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BETA the beta theta pi magazine

FALL 2020 lost in the alaskan wilderness | soul-searching | annual report

BETA IN

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contents inside this issue DEPARTMENTS 04 | Archives

historical throwback

06 | The Inbox

unfiltered feedback

10 | Newsworthy fraternity updates

12 | Beta Eponyms worldwide tributes

13 | Cut and Polished

refining men of principle

32

14 | Alumni News

lifelong brotherhood

36 | Campus Life student highlights

48 | Chapter Eternal in loving memory

22

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Lost in the Alaskan Wilderness A new podcast revisits the mysterious 1972 disappearance of an Alaskan flight carrying a famous Beta congressman.

On the Cover Illustrations convey the challenges and obstacles of this tumultuous year for Beta Theta Pi and its members.

The Beta Theta Pi Magazine The oldest continuously published college fraternity magazine, The Beta Theta Pi was founded on December 15, 1872, by Charles Duy Walker, VMI 1869.

Publication Schedule Issue Winter Spring Fall

Deadline Jan. 15 April 15 Oct. 15

Soul Searching

Beta in 2020 Facing a destabalizing pandemic, economic peril, racial unrest and rising campus tensions, 2020 has challenged the Fraternity’s resolve and the very essence of brotherhood.

Mail Date Feb. 15 May 15 Nov. 15

Who Receives the Beta Magazine? All Beta undergraduates and parents, current and former volunteers, Foundation donors, and anyone who requests to receive it in print. Update your subscription and contact info at my.beta.org, 800.800.BETA or phyllis.bowie@beta.org.

Following a string of heartbreaking deaths of Black Americans this spring, institutions everywhere were called to reflect upon their role in the building of a more inclusive world. Beta’s Board of Trustees did not demur.

How Does One Get Published? Content submissions and high resolution photos can be sent to beta@beta.org or: Beta Theta Pi Administrative Office 5134 Bonham Road Oxford, OH 45056

While space constraints make it difficult to include all submissions, a fair evaluation process is exercised to publish a variety of unique content.

Want Instant Access to a Past Issue? All past issues since 1872 can be accessed in Beta’s digital archive: magazine.beta.org.

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Awards Recognition The Fraternity recognizes top performing chapters and individuals and designates its General Fraternity leadership.

The Beta Theta Pi, (USPS 052-000),

official magazine of Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, is owned by the Fraternity, edited and published under the direction and control of its Board of Trustees, published winter, spring and fall for a $30 one-time, pre-paid subscription. Standard non-profit class postage paid at Oxford, Ohio, and additional points of entry. Canada Post International Publications Mail (Canadian Distribution) Sales Agreement No. 0397474. Copyright Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. Produced in the USA.

Photo: Alexander Giang

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42

Honouring John Turner

CONTENTS

The only Beta to ever serve as head of state, Canada’s 17th prime minister, John Turner, British Columbia ’49, left an indelible impression on his country and fraternity.

3 FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

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Holiday Wish List Need gift ideas for the holidays? This year’s collection was hand-picked with your favorite Beta – and you – in mind!

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51

Annual Report This year’s Annual Report highlights the Beta Foundation’s 2020 fiscal year, which includes the largest Beta Leadership Fund result in the history of the Fraternity.

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ARCHIVES

4 THE BETA THETA PI Photo: Derek Standarowski

archives historical throwback

The Medal of Honor, official citation and Beta badge (pictured) of Terry Graves, Miami '67, reside in Oxford, Ohio, split between his alma mater and the Beta Museum within the Fraternity's Administrative Office.

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This year marks 45 years since the end of the Vietnam War – a conflict that spanned some two decades and sparked unrest across the United States. Of the many Betas who served during the war, Fraternity records indicate 27 of those heroic warriors never returned home. The names of the brothers lost in battle are etched into the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Among them is one of the Fraternity’s six Medal of Honor recipients, Terry Graves, Miami ’67, who received the honor posthumously for his “outstanding courage, superb leadership and indomitable fighting spirit” after exposing himself to enemy fire in order to facilitate the safe extraction of his men from the battlefield. The brotherhood's gratitude for those soldiers who served their country with great distinction lives on.

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T

he motto for our communication team's magazine production is simple: "Inform, Inspire, Entertain." It pretty much anchors how we approach all of our work, be it social media, marketing collateral, special events and beyond. Yet, the Beta magazine is unique. It's the nexus of the Fraternity's historical documentation, as well as the memorializer of member and chapter activities that invoke pride and teach through their example the purpose of an organization that is inherently good. Sometimes that includes straight-talk and a need to wade into waters that are uncomfortable. When done right, hopefully we present a variety of content that is compelling and influences the Fraternity for the better.

You'll find some special coverage in this fall issue, as a result: Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96 martin.cobb@beta.org

Creative Director

Sarah Shepherd sarah.shepherd@beta.org

Managing Editor | Graphic Designer Mike Roupas, Iowa ’10 mike.roupas@beta.org

Director of Media Relations | Senior Writer

Justin Warren, SMU ’10 justin.warren@beta.org

Publication Printer

Royle Printing Sun Prairie, Wisconsin

• COVID-19, an economic downturn, racial unrest and a new "Abolish Greek Life" movement created a perfect storm of stressors on all levels of the Fraternity. • A new diversity commission gave rise to the question if Beta can avoid political pitfalls and focus on the heart of a fraternity known for being "a little warmer and stronger" and possessing a "little tenderer and more enduring fraternity feeling."

5 FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

Editor | Director of Communication

FOREWORD

foreword editor’s note

Of course, most don't need the Beta magazine to remind them of what has been one of the most unique years in memory. But, with plans to cover a whole host of other topics, it was impossible not to dedicate significant magazine real estate to the circumstances of the day. Like the Civil War, World Wars and 9/11, Betas 20, 50 and 100 years from now will benefit from understanding how the Fraternity responded to the historic challenges 2020 threw at it.

"Like the Civil War, World Wars and 9/11, Betas 20, 50 and 100 years from now will benefit from understanding how the Fraternity responded to the historic challenges 2020 threw at it."

• In September, we lost Beta's first and only head of state, former Canadian Prime Minister John Turner, British Columbia '49. In the end, this issue puts a time stamp on the sentiments of 2020. Complemented by an array of other interesting subjects, our team attempts to tell the Beta story objectively – good or bad, and not without risks. We hope this issue underscores the value of a brotherhood that listens to one another, empathizes with others and seeks – humbly – to better understand its role in the world. Sincerely and yours in ___kai___,

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10/23/20 3:23 PM


magazinefeedback “Thank you for your

incredible article on ‘The Changing Face of the College Campus.’ This topic has been one that our staff has had a lot of conversation around and has struggled, as I believe most have, to accurately find productive and genuine steps moving forward.

THE INBOX

6 THE BETA THETA PI

“[Beta’s] ‘stuff’ is always a good read, and I love how you all push the envelope. I know how to appreciate excellence … and how to steal from the best! Example: The diversity issue has been a very good tool for us to inspire thought down that path. Any time you can frame that stuff in a ‘non-threatening’ manner that enlightens, you hit the mark. And you did.” — Bill Schilling, Executive Director Delta Sigma Pi Business Fraternity

the inbox unfiltered feedback Share your thoughts with Beta’s editorial team at beta@beta.org.

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My fraternity is continuing to analyze our progress in diversity and inclusion, but I appreciate Beta Theta Pi continuing to be an interfraternal leader, not only taking the steps to understand anecdotally the conversations around diversity in your undergraduate members but to try and measure objectively these statistics as well. This article reflects a tone that most of us strive towards in trying to address this subject. Thank you for doing what Beta continues to do best.” — Nathan Laudan Past Staff Member, Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity

“On the heels of a

powerful winter issue, I was looking forward to the spring edition. Even from the magazine cover, it didn’t disappoint. All the stories wove together a cohesive narrative about the current state of racial diversity in our fraternity and the tensions that go along with it. Nestor’s point about finances speaks. If we’re to continue pursuing membership diversity, we need to tackle questions surrounding our accessibility. With racial inequalities having a negative

effect on Blacks’ and Latinos’ median incomes, what are we doing to be more financially accessible? Brotherhood, personal growth and a sense of home are all noble endeavors, but are we content with the reality that this can only be offered to those who can afford it? In ___kai___,” — Bryant Fiesta, UC Irvine ’16

“Beta needs to lead

the way in changing (including the ritual) who and how we attract members. We must work for change and, in order to stay relevant, remain a welcoming, positive and beneficial member of university communities.” — Rick Brown, Ohio ’65

“I really identify with

the recent magazine. I felt surrounded by brothers, but I also felt alone sometimes and that I had a target on my back because I was the only Black man in the chapter and couldn’t mess up. I often felt like a token, but then again, I knew they all loved me. In fact, they protected me because they saw and heard things members from other fraternities would say to me and it pissed them off so bad that sometimes it ended with them throwing punches. The Betas at Ole Miss didn’t stand for any racist acts toward me and they’d tell me every chance they got how much they loved me and that I BELONGED in the Beta Beta Chapter. I’ll never forget that kindness and love. We always joked about me being the only Black guy and it made us bond. My pain

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BETA THETA PI’S

became their pain, and they learned what it was like to be a Black man in Mississippi. They became my family and they supported me when I was playing rugby in New Zealand. They support me now in the Army. When I say I’d take a bullet for each and every member, I mean it because they endured all the hardship with me. _kai_,” — Kalon Gipson, Mississippi ’18, U.S. Army, Ft. Bragg N.C.

“The ‘Changing Face of

Now, present day in COVID-19 we are surviving and thriving (slowly growing!) with 12 employees: seven women, five men ... three people of color, one of proud Jewish faith, one with a disability, one Canadian. :) We made the choice from a leadership position to intentionally change our culture as it pertains to personnel. The talent is the same, if not better. And our culture is flourishing. Again, it comes down to intention and creating an environment that fosters equity.” — David Rae, British Columbia ’00

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magazine (yes, I am a little slow) but wanted you to know how well done it was on the suicide and mental health issues – tears were in my eyes. I know for me, Beta was the first place I could safely share feelings and to do it with a band of brothers – wow, I am forever grateful. It’s not lost on me that the traditions of the Fraternity, its ethos, the rituals and its culture fostered a depth of relationship and encouraged a very healthy emotional openness. I feel fortunate my emotional awakening began in such a supportive and safe environment, and I know it provided the foundation for continued growth. Happy to help out on this important topic in any way, as I do fundamentally believe that a fraternity of men with shared values and the right traditions and approach can be massively valuable. Yours in ___kai___,” — Jeff Lieberman, Pennsylvania ’96

schoolhouseknox “Super Trooper Erik

Stolhanske? Love it. Couldn’t have picked a better guy to kick it off.” — Mike Rodmaker, Cincinnati ’13

“I love this series.

Well done!” — Mandi Dilling, Sigma Sigma Sigma

“Last night as I was in

bed with my tablet, I clicked on the Beta ‘Field Trip’ video tour of Oxford. My husband, Rick, was totally engaged. He said it was very interesting and he learned a lot. Just thought you’d appreciate the perspective of a non-Beta. Thanks for the effort!” — Laura Lednik, Friend of Beta

“I’m so here for this

Did you miss Beta’s SchoolhouseKnox! entertainment series on social media during the first six weeks of the pandemic? With a Beta celebrity kickoff, at-home workout with one of the fittest men on earth, cooking class with a Beta chef, virtual tour of Oxford led by a Beta lore guru, music class with some of the best Beta singing on record, and more, check it out at beta.org/ schoolhouseknox.

7 FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

For context, I looked in the mirror with our creative agency/event company three years ago, as we had a nine-person staff then. Seven males and two females. All white. And we live in the whitest city in America ... Portland, Oregon.

