119 Tulane Ave., 301-229-6600, irishinnglenecho.com. This historic tavern has been a family home and a biker bar, but its incarnation as the Irish Inn has been delivering smiles and hearty food since 2003. Traditional Irish music on Monday nights, The 19th Street Band or other live music on Wednesday nights and live jazz on Sunday nights. ❂ J R L D $$

JETTIES 4829 Fairmont Ave., 301-769-6844, jettiesdc.com. The only suburban location of the popular Nantucket-inspired sandwich shop, which has five restaurants in Northwest Washington, D.C. Aside from the signature Nobadeer sandwich (roasted turkey and stuffing with cranberry sauce and mayonnaise on sourdough), look for large salads and an innovative children’s menu. ❂ J L D $

KADHAI (EDITORS’ PICK) 7905 Norfolk Ave., 301-718-0121, kadhai. com. This popular Indian restaurant formerly known as Haandi serves a variety of traditional chicken, lamb and seafood dishes, plus rice and vegetarian dishes and a

PHOTO BY DEB LINDSEY

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selection of breads. An extensive lunch buffet is offered daily. ❂ L D $$

LA PANETTERIA 4921 Cordell Ave., 301-951-6433, lapanetteria.com. La Panetteria transports diners to a quaint Italian villa with its impeccable service and Old World atmosphere, serving Italian and Argentinian dishes, such as homemade pasta, pizzas and Argentinian meats. There are vegan options on the menu. L D $$

LE PAIN QUOTIDIEN 7140 Bethesda Lane, 301-913-2902; 10217 Old Georgetown Road (Wildwood Shopping Center), 240-752-8737, lepainquotidien. com. New York-based Belgian-born bakery/ restaurant chain with farmhouse vibe, featuring organic breads, European breakfast and dessert pastries, savory egg dishes, soups, Belgian open-faced sandwiches, entree salads, wine and Belgian beer by the bottle. ❂ J B R L D $

LEO & LIV (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

LUKE’S LOBSTER 7129 Bethesda Lane, 301-718-1005, lukeslobster.com. This upscale carryout features authentic lobster, shrimp and crab rolls; the seafood is shipped directly from Maine. Try the Taste of Maine, which offers all three kinds of rolls, plus two crab claws.

❂ LD $

MAKI BAR 6831 Wisconsin Ave. (Shops of Wisconsin), 301-907-9888, makibarbethesda.com. This tiny 30-seat Japanese restaurant and sushi bar offers 60-plus kinds of maki rolls, categorized as Classic (tuna roll), Crunch Lover (spicy crunch California roll) and Signature (eel, avocado, tobiko, crab), along with sushi, sashimi, noodle bowls and ricebased entrees. L D $$

MAMMA LUCIA 4916 Elm St., 301-907-3399, mammalucia restaurants.com. New York-style pizza dripping with cheese and crowd-pleasing red sauce, and favorites like chicken Parmesan and linguini with clams draw the crowds to this local chain. Gluten-free options available.

❂ L D $$ 286

A dim sum offering at Q by Peter Chang in Bethesda

MATCHBOX 7278 Woodmont Ave., 240-465-0500, matchboxrestaurants.com. At this local chain, look for mini-burgers, a “ginormous meatball” appetizer and thin-crust pizza with toppings, including herb-roasted chicken, roasted mushrooms, fire-roasted red peppers and Spanish onions. ❂ J R L D $$

MEDIUM RARE 4904 Fairmont Ave., 301-215-8739, mediumrarerestaurant.com. A prix fixe menu that comes with bread, salad, steak and fries is the sole option at this small chain outpost (there are two Medium Rares in D.C.). Desserts cost extra. Weekend brunch also features a prix fixe menu. D $$

MOMO CHICKEN & GRILL 4862 Cordell Ave., Bethesda, 240-483-0801, usmomo.com. Skip the breasts, and head for the wings or drumsticks at Bethesda’s first Korean fried chicken spot. Options such as seafood pancakes, bulgogi and bibimbap are part of the extensive offerings, all served in a hip space with framed record albums gracing the walls. ❂ J L D $$

MON AMI GABI (EDITORS’ PICK) 7239 Woodmont Ave., 301-654-1234, monamigabi.com. Waiters serve bistro classics such as escargot, steak frites and

profiteroles in a dark and boisterous spot that doesn’t feel like a chain. Live jazz Thursday nights. Voted “Best Restaurant Wine List” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2019.

❂ J R L D $$

MORTON’S, THE STEAKHOUSE 7400 Wisconsin Ave., 301-657-2650, mortons.com. An ultra-sophisticated steak house serving pricey, large portions of primeaged beef and drinks. The restaurant is known for a top-notch dinner experience but also offers lunch and a bar menu. L D $$$

MUSSEL BAR & GRILLE 7262 Woodmont Ave., 301-215-7817, musselbar.com. Kensington resident and big-name chef Robert Wiedmaier serves his signature mussels, plus wood-fired tarts, salads and sandwiches. Wash them all down with a choice of 40 Belgian beers.

❂ R L D $$

NOT YOUR AVERAGE JOE’S (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

10400 Old Georgetown Road, 240-3164555, notyouraveragejoes.com. This Massachusetts-based chain’s moderately priced menu offers burgers, big salads and stone-hearth pizzas, plus entrees including Anything But Average Meatloaf. ❂ J L D $$

PHOTO BY DEB LINDSEY

8120 Wisconsin Ave. (Bethesdan Hotel), 301-652-2000, tapestrycollection3.hilton. com/tc/the-bethesdan-hotel. Set in a hotel, this farm-to-table restaurant serves Mediterranean and American cuisine, from filet mignon and Moroccan lamb shank to butternut squash ravioli. There are also flatbreads and sandwiches, and a bar called But First Drinks (BFD). B D $$

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St.Veg OLAZZO (EDITORS’ PICK)

7921 Norfolk Ave., 301-654-9496, olazzo. com. This well-priced, romantic restaurant is the place for couples seeking red-sauce classics at reasonable prices. Founded by brothers Riccardo and Roberto Pietrobono, it was voted “Best Italian Restaurant” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020.

❂ L D $$

THE ORIGINAL PANCAKE HOUSE

7700 Wisconsin Ave., Store D, 301-9860285, ophrestaurants.com. Along with the classic flapjacks on this chain’s menu, you’ll find flavor-packed items such as apple pancakes with a cinnamon sugar glaze. And it’s not just pancakes to pick from: The restaurant serves a variety of waffles, crepes, eggs and omelets. J B L $

PASSAGE TO INDIA (EDITORS’ PICK)

4931 Cordell Ave., 301-656-3373, passagetoindia.info. Top-notch, panIndian fare by chef-owner Sudhir Seth, with everything from garlic naan to fish curry made to order. ❂ R L D $$

PAUL

4760 Bethesda Ave., 301-656-3285, paul-usa.com. Fifth-generation, family-owned French bakery becomes an international chain, with locations in close to 35 countries. Aside from breads and pastries, look for soups, sandwiches and quiche. ❂ B L D $

PICCOLI PIATTI (NEW)

10257 Old Georgetown Road (Wildwood Shopping Center), 240-858-6099, piccolipiattipizzeria.com. The owner of local chains Fish Taco and Don Pollo opened this full-service Italian concept in the former Oakville Grille spot. Specializing in 12-inch Neapolitan-style pizzas, the restaurant also sells sandwiches, salads, small plates and pasta dishes. ❂ L D $$

PINES OF ROME

4918 Cordell Ave., 301-657-8775. Longtime Italian restaurant, formerly on Hampden Lane, still serves traditional pasta, pizza, fish and seafood at prices that are easy on the wallet. The white pizza is a hit, and don’t forget the spaghetti and meatballs. L D $

PIZZERIA DA MARCO (EDITORS’ PICK)

PHOTO BY DEB LINDSEY

8008 Woodmont Ave., 301-654-6083, pizzeriadamarco.net. Authentic Neapolitan pizzas fired in a 900-degree Italian brick oven range from the Siciliana with eggplant confit and black olives to the Solo Carne with sausage, pepperoni and salame. Salads, antipasti and calzones available, too.

❂ LD $

POKE DOJO

7110 Bethesda Lane, 240-696-0990, pokedojo.com. The owners of Bethesda’s Hanaro Sushi opened this poke place at Bethesda Row. The menu includes a handful of signature bowls, or you can build your own

from the raw fish, rice and toppings offered. LD$

POSITANO RISTORANTE ITALIANO 4940-48 Fairmont Ave., 301-654-1717, epositano.com. An authentic Italian, familyrun restaurant popular for private events, large and small. Colorful rooms are decorated with Italian landscapes, copper pots and hanging plants, and the outdoor patio is one of the most beautiful in the county. ❂ L D $$

100% Plant-Based Homestyle Cooking From Scratch

PRALINE BAKERY & BISTRO 4611 Sangamore Road, 301-229-8180, praline-bakery.com. This sunny restaurant offers a tempting bakery takeout counter, full dining service and a patio. The food, which includes chicken pot pie and pralines, is French with an American accent.

❂ J B R L D $$

Q BY PETER CHANG (EDITORS’ PICK) 4500 East West Highway, 240-800-3722, qbypeterchang.com. Notable chef Peter Chang’s high-end flagship restaurant offers traditional Chinese dishes in an attractive, modern space. Peking duck, double-cooked pork belly and other authentic Sichuan cuisine are served, and some dishes are “ultimate spicy” for brave palates. Dim sum is available. ❂ J L D $$

14929 Shady Grove Rd. Rockville, MD (301) 605-7511

www.stveg.com

RAKU (EDITORS’ PICK) 7240 Woodmont Ave., 301-718-8680, rakuasiandining.com. Voted “Best Sushi” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020 and “Best Restaurant in Bethesda” in 2021, this casual restaurant has bamboo walls that do little to dampen the noise, but the menu satisfies with everything from sushi to kung pao chicken. ❂ L D $$

RICE PADDIES GRILL & PHO 4706 Bethesda Ave., 301-718-1862, ricepaddiesgrill.com. This cute copper-andgreen eat-in/carryout makes quick work of Vietnamese favorites such as pork, beef and vegetable skewers infused with lemongrass and the classic beef noodle soup known as pho. L D $

ROCK BOTTOM RESTAURANT & BREWERY 7900 Norfolk Ave., 301-652-1311, rockbottom.com. India Pale Ales and specialty dark brews are among the awardwinning beers crafted in-house at this cavernous yet welcoming chain, which offers a vast menu. The burgers are the real deal.

❂ J L D $$

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE 7315 Wisconsin Ave., 301-652-7877, ruthschris.com. A dark and clubby feel makes this elegant chain popular with families as well as the happy-hour crowd. Don’t skip the fresh seafood choices, which include Caribbean lobster tail and barbecued shrimp. D $$$

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SALA THAI 4828 Cordell Ave., 301-654-4676, salathaidc.com. This Thai mainstay cooks the classics and offers diners a nearly panoramic view of Woodmont Avenue through huge, curved windows. Live jazz Friday and Saturday evenings. L D $$

SAPHIRE CAFÉ 7940 Wisconsin Ave., 301-986-9708. A relaxing spot for tasting everything from Maryland-style crab soup to Argentine skirt steak, Saphire pumps it up a notch on Friday and Saturday nights with drink specials and DJs. Tiki bar open Wednesdays through Saturdays. ❂ L D $

SATSUMA 8003 Norfolk Ave., 301-652-1400, satsumajp.com. Bethesda’s first yakiniku (Japanese barbecue) restaurant has builtin grills at each table. Diners select a cut— short rib, chuck rib, skirt or tongue—and prepare it themselves. There’s also an extensive sushi and sashimi menu, as well as interesting cooked dishes. L D $$

SILVER (EDITORS’ PICK)

SMOKE BBQ BETHESDA 4858 Cordell Ave., 301-656-2011, smokebbq.com. Pulled pork, beef brisket, smoked chicken, ribs and all the fixin’s, plus starters including smoked tomato soup and fried pickles served in a friendly, casual space. J L D $

ST. ARNOLD'S MUSSEL BAR (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

7525 Old Georgetown Road, 240-8216830, starnoldsdc.com. Czech, German and Belgian brews served in an authentic beer-hall setting, furnished with the same benches as those used in the Hofbrau brewhouse in Munich. Pub menu features mussels, hearty sandwiches, schnitzel and goulash. R L D $$

SWEETGREEN 4831 Bethesda Ave.301-654-7336, sweetgreen.com. The sweetgreen fast-casual chain—with its focus on local and organic ingredients—concentrates on salads (devise your own, or pick from a list) and soups. Look for eco-friendly decor and a healthy sensibility. Voted “Best Salads” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021. ❂ L D $ 288

Margherita pizza at Bethesda’s True Food Kitchen

TAKO GRILL 4914 Hampden Lane (The Shoppes of Bethesda), 301-652-7030, takogrill. com. Longtime, popular sushi destination relocated to the space formerly occupied by Hinode Japanese Restaurant. Look for the same traditional sushi menu, plus some new options, such as griddle-cooked teppanyaki at lunch, and more varieties of yakitori at dinner. L D $$

TANDOORI NIGHTS 7236 Woodmont Ave., 301-656-4002, tandoorinightsmd.com. Located in the heart of downtown Bethesda, the restaurant serves traditional Indian fare ranging from tandoori chicken, marinated in yogurt and spices, to a biryani flavored with saffron, nuts and raisins. ❂ L D $$

TARA THAI 7101 Democracy Blvd. (Westfield Montgomery mall), 301-657-0488, tarathai. com. Thai cuisine goes high style at Bethesda Magazine readers’ pick for “Best Thai Restaurant” in 2020. With colorful murals of ocean creatures looking on, diners can try dishes ranging from mild to adventurous. L D $$

TASTEE DINER

7731 Woodmont Ave., 301-652-3970, tasteediner.com. For 80 years, this crowdpleasing if slightly sagging spot has served up everything from breakfast to burgers to blue-plate specials such as steak and crabcakes to crowds of loyal customers. Open 24 hours. J B L D $

TERRAIN CAFÉ (EDITORS’ PICK) (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

7228 Woodmont Ave., 240-345-9492, shopterrain.com/restaurants. Located inside the Anthropologie & Co. at Bethesda Row, this quaint cafe changes its menu with the seasons. Look for cheese boards; salads; toast topped with eggplant, smoked salmon or fig; and entrees such as duck breast and a fried cauliflower sandwich. ❂ R L D $$

TIA QUETA

4839 Del Ray Ave., 301-654-4443, tiaqueta. com. This longtime family and happy-hour favorite offers authentic Mexican food such as moles and fish dishes, as well as the usual Tex-Mex options. Drink menu includes American and Mexican beers. ❂ J L D $$

TIKKA MASALA (NEW)

4929 Elm St., 301-312-8191. Named after

PHOTO BY DEB LINDSEY

7150 Woodmont Ave., 301-652-9780, eatatsilver.com. Upscale, tonier version of the homegrown Silver Diner chain, with modern takes on American classics and an emphasis on healthy, local and organic ingredients. Sleek interior takes its cue from the 1920s. ❂ J B R L D $$

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the classic curry recipe, Tikka Masala serves its namesake dish with a choice of four proteins—chicken, shrimp, lamb and paneer (cheese). Other classic Indian meat dishes and vegetarian entrees (including chickpea curry and cauliflower vindaloo) are also on the menu. L D $$

TOMMY JOE’S 7940 Norfolk Ave., 301-654-3801, tommyjoes.com.This Bethesda institution is now in the space formerly housing Urban Heights. The second-floor, window-filled corner location suits its sports bar persona, and the vast rooftop is ideal for outdoor drinking and snacking. Fare includes wings (Poho-style, grilled and smoky, are a good option), burgers, crabcakes and ribs. Chunky brisket chili, on its own or on nachos, is a winner.

