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president’s Message

President’s Message Thank you for taking the time to learn more about Bethany College of Missions. God is looking for people who love Him above all else to be faithful witnesses of the gospel to all nations. I suspect that if you’re checking out Bethany College of Missions you have felt God’s calling in your life. Bethany’s unique Intercultural Studies training is designed to equip you to be God’s agent of transformation. You are not the average person if you are looking into this – you already are asking extraordinary questions about what it means to prepare to make a difference in your generation and for eternity. While on campus you will engage in a prayer & missions focused community with people passionate about reaching the unreached where ever they are found. (Some are in our backyard – Minneapolis is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the US.) You will receive a solid Biblical foundation and experience intimate relationship with God. But, this is just the beginning. It is preparation to serve with experienced missionaries in a far away country your junior and senior years. You will do missions. You will learn a foreign language. You will interact with and minister to people of another culture. You will spend 16 months with your team at one of our many Global Internship sites around the world – in Southeast Asia, Europe, Central Asia, Africa, or perhaps South America. You will partner with experienced missionaries in various intercultural ministry opportunities. You will come home an intercultural Christian! Someone who has not just done a mission trip, but someone who can confidently enter any cross-cultural setting and flourish. We’re not looking for people who want to live ordinary lives, we’re looking for those who would gladly give theirs up for the sake of a better eternity and it seems like you might be one of them. With the experiential missions training you receive, you will discover God’s leading and move forward into His calling on your life. You may be are looking for advanced training in intercultural leadership. If so, the Bethany Center for Global Studies offers online training that connects you with experienced missionaries and leaders who bring a wealth of knowledge in pursuit of going to the next level of competency and impact. Leadership, cross-cultural skills and Biblical truth are woven together to give practical growth and preparation. You will get so much more than a Bachelor of Arts degree in Intercultural Studies; you will get a vision-giving, lifetransforming experience. You will be equipped to GO where God leads you. Together serving Him,

Dan Brokke President Bethany International

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Contents I. About Bethany ................................................................................................................................................................... 4 College Profile ......................................................................................................................................................... 4 History ...................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Bethany Ministries ................................................................................................................................................... 5 Governance ............................................................................................................................................................. 5 Mission Statement .................................................................................................................................................. 5 Core Values ............................................................................................................................................................... 5 Statement of Faith.................................................................................................................................................... 6 Institutional Goals ................................................................................................................................................... 6 Institutional Objectives ........................................................................................................................................... 6 II. Admissions ...................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Contact Info ............................................................................................................................................................. 8 Eligibility ................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Academic Requirements for Undergraduate Studies .............................................................................. 8 Academic Requirements for Graduate Studies ......................................................................................... 9 Applying to Bethany ................................................................................................................................................. 9 International Students ............................................................................................................................... 10 MarriedStudents/Families..........................................................................................................................................10 Part-time Students ........................................................................................................................................ 11 Submitting Application Components .......................................................................................................................... 11 Getting Accepted to Bethany ............................................................................................................................. 12 Exiting Students ................................................................................................................................................... 12 Withdrawal/Dismissal ............................................................................................................................. 12 Leave of Absence ............................................................................................................................. 12 Re-enrollment for Former Students ............................................................................................................. 12 Applying to Bethany Center for Graduate Studies ................................................................................................. 13 III. Academics ................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Certificate in Bible and Missions ............................................................................................................................ 14 Certificate in Pre-field Preparation ........................................................................................................................ 15 Associate of Arts Degree in Intercultural Ministry ................................................................................................. 15 Bachelor of Arts in Intercultural Studies ................................................................................................................ 16 B.A. degree Concentrations ................................................................................................................................ 17 Kingdom Justice ..................................................................................................................................... 17 Social Entrepreneurship .......................................................................................................................... 18 Early Childhood Development .................................................................................................................. 18 Graduate Certificate in Christian Montessori Instruction .................................................................................. 18 Master of Arts Degree in Intercultural Studies........................................................................................................ 19 Master of Arts Degree in Intercultural Leadership ...................................................................................................... 20 Master of Arts Degree in Intercultural Education ................................................................................................ 21 IV. Policies ......................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Academic Policies ......................................................................................................................................... 22 Grading Scale ......................................................................................................................................... 22 Undergraduate Policies.......................................................................................................................................... 23 Academic Grievences ............................................................................................................................. 23 Academic Probation ................................................................................................................................ 24 Graduate Studies Policies ...................................................................................................................................... 24 V. Experiential Learning for Undergraduate Programs..................................................................................................... 25 Global Internship .......................................................................................................................... 27

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

VI. Campus Facilities ............................................................................................................................................................ 28 On-Campus Housing ........................................................................................................................................... 28 Recreation ......................................................................................................................................................................... 29 Special Events ...................................................................................................................................................... 30 VII. Financial Information ................................................................................................................................................... 31 Undergraduate Financial Information ........................................................................................................................ 31 Global Internship Costs ....................................................................................................................................... 32 Missions Trip Costs ............................................................................................................................................. 32 Senior Semester Costs ......................................................................................................................................... 32 Financial Assistance ............................................................................................................................................... 33 How Financial Assistance is Awarded .................................................................................................................... 34 Financial Services ................................................................................................................................................... 35 Making Payments .................................................................................................................................................. 35 Graduate Studies Financial Information ............................................................................................................ 37 VIII. Faculty ....................................................................................................................................................................... 38 Full Time and Administrative Teaching Faculty.......................................................................................................... 38 Part-Time Faculty .................................................................................................................................................. 39 Non-Teaching Administrative Faculty ................................................................................................................... 41 VIIII. Course Descriptions .................................................................................................................................................. 43 Undergraduate Programs ...................................................................................................................................... 43 General Education ..................................................................................................................................... 51 Concentration Electives ........................................................................................................................... 54 Graduate Studies ..................................................................................................................................................... 55

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about bethany

History

About Bethany

Bethany International (originally known as “Bethany Fellowship”) was founded by five families in 1945. These friends were all members of Bethany Church (founded as “Bethany Chapel” in 1943). Having been challenged to live a deeper, more passionate relationship with Jesus, these families were seeking the Lord as to how they might give all they had to Him. The possibilities of the sanctified Christian life and the unfinished task of world missions greatly inspired them, but most of their time, energy and money were needed to support their families and maintain their homes.

College Profile Name: Bethany College of Missions Parent Organization: Bethany International Founded: 1945 Location: Bloomington, MN, USA Denomination: Interdenominational President & CEO: Dan Brokke *Number of Students Enrolled: 127 *Male/Female Ratio: 1.4:2 *Top Home States: Minnesota 31%, Michigan 10% Texas 7%, South Dakota 4%, Pennsylvania 4% Phone: 1-800-323-3417 Email: info@bcom.org Address: Bethany College of Missions 6820 Auto Club Road, Ste C Bloomington, MN 55438 Website: www.bcom.org Online Student Database: www.bcom.populiweb.com Facebook: www.bcom.org/facebook Twitter: www.twitter.com/bcom_network

*As of Fall 2010

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After much prayer and discussion, they sensed God leading them to sell their possessions and pool their resources to acquire a common residence where they could live, worship and work together to fulfill the purposes to which God was calling them. Consequently, in 1945, they sold their homes and combined their belongings to support their newly formed organization, which they called Bethany Fellowship. The headquarters were established in a large, 30-room home in Minneapolis called “Bethany House”. The purpose of this community life was to reduce unnecessary work and expense entailed in maintaining several households so that more time and money could be given to missions. The name “Bethany” was chosen because it was a place Jesus preferred and would retreat to for prayer and reflection with the Father. The group grew rapidly as others joined the original families for teaching, prayer and fellowship. Soon they had outgrown both the chapel and Bethany House. As a result, in April 1946, they purchased a 62.5 acre farm in Bloomington, Minnesota. During these early days of growth, God gave Pastor Ted Hegre the vision of preparing and sending missionaries throughout the world, spreading the message of Jesus to many distant places. Under Ted Hegre’s leadership, the 50 adults that were then part of Bethany Fellowship set the faithfilled goal of training, sending and fully supporting 100 missionaries. Bethany College of Missions began with 10 students in October 1948. In the early years, graduates of what was then called “Bethany Fellowship Missionary Training Center” served with various sending agencies. In 1963, Bethany Fellowship Missions (now called Bethany International Ministries) was formed and began fielding missionaries. The first BIM mission fields were located

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about bethany

in Brazil and included a Bible school, church planting project, publishing house and seminary. Bethany met the original 100 missionary goal in 1975. Since then BIM has fielded hundreds of missionaries, partnered to start numerous churches and missionary training centers, and provided training for church leaders in almost 40 countries. Business ventures have always been Bethany’s primary source of funding through the years. Some early business ventures included the manufacture of wood toys, Bethany Heritage lefse griddles, and Bethany popup camping trailers. These ventures funded the work of missions and supported the college exclusively for years. Bethany House Publishers (BHP) was formed in 1956 to spread the good news of Christ through publishing and printing Christian books and literature. It was sold in 2003 to Baker Book House and continues operations to this day, with a division still located on the Bethany International property. Bethany Press International was created in 1997 as a separate ministry to print books produced by BHP, other publishers and most recently for individual publications via digital press. BPI continues to provide the largest single source of income to the ministries of Bethany International and is one of the nation’s primary printers of Christian literature.

Bethany Ministries

paperback best sellers, “Heaven is For Real” and the “Left Behind” series. • STEM. Short Term Evangelical Missions is Bethany’s short-term mission-sending agency. STEM has facilitated 500 teams, giving 8,700 people exposure to missions in 25 countries over its 25 year history. All of these ministries are headquartered on the Bloomington campus.

Governance Bethany International is governed by a Board of Trustees with a majority of external members. Board members are drawn from leadership of other ministry organizations, from Christian business leaders, and from those presently in missionary service.

Mission Statement Our mission is to bring the Church to where it is not by recruiting, preparing, and fielding followers of Jesus who are transformed by the cross, empowered by the Spirit, and effectively prepared with intercultural educational experience, who lead by serving with global partners to transform people and communities, delighting God’s heart and extending His Kingdom! 

Core Values

The Bethany International family of ministries consists of: • Bethany College of Missions • Bethany International Ministries, which fields and serves over 125 missionaries in 29 countries. • Go100, which works with national partners worldwide to mobilize churches for mission and help them start competence-oriented missionary training schools focused on the least-reached peoples. Since 2002, our partnerships have yielded 124 new training programs globally. • Bethany Press International, a Christian book printer providing publishing solutions for production, printing, binding, fulfillment, and warehousing for publishers and authors. BPI is one of the leading printers of Christian books in the U.S., including

We join God WE JOIN GOD – We embrace identification in Jesus’ death, burial, and resurrection and the fullness of life in the Spirit. This Message of the Cross is central to victorious living and ministry. Therefore, our priorities are love for God, abiding in Him, and doing what He says (Galatians 2:20; Matthew 22:37-38; John 15:5-8; John 14:15-21; Ephesians 1:17-19).

Community with a purpose We fellowship, pray, and work with others. We collaborate across a wide spectrum of the Body of Christ, recognizing each one’s character and abilities to bring the greatest value to the Kingdom of God (John 17:20-23; Luke 10:1-2; Romans 12:4-6; Philippians 2:2-5; Psalm 133).

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about bethany

Faith-filled initiative

sanctification through identification with Jesus Christ in His death and resurrection.

We take joy in working and serving – giving our best efforts - to support God’s work with discipline, creativity, and excellence as an act of worship; while trusting the Holy Spirit for exceptional lasting results (Nehemiah 4:6, 14; Ephesians 6:7-8; Colossians 3:23-24; Hebrews 11:6).

WE BELIEVE in the present ministry of the Holy Spirit by whose indwelling, empowering, and gifts the Christian is enabled to live a life of godliness and effective service.

Invest in people We invest in equipping mature disciples of Christ Jesus who are trained in the context of authentic spiritual community with the knowledge, skills, and vision to effectively fulfill the Great Commission (Matthew 5:3-10; Romans 8:29-30; Ephesians 4:15-16; Colossians 1:2829; II Peter 1:5-8; Rom 1:11-12).

WE BELIEVE in the bodily resurrection of both the saved and the lost; the saved to the resurrection of life and the lost to the resurrection of damnation. WE BELIEVE th at all followers of Jesus are to be committed to the fulfilling of the Great Commission, as found in Mt. 28:18-20, and to be involved in making it possible for the Gospel to be preached to all the peoples of the world.

Institutional Goals

Transformation of lives We are intent on reaching, rescuing, and restoring people into relationship with God, and establishing gatherings of followers of Jesus for sustainable holistic Kingdom impact in families, communities, and the world (Matthew 22:18-20, 38; Luke 11:2; Revelation 7:9).

Bethany College of Missions students will complete the program with: • •

Statement of Faith

Effective preparation to face the varying challenges of cross-cultural missionary life and service. A firm understanding of who they are in relation to God, of His hand at work in their lives, of their own unique gifts and skills and their relationship to the Body of Christ.

WE BELIEVE the Bible to be the only inspired, inerrant, and authoritative Word of God.

Knowledge of the calling upon their lives to serve God in whatever capacity He directs them.

WE BELIEVE that there is one God, eternally existent in three persons: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

Depth of spirituality, a reliability and honesty of character.

WE BELIEVE in the deity of our Lord Jesus Christ, His virgin birth, His sinless life, His miracles, His vicarious and atoning death, His bodily resurrection, His ascension to the right hand of the Father, and His personal return in power and glory.

A balanced approach to biblical understanding and commitment to life-long learning.

WE BELIEVE that man was created in the image of God, that he was tempted by Satan and fell, and that all following Adam have sinned and are sinful; that repentance toward God, faith in Jesus Christ, and regeneration by the Holy Spirit are necessary for salvation.

Institutional Objectives Graduates should be able to do the following: •

Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the Bible with an appreciation for its truth and message that encourages them toward a lifelong study and application of its content and meaning (Bible knowledge).

WE BELIEVE that followers of Jesus Christ are called to

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about bethany

Exemplify a life transformed through the cross and empowered by the Holy Spirit (biblical worldview and spiritual maturity).

Develop character qualities proven to be essential for cross-cultural ministry (cultural awareness).

Inculcate a passion for continued life-long learning (problem-solving skills and attitudes/values).

Display effective interpersonal and social skills evidenced in the context of a team environment (people skills).

Demonstrate the ability to work (attitudes/values).

Develop intercultural ministry skills (cultural awareness). Interact effectively with individuals of diverse cultural perspectives (people skills, communications skills and cultural awareness).

Apply critical thinking skills to scholarly, professional, and personal endeavors (problem-solving skills and attitudes/values).

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admissions

Admissions

associates level or higher and be referred by a missionsending agency.

Academic Requirements

Anti-Discrimination Statement Bethany College of Missions welcomes applicants of all backgrounds regardless of race, gender, nationality, or denominational affiliation.

Phone: Monday – Friday from 8 am - 5 pm CST 800-323-3417 or 952-829-2403 Fax: 952-829-2535

Web site: www.bcom.org Live Chat - Monday-Friday (times vary) Contact Us Form Online Application Forms and Reference Form Links Bookstore Online: Facebook Twitter Blog

Those who have not earned a high school diploma must pass the GED (General Education Development) tests by the time of enrollment at Bethany with an average GED score of C or higher. Applicants who fail to meet these requirements may be granted exemption and approved for admission on probationary status

Home-School Graduates Home-schooled applicants must meet the high school graduation requirements for their state of residence. Applicants must submit a transcript of coursework from ninth through twelfth grade, including the grade earned for each course and the cumulative grade point average on a 4.0 scale. Although it is preferable to receive the transcript through a record-keeping organization, a transcript submitted by parents is acceptable.

Mail: Bethany College of Missions Admissions Office 6820 Auto Club Road, Suite C Bloomington, Minnesota 55438

Eligibility Any applicant to Bethany College of Missions must be a follower of Jesus Christ, demonstrate Christian lifestyle and character, meet stated academic requirements and demonstrate ability to meet non-academic requirements of the selected program, including practical training (and for completion of the Bachelor’s degree program, overseas travel). In addition, the following eligibility requirements apply to particular types of students and/or enrollment in particular programs: International applicants must demonstrate college-level English proficiency. Those applying for the Certificate in Pre-field Preparation must have earned a previous degree at the

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High School Students/Graduates/GED All applicants must earn a high school diploma by the time of enrollment at Bethany. Qualified high school graduates must have earned a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale

Admissions Office Contact Information

Email: info@bcom.org

for Undergraduate Admissions

If a home-schooled applicant does not meet these requirements he or she may submit GED test results instead of transcripts.

College Students/Graduates Applicants currently or previously enrolled in college and/or college graduates must have earned a CGPA of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale in their most recent full-time enrollment. Part-time college students and those who have not yet completed an Associates degree or higher are assessed based on their high school CGPA as well as their college CGPA. Applicants who fail to meet the CPGA requirement for college students may be granted exemption and approved for admission on probationary status

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admissions

Transferring Credits

CGPA of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale.

New students who may qualify to transfer credits receive a transfer credit request form with their acceptance materials. This form must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office at least 30 days before their first freshman semester commences.

Transferring Credits

Students wishing to transfer credits into Bethany must provide an official transcript from the school they previously attended to be considered for transfer. Transfer credit requests are assessed on a case-by-case basis by the college registrar. Transferability is based on the following criteria: • Course content must fit within the scope of the Bethany curriculum. • College level or PSEO credits are considered. • A grade of C *(2.0 on a 4.0 or higher scale) must be achieved. • AP Exam scores of 3 or higher are considered. Students receive a written response from the registrar detailing which credits are accepted. All accepted credit transfers remain pending until the student has successfully completed 30 credits with Bethany. Since Bethany employs banded tuition, credit transfers do not result in a reduction of semester fees.

A maximum of 6 earned graduate-level credits may be transferred from an accredited institution. Students may officially petition for the acceptance of transfer credits after being accepted into a graduate program. All credits petitioned will be evaluated by the Academic Dean as to their eligibility for program requirements. Transfer credits will not receive final acceptance until after the student has completed 15 program credits through Bethany Center for Graduate Studies.

Applying to Bethany

for Undergraduate Admissions Applicants to any full-time program at Bethany must submit the following required application components, sign the Bethany Statement of Faith, and agree to a background check if deemed necessary by the college. All application forms are available as downloadable PDF documents on our web site.