“I just read the winter

THE INBOX

the College Campus’ was great. It was spot on ... it comes down to being intentional.

silentissue

content! Proud FOB.” — Adam Bantz, Sigma Nu

“The Beta choruses:

Incredible. Keep it coming, Beta!” — Alex Gardner, Puget Sound ’11

10/29/20 10:38 AM


the inbox

THE INBOX

8

In Beta’s winter magazine, Josh Owens, Wabash ’07, was recognized for being the first openly gay male to run for governor of Indiana. A letter to the editor blasted that decision — among other coverage — which was published in the spring issue that followed. Betas did not hold back on their feelings about that letter, nor the editorial decision to share it uncensored.

inboxcritique ”The language Milton

THE BETA THETA PI

used was not fit for sharing. That kind of [stuff] doesn’t need a platform. I read The Beta Theta Pi Magazine from cover to cover each time it comes for the positive influence in my life. Be kind to all your brothers. Yours in -kai-” — Jay Dukesherer, Michigan State ’90

“I read the letter from

Milton Tatter, Ball State ’65. His letter should not have been published in the Beta magazine. It’s hate mail. Senator Lugar was hardly a “left winger” and as for Owens for governor being tagged a ‘f**/h***,’ that’s unacceptable! And then there is the Men of Principle which, according to Tatter, should be ‘Men of Christian Principle.’ Well, does he

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think he is a Christian? I think not. Yours in -kai-” — Tom Teusch, Ball State ’67

“Frankly, I am glad

– proud – you had the guts to run it. Beta Theta Pi is able to look at itself despite occasional embarrassments, disasters, and members who have not moved nor ripened with the times. That godawful screed was a good ice water bath, re-awakening us as to the challenges we face in educating ourselves to the pervasiveness of blocked thinking, irrationality and poisonous nostalgia for what truly never existed. Beta is far better today than in earlier times because of our diversity – all colors, sizes, interests, faiths, races and political stances. So, good for you and your willing-

ness to show all viewpoints which is democratic, even if you must take the heat. It is vital you do just as you did. Yours in _kai_,” — Tom Lipton, Western Reserve ’63

“Thank you for your

tireless work on the magazine. There is no doubt that the choice to publish Mr. Tatter’s letter was not taken lightly. Having said that, I’m not sure I agree with the decision. At the past four General Fraternity events I’ve attended, facilitators have preached to the undergraduate constituency ‘you are what you tolerate.’ Let’s be consistent in that message.” — John Smid, Toronto ’99

“I still feel as if the

decision was the wrong one. In my short time on this earth, I have met a good many men just like the ‘brother’ who penned the letter. I can assure you, no amount of bringing them to light or civil discourse will change their perspective. Ignorance and hate is best left to fester in its own misery. Thanks and forever in __kai__,” — Ben Fraley, Cincinnati ’17

“I am a big fan of

the high quality of our magazine. But, I have to say I was a bit taken aback by the editorial written by the Ball State alumnus and published in the spring magazine. I’m all for free speech but to me this one crossed the line and didn’t deserve the right to be published. It’s obvious not

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Mr. Tatter’s letter in the spring ’20 issue of The Beta Theta Pi. While I won’t comment on the nonexistent merits of his submission, I would like to compliment the courageousness of your

staff’s decision to publish it unfiltered. I’ve long felt the best response to bad speech isn’t suppression, but more speech. Your decision to print his words has no doubt generated just that. These days we aren’t accustomed to consuming media that hasn’t been expurgated

fromtheeditor Given the size and loyalty of the Fraternity’s membership, a lot of feedback crosses the desk of our communication team, especially when it comes to the magazine. As such, in December we were harshly criticized in a letter to the editor for highlighting the Indiana gubernatorial run of Josh Owens, Wabash ’07 – the first openly gay male in the state to do so. Our tribute to Senator Lugar was also attacked, and the author even suggested the Fraternity adopt a religious litmus test. My gut instinct was to ignore something so extreme, but eventually I penned a charged 725-word defense with plans to include both in the next magazine’s “Inbox.” While writing, however, I couldn’t shake the fact that we continue to hear variations of that author’s message – specifically on the sexual orientation front. So I challenged myself and, by recommendation, our team: “In the spirit of journalistic objectivity, is it right for those who ‘buy ink by the barrel’ to blast a Beta’s strongly held views or should we be transparent with his criticism and allow the brotherhood at-large to weigh in on the matter?” An Eye of Wooglin, if you will. In that moment, it became clear: It’s 2020. You shouldn’t protect the Fraternity from seeing an honest spectrum of opinions purely because of your staff position or personal beliefs. The larger membership is best suited to articulate Beta’s culture of tolerance, be it sexual orientation, political persuasions or religious beliefs.

to suit our sensitivities. While opinions will vary on your editorial decision, one would be hard-pressed to challenge the fortitude of it. And for that matter, the courage the Fraternity has shown to tackle uncomfortable issues. _kai_,” — Chris Ciancimino, Wisconsin-Oshkosh ’00 “To our many brothers whose political views align with the late Senator Lugar; to our many brothers who identify as LGBTQ; to our many brothers who are not Christian: Please know that these comments submitted by Bro. Tatter DO NOT represent the majority of your fraternal brothers. As Men of Principle, most of us are proud to call you our brothers, if for no other reason than you too have sought the illumination of the three stars. In ___kai___,”

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“I fully support

representing the wide variety of viewpoints that Betas hold. This is one of the reasons why the Beta magazine is so much better than other industry publications. It is transparent and honest and critical, all with the intention of personal and organizational accountability and improvement. However, I think the approach could have been different in this case. Censoring the slurs would have been acceptable. Or, immediately printing a response with the comments could have achieved your goal. Warmly,” — Avery McNaughton, Chapter Counselor, George Mason University

“It was jarring to read

THE INBOX

all brothers feel the same way on issues and we have to recognize this and deal with it. But certain standards have to be met. This one hit home to me on several levels. First of all I am a big Lugar fan. I have basically known him all my life. His assessment of Lugar, in my opinion, is grossly incorrect (regardless of your political views). And his assessment of Josh Owens was flat out offensive. I met Josh at the Indianapolis Conclave and found him to be a high class individual. And, as the parent of two gay children (including one who is a proud Beta), he should not be allowed to expose his outdated prejudices. Yours in _kai_” — Tom Hoover, Purdue ’82

— Dan Skrypczak, Wisconsin-Oshkosh ’03

Importantly, Brother Owens was also consulted on how he would feel if we shared the letter. His endorsement was unequivocal: “I agree. I would be fine with you all including that comment . . . [It] shows why so much still is yet to be accomplished.” Certainly, this editorial team is entrusted with a lot as it relates to the fraternity world’s oldest continuously published magazine. The sense of duty we feel to work hard, listen, document Fraternity history and truth-tell will continue to drive us. Sincerely and yours in ___kai___,

10/26/20 1:41 PM


newsworthy fraternity updates Cassady Named 30th General Fraternity President

Due to this year’s canceled General Convention, former General Secretary and longtime Insurance Commissioner Tom Cassady, Cincinnati ’76 (above), was appointed General Fraternity President during the Board of Trustees’ August 7 virtual meeting. Vice President Justin Rutherford, Northwestern ’00, was reappointed to a second three-year term. For coverage of all outgoing and incoming Board members, see page 40.

87-Man Arizona Chapter Disbands in Wake of Accountability

Following repeated violations of Beta’s Risk Management Policy, specifically hazing and unsafe social practices, on July 7 the Fraternity announced closure of its Delta Beta Chapter at the University of Arizona. The activities that led to this result spanned several years, defying multiple interventions from the university, alumni and General Fraternity – including two membership reviews. At the conclusion of the chapter’s most recent reorganization, Delta Beta was left with 20 members. Those men chose to resign their memberships soon thereafter.

Historic Cancellations

Due to COVID-19, and for the first time since World War II, Beta’s 181st General Convention was canceled. The Wooden Institute was also canceled for the first time since its 1999 inception, as were Installations at Delaware, Loyola Chicago, MIT, Rochester, Rockurst and New Jersey. See pages 22-31 for expansive coverage of the pandemic’s historic impact on the Fraternity.

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2020-21 Expansions Postponed

Given the impact of COVID-19, the Fraternity has chosen to postpone this year’s expansion plans until more favorable conditions can ensure success: • Boise State • Illinois (Sigma Rho) • Kennesaw State • Missouri-Kansas City (Epsilon Lambda) • UNC – Wilmington • Vanderbilt (Beta Lambda)

Fraternity Buys Robeson House Next to Administrative Office

Custom built in 1985 by Sig Ep Grand President and Miami School of Business Dean Dr. Jim Robeson, and thanks to longstanding interfraternal friendships with Beta staff members, the Robeson family home next door to the Administrative Office in Oxford was purchased by the Fraternity from his widow, Teddi, on February 19. It now serves as the home of Beta’s executive director and his family.

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greekheadlines “[This] should serve as a lesson to Harvard and other universities. Students are free to associate with other students without regard to their gender, and targeting single-sex student organizations is illegal and wrong.” — NPC CEO Dani Weatherford and NIC CEO Jud Horras, Iowa State ’97

With wind at their backs after a landmark June 15 U.S. Supreme Court ruling prohibiting workplace discrimination based upon gender identity, Stand Up to Harvard plaintiffs immediately filed a motion for injunction that resulted in the university dropping enforcement of its 2016 ban on single-sex social clubs. Announced within hours of the injunction filing, Harvard concluded its prohibition would likely not withstand continued legal challenge from fraternities and sororities.

Citing the Greek community is exclusionary, racist and misogynistic, college students on dozens of campuses across North America have joined a grassroots effort known as “Abolish Greek Life.” With the sole intent of dismantling a system they say is beyond reform, efforts include creation of anonymous social media accounts that allege egregious conduct by individuals in specific fraternities and sororities. Peer pressure is then exerted to influence mass resignations of their members by shaming them into “not being on the wrong side of history.”

Ole Miss Greeks Lobby for Confederate Statue Removal

On June 4, led by the presidents of NPHC, Panhellenic and IFC, a letter was signed by all 30 chapter presidents calling on the Ole Miss Board of Trustees to relocate a Confederate statue in the iconic Lyceum Circle to the Confederate cemetery in a more

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secluded part of campus. The Associated Student Body advocated for such a change in March 2019. Questioned by the campus paper on the timing, IFC President Cole Barnhill remarked, “All I can say is different leadership, different time. We’re trying to acknowledge maybe some lacking on our part in previous years, and saying this is who we are today and this is who we are moving forward.” The statue was relocated on July 14 as requested by Ole Miss student leaders.

Three (More) Resign From NIC

Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha Sigma Phi and Theta Chi have resigned from the now 58-member NIC, citing philosophical differences with the direction of the Conference. Nine members have resigned since 2002.

31 Year-End Deadline for Tax-Deductible Gifts to Beta Leadership Fund beta.org/gift

January 2021

10 Miller Nichols Chapter Presidents Leadership Academy & Stephenson Leadership Summit Virtual beta.org 17 Legislation Session for Charter Petitions & Trustee Elections Virtual beta.org 22 Winter Joint Board Meetings Virtual jeff.rundle@beta.org

February 2021

15 Winter Beta Magazine Published

March 2021

18 Naples Alumni Association Lunch Naples, Fla. davidcnordhoff@gmail.com

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April 2021

15 Naples Alumni Association Lunch Naples, Fla. davidcnordhoff@gmail.com 23 Spring Board of Trustees Meeting Virtual jeff.rundle@beta.org

May 2021

15 Spring Beta Magazine Published

FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

“Abolish Greek Life”

December 2020

NEWSWORTHY

Harvard Admits Defeat; NIC Leads Single-Sex Case to Victory

betaevents

August 2021

5-8 182nd General Convention Oxford, Ohio beta.org/convention 13-14 Washington State 100th Anniv. Pullman, Wash. contact@wsubeta.org 19 54th Annual Northeast Ohio Beta Steakout Canton, Ohio betasteakout@hotmail.com

November 2021

6 Truman State 25th Anniversary Kirksville, Mo. zetaxialumniassociation@gmail.com

Upcoming alumni event? Email specifics to beta@beta.org!

10/23/20 1:22 PM


beta eponyms worldwide tributes “There are many one-man dogs, many one-family dogs, but ‘Beta’ was a whole university’s dog.”