❂ L D $$

TRATTORIA SORRENTO (EDITORS’ PICK) 4930 Cordell Ave., 301-718-0344, trattoriasorrento.com. This family-run Italian favorite offers homemade pastas, baked eggplant and fresh fish dishes. Half-price bottles of wine on Wednesdays. D $$

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN (EDITORS’ PICK) 7100 Wisconsin Ave., 240-200-1257, truefoodkitchen.com. Health-focused chain prides itself on serving fresh ingredients and features an open kitchen. The eclectic, multicultural menu changes from season to season, and includes sandwiches, salads and pizza. Beer, wine and fresh-fruit and vegetable cocktails are also available. Voted “Best Restaurant for Vegetarian Dishes” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020. ❂ R L D $$

URBAN PLATES 7101 Democracy Blvd. (Westfield Montgomery mall), 301-690-9540, urbanplates.com. The fast-casual chain’s wide-ranging menu includes salads, soups, sandwiches, entrees such as grass-fed steak and striped sea bass, plus seasonal items. Meals are offered at stations—customers grab a plate and get in their desired line where chefs serve the made-from-scratch dishes. J L D $

UNCLE JULIO’S

PHOTO BY DEB LINDSEY

4870 Bethesda Ave., 301-656-2981, unclejulios.com. Loud and large, this Tex-Mex eatery packs in families and revelers fueling up on fajitas, tacos and more. Kids love to watch the tortilla machine. Voted “Best Mexican Restaurant” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020 and “Most Kid-Friendly Restaurant” in 2021. ❂ J R L D $$

VIRRAAJ (NEW) 4914 Cordell Ave., 301-906-8425, virraaj.com. The Indian fusion-style dishes at this Woodmont Triangle restaurant range from vegetarian entrees such as Paneer Makhan Masala (cottage cheese cubes in a tomato cream sauce) and Maa Ki Dal (creamy

black lentils) to meat-based dishes such as Lamb Vindaloo (with a spicy curry sauce) and Murgh Tikka Masala (boneless grilled chicken sauteed in a creamy tomato sauce). L D $$

VÜK

4924 St. Elmo Ave., 301-652-8000. VÜK owner (and MOM’S Organic Market CEO) Scott Nash consulted restaurateur Mark Bucher for the only thing offered on the short menu of his Bethesda pinball arcade other than Trickling Springs Creamery’s soft-serve ice cream: thin-crust New York-style pizza and thick-crust Sicilian pizza sold by the slice or as whole pies: cheese, sausage, pepperoni and mushroom/onion. L D $

WANG DYNASTY

4929 Bethesda Ave., 301-654-1188, wangdynastybethesda.com. A mix of dishes from Shanghai and Taiwan—sweet and sour chicken, crispy shrimp with minced pork, Peking duck, pan-fried noodles with beef— fill the long menu at this Chinese restaurant in the space that housed Shanghai Village. Weekend dim sum is offered. R L D $$

WILDWOOD KITCHEN (EDITORS’ PICK)

10223 Old Georgetown Road (Wildwood Shopping Center), 301-571-1700, wildwoodkitchenrw.com. Chef Robert Wiedmaier’s attractive neighborhood bistro serving fresh and light modern cuisine. Entrees range from Amish chicken with a scallion potato cake to grilled Atlantic salmon with creamy polenta. L D $$

WOODMONT GRILL (EDITORS’ PICK)

7715 Woodmont Ave., 301-656-9755, hillstone.com. Part of the Houston’s chain, the eatery offers such classics as spinachand-artichoke dip and its famous burgers, but also house-baked breads, more exotic dishes, live jazz and a granite bar. Voted “Best Overall Restaurant,” “Restaurant With Best Service” and “Best Burger” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020, and “Restaurant You Missed Most During the Pandemic” in 2021. ❂ L D $$$

WORLD OF BEER

7200 Wisconsin Ave., 240-389-9317, worldofbeer.com. Craft beer-focused tavern chain offers 50 brews on tap rotating daily and hundreds of bottled options. Food is classic pub fare, including hamburgers, wings and bratwurst sandwiches, as well as flatbreads and salads. Voted “Restaurant With Best Beer Selection” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021. ❂ JRL D $

7945 MacArthur Blvd., 301-229-0900, fishtacoonline.com. See Bethesda listing.

❂ J LD$

7945 MacArthur Blvd., 240-802-2370, salsitaliankitchen.net. Persimmon and Wild Tomato owners Damian and Stephanie Salvatore replaced their Asian concept Indigo House with a return to their roots. Find traditional Italian fare, such as bruschetta, risotto balls, Caprese salad, meatball subs, fettuccine Alfredo, chicken cacciatore and shrimp scampi. ❂ L D $$

WILD TOMATO (EDITORS’ PICK) 7945 MacArthur Blvd., 301-229-0680, wildtomatorestaurant.com. A family-friendly neighborhood restaurant from Persimmon owners Damian and Stephanie Salvatore, serving salads, sandwiches and pizza. Voted “Best Neighborhood Restaurant” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021.

❂ J LD$

CHEVY CHASE ALFIO’S LA TRATTORIA 4515 Willard Ave., 301-657-9133, alfios. com. This Northern Italian classic on the first floor of The Willoughby of Chevy Chase Condominium has been feeding families and casual diners for more than 30 years. Look for traditional pasta, veal and chicken dishes (plus pizza), served in an Old World environment. J L D $$

THE CAPITAL GRILLE 5310 Western Ave., 301-718-7812, thecapitalgrille.com. The upscale steakhouse chain, known for its He-Man-sized portions and extensive wine list, is located in The Shops at Wisconsin Place. Entrees also include chicken, lamb chops, salmon and lobster. Voted “Best Private Dining Room” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020. L D $$$$

CLYDE’S 5441 Wisconsin Ave., 301-951-9600, clydes.com. The popular restaurant features a frequently changing menu of American favorites and a collection of vintage airplanes and cars, as well as a model train running on a track around the ceiling.

❂ J R L D $$

DON POLLO 7007 Wisconsin Ave., 301-652-0001, donpolloonline.com. See Bethesda listing. LD$

LA FERME (EDITORS’ PICK) (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

CABIN JOHN FISH TACO

SAL’S ITALIAN KITCHEN (EDITORS’ PICK)

7101 Brookville Road, 301-986-5255, lafermerestaurant.com. This charming Provence-style restaurant serving classic French cuisine is a popular choice for an intimate dinner. Cognac Le Bar at La Ferme, a bar within the restaurant, opened in fall 2016. The bar serves small plates and

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cocktails. Voted “Best Romantic Restaurant” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020 and “Best Restaurant in Chevy Chase” and “Best Special Occasion Restaurant” by readers in 2021. ❂ R L D $$$

LIA'S

4435 Willard Ave., 240-223-5427, chefgeoff.com. Owner Geoff Tracy focuses on high-quality, low-fuss modern Italian-American fare at this modern space with a wine room. Pizzas, house-made pastas and fresh fish please business lunchers and dinner crowds. ❂JRLD$

LITTLE BEET TABLE (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

5471 Wisconsin Ave., 240-283-0603, thelittlebeettable.com/chevychase. Part of a small chain that started in New York City, Little Beet Table serves an entirely glutenfree lineup of dishes, including chicken, salmon, Korean rice cakes, a mushroom-andblack-bean burger and a whole branzino fish. The 100-seat full-service restaurant is in The Collection shopping area in Chevy Chase’s Friendship Heights neighborhood. ❂ L D $$

MANOLI CANOLI RESTAURANT

8540 Connecticut Ave., 301-951-1818, manolicanoli.com. Italian and Greek specialties abound at a fun family eatery that features a large prepared foods section, dishes made with olive oil from owner Stavros Manolakos’ family farm in Greece and homemade mozzarella on pizza and subs. ❂ J L D $

MEIWAH RESTAURANT

4457 Willard Ave., 301-652-9882, meiwah restaurant.com. This modern restaurant on the second floor of a Friendship Heights office building offers top-quality Chinese dishes that are hard to beat. There’s also a sushi bar with an extensive menu. A fountain sparkles on the outdoor patio. ❂ L D $$

MOBY DICK HOUSE OF KABOB

7023 Wisconsin Ave., 301-654-1838, mobyskabob.com. This kabob takeout/eat-in mainstay was one of the first kabob places in the area. It makes its own pita bread. The menu includes a variety of salads and vegetarian sandwiches and platters. L D $

PERSIMMON (EDITORS’ PICK)

7003 Wisconsin Ave., 301-654-9860, persimmonrestaurant.com. Owners Damian and Stephanie Salvatore’s popular restaurant offers casual fare from salads to sandwiches to meat and seafood entrees in a bistro setting featuring a lively bar, cozy booths and bright paintings on the walls. ❂ R L D $$

POTOMAC PIZZA

19 Wisconsin Circle, 301-951-1127, potomac pizza.com. This cheery, casual dining room

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provides a break from the ultra-posh shopping surrounding it. In addition to pizza, subs and pastas are popular. Beer and wine available. ❂ JLD$

SUSHIKO (EDITORS’ PICK) 5455 Wisconsin Ave., 301-961-1644, sushiko restaurants.com. Known as one of the Washington, D.C., area’s most respected sushi restaurants, Sushiko offers a wide range of sushi and other dishes. Kōbō, a restaurant within the restaurant, allows eight people to dine on 12- to 15-course tasting menus. ❂ L D $$

TAVIRA 8401 Connecticut Ave., 301-652-8684, tavira restaurant.com. Fish stews and several versions of bacalhau (salted cod) figure prominently on the menu of this intriguing Portuguese restaurant, which manages to be charming and attractive despite its location in an office building basement. L D $$


GAITHERSBURG/ NORTH POTOMAC

BGR: THE BURGER JOINT 229 Boardwalk Place (Rio), 301-569-7086, bgrtheburgerjoint.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂JLD$

BONEFISH GRILL 82 Market St., 240-631-2401, bonefishgrill. com. While fresh fish cooked over a wood fire is the centerpiece of this upscale Florida chain, the steaks, crab cakes and specialty martinis make it a fun option for happy hour and those with hearty appetites. R L D $$

BREWS & BARRELS BOURBON BAR AND GRILL 625 Center Point Way, 240-912-7736, brewsbarrels.com. With rustic chic decor, this Kentlands spot serves burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, baby back ribs and pan-seared scallops alongside craft beer, whiskies and cocktails. D J $$

BUCA DI BEPPO 122 Kentlands Blvd., 301-947-7346, bucadibeppo.com. The Kentlands outpost of this national chain serves huge, familystyle portions of Italian specialties from fresh breads to antipasti and pasta dishes amid a sea of Italian kitsch. Desserts include Italian Creme Cake and tiramisu.

J L D $$

&PIZZA 258 Crown Park Ave. (Downtown Crown), 240-499-8447, andpizza.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ L D $

CAVA

ASIA NINE

CHENNAI HOPPERS (NEW)

254 Crown Park Ave. (Downtown Crown), 301-330-9997, asianinemd.com. Pan Asian restaurant with a first location in Washington, D.C.’s Penn Quarter offers dishes from Vietnam, China, Thailand and Japan. Specialties include grilled lamb chops served with mango-soy coulis and miso honey duck breast drizzled with a sake butter sauce. R L D $$

ATHENS GRILL 9124 Rothbury Drive, 301-975-0757, athensgrill.com. This casual, friendly, familyrun restaurant specializes in authentic Greek cooking, using recipes handed down through generations. Specialties such as rotisserie chicken, chargrilled salmon with a lemon dill sauce and lamb kabobs are cooked on a hardwood grill. L D $

BARKING MAD CAFE 239 Spectrum Ave., 240-297-6230, barkingmadcafe.com. Cooking from a wood hearth and selecting vegetables, herbs and edible flowers from its aeroponic (grown in air/mist but without soil) organic garden, Barking Mad Cafe has a corner spot in Watkins Mill Town Center. Look for madefrom-scratch brunch, lunch and dinner sweets and savories, such as breakfast pizza, watermelon salad and farro salad. ❂ R L D $$

213 Kentlands Blvd., 301-476-4209, cava. com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ L D $ 136 Paramount Park Drive (Spectrum Town Center), 240-813-0061, chennaihoppers. com. The South Indian dishes here are made with creative twists, including the Kozhi Lollipop (chicken wings that are battered and fried, then tossed with a sauce, onions and peppers) and Madras Ilai Meen Varuthathu (fish in a red sauce and coconut oil, wrapped in banana leaf and pan seared). L D $$

CINCO DE MAYO 640 Center Point Way, 240-261-4349, cincodemayorest.com. Part of a small chain, this Kentlands restaurant serves Mexican fare, including quesadillas, tacos, grilled chicken, steak, burritos and fajitas. ❂ L D $$

COAL FIRE 116 Main St., 301-519-2625, coalfireonline. com. Homemade crusts fired by coal and topped with your choice of toppings and three different sauces: classic, spicy and signature, which is slightly sweet with a hint of spice. Salads, sandwiches and pasta also available, plus a full bar. ❂ L D $

COASTAL FLATS 135 Crown Park Ave. (Downtown Crown), 301-869-8800, greatamericanrestaurants. com. First Maryland locale for Great American Restaurants, a Fairfax-based chain. Seaside-

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inspired decor extends to the menu, which offers lobster and shrimp rolls, fried grouper and Key lime pie. Steaks, pasta and burgers also served. Voted “Best Restaurant in Gaithersburg/North Potomac” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021. ❂ J R L D $$

COPPER CANYON GRILL 100 Boardwalk Place (Rio), 240-631-0003, ccgrill.com. Large portions of American classics such as salads, ribs and rotisserie chicken prepared with seasonal ingredients at family-friendly prices are the bill of fare at this spacious and casual chain restaurant.

J L D $$

DOGFISH HEAD ALEHOUSE 800 W. Diamond Ave., 301-963-4847, dogfishalehouse.com. The first Maryland outpost of the popular Rehoboth Beach brewpub, the restaurant is packed with revelers and families clamoring for the Dogfish Head brews, burgers, pizzas and ribs. Check out the burger of the week.

❂ J L D $$

DOG HAUS BIERGARTEN 644 Center Point Way, 240-690-6090, kentlands.doghaus.com. See Bethesda listing. L D $

DON POLLO 9083 Gaither Road, 301-990-0981, donpollogroup.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂LD$

FIREBIRDS WOOD FIRED GRILL 390 Spectrum Ave., 301-284-1770, gaithersburg.firebirdsrestaurants.com. Part of a chain, this restaurant in the Watkins Mill Town Center cooks steaks and seafood over a wood-fired grill. Designed to look like a Colorado lodge, the eatery tends toward classic fare for entrees (surf-and-turf, salmon, burgers) and dessert (chocolate cake, Key lime pie, carrot cake). ❂ J L D $$

GUAPO’S RESTAURANT 9811 Washingtonian Blvd., L-17 (Rio), 301977-5655, guaposrestaurant.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ J R L D $

HERSHEY’S RESTAURANT & BAR 17030 Oakmont Ave., 301-948-9893, hersheysatthegrove.com. Fried chicken that tastes like it was made by an aproned elder is served up in a clapboard building constructed in 1889. Besides the fab fried chicken, Hershey’s serves up warm rolls, inexpensive prices and live music. ❂ J B R L D $$

IL PORTO 245 Muddy Branch Road, 301-590-0735, ilportorestaurant.com. A classic red-sauce menu, elegant murals of Venice and an authentic thin-crust pizza are hallmarks of this friendly, unfussy Italian restaurant tucked in the Festival Shopping Center. Fried calamari and the white pizza are among customer favorites. ❂ L D $

INFERNO PIZZERIA NAPOLETANA (EDITORS’ PICK)

12207 Darnestown Road, 301-963-0115, inferno-pizzeria.com. Tony Conte, former executive chef of Washington, D.C.’s Oval Room, goes casual with his first restaurant, an authentic Neapolitan pizzeria offering sophisticated toppings such as shaved truffles and garlic confit. Cozy dining room seats 39, with a tiled, wood-burning pizza oven as the centerpiece. D $$

IXTAPALAPA TAQUERIA

411 N. Frederick Ave., 240-702-0217, ixtataqueria.com. The owners of Taco Bar (in a Gaithersburg gas station) serve Mexican street food at this fast-casual spot. Pick a protein to go on corn tortillas, then head to the fixings bar. Or try a taco that comes already topped (the alambre with bacon, grilled onions and red peppers and Oaxaca cheese is good). ❂ L D $

KENAKI SUSHI

706 Center Point Way, 240-224-7189, kenakisushi.com. This sushi counter at Kentlands Market Square offers what the owners call a “modern take on traditional sushi.” Experiment with the Black Magic roll, which comes with truffle oil and black sushi rice. Lunch is more informal, but at dinner there’s full service. L D $

LANZHOU HAND PULL NOODLE

3 Grand Corner Ave. (Rio), 240-403-7486, handpullnoodle.com. The made-to-order noodles (choose hand-pulled or knife-sliced) at this fast-casual spot are served in soups and stir-fries with beef, chicken, duck and other proteins. Rice dishes, dumplings and pork buns are also available. L D $

THE MELTING POT

9021 Gaither Road, 301-519-3638, themeltingpot.com. There’s nothing like dipping bits of bread, vegetables and apples into a communal pot of hot cheese to get a date or a party started. The Melting Pot chain also offers wine, oil or broth to cook meat tableside and chocolate fondue for dessert.