Application Form

The maximum number of individual transfer credits may not exceed 15% of the total number of credits needed to complete any certificate or degree program at Bethany. However, in certain circumstances, students may transfer in the equivalent of an Associate’s Degree if the overall content of that degree fits within the scope of the Bethany curriculum.

The Bethany College of Missions application form is available in several formats: An electronic form can be completed online by going to our web site at www.bcom.org/apply.

English Composition credits do not transfer directly into the program; students must first take a competency test to determine whether or not the credits will be accepted for transfer.

An application packet, containing paper versions of all forms and instructions is available upon request by contacting the Admissions Office.

Academic Requirements

for Graduate Studies Admissions Pre-requisite Academic Credentials Applicants must have earned a Bachelors Degree with a

A downloadable PDF version of the form is available at www.bcom.org/apply/pdfdocuments.

References All reference forms are available in electronic format. Applicants may send a form link to their references from the application section of our web site at www.bcom. org/admissions/apply. Each one must be filled out by someone who knows you well, preferably someone who has known you for 2 years or longer. References filled out by relatives are not permitted.

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admissions

Pastors Reference Form The reference must be filled out by someone in a position of spiritual authority in your life. Personal Reference Form The reference must be filled out by someone who knows you well. Teacher or Employer Reference Form The reference must be filled out by someone who has employed or taught you, professionally or in an informal setting.

Transcripts All College Transcripts Applicants must submit transcripts from all colleges attended, regardless of credit completion or performance.

International Students Bethany College of Missions is SEVIS (Student and Exchange Visitors Information System) - approved to grant F1 student visas for those enrolling in the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Intercultural Studies program or the Certificate in Bible and Missions program. In addition to all application components required of American students international applicants must submit a 500 word unedited essay in English. The applicant must also take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). This test is waived for native English speakers and/or for those who studied primarily in the English medium in high school and/or college. Evidence of meeting these waiver requirements may be requested.

High School Transcripts Applicants must submit transcripts for 9th through 12th grade. High school transcripts are not required for those who have earned an associates degree or higher.

Minimum TOEFL scores required for acceptance are: Paper-based test: 508 Computer-based test: 225 Internet-based test: 90

Dual Enrollment in College and High School/Post Secondary Education Option If you have earned college credits as part of a dual enrollment program with your high school, a separate college transcript is not required since the credits should be listed on your high school transcript. However, if you seek to transfer these credits into Bethany an official transcript from the college is required in addition to your high school transcript.

These score values reflect that you earned at least 75% on the test.

GED Test Required if the applicant is not a high school graduate

Application Fee The $30 application fee is payable by personal check, cash or electronic transfer through our bookstore, located on the Bethany College of Missions web site. This fee is waived for international applicants

Visit the Educational Testing Services (ETS) web site at www.ets.org to learn more about the Test of English as a Foreign Language, including test dates and locations, registration information, costs, sample testing and more.

Married Students/Families Whenever possible the college prefers that married couples study together in preparation for a lifetime of ministry. However, because of the complexities of housing, work, and family obligations for many couples we offer 4 different program options designed specifically for married students. Program Option One - Both full-time students Both spouses must meet the pre-requisites for the B.A. Degree Program Option Two - One full-time student, one part-time student The full-time spouse must meet the pre-requisites for

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admissions

B.A. Degree, and the part-time spouse must meet the pre-requisites for a Global Internship team member.

commuter student application form and a $30 application fee.

Program Option Three - One full-time student, one non-student spouse The student qualifies for any of the certificate programs and A.A. Degree.

Special Needs Students

Available to international students for no more than one academic year Program Option Four (Split Program) - Two spouses split one full-time program No credential is earned; a certificate of achievement showing total number of credits earned is presented to each spouse.

Bethany College of Missions approves all applicants who meet eligibility requirements and have a reasonable potential to successfully meet physical and cognitive and co-curricular program requirements. Applicants should note that as a small, private institution that does not receive government funding, Bethany has very limited resources for meeting the needs of those with profound physical, emotional, and learning needs.

Veterans

International students are not eligible. Married students who live within a daily commute of the college may elect to live off-campus and still complete a full-time program. All other couples and families are required to live on campus. Bethany does not condone or facilitate the separation of families for the sake of training. Therefore, spouses and dependent children are expected to live together in the dorms. Single parents must have children ages 14 and older to be admitted to the college. International students are permitted to attend Bethany without their spouse or children for a maximum duration of one academic year due to the limited educational opportunities and high exchange rates in many countries.

Part-time Students Any student taking less than 12 credit hours per semester is considered a part-time student. A part-time student may live on campus if married to a full-time student. Due the nature of our multi-generation campus environment, part-time students living on campus must complete all of the same application components as any full-time student. Part-time students living off-campus must only submit a

Bethany College of Missions does not currently accept Veteran’s benefits due to facilities requirements of the US Government to receive those funds.

Submitting Application Components It is not necessary to submit all components at once. However, your application will not be reviewed until everything has been received. Use one of the following methods to submit materials: Electronic submissions 1. Go to our web site at www.bcom.org. 2. Use our electronic application form and reference links. 3. Pay the application fee electronically by going to the online bookstore, also located on the web site. Within your online student profile at www.bcom. populiweb.com Once you have started the application process and have a student profile you may complete the application form and upload materials directly into your online application. Download PDF documents from the Admissions section of our web site.

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admissions

Scan and send as email attachments to info@bcom.org Fax to: 952-289-2535 Mail to: Bethany College of Missions Admissions Office 6820 Auto Club Rd, Suite C Bloomington, MN 55438

Leave of Absence

Official transcripts must be sent by mail directly from your high school and/or college(s).

• Financial hardship • Marriage • Pregnancy or adoption • Family or personal medical issues • Global Internship delay • Other reasons based on the recommendation of the college faculty or staff

Getting Accepted to Bethany Once the Admissions Office receives all application materials your file will be reviewed. If approved you will be notified by email and sent an acceptance packet. International students are directed to acceptance materials online. All accepted students are asked to complete acceptance paperwork. Accepted students also receive an email notification to register for classes online approximately 2 months prior to enrollment. Applicants who do not meet the eligibility requirements or academic standards of the college, married couples, and international applicants are reviewed by the Admissions Committee, which meets as needed. Additional information may be requested by this committee. Any applicant may receive provisional acceptance from the Admissions Committee. Provisions are outlined in the student’s acceptance letter. International students are required to pay for one year of studies prior to being sent an I-20 form, which is needed to secure a student visa.

Exiting Students

Withdrawal/Dismissal Students who are exiting Bethany due to completion of program, withdrawal, or dismissal from the school must complete all exit paperwork and procedures. Failure to do so results in a fine, which is deducted from the student’s room deposit.

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Students who wish to take a planned year off may request approval from the Admissions Committee to take a one-year leave of absence from the college due to one or more of the following circumstances.

Along with the normal exit paperwork and procedures, students taking a leave of absence must complete a Leave of Absence Plan form, (available from the Admissions Office or in the shared files of Populi) detailing the circumstances of the leave and stipulations for re-entry into the college. It is suggested that students take care of this at least two weeks prior to the planned leave, if possible. The Leave of Absence Plan form should be turned in to the admissions office upon completion. Upon receipt of the form, the admissions office consults with appropriate college staff to ensure that the leave is approved and stipulations for return are clear. The admissions office generates a response letter to the student, detailing instructions for re-enrollment.

Re-enrollment for Former Students Students who withdraw or are dismissed from school may apply for re-enrollment after a minimum of one semester. Process for Re-enrollment Former students seeking re-enrollment must contact the Admissions Office to request re-enrollment forms. Former students are subject to the same application and registration deadlines as new students. It is recommended that the student starts this process at least two months prior to the desired reenrollment date. The following is required of those seeking re-enrollment: • • •

a completed Request for Re-enrollment form a completed pastors reference form any college transcripts from schools attended since

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• •

enrollment at Bethany College of Missions a $30 application fee a $250 degree completion fee* - leave of absence students are exempt from this requirement if reenrolling according to their approved leave of absence plan

*Any former student who has served as a Ministry Intern or Ministry Volunteer at Bethany may be eligible for exemption from the degree completion fee, regardless of whether they had a planned leave of absence. The returning student must have served as an MI or MV for a minimum of 3 months within the 2 year time period prior to his or her re-enrollment.

Disclaimers for Former Students Seeking Re-enrollment 1. Students who leave school for any reason (including a leave of absence) are not guaranteed readmittance. The college reserves the right to reject requests for re-admittance if the student does not meet current acceptance requirements. 2. Students with outstanding bills are not admitted until all such debts are paid in full. 3. Former students are subject to the fee schedule being implemented at the time of their re-enrollment. 4. Former students may apply for financial assistance available at the time of their re-enrollment. Posted deadlines for submitting financial assistance application forms apply.

Applying to Bethany Center for Graduate Studies 1. Complete the online application, including $30 application fee. 2. Request official transcripts from each college or university where 12 or more credits were earned. Transcripts should show all courses taken, grade point average, and date of graduation. 3. Submit a pastoral reference and two personal references online.

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academics

Academics Certificate in Bible and Missions Description: The Certificate in Bible and Missions is a foundational program consisting of the first year courses and requirements of our B.A. and A.A. degrees. These courses focus on biblical and theological studies, personal spiritual development, missions and ministry. A student enrolled at the certificate level may elect to transfer into either the Associates or Bachelor’s degree after the certificate year, since all freshman requirements for both degrees will be met. This makes the Certificate in Bible and Missions a good choice for students who desire basic discipleship and grounding in the Christian faith while exploring these continuing options.

Program Objectives Because this is a 1-year program, it is limited in depth, scope, and experiential opportunity but seeks to achieve the following objectives at a basic level: 1. Exemplify a life of true experiential intimacy with God, showing evidence in their lives of being transformed through the work of Christ on the Cross and being empowered by the Holy Spirit. 2. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of the Word of God and its centrality to all Christian life and ministry along with an ability to accurately and perceptively apply the Word to ministry realities and personal life 3. Describe a basic understanding of the missionary role of the Church, the history of Christian missions and the contemporary opportunities for missionary service. 4. Demonstrate the development of key competency skills necessary for mission-oriented ministry service including skills in communications, cultural awareness, interpersonal relations, prayer, critical thinking, and collaboration. 5. Demonstrate a personal understanding and ability to effectively identify their own talents and spiritual gifts and a dependence on the Holy Spirit to guide the application of all skills and abilities. 6. Describe the biblical nature of the church and its application in carrying out the work of extending

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God’s kingdom through evangelism and discipleship that leads to the establishment of viable churches. 7. Exemplify attitudes and values that promote strong interpersonal relationships and the building of community between fellow ministers, and create engaging relationships with unbelievers. 8. Demonstrate an awareness of the impact of cultural values and worldviews on ministry and communication and the importance of adaptability and flexibility in responding to differing cultural values and worldviews while also showing an understanding of the dangers of compromise and syncretism. 9. Demonstrate the ability to integrate all of the above into a lifestyle of joyful, unashamed love for God and sacrificial service.

Program Requirements The following details the course requirements which must be completed to attain the Certificate in Bible and Missions. Although all courses need not be successfully completed, all courses must be attempted. I. General Studies.........................................8 Hours II.

Bible & Theology.......................................9 Hours

III. Missions Requirements.............................6 Hours MIS 111 Intro to Missions .............................................3 MIS 112 Evangelism, Discipleship & Community .........3 IV. Christian Ministry Requirements ................1 Hour CHM 111 Kingdom Impact Plan ...................................1 CHM 123 Ministry Week ............................................p/f V. Spiritual Development Requirements.......7 Hours SPD 121 Kingdom Lifestyle ..........................................2 Must complete 1 of 2: SPD 111 Power of the Cross I ......................................1 SPD 112 Power of the Cross II ......................................1 Must complete 1 of 2: SPD 131 Community, Character and the Cross I .........2 SPD 132 Community, Character and the Cross II .........2 VI. Co-Curricular Requirements.................................. Chapels (weekly) Pre-Thanksgiving College Event (annual - 2 days) BCOM Preview (semi-annual) Graduation (annual)

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VII. Total Attempted .....................................37 Hours Total Earned ...........................................31 Hours

Certificate in Pre-field Preparation

III. Additional Elective Requirements ....................6 Hours

Description: This certificate is designed specifically for those who already have a degree but need basic biblical and theological training prior to leaving on an overseas missions assignment. A number of mission sending agencies refer students to Bethany for this purpose and find the training environment ideal for outgoing missionaries. Students select a personalized full-time curriculum from among the courses offered and engage in practical training, cell groups, prayer and worship, and outreach along with the rest of the student body. The college works closely with the mission agency to advise the student; some tailoring of curriculum is provided to meet specific desired outcomes.

Program Objectives The objectives for the student in this program are the same as those for the Certificate in Bible and Missions with the addition of the following objective at a basic level: Describe a working knowledge of the basic principles of missiology and demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the importance of these principles in ministry.

Program Requirements The following details the course requirements which must be completed to attain the Certificate in Pre-field Preparation. I.

LDR 211 Leadership .............................................2 MIS 112 Evangelism, Discipleship & Community..3 HUM 111 Worldviews .............................................3

IV. Additional Optional Elements ....................................... CHM 121 Christian Ministry Outreach I ...............p/f CHM 122 Christian Ministry Outreach II ..............p/f SPD 111 Power of the Cross I ..............................1 SPD 112 Power of the Cross II .............................1 SPD 212 Spiritual Warfare ....................................1 V. Practical Training Requirements ....................2 Courses PRT 111 Practical Training .................................p/f PRT 112 Practical Training .................................p/f VI. Co-Curricular Requirements ....................................... Chapels (weekly) Pre-Thanksgiving College Event (annual - 2 days) BCOM Preview (semi-annual) Graduation (annual) VIII. Total ..............................................................32 Hours

Associate of Arts Degree in Intercultural Ministry Description: Our Associate of Arts in Global Christian Ministry degree curriculum follows the same basic prefield training format as the bachelor’s degree. A.A. degree students spend their first two years of study focused on biblical and theological studies, personal spiritual development, courses in missions, and ministry. A.A. students also participate in at least two BCOMsponsored short-term mission trips during the summer after their freshman year or as electives during the sophomore year. These trips average two weeks in length and give students an introduction to life and work on the mission field.

Bible & Theology ......................................9 Hours

II. Pre-Field Studies Requirements ............17 Hours CHM 111 Kingdom Impact Plan ............................1 COM 111 Communications ....................................3 COM 121 English Composition ..............................2 ECO 212 Fundraising ............................................1 ICS 212 Cultural Anthropology I ..........................2

Program Objectives The objectives for the student in this program are the same as those for the Certificate in Bible and Missions but pursued at a higher level and with the addition of: 1. Describe a working knowledge of the basic principles of missiology and demonstrate a conceptual

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understanding of the importance of these principles in ministry. 2. Demonstrate the development of additional key competency skills necessary for missionary life and service

Program Requirements The following details the course requirements which must be completed to attain the A.A. in Intercultural Ministry degree. Although all courses need not be successfully completed, all courses must be attempted. I. General Studies ......................................18 Hours II.

Bible & Theology ....................................18 Hours

III. Global Christian Ministry Major ..............13 Hours ICS 212 Cultural Anthropology I ..........................2 MIS 111 Intro to Missions ....................................3 MIS 112 Evangelism, Discipleship & Community..3 MIS 212 Suffering Church ....................................1 STEM Short Term Mission Trips ....................................4 IV. Christian Ministry Requirements ..............3 Hours CHM 111 Kingdom Impact Plan ............................1 CHM 123 Ministry Week ......................................p/f Must complete 1 of 2: CHM 211 Prep for Ministry I ..................................1 CHM 212 Prep for Ministry II .................................1 V. Spiritual Development Requirements ....11 Hours SPD 121 Kingdom Lifestyle ..................................2 Must complete 3 of 4: SPD 111 Power of the Cross I ..............................1 SPD 112 Power of the Cross II .............................1 SPD 211 Power of the Cross III ............................1 SPD 212 Spiritual Warfare ....................................1 Must complete 3 of 4: SPD 131 Community, Character and the Cross I ..........2 SPD 132 Community, Character and the Cross II .........2 SPD 231 Community, Character and the Cross III ........2 SPD 232 Community, Character and the Cross IV ........2 VI. Co-Curricular Requirements ................................. Chapels (weekly) Pre-Thanksgiving College Event (annual - 2 days) BCOM Preview (semi-annual) Graduation (annual) VII. Total Attempted .....................................75 Hours Total Earned ...........................................63 Hours

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Optional Concentrations: 1. Early Childhood Development 2. Kingdom Justice 3. Social Entrepreneurship

Bachelor of Arts in Intercultural Studies Description: Our Bachelor of Arts in Intercultural Studies degree will prepare you to effectively minister in any culture. In four years you will gain a deeper understanding of the Word of God, grow in your own walk with the Lord, and develop an international and intercultural perspective on life and ministry. As a B.A. degree student your first two years of study will consist of pre-field training focused on biblical and theological studies, personal spiritual development, and courses in missions and ministry. After pre-field training you will be ready to head overseas! You will spend the next 16 months on Global Internship, living and studying in another country with a team of fellow students. Global Internship is an outstanding catalyst to explore culture, participate in a variety of real life ministries, and find out how you personally fit into God’s plan for the world. At the end of Global Internship your team will return to the Minnesota campus for a final semester designed to help you process and integrate all you have experienced. You will graduate from Bethany with an understanding of your personal strengths and spiritual gifts, ministryfocused career options, contacts in the US and abroad, and a tangible plan for the next step God has for you.

Program Objectives The objectives for the student in this program are the same as those for the Associate of Arts in Intercultural Studies but pursued at a higher level and with the addition of: 1. Demonstrate an integration of conceptual principles of missiology through effective application of knowledge of God and his Word in contextually relevant ways in the extension of God’s kingdom. 2. Demonstrate the development of additional key competency skills necessary for missionary life and service. 3. Demonstrate the applications of an understanding

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of the biblical nature of the church to ministry issues of partnership, collaboration, team and community in carrying out the work of extending God’s kingdom through evangelism and discipleship that leads to the establishment of viable churches. 4. Demonstrate the application of attitudes and values in ministry that promote strong interpersonal relationships and the building of community between fellow ministers and that create engaging relationships with unbelievers. 5. Demonstrate flexibility and adaptability in responding to differing cultural values and worldviews in ministry. 6. Demonstrate a readiness to apply principles learned to life-long ministry in an intercultural setting.