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Recognized as the first official mascot of the University of Virginia, “Beta” was a black and white mixed-breed dog adopted in 1929 by Beta’s Omicron Chapter. Giving rise to his name across campus, “Beta” lived at the chapter house on Rugby Road and attended all ballgames and major campus events. So beloved, his name was even called on the roll of a Plato lecture, for which he attended regularly. Struck tragically by a car one night in 1939, he was carried by a non-Beta student to the local veterinarian where he succumbed to a broken back. Considered by most a “state affair,” his funeral included lying in honor all day at the Beta house with hundreds filing through to view the black-draped coffin. He was then transported by hearse from the Beta house to his final resting place, which was followed by a walking processional of an estimated 1,000 mourners. With the ceremony concluding at University Cemetery, a dean remarked in his eulogy, “There are many one-man dogs, many one-family dogs, but ‘Beta’ was a whole university’s dog.” The coffin was then lowered into the grave and the crowd joined in the singing of “The Good Old Song.”

10/29/20 10:37 AM


3 RULES FOR GIFT GIVING This year, be the Beta that crushes all eight nights of Hanukkah and leaves loved ones rockin’ around the Christmas tree. 1 | GET PERSONAL Sure, scented candles, picture frames and neck ties are the perfect present for someone out there. But gifts inspired by the values you share with a loved one or their unique interests guarantee to be a bigger hit. Most people don’t care if you spend much money on them, they just want to feel like you know them, appreciate them and enjoy the contributions they make to your life.

PRO TIP | PRESENTATION MATTERS “Wrapping” gifts in double-knotted plastic bags is NOT charming. Author Ramit Sethi says it best: “The way you live life directly affects the way others see you — and how you see yourself. That means the way you look, the clothes you wear, the conversations you have, the gifts you give … it all matters.” Most stores offer gift wrapping for $5 or less, but even if you learn for yourself using YouTube, the effort you put in won’t go unnoticed.

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3 | MAKE MEMORIES Special memories are gifts that keep on giving. Reserving seats at a Thai cooking class for a sibling who studied abroad in Bangkok, securing tickets to Wrigley Field for a die-hard Cubs fan or planning a road trip to attend a special concert or show are bound to leave an impression. If those don’t fit your budget, performing a simple service or trying your hand at a new skill like baking their favorite desert is something they’ll never forget.

CUT AND POLISHED

2 | JUST ASK Is it ever OK to gift your partner exercise equipment or household appliances? Yes – if they ask for them! They say it’s the thought that counts, but for some people practicality far outweighs sentimentality. You might just save yourself a lot of time and energy by simply asking what he or she wants. If that doesn’t feel quite right, ask their best friend or a close relative for an idea or two.

BUYING FOR A BROTHER? FIND BETA’S HOLIDAY WISH LIST ON PAGE 44.

Illustration: Alexa Chmura

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cut and polished refining men of principle

10/23/20 1:25 PM


Photo: Sue Ogrocki

alumni news lifelong brotherhood Citing Firsthand Experience, Billionaire CEO Shad Khan Pens Racism Op-Ed Points to Fraternity Brothers for Help up in Life

“Even recently, I have had people spew racist language in my presence when talking about other people of color – apparently ignorant of my ethnicity.” — Shad Khan, Illinois ’70

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In the wake of intense racial upheaval this spring following the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor, billionaire automotive CEO and NFL Jacksonville Jaguars Owner Shad Khan, Illinois ’70, penned an op-ed on racism that was posted to his team’s website. Citing firsthand experiences as an immigrant who moved from Pakistan to the United States in 1967 with little to nothing to his name, Khan was impassioned in his call for “the greatest nation on the planet” to truly listen and seize this moment in pursuing meaningful change. Asserting economic opportunity is the key to leveling the playing field and lifting up marginalized families, he remarked, “I know change is possible, and here’s one reason why: While I am often described as ‘self-made,’ the truth is I benefitted tremendously from hundreds of good and generous people early on, from all walks of life, who supported me unconditionally and contributed to my realization of the American Dream. My classmates, professors, fraternity brothers, colleagues, friends and family all helped to shape the person I am today. Opportunity and some help along the way allows us all to do great things.” Read more at beta.org/shadkhan.

10/23/20 1:28 PM


alumninews A | El Salvador-Born Beta Virologist Pursues Antibodies

A

B | Ashenafi Provides 2,000 Beds for Street Children

B

C

C | Gu Creates COVID-19 Model Picked up by CDC

“Back in March, I was frustrated by the quality of existing COVID-19 models. I wanted to apply my expertise in machine learning to create a more accurate and realistic model,” said data scientist Youyang Gu, MIT ’15. The CDC picked it up and featured it on its own site for public awareness.

15 FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

The personal foundation of Tewodros Ashenafi, Columbia ’91 – one of Ethiopia’s foremost businessmen – recently made available a 2,000-bed facility for Ethiopian street children affected by COVID-19.

ALUMNI NEWS

A postdoctoral scholar at North Carolina’s School of Global Public Health, David Martinez, Oklahoma ’12, was working on a better vaccine for Dengue, a pervasive disease in his native country of El Salvador, when COVID-19 captured the world’s attention. Working in the lab of Dr. Ralph Baric, one of the foremost coronavirologists in the world, he is now focused on COVID-19’s antibodies and sites on the spike protein that can block the virus from entering human cells.

D | Frontline Reunion

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They hadn’t seen each other since graduation, but in the midst of their frontline work on July 4, fourth year resident physician Rob Coppola, Nova Southeastern ’13 (left), and police officer Josh Molina ’15, picked up where they left off upon crossing paths tending to patients in the emergency room. It seems Phi Kai Phi and service to others still knows no bounds.

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Ribbing Yields Sky-High Kai This past May, Top Gun Navy Pilot and former Chapter President Dave Bellis, Maryland ’03, didn’t hesitate to respond to his Beta brothers’ cell phone ribbing while flying an F-18 round trip from Virginia to San Diego. Not surprisingly, he got nothing but love from the brotherhood.

ALUMNI NEWS

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betaauthors

Read more about these literary creations – as well as a slew of classic Beta history books available for download – at beta.org/books.

First-time Officiant

by Mike Scott, Miami ’09

The Lantern (Novel)

by Frank Newell, Willamette ’49

Reborn of Crisis: 9/11 and the Resurgent Superhero

by Michael Harrison, Furman ’98

The Good Husband: 50 Practices That Will Make You Nearly Perfect by Danny Langdon, Idaho ’61

ALUMNI NEWS

E

17

by Brett Nelson, Kentucky ’93 F

E | Herrmann Ordained Deacon at Saint Meinrad Archabbey A founding member of the Eta Delta Chapter, Br. Simon Herrmann, Dayton ’10, was ordained a deacon on August 15 in the Archabbey Church of Saint Meinrad, a community of Benedictine monks in southern Indiana.

A fun-loving spirit with a curious and reflective mind, Herrmann is known for his caring attitude toward others. Serving as a former associate editor on the Administrative Office staff and facilitator of numerous Beta leadership programs, he remarked upon the announcement of his ordination, “Please pray for me that I may be a monk of prayer and charity. Be assured of my prayers.”

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G

F | President Fox Announces Retirement from St. Lawrence

The College Man’s Cookbook by George Hirsch, Georgia ’16

Completing 12 years of service to his alma mater, Dr. Bill Fox, St. Lawrence ’75, announced in August his retirement taking effect next June. As he shared in his community announcement, “The invitation to serve St. Lawrence is the greatest honor of my life.”

by Tommy Cox, Oregon ’55

G | Foster Named Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer

Bad Love Strikes (Novel)

Board of Trustees Vice President Justin Foster, West Chester ’11, was promoted in August by the DLL global equipment and technology finance group from senior director of talent acquisition to chief diversity, equity and inclusion officer.

FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

The Magical Forest (Children’s Book)

Quest for Closure (Novel)

by David McKinney, Oregon State ’75

The Other Oregon (History)

by Kevin Schewe, Missouri ’79

Sons of the Stars (Beta Song) by Ryan Newton, Kansas State ’08 (Listen at beta.org/sotssong)

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alumninews H | Sweetheart Named First Black Female Tactical Aviator

Highlighting alumni achievements is pretty common, but sometimes Sweethearts deserve the hype. Say hello to Lt. J.G. Madeline Swegle, the Navy’s first Black female tactical jet aviator. (Her Naval Academy hubby, Scott Swegle, TCU ’ 16, is pretty cool, too.)

I | Warner Retires After 30 Years H

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ALUMNI NEWS

The Fraternity is proud to recognize former General Secretary and president of the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors Charlie Warner, Lynchburg ’87, as he retired in August after 30 years of service as West Chester’s director of student leadership and involvement.

J | Destroyer Named for Lugar

Joined by the Lugar family at an Indianapolis ceremony officiated by the U.S. Navy Secretary, America’s next destroyer warship will be named for former Senator and beloved Men of Principle Spokesman Richard Lugar, Denison ’54.

18 THE BETA THETA PI

K | Flight Records in the Books

In October 2019, Chip Haskell, Hanover ’88, set two Georgia state sailplane records for the 100-kilometer speed triangle in both the standard and sports class in a 1971 Glasfugal Libelle H-201.

J

L | UCLA’s Guerrero is Pure Gold

L

Appointed UCLA athletic director in 2002, Dan Guerrero, UCLA ’74, officially retired in July. The Bruins won 32 team championships in 15 different sports during his tenure – the most under any sitting NCAA Division I athletic director.

M | Marshall Makes Senate Run

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M

Elected chapter president before medical school and service in the Army Reserve, two-term Kansas Congressman Dr. Roger Marshall, Kansas State ’84, competed in the general election for the U.S. Senate. (Editor Note: Magazine files were at the printer prior to election results.)

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“Sebastian” Unveiled

19 FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

Sebastian’s identity is a closely guarded tradition not revealed until the end of graduation, but this year’s hyped-up fanfare wasn’t possible due to COVID-19.

ALUMNI NEWS

Following in the footsteps of two Beta alumni who recently served as “Sebastian the Ibis,” and another who serves as mascot program coordinator, the Fraternity is excited to recognize Peter Caride, Miami (Fla.) ’20, as the Hurricanes’ most recent favorite feathered phenom.

In a hint of what was to come, the New Jersey biomedical engineering major was actually wearing the editor’s Beta badge throughout last fall’s photo shoot, which coincided with The Beta Theta Pi’s twoday interview that followed the program for the winter magazine feature. Because these days, you can’t spell Sebastian without B-E-T-A. (Read more at beta.org/sebastian.)

Photo: Munoz Photography

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LOST IN THE ALASKAN WILDERNESS

New Podcast Renews Interest in a Missing Airplane and the house majority leader On board by justin warren, smu ’10 | designed by mike roupas, iowa ’10

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On October 15, 1972, U.S. House Majority Leader Hale Boggs, Tulane ’35, dazzled the crowds at a cocktail reception and campaign fundraiser for his Democratic colleague, Alaska’s Nick Begich. The next day, a twin-engine Cessna carrying both men from Anchorage to Juneau vanished. Forty-eight years later, no one knows why. Alaska is a vast wilderness dotted with small, remote cities and communities. Far and away the largest American state at 665,384 square miles – nearly two-and-ahalf times the size of Texas – its rugged landscape teems with towering mountains, winding rivers, formidable glaciers and deep canyons. Creating a spectacular scene on clear, sunny days, once conditions worsen these features can become deadly for even the most experienced adventurers. So was the case on a foggy and rainy October 16 morning when Brother Boggs, Congressman Begich, his aide, Russell Brown, and Pan Alaska Airways Chief Pilot Don Jonz lifted off from Anchorage at 8:59 a.m. in a white and orange Cessna 310. Word arrived to the United States Air Force Rescue Coordination Center that the plan was late around 1:15 p.m. Ninety minutes later, tensions rose further as the still-missing aircraft was expected to have run out of fuel. Somewhere along the 550-mile flight path through Portage Pass, over Prince William Sound and on to Juneau, the plane had disappeared. What began as a small search expedition comprised mostly of fishing boats,

volunteer pilots and military planes soon spanned 39 days and over 325,000 square miles – then the largest search operation in American history. In the recent podcast “Missing in Alaska,” investigative reporter Jon Walczak details the countless tips authorities received throughout their search. Residents in the small town of Whittier located along the flight path reported hearing a plane pass overhead, clairvoyants phoned in with clues appearing to them in visions and a select few amateur radio operators from as far south as Northern California swore their devices crackled to life that night in receipt of a garbled mayday distress signal from an Alaskan pilot ending in a Morse code transmission: “We need help.” Plane crashes being relatively common in the expansive frontier, some 90% of missing aircraft are, at least in part, recovered. In December 1972, with not a single piece of the vessel recovered, the four passengers were declared dead. The location of any wreckage remains a mystery still today, as does the cause of the presumed crash. Not surprisingly, 48 years of questions have given rise to many potential answers, each more conspiratorial than the next. The most far-fetched include a plot against Boggs’ life by loyalists to former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, a man he had publicly feuded with in the past, or retribution for the congressman’s purported skepticism of the “single bullet theory” as a member of the Warren Commission investigating the death of President John F. Kennedy. Others still allege involvement from the mafia or American Croatian separatists.