J D $$

MOBY DICK HOUSE OF KABOB

105 Market St., 301-978-7770, mobyskabob. com. See Chevy Chase listing. L D $

MOD PIZZA

145 Commerce Square Place, 240-5529850, modpizza.com. The Bellevue, Washington-based chain offers designyour-own fast-casual pies (hence, Made on Demand, or MOD). Pizzas, cooked at 800 degrees for three minutes, can be topped with a choice of nearly 40 sauces, cheeses, meats, spices and veggies. ❂ L D $

NOT YOUR AVERAGE JOE’S

245 Kentlands Blvd., 240-477-1040, notyouraveragejoes.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ J L D $$

OLD TOWN POUR HOUSE 212 Ellington Blvd. (Downtown Crown), 301963-6281, oldtownpourhouse.com. One of the eateries from Chicago’s Bottleneck Management restaurant company, this place features more than 90 local and international brews on tap. Classic American cuisine is served in a setting with copper-inlaid bars and high ceilings. ❂ L D $$

PALADAR LATIN KITCHEN & RUM BAR 203 Crown Park Ave., 301-330-4400, paladarlatinkitchen.com. This Clevelandbased chain covers the spectrum of Latin cuisine, with dishes from Cuba, the Caribbean and Central and South America. From Brazil, there’s feijoada stew; from Cuba, ropa vieja; and from Jamaica, jerk chicken. Bar selections include 50 varieties of rum, 15 tequilas and six types of mojitos.

❂ J R L D $$

QUINCY’S BAR & GRILLE 616 Quince Orchard Road, 301-869-8200. Energetic neighborhood pub with a sports bar atmosphere, Quincy’s also has an extensive menu with wings, pizza, build-yourown burgers and chicken sandwiches, plus entrees including Guinness-braised brisket. Live music is also a big draw. L D $

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE 106 Crown Park Ave. (Downtown Crown), 301-990-1926, ruthschris.com. See Bethesda listing. D $$$

SILVER DINER 9811 Washingtonian Blvd. (Rio), 301321-3530, silverdiner.com. This branch of the trendy diner includes a full bar and brasserie-style interior. The latest food trends (think quinoa coconut pancakes) share company on the enormous menu with diner staples such as meatloaf and mashed potatoes. Voted “Best Late-Night Eats” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021.

❂ J B R L D $$

SIN & GRIN 353 Main St., 301-977-5595, singrintacos. com. Located in the heart of Kentlands Market Square, Sin & Grin is a fast-casual restaurant owned and operated by the Hristopoulos family, which also runs Vasili’s Kitchen. Pick from eight tacos, rotisserie chicken and an assortment of Mexican cuisine. L D $

TANDOORI NIGHTS 106 Market St., 301-947-4007, tandoorinightsmd.com. See Bethesda listing.

❂ LD$

TARA THAI 9811 Washingtonian Blvd., L-9 (Rio), 301947-8330, tarathai.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ L D $$

TED’S BULLETIN 220 Ellington Blvd. (Downtown Crown), 301-

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990-0600, tedsbulletin.com. First Maryland location of the modern diner chainlet from the folks at Matchbox Food Group. Boozy milkshakes, homemade pop tarts and the Cinnamon Roll As Big As Ya Head (served weekends only) are among the specialties.

❂ J B R L D $$

TED’S MONTANA GRILL 105 Ellington Blvd. (Downtown Crown), 301330-0777, tedsmontanagrill.com. First Maryland location of billionaire and bison rancher Ted Turner’s restaurant chain, which uses bison as the showpiece in a humongous selection of dishes, including burgers, meatloaf, nachos and chili. Soups, salads, American classics and spiked milkshakes also available at this saloon-style eatery.

❂ J L D $$

THAI TANIUM 657 Center Point Way, 301-990-3699, thaitaniumrestaurant.com. Authentic Thai food laced with lots of chilies and garlic as hot as you like. Try one of the Thai street food dishes, such as roasted pork with Thai herbed sweet sauce and noodle soups.

❂ JLD$

UNCLE JULIO’S 231 Rio Blvd. (Rio), 240-632-2150, unclejulios.com. See Bethesda listing.

❂ J R L D $$

VASILI'S KITCHEN 705 Center Point Way, 301-977-1011, vasilis kitchen.com. Tan and brown decor lends a cozy vibe to this 4,700-square-foot Kentlands restaurant. The owners ran the popular Vasili’s Mediterranean Grill in another Kentlands location for more than a decade before closing it to focus on Vasili’s Kitchen. The Mediterranean menu is heavy on seafood dishes. ❂ J D $$

YARD HOUSE 211 Rio Blvd. (Rio), 240-683-8790, yardhouse.com. Part of a chain with locations in California, Illinois and Texas, this RIO Washingtonian Center spot is big: The 13,000-square-foot restaurant has more than 100 beers on draft, and more than 100 items on its menu, from poke nachos and Nashville hot chicken to Parmesan-crusted pork loin and ginger-crusted salmon. ❂ J L D $$

YOYOGI SUSHI 317 Main St., 301-963-0001. yoyogisushi. wixsite.com/yoyogisushi. A no-nonsense neighborhood sushi place offering the familiar sushi, teriyaki, tempura and green tea or red bean ice cream. ❂ L D $

ZIKI JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

10009 Fields Road, 301-330-3868, 292

zikisteakhouse.com. This large steak house on a busy corner charms patrons with its fountains, stone Buddhas and geisha mannequins. Food offerings include sushi, as well as meats cooked on a tableside hibachi.

J L D $$

GARRETT PARK BLACK MARKET BISTRO (EDITORS’ PICK) 4600 Waverly Ave., 301-933-3000, blackmarketrestaurant.com. Sublime American bistro fare served in a restored Victorian building next to railroad tracks; the building once served as a general store and still houses a post office. Entrees range from swordfish to a burger and pizza, including several vegetable options. Voted “Best Restaurant in Garrett Park/Kensington” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021.

❂ J R L D $$

continental dishes from this family-run eatery owned by Gonzalo Barba, former longtime captain of the restaurant in the Watergate Hotel. L D $$

KNOWLES STATION WINE & CO.

10414 Detrick Ave., Suite 100; 301-2729080; knowlesstation.com. Part retail wine shop, part restaurant, part bar, this spot near the intersection of Knowles and Summit avenues features a short menu with meat and cheese plates, appetizers, salads and sandwiches (including grilled chicken, roast pork and crabcake). Find more than a dozen beers on draft and more than two dozen wines by the glass, plus lots of beer and wine to go. ❂ J L D $$

NORTH BETHESDA/ ROCKVILLE A & J RESTAURANT (EDITORS’ PICK)

KENSINGTON THE BIG GREEK CAFE 5268 Nicholson Lane, 301-881-4976, biggreekcafe.com. See Bethesda listing. LD$

THE DISH & DRAM 10301 Kensington Parkway, 301-9624046, thedishanddram.com. The owners of The Daily Dish in Silver Spring serve comfort food made with local ingredients in a 2,800-square-foot space in Kensington. Steak frites, Maryland crab soup, burgers and house-made desserts are on the menu. J R L D $$

FRANKLY…PIZZA! (EDITORS’ PICK) 10417 Armory Ave., 301-832-1065, franklypizza.com. Owner Frank Linn turns out high-quality pizza in a rustic brick-and-mortar restaurant. The menu offers wood-fired pies topped with home-cured meats and tomato sauce made from an 80-year-old family recipe. Wines and homemade sodas served on tap, too. Voted “Best Pizza” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020. ❂ L D $

JAVA NATION 10516 Connecticut Ave., 301-327-6580, java-nation.com. There’s a brunch menu at this coffee shop tucked into a strip mall. Beer, wine and liquor are served, along with coffee that’s roasted on-site. R L $$

K TOWN BISTRO 3784 Howard Ave., 301-933-1211, ktownbistro.com. Try filet mignon, duck breast à l’orange, chicken marsala and other classic

1319-C Rockville Pike, 301-251-7878, ajrestaurant.com. Northern dim sum is the specialty at this hard-to-find cash-only spot in the Woodmont Station shopping center. Warm-colored walls surround the crowd digging into thousand-layer pancakes and fresh tofu. R L D $

AKIRA RAMEN & IZAKAYA

1800 Rockville Pike, 240-242-3669, akiraramenizakaya.com. This minimalist Japanese eatery serves house-made noodles and vibrant food such as a poke salad. The sleek establishment, located on the first floor of the Galvan at Twinbrook building, features an open kitchen and several variations of ramen to choose from. L D $

AL CARBÓN

200 Park Road, 301-738-0003, alcarbonrestaurant.com. Serving authentic Latin American fare across the street from the Rockville Metro station, this unassuming roadhouse has a loyal following for its arepas, empanadas, tapas and more. Try one of the natural juices including mango and tamarindo. ❂ B L D $

AL HA'ESH

4860 Boiling Brook Parkway (Randolph Hills Shopping Center), 301-231-0839, al-haesh. com. Kosher Israeli grill serves vegetable and protein skewers (including chicken, lamb, beef, chicken livers and sweetbreads). All entrees come with small ramekins of salads (think curried chickpeas; marinated red cabbage; and balsamic marinated mushrooms). ❂ L D $$

AMALFI RISTORANTE ITALIANO (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

12307 Wilkins Ave., 301-770-7888,

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amalfirockville.com. A family-run, red-sauce Italian restaurant with specialties including white pizza and lasagna. Lots of antipasti choices, too. The gazebo is a charming spot to dine during the summer. J L D $$

AMICI MIEI RISTORANTE 6 N. Washington St., 301-545-0966, amicimieiristorante.com. Previously located at the Potomac Woods Plaza, this upscale Italian restaurant serves wood-fired pizzas, homemade pastas and creative salads. The new, smaller establishment is cozier than the last with a menu that changes twice a year. LD$

AMINA THAI RESTAURANT 5065 Nicholson Lane, 301-770-9509. Pleasant and bright, Amina Thai is run by a husband-and-wife team and bills itself as the first Muslim Thai restaurant in the area, using only halal meats and serving familiar Thai dishes. Chef’s specials include pineapple fried rice and grilled salmon. L D $

&PIZZA 11626 Old Georgetown Road (Pike & Rose), 240-621-7016, andpizza.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ L D $

BANGKOK GARDEN THAI STREET EATS 891-D Rockville Pike (Wintergreen Plaza), 301-545-2848, bkgrockville.com. This fastcasual spot offers Thai classics (drunken noodles, pad Thai, fried rice, and curries served with chicken or pork belly) alongside Thai street fare, such as a mussel omelet. LD$

BARONESSA ITALIAN RESTAURANT 1302 E. Gude Drive, 301-838-9050, baronessarestaurant.com. Pizzas made in a wood-burning oven and more than two dozen Italian entrees star on the menu at this 100seat strip-mall restaurant. Trivia nights and kids pizza-making classes are offered. J R L D $$

BB.Q CHICKEN 9712 Traville Gateway Drive, 301-309-0962, bbqchickenrockville.com. This Korean chain uses olive oil for frying its chicken, which you can order as whole, half, wings or boneless. Other Korean and fusion entrees and sides— including kimchi fried rice, calamari and fried dumplings—are on the menu too. There’s also a full bar. L D $

THE BIG GREEK CAFE 4007 Norbeck Road, 301-929-9760; 5268 Nicholson Lane, 301-881-4976, biggreekcafe.com. See Bethesda listing. LD$

THE BLOCK 967 Rose Ave. (Pike & Rose), theblockfoodhall.com. This Asian food hall is a sibling of an Annandale spot that helped launch the food hall trend. Find tacos, Korean

barbecue, shaved ice cream and more from a half dozen stalls. The center of the space houses a bar with TVs. ❂ L D $

BOB'S SHANGHAI 66 305 N. Washington St., 301-251-6652. Dim sum and rice and noodle dishes are the specialties at this popular eatery offering Taiwanese, Shanghai and Sichuan cuisine. It’s also one of the area’s top destinations for soup dumplings, where you can even watch the chefs making them in a glass-enclosed booth. R L D $

BOMBAY BISTRO 98 W. Montgomery Ave., 301-762-8798, bombaybistro.com. Bombay Bistro opened in 1991 as one of the first Indian restaurants in the area to combine high style, reasonable prices and a fresh take on traditional Indian, and it has been packed ever since. House specialties include tandoori lamb chops and shrimp and scallops masala. J L D $$

BONCHON CHICKEN 107 Gibbs St., Unit A (Rockville Town Square), 301-637-9079, bonchon.com. International fried chicken franchise with Korean roots serves up wings, drumsticks and strips with soy-garlic or spicy hot garlic sauce, plus other traditional offerings such as bulgogi, bibimbap and scallion seafood pancakes. LD$

choices. Fresh, uncooked dumplings are also available for carryout. L D $

CHINA GARDEN 11333 Woodglen Drive, 301-881-2800, chinagardenhg.com. The Cantonese restaurant moved from Rosslyn, Virginia, to the former Paladar Latin Kitchen & Rum Bar space. The lunch menu includes dim sum items (they are on a pushcart on weekends). L D $$

CITY PERCH KITCHEN + BAR (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

11830 Grand Park Ave. (Pike & Rose), 301231-2310, cityperch.com. Located above the entrance to the iPic Theaters at Pike & Rose, City Perch offers creative, seasonal American cuisine in a rustic, inviting space. The menu includes raw-bar selections, small plates, shareable salads and entree options such as grilled shrimp and Long Island duck.

❂ R L D $$$

CLYDE'S TOWER OAKS LODGE 2 Preserve Parkway, 301-294-0200, clydes. com/tower. Here is Clyde’s version of a lodge in the mountains. Well-prepared food runs the gamut of American desires, from burgers to fish, plus a raw bar. Check out the twig sculpture spanning the ceiling of The Saranac Room. J R L D $$

COMMONWEALTH INDIAN

BOTANERO 800 Pleasant Drive, Suite 160, 240-4745461, botanerorockville.com. Located in the King Farm neighborhood, this small plates restaurant and wine bar features cuisine that changes seasonally. Some recent offerings include a fig and prosciutto flatbread and quinoa grilled salmon. B L D $

CAVA 12037 Rockville Pike (Montrose Crossing), 240-235-0627; 28 Upper Rock Circle, 301200-5530; cava.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂LD$

CAVA MEZZE (EDITORS’ PICK) 9713 Traville Gateway Drive, 301-309-9090, cavamezze.com. The dark and elegant CAVA Mezze offers small plates of everything from fried Greek cheese, octopus and orzo in cinnamon tomato sauce to crispy pork belly and macaroni and cheese. There are martini specials, too. Voted “Best Middle Eastern Restaurant” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020, and “Best Small Plates” by readers in 2021. ❂ R L D $$

CHINA BISTRO 755 Hungerford Drive, 301-294-0808. Extensive Chinese menu features many familiar favorites, but this is the place to go for dumplings. With tender dough wrappers and chock-full interiors, these beauties come 12 to an order and with 16 different filling

11610 Old Georgetown Road (Pike & Rose), 240-833-3055. The owner of two Bollywood Bistro restaurants in Virginia opened this fine-dining spot that serves traditional Indian favorites such as curry chicken and butter chicken, along with fresh-baked bread and Indian salad. The bar has Indian-inspired cocktails and Indian beers and wines. ❂ R L D $$$

COOPER’S HAWK WINERY & RESTAURANT 1403 Research Blvd. (Research Row), 301-517-9463, chwinery.com/locations/ maryland/rockville-md. Part of a national chain, this restaurant and winery lists which of its wines to pair with the contemporary American dishes on the sprawling menu (pasta, steak, seafood, burgers, 600-calorie or less dishes). There’s also a tasting room and a retail space. Voted "Restaurant With Best Wine List" by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021. ❂ J L D $$$

CSNY PIZZA 1020 Rockville Pike, 301-298-3650, csnypizza.wixsite.com/sneaksite. Carry out a New York-style pizza from this spot by the owners of Pizza CS. Their second Rockville location also offers six seats for guests to dine in, and serves whole pies, hot subs and pizza by the slice. L D $

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DOMOISHI 201 E. Middle Lane, 301-666-6685, domoishi.com. This Rockville Town Center restaurant lets diners customize their bowls of ramen, and also sells poke and wings. The eatery shares an address with Pearl Lady, a bubble tea shop. L D $

DON POLLO 2206 Veirs Mill Road, 301-309-1608, donpollogroup.com. See Bethesda listing. LD$

EAST PEARL RESTAURANT 838-B Rockville Pike, 301-838-8663, eastpearlrestaurant.com. Choose from many options of Hong Kong cuisine, including familiar dishes featuring chicken, beef, poultry, pork and even duck, as well as those for adventurous tastes. Try the soups ranging from egg drop to seafood with bean curd. LD$

EL MARIACHI RESTAURANT 765-D Rockville Pike, 301-738-7177, elmariachirockville.com. Serving Tex-Mex and South American food in a bright, pleasant space made lively with colorful art. In addition to the usual enchiladas, tacos and burritos, look for Peruvian seafood and Cuban beef specialties. L D $

EL PATIO 5240 Randolph Road, 301-231-9225. This bustling cafe with pretty green umbrellas on the patio serves up the traditional meatheavy dishes of Argentina, as well as pizzas and freshly made baked goods. Look for mouth-watering empanadas, beef tongue and sausage specialties. ❂ J B L D $