Program Requirements The following details the course requirements which must be completed to attain the B.A. in Intercultural Studies degree. Although all courses need not be successfully completed, all courses must be attempted. I. General Studies .............................................. 36 Hours II. Bible & Theology ............................................. 30 Hours CHM 431 Local Ministry Study Lab ...........................1 COM 311 Cross-Cultural Communications 2 ICS 212 Cultural Anthropology I ............................2 ICS 411 Cultural Anthropology II ..........................2 ICS 313 Field Orientation .....................................2 ICS 314 Local Area Religions ..............................2 ICS 422 Contextualization ....................................3 ICS 431 Integrative Project ...................................2 MIS 111 Intro to Missions .....................................3 MIS112 Evangelism, Discipleship & Community...3 MIS 212 Suffering Church ......................................1 MIS 411 Evangelism & Discipleship in Context .........2 MIS 412 Local Area Christianity .............................2 MIS414 Methods & Models of Church Planting ......2 MIS 415 Cultural Innovation and Change ................3 MIS 421 Re-Entry ..................................................2 VARIED Concentration Electives (description below) ....................................6 III. Intercultural Studies Major...................................40 Hours CH431 Local Ministry Study Lab............................1 COM 311 Cross-Cultural Communications.................2 ICS 212 Cultural Anthropology I...............................2 ICS 411 Cultural Anthropology II..............................2 IV. Christian Ministry Requirements ......................11 Hours CHM 111 Kingdom Impact Plan..............................1 CHM 123 Ministry Week .......................................p/f CHM 412 Missionary Member Care ........................2

CHM 423 Ministry Week Leadership .......................1 Must complete 1 of 2: CHM 211 Prep for Ministry I .................................1 CHM 212 Prep for Ministry II ................................1 Must complete 2 of 3: CHM 321 Ministry Practicum I 3 CHM 421 Ministry Practicum II 3 CHM 422 Ministry Practicum III 3 V. Spiritual Development Requirements ...............11 Hours SPD 121 Kingdom Lifestyle ...................................2 Must complete 3 of 4: SPD 111 Power of the Cross I ............................1 SPD 112 Power of the Cross II ...........................1 SPD 211 Power of the Cross III ..........................1 SPD 212 Spiritual Warfare ....................................1 Must complete 3 of 4: SPD 131 Community, Character & the Cross I ..........2 SPD 132 Community, Character & the Cross II .......2 SPD 231 Community, Character & the Cross III ........2 SPD 232 Community, Character & the Cross IV ........2 Must complete 3 of 4: SPD 311 Missionary Spiritual Formation ....pass/fail SPD 312 Missionary Spiritual Growth ................p/f SPD 411 Missionary Relational Growth ..............p/f SPD 412 Missionary Ministry Development ........p/f VI. Co-Curricular Requirements ....................................... Chapels (weekly) Pre-Thanksgiving College Event (annual - 2 days) BCOM Preview (semi-annual) Graduation (annual) VIII. Total Attempted ............................................152 Hours Total Earned .................................................128 Hours

B.A. Degree Concentrations Students pursuing the B.A. in Intercultural Studies have the option within the program structure to pursue the following concentrations by choosing 6 credits of electives within these areas and by participating in ministries related to these concentrations during Global Internship. New concentrations will be added, but current concentrations include the following three:

Kingdom Justice The concentration in Kingdom Justice allows students to focus their Intercultural Studies program on issues directly related to seeing the presence of God’s Kingdom on earth exemplified in responding to issues created by human injustice such as racism, oppression, human trafficking and persecution. Students will examine biblical

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perspectives of justice and historical patterns of injustice as well as the Church’s historical and contemporary response to injustice. This concentration will prepare a student to work in partnership with others in intercultural environments to bring Kingdom principles to bear on issues of injustice in the world today. The objectives of this concentration are: 1. Define issues of human injustice and the cultural and worldview issues which contribute to their cause and perpetuation. 2. Describe the contrast between humanistic approaches and Kingdom approaches to human injustice. 3. Describe historical and contemporary responses of the Church to issues of social injustice. 4. Describe Kingdom-oriented opportunities and approaches to dealing with injustice in intercultural settings. 5. Define and apply issues of partnership and collaboration to the discovery of solutions to injustice.

Social Entrepreneurship The concentration in Social Entrepreneurship allows students to focus their Intercultural Studies program on bringing social change through the use of innovative partnerships and entrepreneurial business models to collaboratively identify problems and define solutions. Students will examine historical and contemporary roles of international businesses and non-government organizations (NGOs), the concept of building social capital, and a basic overview of macro and microeconomics. This concentration will prepare a student to work in partnership with others in intercultural environments to identify issues and create solutions for social change. The objectives of this concentration are: 1. Define issues of human need and social change as related to contemporary world issues and the impact of social crises such as war and displacement. 2. Describe historical and contemporary approaches to social change. 3. Describe a basic understanding of macro and microeconomics as they relate to social change situations. 4. Define the concept of social capital and relate it to issues of social change. 5. Describe biblical approaches to dealing with social change in intercultural settings.

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6. Define and apply issues of partnership and collaboration to the discovery of solutions for social change.

Early Childhood Development The concentration in Early Childhood Development allows students to focus their Intercultural Studies program on the specific needs of younger children. Students will gain a foundational understanding of theories of how children develop and learn and will examine the planning and implementation of learning activities for young children. This concentration will prepare a student to work in partnership with others in intercultural environments to minister directly to the needs of pre-school age children. The objectives of this concentration are: 1. Define developmental and learning needs of young children. 2. Identify the basic concepts and principles of a Christian Montessori Curriculum and its application to intercultural settings. 3. Describe biblical opportunities and approaches to meeting the needs of young children and their families. 4. Define and apply issues of partnership and collaboration to the creation of learning opportunities for young children in intercultural settings.

Graduate Certificate in Christian Montessori Instruction Description: The Certificate in Christian Montessori Instruction is a 3-month highly intensive program designed to provide the student with basic but essential tools in the application of Montessori teaching methods to intercultural settings from a Christian perspective. Students will explore theoretical foundations that explain how children develop and learn as well as the planning and implementation of learning activities for young children. The skill set obtained through this certificate gives students a valuable credential, allowing graduates to teach children and influence families in intercultural settings in the US and abroad. This Certificate program has a prerequisite of an Associate of Arts degree or higher and is intended as a supplement to the Associate or Bachelor’s degree for those who desire more specific training than the B.A. concentration in Early Childhood Development offers.

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Program Objectives The objectives for the student in this program are: 1. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of early childhood developmental and learning processes. 2. Identify a basic knowledge of the different types of activities found in the Montessori Method and explain their significance for young children. 3. Demonstrate the ability to plan & implement the basic Christian Montessori Curriculum for young children based on its theoretical & Biblical foundation

Program Requirements Students in this certificate program will complete 18 credit hours of Christian Montessori theory. Actual courses for this program are under development for implementation in early 2012 and are not yet available at the time of publication of this catalog. Instruction will be given in the following areas: • • • • • • • • •

Philosophy and Method of Montessori Education Childhood Growth and Development Classroom Management and Relationships Spiritual Formation Practical Life Skills Development Sensorial Development Music and Art Language Arts Math and Sciences

1. Develop a worldview that is comprehensively Kingdom-oriented, with everything fitting within the sovereign reign of God and everything fitting to His direction, undertaking, resourcing, enabling; in fact, everything flowing from Him and to Him for His glory. This gives a clear framework for all work, ministry and for training others for mission. 2. Develop an understanding of the transformation power of the Gospel in individual lives (conversion, sanctification, relationships with others, etc.,) and in society (the impact of transformed people and church on culture and society). 3. Provide an understanding of the major movements of the Spirit of God in mission from the early church to the present time, how these came about, and how they have impacted mission conceptualization and praxis. 4. Provide a practical (applied) understanding of culture and of issues of ministry in the inter-cultural context. 5. Help the student think dynamically about the church and how it begins, grows, and functions viably within another cultural context. 6. Help the student understand approaches to, models of, and issues in contextualization. 7. Enhance the student’s ability to understand and be effective in cross-cultural communication. 8. Develop knowledge and skills for leadership in the cross-cultural ministry setting.

Program Requirements Course Track

Students may elect to take twelve (12) courses to complete the 36 credit M.A.I.S. degree program.

Master of Arts Degree in Intercultural Studies Description: The M.A.I.S. degree, which is designed for missions practitioners, draws from the Intercultural Studies, Bible & Theology, Education, Leadership, and History courses and allows for flexibility in elective course selection. Students may choose between a Course Track and Thesis Track.

Program Objectives Because of the flexibility of this program, the outcomes in part depend on the courses that students choose. In general, the M.A. in Intercultural Studies program aims for the following outcomes:

I. Bible & Theology ……………………..............… 6 cr. hrs. BTH 511 Dynamics of Kingdom Ministry….........3 cr. hrs. BTH 512 Transforming Power of the Gospel.......3 cr. hrs. II. Intercultural Studies Core ……………….....…..12 cr. hrs. ICS 511 Cross-Cultural Communication……..…...3 cr. hrs. ICS 521 Applied Cultural Anthropology……..........3 cr. hrs. ICS 522 Applied Church-Planting Models & Methods ...............................................3 cr. hrs. ICS 523 Contextualization in Missions………..…. 3 cr. hrs. III. General Electives ……...….....…………………18 cr. hrs.

Thesis Track

The Thesis Track gives students the option of eight (8) courses from Bible & Theology, Intercultural Studies,

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Education, Leadership and History, a Research Methods course and a 9 credit thesis. The thesis must relate to application of intercultural studies concepts to the student’s current or anticipated ministry. Total number of credits is 36. IV. Bible & Theology………….............................… 6 cr. hrs. BTH 511 Dynamics of Kingdom Ministry……..… 3 cr. hrs. BTH 512 Transforming Power of the Gospel…… 3 cr. hrs. V. Intercultural Studies Core ................................12 cr. hrs. ICS 511 Cross-Cultural Communication….…...…3 cr. hrs. ICS 521 Applied Cultural Anthropology……....….3 cr. hrs. ICS 522 Applied Church-Planting Models & Methods…..........3 cr. hrs. ICS 523 Contextualization in Missions….……..…3 cr. hrs. VI. General Electives ............................................18 cr. hrs. Research Methodology Course............................3 cr. hrs. Thesis....................................................................9 cr. hrs.

Master of Arts Degree in Intercultural Leadership Description: The M.A.I.L. degree is designed to equip leaders in today’s missions movement, whether serving on the frontlines as missionaries, working to develop national leaders, or serving as strategic senders. Students may choose between a Course Track and Thesis Track.

Program Objectives Program outcomes include: 1. Understanding and building upon the biblical foundations of leadership. 2. Internalizing and practicing the spiritual disciplines that form the godly character necessary for transformational leadership. 3. Understanding current issues and trends in global leadership. 4. Awareness of how differences in worldview and culture shape perspectives and practices in leadership, enhancing one’s ability to communicate effectively in a cross-cultural setting. 5. Effective use of the tools and methods available to leaders for understanding, shaping and influencing the culture of the organization they lead. 6. Understanding the value and method of forming collaborative relationships in intercultural settings. 7. Casting vision and creating a strategic plan in an

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intercultural leadership context. 8. Understanding the role of worldview in the formation of culture and how to bring about change and innovation to areas of culture which do not conform to the Biblical worldview. 9. Understanding how to develop leaders in an intercultural setting. 10. Adopting the skills and tools necessary to become a lifelong leader.

Program Requirements Course Track

Students may elect to take twelve (12) courses to complete the 36 credit M.A.I.L. degree program. This program track draws from Leadership, Intercultural Studies, Bible & Theology, and History: Bible & Theology ..............................................3 cr. hrs. BTH 511 Dynamics of Kingdom Ministry Intercultural Studies ..........................................6 cr. hrs. Intercultural Leadership Core Course Group.....9 cr. hrs. BTH 513 Biblical Foundations of Leadership LDR 511 Spiritual Formation for Leaders BTH 514 Jesus as Leader Intercultural Leadership Electives .....................9 cr. hrs. General Electives ..............................................9 cr. hrs.

Thesis Track

The Thesis Track gives students the option of eight (8) courses from Bible & Theology, Intercultural Studies, Leadership, Education and History, a Research Methods course and a 9 credit thesis. The thesis must relate to application of intercultural leadership concepts to the student’s current or anticipated ministry. Total number of credits is 36. Bible & Theology ...............................................3 cr. hrs. Theology of Kingdom Ministry Intercultural Leadership Core Course Group ....9 cr. hrs. Biblical Foundations of Leadership Spiritual Formation for Leaders Jesus as Leader Intercultural Leadership Electives .....................9 cr. hrs. General Electives ..............................................3 cr. hrs. Research Methodology Course ........................3 cr. hrs. Thesis ...............................................................9 cr. hrs.

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Master of Arts Degree in Intercultural Education

Program Requirements Course Track

Description: The M.A.I.E. degree is designed for people who will be training others for mission. While some of the courses are missiological, the focus is on how to train others in mission concepts and methodology. Students may choose between a Course Track and Thesis Track.

Program Objectives The M.A. in Intercultural Education program aims for the following specific outcomes: 1. Develop a worldview that is comprehensively Kingdom-oriented, with everything fitting within the sovereign reign of God and everything fitting to His direction, undertaking, resourcing, enabling; in fact, everything flowing from Him and to Him for His glory. This gives a clear framework for all work, ministry and for training others for mission. 2. Develop an understanding of the transformational power of the Gospel in individual lives (conversion, sanctification, relationships with others, etc.,) and in society (the impact of transformed people and church on culture and society). 3. Provide an understanding of the major movements of the Spirit of God in mission from the early church to the present time, how these came about, and how they have impacted mission conceptualization and praxis. 4. Provide a practical understanding of culture and of issues of ministry in the intercultural context. 5. Help the student think dynamically about the church and how it begins, grows, and functions viably within another cultural context. 6. Help the student understand approaches to, models of, and issues in contextualization. 7. Enhance the student’s ability to understand cross-culturally communication and how to teach others the skills of cross-cultural communication. 8. Give students the resources and skills for helpingthose who will be ministering crossculturally to develop themselves in the spiritual and life-skills dimensions, cross-cultural character qualities, and social skills critical for effective ministry.

Students may elect to take twelve (12) courses to complete the 36 credit M.A.I.E. degree program. Bible & Theology ............................................3 cr. hrs. BTH 511 Dynamics of Kingdom Ministry Intercultural Studies ........................................6 cr. hrs. Intercultural Education Core Course Group .15 cr. hrs. EDU 511 Training for Effective Growth EDU 521 Philosophy of Missiological Education EDU 522 Design for Effective Teaching EDU 523 Design for Effective Training EDU 524 Program and Curriculum Design General Electives ..........................................12 cr. hrs.

Thesis Track

The Thesis Track gives students the option of eight (8) courses from Bible & Theology, Intercultural Studies, Education, Leadership and History, a Research Methods course and a 9 credit thesis. The thesis must relate to application of intercultural education concepts to the student’s current or anticipated ministry. Total number of credits is 36. Bible & Theology .............................................3 cr. hrs Theology of Kingdom Ministry Intercultural Education Core Course Group..15 cr. hrs. Training for Spiritual, Character & Interpersonal Growth EDU 521 Philosophy of Missiological Education EDU 522 Design for Effective Teaching EDU 523 Design for Effective Training EDU 524 Program and Curriculum Design General Electives ............................................6 cr. hrs. Research Methodology Course ......................3 cr. hrs. Thesis .............................................................9 cr. hrs.

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policies

Policies

Students are expected to participate in all course sessions and activities. Participation includes taking notes, remaining attentive, interacting with instructors and fellow students, and submitting all assignments on time.

Academic Policies Academic Success

Students are expected to take responsibility for their success in achieving the certificate or degree path they have chosen. The program requirements are made available to students through the catalog and themanagement system in Populi. Students should be aware of their status at all times. The programs at Bethany are designed to allow some margin of failure. Some courses are required as prerequisites to continue to the next level of the program; other courses can be attempted but continuation is allowed even if the course is not completed successfully. A CGPA of 2.0 or higher is required for completion of any certificate or degree program of Bethany. Students should review their grades on Populi regularly and consult with the Registrar’s office if they have any concerns. It is expected that students will spend1-1½ hours in study for every hour in class, coming to roughly 15-22 hours a week. This amount will vary greatly based on a student’s ability and the nature of the course assignments. Students should give adequate priority to their assignments to ensure their own success, using evenings and weekends and budgeting their time wisely.

Grading Scale The following grading scale has been adopted by the college: A+ 98-100% A 94-97% A- 91-93% B+ 88-90% B 84-87% B- 81-83% C+ 78-80% C 74-77% C- 71-73% D+ 68-70% D 64-67% D- 61-63% F 51-60% I 0% (Incomplete) W Withdrawn

Academic Excellence Students are expected to maintain a high standard of academic responsibility and integrity. Academic dishonesty in any form will not be tolerated and will result in a grade of zero for the particular test, paper, or activity. Academic dishonesty may result in additional disciplinary action. Dishonesty includes plagiarism, cheating, copying homework, or taking credit for group activities without active participation. Plagiarism is the taking of ideas, language or words from another source and passing them off as one’s own. It includes copying of text from another source and failing to note it as a quote or give appropriate citation.

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Undergraduate Policies Course Selection and Academic Advising The staff of the registrar’s office is available to guide students in course selection, dropping or adding courses or similar issues. Students are encouraged to contact the undergraduate or graduate studies registrar with any questions concerning academic issues.

Course Registration Students may register for courses on line through Bethany’s course management system (Populi). Undergraduate students must register for courses 45 days prior to the start of the next semester.

Dropping and Adding Classes

Three late arrivals in a class equals one absence. Students are considered late, and must circle their initials on the attendance chart, if they arrive after the instructor has started addressing the class. When students miss class periods for any reason, they are responsible to connect with the instructor regarding the missed period, and make arrangements for turning in an assignment, taking a quiz, getting notes, etc. For tracking purposes, attendance at the weekly integrative Cell Group discussion is counted as part of the attendance for the current course(s) being taken. It is assumed that this discussion time extends the discussion and application of the current course(s). Mentors and advisors will track Cell Group attendance and report absences each week to the registrar who will record them into the attendance record of the current course(s).

Course Materials

Dropping a Class

Students requesting to withdraw from individual courses during the semester must submit a request to the registrar. If approved, the official withdrawal date will be noted as the date of the written request.