Federal officials have never found proof of a plot to murder the elected officials. Likewise, few question the plane’s basic integrity because it passed a pre-flight inspection. Instead, it’s widely believed that blame lies squarely on the skilled but arrogant pilot, Don Jonz. A military aircraft was scheduled to fly the identical flight path as Jonz and his passengers that day but abandoned the attempt after encountering severe turbulence and marginal weather conditions, including ice and fog, along the route. Jonz, who had authored a controversial article in Flying Magazine that very month entitled “Ice Without Fear,” likely ignored the warnings and local laws requiring an Emergency Local Transmitter on board. Having seen thousands of crashes before, locals don’t see a need for complex theories – an overconfident pilot and undesirable weather is enough explanation for them. As the search and rescue mission carried on, both he and Begich were posthumously reelected to their seats in November 1972. An energetic, thoughtful speaker, the 58-year-old Boggs was a Southern Democrat from Louisiana unafraid to buck his party on matters such as civil rights. He was likely to have been chosen as the next Speaker of the House of Representatives. A special election was held after his death became official, which Boggs’ widow, Lindy, won. She served in her late husband’s House seat until 1991. His political legacy was further carried on by his three children, Barbara Boggs Sigmund, Thomas Boggs Jr., and late American journalist Cokie Roberts.  Listen to the series “Missing in Alaska” anywhere you listen to podcasts.

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BETA IN

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A

s the clock ticked ever closer to midnight on January 1, 2020, the world breathlessly awaited the welcoming of a new year and the promises of a new decade. The champagne flowed freely as friends and loved ones packed crowded bars and restaurants in celebration, many proclaiming those most well-rehearsed resolutions of good health, financial fortunes and enduring relationships ripe for the taking. Anticipation built across North America in those first three months for the major events 2020 had in store: the Tokyo Summer Olympics, Daniel Craig’s curtain call as James Bond, the meeting of the New York Yankees and Chicago White Sox in an Iowa corn field for Major League Baseball’s first-ever “Field of Dreams” game. The excitement within Beta Theta Pi was palpable, too. By March, six colonies – Delaware, New Jersey, Loyola Chicago, Rochester, Rockhurst and MIT – stood mere weeks away from installation as the Fraternity’s newest chapters, six more campuses prepared for Beta to join their communities in the fall, Beta seniors planned their send-off celebrations and brothers everywhere looked forward to reuniting during the annual General Convention.

written by Justin Warren, SMU ’10 designed by Sarah Shepherd illustrated by Adam Fields

Eight months later, after more than a quarter million deaths from COVID-19 in the United States and Canada alone, a severe economic downturn, months of social unrest amidst racial tensions and campus hostilities aimed squarely at Greek-letter organizations, 2020 has been anything but kind to the hopes and aspirations of Betas and those around them. But if hindsight is 20/20, it’s the lessons learned across the Fraternity’s 181year history that have allowed her to weather the storm and remain focused on enduring through to the future.

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A GLOBAL PANDEMIC SETS IN

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he World Health Organization announced January 9 that a deadly coronavirus had emerged in Wuhan, China. Although leading health officials had previously assured North Americans the virus posed a low risk, by March COVID-19 had taken the continent by storm. On March 5, the University of Washington became the first large college in the United States to shift to onlineonly learning, but the domino effect commenced swiftly as students left their respective institutions for spring break not knowing if they would return to finish the school year. In light of the growing pattern of campuses, businesses and organizations choosing to cancel or suspend operations and events, on March 11 General Secretary Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73, and Executive Director Jeff Rundle, Kansas State ’03, issued a joint message to undergraduate Betas and volunteers alerting them that the Fraternity was removing its traveling staff from the road and temporarily shifting to a remote, digital support model.

BETAS LOST, BETAS RESPOND Instances of COVID-19 directly affecting the lives of brothers were on the rise just as the General Fraternity began understanding the extent the pandemic would alter Beta Theta Pi’s operations. The virus claimed its first Beta, Bob Naifeh, Oklahoma ’79, on March 29. While several more have been reported to the Administrative Office since, a true count of brothers who succumbed to the virus may never be known.

Likewise, there is simply not enough space in this magazine to take full stock of those men who risked their health and sacrificed their time as the virus ravaged their communities. That list includes frontline workers like Dr. Mike D’Beisi, Washington & Jefferson ’98, who lent his voice to a Salt Lake City public service announcement encouraging social distancing, and Dr. Levi Dygert, UCLA ’12, whose skills were critical in the epicenter of New York City. It also includes data scientist Youyang Gu, MIT ’15, whose side project creating a COVID-19 model was ultimately used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; virologist David Martinez, Oklahoma ’12, who spent months researching a cure for the disease; and community activists like Kyriakos Chatzis, Stevens ’22, whose nonprofit “Community Cares” distributed care packages to those in need. See pages 15 and 37 for more on those stories.

TAKING DRASTIC ACTION The sustained uncertainty and intensity of the coronavirus, meanwhile, forced the General Fraternity to make its own significant sacrifices. Despite timing complexities, incomplete information and the murkiness of an unclear future, in April the Board of Trustees announced its unanimous vote to cancel Beta’s summer slate of programming. This meant, for the first time in 21 years, no Betas would attend the Fraternity’s hallmark John and Nellie Wooden Institute for Men of Principle. But the greatest casualty of this decision was the 181st

“WE ARE WRITING TODAY REGARDING THE EVOLVING IMPACT OF THE CORONAVIRUS AND HOW IT RELATES TO BETA THETA PI’S DAY-TO-DAY OPERATIONS IN THE FORESEEABLE FUTURE …” General Secretary Wayne Kay,Virginia Tech ’73 Executive Director Jeff Rundle, Kansas State ’03 March 11, 2020

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General Convention. Arguably the most cherished of the Fraternity’s traditions, the annual reunion was to be held in August at Phoenix’s Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass and attract some 600 Betas and guests to the Gila River Native American Reservation for a weekend of cultural immersion and brotherly camaraderie. It is only the sixth time a General Convention was not held as scheduled, previous instances forgone first in 1862 in light of the Civil War, then in 1874 following a delay in the 1873 Convention due to a cholera pandemic and, finally, from 1943-45 during World War II. The Board looked to precedent set by its predecessors for guidance navigating these unfamiliar waters. Specifically, those most recently canceled Conventions as college-aged men were abruptly pulled from school to fight in the war. General Secretary G. Herbert Smith, DePauw ’27, wrote in the October 1943 issue of The Beta Theta Pi: “In Beta Theta Pi we have taken just pride in the continuous line of Conventions which annually have brought anew the Beta vision and have strengthened our bonds of fraternal friendship. Our posterity will recognize the demands of total war when it is realized that the Convention could not be held. Nothing less serious than the present conflict could have resulted in this omission.” Today’s Trustees likewise felt their actions were unfortunate but necessary for the welfare of the Fraternity and its members. Beta Theta Pi suffered greatly during the war – nearly one-third of all chapters experienced varying periods of inactivity – but it came out the other side realizing record growth and in a strong position to move forward. Its current leaders hoped, amidst a crippling global health crisis, history might repeat itself.

UNPRECEDENTED SUPPORT As the summer months began and COVID-19 raged on, question marks swirled around whether students would return to campuses in the fall. Believing men would be drawn to Beta Theta Pi as a place for connection, community and friendship during a time of disruption and social distancing, Fraternity leaders provided unprecedented support to prepare chapters for a tumultuous recruitment season. These efforts focused on providing high quality advisor support, hyper-customized recruitment training both online and via dedicated recruitment experts, access to a broad swath of professionally designed marketing items – brochures, T-shirts, digital graphics, banners and more – at reduced cost, and financial incentives including doubling the Men of Principle Scholarship Grant from $500 to $1,000 per applying chapter. Day-to-day life was different for those brothers who returned to campus in the

fall. Members were required to wear masks and many classes were held virtually due to restrictions on the size of gatherings – limitations that also affected chapter morale by all but eliminating in-person chapter meetings, brotherhood events and ritual ceremonies. But beyond the threat of COVID-19 to chapter operations, risks to the health and safety of undergraduate members themselves loomed. In response, the Beta Foundation provided funding for all members to receive a Fraternity-branded face mask to minimize virus spread, while the General Fraternity House Corporation announced new support for local house corporations to keep chapter facilities in compliance with CDC guidelines, including partnering with vendors who provided personal protective equipment such as sanitation stations for members and guest use, as well as resources for virus testing members on move-in day to prevent early outbreaks.

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CONFRONTING AN ECONOMIC COLLAPSE

A

s numerous countries went into lockdown, the coronavirus pandemic also triggered a global recession, signaled in the U.S. by the Dow Jones Industrial Average’s worst single-day point drop ever on March 16, the unemployment rate increasing from 3.5% in February to 14.7% in April and, as of September, the country remaining down 10.7 million jobs. These circumstances left Beta undergraduate, staff and volunteer leaders without clear answers to a number of questions: Will members go inactive to stay home and help support their families? Are there students who lost their part-time jobs and can no longer afford the Fraternity? Could chapters struggle to find new members amidst widespread economic uncertainty?

“WITH MANY FAMILIES OF UNDERGRADUATES FACING UNPRECEDENTED FINANCIAL CHALLENGES, THE TRUSTEES HAVE ACTED AND RELIEF IS ON THE WAY.” General Secretary Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73 August 18, 2020

To varying degrees, the answer to all of these questions was, “Yes.” Help would come from two sources – the mutual aid and assistance of Beta Foundation donors and a Board-authorized, multi-faceted plan providing financial incentives, credits and reductions to General Fraternity dues.

BETAS STEP UP In mid-March, as the financial markets came tumbling down, the planning committee for Beta Theta Pi’s inaugural Giving Day Challenge knew the massive fundraising event, originally scheduled for April 2, would need to be postponed. The team reconvened one month later and hotly debated whether, at a time when members were focused on their own physical and financial health, a case for supporting the Beta Foundation could rightfully be made. With a major adjustment to the event’s goals, including the introduction of funding for need-based relief scholarships, the planning committee held its breath and hoped for the best. By the Challenge’s end, with nearly 1,900 donors gifting some $270,000, there was

no doubt that Betas step up for one another even in the toughest of times. In addition to helping the Beta Foundation meet its annual goal and double all Men of Principle Scholarship Grants, this total proved enough to guarantee all 139 chapters access to $1,250 in relief funds for members facing financial uncertainty.

TRIMMING THE BUDGET Recognizing the need to balance shortand long-term objectives responsibly while managing the Fraternity’s affairs, the Trustees also believed additional financial assistance was warranted to help chapters juggle a number of local stressors. This support began with delaying fall General Fraternity billing by 30 days to allow additional time for chapters to adjust their fall budgets and update their rosters. Beyond flexibility in timing, the Trustees approved nearly $450,000 in reduced fees, credits, scholarships and software licensing reimbursements across all chapters.

UNKNOWN EFFECTS Eight months into the pandemic, it’s still too early to know the long-term effects the seemingly ever-spreading virus will have on Beta Theta Pi. But the Fraternity is experiencing short-term repercussions right now, namely a decrease of approximately 15% in fall new members and a more than 40% increase in initiated brothers claiming temporarily inactive status to remain at home, sort out financial difficulties or otherwise await the pandemic’s end before actively rejoining their chapters. It is said the darkest hour is just before the dawn. While the brotherhood has weathered 2020, it has done so largely thanks to aggressive intervention from Fraternity leadership at all levels. This determination brings hope that 2021 will see the return of stability, clarity and the familial connections that lead so many to join Beta’s band.