EMA ROSSI PIZZERIA NAPOLETANA 5556 Norbeck Road, 240-669-9900, emarossipizzeria.com. Neapolitan-style pizza, cooked in a wood-burning oven, is the focus of this spot in Rockville’s Rock Creek Village Center. Also look for rigatoni with Bolognese sauce; Wagyu beef and veal meatballs in marinara sauce; deviled eggs with a sauce flavored with anchovies, capers, chives and pickles; and house-made gelato. ❂ L D $

FAR EAST RESTAURANT 5055 Nicholson Lane, 301-881-5552, fareastrockvillemd.com. Owned and operated by the same family since 1974, this classic Chinese restaurant greets customers with two royal stone lions out front and sticks to the familiar Chinese-American basics. Check out the daily specials and dim sum menu. L D $$

FARMSOOK 800 King Farm Blvd., 301-258-8829, farmsookthaikitchen.com. A tastefully modern dining room soaked in a soothing 294

yellow light. The usual suspects are on the menu here, but chef’s suggestions include an intriguing broiled fish wrapped in banana leaf and stir-fried duck. L D $$

FINNEGAN’S WAKE IRISH PUB 100 Gibbs St. (Rockville Town Square), 301339-8267, finneganswakerockville.com. Irish pub with a nice selection of bourbons, whiskeys and Irish beers and a very limited bar menu offering such fare as bangers and mash, poutine (french fries, gravy and cheese curds), a chicken club sandwich, fish and chips, wings and a burger. L D $

FLOR DE LUNA 11417 Woodglen Drive, 240-242-4066, flordelunamd.com. Latin American fare includes tamales and lomo saltado (a stirfry of beef and peppers) at this 75-seat restaurant near Whole Foods Market. Tacos, nachos and quesadillas are also in the lineup. Finish off your meal with the tres leches (three milks) cake. ❂ J R L D $$

FOGO DE CHÃO 11600 Old Georgetown Road (Pike & Rose), 301-841-9200, fogodechao.com. Part of an international chain, the Brazilian steakhouse offers cuts of meat—plus a salad and vegetable station—at all-you-can-eat prices. ❂ R L D $$$

FONTINA GRILLE 801 Pleasant Drive, 301-947-5400, fontinagrille.com. A trendy spot with its curvy maple bar and wood-burning pizza oven, Fontina Grille is a favorite gathering place for the King Farm neighborhood. Pizza, pasta and salads are the main attractions. Three-dollar pasta dishes available on Monday nights and half-price bottles of wine on Tuesdays.

❂ J R L D $$

GYROLAND 1701-B3 Rockville Pike, 301-816-7829, gyrolandmd.com. Build-your-own salads, open-face and wrapped sandwiches, and other Greek choices star at this fast-casual spot near Congressional Plaza. For dessert, Gyroland serves loukoumades, a bite-size fluffy Greek doughnut soaked in hot honey syrup. L D $

HARD TIMES CAFÉ 1117 Nelson St., 301-294-9720, hardtimes. com. Good American beer selections, hearty chili styles ranging from Cincinnati (cinnamon and tomato) to Texas (beef and hot peppers), and hefty salads and wings bring families to this Wild West-style saloon for lunch and dinner. L D $

HINODE JAPANESE RESTAURANT 134 Congressional Lane, 301-816-2190, hinoderestaurant.com. Serving traditional

Japanese cuisine since 1992. All-you-caneat lunch and weekend dinner buffet offers 40 types of sushi, 14 hot foods and a salad bar. Check out the patio with full bar service. L D $$

IL PIZZICO (EDITORS’ PICK) 15209 Frederick Road, 301-309-0610, ilpizzico.com. Setting aside the strip mall location and lack of pizza (il pizzico means “the pinch” in Italian), chef-owner Enzo Livia’s house-made pasta dishes, gracious service and extensive wine list of mainly Italian wines make even a weeknight meal feel special. L D $$

IRON AGE 1054 Rockville Pike, 301-424-1474, ironagekoreansteakhouse.com. Part of a small chain of all-you-can-eat Korean barbecue restaurants, this branch opened in 2012. Garlic pork belly, spicy chicken and beef brisket are among the dozen-plus offerings. There are two menu options (the pricier one includes a few more items, such as steak and octopus). J L D $$

JAVA NATION 11120 Rockville Pike, 301-836-6022, javanation.com. An offshoot of a coffeeshop in Kensington, this Rockville Pike restaurant in the space that once housed Addie’s serves a full-service menu of fish, oysters and other seafood. There’s a 10-seat bar for beer, wine, liquor—and coffee. ❂ J R L D $$

JINYA RAMEN BAR 910 Prose St. (Pike & Rose), 301-816-3029, jinya-ramenbar.com. A 74-seat eatery that’s part of a chain, Jinya serves 12 different types of ramen, ranging from the classic wonton chicken to a creamy vegan option. Try the Jinya Mini Tacos, which come with a choice of salmon poke, pork chashu and kimchee, or spicy tuna. Voted “Best Ramen” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020.

JL D $

JOE’S NOODLE HOUSE 1488-C Rockville Pike, 301-881-5518, joesnoodlehouse.com. Chinese expats and many other customers consider the Sichuan specialties (soft bean curd with spicy sauce and hot beef jerky) among the area’s best examples of gourmet Chinese cooking. LD$

JULII (EDITORS’ PICK) 11915 Grand Park Ave. (Pike & Rose), 301517-9090,  julii.com. A French Mediterranean bistro from the owners of CAVA, Julii looks like a glass box from the outside and serves fare such as salmon crudo, roasted bone marrow, crispy trout, New York strip au poivre and tableside nitrogen ice cream. Voted “Best

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New Restaurant” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020. L D $$

KUSSHI 11826 Trade St. (Pike & Rose), 240-7700355, kusshisushi.com. The owners of Hanaro Sushi, a Japanese restaurant in Bethesda, serve up similar sushi offerings here. A boat-shaped platter with 64 to 128 pieces of sushi or sashimi is a fun shareable option. L D $$

KUYA JA’S LECHON BELLY 5268-H Nicholson Lane, 240-669-4383, kuyajas.com. This fast-casual restaurant that started as a pop-up in the Rockville area specializes in serving lechon, a Filipino pork belly dish. Chef and owner Javier J. Fernandez, a native of the Philippines, shares the flavors of his home country through ricebowls, spiced wings and homemade pastries. LD$

LA BRASA LATIN CUISINE 12401 Parklawn Drive, 301-468-8850, labrasarockville.com. A bold, yellow awning marks the unlikely industrial location of the popular La Brasa. Customers rave about the rotisserie chicken, lomo saltado (Peruvian marinated steak), Salvadoran pupusas and Tres Leches. ❂ L D $

LA CANELA (EDITORS’ PICK) 141-D Gibbs St. (Rockville Town Square), 301-251-1550, lacanelaperu.com. Sophisticated, modern Peruvian cooking shines in a regally furnished dining room in a yellow stucco building graced with curvy black ironwork. The menu includes artfully prepared seafood, pork, chicken and beef dishes.

❂ LD $

LA LIMEÑA GRILL 1093 Rockville Pike, 301-417-4922. An offshoot of nearby La Limeña Restaurant, this Peruvian eatery with a spacious patio serves several traditional seafood dishes, including Ceviche Mixto, an appetizer of lime-marinated tilapia served with glazed potatoes and crispy dried corn kernels. The Chicha Morada, a sweet corn-based drink, pairs nicely with authentic and tender braised-beef entrees. ❂

J L D $$

LA LIMEÑA RESTAURANT 765 Rockville Pike, 301-424-8066, lalimena restaurant.com. Diners can choose dishes such as beef hearts, tripe and homemade pastries in this tiny but well-appointed eatery. Desserts include passion fruit mousse and vanilla flan. And of course, there’s rotisserie chicken to go. L D $

LEBANESE TAVERNA CAFÉ 115 Gibbs St. (Rockville Town Square), 301-309-8681, lebanesetaverna.com. A

casual and pleasant family spot for lunch or dinner, the cafe is a more casual offshoot of the local Lebanese Taverna chain, serving hummus, pita, falafel, lamb kabobs, salmon and chicken. ❂ J L D $

LEBTAV 1605 Rockville Pike, 301-468-9086, lebtav. com. LEBTAV has a shorter menu than its fast-casual sibling Lebanese Taverna Café. You’ll find sandwiches, bowls, hummus, falafel, chicken and lamb kabobs. LD$

MAHSHAD MODERN PERSIAN KITCHEN 404 King Farm Blvd., 240-477-6333, mahshadmd.com. The fast-casual restaurant’s menu highlights kebabs (ground beef and a vegan version of it; beef fillet; chicken marinated in saffron and yogurt, with a spicy option; and veggies) that come with warm pita bread, a roasted tomato and rice or salad or half rice, half salad. ❂ L D $

MAMMA LUCIA 12274-M Rockville Pike, 301-770-4894; 14921-J Shady Grove Road, 301-762-8805; mammaluciarestaurants.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ L D $$

MATCHBOX 1699 Rockville Pike, 301-816-0369, matchboxrestaurants.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ J R L D $$

MISSION BBQ 885 Rockville Pike, 301-444-5574, missionbbq.com. This outpost of a national chain, known for its support of U.S. military troops and veterans, serves its barbecue—including brisket, ribs and pulled pork—alongside a slew of add-your-own sauces. Come for lunch and stay to recite the national anthem at noon. J L D $

MOBY DICK HOUSE OF KABOB 14929-A Shady Grove Road, 301-738-0005, mobyskabob.com. See Chevy Chase listing. LD$

MOD PIZZA 12027 Rockville Pike, 301-287-4284. modpizza.com. See Gaithersburg/North Potomac listing. ❂ L D $

MOSAIC CUISINE & CAFÉ 186 Halpine Road, 301-468-0682, mosaiccuisine.com. A diner with a soft European accent. Try the fresh Belgian waffles for breakfast. For those with hefty appetites, the waffle sandwiches are worth the trip, but don’t overlook the homemade soups or light dinner entrees. J B R L D $$

MYKONOS GRILL 121 Congressional Lane, 301-770-5999, mykonosgrill.com. An authentic Greek taverna

with whitewashed walls with Mediterranean blue accents on a busy street, Mykonos Grill turns out legs of lamb and fresh seafood expected at any good Greek restaurant.

❂ L D $$

NADA 11886 Grand Park Ave. (Pike & Rose), 301771-4040, eatdrinknada.com/n-bethesda. Part of a small national chain, Nada serves street tacos with fillings such as caramelized cauliflower, fried tofu and pork carnitas. The brief menu also includes soups, salads and a fajita plate. Margaritas and seasonal cocktails are available. R L D $$

NAGOYA SUSHI 402 King Farm Blvd., Suite 130, 301-9906778, nagoyasushirockville.com. Cheery yellow walls decorated with shelves of Japanese knickknacks greet customers who come for the large selection of sushi at this unassuming sushi spot in King Farm. L D $$

NANTUCKET’S REEF (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

9755 Traville Gateway Drive, Rockville, 301279-7333, nantucketsreef.com. This casual New England-style eatery offers a wide range of reasonably priced seafood dishes, including raw and baked oysters, stuffed cod, fried Ipswitch clams, seafood tacos, tuna and salmon salads, and lobster items. Signature cocktails are made with Nantucket Nectars juices. ❂ R L D $$

NIWANO HANA JAPANESE RESTAURANT 887 Rockville Pike, 301-294-0553, niwanohana.com. Clean Asian decor and elegant wooden screens greet diners at this friendly and busy sushi spot located in Wintergreen Plaza. There are the usual sushi rolls, plus creative options such as a Spicy Scallop Roll with mayonnaise and chili peppers, noodle dishes, teriyaki and yakitori. L D $$

THE ORIGINAL PANCAKE HOUSE 12224 Rockville Pike, 301-468-0886, ophrestaurants.com. See Bethesda listing. This location stays open until 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. J B L D $

OWEN’S ORDINARY (EDITORS’ PICK) 11820 Trade St. (Pike & Rose), 301-2451226, owensordinarymd.com. This Americanstyle restaurant, barroom and beer garden from Neighborhood Restaurant Group boasts 50 rotating drafts and more than 150 types of bottled beer. The 175-seat restaurant serves salads, burgers, pork, seafood and fondue entrees, and those looking to grab a drink can make the most of the space’s 60seat beer garden. R L D $$

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PETER CHANG (EDITORS’ PICK) 20-A Maryland Ave. (Rockville Town Square), 301-838-9188, peterchangarlington.com. Chef Peter Chang’s Sichuan specialties are showcased in an apricot-walled dining space. Garnering a cult-like following over the years, Chang is best known for dishes such as dryfried eggplant, crispy pork belly and duck in a stone pot. L D $$

PHO 75 771 Hungerford Drive, 301-309-8873. The restaurant is one of the Washington area’s favorite spots for the Vietnamese beef noodle soup known as pho. Soup can be customized with bean sprouts, Thai basil, chilies, lime, and hot and hoisin sauces. Beverages include interesting options such as Iced Salty Pickled Lemon Juice. L D $

PHO HOA BINH 11782 Parklawn Drive, 301-770-5576. This pleasant pho restaurant offers the full gamut of variations on the beef noodle soup, plus about a dozen grilled entrees. The Adventurer’s Choice features “unusual” meats, including tendon, tripe and fatty flank. The Vietnamese iced coffee is divine. L D $

PHO NOM NOM 842 Rockville Pike, 301-610-0232, phonomnom.net. As the name suggests, the specialty is pho, but there are also grilled dishes, noodles and the Vietnamese sandwich known as banh mi. House specials include Vietnamese beef stew and pork and shrimp wontons. L D $

PHOLUSCIOUS VIETNAMESE GRILL 10048 Darnestown Road, 301-762-2226, pholuscious.com. This casual restaurant and bar is home to traditional Vietnamese cooking, with fresh ingredients, minimal use of oil and many herbs and vegetables. The menu features pho, noodle dishes, rice plates and lots of protein dishes. Beverages include bubble tea, smoothies, beer and wine. L D $$

PIKE KITCHEN 1066 Rockville Pike, 301-603-2279, pikekitchen.com. The 6,200-square-foot, 100-seat Asian food hall at the Edmonston Crossing shopping center includes eateries dishing up Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches, pho, poke, ramen, bibimbap and more. ❂LD$

POTOMAC PIZZA 9709 Traville Gateway Drive, 301-279-2234, potomacpizza.com. See Chevy Chase listing.

❂ J LD$

POYOTECA 14921 Fallsgrove Blvd., 240-386-8234, poyoteca.com. Peruvian rotisserie chicken 296

is the signature item here, in quarter, half or whole portions. You’ll also find burritos, a handful of salads, and bowls of rice with chicken and other toppings. J L D $

QUINCY’S SOUTH BAR & GRILLE 11401 Woodglen Drive, 240-669-3270, quincyssouth.com. See Gaithersburg/North Potomac listing. ❂ L D $

SADAF HALAL RESTAURANT 1327-K Rockville Pike, 301-424-4040. An elegant alternative to the run-of-the-mill kabob places dotting Rockville Pike, Sadaf is pristine, with lace curtains and glass mosaic tiles in front. In addition to kabobs, it offers Persian curries and fish dishes.

❂ J LD$

SAM CAFÉ & MARKET 844 Rockville Pike, 301-424-1600, samcafemarket.com. Fill up on the kitchen’s juicy skewered meats or interesting entrees, including pomegranate molasses stew and marinated grilled salmon, then have a gelato and check out the hookahs.

❂ LD$

SEASONS 52 11414 Rockville Pike, 301-984-5252, seasons52.com. A fresh, seasonal menu featuring items under 475 calories. Choose from flatbreads including Blackened Steak & Blue Cheese and Grilled Garlic Pesto Chicken to entree salads to meat and seafood dishes. Nightly piano music.