Students can purchase course textbooks through online textbook sites (such as Amazon.com) or in certain circumstances through the online college bookstore accessed through the Bethany web site.

Adding a Class

Submitting Late Work

Depending on course schedules and offerings, there may be times when a student has the opportunity to add another course to their schedule. Adding a course must be done in consultation with the registrar and must take place before the end of the 4th class session. The student will be responsible to obtain recordings of missed sessions and make up any missed work when joining the class.

Attendance An attendance chart is circulated at the beginning of each class period. Students are required to initial the chart when in attendance. Students are expected to attend all classes but will not be penalized for missing one period per credit hour. Additional time missed results in a 5% grade reduction per period. However, students can avoid the grade reduction by purchasing and listening to audio recording of missed periods from the Registrar’s office within two weeks of the end of that course. If students know in advance that they will be missing a significant amount of class time, they should contact the registrar to discuss alternatives for completing the course.

Assignments must be submitted on time. Failure to do so results in a 5% grade reduction per calendar day for that assignment. When turning in a late assignment, the student must write the date submitted on the assignment. All undergraduate courses close at 11:59 PM on the Saturday after the last day of class. All graduate courses close at 11:59 PM on the Sunday after the last week of the course. After the course closes, late assignments are reduced 10% per calendar day.

Academic Grievances Academic Appeal

If students feel that they have been incorrectly graded, they may submit an Academic Appeal form to the registrar. The appeal process must commence within two weeks of the grades being finalized in Populi. The academic dean will consult with the student and faculty regarding the appeal. All decisions made by the academic dean in regard to appeals are final.

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Grade Improvement/Incompletes Students who do not complete all course requirements before a course is finalized may receive a failing grade for the course. Students who are dissatisfied with their final grade may submit an Academic Improvement form for any grade that is lower than a C for the course. There will be a $20.00 administration fee for all academic improvements. The Academic Improvement form must be submitted to the registrar’s office within two weeks of the grades being finalized in Populi. The academic dean will consult with the faculty to create alternative or makeup assignments. Makeup assignments are graded at 80% of their original value in the course and the final course grade cannot be higher than a C. All decisions made by the academic dean in regard to such requests are final. Students are alternatively allowed to retake a course if they fail to complete it successfully for any reason or do not meet the appeal deadline. There is an additional tuition charge for retaking a course. Because of the modular schedule, a retake will most often be done on the student’s own time or during breaks in the program as an independent study.

Academic Probation There are a variety of reasons why a student may be placed on academic probation. These might include, but are not limited to failure to meet the academic requirements for initial admission, failure (or a request for a grade improvement) in two or more courses within one semester, failure to maintain a CGPA of 2.0 or higher, and academic dishonesty Students are notified in writing if they are placed on academic probation. They will then meet with the academic dean or a designated faculty member to design an individualized growth plan with the intent to help them succeed in their studies. Students who fail to meet the requirements of their growth plan may be dismissed from the college. In such circumstances, a student may be eligible to re-enroll after a minimum of one semester’s absence and should contact the Admissions Office.

Graduate Studies Policies Course Selection and Academic Advising

An academic adviser is assigned to each incoming student. Students work with their adviser to determine

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the student’s preferred program track – course track or thesis track – and to choose courses that best fit the student’s vocational goals. 

Course Registration Students may register for courses on line through Bethany’s course management system (Populi). Graduate students must register for courses 14 days prior to the start of the new term.

Dropping Classes Graduate students enrolled in an online course may withdraw from the course any time before the end of the second week of the term without penalty. The withdrawing student’s transcript will show the withdrawal designation of “W”. The withdrawal petition must be made in writing to the Graduate Studies registrar before the end of the second week of a course.

Course Materials

Graduate students should purchase course textbooks through online textbook sites (such as Amazon.com). Students studying in international locations should plan to purchase course textbooks well in advance of term start dates to ensure delivery or, whenever possible, order a downloadable online version of the book.

Submitting Late Work

Assignments must be submitted on time. Failure to do so results in a 5% grade reduction per calendar day for that assignment. Assignments are automatically date and timestamped when an assignment is uploaded online. All graduate courses close at 11:59 PM on the Sunday of the last week of the course. After the course closes late assignments are reduced 10% per calendar day.

Academic Grievances Academic Appeal

If students feel that they have been incorrectly graded, they may submit an Academic Appeal form to the registrar. The appeal process must commence within two weeks of the grades being finalized in Populi. The academic dean will consult with the student and faculty regarding the appeal. All decisions made by the academic dean in regard to appeals are final.

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policies/ Experiential learning Grade Improvements/Incompletes

Students who do not complete all course requirements before a course is finalized may receive a failing grade for the course. Students who are dissatisfied with their final grade may submit an Academic Improvement form for any grade that is lower than a C for the course. There will be a $20.00 administration fee for all academic improvements. The Academic Improvement form must be submitted to the registrar’s office within two weeks of the grades being finalized in Populi. The academic dean will consult with the faculty to create alternative or makeup assignments. Makeup assignments are graded at 80% of their original value in the course and the final course grade cannot be higher than a C. All decisions made by the academic dean in regard to such requests are final. Students are alternatively allowed to retake a course if they fail to complete it successfully for any reason or do not meet the appeal deadline. There is an additional tuition charge for retaking a course. Because of the modular schedule, a student will have to wait until the course is offered again before reattempting the course.

Academic Probation

Experiential Learning for Undergraduate Programs Spiritual Development As a college centered on the Word of God, Bethany strives to keep the spiritual disciplines reflected in the Bible at the core of its missions training. Students enrolled at Bethany are challenged to go deep in their walk with the Lord and cultivate a life of wholehearted communion with Him. Bethany desires to see missionaries raised up who not only have the practical skills necessary for effective, sustained missionary work but also minister from the overflow of their love for God. The college recognizes that practicing spiritual disciplines is new for some students. By accepting teaching, oversight, and opportunities to practice the spiritual disciplines, the students will also experience the blessings associated with them.

Church Involvement

There are a variety of reasons why a student may be placed on academic probation. These might include, but are not limited to failure to meet the academic requirements for initial admission, failure (or a request for a grade improvement) of two or more courses within one semester, failure to maintain a CGPA of 2.0 or higher, and academic dishonesty Students are notified in writing if they are placed on academic probation. The Academic Dean will work with the student to develop a plan to help them succeed in their studies. Students who fail to meet the requirements of the plan may be dismissed from Bethany Center for Graduate Studies. In such circumstances, a student may be eligible to re-enroll after a minimum of one semester’s absence and should contact the Admissions Office.

Although students may feel that they are in “church” every day at Bethany, there is still value in being involved in a local church body. This gives the student a broader perspective of what God is doing in the Church at large, allows inter-generational relationships to develop, and provides opportunities to serve. The role of the Church as the “sender” of missionaries is valued. The college serves the Church by training its people for ministry. Therefore, students are encouraged to maintain a strong relationship with their home church. In addition, they should select a local church to be involved in and attend weekly during their time at Bethany.

Chapels The following chapels occur weekly at Bethany and student attendance is required. College Chapel - This chapel is specifically for Bethany College students and is an opportunity for staff to give announcements, communicate news, and address the student body. Guest speakers such as missionaries, alumni, and visiting adjunct instructors may address the students as well. In addition, students have opportunities to give testimonies and pray for outreaches. Worship is

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Experiential learning

typically part of each chapel. Team Bethany Chapel - Everyone on campus is invited to come together for this time of worship, prayer, preaching, reports from the mission field, updates on Bethany International and its divisions, and “family times” of celebration and thanksgiving. Prayer and Fasting Chapel – This chapel is open to anyone on campus. Typically, an extended time of corporate worship leads into prayer directed toward specific themes, parts of the world, people groups, missionary activities, and requests. A short teaching time is often included. The chapel takes place over the noon hour in order to encourage the discipline of fasting.

Worship There are many opportunities to take part in corporate and personal worship on campus. See the Prayer Ministry section of the Student Handbook for more details.

Worship Teams

Students may request to be involved on teams that lead prayer and worship in the Prayer Room. Teams typically include worship leaders, prayer leaders, sound and computer technicians, vocalists, and a variety of musicians (those who play acoustic, electric, and bass guitars, drums, keyboards, flutes, violins, etc.). Auditions are required.

Prayer An environment of prayer is continually fostered on campus. Prayer for, and with, one another is an integral part of cell group times, one-on-one meetings with mentors, and team meetings on Global Internship. Throughout the week, the Bethany Prayer Room and the Bethany Church Prayer Sanctuary also provide opportunities to take part in corporate and personal worship and prayer.

The Bethany Prayer Room

The desire of those involved in the Bethany Prayer Team is to see “Watchmen on the Walls” (Isaiah 62:6-7) offering up prayer twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Students have the opportunity to be these watchmen by signing up for one or more one-hour time slots, as well as participating in the weekly corporate worship and intercession times.

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In the Prayer Room, there are three primary motivations. 1. Attentively listening to the words of Jesus (Luke 10:42, John 15:7), 2. Giving love and worship to God (Matthew 22:37), and 3. Joining God in interceding for His purposes and work at Bethany and around the globe.

Prayer and Missions

Prayer is core to missionary training. To offset the lies of the world, the flesh, and the devil, the Lord’s servants need to be saturated with the truth of the living and the written Word of God. It is also recognized that the Godly discipline of prayer is one that is difficult to develop because of the spiritual opposition to personal intimacy with God and to corporate worship and intercession. For this reason, one of the most crucial parts of missionary training is to develop a history and habit of prayer and fasting (both personal and corporate) in preparation for full-time ministry. Therefore, students are encouraged to spend as much time as they can in the Prayer Room or Prayer Sanctuary.

Scripture Although classes pertaining to Biblical Studies make up a large portion of the curriculum, Bethany is unable to cover every book of the Bible in the classroom during the limited time of a student’s enrollment. However, in the course of the B.A. program, students will come close! In addition, students are encouraged to participate in Bible studies through their church and to incorporate regular personal Bible study, memorization, and meditation on the Word in their Personal Development Plan.

Fasting Fasting from food is a gift that God has given us to become voluntarily weak so that He can fill us with His strength and drive us to the place of encounter (prayer) with Him. Unfortunately, fasting is not a widely-practiced discipline in the Church today. To begin to form the habit of fasting, Bethany staff and students are encouraged to participate in a weekly corporate fast which takes place over the lunch hour. By giving the opportunity to experience fasting, we desire to grow in humility before the Lord, harnessing the desires of the flesh, and incorporating this practice into the Christian walk.

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Experiential learning

Abstaining

these benefits, each full-time student enrolled in the PT program receives a $3000 scholarship per semester.

Abstaining, like fasting, provides the opportunity to voluntarily set aside an activity, practice, or use of time. Doing so allows further development of Biblical worldview, focus on creating new positive habits and priorities, or deeper investment in the lives of others. We incorporate practical opportunities for this as students begin their time at Bethany. The intent is that after a time of abstaining students can approach these lifestyle choices with a Biblical worldview and with habits established that will carry them through when they are again surrounded by these influences. For ease of communication, we refer to nonfood abstaining as a “fast” throughout college literature and on the web site.

Outreach Outreach gives students the opportunity to engage as ministers of the Gospel while training to be ministers of the Gospel. Bethany partners with several local organizations to provide a number of weekly outreach opportunities. The selection process for outreach teams takes place at the start of each year and students are asked to commit to one team for the duration of at least one semester. Our desire is that students will find a particular outlet for their unique giftings and interests. This leads to meaningful and effective ministry. Ministry teams consist of campus outreach, inner city church services, street evangelism, English language tutoring, and children’s clubs.

Practical Training From the founding of Bethany in the late 1940s, student involvement in on-campus missions, business, and ministry operations has proven invaluable in giving them “real world” experience and skills. Bethany continues to give students these opportunities through the Practical Training (PT) program. During PT, students work in a department on campus for twenty hours each week. This experiential learning allows students to acquire new skills, develop a strong work ethic, work with godly leaders, learn to be good team members, and take on leadership responsibilities themselves. In addition to

Bethany graduates are highly praised by mission-sending agencies for their excellent work ethic and integrity. Over the years, alumni have testified time and again as to the impact PT has had on their ministries, lives, and character.

Mentoring/Cell Groups Each student is part of a cell group made up of 6-12 students living together in the dorms under the oversight of a resident mentor. Bethany mentors are chosen for their proven leadership abilities, good organizational and communication skills, spiritual maturity, humility, and genuine love and concern for students. A mentor provides exhortation, encouragement, prayer, and a godly example in order to see students develop an authentic relationship with Christ. Mentors have the support and assistance of an advisor, a volunteer from among Bethany International associates, Bethany alumni, or Bethany Church members. Advisors are partnered with a mentor and are available to help with special concerns, meet with students, and offer advice and prayer. Advisors and mentors together lead a weekly cell group with their students. During this time, they discuss coursework, pray together, encourage one another, and talk through concerns. Students also meet individually with their mentor each week.

Personal Development Plan Each student is creates a Personal Development Plan outlined in the Mentoring section of the Student Handbook. The PDP is a “living document” which gives students the opportunity to set goals, address spiritual, personal and academic issues, and be intentional in making wise decisions throughout the year. Students share their PDPs with their mentors and make adjustments as they progress in their growth and face new challenges.

Global Internship Global Internship makes up a significant portion of the B.A. program. During Global Internship, students live overseas as a team for 16 months at one of our Global Internship

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Campus Facilities

sites; learn a foreign language; partner with missionaries and local ministries to bring the Gospel to a people group; study social structures, religion, and worldview and ultimately become intercultural (defined as being able to comfortably move between two or more cultures). These goals are accomplished by providing a holistic experience encompassing formal and experiential learning, research, reflection, interaction with other students and practical ministry application for maximized learning. The ministry emphasis of Global Internship, primarily focused on church-planting, provides opportunities for students to gain experience in leading Bible studies, preaching, teaching, discipleship, friendship evangelism, child and youth ministry, TESOL, relief and development, meeting physical and social needs, and more. Students observe and engage in missionary life firsthand through Global Internship, applying knowledge gained in the classroom to life experience and bringing life experience back into the classroom. Global Interns develop skills for working collaboratively in the context of ministry teams. They grow deeper in trust and reliance on God. They explore God’s leading for future direction as they discover and develop the gifts He has given them. Global Interns are sent in teams. Student teams live together in one of several different locations around the world. The Global Internship sites each provide their own unique environments, languages, cultural and religious contexts and ministry challenges or opportunities. Global Interns over the past several years have lived at sites in Central Asia, Southeast Asia, Mexico, Thailand, Austria, France, and Kenya. New sites are continually being identified and developed to receive Global Internship teams.

Campus Facilities

Married students who live within daily commuting distance are permitted to live off-campus and still enroll in a fulltime program. No other full-time students are permitted to live off-campus due to the critical nature of the resident mentoring component of the program. For married couples living in the dorms, it is assumed that young children will be housed in the parents’ dorm room. Families with children ages 3 and up will automatically be assigned at least 1 additional room. Parents may house more than one child per room, but no more than current City of Bloomington rental housing standards allow by law (typically 2 per room, based on the size of rooms in most of our dorms).

Foodservice The cost of room and board are combined together; therefore, students are not permitted to opt out of the campus meal plan. The meal plan consists of 3 meals per day, 7 days per week, served in the campus foodservice while school is in session. During school breaks students who choose to stay on campus may purchase meals or work on campus to cover the costs of room and board. Serving times are posted at the entrance to the cafeteria. Students with special dietary needs are encouraged to meet with the Foodservice Director to become informed about the ingredients and processes used in the kitchen in order to plan and compensate, if necessary.

Parking

On-Campus Housing Single, full-time students are required to live on campus. They are assigned to a floor with a resident mentor and fellow students who make up their cell group for the year. Three dorm buildings house students – Bergh Hall (men’s dorm), Finsaas Hall (women’s dorm) and Shelling Hall (men’s dorm and married student housing). These designations change from year to year based on the

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make-up and housing needs of each student body. New students should plan to have at least one roommate and can request a particular roommate but are not guaranteed their request due to the complexity of creating cell groups based on residency. Single students are asked to fill out a roommate questionnaire upon acceptance and are assigned to housing based on roommate compatibility, age, and resident cell group make-up.

Student parking is available on the west side of the campus between Bethany Church and the gym. Parking is limited to one assigned space per student. Students wishing to keep a car or motorcycle on campus must apply for a parking permit. The permit fee of $100 per semester covers parking only and does not include use of the service garage.

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Campus Facilities

Storage

Guest Rooms

Students have access to a minimal amount of storage space in their dorms. The college also offers storage space for rent to students over summer breaks and Global Internship. Free off-season bicycle storage is available on campus. The Services Department can be contacted for more information.

Bethany International has a number of guest rooms available on campus. Students may contact the Services Department for information on availability and pricing of these guest rooms (maintenance.secretary@ bethanyinternational.org or 952-829-2459).

Recreation

Laundry Laundry facilities are available in Shelling Hall, Finsaas Hall and in the central laundry located on the north end of the campus across from Bergh Hall. Use of machines is free-of-charge; however, students must supply their own supplies.

Student Resource Center The Student Resource Center (SRC) provides a variety of resources for students, which include a 20,000 volume library, computer work stations with internet access, wireless internet, a color photocopier/ printer (copy cards can be pre-loaded and purchased in the SRC), movies and board games for loan, a television lab, a student conference room, and Bethany merchandise for sale An online catalog (located in Populi) allows students to place books on hold, renew items, and pay fines. The SRC also provides a comfortable and welcoming environment for group studies and projects. The hours of operation for the SRC vary depending on the academic schedule; however, it is generally open Monday through Saturday.

The Oasis Located across from the Student Resource Center, the Oasis is a student-run activity center offering a variety of amenities including wireless internet, board games, pool, carpetball, a snack bar and a lounge area. Throughout the year, the Oasis Team (made up of student volunteers) also organizes special events for the student body.

The Union Located in the Barn, the Union is a student-run activity center providing various amenities including wireless internet, video games and television. The Union is open to Bethany students but is operated by Rivendell Sanctuary, a partner school which rents facilities on the Bethany campus.

Gymnasium & Weight Room A full-sized gymnasium with basketball, volleyball, and racquetball courts is located on the west side of the Bethany campus. An adjoining weight room, locker rooms, and a concession area are available for student use.