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A RENEWED CALL FOR RACIAL EQUITY

T

he early months of the COVID-19 pandemic bred wall-to-wall news coverage and a worldwide obsession with tracking the virus’ spread and charting its rapidly increasing case numbers. The situation seemed to evolve by the day as state leaders announced stay-at-home orders, cars gathered at drive-thru testing lines and people settled into a new reality of wearing masks in public. Then, following the tragic killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd in February, March and May, respectively, a wave of protests broke across the world demanding an end to police brutality and racial injustice. Primarily focused on government and law enforcement officials, calls to quickly and comprehensively address system-wide inequities grew louder for all institutions – and the traditionally White Greek community was no exception.

COMING TO TERMS The Fraternity is well-versed in presenting the many brothers and moments in its history displaying Beta Theta Pi’s true heart on matters of race. Among them, Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan, Centre 1850, who earned the title “The Great Dissenter” in part for his progressiveness on matters of civil rights; Bill Lowry, Kenyon ’56, who in 1954 became one of the first Black initiates of any North American Interfraternity Conference organization; and recent efforts the Fraternity has pursued to better account for and understand its minority members and the changing demographics of today’s college student. Yet leaders at all levels of the organization, from chapter presidents to the Board of Trustees, saw considerable room for improvement. At a first-ever virtual chapter meeting in June, Executive Director Rundle responded to the numerous Betas and volunteers asking the Fraternity to speak out and “do the work” on this important topic. There, he acknowledged existing racism in North America, the college fraternity system and the dark corners of Beta Theta Pi. “At all levels, from local chapters to the larger General Fraternity, racial matters have not been championed consistently,” Rundle said. “We come to this conversation humbly and with open eyes, ears and hearts. The truth is most of us cannot ever understand the fear and pain that people of color live with each and every day, nor the injustice they have endured for centuries. But we can listen, we can learn and we can do better.”

A NEW COMMISSION Then, with unanimous support from the Board of Trustees, Beta announced a new Commission on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion to analyze the Fraternity’s existing efforts and identify future opportunities for positive internal cultural shifts.

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Chaired by the aforementioned Brother Bill Lowry, an aggressive 60-day timeline was set for the 24-member commission to consider member and constituent feedback, complete its work and deliver initial recommendations to the Board of Trustees by early August. Making clear to all involved the critical nature of these discussions, Lowry emphasized: “If we are really a leader of men, it is time to lead. In 1954, Beta Theta Pi made a bold move, which in turn helped to distinguish our leadership. Perhaps it’s time to fortify that reputation. We say

we strive for the greatest possible good in our undergraduates, alumni, chapters, volunteers and Fraternity. To me, that translates into humanity. As moral men, it’s time to demonstrate moral action.” Recommending an initial framework focused on the language, voices and education of the Fraternity, in August the Board reinforced its commitment to addressing diversity and equity within Beta Theta Pi by authorizing a standing committee to continue the commission’s important work. For an in-depth read on the commission and a progress report on its recommendations since the beginning of the academic year, see pages 32-35.

“AS THE CHAIRMAN OF YOUR TRUSTEES, I WANT TO BE CLEAR THAT BLACK LIVES MATTER.” General Secretary Wayne Kay,Virginia Tech ’73 June 10, 2020

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FIGHTING TO EXIST

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ational headlines like “Fall of the Frat House” and “War on Frats” might sound like any other year’s standard anti-fraternity media narrative. But in 2020, these stories were inspired not only by outside pressures exerted on Greek organizations, but from the members within.

ABOLISH GREEK LIFE The so-called “Abolish Greek Life” movement became most prominent at Vanderbilt University in Nashville where more than 35% of the undergraduate student body affiliates with a fraternity or sorority. However, the movement – largely propagated through anonymous social media activism pages – quickly came to institutions across North America.

“THE GENERAL FRATERNITY WILL CONTINUE TO DEFEND ITS STUDENTS’ AND ALUMNI’S RIGHT TO OPERATE.” General Secretary Wayne Kay,Virginia Tech ’73 August 18, 2020

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This year, brothers in states like New York, North Carolina, Ohio and Washington received assistance and guidance from the General Fraternity as Abolish Greek Life accounts levied judgments on their or their peers’ lack of sensitivity on issues of race, sexism, classism and homophobia. Beyond criticizing historically White Greek organizations themselves, the movement’s appeals reached new heights when activists wanted members to resign en masse or vote to revoke their own charters. Many chapters felt helpless, facing a barrage of attacks via social and campus media with no tangible or realistic way of quelling the mob mentality. A standoff commenced between those wanting to put in the work to make changes from within and others whose only acceptable solution was the dismantling of Greek life altogether.

CRUMBLING FROM WITHIN For some interfraternal brothers and sisters, such as a Delta Tau Delta chapter at American University in Washington, D.C., the pressure to justify their existence was too much and an internal vote to disband

succeeded. Organizations on more than a dozen other institutions met the same fate in the short three months spanning July to September. Beta, too, has not come out of this struggle unscathed. Though the Fraternity’s losses as a direct result of the Abolish Greek Life movement have been minimal, Beta at Washington in St. Louis was hit particularly hard. A strong, 93-man chapter at the end of the 2018-19 academic year, Alpha Iota will end the fall 2020 term numbering only 23 men. General Secretary Kay communicated with all undergraduate members and chapter volunteers in August to preempt the perils Beta, too, might have faced at the hands of the Abolish Greek Life movement. “The General Fraternity is unequivocal in its belief that Greek organizations are part of (and often lead) important cultural changes in our communities,” Kay said. “The General Fraternity will continue to defend its students’ and alumni’s right to operate as important parts of the local institutions they call home.” This level of support was widespread across international organizations, and no college or university has yet banned Greek life in response to mounting demands for abolition. Thankfully, of the Beta chapters that have had their existence questioned, all have chosen to band together and fight for reform from within – no doubt the true Beta way.

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A

A YEAR UNLIKE ANY OTHER

t midnight on January 1, 2020, no one knew what the year ahead had in store, but the high hopes and aspirations certainly don’t match what has since come to pass: a nearly year-long global pandemic, unprecedented economic uncertainty, sustained racial unrest and intense public scrutiny. The challenges presented in recent months have posed a great threat to this well-established, 181-yearold organization. Even for this Fraternity, which has survived past pandemics, a Civil War, two World Wars and endless detraction from public and campus activists, saying 2020 was a “hard year” would be an understatement. So imagine the difficulties Beta’s 10,000 undergraduate members have faced. Their worlds upended, uncertain of when they can once again trade Zoom classrooms for lecture halls, smile at one another from across the quad without the barrier of a mask or celebrate their greatest college moments with the connection and intimacy inherent in human nature.

“The path ahead is of course uncharted, but for those still wondering how Beta Theta Pi will navigate this complex new world, my answer is simple – we will continue to do so together.” General Secretary Wayne Kay,Virginia Tech ’73 August 18, 2020

And imagine that these and other life challenges have been felt by countless Betas across all generations and levels of Fraternity involvement. From house corporation volunteers struggling to overcome significant vacancies and keep the doors open at their beloved chapter homes, to the Silver Grays who have gone months without seeing not only their Beta brothers but their families out of an abundance of caution for their health. Yet Betas have found connectedness despite these struggles. Members, chapters and volunteers have adapted under stressful circumstances and made great sacrifices in the name of brotherhood. “The journey has led me not toward feelings of worry and fear but of inspiration and resolve,” General Secretary Kay said. “Their actions have breathed new life into the timeless words of Founder John Reily Knox: ‘What a few men united in object and effort will to do can be done.’” If hindsight is 20/20, no one could possibly have been prepared for a year like this. Some have floundered, others have endured. Beta Theta Pi, as it has countless time before, endured. And it will continue to navigate this complex new world – together. 

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SOULSEARCHING BETA LOOKS INWARD AND ESTABLISHES HISTORIC COMMISSION ON DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION by Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96; designed by Mike Roupas, Iowa ’10

“The conditions and requirements for membership in our order promise still more. These conditions were founded not on wealth, not on social rank, but upon an active brain and a good heart." — Rev. Oliver A. Brown, Ohio Wesleyan 1866

F

ollowing this spring's heartbreaking deaths of Black Americans George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor, public cries for justice grew loud. As video recordings gripped millions and masses marched in the streets, calls rang out for individuals and institutions to search their own hearts and reflect on their roles in the building of a more inclusive world. Beta’s Board of Trustees did not demur.

“This isn’t about change. It’s about growth. Beta

Theta Pi isn’t coming from a state of depravity. It can simply be better."

— Bill Lowry, Kenyon ’56, Commission Chairman

Recognizing the sincere pain voiced by individuals of color, thousands of whom also wear the badge of Beta Theta Pi, on June 10 the 12-man body announced a unanimous decision — the establishment of a new Commission on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. It was a first for the 181-year-old organization. Of course, most know Beta Theta Pi was founded on the belief that a man’s life is enriched when he joins kindred spirits who care for one another. Pledged to the notion that, “In Beta Theta Pi, brothers are brothers for life, and all stand on the same fraternal level,” from its inception Beta was uniquely void of White-Christian membership clauses that reinforced social segregation. Such policies were unfortunately common among Beta’s peers.

A LOOK BACK

On one hand, Beta can be proud of individual and organizational actions that demonstrate the character of the Fraternity and its belief in the personal growth that comes to life when men break bread with those different from themselves. On the other, few can argue the Fraternity hasn’t had room for improvement in all aspects related to diversity, be it race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, etc., nor done all it could to help overcome societal barriers that undermine brotherhood and cultivation of the intellect.

Yet still, Beta Theta Pi has not been perfect nor inoculated from the world of which it is a part.

32 | THE BETA THETA PI | SOULSEARCHING

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“The Fraternity has many notable past achievements in this space,” said General Secretary Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73, as he wrote to the Trustees and proposed the commission idea in early June. “But we must be humble and acknowledge that we could and should do more. Our brotherhood is deserving of concrete action informed by our members, volunteers and subject matter experts.” Vice President Robert Beall, Oklahoma ’80, was quick to endorse Kay’s recommendation. “I fully agree,” he said. “What I have found in the past is that it is easy to stay with the status quo and unintentionally not see opportunities for inclusion. When there is intentional focus on the diversity issue, it seems opportunities for better inclusion present themselves.” With the Trustees unified, it's not surprising Kay turned to an iconic symbol in Beta lore to serve as commission chairman, Beta’s first Black initiate Bill Lowry, Kenyon ’56. A former director on Beta’s Foundation Board with impeccable credentials and a lifetime trustee to his alma mater, Lowry is a reminder of the goodness that can flow to the Fraternity when brothers engage in hard work focused on brotherhood and integrity. Wise beyond measure and grandfatherly to the core, Lowry's presence charted an optimistic tone over the fast-paced 60-day timeline upon which Kay asked him to have recommendations before the Trustees. Underscoring the importance of the work, he oversaw recruitment of 23 talented and diverse individuals to serve on the brain trust. Critical thinking was certainly necessary, as commissioners were pushed hard with hours of homework before and after each week's meeting.

LAY OF THE LAND

During the first meeting on June 30, Lowry reflected poignantly on Beta’s past with an eye toward the future: “We say we strive for the greatest possible good in our collegians, alumni, chapters, volunteers and Fraternity. To me, that translates into humanity. As moral men, it’s time to demonstrate moral action.” Internal data helped the commission understand chapter cultures across the land. In 2013, the Fraternity started collecting new members’ race classifications. At that time some 25% joining Beta were students of color. As recently as the magazine’s spring 2020 feature, “The Changing Face of the College Campus,” that statistic remains unchanged, although the Fraternity has evolved considerably since Lowry’s 1954 initiation.

"It is easy to stay with the status quo and

unintentionally not see

opportunities for inclusion. When there is intentional

focus on the diversity issue, it seems opportunities for better inclusion present themselves."