❂ L D $$

SHANGHAI TASTE 1121 Nelson St., 301-279-0806. Coowner and chef Wei Sun, a Shanghai native, specializes in preparing three different flavors of soup dumplings at this small restaurant in a strip mall. The menu also includes traditional Chinese-American dishes, such as General Tso’s chicken and fried rice. LD$

SHEBA RESTAURANT 5071 Nicholson Lane, 301-881-8882, sheba rockville.com. The menu features authentic Ethiopian cuisine with lots of vegetarian and vegan options. House specialties include Dulet Assa, chopped tilapia mixed with onion, garlic and jalapeno and served with a side of homemade cheese. L D $

SICHUAN JIN RIVER 410 Hungerford Drive, 240-403-7351, sichuanjinrivermd.com. Customers find terrific Sichuan cuisine served in a no-frills setting. Take the plunge and try something new with the authentic Chinese menu, including 23 small cold plates. L D $

SILVER DINER 12276 Rockville Pike, 301-770-2828, silverdiner.com. Customers flock to this trendy diner that still offers tableside

jukeboxes. The latest food trends (think quinoa coconut pancakes) share company on the enormous menu with diner staples such as meatloaf and mashed potatoes. Voted “Best Late-Night Eats” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021. J B R L D $

SPICE XING 100-B Gibbs St. (Rockville Town Square), 301-610-0303, spicexing.com. Chef and owner Sudhir Seth, who also owns Bethesda’s Passage to India, serves up small plates and dishes that reflect the history of culinary influences on India. Try the all-youcan-eat lunchtime buffet. ❂ J R L D $$

THE SPOT 255 N. Washington St., thespotdmv.com. This 6,200-square-foot, 200-seat Asian food hall, not far from Rockville Town Square, includes a handful of vendors, including Mian Pull Noodle (dumplings and noodle dishes), Poki DC (the Hawaiian-inspired raw fish dish called poke) and Alpaca Dessert (shaved snow ice and ice cream-filled waffle cones). LD$

STANFORD GRILL 2000 Tower Oaks Blvd., 240-582-1000, thestanfordgrill.com. From the Blueridge Restaurant Group, owner of Copper Canyon Grill restaurants, comes this 300-seat American eatery on the ground floor of an office building. Salads, burgers, steaks and seafood, plus sushi, with an eye toward high quality. ❂ R L D $$

STELLA BARRA PIZZERIA 11825 Grand Park Ave. (Pike & Rose), 301770-8609, stellabarra.com. Adjacent to its sister restaurant, Summer House Santa Monica, Stella Barra is an artisan pizzeria with a hip, urban vibe. Look for crisp crusts with chewy centers topped with butternut squash and candied bacon or house-made pork sausage and fennel pollen. Italian wines available. ❂ R D $$

SUMMER HOUSE SANTA MONICA (EDITORS’ PICK)

11825 Grand Park Ave. (Pike & Rose), 301881-2381, summerhousesm.com. An airy, light and stunning space sets the scene for modern American cuisine with a West Coast sensibility. Fare includes salads, sushi, tacos, sandwiches and steak frites. Do not miss the bakery counter. Voted “Best Restaurant in Rockville/North Bethesda” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021, and “Restaurant With Best Decor” by readers in 2020.

❂ J R L D $$

SUPER BOWL NOODLE HOUSE 785 Rockville Pike, 301-738-0086, superbowlnoodlehouse.com. Look for a large variety of Asian noodle dishes in super-size portions, plus a wide selection of appetizers.

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Also, bubble tea and desserts, including Sweet Taro Root Roll and Black Sugar Shaved Ice. ❂ L D $

SUSHI DAMO 36-G Maryland Ave. (Rockville Town Square), 301-340-8010, sushidamo.com. A slice of New York sophistication, this elegant restaurant offers sushi à la carte or omakase, chef’s choice, plus beef and seafood entrees and an impressive sake list. L D $$

SUSHI HOUSE JAPANESE RESTAURANT 1331-D Rockville Pike, 301-309-0043, sushihouse1331.com. A tiny, plain restaurant serving a large selection of fresh sushi, including sushi and sashimi combinations. Lunch specials for under $7. It’s popular, so be prepared to wait. L D $$

SUSHI OISHII 9706 Traville Gateway Drive, 301-251-1177, sushioishii.com. This charming sushi bar in the Traville Gateway Center offers friendly service and 24 specialty sushi rolls, bento boxes and a few grilled items, including beef, poultry and seafood teriyaki. L D $$

TAIPEI TOKYO 14921-D Shady Grove Road (Fallsgrove Village Center), 301-738-8813; 11510-A Rockville Pike, 301-881-8388; taipei-tokyo. net. These sister restaurants offer a sizable roster of Chinese, Japanese and Thai dishes. The Fallsgrove Village location is the younger and sleeker of the two, with full sit-down service. The older sister, opened in 1993, is more like a noodle shop/cafeteria. L D $$

TARA THAI 12071 Rockville Pike, 301-231-9899, tarathai.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ L D $$

TEMARI CAFÉ 1043 Rockville Pike, 301-340-7720. Deepfried oysters, classic rice balls, ramen noodle soup, sushi and sashimi and comic books to peruse while you await your order set this Japanese restaurant apart from the rest. L D $$

THAT’S AMORE 15201 Shady Grove Road, 240-268-0682, thatsamore.com. This local chain focuses on family-style portions of classic Neapolitan dishes such as lasagna and chicken Parmesan in a more elegant setting than might be expected. Good for groups and large families. J L D $$

TRAPEZARIA 11 N. Washington St., 301-339-8962, thetrapezaria.com. This down-to-earth and hospitable Greek/Mediterranean restaurant serves top-notch and unfussy small plates and entrees. Choose among a variety of dips, vegetarian mezze, souvlaki, sausages and

more-involved fish and lamb dishes. Save room for the baklava. L D $$

URBAN BAR-B-QUE COMPANY 5566 Norbeck Road, 301-460-0050, urbanbarbq.com. Urban Bar-B-Que Company, a tiny joint run by a couple of local friends, has a winning formula and features fingerlicking ribs, burgers and wings, plus salads, chili and smothered fries. Staff is friendly, too. J L D $

URBAN HOT POT 1800 Rockville Pike, 240-669-6710, urbanhotpot.com. On the first floor of the Galvan at Twinbrook building, this hot pot spot features a conveyor belt where food travels to diners. A prix fixe all-you-caneat menu allows you to create your meal at your table using one of the stationed iPads. Choose from a selection of noodles, vegetables and meat to add to a bowl of hot stock, then do it again if you’re still hungry. L D $$

VILLA MAYA 5532 Norbeck Road (Rock Creek Village Center), 301-460-1247. Here you’ll find all the traditional Mexican and Tex-Mex favorites from quesadillas to fajitas that are sure to please the whole family. ❂ R L D $$

THE WOODSIDE DELI 4 N. Washington St., 301-444-4478, thewoodsidedeli.com. Though the original location of the venerable Silver Spring eatery and caterer that dished up matzo ball soup from 1947 to 2019 closed, this location is still open. Choose from a wide selection of sandwiches, burgers and entrees. There’s also a pickle bar. ❂ J B R L D $

WORLD OF BEER 196B East Montgomery Ave., 301-340-2915, worldofbeer.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ JRL D $

XI’AN GOURMET 316 N. Washington St., 301-875-5144, xian-gourmet.business.site. This casual diner prides itself on its comfort food. Named after an ancient city, Xi’an heavily features Sichuan and Shaanxi cuisines, after the chefs’ regional heritage. Go for the Shaanxi cold steamed noodles or the Shanghai soup dumplings. L D $

YEKTA

YUAN FU VEGETARIAN 798 Rockville Pike, 301-762-5937, yuanfuvegetarian.com. From tea-smoked “duck” to kung pao “chicken,” the whole menu is meatless, made from Chinese vegetable products. There is a large selection of chef’s specials, including Pumpkin Chicken with Mushrooms in a hot pot. L D $

POTOMAC ATTMAN’S DELICATESSEN (NEW) 12505 Park Potomac Ave., 301-765-3354, attmansdeli.com. The menu at this branch of a landmark Baltimore deli offers the same legendary corned beef, pastrami and other deli specialties. Third-generation owner Marc Attman is at the helm. ❂ B L D $

BROOKLYN’S DELI & CATERING 1089 Seven Locks Road, 301-340-3354, brooklynsdelimd.com. From chopped liver to chicken soup, Brooklyn’s serves all the deli specialties, plus more. Think hot pastrami with coleslaw and Russian dressing on pumpernickel. ❂ J B L D $

CAVA 7991 Tuckerman Lane (Cabin John Village), 301-200-5398, cava.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ L D $

ELEVATION BURGER 12525-D Park Potomac Ave., 301-838-4010, elevationburger.com. Fast-food burgers go organic and grass-fed at this Northern Virginia-founded chain. Veggie burgers, chicken sandwiches, grilled cheese and a BLT available, too. Shake flavors range from banana to Key lime and cheesecake.

❂ LD$

GRAND FUSION CUISINE 350 East Fortune Terrace, 301-838-2862, grandfusionpotomac.com. Diners will find something for everyone seeking a taste of the Asian continent, a full sushi bar, and Chinese, Malaysian and Singaporean specialties. Chef’s specials include Crispy Eggplant in Spicy Orange Sauce and Double Flavored Shrimp. ❂ L D $

GREGORIO’S TRATTORIA 7745 Tuckerman Lane (Cabin John Village), 301-296-6168, gregoriostrattoria.com. See Bethesda listing. J L D $$

THE GRILLED OYSTER CO. (EDITORS’

1488 Rockville Pike, 301-984-1190, yekta. com. Persian cuisine, including a selection of beef, chicken and lamb kabobs, is served in a beautiful dining room. Try a dessert such as frozen noodle sorbet or saffron ice cream. Check out the adjacent market after polishing off your kabob. L D $$

PICK)

7943 Tuckerman Lane (Cabin John Village), 301-299-9888, thegrilledoystercompany. com. This Chesapeake-style seafood eatery features small plates, salads, sandwiches and entrees. The sampler of four grilled oysters—with ingredients such as coconut

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rum and cucumber relish—showcases the namesake item. ❂ J R L D $$

GRINGOS & MARIACHIS (EDITORS’ PICK) 12435 Park Potomac Ave., 301-339-8855, gringosandmariachis.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ D $

HUNTER’S BAR AND GRILL 10123 River Road, 301-299-9300, huntersbarandgrill.com. At this Potomac institution and popular English hunt-themed spot, try a big salad or hamburger for lunch and a traditional pasta dish or filet mignon for dinner with the family. ❂ J R L D $$

LAHINCH TAVERN AND GRILL 7747 Tuckerman Lane (Cabin John Village), 240-499-8922, lahinchtavernandgrill.com. The menu of this sister restaurant to The Irish Inn at Glen Echo commingles Irish standards (traditional sausage roll, shepherd’s pie, bangers and mash, lamb stew) with fare such as Alaskan halibut. Lahinch is a coastal town in Ireland’s County Clare.

J R L D $$$

LOCK 72 KITCHEN & BAR (EDITORS’ PICK) 10128 River Road, 301-299-0481, lock72. com. Well-known chef Robert Wiedmaier’s RW Restaurant Group runs this upscale American pub (formerly called River Falls Tavern). Entrees include pan-roasted duck breast, crabcake, rockfish and New York strip steak. ❂ R L D $$

MOBY DICK HOUSE OF KABOB 9812 Falls Road, 240-660-2626, mobyskabob.com. See Chevy Chase listing. LD$

MOCO’S FOUNDING FARMERS 12505 Park Potomac Ave., 301-340-8783, wearefoundingfarmers.com. Farm-inspired fare in a modern and casual setting; this is the sister restaurant to the phenomenally popular downtown D.C. Founding Farmers. Try the warm cookies for dessert. Voted “Best Craft Cocktails” and “Best Brunch” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020, and “Best Restaurant in Potomac” and “Best Brunch” by readers in 2021. ❂ B R L D $$

NORMANDIE FARM 10710 Falls Road, 301-983-8838, popovers. com. This fine-dining French restaurant, open since 1931, strives to preserve its classical heritage while embracing new traditions. Dinner entrees run from seafood to beef and lamb. The restaurant offers quick service, a casual cafe option and a violinist at afternoon tea. ❂ J R L D $$

O’DONNELL’S MARKET 1073 Seven Locks Road, 301-251-6355, odonnellsmarket.com. This market, from the family that ran O’Donnell’s restaurants in 298

Montgomery County for decades, features a 10-seat bar for lunch and happy hour. The menu includes a raw bar, salads and many O’Donnell’s classics, among them a lump-filled crabcake sandwich, salmon BLT, seafood bisque and crab gumbo. Voted “Best Takeout During the Stay-at-Home Order,” “Best Crabcake” and “Best Place to Buy Fish” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021.

❂L$

OLD ANGLER’S INN 10801 MacArthur Blvd., 301-365-2425, oldanglersinn.com. Open since 1860 and known for its refined American food and beautiful fireplaces and grounds, it features live music on weekends. Signature cocktails include hard cider sangria and a pumpkin pie martini. Voted “Best Outdoor Dining” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2020.

❂ R L D $$$

POTOMAC PIZZA 9812 Falls Road, 301-299-7700, potomacpizza.com. See Chevy Chase listing. JLD$

QUINCY’S (NEW) 1093 Seven Locks Road, 240-500-3010, quincyspotomac.com. See Gaithersburg/ North Potomac listing. L D $

RENATO’S AT RIVER FALLS 10120 River Road, 301-365-1900, renatosatriverfalls.com. The Italian restaurant offers fish dishes among its menu of pastas and classics such as penne with eggplant, and chicken parmigiana. Traditional Italian desserts include tiramisu, profiteroles, and cannolis. ❂ J L D $$

SISTERS THAI 7995 Tuckerman Lane (Cabin John Village), 301-299-4157, sisterscabinjohn.com. The owners of a Thai restaurant and bakery in Virginia serve classic Thai dishes in a setting that mixes several decor styles (one room has a fireplace and looks like a living room filled with books). A dessert counter offers coffee and tea drinks along with ice cream, snow ice and other treats. ❂ L D $$

SUGO OSTERIA 12505 Park Potomac Ave., 240-386-8080, eatsugo.com. This stylish spot starts you off with honey-thyme butter on rustic bread. The menu focuses on Italian small plates, meatballs, sliders, pizza and pasta. Chef specialties include blue crab gnocchi and charred octopus. ❂ R L D $$

TALLY-HO RESTAURANT 9923 Falls Road, 301-299-6825, tallyhorestaurant.com. A local fixture since 1968, the eatery serves an expansive dinerstyle menu with Greek and Italian specialties.

Choose from options ranging from burgers and deli sandwiches to pizza, calzones and dinner entrees. ❂ J B L D $

SILVER SPRING ALL SET RESTAURANT & BAR 8630 Fenton St., 301-495-8800, allsetrestaurant.com. American cuisine with a focus on New England specialties. Look for clams, oysters and lobster, plus crabcakes, and beef and vegetarian options. Voted “Best Restaurant in Silver Spring” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021. ❂ J R L D $$

AMINA THAI 8624 Colesville Road, 301-588-3588. See North Bethesda/Rockville listing. L D $

ASTRO LAB BREWING 8216 Georgia Ave., 301-273-9684, astrolabbrewing.com. A menu of about a dozen items—including handheld savory pies, a sausage roll and a hummus platter— are served in the downtown Silver Spring brewery’s taproom. Grab one of the hopforward beers brewed on-site to sip at the communal tables or on the patio. ❂ JLD$

AZÚCAR RESTAURANT BAR & GRILL 14418 Layhill Road, 301-438-3293, azucarrestaurant.net. The name means sugar, and it fits: The colorful Salvadoran spot is decorated in bright purple and orange with Cubist-style paintings. The pork-stuffed corn pupusas are stars. Also look for more elegant dinners, including fried whole trout. L D $$

BETE ETHIOPIAN CUISINE 811 Roeder Road, 301-588-2225, beteethiopia.com. Family-run Ethiopian restaurant with a modest dining room but some exemplary cooking. Don’t miss the vegetarian sampler, and in nice weather, opt for eating outside in the lovely, shaded back patio. ❂ J B L D $$

THE BIG GREEK CAFE 8213 Georgia Ave., 301-587-4733, biggreekcafe.com. See Bethesda listing. LD$

CAVA 8515 Fenton St., 301-200-8666, cava.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ L D $

COPPER CANYON GRILL 928 Ellsworth Drive, 301-589-1330, ccgrill. com. See Gaithersburg listing.

❂ J R L D $$

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CRISFIELD SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

8012 Georgia Ave., 301-589-1306, crisfieldseafood.com. With its U-shaped counter and kitschy, oyster-plate-covered walls, this landmark seafood diner has customers lining up for the Eastern Shore specialties such as oysters and crabmeatstuffed lobster that it has served since the 1940s. L D $$

CUBANO’S

1201 Fidler Lane, 301-563-4020, cubanos restaurant.com. See Bethesda listing.

❂ L D $$

THE DAILY DISH

8301 Grubb Road, 301-588-6300, thedailydishrestaurant.com. A neighborhood favorite serving seasonally inspired, locally sourced comfort food, including bar bites and brunch dishes. Full-service catering is available, too. ❂ J R L D $$

DENIZENS BREWING CO. (EDITORS’ PICK)

1115 East West Highway, 301-557-9818, denizensbrewingco.com. The bright-orange building houses Montgomery County’s largest brewery, featuring core beers and seasonal offerings, along with drafts from other regional breweries. Menu of snacks, sandwiches and salads includes vegetarian options. There is a large outdoor beer garden and indoor seating overlooking the brewery.