Sports Fields

Student Kitchens Full-size kitchens with storage areas for food and equipment are located in the basement of Shelling Hall and Finsaas Hall. Finsaas Hall also has a large party room adjoining the kitchen. Students living in these buildings may keep personal kitchen and food items in designated spaces in these kitchens. Smaller kitchenette facilities/ snack prep areas are located in all dorms. An additional student kitchen is located in the T.A. Hegre Ministry Center across the hall from the SRC. Keys for this facility are available from the Student Life Coordinator.

Outdoor playing fields are located on the west end of the campus across from the gym. The fields are currently under construction due to property development on that side of the campus. They are scheduled to be available for use again in the spring of 2012.

Playground A children’s playground and play field is located just north of Atkins Hall.

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Campus Facilities

Extracurricular Activities Our Student Life Coordinator organizes activities and events guided by the make-up, interest and requests of the student body. Common intramural sports include flag football, basketball, racquetball, soccer, and frisbee. Students have also organized art festivals and exhibitions, dramatic performances, talent shows, coffee houses, craft days, broomball, table tennis tournaments and more. The Oasis and the Union are available for special events and just hanging out, getting online, playing a game, or throwing a surprise party. Students are provided with wireless internet in the dorms and in other public buildings on campus. The lower level of the Barn can be reserved for school-sponsored and cell group events. Our campus is located in a beautiful, suburban neighborhood on the bluffs of the Minnesota River, so there are plenty of trails for biking and running. The Isaak Walton nature preserve and Three Rivers Park District lands are within close proximity of the campus and offer great nature hikes and wildlife viewing. Public transportation comes directly to our campus on a limited schedule. Additional public transportation options are also available nearby which make for ready access to the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St Paul available to students too! The Twin Cities have endless cultural, social, and sporting activities, including the nearby Mall of America, Valleyfair Amusement Park and more.

Special Events Highlights of the year include the annual fall picnic, the alumni picnic (summer), the semi-annual BCOM Preview campus visit event for prospective students (fall and spring) , graduation (spring), annual retreats for men and women, the senior retreat, ministry week, the annual Thanksgiving outreach event, and the annual student appreciation event as well as other cell group related events. Students are required to participate in all special events. Some events require a scheduled work shift as well as attendance. All special events are incorporated into the calendar due to their value in providing unique experiences conducive to building community, giving time for reflection and learning, stretching students beyond their comfort zone, celebration, and/or to honor and bless others.

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Financial Information

Financial Information

plan, except in the case of full-time married students who live within daily commuting distance. *Partially to fully refundable

Institutional Statement Bethany is a non-profit institution. We make every effort to keep our costs as low as possible while covering our operating expenses and providing excellent services to our student body. We review our fee schedule and financial assistance information and make necessary adjustments prior to the start of each new academic year. Fees for each upcoming school year are published approximately 9 months in advance. Adjustments to individual student accounts may be made at any time up until the final invoices are posted for any given semester of that academic year. We do not add new fees or increase fee amounts without carefully considering the benefit of the service to the student body, and whenever possible we give advance notice of significant fee or financial assistance changes. The governing body of Bethany College of Missions reserves the right to make adjustments to the student fee schedule and financial assistance offerings at any time, as deemed necessary. Therefore, the fees for your freshman year are not in effect for the duration of your enrollment but should be expected to change slightly from year to year.

Undergraduate Financial Information

Student Activity Fee $200 - non-refundable Technology Fee $25 - non-refundable Student Resource Center Fee $120 - non-refundable LGA (student directory) Fee $15 - non-refundable

New Student Fees Advance Registration Fee $150 - non-refundable; applied to tuition upon enrollment Room Deposit $350 - partially to fully refundable

Optional Costs • • •

Costs Costs listed are annual costs for all freshman, sophomore, and senior full-time students unless noted. See the refund policy for details regarding refunds.

Parking $100 per semester - partially to fully refundable Books and Materials $200 (approximate) Medical Coverage $264 – Parkway Plan minimal coverage; required for US students without medical insurance; optional for all other students - nonrefundable Medical Insurance $400 (approximate) – Inbound Immigrant minimal insurance; required for international students; cost listed is an estimate only - non-refundable

Married Student/Family Costs Program Option One - Both full-time students

Tuition $10,600

Bethany employs a banded-tuition system, which allows full-time students to take up to 19 credits for one flat tuition rate. *Partially to fully refundable

Room and Board $6,190

Standard Fees

A flat rate applies to all full-time students regardless of room size, dorm, or number of roommates. Students are not permitted to opt out of living on campus or the meal

Tuition $21,200 Room and Board (housing and all meals for both spouses) $12,380

Program Option Two - One full-time student,

one part-time student Tuition $15,900 Room and Board (housing and all meals for both spouses) $12,380

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Financial Information

Program Option Three - One full-time student +

or

One non-student spouse

Program Option Four (Split Program) Two spouses split one full-time program Tuition $10,600 Room and Board (housing and all meals for both spouses) $12,380

Costs for Children Medical coverage/insurance: All dependent children living on campus must have minimal medical coverage in the form of • •

The Parkway Plan for children of American students Medical insurance billed through the college for children of international students.

Check with Admissions for detailed estimates of the cost of meeting this requirement for your children.

Housing and meals:

Children aged 2 and under: There is no added cost for the housing and meals of children ages 2 and under. It is assumed that young children will be housed in the parents’ dorm room.

Children ages 3 and up: • • •

Children ages 3-10 are charged $360 per semester per child Children 11+ are charged $600 per semester per child In addition, a $100 room deposit is required for each additional room used for children’s housing

International Student Families International student families are required to pay for children’s housing, meals, and medical insurance as well as additional room deposits for the year in advance before receiving immigration documents. Canadians are exempt from this policy.

Global Internship Costs (B.A. Degree only) Students participating in the internship program for the B.A. must be accepted as missionaries under Bethany

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International Ministries (BIM). As such they raise support for their field ministry costs such as housing, food, ministry expenses, airfare, insurance, visa costs, etc. The funds raised are considered a donation to Bethany International Ministries and the donor is provided a taxdeductible receipt. Students accepted into Global Internship mission service are given guidance on how to raise funds and communicate with donors as part of the program. All expenses below are eligible to be raised via missionary support with the exception of the Bethany College of Missions Program Fee. The costs here are estimates based on the average expenses for interns based on the last academic year. Actual costs vary dependent on location, local and global economic fluctuations and other factors. All costs are eligible to be raised via missionary support except the Bethany Global Internship Tuition. Ministry Set-up Costs (average) $8,000; includes airfare, medical insurance, housing and furnishings and 1 month support. Ministry Costs (average) $1,800/month, $28,800 total for entire internship; includes housing, language-learning costs, transportation, etc. Tuition $2,500 Total cost of Global Internship for a single student (estimated): $39,300 (of which $36,800 is raised as missionary support)

Missions Trip Costs (A.A. Degree only) Students in the associate’s degree program are required to take part in two mission trips offered by the college. Costs vary depending on the trips chosen, but average around $3,000 per trip and are eligible to be raised as missionary support.

Senior Semester Costs (B.A. Students only) Seniors returning from Global Internship spend one final semester on campus prior to graduation. They pay the same room and board rates and other school fees as freshmen and sophomores enrolled during that semester. Seniors are granted a 100% tuition scholarship for their final semester.

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Financial Information

Variations in school fees for seniors: Additional Fee: $50 Graduation Fee Reduction: $120 Senior Student Activity Fee

Financial Assistance

FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) Bethany College of Missions students are not able to avail of FAFSA at the time of this printing. The college is in the applicant stage of securing accreditation with the Association of Biblical Higher Education (ABHE). The next stage of this process is the candidate stage. Once the college has been approved at the candidate level our students will be able to avail of FAFSA funding.

Institutional Financial Assistance We currently offer the following institutional financial assistance. All full-time students may apply for all financial assistance for which they qualify. Criteria to qualify is found in the financial assistance application materials. In some cases part-time students enrolling with a fulltime spouse or in the split program may receive certain scholarships and discounts as well. See the financial assistance application materials for details. Financial assistance listed is annual award amounts for all qualifying freshman, sophomore, and senior full-time students unless noted.

Practical Training Scholarship All full-time freshmen and sophomores automatically receive a $6,000 annual Practical Training Scholarship for participating in the required practical training program.

Additional Institutional Scholarships and Discounts Freshmen only Campus Visit Discount $300 Excellence in Christian Ministry Scholarship $600; not available to international students Full-time Christian Worker Scholarship $600 Home School Graduate Scholarship $600 Merit Scholarship $2,000

Freshmen and Sophomores Church Matching Scholarship - up to $600 Dependent of full-time Christian worker/Bethany College of Missions Alumnus Scholarship $600 Need-based Scholarship - up to $2,000 Honor Academy Graduate Intern Scholarship $3,000; not available to international students Sophomores only Excellence in Service $1,500 Academic Excellence Scholarship $1,500 President’s Distinguished Student Award $4,000 Seniors only Seniors are granted a 100% tuition scholarship for their final semester.

Applying for Financial Assistance Financial Assistance Application Forms, corresponding deadlines and criteria for eligibility are available on our web site, upon acceptance for new students and from the Admissions Office for all prospective students, freshmen and sophomores. We encourage students who are considering applying to Bethany to fill out financial assistance application materials prior to being accepted in order to receive an estimate of financial assistance and costs to help with planning.

Payment Plans Standard Payment Plan New students are invoiced approximately one month prior to the start of each semester and are expected to pay for the semester in its entirety by arrival day/the first day of orientation for that semester. One-time and annual fees are included on the first invoice of each school year. After the first semester, fees are due by the first day of class of each subsequent semester. International students are not eligible for this plan.

Pay in Advance Plan Pay for the entire year at once and receive a $200 discount off the total cost. Payment is due by arrival day/the first day of orientation of the first semester of the school year. If you are planning to take the Pay in Advance payment plan option, you are not eligible for a need-based scholarship or a loan.

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Financial Information

New international students must select this payment plan, but should note that the due date for payment is earlier than the posted due date for American and Canadian students.

Quarterly Payment Plan Your first payment of ½ of the total due for that semester plus a $50 service fee is due on arrival day/the first day of orientation. Your second payment of the balance due for the semester plus a $50 service fee is due at the approximate halfway point of that semester (the exact date is determined when making your first payment on arrival day). International students are not eligible for this plan.

Loans Although Bethany does not condone students taking on debt, the college does offer small student loans as part of the overall institutional financial assistance package. Guidelines: The maximum loan amount granted is $1,500 per semester for a full-time student. Students are only considered for a loan after all other financial assistance has been applied and may not be eligible for a student loan if they have been granted maximum awards for other financial assistance. Loans are only granted for one semester at a time and students must re-apply for loans by the financial assistance application deadline for each semester. If you are claimed as a dependent on your parents’ tax return your parents are required to co-sign on the loan. Interest begins to accrue upon the first day of enrollment in the semester for which the loan is taken out. The interest rate is 7%. Monthly payments on the loan begin 2 months after the student graduates from BCOM with payment in full due 60 months after graduation. For married couples, if one spouse finishes his/her program prior to the other, payments begin based on when the spouse enrolled the longest finishes the program. Students who withdraw prior to completion of their declared program must begin monthly payments within 1 month of withdrawal from BCOM with payment in full due within12 months. If the student becomes a full-time BIM missionary within the 60 month term of the loan 50% of the remaining balance due is forgiven. Failure to pay

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a monthly payment by the due date results in a late fee of 20% of the current balance due. If the student defaults on the loan it is sent to collection. International students are not eligible to receive a student loan for the first year of enrollment. The applicant for a loan must demonstrate significant financial need, as indicated in the financial assistance application.

How Financial Assistance is Awarded Application Review Your financial assistance application is reviewed by the Admissions Office and awards for which you qualify are estimated (if you are a potential student) or offered in the Financial section of your online student profile, Populi (if you are an accepted student). Your financial assistance awards are reviewed by the Finance Office prior to your being invoiced for the semester. Financial Assistance Distribution Financial assistance is distributed on new student arrival day for new freshmen and on the first day of each semester for continuing students. Financial Assistance Limits: The amount of financial assistance awarded by Bethany is made up of a combination of all scholarships, discounts, and loans awarded. The total amount of assistance cannot exceed the total cost of tuition invoiced for any given semester. If a student qualifies for more than the amount of tuition invoiced, the awards are capped. In some situations the award overage may be applied to the next semester (if the maximum assistance has not yet been reached for that semester). Gifts given from your church toward Bethany’s Churchmatching Scholarship are NOT figured into the capped maximum amount of assistance; instead church gifts are applied as payments toward your outstanding balance, not financial assistance. However, Bethany’s Church-matching Scholarship is considered part of your financial assistance package and can be subjected to the financial assistance cap.

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Financial Information

Financial Services Students have access to their financial records in their online student profile at bcom.populiweb.com. Charges incurred, financial assistance pending and applied, invoices, statements, and payment history are all available on the profile. Students may choose to give a parent or donor viewer access of their online invoice for up to 30 days. They may also print off these records at any time. Students are given the opportunity to give their parents or donor access to their financial information by signing a financial release form at the time of their enrollment. The Admissions Office handles offers basic financial assistance application information for new and continuing students and their parents. Students seeking a payment plan, a Bethany loan or additional financial counseling are directed to the Finance Office. Likewise, complications with payments and questions about individual accounts, particularly for continuing students, are handled by the Finance Office. Students raising support for a short-term trip or Global Internship are given instructions from the Finance Office as to correct processes for managing donor funds when they are approved for their trip. The college does not provide banking services on campus.

Methods of Payment All fees may be paid using any of these methods:

• •

• •

All fees must be paid in U.S. dollars only. We are unable to process payments made with foreign currencies or payments with unofficial indications of exchange to U.S. dollars (e.g. a handwritten note on a check indicating that the check was cut in U.S. dollars). Our mailing address for sending payments is: Bethany College of Missions Finance Dept, 6820 Auto Club Rd, Suite J Bloomington, MN 55438-9900

Financial Policies Non-Payment of Fees New Students

New students are expected to select one of the published payment plan options and make the first minimum payment for that plan by the first day of orientation. New students who fail to do so must make their initial payment in full, according to the determined payment plan, by 5 pm the night before classes begin. If the student is not able to do so he or she may not attend class or practical training the next day, but instead should use that day to make arrangements to leave campus within 48 hours. Orientation week is a week of “grace” in which students may participate in orientation and stay on campus without charge. This grace period lasts from arrival day until the day they are scheduled to leave campus.

Making Payments

sending bank and the receiving bank for this service – this method is only available to international students or Americans living outside the US.

Credit Card (via the Financial tab of the student’s online profile – bcom.populiweb.com). We are able to process Visa, Master Card, and Discover cards. Cash or personal Check from a U.S. bank Cashier’s check or U.S. Bank Draft drawn from a U.S. bank or payable through a major U.S. bank (most major banks in foreign countries will be able to sell cashier’s checks payable through a U.S. bank; there is a fee from the bank for this service) U.S. Dollar Money Orders Wire transfer of funds in U.S. dollars (instructions available upon request); there is a fee from the

If a new student is not able to enroll due to finances the college encourages him or her to defer enrollment to the next semester.

Continuing Students

Continuing students must make payments according to the set due dates for the payment plan they have chosen. If unable to do so, the student must meet with the Finance Office in order to work out an alternative payment plan. Alternative payment plans are typically set up in monthly installments and include a processing fee. Payments are due on the 1st business day of the month; a $25 late fee applies on the 4th business day. If the student is not able

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Financial Information

to make payment by the 4th business day of the month the Finance Office sends an invoice to the student’s parents (if the student has signed the financial disclosure waiver). Students in financial default have 30 days from the original due date to make their late payment. At the 30 day mark the student may no longer attend class or practical training and should make arrangements to leave the campus within 48 hours. If the student is able to secure funding within the 48 hours, he or she must pay both the late payment and the next month’s payment (which would be due by this time) in full in order to remain enrolled. The student must also make up any time missed from p.t. during the 48 hours (or use personal hours to make up the missed time) and is responsible to speak with his or her instructor about making up missed coursework. If a student must leave school due to non-payment the Finance Office informs the Deans and Registrar’s Office. The student must go to the Registrar’s Office immediately to pick up exit paperwork and instructions. It may be possible for a student in financial default to stay at Bethany as a Ministry Intern, but this must be approved not only through the MI application process but by the Finance Office as well. It may also be possible for the student to arrange a leave of absence for up to one year due to finances. If interested in this option, the student should contact the Admissions Office. If a student must leave school due to finances the college encourages him or her to re-enroll at the next appropriate entry date, depending on where the student is at in his or her given program. The student should contact the Admissions Office to make these arrangements.

Refunds Refund Payments: Since the college has an enrollment agreement with the student (and not parents or other financial supporters) all refunds are made out to the student, regardless of who made the original payments, and are sent by check directly to the student within approximately two weeks of withdrawal. Scholarship Funds: Students are not refunded any funds granted to them by the college in the form of financial assistance. Likewise, funds donated by a church toward the student’s school fees are not refundable. Tax

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law prohibits such money being refunded to an individual. The following fees paid to Bethany College of Missions prior to or upon enrollment are non-refundable: •

Application fee

Parking fee for the semester in which the withdrawal takes place (If you paid in advance for the next semester, the advanced fee will be refunded in full.)

Student activity fee

Technology fee

Advance Registration and continuing student Registration fees

Student Resource Center fee

Parkway Plan medical coverage (if you have chosen this plan)

Inbound Immigrant medical insurance – international students only

Materials fees

LGA fee

The following fees paid to Bethany College of Missions may be partially refundable : Room Deposit for your room and children’s rooms (when applicable). Conditions for refund: Room meets inspection; no outstanding fines or fees; you have followed official withdrawal procedure. The college reserves the right to retain all or part of the room deposit if any of these conditions for refund are not met in full SRC Copy/Print card Undergraduate tuition, meals, housing (including costs for children’s meals and housing when applicable) are partially refundable in the case of withdrawal from the program as shown below: Enrolled students who withdraw for any reason within the first 4 weeks of a given semester are charged a fee of $25/night to cover the costs of room and board for the time he or she was enrolled. This amount is deducted from the total refund returned to the student.

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Financial Information

First full week of classes – 100% Second full week of classes – 75% Third full week of classes – 50% Fourth full week of classes – 25% Remainder of semester – not eligible for refund.

Graduate Studies Financial Information Tuition $150 per credit (3 credit course = $450) – partially to fully refundable Standard Fees Application Fee: $30 one-time, non-refundable Technology Fee: $25 per term, non-refundable Online Library Fee: $25 per-term, non-refundable

Financial Assistance for International Students Need-based scholarships are available to qualified international students from developing world countries on a limited basis. Scholarship enquiries should be directed to the Graduate Studies Registrar’s Office at 952.829.2454 or jamie.swan@bcom.org.