— Robert Beall, Oklahoma ’80, Board of Trustees Vice President

Still, with college enrollments averaging 50% students of

COMMISSION ON DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION

COMMISSION ADVISORY BOARD

1 | Bill Lowry, Kenyon ’56 Chairman

10 | Bryant Fiesta, UC Irvine ’16 Former Dir. of Colony Development

2 | S. Wayne Kay, Virginia Tech ’73 General Secretary

11 | Rod Kelley, Florida State ’14 Risk Management Advisor

3 | Steven Cruz, Florida Int. ’12 Vice President, Board of Trustees

12 | Erin McHale, Gamma Phi Beta Director of Chapter Services

20 | Dr. Bill Fox, St. Lawrence ’75 President, St. Lawrence University

4 | Justin Foster, West Chester ’11 Vice President, Board of Trustees

13 | Jeff Pioquinto, Iowa State ’21 Former Chapter President

21 | Mike Feinstein, MIT ’82 Beta Foundation Chairman

5 | Ian Ross, Michigan ’21 Undergraduate Commissioner

14 | Jaden Pitts, Chapman ’22 Diversity and Inclusion Chairman

6 | Dr. Melissa Shivers Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Ohio State V.P. for Student Life

15 | Jeff Rundle, Kansas State ’03 Executive Director

22 | Veronica Moore, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Delta Upsilon Director of Educational Programs

16 | Denzel Akuffo, Oklahoma ’23 Pledge Class President

23 | Mike Okenquist, Villanova ’94 Advisory Council Commissioner

8 | Nestor Carrera, Embry-Riddle ’21 Colony President

17 | Swochchhanda “Swoosh” Shrestha, MIT ’21 Chapter President

24 | John Stebbins, Emory ’92 General Fraternity House Corp. Chairman

9 | Martin Cobb, Eastern Kentucky ’96 Editor & Dir. of Communication

18 | Dr. Jennifer Zamora, Delta Zeta Univ. of Texas Dir. of St. Programs

7 | Malcolm Andrews, Virginia ’89 District Chief

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19 | Jason Blake, Georgia Tech ’92 Chapter Counselor

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A CULTURE OF BELONGING STATEMENT OF POSITION Beta Theta Pi will lead the interfraternal world on matters of diversity, equity and inclusion. RECOMMENDATIONS To become a lasting, sustainable part of the fabric of Beta Theta Pi, diversity, equity and inclusion will – on an ongoing basis – receive the highest level of attention possible.

LANGUAGE

The words used to authentically articulate Beta Theta Pi’s history, values and aspirations will reflect what it means to be a member, including the future the Fraternity envisions for itself and the interfraternal community in the critical imperatives of diversity, equity and inclusion.

VOICES

The Fraternity’s collegians, alumni, volunteers and staff will be high-minded, and efforts to identify, attract, retain and empower an enriching blend of individuals from all walks of life must be intentional in nature.

EDUCATION

Cultivating a Fraternity culture that possesses a sincere appreciation for difference requires intentionality, creativity and commitment over the long-term.

NEXT STEPS In what has been coined “Commission 2.0,” membership has been expanded and divided into three sub-committees. Focusing on tactical ideas that can advance the recommendations adopted by the Trustees, their work began in early October. Stay tuned for more updates.

1. LONG-TERM COMMITMENT Trustees shall authorize a standing committee to continue the valuable work of diversity, equity and inclusion. 2. INTERNAL LANGUAGE Beta shall update all foundational, internal documents to include language that aspires for inclusivity, specifically in the areas of The Code, Beta Ritual and educational materials. 3. EXTERNAL LANGUAGE Beta shall update all public-facing documents to include language that aspires for inclusivity, specifically Beta’s Core Values, Strategic Plan and website, among others. 4. RECRUITMENT Beta shall seek a diverse collegian membership by addressing issues related to accessibility and affordability, the creation of merit and access-based scholarships for men from underrepresented and socio-economically challenged populations, and the Fraternity’s campus selection policy related to diverse communities. 5. VOLUNTEERS AND STAFF Beta shall commit to the intentional recruitment of a diverse volunteer corps and Administrative Office staff. 6. COMMUNITY Beta shall explore opportunities for local chapters to engage their communities in advancing the important work of diversity, equity and inclusion. 7. COLLEGIAN AND VOLUNTEER TRAINING Beta shall develop targeted new member, officer, advisor, house corporation and General Fraternity Officer educational materials — including unconscious bias training — to promote a stronger culture of belonging at all levels of the Fraternity. 8. HISTORICAL DOCUMENTATION Beta shall research and author a complete history of the Fraternity’s actions and inactions as it relates to diversity, equity and inclusion and include it in educational materials for members, officers and volunteers.

34 | THE BETA THETA PI | SOULSEARCHING

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color – a trend only projected to increase over the next two decades, it's evident there are not only significant opportunities to enlist more diverse populations in the Fraternity, but longterm viability requires it. The moral duty before Beta Theta Pi is unquestioned. Fortunately, a recent study by Dyad Strategies indicates Beta – unlike most interfraternal peers – possesses just “minor” statistical differences in the sense of belonging its students of color feel in their chapters compared to their White brothers. There are many forms of diversity beyond race deserving attention, but it points to an encouraging sign that Beta chapters are fostering an inclusive experience for those admitted to the brotherhood. However, given the considerable disparity between campus enrollment trends of students of color and Beta chapters’ racial make-up, it begs the question if Beta is doing all it can to appeal to those same students on the recruitment front. As St. Lawrence University President Dr. Bill Fox, St. Lawrence ’75, put it when talking with commission leaders: “Just like a campus’ student body should be reflective of the world, ultimately, we want our chapters to be truly representative of their campus. Diversity is our destiny, and no fraternity is better positioned to lead than Beta Theta Pi.” NATURE OF THE WORK

The sensitivities that come with such subjects are of course well known. There's a natural skepticism of actions designed just for political correctness. That's why Commission members quickly rejected quotas and checklists that simply pursue compliance over authentic conviction and empathy. Ohio State Vice President for Student Life Dr. Melissa Shivers, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., said it best early on in the proceedings: “This is about the heart. Connect Betas’ hearts with their minds and the rest of the work will take care of itself.” Undergraduate Commissioner Ian Ross, Michigan ’21, echoed, “This is as much about the intangibles as it is the tangibles.” Prior to the commission's first meeting, the Fraternity created an open survey that invited feedback on how Beta could improve. Resulting in hundreds of observations, criticisms and ideas, submissions formed the basis for the commission's most difficult task: establishing a framework that focuses the Fraternity's attention. Leading to a model that prioritizes Language, Voices and Education, Lowry reminded commissioners that language and policies reflect an organization’s values and culture. And that culture is what fosters understanding of one another – understanding that warms hearts and melts away boundaries of tribalism. As the Beta Ritual prescribes, “Get wisdom, and with all thy getting, get understanding.”

And, since an organization is only as healthy as its environment, Beta must view this whole matter through two lenses: the environment its chapters are creating internally and, outwardly, Beta's contribution to the world of which it is a part. The commission’s top recommendation called upon the Trustees to make a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion via a standing committee – not an ad hoc body that evaporates as quickly as it came. One additional issue was identified as a real headwind if Beta seeks long-term relevancy on campus: affordability. Consulted on the inclusivity topic given his prosecution of Ku Klux Klan members as U.S. Attorney, U.S. Senator and former District Chief Doug Jones, Alabama ’76, sustained the affordability concern during a special session with the commission. Believing Beta must defy the financial trajectory that is pushing the experience out of reach for so many, he shared with conviction: "We don't want 'Men of Principle' to simply become 'Men of Privilege.'" THE ROAD FORWARD

In what was a Herculean effort to meet the Trustees’ 60-day charge, Beta’s Commission on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion met the challenge asked of it: a framework for improvement that is rooted in serious reflection and humility. Simply the start of an effort that requires a commitment over the long haul, on August

"Commission members

quickly rejected quotas

and checklists that simply pursue compliance over

authentic conviction and empathy. 'This is about

the heart. Connect Betas'

hearts with their minds and the rest of the work will take care of itself.'"

— Dr. Melissa Shivers, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Ohio State Vice President for Student Life

12 the Trustees unanimously adopted the recommendations and, to make sure the cause isn't a side project, have woven it into the Fraternity's strategic plan. A body coined "Commission 2.0" has already started working on tactics via three sub-committees. Aimed at inculcating a culture that is instinctively inclusive, expresses a genuine respect for difference and, above all, fosters a brotherhood that welcomes men from all walks of life, Beta is getting its arms around a new call of the times. As Chairman Lowry opined, “This isn’t about change. It’s about growth. Beta Theta Pi isn’t coming from a state of depravity. It can simply be better." 

SOULSEARCHING | FALL 2020 | 35

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campus life student highlights Epsilon Honors New Sweetheart, Receives NIC Award of Distinction

A special tradition awaits the woman Epsilon Chapter chooses each year as Beta Sweetheart. The surprise announcement and serenade are held at Bellevue Cemetery in Danville, Kentucky, where famous Sweetheart Leila McKee is buried alongside her extended Beta family. As brothers knelt near McKee’s tombstone this fall, their masks hearkened back to the sad story of her original Beta beau, John Young Craft, Centre 1878, who was among the 13,000-20,000 deaths in summer 1878 from a yellow fever epidemic. Not marrying until well into adulthood, for years McKee wore Craft’s badge on her neckline (pictured). A lifelong Beta supporter, she recommended the pink rose as the Fraternity flower, which was adopted in 1889. This year, Katie Nettesheim joins McKee as a fellow Sweetheart. As the chapter comes off its second win of the NIC Chapter Award of Distinction since 2017 – only the second Beta chapter to ever twice receive the honor – there’s no better time to be part of Beta history at Centre.

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notablehighlights State of the Fraternity

With the 2019-20 year in the rearview mirror, take a look at how Beta chapters performed in key operational areas:

A

Student Body Presidents

C

A | On the Front Lines

1| 2| 3| 4| 5| 6|

Most summers, Betas at George Washington might have traveled the world or interned on Capitol Hill. But in 2020, eight of their brothers instead answered the call of leadership and spent their break processing samples at a COVID-19 detection lab. Among them was Shalin Bhatt ’20, (back row, second from left) who is the second-straight Beta to be named Greek Man of the Year by the university. Given Bhatt’s sacrifice alongside his fellow Zeta Nus, it’s not hard to see why.

B | Community Cares

As New York became the U.S. coronavirus epicenter, Kyriakos Chatzis, Stevens ’22, established the nonprofit “Community Cares” to provide packages of canned goods, paper and cleaning products, and nonperishable items to low-income families. All told, Chatzis exceeded his $10,000 fundraising goal and distributed to more than 1,000 families in need.

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Matt Ternus, North Dakota ’21 Apramay Mishra, Kansas ’21 Ryan Hyde, Denver ’21 Jack Palen, Loyola Marymount ’21 Joon Baek, Columbia ’21 Max Giarrusso, Denison ’21

37 FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

B

Being elected student body president is always an honor. But, earning the faith and confidence of your peers and being chosen for the role in this most turbulent of years certainly speaks volumes about the character and drive of these six Betas selected to lead their campuses during the 2020-21 academic year.

CAMPUS LIFE

• 142 chapters across Beta’s Broad Domain in August 2019; 139 chapters by May 2020 following the closure of chapters at Auburn, Nova Southeastern and Arizona for risk management or operational deficiencies. • 3.251 all-chapter GPA in 2019, an increase of 0.025 from 2018 and an alltime Beta record. • 3,524 men pledged a Beta chapter, helping the Fraternity reach 10,119 total undergraduate members and a 72-man average chapter size for 2019-20.

C | Everywhere a Beta

Social distancing couldn’t stop WPI from giving its graduating seniors a proper send-off. Members came together last spring for the Senior Ceremony via Twitch, Zoom and Minecraft. Complete with the Beta dragon, a grand chapter hall, their Beta house and even a fireworks finale, this custom digital world left no doubt that “Once a Beta, Always a Beta, Everywhere a Beta.”

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Beta’s Best Friends

CAMPUS LIFE

38

For National Dog Day on August 26, chapters from coast to coast shared their favorite shots of those good boys and girls that warm the hearts of Betas everywhere.