❂D$

DISTRICT TACO

1310 East West Highway, 240-531-1880, districttaco.com. This branch of a local chain of eateries that grew out of a food truck serves fast-casual fare, from egg-filled tacos for breakfast to quesadillas, burritos and tacos for later in the day. ❂ J B L D $

DON POLLO

12345 Georgia Ave., 301-933-9515; 13881 Outlet Drive, 240-560-7376, donpollogroup. com. See Bethesda listing. L D $

EL AGUILA RESTAURANT

8649 16th St., 301-588-9063, elaguilarestaurant.com. A cheery bar and generous plates of Tex-Mex favorites such as enchiladas and Salvadoran seafood soup make this eatery popular with families and others looking for a lively night out. ❂ L D $

EL GAVILAN

8805 Flower Ave., 301-587-4197. The walls are bright, the music’s upbeat, the margaritas are fine and the service is friendly. The usual Tex-Mex fare is here, as well as Salvadoran specialties such as tasty cheese- or porkfilled pupusas. J L D $

EL GOLFO

8739 Flower Ave., 301-608-2121, elgolforestaurant.com. Friendly, home-style

Latin service is the hallmark, as attested to by the many Salvadorans who stop in for lunch and dinner. Pupusas, soups and beef dishes such as carne asada as well as more adventurous choices can be found in the charming, raspberry-colored dining room.

❂ J RLD$

EL SAPO CUBAN SOCIAL CLUB (EDITORS’ PICK)

8455 Fenton St., 301-326-1063, elsaporestaurant.com. Cuban specialties are the focus at this restaurant from owner and chef Raynold Mendizábal, who also owns Urban Butcher in Silver Spring. Small bites such as empanadas and cod croquettes are on the menu with dishes that Cuba is known for, including the beef entree ropa vieja and puerco asado (roasted pork). L D $$$

FENTON CAFÉ 8311 Fenton St., 301-326-1841, fentoncafesilverspring.com. An out-of-the-way crêperie serving 31 kinds of sweet crêpes and 16 varieties of savory crêpes. Savory versions range from cheese and ham to roasted eggplant with zucchini, bell pepper, sundried tomato, garlic and onion. B L D $

FIRE STATION 1 RESTAURANT & BREWING CO. 8131 Georgia Ave., 301-585-1370, firestation1md.com. A historic firehouse made over as an eatery serves 21st-century pizza, sandwiches, meat, seafood and vegetarian entrees. Try the Cuban sandwich with seasoned pork, chipotle mayo, Dijon mustard, pickles and Swiss cheese on a ciabatta roll. L D $

GHAR-E-KABAB 944 Wayne Ave., 301-587-4427, gharekabab. com. This spot offers a mix of authentic Indian and Nepali cuisine. From Indian staples such as chicken tikka masala and lamb curry to Nepalese appetizers such as furaula (vegetable fritters) and cho-e-la (marinated duck), there are a variety of South Asian flavors. J L D $$

THE GREEK PLACE 8417 Georgia Ave., 301-495-2912. Here are big portions of better-than-average food at reasonable prices. The bifteki pita sandwich, a seasoned ground lamb and beef patty with tzatziki, tomatoes and red onions, is especially good. L D $

ITALIAN KITCHEN 8201 Fenton St., 301-588-7800, italiankitchenmd.com. Casual, attractive pizzeria with bar seating also turns out homemade sandwiches, calzones, salads and pasta dishes. L D $

JEWEL OF INDIA 10151 New Hampshire Ave., 301-408-2200, jewelofindiamd.com. Elegant decor and excellent northern Indian cuisine make this shopping center restaurant a real find. Diners will find a good selection of curries, and rice and biryani dishes. L D $$

KAO THAI 8650 Colesville Road, 301-495-1234, kaothairestaurant.com. This restaurant turns out top-notch curries, noodle dishes and vegetarian options, plus house specialties, such as Siam Salmon with Spicy Thai Basil Sauce and Thai Chili Tilapia. Dishes are cooked medium spicy. ❂ L D $$

LA CASITA PUPUSERIA & MARKET 8214 Piney Branch Road, 301-588-6656, lacasitapupusas.com. Homemade pupusas, tamales and other Salvadoran specialties are available, plus a full breakfast menu and a small selection of grocery items. B L D $

LA MALINCHE 8622 Colesville Road, 301-562-8622, lamalinchetapas.com. Diners will find an interesting selection of Spanish and Mexican tapas, plus a full Saturday and Sunday brunch featuring huevos rancheros, variations of tortillas Espanola and more. R L D $$

LANGANO ETHIOPIAN RESTAURANT 8305 Georgia Ave., 301-563-6700, langano restaurant.com. Named for the popular Ethiopian vacation spot, Lake Langano, this longtime restaurant offers fine Ethiopian cuisine such as doro wat (spicy chicken stew) and tibs (stewed meat) in a cozy white- and red-accented dining room. Lunch specials on weekdays. L D $

LEBTAV 8535 Fenton St., 301-588-1192, lebtav.com. See Rockville listing. ❂ L D $

LOCAVINO 8519 Fenton St., 301-448-1819, locavino. com. In the space that overlooks Veterans Plaza and that once housed Adega Wine Cellars & Cafe, this wine bar focuses on local wines and beer but includes offerings from other regions. Salads, burgers, sandwiches, pasta and flatbreads fill the menu. L D $

LUCY ETHIOPIAN RESTAURANT 8301 Georgia Ave., 301-589-6700. The authentic Ethiopian menu here includes beef and lamb plates, such as kitfo (raw beef) sandwiches and boneless braised yebeg alicha (Ethiopian mild lamb stew). The interior is decorated with Ethiopian-inspired art and features a full bar. L D $

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MAMMA LUCIA 1302 East West Highway, 301-562-0693, mammaluciarestaurants.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ L D $$

MANDALAY RESTAURANT & CAFÉ 930 Bonifant St., 301-585-0500, mandalay restaurantcafe.com. The modest dining room is packed most evenings with families and large groups who come for the Burmese food, a cross between Indian and Thai. L D $

MATCHBOX 919 Ellsworth Drive, 240-247-8969, matchboxrestaurants.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ J R L D $$

MCGINTY’S PUBLIC HOUSE 911 Ellsworth Drive, 301-587-1270, mcgintys publichouse.com. Traditional Irish pub and restaurant features corned beef and cabbage, live music and dancing. Early-bird special, three-course menu for $15, from 5 to 7 p.m. ❂ J R L D $$

MELEKET 1907 Seminary Road, 301-755-5768, meleketrestaurant.com. This family-owned, Ethiopian-Italian restaurant serves classic vegetarian, beef and chicken Ethiopian plates, alongside Italian entrees such as pesto pasta with chicken. For breakfast, try a traditional Ethiopian dish of kinche (a buttery grain porridge) or firfir (bread mixed with vegetables in a red pepper sauce). B L D $

MI RANCHO 8701 Ramsey Ave., 301-588-4872, miranchomd.com. You'll find a boisterous party atmosphere every night at a place where customers can count on standard TexMex fare at good prices. The outdoor patio, strung with colorful lights, is the place to be in nice weather. ❂ L D $

MIX BAR & GRILLE 8241 Georgia Ave., #200, 301-326-1333, mixbargrille.com. Modern American bistro with charcuterie and cheese plates, brick-oven flatbreads, ceviche and other light fare. Look for lots of wines by the glass and beers on tap. ❂  R L D $$

MOD PIZZA 909 Ellsworth Drive, 240-485-1570, modpizza.com. See Gaithersburg/North Potomac listing. ❂ L D $

OLAZZO (EDITORS’ PICK) 8235 Georgia Ave., 301-588-2540, olazzo. com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ J L D $

PACCI’S TRATTORIA & PASTICCERIA 6 Old Post Office Road, 301-588-0867, paccistrattoria.com. Diners will find a range of classic Italian dishes, including homemade meatballs and sausage. L D $$ 300

PARKWAY DELI & RESTAURANT 8317 Grubb Road, 301-587-1427, theparkwaydeli.com. Parkway features a bustling back dining room that makes this popular spot so much more than a deli. Longtime waitresses greet regular customers and kids with hugs during busy weekend breakfasts. All-you-can-eat pickle bar.

❂ BLD$

PHO TAN VINH 8705-A Colesville Road, 301-588-8188, photanvinh.com. A family-owned Vietnamese restaurant, Pho Tan Vinh was opened in 2014 by Tiffany Chu, who sought the traditional food she ate in her youth. She and her chef mother serve emergent classics such as pho and put their own spin on items such as the Tan Vinh special, a “deconstructed” banh mi sandwich. L D $

PLNT BURGER 833 Wayne Ave. (Whole Foods Market), 301608-9373, plntburger.com. This vegan fastcasual eatery within Whole Foods Market serves cooked-to-order plant-based Beyond Meat burgers, fries and soft-serve dairy-free ice cream. ❂ J L D $

PORT-AU-PRINCE AUTHENTIC HAITIAN CUISINE 7912 Georgia Ave., 301-565-2006, paphaitiancuisine.com. The eatery serves a small menu of Haitian fare: five appetizers, five entrees (plus an entree salad) and two desserts. Chicken wings, fritters, whole red snapper, fried turkey and legume casserole are among the highlights. A Sunday brunch buffet draws crowds. R D $$

QUARRY HOUSE TAVERN (EDITORS’ PICK) 8401 Georgia Ave., 301-844-5380, facebook. com/quarryhouse. Closed for nearly three years after a fire, this basement-level dive bar reopened in its original space. The inside holds the same 1930s-era feel as the original bar, and burgers and Tater Tots are still on the menu. D $

SAMANTHA’S 631 University Blvd. East, 301-445-7300, samanthasrestaurante.com. This whitetablecloth, Latin-Salvadoran spot in an industrial neighborhood is popular because of its welcoming attitude toward families with young children. The steak and fish specialties are good. L D $$

SILVER STRINGS 8630 Colesville Road, 301-587-0596, silverstringsonline.com. Serving classic American food in downtown Silver Spring, this spot features live music in the evenings by mostly jazz, blues and classic rock musicians. ❂ L D $$

SLIGO PIT BBQ

9701 Sligo Creek Parkway (Sligo Creek Golf Course), 301-585-9511, sligopit.com. This open-to-anyone spot at Sligo Creek Golf Course serves meats—turkey, pork, brisket and chicken—cooked in wood-fired smokers. Burgers, hot dogs, classic sides and beer are available. J ❂ B L D $$

THE SOCIETY RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

8229 Georgia Ave., 301-565-8864, societyss.com. A sleek and modern atmosphere catering to a nightlife crowd, Society offers fare with a Caribbean accent. Check out the rooftop seating and daily drink specials, which include $25 beer buckets.

❂ L D $$

SPICE STREET (NEW)

8242 Georgia Ave., 301-755-6144, spicestreetmd.com. In the bottom of the Solaire apartments, this spot serves Indian street food and other dishes. Expect tandoori chicken and shrimp, minced lamb kabobs, scallops in coconut sauce, and a crab and cauliflower entree with mild spices. L D $$

SUSHI JIN NEXT DOOR

8555 Fenton St., 301-608-0990, sushijinnextdoor.com. The eatery is spare, clean and modern, and offers terrific udon noodle soup and impeccable raw fish. Choose from 11 appetizers and seven soups and salads. L D $$

SWEETGREEN

8517 Georgia Ave., 301-244-5402, sweetgreen.com. See Bethesda listing. LD $

TACOS, TORTAS & TEQUILA

8407 Ramsey Ave., 301-755-6132, tttrestaurant.com. Also called TTT, this fastcasual spot focuses on quesadillas, tortas and tacos—carne asada, garlic shrimp and house-made chorizo among them. There’s a full-service bar and an outdoor patio. ❂BLD$

TASTEE DINER

8601 Cameron St., 301-589-8171, tasteediner.com. See Bethesda listing.

❂ J BLD$

THAI AT SILVER SPRING

921-E Ellsworth Drive, 301-650-0666, thaiatsilverspring.com. The Americanized Thai food is second to the location, which is superb for people-watching on the street below. A modern and stylish dining room with a hip bar in bold colors and good service add to the appeal. ❂ L D $$

URBAN BUTCHER (EDITORS’ PICK) (TEMPORARILY CLOSED) 8226 Georgia Ave., 301-585-5800, urbanbutcher.com. Hip, eclectic setting is the backdrop for this New Age steak house, with

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its home-cured salamis, sausages and other charcuterie, plus meat dishes made from local animals of yesteryear breeds. There’s a lounge, bar, meat curing room, retail counter and dining area. R D $$

VEGETABLE GARDEN 3830 International Drive (Leisure World Plaza), 301-598-6868, vegetablegarden.com. The popular vegan, vegetarian and macrobiotic Asian restaurant features a wide variety of eggplant and asparagus dishes, plus vegetarian “beef,” and “chicken” dishes often made with soy and wheat gluten. L D $$

VICINO RISTORANTE ITALIANO 959 Sligo Ave., 301-588-3372, vicinoitaliano. com. A favorite neighborhood red-sauce joint that hasn’t changed in decades, Vicino features some fine seafood choices in addition to classic pasta dishes. Families are welcome. ❂ L D $$

UPPER NW D.C. THE AVENUE 5540 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-2444567, theavenuedc.com. A family-friendly neighborhood restaurant and bar with dishes such as crab pasta, poutine, burgers and baby back ribs. Fun decor includes classic posters and a giant magnetic scrabble board. ❂ J B L D $$

BLUE 44 5507 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-362-2583, blue44dc.com. The menu features classic American favorites infused with the flavors of Italy and France, including ratatouille, pork schnitzel and bouillabaisse. ❂ J R L D $$

BUCK’S FISHING & CAMPING 5031 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-364-0777, bucksfishingandcamping.com. Diners can enjoy a seasonal menu that changes daily, and offers hip takes on comfort food such as roast chicken (locally raised) in an artsy-chic setting. D $$$

CAFÉ OF INDIA 4909 Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-244-1395, cafeofindiadc.com. Here’s a cute corner cafe with two levels of dining and an extensive menu that includes vegetarian and tandoori entrees, dosas, samosas, tikkas, curries and kabobs. ❂ L D $$

COMET PING PONG (EDITORS’ PICK) 5037 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-364-0404, cometpingpong.com. Landmark fun spot where you can play Ping-Pong or admire local art while you wait for your wood-fired pizza. Choose from more than 30 toppings to design your own pie. ❂ R L D $

DECARLO’S RESTAURANT

MASALA ART

4822 Yuma St. NW, 202-363-4220, decarlosrestaurant.com. This is a familyowned neighborhood staple, with a traditional Italian menu and upscale/casual atmosphere. Signature dishes include agnolotti, veal scallopini, broiled salmon and hand-made pasta. ❂ L D $$

GUAPO’S RESTAURANT 4515 Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-686-3588, guaposrestaurant.com. See Bethesda listing.

❂ R L D $$

I’M EDDIE CANO (EDITORS’ PICK) 5014 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-8904995, imeddiecano.com. A play on the way “Americano” is pronounced, I’m Eddie Cano is an Italian joint with nostalgic 1970s-themed decor. The standouts on executive chef James Gee’s menu include fried zucchini, spaghetti and meatballs, spaghetti with clams, escarole salad and eggplant parmigiana. D $$

JETTIES 5632 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-364-2465, jettiesdc.com. See Bethesda listing. J L D $

LE CHAT NOIR 4907 Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-2442044, lechatnoirrestaurant.com. This cute, cozy neighborhood bistro is run by French restaurateurs, who cook traditional fare such as steak frites, bouillabaisse and braised lamb cheeks. R L D $$

LE PAIN QUOTIDIEN 4874 Massachusetts Ave. NW, 202-4599141, lepainquotidien.com. See Bethesda listing. ❂ J B R L D $

LITTLE BEAST CAFÉ & BISTRO 5600 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-741-4599, littlebeastdc.com. At this dinner spot on the corner of McKinley Street NW, find pizza cooked in a wood-burning oven, sharable dishes such as Brussels sprouts, and entrees such as lamb ragu. ❂ D $$

MACON BISTRO & LARDER (EDITORS’ PICK)

5520 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-248-7807, maconbistro.com. Southern and French cuisine converge at this airy, charming restaurant in the historic Chevy Chase Arcade. Appetizers include raclette and fried green tomatoes, and steak frites are offered alongside short ribs with grits for main courses. ❂ R L D $$

MAGGIANO’S LITTLE ITALY 5333 Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-966-5500, maggianos.com. The restaurant features old-style Italian fare that’s a favorite for large groups and private celebrations. Check out the signature flatbreads and specialty pastas, including lobster carbonara. J R L D $$

4441-B Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-362-4441, masalaartdc.com. Here is fine Indian dining featuring tandoor-oven specialties and masterful Indian spicing. Start off by choosing from a selection of nine breads and 17 appetizers. L D $$

MILLIE’S (EDITORS’ PICK)

4866 Massachusetts Ave. NW, 202-7335789, milliesdc.com. This eatery in the Spring Valley neighborhood may be from up north— it’s the second location of a popular Nantucket restaurant—but its flavors are distinctly southof-the-border. The menu offers coastal takes on tacos, quesadillas and salads that are as summery as the bright, nautical décor of the dining room. Voted “Best Restaurant in Upper Northwest D.C.” by Bethesda Magazine readers in 2021. ❂ J R L D $$

PARTHENON RESTAURANT

5510 Connecticut Ave. NW, 202-9667600, parthenon-restaurant.com. This is a neighborhood eatery taken up a couple notches, with an extensive menu full of authentic selections familiar and exotic, including avgolemono (egg/lemon soup), tzatziki, moussaka, dolmades and souvlaki.