Refunds The following tuition refund schedule is applies to Bethany Center for Graduate Studies students enrolled in online courses: Week 1 90% of course tuition Week 2 50% of course tuition Week 3 The remainder of the term is not eligible for refund

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Faculty

Faculty

program at BCOM; serves as a board trustee for the Seminary by Extension for All Nations (SEAN) headquartered in London (www.seaninternational.com); teaches on Spiritual Formation, Spiritual Warfare and Women in Missions.

Full Time and Administrative Teaching Faculty These faculty members teach full time or teach parttime and also hold an administrative position within BCOM. Randy Dirks: Ph.D. in Intercultural Studies from Trinity International University; M.Div. from Bethel Seminary; B.A. in Theology from Canadian Bible College; former Pastor with the Christian Missionary Alliance; 6 years of field experience in cross-cultural missions; currently the Vice President of Advancement at Bethany International. Ed Dudek: M.A. in Intercultural Studies at Bethany International University, Singapore; B.A. in Theology and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; B.S. in Chemistry from Westminster College, New Wilmington, PA; 18 years of field experience in crosscultural missions in Brazil, 13 of which Ed served as Director of the Bethany Seminary and Bible Institute; 35 years of experience teaching abroad and in the USA; international speaker on the victorious Christian life based on Romans 6-8; author of Oh God, If I Could Just Be Holy; teaches courses on Romans, Synoptic Gospels and Theology. Ed and his wife, Milta, have four children and six grandchildren. Steve Eliason: B.A. in Theology and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; B.S. in Missions Education from North Central University; presently enrolled in M.A. in Intercultural Studies program at Bethany International University; 11 years of field experience in cross-cultural missions and church planting; Dean of Men at Bethany College of Missions; Assistant to the Director of Bethany International Ministries; teaches courses on Cross-Cultural Communications, Cross-Cultural Evangelism, Church History and Discipleship. Carol Freeman: B.A. in Theology and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; 15 years of field experience in cross-cultural missions, church planting and translation in the rural areas of the Philippines; currently oversees the Mentoring Program at BCOM; Dean of Women; coordinator for the Ministry Intern

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Paul Hartford: Ph.D. in Education (Postsecondary and Adult) from Capella University (Dissertation: Collaborative acculturation: The role of community in the process of becoming intercultural); M.A. in Intercultural Studies from Wheaton Graduate School (Thesis: Stages in partnership development); B.A. in Theology and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; served 9 years as Director of Bethany College of Missions; founding Director of Bethany School of Church Planting (Philippines); 11 years of field experience in cross-cultural missions, church planting and leadership training; currently the Academic Dean and the Director of Global Internship for Bethany College of Missions. Teaches courses on CrossCultural Communications; Leadership Development; Team Development; Spiritual Warfare; Cross-Cultural Church Planting; Instruction Methods; Evangelism, Discipleship, and Community; Preparation for Ministry and Interpersonal Communications. John Kayser: Ph.D. in Missiological Education from the University of Edinburgh (Scotland); M.A. in Missiology from Grace Theological Seminary; B.A. in Theology from the Prairie Bible Institute; 2 years of pastoral experience with the Evangelical Free Church (Canada); 17 years on faculty at Prairie Bible College and Seminary; 3 years at Bethany School of Missions (Singapore); 12 years of experience as an educational consultant with Bethany International and GO100; specializes in missions’ curriculum development and program design; teaches courses on Exegetical Skills, Homiletics, Discipleship, Missiology, Cultural Anthropology, CrossCultural Communications, Church Planting, Theology, Evangelism, Interpersonal Communication, Christianity and Culture, Applied Missiological Ecclesiology, Educational Philosophy and Theory, Formal Educational Design, Educational Planning and Evaluation, Educational Analysis. Tom Shetler: M.A. in Christian Education from Winnipeg Theological Seminary; B.A. in Theology and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; B.A. in Physics from the University of Colorado; former Accounts Receivable Coordinator at Bethany Press International; presently a faculty member of the Bethany Center for Global Studies teaching in the online Master’s degree program for Cross-

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Faculty

Cultural Leadership; teaches courses on Old Testament, Hermeneutics, Apologetics, Hebrews, Church History and Religions of the World. Paul Strand:  Doctorate of Missiology Candidate at Fuller Theological Seminary; M.A. in Missiology from Fuller School of World Missions; B.S. from the University of Minnesota; Diploma in Bible and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; 15 years of field experience in Indonesia in cross-cultural missions; served 7 years as President of Bethany International; 32 years of experience teaching in the U.S.A. and abroad; faculty member at Bethany International University, Singapore; adjunct faculty member at Ethiopia Kale Hewat School of Missions, Africa Center for Missions, Kenya, Nigeria Evangelical Missions Institute and Missionary Training Partners Int’l, Nigeria; currently serves on the board at the U.S. Center for World Missions; teaches courses on Cultural Anthropology, Church Growth, Cross-Cultural Communications, and Area Studies.

Part-Time Faculty Norbert Bauer: M.A. in Intercultural Studies from New Covenant International University; Diplomas in Ministry and Missions from Faith School of Theology; currently serving as Director of dtst-ASIA Training School in Chiang Mai, Thailand; 22 years of field experience in intercultural ministry in the Philippines, Cambodia, Malysia, Vietnam and Thailand in church planting, pastoring, and leadership training; teaches courses on Cross-CulturalCommunications, Leadership Development, and Church Planting. Dan Brokke: BA Degree in Theology and Christian Education from Azusa Pacific University; BA Degree in Cross-cultural Studies from Bethany College of Missions. Served 24 years in the Christian publishing industry providing leadership for DaySpring Cards, as Sr. Vice President and COO of David C Cook Publishing, a Christian publishing and distribution company.  He has served on boards such as: Christian Booksellers Association, David C Cook, University of the NationsKona, Heritage Builders Association, and Bethany International. Serves as President of VisionServe, a organizational leadership and marketing consulting firm, and as President/CEO of Bethany International/Bethany College of Missions; teaches courses in Leadership. Dan Germo: enrolled in Graduates Studies towards M.B.A. in Strategic Leadership from Amberton University; B.A. in Organizational Studies from Bethel University; Bachelor of Theology & Missions from Bethany

College of Missions; served on staff/faculty of BCOM in Bloomington for 7 years; served as missionary in Kenya from 1999 to present; is Kenya Field leader for Bethany International and Africa Area Coordinator 2004 to present; Director of Africa Centre for Missions from 1999 - 2004; Finish the Task (Kenyan mission initiative) National Coordinator, 2008 – 2011; teaches classes in Organizational Development, Strategic Planning, Building Effective Teams, Role of the Church in Missions, and Biblical Basis for Missions. Theresa Hartford: B.A. in Theology and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; 11 years of field experience in cross-cultural missions and church planting; Director of Bethany International Ministries; teaches courses on Pre-field Preparation for Ministry, Interpersonal Relationships, Children at Risk and The Suffering Church. Matt Hedrick: M.A. in Christian Thought from Bethel Seminary; B.A. in Cross-Cultural Studies from Bethany College of Missions; currently the Senior Pastor at Bethany Church; teaches courses in Biblical Studies, Worldview and Apologetics. Tony Hedrick: B.F.A. in Painting from Kansas University; graduate Theological studies at Regent College, Tyndale Seminary; Canadian Theological Seminary and Bethel Seminary; planted several churches in Canada; former Executive Director of Adventure Cross Cultural Initiatives, a Canadian mission to the world; currently serves as a missionary/evangelist to Italy, Europe, Canada and the United States; teaches courses on Apologetics, Evangelism, Leadership Development, Acts and Corinthians. Kay Hudgins: M.S.N. Vanderbilt University; B.S. Psychology David Lipscomb University; A.A. Martin Methodist College;  YWAM Schools: Discipleship Training School, School Of Evangelism, School Of Intercession, Worship & Spiritual Warfare, School Jewish Studies, Leadership Training School, Leadership Development Course; Served as YWAM Discipleship Training School Leader, Outreach Leader for School of Jewish Studies, Discipleship Training School & School of Intercession Worship & Spiritual Warfare; extensive ministry in Israel, Honduras, Brazil, Barbados, Tonga, New Zealand, Australia, Malaysia, Singapore, Scotland, Cyprus, Canada, Hungary, Ukraine, India and throughout the USA; for the past 12 years has served as Director, YWAM Jewish-World Office and School of Jewish Studies

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Faculty

Grace Lee: enrolled in Graduate Studies towards M.A. in Intercultural Education from Bethany Center for Graduate Studies; Music Major at Kyung-Hee University, Seoul, Korea; Certificates from Reggio Emiliia Approach Method Training, Montessori Training, AMI, Korean Montessori Training, Montessori Music Workshop Training I & II; teacher at Ramalynn Montessori Academy, Grades 4 – 7, 2004~2007; ABC International Montessori Academy, preschool – grade 6, 1998~2001; Young-Hyun Girls’ Middle School, 1977~1982; Chon Boy’s High School, 1988~1995 as Music Teacher, Flute Choir Conductor; Director, Greesae Montessori School, 2001~2003 supervised teachers for preschool through Grade 6; Director of Children’s Ministry, Korean Presbyterian Church of Minnesota, 2008 to present; currently Montessori instructor at Bethany College of Missions. Mark Nysewander:  Master of Divinity from Candler School of Theology at Emory University, B.A. from Asbury College, pastor; missionary to Monterrey Mexico; church planter in Mexico and Kentucky; author of three books and evangelist; teaches on the work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the believer.  Kathie Pederson: M.A. in Intercultural Leadership from Bethany Center for Global Studies; Graduate Studies at Moody Bible Institute and Campus Crusade for Christ Institute of Biblical Studies; B.A. in Special Education/ Elementary Education from Eastern Illinois University; served 12 years as a missionary in Venezuela with TEAM (The Evangelical Alliance Mission Wheaton Illinois); 5 years teaching English, working as Academic Assistant, and Short term Mission Coordinator at Oak Hills Christian College, Bemidji, MN; former public school elementary and high school teacher, Bemidji School District and Cass Lake School District, MN;  Instructor at Leech Lake Tribal College, MN;  ten years to present, serving as Short-term Mission Leader/Trainer/Public Speaker with STEM (Short Term Evangelical Mission ) in 7 countries; currently on faculty at Bethany College of Missions (Early Childhood Education and Academic Advisor). Bruce Pinke: Master of Theology in Islamics from Luther Seminary; M.A. in Ministry from Moody Graduate School. B.A./Bachelor of Sacred Literature from Central Washington Bible College; Sserved 9 years as Pastor and Teacher, Community Country Church of Holdingford, MN and Outlook Church of the Bretheren, Outlook, WA; served as Missionary with WEC international for 23 years in Liberia, Cote d’Ivoire; served as Deputy Field leader for WEC West Arica; currently serving as a Church Planting Coach and Assistant to the WEC Africa Regional Director;

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teaches on world religions. Jim Raymo: D.Min. (Global and Contextual Leadership) Bethel Seminary; M.C.S. Regent College (Vancouver), B.A. Bethel College; 13 years with Campus Church ministries in Minneapolis and Europe involving street evangelism and discipleship, teaching and administration; 23 years with WEC International including teaching in Tasmania, Australia at WEC’s mission training school; Candidate Director and US Director; 6 years teaching at BCOM and Northwestern College Roseville, MN. Nita Steiner: B.A. in Theology and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; 22 years of field experience in cross-cultural missions; teaches courses on Spiritual Formation, Prayer & Christian Ministry, Old Testament Poetry & Wisdom Literature, Gospel of John, Bible Study Methods, Cross-Cultural Missions, The Life and Work of a Missionary, Communicating God’s Story, Theology, Sanctification and Eschatology. David Stone: M.A. in Intercultural Studies from Bethany International University; B.A. in Theology and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; 30 years of experience in ministry in SE Asia; teaches courses on Contextualization, Asian Religions, Islam, Biblical Basis of Missions, Strategy of Missions, History of Missions, and Messenger, Message & Community. Jul Stone: B.A. in Theology and Missions from Bethany College of Missions; Certificate in Intercultural Studies from Bethany International University; 30 years of experience in ministry in SE Asia; teaches courses on Cross-Cultural Communications, Cultural Anthropology, English and Language Acquisition. Michelle Winger: B.A. in Linguistics from the University of Auckland; Four-Year Certificate in Cross-Cultural Studies from Bethany College of Missions; 15 years missionary experience in New Zealand; currently a freelance proofreader, Family Ministries Administrator at Bethany Church, and an instructor at Bethany College of Missions; teaches English Composition. Richard A. Wexler: J.D., University of Minnesota Law School; B.A., Lafayette College; Assistant Attorney General, Minnesota Attorney General’s Office, 19711999; Assistant Commissioner, Access and Quality Improvement Bureau, Minnesota Department of Health, 1999-2003. Senior Adviser to the Commissioner, Minnesota Department of Health, 2003-2008; currently serving as the Minnesota State Director for the Not For

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Faculty

Sale Campaign and as a member of the Minnesota State Human Trafficking Task Force and of the Gerald Vick Human Trafficking Task Force; has also volunteered with and coordinated support for three provider organizations that serve and assist survivors of human trafficking; works with various faith based abolitionist groups, including Servants of Mercy which he started in his own church, North Heights Lutheran; teaches Response to Human Trafficking. Jason Witt: B.A. in Cross Cultural Communications Bethany College of Missions; served 3 years as a Bible teacher with Tucker Swamp Baptist Church in Zuni, Virginia; served in Kenya with Bethany International Ministries from 2008 to present; currently the Team Leader in Garissa, Kenya for BIM; currently the Kenya Global Internship Coordinator teaching courses in Cross Cultural Communications and facilitating Bible Study and Ethnography discussions. 

Non-Teaching Administrative Faculty These faculty members perform administrative duties and are not currently teaching. Zach Andress: B.A. from Bethany College of Missions in Cross-Cultural Studies; currently serving with Bethany International Ministries as Missionary in conjunction with Bethany College of Missions as a Global Internship Site Leader, Chiang Mai, Thailand. 

of missionary training and sending entities with works in more than 50 nations; currently serving as Bethany International’s Executive Vice President and Vice President for International Ministries. Jason Haché: Bachelor of Arts in Cross-Cultural Studies from Bethany College of Missions; currently serving on the Board of Directors for Alpha Pregnancy Resource Center, Savage, MN; and Co-Director of Olive Tree Adoptions, Bloomington, MN; College Administrator and Registrar, Bethany College of Missions. David Horsman: Attended Bethany College of Missions; served 3 years on the Leadership Team and as the Worship Arts Director at the Pool Church in Moncton, NB, Canada; for 6 years to present as the Worship Leader at Bethany Church and Prayer and Worship Coordinator at Bethany College of Missions; guest lecturer on issues of prayer, spiritual disciples and eschatology. Amy Owen: B.A. in Cross-Cultural Studies from Bethany College of Missions; served 2 years as College Outreach Coordinator at First Assembly of God in Clovis, New Mexico; served 5 years in ministry as Customer Service Coordinator at The Master’s Books and Gifts in Clovis, New Mexico; served 9 months as an Intern/ Missionary with Bethany International and Operation Mobilization in Sarajevo, Bosnia; served as Missionary and Global Internship Site Leader with Bethany International for 17 months in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; currently serving as Global Internship Associate Director with Bethany International in Chiang Mai, Thailand. 

Lori Beyer: B.A. in International Ministries from Moody Bible Institute; Part-time Certificate from Bethany College of Missions; 6 short-term mission experiences in 3 countries; currently serving on the missions committee at Oxboro Evangelical Free Church in Bloomington, MN and as a missionary member of World Mission Prayer League, Minneapolis, MN; from 1999 to present as Admissions Coordinator, Bethany College of Missions.

Kirby Patterson: Founder of Heartwork, mobilizing and empowering youth groups across the United States to bring orphan care around the world; President of Destiny Foods Direct provided funding for orphan projects; 14 years of involvement in management, consulting, sales management and sales with the home food service industry in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Texas and Arizona; currently serving as Director of Enrollment, Bethany College of Missions.

Tim Freeman: Graduate studies in Intercultural Leadership at Bethany Center for Global Studies and Human Resources Leadership at Azusa Pacific University; Bachelor of Theology from Bethany College of Missions; served 15 years as a missionary with Bethany International Ministries as a church planting/ training missionary and as Bethany’s field director for the Philippines; served from 1995 until present as the International Coordinator for GlobeServe, an association

Jamie Swan: Pursuing M.A. in Intercultural Leadership from Bethany Center for Graduate Studies; B.A. in CrossCultural Studies from Bethany College of Missions; completed Discipleship Training School, School of Jewish Studies, School of Intercession, and School of Digital Filmmaking from University of the Nations; served 2 years on staff with Youth With A Mission’s Jewish World Office in Richmond, VA; served 6 years as GO100/Global

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Faculty

Ministries Project Manager with Bethany International; short-term missions outreach leader to Spain, Honduras, and Kenya; travel and missions outreach with Bethany, STEM, and YWAM in 17 nations, including Papua New Guinea, Israel, Scotland, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Singapore, Gibraltar, and France; serving on the missions committee of Bethany Church since 2008; current member of the Board of Trustees for Bethany International and Registrar for Bethany Center for Graduate Studies. Jasmine Swope: B.A. in Cross-cultural Studies from Bethany College of Missions; served for 9 months as a missionary and Intern with Bethany International and Ministries to unreached peoples in India; served for 2 years a Mentor and then for 1 year as Mentoring Coordinator at Bethany College of Missions; currently serving as a missionary and Global Internship Field leader for Bethany International in Thailand.   Elisabeth Wilson: B.A. in Cross-cultural Studies, Bethany College of Missions; Certificate in Biblical Studies from Ecola Bible School; Completed an internship at IHOP Northwest; Mentor at Bethany College of Missions for 2 years; now serving in year 3 as the Mentoring Coordinator, Bethany College of Missions.