THE BETA THETA PI

Pooches showing their “Canine Kai” (top to bottom): • “Willow” (James Madison) • “Kumo” (Utah) • “Bentley” (Sacred Heart) • “Riley” (Cal Poly) (right)

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D | A Commissioned Scholar

Now commissioned into the U.S. Navy, former chapter officer and member of the Naval ROTC Garret Welsh, NC State ’20, was the inaugural recipient of the school’s Textile Military Scholarship.

E | Proud To Be an American Nico Yepes, Florida Gulf Coast ’22, is a campus tour guide, former chapter officer and combat engineer. And as of July 2020, he’s also an American citizen!

F | Taking in the View

D CAMPUS LIFE

Harrison Redden, Oklahoma State ’22, carried Beta along on his summer vacation to the Gulf Coast town of Galveston, Texas. “I can’t wait to be back at school with my brothers,” he said.

G | Leading the Team

39

E

FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

A sad reality for many schools Beta calls home, Covid-19 ended British Columbia’s 2020 football season before it even began. To ease the sorrow, the chapter shared a throwback photo of defensive back Chris Thelasco ’22, leading the Thunderbirds down the field.

H | Beta Was Here

Where’s the most unlikely place to find the Fraternity’s letters? Thanks to Aidan Huff, South Dakota ’23, that honor might just be at the art installation known as Cadillac Ranch in the Texas Panhandle city of Amarillo.

F

G

I | 1,100 Hours

Some 1,100 college students die by suicide each year. To raise awareness of this staggering number and in memory of those lost, brothers at Elon strove to fulfill 1,100 hours of service, which the group kicked off with work at a local farm and for Habitat for Humanity.

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H

I

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SAVE THE DATE

2021 AUGUST 5-8

During Beta's 182nd General Convention, Beta brothers, Sweethearts and guests will return home to Oxford, Ohio! Walk the pioneering steps of Beta’s “eight earnest young men.” Listen for the bells of the Beta Campanile that ring beautifully every quarter hour. Witness the very space where Beta was founded under candlelight and tour the grounds and museum that protect and preserve Beta’s prestigious legacy. Inhale the charm of Miami University, uptown Oxford and Beta’s Alpha chapter house. Meet Beta undergraduates and scores of Beta Greats, devoted Silver Grays, Beta Sweethearts, and Oxford Cup and Shepardson Award honorees. Fill your lungs (and heart) with the songs of a Great and Good Fraternity and, of course ... Celebrate your membership in one of North America’s greatest college fraternities.

"THERE’S A SCENE WHERE BROTHERS GREET, WHERE TRUE KINDRED HEARTS DO MEET." beta.org/convention

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B E TA T HE TA P I A 2 02 0 AWA R D S R EC O G N I T I O N Convention goers couldn't reunite in Phoenix for Beta's 181st, but the pandemic didn't stop the Fraternity from recognizing top performing chapters and individuals or designating its General Fraternity leadership.

INDIVIDUAL AWARD WINNERS Dr. Edward B. Taylor Advisor of the Year

Dr. Eric Buller, Miami ’19 Dr. Jeff Johnson, Iowa State ’16 Jerry Blesch General Secretary Leadership Award

Joseph A. (Jojo) Katool Jr, Mississippi ’20 Interfraternalism Recognition Award

Justin Kirk, Delta Upsilon

CHAPTER AWARD WINNERS Outstanding Campus Involvement Award

Iowa State, Nebraska, UC San Diego Miami, Loyola Chicago Excellence in Risk Management Award

Miami, Nebraska Advisory Team of the Year

UC San Diego Most Improved Chapter Award

Iowa State Outstanding New Member Education Award

Loyola Chicago Centre, Denver (Honorable Mention) North Dakota Award for Excellence in Chapter Publications

Miami, MIT, Nebraska John Holt Duncan Community Service Award

Florida (Best Ongoing Service) Iowa State (Best Annual Event) H.H. Stephenson Jr. Award for Excellence in Historical Preservation and Research

Georgia Tech, MIT (Honorable Mention) Best New Song

South Florida Charles H. Hardin Leadership Development Award

Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida Gulf Coast, Kettering A, Kettering B, Knox, Loyola Chicago, MIT, New Mexico, Oregon State, Rochester, Rockhurst, South Dakota, Wisconsin-Oshkosh Sons of the Dragon Club Award

100% participation from Arkansas (also had the most brothers join with 125 Club members), Bethany, Bowling Green, Cornell, Kettering A, Oregon, Southern Illinois, Toledo

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British Columbia, Columbia (Highest GPA | 3.73), Connecticut, Kettering B, Louisville, Miami (Fla.), Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma State, Southern Illinois (Most Improved GPA | 0.64 increase), Wittenberg Top Fraternity GPA on Campus (at least one term during the 2019 calendar year)

American, Bethany, Centre, Cincinnati, Cornell, Creighton, Dayton, Delaware, Denison, Denver, Elon, Florida State, High Point, John Carroll, Johns Hopkins, Kentucky, Kettering B, Loyola Chicago, Loyola Marymount, NC State, Oklahoma, Pittsburgh, Quinnipiac, Sacred Heart, San Diego, St. Lawrence, TCU, Texas, Texas at Arlington, Truman State, UC San Diego, Utah, Westminster, Willamette, Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Wittenberg Sisson Award Winners

British Columbia, Centre, Creighton, Delaware, Denver, Georgia Tech, High Point, Kansas State, Kettering B, Loyola Chicago, Miami, Nebraska, New Jersey, Pittsburgh, San Diego, Texas, Truman State, Villanova Knox Award Winners

Centre (7), Creighton (3), Delaware (2), Georgia Tech (7), Kansas State (12), Kettering B (9), Miami (8), Nebraska (17), New Jersey (2), Pittsburgh (1), San Diego (11), Villanova (1)

Matthew V. Zahn, George Washington ’15 District Chief of the Year

Nicholas H. Sexton, Eastern Kentucky ’11 J. Nicholas Gilson, Utah ’03 (Honorable Mention) Malcolm C. Andrews, Virginia ’89 (Honorable Mention)

Rookie District Chief of the Year

Brock R. Griffin, Utah ’14 Terry Weber, Truman State ’01 House Corporation Volunteer of the Year Award

Patrick C. Rissi, Arizona State ’80 House Director of the Year

Bobbie "Mom" Lonker (Kansas State) Fraternity/Sorority Advisor of the Year

Chris Graham (Florida State)

BOARD APPOINTMENTS Fraternity Board of Trustees

41 FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

Outstanding Alumni Relations Award

Virginia Tech Award for Excellence in Academics (spring and fall 2019)

AWARDS RECOGNITION

Outstanding Recruitment Award

Regional Chief of the Year

Tom Cassady, Cincinnati ’76 (General Fraternity President) Justin Rutherford, Northwestern ’00 (Reappointed Vice President) Foundation Board of Directors

Stavan Bhatt, Louisville ’98 Mike Bickford, Oklahoma ’80 Art Carmichael, Oregon ’62 Jeff Flanagan, Rhode Island ’93 Tom Olver, Central Michigan ’98 Tom Reeves, Eastern Kentucky ’99 Nelson Vincent, Cincinnati ’12 General Fraternity House Corporation Board of Directors

Andy Mattox, Nebraska ’00 Undergraduate Commissioners

Colin Dunning, Texas ’20 Ian Ross, Michigan ’21

10/29/20 10:32 AM


“John Turner was one of a kind. An honourable gentleman and an upstanding Canadian, John cared deeply about democracy, equality, and those he served. His optimistic outlook, energetic approach and tireless service inspired many — and our country is a better place for it.” — Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Photo: The Canadian Press

42 | THE BETA THETA PI | HONOURING JOHN TURNER

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A

rriving in British Columbia from England in 1932, the child known as John “Chick” Turner, British Columbia ’49, was destined to become a Canadian golden boy and the first Beta to ever lead his nation in elected office. Turner entered the University of British Columbia in 1945 at the young age of 16 and brought honor to Gamma Omicron with his high grades, seat on the student council, role as writer and editor of the campus newspaper, and a sports acumen that led the chapter to an intramural cup in two consecutive years.

him home to Canada to do “real work.” Instead, he landed at Montreal law firm Strikeman Elliott. Already possessing the brains and the brawn, Turner soon obtained the professional and social stature he would need to earn the title “Canada’s Kennedy.” Author Christina McCall said “he was the sexiest thing on the squash courts, the handsomest man at the balls, escorting the prettiest and most eligible girls.”

nancial stability, and earning a reputation for always sticking up for the little guy. His years of service saw his career crowned in 1984 when he moved into 24 Sussex Drive in Ottawa as the 17th prime minister of Canada. In this, Turner reached a pinnacle that generations of his American Beta brothers have yet to reach – winning election to his nation’s highest office.

Over the course of his life, Turner touched thousands of lives across the country. He supported many charitable organizations, including the Mount Sanai H o s p i t a l in Toronto, t h e Community Foundation of Toronto an d World Wildlife Of course, his Fund Canada. success as an Re m e m b e re d THE RHODES SCHOLAR AND POLITICAL DARLING ONCE DUBBED “CANADA’S intramural atheven by his KENNEDY” IS THE ONLY BETA TO HAVE EVER BECOME HEAD OF STATE. lete downplays political rivals BY JUSTIN WARREN, SMU ’10; DESIGNED BY MIKE ROUPAS, IOWA ’10 Turner’s prowa s a “t r u e ess on the field. g e n t l e m a n” Competing in who brought a track, he won “great sense” of four Canadian championship gold med- Yet Turner always remained drawn to dignity to his long career as a politician, als, held the country’s record for the men’s community and public service, and he ex- Turner was appointed a Companion of 100-yard dash and qualified for the 1948 ecuted a dazzling winning campaign for the Order of Canada in 1994. Olympic team. A 1949 article in The a seat in Parliament in 1962. It was then Beta Theta Pi magazine noted Turn- he fell in love with one of his campaign In all his years of service to his country, er’s “fine team spirit and sports ability,” workers, Geils Kilgour, who he married he never lost his deep love and passion for the Beta brotherhood. First representwhich in hindsight sells far short the the following year. ing his chapter as delegate at the 108th contributions John Turner would make to both his home chapter and Canadian Brother Turner’s political career contin- General Convention in 1947, Turner reued uninterrupted for more than a decade mained a mainstay at Fraternity events in Betas everywhere. in increasingly prominent roles – Register British Columbia and Ontario even after After graduation, he returned to his na- General, Minister of Consumer and Cor- his graduation. For this, in 1986 he betive country as a Rhodes Scholar – one porate Affairs, Solicitor General, Minis- came the fourth Beta and first Canadian of only 85 Betas to ever receive the pres- ter of Justice and Attorney General, and to be awarded the coveted Oxford Cup. tigious academic award – and studied Minister of Finance – where he achieved jurisprudence and civil law at Magda- major successes in protecting human A true man of principle who spent a lifetime len College at the University of Oxford. rights and decriminalizing homosexu- putting others before self, Brother John Turner intended to continue studying ality, passing the Official Languages Act Turner died peacefully at home surroundfor his doctorate in Paris, but his plans giving French and English equal status in ed by his family on September 19, 2020, were cut short when his stepfather called the Canadian government, providing fi- at the age of 91. May he rest in peace. 

J HN TURNER

HONOURING JOHN TURNER | FALL 2020 | 43

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Need gift ideas for the holidays? This year’s collection of Beta Theta Pi products was hand-picked with your favorite Beta — and you — in mind! HOLIDAY WISH LIST

44 THE BETA THETA PI

i P a et

t s i L h s i W y a d li

Th a t Be

Ho

0 2 0 2

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’Tis the season for ugly sweaters and Beta holiday apparel! Designs available in a variety of colors in the following garment styles:

beta.org/merchhouse

Small Gifts

Been searching high and low for a Beta stocking stuffer or a grab bag gift? The hunt ends now! (Additional colors and styles of each item are available.)

45 FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

Pocket Tees - $20 Longsleeve Shirts $25 Crewneck Sweatshirts - $30 Hoodies - $35

HOLIDAY WISH LIST

Holiday Collection

B. A.

A. Beta Ornament - $11.78 betaspirit.com

C.