❂ L D $$

PETE’S NEW HAVEN STYLE APIZZA

4940 Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-237-7383, petesapizza.com. The crunchy-crusted New Haven-style pizzas can be topped with a choice of almost three dozen ingredients. There's also pasta, panini, salads and housemade desserts. ❂ J L D $

PIZZERIA PARADISO

4850 Massachusetts Ave. NW, 202-8859101, eatyourpizza.com. An outpost of the small chain started by chef and owner Ruth Gresser, this Spring Valley spot has the same style of wood-fired Neapolitan pizza as the original Paradiso that opened in D.C. in 1991. Try the Di Mare pizza, which has spicy garlic pesto, mussels, shrimp, spinach, red onions and Grana Padano cheese. ❂ L D $$

SATAY CLUB ASIAN RESTAURANT AND BAR

4654 Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-363-8888, asiansatayclub.com. The restaurant prides itself on providing a comfortable/casual setting with a menu that spans Japanese sushi, Chinese mooshi vegetables, Thai curries and Vietnamese spring rolls. L D $

WAGSHAL’S RESTAURANT

4855 Massachusetts Ave. NW, 202-3635698, wagshals.com. Longtime popular deli expands grocery and carryout section, and adds a casual sit-down restaurant in the Spring Valley Shopping Center. Same high-quality fare, including the overstuffed sandwiches. L D $ n

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Summer Camps CAMP

TYPE

GENDER

AGES

LOCATION

WEBSITE

PHONE

Adventure Theatre's Summer Musical Theater Camp

Day

Coed

6 - 12

Glen Echo

adventuretheatre-mtc.org/ camps/summer-programselementary/

301-251-5766

Adventure Theatre's Summer Musical Theater Training Program

Day

Coed

12 - 17

Rockville

adventuretheatre-mtc.org/ camps/summer-programssecondary/

301-251-5766

Barrie Camp

Day

Coed

4 - 14

Silver Spring

www.barrie.org/camp

301-576-2818

Calleva

Day & Overnight

Coed

5 - 17

DC Metro area

www.calleva.org

301-216-1248

Camp Horizons

Overnight

Coed

6 - 16

Harrisonburg, Va.

www.camphorizonsva.com

540-896-7600

Camp JCC

Day

Coed

4 - 21

Rockville

www.benderjccgw.org/camp

301-348-3883

Green Acres School Summer Camp

Day

Coed

3 - 12

N. Bethesda

www.greenacres.org

301-468-8110

Headfirst Summer Camps

Day

Coed

3 - 13

Bethesda, Washington, DC

www.headfirstcamps.com

202-625-1921

Imagination Stage Summer Camp

Day

Coed

3.5 - 18

Bethesda

www.imaginationstage.org

301-280-1636

Montgomery County Recreation

Day

Coed

3 - 16

multiple MoCo locations

www.mocorec.com/guide

240-777-6840

Oneness-Family School Summer Programs

Day

Coed

3.5 - 11

Chevy Chase

www.onenessfamilyschool.org

301-652-7751

Summer at Sandy Spring

Day

Coed

3 - 16

Sandy Spring

www.summeratsandyspring.org

301-774-7455

Summer at WES

Day

Coed

3.5 - 14

Bethesda

www.w-e-s.org/summer-at-wes/

301-652-7878

Summer in French

Day

Coed

5 - 11

Online

www.francedc.org

202-234-7911

SummerEdge at McLean School

Day

Coed

4 - 18

Potomac

www.summeredge.org

240-395-0676

Valley Mill Camp

Day

Boys camp Girls camp

4 - 14

Darnestown

www.valleymill.com

301-948-0220

VisArts Summer Camp

Day

Coed

5 - 18

Rockville

www.visartscenter.org

301-315-8200

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HORSES

FIELD TRIPS

WATER SPORTS

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Essential information on

17

summer camps

SPECIALTIES

6

A fun, full-day camp for grades 1–6! Students will work alongside theatre professionals and teaching artists during socially distanced rehearsals of dancing, singing, and acting. With props, costumes, music, and scene-work, classes will culminate into a show for friends and family. Space is limited!  

6

Led by experienced teaching artists, this program provides focused instruction in an immersive environment. Students will be placed into companies and train together during rehearsals of productions to be presented on the last day of the session. There will not be a New York trip. 

8

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On-site swimming, canoeing, sports, archery, arts, nature, outdoor living skills, STEM, karate, science, video production, culinary arts, theatrics, music and leadership training.

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Calleva focuses on empowering kids through exciting outdoor adventure experiences, with Maryland & Virginia locations & transportation pickup points throughout the DMV. Some programs include overnight.

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Camp JCC is the place to be this summer. Explore everything we have to offer from arts, sports, theater, STEM, swimming and so much more.

0

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Swimming instruction at our on-campus pool; Create your own path in science & Technology, Sports, Music and Art.

1

l

Our camps provide an environment of growth through exploration and play. We offer programming in creative arts, sports, leadership and day camps.

At Camp Horizons, “we are many, we are one.” Our diverse camp program offers over 50 activities which challenge campers to reach their fullest potential as individuals and team players. Activity departments include: aquatics, sports, science and technology, performing arts, outdoors, equestrian, and visual arts.

More than 100 1, 2, 3, & 4-week camps in drama, dance, musical theatre, filmmaking, and performance. Both online and in-person options available.

6

0

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Specialties include art, adventure, business, cheer, cooking, dance, gaming, leadership, music, sports, STEM, performing arts and much more.

1

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Daily nature exploration (1st-5th grade), pool trips & water-play, yoga, thrilling creative arts & sciences, low camper to counselor ratio and extended care!

5

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Campers can choose from a wide variety of workshops and specialty camps that include sports, adventure, arts, technology, academics, music, robotics and much more!

8

Nine sessions that include archery, robotics, cooking, sculpture, animation and video game development, basketball, hiking, entrepreneurship, dance and more!

1

Learn French while doing fun, hands-on activities such as judo, ballet, ceramics, cooking, science and more!

6

0

0

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SummerEdge at McLean School offers fun and learning for everyone in a setting that fosters self-discovery, creativity, connection, and confidence. One summer, a lifetime of memories!

l

Kayaking, canoeing, swimming, horseback riding, rock climbing, archery, air rifle, gymnastics and more. Adventure program for children 10 -14. Transportation provided. Classes include painting and drawing, ceramics, digital art, mosaics, fused glass, movement and more.

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summer camps

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SUMMER PROGRAMS CAMP 2021 DATES: JUNE 21-JULY 30

LEARN MORE & REGISTER!

DAY-CAMPS PEACE WEAVERS (Ages 3½-6½ years old) • Unique weekly themes with related arts, play and projects • Water-play and trips • Fun-fitness games, creative movement and yoga • In-house entertainment and off-campus field trips

www.OnenessFamily.org

REGISTRATION

Begins February 8 Early-Bird Ends March 8

EARTH KEEPERS (Rising 1st-R Rising 5th+ graders) • Daily outdoor excursions to wilderness areas of MD, VA and D.C. • Interactive exhibits at nature centers and museums • Exploring with fossils, animal tracks, fishing nets and bird-calls • Swimming and climbing time

Pool & Water Play

Moon Bo Field Trips Yo g a unce A r t works Mindfulness Environmental Education

Hikes

Chesapeake Bay

CONTACT US! SUMMER@ONENESSFAMILY.ORG – (301) 652-7751 304

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summer camps

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Alliance Française Washington of DC (AFDC) Summer in French program is a great way to keep your kids age 5 to 11 active and up to speed in the language practice. All language levels welcome. Due to Covid-19, our camps will either be fully online again - 2-hour workshops-, OR half-days in-person at 50% capacity and fully masked for judo only (TBC according to vaccination schedule) Seven weekly themes adaptable to both formats will include sciences, engineering, performing arts, and more. AFDC ‘s camps provide a fun and engaging opportunity to build connections through French language and culture.

2142 Wyoming Avenue NW, Washington DC 20008

www.francedc.org/camps

June 21 – August 13, 2021 Cost per week (subject to change/Covid-19): $520 (non-member); $455 (member) 306

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Multi-Sport Camps

OUTDOORS

BOYS AND GIRLS

AGES 5-10

We do more than just teach kids to play sports. In addition to emphasizing leadership and teamwork rather than being the “best” player on a team, we also encourage campers to focus on their physical literacy, which is the ability to move with competence and confidence in a variety of physical activities and environments.

MATER DEI SCHOOL BETHESDA, MD

REGISTER: headfirstcamps.com

(202) 625-1921

ALSO AVAILABLE

BOYS & GIRLS • AGES 5-13

BOYS & GIRLS • AGES 5-13

Connelly School of the Holy Child June 21-25 • July 12-16 • August 2-6

Norwood School July 6-9 • July 19-23 • August 9-13

Register at dcunitedsummercamps.com

Register at nationals.com/camps

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summer camps

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

VisArts Online and On-site Summer Camp is back and better than ever! With new offerings in our online camp, and meticulous safety procedures for our on-site camp, students will have even more to choose from.

Get your hands dirty while learning the basics of ceramics. Wheel and handbuilding classes available.

Create an entire portfolio of 2-D projects while learning different techniques in acrylic and watercolor painting, charcoal, oil pastels and more.

Create stories, illustrations, and stop motion animations using exciting new digital technologies.

All this and more at VisArts this summer. Online Camp registration is open now and Onsite Camp registration opens March 31st.

Register at www.visartscenter.org 155 Gibbs Street, Rockville, MD 20850 | 301-315-8200

SUMMER OF

for boys and girls Pre-K-Grade 8

June 21-July 30 Limited Spots Available!

Awesome adventures await your child— including art, sports, technology, cooking, and more!

CHAMPIONS

summer camp

Camp Dates are June 21 to August 6 Lots of session options REGISTER NOW

www.w-e-s.org/summer WASHINGTON EPISCOPAL SCHOOL 5600 Little Falls Parkway, Bethesda, MD 20816 www.w-e-s.org I 301-652-7878

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www.greenacres.org

Age 3 to Grade 8 camp@greenacres.org

301-468-8110

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summer camps

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Bender Early Childhood Center

PRESCHOOL A Place For Summer 2020

• Onsite swimming • Group sizes of 15 or less including counselors • Sports, arts and technology options available Readers’ Pick, A Top Vote Getter, • Camp programming designed with Best Camp Four years running! Covid protocols in mind • Currently operating Covid Safe virtual learning pods 2017

2021 APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN Limited Space Available! Apply Today at benderjccgw.org/camp

6125 Montrose Road Rockville, MD 20852

A Place For Families • Preschool for children 18 months-5 years • Various program options, 8:00 AM-4:00 PM • Free family membership with full day enrollment

2020

Readers’ Pick, A Top Vote Getter, Best Preschool

• Conveniently located in Rockville, Maryland

2021/2022 APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN Limited Space Available! Apply Today at benderjccgw.org/ecc

Visit benderjccgw.org or call 301.881.0100

Ages 4-14

Schedule your private tour!

Award-winning sleepaway camp in The beautiful shenandoah valley for ages 6-16. camp horizons offers 50+ activities that challenge our campers to reach their fullest potential, and experience their best summer ever!

|540.896.7600 • www.camphorizonsva.com|

REGISTER NOW for

Begins June 14

barrie.org/camp Want to learn more?

Join us at a Virtual Open House Sundays • 1 to 2 pm Mar 21 | Apr 18 | May 16 Email us at camp@barrie.org for Zoom link. Extended Day & Transportation Available 13500 Layhill Rd., Silver Spring, MD BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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BY ROSE HOROWITCH

WEDDINGS

Backyard Vows A Chevy Chase couple who got together more than 40 years after meeting in high school married in a quiet outdoor wedding

grew up in Arlington and D.C. She is a Fair Finance fellow at Georgetown University’s BEECK Center for Social Impact and Innovation. David Kleeman, 63, grew up in Bethesda and D.C.’s Cleveland Park neighborhood and works as the senior vice president of global trends for Dubit, a children’s media company based in England. He graduated from Sidwell Friends in the District in 1975 and Betsy graduated a year later. They live in Chevy Chase.

HOW THEY MET: When David and Betsy worked on the school newspaper at Sidwell, they interacted but weren’t close friends. In 2014, David helped plan a Sidwell alumni event in New York City, where they both lived at the time. At the event, they sat at a table talking to a past teacher. After the brief conversation, David and Betsy exchanged numbers and planned to meet again. THE FIRST DATE: David frequently traveled for work, and Betsy has a daughter, 310

Ruby, who was then young enough to need a sitter. After a few months of exchanging messages to coordinate a time to get together, the two met at a restaurant in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood. “The evening passed really quickly,” David says. “We both kind of looked at our watches and couldn’t believe how long we’d been there.” The day after the first date, Betsy met a friend for coffee. “I re-met this guy last night,” Betsy told her friend. “And I don’t know, but there was something about it….” David and Betsy settled into a habit of long evenings of conversations. In 2016, Betsy moved from New York to D.C.; about eight months later, David followed, and they moved in together.

THE PROPOSAL: The two had occasionally floated the idea of marriage. “As older people who are going to want to take care of each other for a long time, it made sense to make it official,” David says. One day, Betsy asked David to give Ruby a ride, and he replied that there was something he wanted to talk to Ruby about anyway.

Betsy figured it was the proposal. When he returned home that night, he said casually, “She’s cool with it.” But he didn’t bring up marriage for the next two months. On a Sunday in August 2018, David and Betsy were sitting on the couch reading The New York Times when he turned to her and asked if she’d like to get married. “There was no flash mob or anything like that,” he says.

THE CEREMONY: Betsy and David were married on July 25, 2020, in an outdoor ceremony at Betsy’s father’s home in Washington, D.C., in front of 10 guests and the couple’s dog, Kate, a Coton de Tulear. Even before the pandemic, the couple had planned to wed there on that day, but they had expected to welcome 50 to 75 guests. When the pandemic hit, they considered postponing but decided to stick with the original date since Betsy’s father was selling the house, and her daughter was heading to college in the fall. Their friend Bryan Garman, the current head of school at Sidwell, performed the

PHOTO BY MICHAEL BENNETT KRESS

THE COUPLE: Betsy Zeidman, 61,

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PHOTOS BY MICHAEL BENNETT KRESS

WEDDINGS

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ceremony and incorporated aspects of Quakerism. The ceremony began with a moment of silence, and included Quaker and Jewish readings. The couple wrote their own vows.

THE DETAILS: “It was a very DIY wedding,” David says. Before the ceremony, guests picked the flowers that crowned the chuppah, a traditional Jewish canopy, and took turns climbing a ladder to set it up. Betsy’s bouquet of roses, lilies, thistle and eucalyptus was from a florist and featured shades of blue and white with green accents. “I knew that I just wanted flowers that looked like they’d been picked from a garden,” she says. The bouquet’s blooms were her “something blue.” Her dress— a long-sleeved white dress studded with crystals—was borrowed from her father’s partner. Betsy’s earrings were old, from her late mother. But she struggles to recall what was new. “Me!” David says. “You,” she says. “And my shoes from Amazon.” Betsy’s nephew, a pianist, prerecorded piano music for the ceremony. Her daughter walked her in to the Beatles’ “In My Life.”

THE RINGS: Instead of traditional wedding bands, the couple had gold rings engraved with each other’s fingerprint. But when David looked at the rings, he felt something was missing. Without telling Betsy, he returned to the jeweler and asked for a heart-shaped pendant with his and Betsy’s fingerprints. At the wedding reception, he gave it to Ruby, now 18, “just sort of saying that both of us are here for her,” he says. THE RECEPTION: Guests headed to the back porch for champagne and small bites. David’s three sisters and two grown daughters, who couldn’t attend due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, connected through Zoom and surprised the couple with coordinated toasts. A dinner of Indian food was followed by white cake with strawberries,

almond paste and mascarpone. “We still have a little bit in the freezer,” David says, though Betsy adds the remnants of the cake will be eaten long before their first anniversary.