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course descriptions

Course Descriptions

for Undergraduate Programs Bible and Theology BTH 111 Old Testament I (3 credits) A study of the historical background and themes of the OT books giving an overall perspective on the message of the OT in the light of its contemporary setting. This course covers creation, the fall, the flood, the Abrahamic covenant, the Patriarchs, the exodus, the Mosaic covenant, the tabernacle and other issues within the Pentateuch. It also covers sacrifices, feasts, wanderings in the wilderness, conquest, judges, Kings, exile and return from exile. BTH 121 Synoptic Gospels (3 credits) This examines the themes, principles, parables, and teachings of Matthew, Mark, and Luke in a harmonic and chronological order. Attention will be placed principally on the Gospel of Matthew and its relevance and importance for our lives today. BTH 122 Acts and the Work of the Holy Spirit (3 credits) This is a survey course, emphasizing the structure and sequence of the events in the book and their relevance to modern missions and missionary strategy. Acts is perceived, not only as a doctrinal dissertation, but as a series of inspired “sample cases� of the Church responding to the impulses of the Spirit in the promotion of world evangelism. The third week will cover the work and ways of the Holy Spirit. There will be an emphasis on being filled with the Spirit, the gifts of the Holy Spirit, the fruit of the Spirit and a culture of revival. BTH 131 Theology I (3 credits) This studies of the existence, person, and attributes of God and the person and work of Jesus Christ. BTH 212 Old Testament II (3 credits) This is the second course in the study of the historical background and general themes of the Old Testament books with a view to giving the student an overall perspective on the message of the Old Testament in the light of its contemporary setting. This course will cover the national covenant, the tabernacle, the sacrifices, the feasts, the wanderings in the wilderness, the judges, the kings, the prophets, and the exile. BTH 221 Romans (2 credits) This course carefully studies Romans with an emphasis on how the gospel produces practical righteousness in those who believe. BTH 222 1st Corinthians (2 credits) The students will do a verse-by-verse analysis of the 1st Corinthian letter while also studying its background, structure and teaching as well. They will also determine the relevance of this letter for the present as well as its missiological/ church planting value.

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course descriptions

BTH 232 Theology II (3 credits) The course deals with a biblical evaluation of mankind, his fallen nature, his inability to save himself and the nature of the gracious salvation afforded by Christ’s finished work on the cross. BTH 233 Intro to Eschatology (3 credits) Often relegated to the back closets of systematic theology, eschatology is one of the most vitally important areas of study for one aspiring to advance the Kingdom of God. Apart from knowing where we’re going and what we will face as revealed in the prophetic Scriptures we will be hard pressed to live upright lives in a crooked generation, attempt various missions strategies that God will not endorse, build church structures that cannot withstand the pressures coming and likely become disillusioned when the judgments of God are poured out on the earth. Students will be compelled to consider what we know about the future and therefore be motivated to align their lives and thinking accordingly. BTH 241 Hermeneutics and Exegetical Skills (3 credits) Students study the principles, methods, and rules necessary for correctly understanding the meaning of Scripture and applying that meaning to our lives today. The course will examine the rules and approaches necessary for the different literary genre of scripture. BTH 321 Philippians (2 credits) A missionary needs to know and understand the Word of God, not only for their own life, but also as they minister to and teach others. Knowledge of the Word includes understanding how to understand it, read it, learn from it, share insights with others and apply it to ones own life. This course is designed to dig deeply into the New Testament writings of Paul to the churches of Philippi. The course will be based on a group Bible-study approach. BTH 322 Ephesians (2 credits) A missionary needs to know and understand the Word of God, not only for their own life, but also as they minister to and teach others. Knowledge of the Word includes understanding how to understand it, read it, learn from it, share insights with others and apply it to ones own life. This course is designed to dig deeply into the New Testament writings of Paul to the churches of Ephesus. The course will be based on a group Bible-study approach. BTH 421 James (2 credits) A missionary needs to know and understand the Word of God, not only for their own life, but also as they minister to and teach others. Knowledge of the Word includes understanding how to understand it, read it, learn from it, share insights with others and apply it to ones own life. This course is designed to dig deeply into the New Testament writings of James. The course will be based on a group Bible-study approach. BTH 422 Galatians (2 credits) A missionary needs to know and understand the Word of God, not only for their own life, but also as they minister to and teach others. Knowledge of the Word includes understanding how to understand it, read it, learn from it, share insights with others and apply it to ones own life. This course is designed to dig deeply into the New Testament writings of Paul to the churches of Galatia. The course will be based on a group Bible-study approach. BTH 423 1st Thessalonians (2 credits) Through personal study, exegesis and a weekly collaborative study, the students will engage this important New Testament epistle of Paul to the church at Thessalonica.

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course descriptions

Christian Ministry CHM 111 Kingdom Impact Plan (1 credit) This course is designed to assist students discover the role God intends for them to play in His plan for the world’s redemption. It is their “Kingdom Impact Plan.” This is accomplished through an examination of God’s interaction with the student through key passages from the Word, prophetic words given by reputable servants of Jesus, previous journal entries and values that God has worked into your life. These are all factors which give evidence of God’s direction in the past and allow for reflection and summary for future direction. CHM 123 Ministry Week (pass/fail) Our purpose is to dedicate an entire week to providing students with opportunities of service and outreach ministry experience. Our intention is to fuel a passion for practical service and outreach within the hearts of our students while demonstrating a Christ-like attitude in being a blessing to the local urban community. CHM 211 Prep for Ministry I (1 credit) This course is designed to enable practical preparation for students as they plan for ministry in another culture. Students will be preparing for participation in the Global Internship program or for other future ministry opportunities. The students in the course will focus on practical matters, interpersonal relationships, and look at the joys and disappointments in Kingdom service while developing the skills that they need for future ministry placement. CHM 212 Prep for Ministry II (1 credit) This course is designed to enable practical preparation for students as they plan for ministry in another culture. Students will be preparing for participation in the Global Internship program or for other future ministry opportunities. The students in the course will focus on practical matters, interpersonal relationships, and look at the joys and disappointments in Kingdom service while developing the skills that they need for future ministry placement. CHM 321 Ministry Practicum I (3 credits) The student will participate regularly in assigned local ministry opportunities designed to give them a broad view of ministry in context as well as specific opportunities available for future consideration. CHM 412 Missionary Member Care (2 credits) This is an opportunity for students who have finished the 16-month internship as missionaries under Bethany International Ministries to pour back into the organization that supported them. Students will get first-hand experience in the home side of missionary operation by participating in and providing logistical support to programs for furloughing missionaries and new missionary candidates. CHM 421 Ministry Practicum II (3 credits) The student will participate regularly in assigned local ministry opportunities designed to give them a broad view of ministry in context as well as specific opportunities available for future consideration. CHM 422 Ministry Practicum III (3 credits) The student will participate regularly in assigned local ministry opportunities designed to give them a broad view of ministry in context as well as specific opportunities available for future consideration.

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course descriptions

CHM 423 Ministry Week Leadership (1 credit) During the final term at Bethany, seniors will provide leadership to underclass students during their Ministry Week (CHM 123). Students will work with Outreach leadership to plan, coordinate, and implement outreach opportunities for freshmen students. CHM 431 Local Ministry Study Lab (1 credit) In the 4th term of Global Internship, students will do an independent study lab to research a local ministry or opportunity which they believe relates to their future involvement in missions. Students will visit the ministry, conduct interviews, explore options and describe opportunities available to them. Some regional travel may be involved as time and budget allow.

Communications COM 311 Cross-Cultural Communications (2 credits) In every encounter between persons of different cultures, verbal and nonverbal factors facilitate or impede effective communication. This course focuses on observing, describing, and interpreting these factors.

Intercultural Studies ICS 212 Cultural Anthropology I (2 credits) The course is designed as an introduction to Cultural Anthropology, especially those concepts which have practical application for cross-cultural field missionaries as they seek to both live and proclaim the gospel. Throughout the course following each lecture a real-life case study will be examined in small group discussions for the purpose of gaining sensitivity into how traditions, personalities, personal ambition and Satan may neutralize the effectiveness of your message or destroy your missionary career. ICS 311 Cultural Anthropology II (2 credits) Approaching the halfway point of the Global Internship experience, many of the cultural differences, patterns and issues which the student has encountered are beginning to make more sense. This course will build from the lessons students have already learned and explore societal systems and structures which can be used to further explain and understand the culture and context around them. ICS 313 Field Orientation (2 credits) Arrival in a new country is an important learning time. New sights, sounds and surroundings allow for ample time to observe and reflect on the new culture and community. This course will guide the learner through the first week in their new home.

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course descriptions

ICS 314 Local Area Religions (2 credits) This course is designed to explore the prominent secondary religions and cults within the region. The religions examined will be determined by the context, but each will be examined through an overview of the beliefs and histories of the religion and the implications to ministry within the region. Each of these prominent religions will be examined to understand the extent of their influence, the key beliefs and values system, the impact to daily life and the interaction of these religions with other religions. If prominent Christian-based cults are also present in the region, these will be explored as well. ICS 422 Contextualization (3 credits) This course borrows from the lessons learned in SSC 311,312 and 311 (Ethnographic Research) and seeks to integrate that learning into the development of a holistic strategy for consideration of the specific worldview issues, belief systems and value systems which either inhibit or provide opportunity for contextualization of the Gospel message for a particular culture. Students will examine principles of contextualization and examine what they have learned from the culture during their Global Internship sojourn to describe this strategy. Students will continue to record observations in a field journal and discuss these observations and their implications in a biweekly collaborative meeting. ICS 431 Integrative Project (2 credits) As students prepare to launch out in the vision that God is growing in their hearts for after graduation, this course is intended to provide an opportunity to reflect on what each has learned, articulating their philosophy of ministry, recognized gifts and callings from the Lord and a strategic plan of their direction post graduation.

Missions MIS 111 Intro to Missions A broad overview of God’s mission in the world as revealed through His activity in the Old and New Testaments. The course also introduces the historical, cultural, strategic, and practical dimensions of the world mission’s mandate. MIS 112 Evangelism, Discipleship and Community (3 credits) This course is designed to establish a biblical framework for missions with a focus on the crucial activities of the church: evangelism, discipleship and the creation of community. The course will examine how these activities integrate for the purpose of seeing God’s Kingdom come and His will done on the earth. MIS 212 Suffering Church (1 credit) The early church considered suffering as part of the known cost of following Christ. Each generation of the Church has continued to experience persecution and suffering, and it is expected that this will intensify as we approach the return of the Lord. Western missionaries have historically been more protected from intense suffering than the nationals they minister among, but they must be prepared both to personally face suffering and to serve a suffering church. This course establishes a theology for suffering from both New and Old Testament and will challenge each student to come to terms with God’s purposes in suffering.

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MIS 411 Evangelism and Discipleship in Context (2 credits) This course will specifically look at the presentation of the Gospel within the local context, examining the issues and looking at historical and contemporary responses to them used by effective ministers. The course also gives a survey of prevalent models contrasted with innovative models of evangelism and discipleship used by local ministries within the region. MIS 412 Local Area Christianity (2 credits) Missionary learners must not only be familiar with local religious and cultural practices, but they must also understand the existing church within the country and region where they serve. This course will explore the emergence of the Church within the region from a historical viewpoint, examining also the implications for ministry. It will also explore the theological concepts and the key theological issues which the church (as expressed within the region) grapples with the most. Attention will be given to both healthy expressions and any prominent theological concerns. MIS 414 Methods and Models of Church Planting (2 credits) This course is designed to examine creative and relevant approaches to ministry within the local context. It focuses on the long-term goal of seeing how ministry adapts to contextual needs with a particular focus on local approaches to church planting. MIS 415 Cultural Innovation and Change (3 credits) This course will cover the issue of directed cultural change. All cultures change, the question becomes do they change for the better or for the worse. This course will examine the forces of cultural change, a process that leads to beneficial cultural change, as well as case studies of significant change agents. Central to this class will be the principle that God intends His church to make a dramatic difference in people’s lives and therefore in their communities and cultures. Beneficial cultural change should be an expected outcome of discipleship and church planting. In this light, the student will learn the thought processes and methods of problem solving, developing creative solutions, and marshaling support for actual implementation of effective change. MIS 421 Re-Entry (2 credits) Students returning from their cross-cultural internship go through the same experiences common to all missionaries. This tension facing the re-entering missionary is often not dealt with simply because the opportunity to express this, to tell the story, is not provided. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunities to tell their stories to one another, to communicate their experiences, to reflect on those experiences, feelings, and thoughts as well as to examine the conclusions that they have come to regarding ministry, culture, their own self and their relationship with God. STEM Short Term Mission Trip (2 credits) As a part of the overall cross-cultural education, the student will travel along with a team to visit another country. Each team will be involved in a variety of different ministries, individually constructed to fit each site location. A focus of each team will be to not only serve the local people, but to connect with them on an individual and cultural level. This will provide a vital cross-cultural experience through which the student will be able to more fully prepare for life and ministry in the future.

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course descriptions

Spiritual Development SPD 111 Power of the Cross I (1 credit) This course explores spiritual development from the perspective of the complete work of Christ on the cross, God’s standards for morality, ethics, righteousness, integrity and God’s design for relationship with Him and each other. SPD 112 Power of the Cross II (1 credit) This course explores spiritual development from the perspective of the complete work of Christ on the cross, God’s standards for morality, ethics, righteousness, integrity and God’s design for relationship with Him and each other. SPD 121 Kingdom Lifestyle (2 credits) This course will dramatically reorient those who’ve grown accustomed to what has become normal Christianity in the west. As children of God and followers of Christ our mandate is to live as citizens of the Kingdom of God and His Christ which will soon be established on the earth when Messiah returns for His inheritance. As those preparing to reign with Him we must learn to reign like him now. This course will progress from establishing students in intimacy with their King to intercession to their King and to the fasted lifestyle of the Kingdom. SPD 131 Community, Character and the Cross I (2 credits) Preparation for a lifetime of service in ministry to God and to his people requires an integrated approach, providing the student with an opportunity to live out and practice what they are learning. Many of the skills necessary to serve well both within one’s own culture and in another culture are skills related to behavior, character, and interpersonal relationships. While teaching of these is covered throughout the curriculum it is daily life and interaction with others that is the evidence of learning. This course combines assessments from multiple areas of community life, ministry and work as well as the “in the journey” training and mentoring that takes place in those contexts. SPD 132 Community, Character and the Cross II (2 credits) This course is the continuation of SPD 131. Preparation for a lifetime of service in ministry to God and to his people requires an integrated approach, providing the student with an opportunity to live out and practice what they are learning. Many of the skills necessary to serve well both within one’s own culture and in another culture are skills related to behavior, character, and interpersonal relationships. While teaching of these is covered throughout the curriculum it is daily life and interaction with others that is the evidence of learning. This course combines assessments from multiple areas of community life, ministry and work as well as the “in the journey” training and mentoring that takes place in those contexts. SPD 211 Power of the Cross III (1 credit) This course explores spiritual development from the perspective of the complete work of Christ on the cross, God’s standards for morality, ethics, righteousness, integrity and God’s design for relationship with Him and each other. This course will be an exploration of the students’ worldview and assumptions concerning spiritual warfare, a comparison with the biblical perspective, and the application of these same principles into the student’s daily life and ministry.

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SPD 231 Community, Character and the Cross III (2 credits) This course is the continuation of SPD 132. Preparation for a lifetime of service in ministry to God and to his people requires an integrated approach, providing the student with an opportunity to live out and practice what they are learning. Many of the skills necessary to serve well both within one’s own culture and in another culture are skills related to behavior, character, and interpersonal relationships. While teaching of these is covered throughout the curriculum it is daily life and interaction with others that is the evidence of learning. This course combines assessments from multiple areas of community life, ministry and work as well as the “in the journey” training and mentoring that takes place in those contexts. SPD 232 Community, Character and the Cross IV (2 credits) This course is the continuation of SPD 231. Preparation for a lifetime of service in ministry to God and to his people requires an integrated approach, providing the student with an opportunity to live out and practice what they are learning. Many of the skills necessary to serve well both within one’s own culture and in another culture are skills related to behavior, character, and interpersonal relationships. While teaching of these is covered throughout the curriculum it is daily life and interaction with others that is the evidence of learning. This course combines assessments from multiple areas of community life, ministry and work as well as the “in the journey” training and mentoring that takes place in those contexts. SPD 311 Missionary Spiritual Formation (pass/fail) As students enter a new culture, many things challenge faith and spirituality. This course encompasses the daily life lessons of the individual and the team during the first term of the Global Internship program. Attention will be given to assessment of community life, personal disciplines and issues of character with regular discussions of the implications of life in a new culture to the student’s ongoing spiritual walk. This course is a 0-credit pass/fail course. Students are required to pass this course to be considered for continuation in the Global Internship into the following term. SPD 312 Missionary Spiritual Growth (pass/fail) This course is the continuation of SPD 311. This course encompasses the daily life lessons of the individual and the team during the second term of the Global Internship program. Attention will be given to assessment of community life, personal disciplines and issues of character with regular discussions of the implications of life in a new culture to the student’s ongoing spiritual walk. This course is a 0-credit pass/fail course. Students are required to pass this course to be considered for continuation in the Global Internship into the following term. SPD 411 Missionary Relational Growth (pass/fail) This course is the continuation from SPD 312 with a primary focus on the growth of the student’s relationships with the Global Internship Team and with nationals within the community. Attention will be given to assessment of community life, personal disciplines and issues of character and cultural sensitivity and participation with the local culture with regular discussions of the implications of life within the culture to the student’s ongoing spiritual walk. This course is a 0-credit pass/fail course. Students are required to pass this course to be considered for continuation in the Global Internship into the following term. SPD 412 Missionary Ministry Development (pass/fail) This course is the continuation from SPD 411 with a primary focus on the development of the student’s capacity in ministry to others, the development of awareness of ministry needs and the ability to respond to those needs. Attention will be given to assessment of community life, personal disciplines and issues of character and cultural sensitivity and ministry to the local culture with regular discussions of the implications of life within the culture to the student’s ongoing spiritual walk. This course is a 0-credit pass/fail course. Students are required to pass this course to be considered for continuation in the Global Internship into the following term.

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course descriptions General Education Communications COM 121 English Composition (2 credits) In this course, students will focus on the process of writing comprehensible, correct, and effective essays. They will learn how to express thoughts logically, clearly, and coherently in a variety of rhetorical modes. The course will teach students how to critically revise and edit their own compositions while avoiding mechanical, grammatical, and orthographical errors. COM 212 Communications (3 credits) Missionaries and ministers of the gospel must be skilled communicators with individuals as well as to small and large groups of people. This course explores communication theory as well as introduces the dynamics of cross cultural communication. Much further study of cross cultural communication will occur during Global Internship course work for those who choose the B.A. program.