THE HONEYMOON: The COVID-19 pandemic has kept the couple mostly at home since the wedding. They briefly went to Chicago in October and hope to return once it’s safer to help with childcare duties for David’s granddaughter, who was born in July. “But I don’t think that translates as a honeymoon,” Betsy says with a laugh.

VENDORS: Catering and cake, Reez Attanayaka; florist, Sophie Felts; photographer, Michael Bennett Kress Photography; rings, Dejan Studio Jewelry; videographer, Paperboys. n

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from the archives Editor’s Note: This story first ran in the November/December 2009 issue of Bethesda Magazine.

‘ The DREAD

Hospitals such as Walter Reed (pictured here) were filled to overflowing with victims of the Spanish flu, with about 1,200 cases in Montgomery County by mid-October.

Disease

T

here were no antibiotics to cure complications. There were no vaccines to prevent it and no Tamiflu to relieve the symptoms. There was only the disease. And then, there was death. The Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918 ravaged the country, the state of Maryland and Montgomery County like nothing before or since. Schools closed for weeks BY EUGENE at a time that fall and winter, and the newspapers were full of obituaries for victims who died too young and too soon. Only funeral homes and undertakers benefited from the disease that seemingly came out of nowhere, decimated the population, then ran its course into history. If the number of deaths from the flu and its complications seems relatively small—roughly a hundred within three or four months, though the precise number isn’t known—consider that there were just under 35,000 people living here in 1920, compared with the current population of about 950,000. One hundred deaths in a population of 35,000 would translate into 2,714 deaths in a population resembling Montgomery County’s today. In all, an estimated 675,000 Americans succumbed

to the flu and its complications. The global death toll is estimated to have been as high as 100 million, with one-third of the world’s population infected. Early on, a large number of deaths in Spain gave the disease its geographical name, but the so-called Spanish flu is believed to have surfaced first in Kansas in the spring of 1918, then spread to U.S. military camps. After that early and moderately mild L. MEYER first wave, the influenza virus resurfaced in the fall. It was, according to infectious disease experts, a strain far more deadly than this year’s. In mid-October 1918, there were an estimated 1,200 cases in the county, “with the number daily increasing,” Rockville’s Sentinel reported. The true number would never be known. On Oct. 18, the paper said the flu was “still raging over the entire county without any signs of abatement. The death rate continues high and the number of new cases reported daily is increasing.… Dr. Linthicum, of this town [Rockville], informs us that on Tuesday last he prescribed for 95 affected persons, a number which is much larger than that of any preceding day during the time of this alarming disease.”

CORBIS | BETTMANN ARCHIVE

In 1918, the Spanish flu caused illness, death and fear in all corners of Montgomery County

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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Members of the Red Cross tend to one of the flu’s victims at an emergency ambulance station in Washington, D.C.

Not surprisingly, local doctors were not immune. Dr. William T. Pratt, the county health officer, fell ill but survived, as did Dr. Jacob Wheeler Bird of Sandy Spring, who went on to found Montgomery General Hospital in Olney in 1920. Doctors Carlton N. Etchison, 32, of Gaithersburg, and Clifton N. DeVibliss, 33, of Laytonsville, weren’t so lucky. The Sentinel memorialized Etchison as “one of Montgomery’s most popular young physicians,” who “worked unceasingly and untiringly, night and day, until he was stricken with the disease.” Medicine, however, failed them both. Rockville then, as now, was the seat of county government, but it was also a commercial and population center and the dateline for all Montgomery County stories about the virus that appeared in The Washington Post. Almost invariably, the sick died not from the flu itself but “from pneumonia following the influenza,” as many obits noted. Helpless without the “miracle drugs” that would become commonplace only decades later, most of the sick didn’t linger

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long—a few days or a week. In a bid to limit the spread of the flu, the Sentinel published advice from the United States Public Health Service. “Coughs and Sneezes Spread Diseases,” the newspaper cautioned in a picture caption, calling the flu “as dangerous as poison gas shells” then exploding over wartorn Europe. Death from the flu or its complications knew no class or social boundaries. It came for a county commissioner, a state senator and an Olney family whose two children were left orphaned by the deaths of their parents, both in their 20s. William Reuben Jr., representing the third generation of the Pumphrey Funeral Home family, went “from house to house with an embalming buggy equipped with instruments, embalming fluid and an operating table,” according to a company history. “Large farm wagons followed, leaving caskets at the home of the flu victims.... Because of the large number of deaths, funerals were performed only when there was a break in

the embalming.” Some county residents died elsewhere. Edward Carroll Cissell, 22, of Rockville, was stationed at Camp (now Fort) Meade, where, The New York Times reported on Sept. 27, 1918, “Influenza is increasing.” Virginia Douglas Thomas, daughter of Maj. and Mrs. George M. Thomas of Rockville, succumbed in Baltimore at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, where she had been training to be a nurse. She was “taken sick while performing her duties and died a few hours later,” the Sentinel said. “Miss Thomas was a young lady of bright and happy disposition.” First-term County Commissioner Nathan H. Metzger died at his home in Poolesville on Oct. 11, a week after coming down with the flu “and pneumonia quickly developed,” the Post reported. He was 41 and single. State Sen. J. Dawson Williams, 36, died a few days later at his home in Kensington “of pneumonia following influenza.” Opined The Baltimore Sun: “In all the heavy toll taken of our people these last few weeks by the scourge of influenza, there has been no death crueler.… Still in his youth, blessed with success and with rich promise; possessed of that quality of ability which expands with the passing years; and imbued with the noblest of ideals, he was assuredly one of the men to whom Maryland looked for high service in the years to come.” The body was barely cold before three other Democrats were vying for his seat. Eustacia Boyle Hardesty, 20, died at her parents’ home, The Forest, near Rockville, of pneumonia brought on by the flu on Oct. 22. She was described in the Post as active in war work with the Red Cross. The year before, she had graduated with honors from the Georgetown Visitation Convent in Washington. After the Rev. Rowland P. Wagner, pastor of the Rockville Baptist Church, caught the flu, several churches, including his, canceled services “because of the prevalence of influenza, which has assumed alarming proportions in the county,” the Post said. After

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After ROCKVILLE CHURCHES HAD CLOSED for two consecutive Sabbaths, the ministers issued a call to prayer. “The dread disease ravages our homes ‘Over Here,’ snatching away some of the best of our much-needed citizenship,” the ministers said, referring to Over There, the hit song by George M. Cohan about U.S. soldiers fighting in Europe. Rockville churches had closed for two consecutive Sabbaths, the ministers issued a call to prayer. “The dread disease ravages our homes ‘Over Here,’ snatching away some of the best of our much-needed citizenship,” the ministers said, referring to Over There, the hit song by George M. Cohan about U.S. soldiers fighting in Europe. Closed for three weeks, Rockville High School reopened on Oct. 28, along with several other county schools that had shut down to stop the spread of the dis-

200 new cases reported in and around Rockville, officials closed Rockville High School on Dec. 13 until after the Christmas holiday. After extended closings, all county schools reopened on Jan. 13. Right after Christmas, four more deaths were reported in the county. These included William H. Nicholson, 27, and his wife, Easton, of Olney, who left two children behind. "The influenza is again prevalent in this county," the Sentinel reported in early Jan-

selves to relieving the distress caused by the epidemic of influenza now in many sections of the county.” The Rockville branch immediately deployed 100 to the task, and other Red Cross organizations in the county pledged to help, as well. Then, on Feb. 19, Uriah Waters, 33, a Damascus farmer, succumbed to typhoid fever, from which he had been ill for several weeks following the flu. He left a wife and three children.

DEATH FROM THE FLU or its complications knew no class or social boundaries. It came for a county commissioner, a state senator and an Olney family whose two children were left orphaned by the deaths of their parents, both in their 20s. ease. This seemed to signal a return to normalcy, and it was followed on Nov. 11, 1918 by the armistice that ended World War I, another reason to rejoice. Yet, just when the epidemic seemed to be subsiding, it resumed in December. The Post reported: “Influenza is again rampant in Montgomery County, reports indicating it is probably more prevalent, particularly in the Rockville, Poolesville, Clarksburg and Unity neighborhoods, than during the first outbreak. The number of cases is daily increasing and the people of the county are much exercised." Schools in Poolesville and Clarksburg closed. With more than

uary. “There are said to be as many as two hundred cases in the neighborhood of Sandy Spring.” When Howard Clark, 36, chief probation officer of Washington’s juvenile court, died of the disease at his Kensington home, “the court adjourned for two days out of respect for the deceased official,” the Sentinel reported. Noting the deaths of four more residents, the Post reported on Jan. 7, 1919: “The death toll from influenza and complications continues heavy in Montgomery County." On Jan. 11, the head of the Montgomery chapter of the Red Cross pleaded with its branches and auxiliaries to, “inasmuch as the war work has practically ceased, devote them-

And that seemed to be the end of it…except that, in January 1920 there were fears of a new epidemic. One doctor in Rockville had 20 flu patients, “and it is estimated that there are several hundred cases in the county,” the Post reported. But this time, at least, no deaths were reported. By February 1923, a single flu death (that of Arthur Linthicum, a Travilah merchant) at Montgomery General led the Post’s county news roundup but didn’t merit its own headline.

Eugene L. Meyer, a former Washington Post reporter and editor, is a contributing editor for Bethesda Magazine.

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BY DANA GERBER

ENOUGH ALREADY FAUCI REALLY DOESN’T WANT the pandemic to end. That’s what Rima Adler says about the cream-colored kitten she adopted in October and named after the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. She also adopted Fauci’s half brother, Rascal. Adler’s daughters—Mackenzie, 9, and Kylie, 6—had begged for a pet after months of isolation. The Potomac family opted for the Ragdoll breed, known for its affectionate demeanor, not realizing how attached the felines would become to them. “We’re actually really concerned about when we do go back to work,” Adler says. “They’re the opposite of sick of us.” With the real Dr. Anthony Fauci predicting some return to normalcy by midfall, families may be wondering how pets will react without the constant company. Adler is bracing for meltdowns. “Whichever room we’re in, they come in,” she says. Once, when she took her daughters on a walk, “both kittens were at the door crying.” Meanwhile, Katrina Mauldin’s mutt, Dexter, could do without the 24/7 companionship. “He likes his personal space, he likes his time,” says Mauldin, a government-contracted project manager with the Department of Homeland Security who lives in Germantown. “Us staying home all the time, he’s annoyed.” Dexter, who’s 10, prefers being alone in 318

the quiet bedroom, so he hurls himself against the baby gates Mauldin and her boyfriend set up to keep their three dogs from getting upstairs. “When we used to be around after work, he would initiate contact with us, play,” she says. “Now it’s very much a ‘leave me alone.’ ” Whether a pet is chomping at the bit for privacy or loving the family time typically depends on individual personality, says Dr. Meghan Connolly, the owner of Atlantic Veterinary Behavior in Gaithersburg. Age can also play a role: Some older dogs may feel their routine has been disrupted. “They’re not used to having all that hustle-bustle around, and so they’re a little bit more irritable and not themselves,” Connolly says. For pets who seem to be withdrawn, Dr. Elise Geldon recommends simply leaving them be. “We’re invading their time and space, in some ways,” says Geldon, who owns Liberty Falls Veterinary Clinic in Potomac. But those pups are in the minority. “I have...far more dogs that I take care of that are thrilled with their owners being home 24/7 than I have dogs that are unhappy about it.” Animals adopted during the pandemic pose their own sets of problems, and Geldon anticipates a spike in anxiety—mostly in dogs—once owners return to work. “All of these dogs that have been very happy that their people

have been home all the time, or all these puppies that have been raised in homes where people were home all the time— what’s going to happen [later this year]?” she says. While dogs become vocal when anxious, cats might relieve themselves outside the litter box, Connolly says. “Cats tend to be a little bit more independent; however, they can also develop separation anxiety,” she says. “We are starting to see that in some cats with owners returning to work right now.” To prepare clingy pets for the change, Geldon recommends simulating the alone time they’ll experience, which has the added benefit of giving introverted pets the privacy they crave. “If their dogs are used to being crated when they’re gone, at least a few times a week I would try to put the dog in the crate and make them think that you’ve left the house for varying lengths of time,” she says. “Or try to actually leave the house on a still-asregular basis as you can. Just get them used to it.” Despite the growing pains ahead, some pet owners wouldn’t have it any other way. Adler says her kittens have been a calming presence and helped her younger daughter stay focused during Zoom classes. As for her cats’ adjustment to post-pandemic life? “I think they’ll figure it out,” Adler says. “But not yet.” n

ILLUSTRATION BY GOODLOE BYRON

When the pandemic begins to subside, will our pets panic or be happy to see us leave?

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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etc. FLASHBACK

BY MARK WALSTON

OFF TRACK

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ALICE KRESSE; MALONEY CONCRETE PHOTO BY DON WETMORE

When the B&O Railroad came to Bethesda, it brought more dirt than glamour IN 1873, THE BALTIMORE & OHIO Railroad opened its new Metropolitan Branch, a modern rail line running straight through the heart of Montgomery County. Towns such as Gaithersburg, Rockville and Silver Spring, all selected as stops on the new line, saw prosperity come in tow, with shops and homes rising around stylish new passenger stations. When the train finally reached Bethesda decades later, all it brought was industrial blight. Originally, the Metropolitan Branch ran too far east to have any impact on Bethesda’s development. The village of the 1870s remained little more than a general store, a blacksmith shop and a handful of houses gathered around the crossroads of Wisconsin Avenue and Old Georgetown Road. In 1892, the B&O would creep a little closer to town. Directors of the railroad determined that a branch leading west from Silver Spring, eventually connecting with Georgetown at the southern end, would be a viable addition to the rail network. Tracks had been laid for the Georgetown Branch as far as Chevy Chase, ending at today’s Connecticut Avenue, when the Panic of 1893 hit, triggering a crushing economic depression. The project was halted.

It would be 1910 before the B&O Railroad finally arrived in Bethesda, following creek beds, cutting through hills and tunneling under Wisconsin Avenue on its way to Georgetown. Developers of the nascent suburbs promised prospective buyers that a passenger train station was coming, an enticement for commuters looking for an easy ride in and out of Washington, D.C. But Bethesda’s stop ended up being for commerce only. No elaborate passenger station was built for the village, just a freight station and platform west of Wisconsin Avenue, near present day Bethesda Row. Cars carrying fuel, cement, lumber and all manner of construction materials soon began moving in and out of the Bethesda station on a daily basis. Charlie Miller, a local fuel vendor, opened a coal yard by the station. Lumber and gravel yards and oil tanker depots followed, creating a noisy, hodgepodge industrial section of town. By 1930, the Maloney Concrete Co. had established its sprawling complex near the intersection of Arlington Road and Bethesda Avenue. To suburban Bethesdans, the railroad was an increasingly bothersome presence. Dust, dirt, vibration and smoke were impacting “the peaceful use,

enjoyment and value of the surrounding properties,” as one petition to the Montgomery County Council remarked. In 1976, after years of protests, the council upgraded the area from industrial to retail use. Maloney Concrete was one of the last large Bethesda industries to shut down its operations, closing its doors around 1980. In 1985, as trucks replaced rail service, the train made its last run through Bethesda. Three years later, Montgomery County purchased the Maryland portion of the Georgetown Branch, inspired by the nationwide “rails to trails” movement that was successfully converting old railbeds into new hiking and biking trails. The following year, the National Park Service took control of the old line in the District of Columbia. The tracks and ties were removed and the right-ofway paved. In December 1996, the 7-mile section of the new Capital Crescent Trail from Bethesda to Georgetown was formally dedicated, a remembrance of the time when the train came to town. n Author and historian Mark Walston (markwalston@comcast.net) was raised in Bethesda and lives in Olney.

BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM | MARCH/APRIL 2021

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etc.

For our story on Doug Neustadt (“The Agent,” page 69), photographer Erick Gibson took pictures in the NBA agent’s Rockville driveway on a windy day in January. “His wife, Shelly, was nearby and even served as my assistant, making sure my light did not blow over,” Gibson says. “I had only brought one sandbag.” During the shoot, Neustadt’s 11-yearold daughter, Dylan, a competitive dancer, came out for a few photos. “I asked Dylan to perform as a bit of an extra background element, maybe doing some triumphant jumps behind and off to the side of Doug,” Gibson says. “Somewhere within the rapport between Doug and his daughter, the jumping idea evolved into Dylan jumping along with Doug’s hand in a way that made it seem like he was dribbling Dylan herself as if she was a basketball.” n 320

PHOTO BY ERICK GIBSON

OUTTAKES

MARCH/APRIL 2021 | BETHESDAMAGAZINE.COM

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Profile for Bethesda Magazine

Bethesda Magazine: March-April 2021  

Bethesda Magazine: March-April 2021  

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