Economics ECO 211 Fundraising (1 credit) This course is designed to provide practical preparation for students to raise ministry funds as they plan for future ministry, specifically in a cross-cultural context. The students in the course will focus on a biblical foundation for fund raising, sharing ministry vision, developing a donor base, communication skills and organizing fund raising efforts.

History HIS 311 History of [GI Location] (2 credits) During the first term of the Global Internship, students will discover the local history of the geographic region of the world including ancient to recent political movements, social trends, people migrations, religious trends and the influence of geography, climate, religion and economics on the current social structures. Focus of this course varies according to Global Internship site.

Humanities HUM 111 Worldviews (3 credits) This course provides a broad overview of the nature and development of a worldview, a critical evaluation of dominant non-biblical worldviews, and an assessment of the biblical worldview in the Western world. Special attention will be given to applying the discovery of worldviews in a missionary context.

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course descriptions

HUM 211 Survey of World Religions (3 credits) This course will provide both an academic understanding of the different major world religions as well as practical insights as to the working of those systems through people who have lived in these religious contexts.

Language LNG 321 Language Learning (6 credits) A significant part of living and learning overseas is a commitment to learn the local language. Learning the host language is considered essential for effective continued ministry. The host language contains elements which reveal the cultural assumptions and worldview of the people and therefore is the way in which their “heart� speaks. Language learning allows greater access to deeper issues, which in turn allow for greater ministry opportunities. During the first term of studies, all students will engage in a formal concentrated 12-week study of the language, devoting significant time to study and practice. We want the learner to both learn the local language and learn how to learn a language. LNG 322 Language Lab I (1 credit) This course is a required practical learning lab as a continuation of lessons learned in LNG321 during the 2nd Global Internship term. As a response to the ongoing need to use the local language for relationships, ministry and daily living, students will continue to pursue language study throughout the term by regular meetings with a language tutor or informant and accountability to their team for progress. LNG 421 Language Lab II (1 credit) This course is a required practical learning lab as a continuation of lessons learned in LNG321 during the 3rd Global Internship term. As a response to the ongoing need to use the local language for relationships, ministry and daily living, students will continue to pursue language study throughout the term by regular meetings with a language tutor or informant and accountability to their team for progress. LNG 422 Language Lab III (1 credit) This course is a required practical learning lab as a continuation of lessons learned in LNG321 during the 4th Global Internship term. As a response to the ongoing need to use the local language for relationships, ministry and daily living, students will continue to pursue language study throughout the term by regular meetings with a language tutor or informant and accountability to their team for progress.

Leadership LDR 211 Leadership (2 credits) This course offers an overview of the biblical basis and dynamic principles of effective leadership with a view toward personal application of these principles in life and work. Students will examine their own leadership experiences and make application to future leadership opportunities.

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course descriptions

LDR 411 Strategic Development (2 credits) This course helps students think beyond the immediate community to thinking strategically on how to take an entire city for God. Contemporary thinking, research, and models are presented. Students work through a strategy for their specific city based on the research they do.

Mathematics MAT 111 Basic Mathematics (3 credits) This course is designed to help the student to understand and apply mathematics at a basic level with specific attention to use in practical day-to-day applications. The student will learn how to work with fractions, ratios and percentages; develop spreadsheets, reports and financial statements for personal and ministry; and use graphs and statistics.

Social Sciences SSC 311 Intro to Ethnographic Research: Exploring Material Culture (3 credits) Learning to learn from the context is considered a key adaptation skill for cross-cultural missionaries. The ethnographic research that students do on a daily basis forms a foundation for understanding the culture they are living in and for their future role in understanding whatever culture they find themselves in. This course is built on daily observations recorded in a field journal and discussed in a biweekly collaborative meeting to share and understand those observations. The observations and discussions for this term will focus on material culture and language practices. SSC 312 Religious Systems and Structures (3 credits) This course continues application of ethnographic research with a specific focus on exploring the religious systems and structures of a particular culture. This course is built on daily observations recorded in a field journal and discussed in a biweekly collaborative meeting to share and understand those observations. SSC 411 Social and Political Structures (3 credits) This course continues application of ethnographic research with a specific focus on exploring the social and political structures of a particular culture. This course is built on daily observations recorded in a field journal and discussed in a biweekly collaborative meeting to share and understand those observations. SSC 421 Team and Interpersonal Skills (2 credits) Interpersonal relationship breakdown has often been identified as a significant issue in missionary success. The development of healthy skills and approaches to relationships, including the establishment of healthy boundaries and the development of healthy approaches to conflict resolution is the focus of this course, which will be given as a midprogram retreat.

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course descriptions

Concentration Electives Kingdom Justice Missions MIS 431 Children at Risk (2 credits) This course is one of three choices for Ministry Focus Electives and is a group independent study in which students will have the opportunity to identify, research and find practical solutions for the prominent issues regarding children at risk. Christian Ministry CHM 131 God’s Heart for the Jewish People (2 credits) This course serves as an introduction to God’s covenant love for Israel and the Jewish people. We will also study the history of Israel and the Jewish people especially in relationship to the Church and Biblical Prophecy in order to form a foundational platform for ministry among the Jewish people worldwide. CHM 231 Responding to Human Trafficking (2 credits) The purpose of this course is to inform future leaders and workers of the injustices of and dynamics behind human trafficking; make salient the connection between Christ’s teaching, life and mission and the church’s responsibility and mission to the enslaved and exploited; and develop in future leaders and workers an informed understanding of the scope of survivor’s needs beyond physical rescue and of the dimensions of care required to help survivors begin a new life.

Social Entrepreneurship Economics ECO 221 Microenterprises (2 credits) A course in the role of microenterprises in the global economy that will examine their potential for alleviating global poverty as part of an effective Christian approach to economic development. Students will examine the sources of global poverty, the strategies both good and bad to deal with it, the history and current status of microenterprise, and the potential for microenterprise to contribute to the spread of the gospel in the world. Christian Ministry CHM 132 Social Entrepreneurship (2 credits) A study of the principles of creative problem solving using networking, social capital, and micro-financing to alleviate suffering, lift people out of poverty, and expand the kingdom of God. The course will be built around case studies of ministry among the poorest people in the world, showing how they can be both treated with the respect due to an image bearer and taught means by which they are able to help themselves.

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Missions MIS 432 Creative Access (2 credits) This course is one of three choices for Ministry Focus Electives and is a group independent study in which students will have the opportunity to identify, research and find practical solutions for the prominent issues or trends regarding creative access. MIS 433 Media and Mission (2 credits) This course is one of three choices for Ministry Focus Electives and is a group independent study in which students will have the opportunity to identify, research and find practical solutions for the prominent issues or trends regarding media & mission.

Course Descriptions for Graduate Studies Bible and Theology BTH 511 Dynamics of Kingdom Ministry (3 credits) This course gives students a personal and Kingdom-oriented theology of ministry, demonstrating God’s heart and passion for the world through Scriptures. How mission fits into the extension and promotion of the Kingdom of God is studied, including the power and resources of the Kingdom, the centrality of the Kingdom in proclamation, and the final victory of the Kingdom over Satan and all his kingdom as mission works towards the culmination of this present evil age and the inauguration of the eternal Kingdom of God, the reign of the King, Jesus, and the role of the glorious people of God in all of these events. The course is intensely practical, with each student working through how a Kingdom worldview should transform life and ministry. BTH 512 Transforming Power of the Gospel (3 credits) This course looks first at the transformational power of the Gospel in regeneration, in making all things new, and in the changed life of the transformed believer, affecting his family, business, perspectives on culture and entertainment, and society. These changes do not occur without profound personal and worldview change. The early church demonstrated this by “turning their world upside down.” Secondly, this course wrestles with how the church is meant to be transformative, what this means and how it occurs. Many places where the Gospel has gone in modern missions corruption has increased. This should not be the case. The course looks at issues in society that are destructive and how the church can respond to these issues. It considers the spiritual authority the church has to enact change as it functions as light and salt. It asks if the church can influence the political and authority structures in society, and if so, how. Finally, it takes into account the “push-back” the church can experience as change takes place, from minor to severe persecution. BTH 513 Biblical Foundations of Leadership (3 Credits) This course is a study of key principles of intercultural leadership arising from a number of biblical passages and characters. It is tempting to impose generally accepted western leadership principles upon our understanding of how notable biblical characters exercised leadership. This course, however, will not follow that path. In addition to challenging teaching with western and non-western perspectives, this course will provide considerable opportunity for reflection and interaction with fellow students and the instructor in the principles of intercultural leadership.

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BTH 514 Jesus as Leader (3 Credits) This course will examine key areas in which Jesus laid a foundation for intercultural leadership. It will particularly emphasize guiding the student to study foundational issues related to servant leadership and focusing on Jesus and the specific ways in which he modeled leadership for his disciples as well as for us today. As Jesus did in the first century, the student may find that much of his style of leadership runs counter-cultural to leadership theory and practice today.

Education EDU 511 Training for Effective Growth (3 Credits) Empirical research has demonstrated that the most critical factors affecting cross-cultural ministry competence are the spiritual, character, and social dynamics of the missionary. This course looks at these empirical studies, detailing the spiritual, character, and social dimensions and considering ways and models by which these can be developed in the lives of missionaries for effective ministry. EDU 521 Philosophy of Missiological Education (3 Credits) This course is focused on educating and training missionary practitioners for competent cross-cultural ministry. It studies theoretical and empirical literature on wide-ranging concepts of competence. These concepts include adaptive patterns, competence assessments, cognitive social learning concepts, social and psychological orientations, models of cross-cultural competence, personal qualities, and ministry skills. Empirical field studies that have redefined cross-cultural competence will be presented along with recommended content design models with reference to their defining philosophies of education and training. EDU 522 Design for Effective Teaching (3 Credits) Approaches to teaching differ around the world. Each of these approaches have strengths and weaknesses inherent in them. This course looks at effective teaching processes and elements from both inductive and deductive approaches to communicating truth. EDU 523 Design for Effective Training (3 Credits) Competence in cross-cultural ministry demands skills including language learning, culture study, religion and worldview study, and ministry skills specific to the cross-cultural context. The course looks at specifics in designing, managing, doing, and assessing experiential field training. EDU 524 Program and Curriculum Design (3 Credits) This course takes students step-by-step through a systematic approach in developing competence-oriented missionary training programs. This will enable students to start their own training schools or to evaluate and effectively improve the training in existing schools. EDU 611 Thesis (9 Credits) Each student will have a faculty advisor assigned while the student is taking the Research Methods course who will advise while the student is looking at research design, doing preliminary literature research, and developing a bibliography. The advisor will help the student clarify the thesis proposal which must be accepted by the thesis committee. Students then write their thesis using accepted thesis format, footnoting, and bibliographic methods following the Turabian format. When the faculty advisor feels the thesis is ready for submission, the committee will receive the thesis from the student for evaluation. Thesis grading is on a pass/fail basis.

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History HIS 511 History of Missions Movements (3 Credits) This course focuses on how God has used the church for expansion of the Kingdom of God on the earth from the time of the apostles to the present. Seven major turning events in the history of mission development will be identified including the factors that led to those events, the ongoing impact of those events, and current lessons to be learned for personal cross-cultural ministry. Case studies will be presented of the men and women used by the Spirit of God to see these major advances take place.

Intercultural Studies ICS 511 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 Credits) Communication is complex; cross-cultural communication is even more complex.  This course first lays a foundation of theory in the field of intercultural communication.  It overviews the many elements and processes involved in the sending and receiving of messages within intercultural contexts. It then addresses issues in communication that students must be aware of, including 15 factors affecting cross-cultural communication, communication competence models, cognitive social learning concepts, perception, categorization, attribution, and cognitive complexity. The course wrestles with the implications of these for effective ministry and how to implement training to develop these competencies. ICS 511 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 Credits) Communication is complex; cross-cultural communication is even more complex.  This course first lays a foundation of theory in the field of intercultural communication.  It overviews the many elements and processes involved in the sending and receiving of messages within intercultural contexts. It then addresses issues in communication that students must be aware of, including 15 factors affecting cross-cultural communication, communication competence models, cognitive social learning concepts, perception, categorization, attribution, and cognitive complexity. The course wrestles with the implications of these for effective ministry and how to implement training to develop these competencies. ICS 521 Applied Cultural Anthropology (3 Credits) This course looks at the universals of culture from the perspective of a missionary, using theory, research, and case studies to help missionaries think about issues and processes of cultural adaptation/contextualization they must work through. As an applied course, this is meant to be practical, its concepts and principles integrated into cross-cultural ministry. ICS 522 Applied Church-Planting Models and Methods (3 Credits) Lessons from evangelistic and church-planting models from around the world are compared to identify strengths and weaknesses of each, and how to personally develop a contextually effective method from the insights gained.

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ICS 523 Contextualization in Missions (3 Credits) Every church exists in some cultural and sociological context. Yet missionaries tend to plant churches that function like their home-culture churches. It is essential that the church be both biblically sound and culturally viable. Contextualization is an essential concept and a necessary skill. However, contextualization is fraught with controversy over degree of contextualization and how contextualization in various contexts is undertaken. These issues will be considered and a theory and model for a biblically and missiologically sound approach to contextualization developed. ICS 611 Thesis (9 Credits) Each student will have a faculty advisor assigned while the student is taking the Research Methods course who will advise while the student is looking at research design, doing preliminary literature research, and developing a bibliography. The advisor will help the student clarify the thesis proposal which must be accepted by the thesis committee. Students then write their thesis using accepted thesis format, footnoting, and bibliographic methods following the Turabian format. When the faculty advisor feels the thesis is ready for submission, the committee will receive the thesis from the student for evaluation. Thesis grading is on a pass/fail basis.

Leadership LDR 511 Spiritual Formation for Leaders (3 Credits) This course examines spiritual principles and examples that can be utilized in intercultural spiritual leadership. The student will study how God develops leaders, the essential qualities needed for spiritual leadership, and how to be successful and finish well as a spiritual leader. In addition, it will also address how to avoid common pitfalls that leaders encounter. Opportunities will be provided for personal evaluation and practice in one’s cultural context. LDR 512 Exploring Organizational Culture (3 Credits) This course will examine the tools and methods used to explore organizational cultures. It will focus on the key concepts of Ethnography, Cultural Hermeneutics, and Qualitative Research and the value they play in helping a leader to shape and influence an organizational culture. LDR 521 Comparative Cultural Leadership (3 Credits) Leadership styles, influenced by widely contrasting worldviews and cultural patterns, can differ markedly from culture to culture. This course will provide students with valuable perspectives on their own leadership views and styles as they compare various cultural expressions of leadership. LDR 522 Lifelong Leadership Development (3 Credits) This course explores the nature of lifelong Christian leadership development. It will help the student become a more effective leader by developing long-term vision and strength-based skills in order to be the leader that God envisions him or her to be. This course incorporates a project that focuses the student on creating a lifelong leadership development plan in the context of his/her ministry goals. LDR 523 Issues and Trends in Global Leadership (3 Credits) This course will explore the current issues and trends in Global Leadership. It will look at what current issues are obstacles for leading in a global setting and possible solutions to effectively overcoming these boundaries. The course will also explore some recent trends that have had major implications for leadership development and the role the West plays in overcoming or further inhibiting leadership growth and development.

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LDR 524 Intercultural Leadership Development (3 Credits) This course will address the theory and practice for effective intercultural leadership development. It will consider biblical principles of leadership and how western leadership principles can translate into a non-western context. Special attention will be paid to the role of collaborative leadership and intercultural communication, and their value in effectively developing leaders. LDR 531 Collaborative Leadership (3 Credits) This course is designed to introduce both a theoretical and practical framework for collaborative leadership. It will provide opportunities to integrate both a practical and theoretical framework and will be valuable in assisting students in achieving collaborative relationships in a cross-cultural context. This course incorporates a 1 credit practicum in addition to the 2 credits of course work. LDR 532 Cultural Innovation and Change (3 Credits) This course will look at change, how it impacts local culture and how that change impacts ministry within the culture. Cultures throughout the world are changing, adapting to internal needs and external circumstances. The course will also look at the bigger picture of globalization and the placement of local cultures and worldviews within emerging predominant worldviews. LDR 533 Vision and Strategic Planning (3 Credits) This course will examine how leaders can use creative processes to develop shared vision, communicate it to internal and external groups and translate it through strategic planning processes into action. Leading theories of vision and strategic planning in organizations will be examined, as well as the dynamic of how these can most effectively be handled in a non-western context. LDR 611 Thesis (9 Credits) Each student will have a faculty advisor assigned while the student is taking the Research Methods course who will advise while the student is looking at research design, doing preliminary literature research, and developing a bibliography. The advisor will help the student clarify the thesis proposal which must be accepted by the thesis committee. Students then write their thesis using accepted thesis format, footnoting, and bibliographic methods following the Turabian format. When the faculty advisor feels the thesis is ready for submission, the committee will receive the thesis from the student for evaluation. Thesis grading is on a pass/fail basis.

Research RSC 511 Missiological Research Methods (3 Credits) This course provides an introduction to the principles and practices of missiological research. It will look at how to do research on missions leadership and praxis or any missiological issue utilizing socioanthropological inquiry integrated with theological and missiological thinking. Development of a research design, bibliography, and database for the thesis will be included.

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RSC 512 Ethnographic and Field Research Methods (3 Credits) This course teaches various ethnographic research methods oriented toward intercultural mission: participant observation, ethnographic interviewing, how to write field notes, the use of audio and video in field settings, how to “code� verbal data and so on. Students will, through this course, develop a methodology for practical ethnographic research of unreached peoples. The ultimate goal of the research is to develop spiritually and culturally appropriate strategies for furthering God’s kingdom among unreached people groups. Issues in doing ethnographic research are covered as well as epistemological issues in anthropological research and recent controversies over ethnographic representation of others. RSC 513 Program and Curriculum Design Research (3 Credits) This course trains the student in how to do a comprehensive review of any school from vision to philosophy of education, to whether or not (and how effectively) clear outcomes (in terms of effective ministry) have been developed, to comprehensive program and curriculum design, effectiveness of formal, informal, and non-formal settings are utilized to accomplish program outcomes, effectiveness of teachers and trainers, evaluative methods used, administration and oversight, and finally, how to get feedback from those of have graduated in terms of how effective the training has been.

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bcom-catalog-2011-12  

While on campus you will engage in a prayer & missions focused community with people passionate about reaching the unreached where ever...

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