B. YETI Drinkware - starting at $39.99 beta.org/yeti C. Playing Cards - $10.35 zazzle.com/betathetapi D. Face Mask - $20 beta.org/masks

D. E.

E. Charcoal Beanie - $14.95 campus-classics.com

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Retro Bro

A.

C.

Looking for that old school style with a modern day twist? We’ve got you covered with these options. A. Champion Crewneck - $56.95 campus-classics.com

B.

B. ’70s Sticker Sheet - $12.99 greekgear.com C. Beta Anorak - $45.95 greekgear.com HOLIDAY WISH LIST

Man of Principle B. C.

46

A traditional and refined classic look is always a good bet for Betas young and old with a simple taste and timeless style. A. Bi-fold Beta Letter Wallet - $35.95 campus-classics.com

THE BETA THETA PI

B. Leather Bracelet - $25.00 hjgreek.com

A.

C. Beta Badge - starting at $27.00 hjgreek.com

D.

D. Beta Flag Cufflinks - $34.95 greekgear.com

Slam Dunk

A.

Whether on the court, at the gym or in the chapter house, these items are perfect for a Beta athlete. A. Nike Dri-FIT Hat - $45.01 betaspirit.com

C.

B.

B. Mini Basketball Hoop - $20.75 zazzle.com/betathetapi C. Personalized Basketball Jersey - $32.95 kineticsociety.com D. Personalized Duffle Bag - $61.95 campus-classics.com

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D.

10/26/20 3:40 PM


B.

Cozy Up

A.

Deck out your lounge space and settle in next to a fire this winter with some comfortable Beta gear. A. Plaid Flannel Pants - $30.32 betaspirit.com B. Table Lamp - $46.70 zazzle.com/betathetapi C. Beta Mug - $9.39 betaspirit.com

C.

D.

D. Bathrobe - $48.95 greeku.com

Congrats, Grad

A.

Graduation coming up this year? Stock up now on a graduation gift he can look forward to in the coming months.

B.

A. Beta Grad Bundle - $99.95 campus-classics.com B. Beta Certificate Frame - starting at $139 diplomaframe.com/btpi C. Graduation Stole - $29.99 greekgear.com

C.

Gifts for Them

Don’t forget about mom, dad, your Sweetheart or man’s best friend! That special Beta supporter in your life deserves a treasured gift to match. A. Beta Mom Quarter-zip - $46.95 campus-classics.com

B. A.

B. Beta Dad T-Shirt - $20.33 betaspirit.com

D.

C. Heart Lavaliere - starting at $23.00 hjgreek.com

C.

D. Pet Gear - starting at $16.60 zazzle.com/betathetapi Who’s this good boy? It’s “Bentley” from Sacred Heart!

p44-47_Holiday Gift Guide_fall20.indd 47

10/29/20 11:13 AM


chapterineternal loving memory

Arkansas

Chicago

Delaware

A. Jordan Santiago ’16, Oct. 7

Robert E. Kronemyer ’53, April 4 C James M. Ratcliffe ’46, June 17 C

Garret D. Christino ’20, Aug. 14

Cincinnati

Robert M. Hoover ’49, July 19, 2018 William W. Johnson ’48, June 4 Robert R. Wiley ’60, July 9, 2019

Arizona Francis R. Bastis ’63, Aug. 12, 2018

Harold F. Benford ’67, Aug. 12 Davis G. Kelly ’18, July 3 William B. Warrick ’74, June 6

Gregory E. Back ’74, April 20 James T. Coughlin Jr. ’67, Aug. 3 John D. Erhardt ’52, Feb. 28 James F. Kaiser ’52, Feb. 13 John L. Shives Jr. ’54, Jan. 24

Forever Remembered Notices of Beta brothers and Beta Sweethearts who passed were reported to the Administrative Office between February 1 and October 7, 2020.

Ball State

Colgate

Report a Beta’s Death Please contact Receptionist Phyllis Bowie at 800.800. BETA or phyllis.bowie@ beta.org to report a death.

Bowdoin

Auburn

CHAPTER ETERNAL

48 THE BETA THETA PI

Donate to the Archives Ask loved ones to donate your Beta badge and important Beta artifacts to the Fraternity’s archives and museum in Oxford. Memorial Gifts The Fraternity is often asked how to memorialize a dearly departed Beta. Memorial gifts can be made at beta.org/gift or with Director of Development Laura Lednik at 800.800. BETA. In lieu of flowers, consider naming the Beta Leadership Fund in your own obituary.

Flags indicate Betas who served in the United States or Canadian armed forces.

p48-50_Chapter Eternal_fall20.indd 48

David A. Jarrett ’73, Sept. 1

Beloit John E. Erickson ’49, March 18 C Harry F. Worth Jr. ’59, March 16

Bethany Richard A. Lenhart ’73, Feb. 15 Paul J. Megna ’86, June 19

Richard L. Badger ’50, July 13, 2019 Terry D. Stenberg ’56, July 5 C

Bowling Green Ronald L. Apple ’66, June 21 Brian W. Bacik ’69, April 25

British Columbia John A. McCurrach ’58, March 25 John N. Turner ’49, Sept. 19 Gordon N. Turriff ’71, June 3

Russell C. Buchanan ’50, May 31 C Ralph A. Jones ’52, Aug. 6 C John L. “Lang” Hatcher ’54, Sept. 25 C Bunn S. Rhea ’50, June 8, 2019 John L. West ’46, April 25 C

Colorado Edwin K. Anderson ’57, May 7, 2019 James P. Dikeou ’55, July 16 C

Colorado College Quintin D. Stephen-Hassard ’61, Feb. 29 C

Colorado Mines Charles W. Bloomquist ’70, June 30, 2019 John R. Feeley ’64, March 12 C Dezsee J. Hajdu ’61, May 31 Thomas W. Rollins ’53, May 22 C

Denison

Denver Robert W. Larson ’50, May 18 C

DePauw Dennis L. Barrett ’67, March 20 Donald M. Malinovsky ’65, April 21 C James T. McCoy ’62, Aug. 23 John E. Somers ’65, Aug. 24 C Roy M. Stanley, II ’58, June 28 C Dickinson Harvey A. Block ’71, April 1 Duke Stanley B. Kirsch Jr ’90, Jan. 11 Joseph A. Miller ’99, July 17 John L. Schmitt ’55, May 3 Eastern Kentucky Michael W. Egan ’07, April 8 Christopher T. McClamroch ’04, April 8

Emory

Columbia

Bruce W. Taylor ’73, Nov. 26, 2019

Florida

George E. Cort ’60, Feb. 12 C Vernon H. Neubert ’48, March 3 C

Charles F. Bowers Jr. ’62, Sept. 19 Carl K. Hammergren ’49, June 24, 2019 C David W. Kinne ’57, March 14 C Donald C. Miller ’61, Sept. 23 E. W. Schmidt ’39, March 29

Case

Cornell

Louis A. Levar ’49, Jan. 25 C Thomas D. Oxley ’65, May 19

Douglas L. Burrill ’66, Jan. 16 Henry Z. Lang Jr. ’49, Jan. 23 Clyde H. Loughridge ’43, Nov. 30, 2019 C Jonathan L. Romero ’99, June 17

Carnegie Mellon

Case Western Reserve Bob Jin “Aiden” Kim ’22, Feb. 20

Central Michigan

Dartmouth

Patrick K. Ball ’91, July 11 Raymond Barkett ’60, May 15 Robert A. Duganne ’60, June 16 C Jerry W. Peters ’82, Jan. 28 David S. Whittaker ’63, Sept. 26 C

Georgia Stephen Norris ’17, Sept. 4, 2018

Georgia Tech Doonan D. McGraw ’48, Oct. 19, 2018

Stephan E. Masters ’90, March 2

Karl F. Du Puy ’64, Aug. 21 Parke H. Sickler ’51, Sept. 6 C

GMI-EMI

Centre

Davidson

Idaho

Bennie D. Barker ’54, Jan. 2 Robert M. Gallant II ’50, Sept. 15, 2019 Ralph M. Holt Jr. ’53, Oct. 14, 2019 Arthur M. Martin Jr. ’56, Oct. 23, 2018 C Robert E. Nimocks Jr. ’52, May 11

Lance L. Johnson ’61, July 22 C Jeffrey J. McQueeny ’65, July 29 Arbie G. Miller Jr. ’53, May 7 David D. O’Harrow ’56, March 2

Karen Van De Hey Lawrence House Mom April 29 Named Beta’s 2014 House Director of the Year, Karen was the beloved house mother of Gamma Pi where she enjoyed cooking and encouraging young Betas for 20+ years.

Jordan Santiago Arkansas ’16 October 7 An ever-optimistic founding father described by a chapter brother as “an example of everything Beta stands for,” “Santi” was tragically struck by a car while walking home.

Walter M. Byington III ’54, April 6 Harry L. Riggs Jr. ’52, Feb. 16 C Thomas E. Runyan ’63, June 26 Sidney R. Wold ’51, Aug. 25 C

Nancy Cottrell Beta Sweetheart September 22 Beta Sweetheart of former Administrative Secretary Bob Cottrell, Miami ’54, Nancy was an enthusiastic supporter of Beta and had three Miami Beta sons, Phil ’78, Rob ’79, and Rick ’80.

Erhart R. Soderwall ’66, Jan. 9

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Illinois

Maine

Joshua T. Bowler ’97, July 28, 2019 Key C. Pittman ’57, Dec. 26, 2019 Bruce W. Wettman ’70, March 13 Philip C. Yenerich ’64, March 30

Clyde M. Bickford ’55, May 31 Jonathan D. Sirois ’06, July 30

Indiana Seavey M. Bailey Jr. ’49, Aug. 16, 2018 Dennis E. Cloud ’71, Feb. 2 Charles W. Compton III ’74, July 5 Brady B. Gruemmer ’84, Feb. 21 Lewis B. Lytton ’72, Aug. 17, 2018 Ronald B. Rice ’55, Jan. 20 C Ronnie J. Spivey ’68, Jan. 26

Iowa Grant R. Bell ’70, March 13 James D. Branan ’62, Feb. 28 C Theodore J. Economos ’80, Aug. 23 Robert D. Musgjerd ’47, May 29, 2018

B. William Hudson ’17, Aug. 18

Kansas Stephen R. Ellsworth ’49, Nov. 24, 2019 Robert K. Lynch ’59, March 13 Lee E. Phillips III ’53, April 12 C Robert R. Roulier ’61, Feb. 6 C Andrew B. Wood ’17, June 25

Kansas State

Kenyon Charles L. Barr Jr. ’48, Feb. 22 Willis S. Hough ’49, Jan. 27 James A. Hughes Jr. ’55, June 16 C

Knox Dale A. Arahood ’55, Dec. 8, 2019 C

Lawrence Welton E. Firehammer ’49, Sept. 7, 2019 David A. Knickel ’50, Aug. 8, 2019 C Robert E. Schwab ’52, April 20, 2019

Miami Steven B. Altshuld ’74, March 27 Otto H. Jung ’55, Aug. 19 C Gregg L. Miller ’77, June 12 Nick Mourouzis ’59, Sept. 16 Andrew L. Olin ’79, April 15 Walter R. Shafer ’50, March 21 C Michael J. Wall ’73, Jan. 21 Mack Yoho Jr. ’58, Sept. 14 Miami (Fla.) Max S. Mann ’12, Feb. 21

Michigan John F. Bloodgood ’60, May 9 Manuel L. Del Valle ’45, April 5 Thomas R. Hibbard ’55, Sept. 6 C

Michigan State William T. Alldredge ’61, Jan. 12 Charles W. Ash ’76, Nov. 1, 2019 John Castiglione ’60, May 26 James A. Hutchinson II ’58, Nov. 22, 2019 Adam L. May ’84, April 21

Minnesota Charles G. Cunningham ’49, July 6 C Donald E. McGrath ’55, June 21 C

Mississippi Patrick J. Flaherty IV ’20, May 16 William A. Pyle ’64, Dec. 18, 2019 James T. Robertson ’73, Jan. 30

Missouri Joe G. Baker ’54, July 27 C William M. Cooper ’50, Sept. 8, 2018 James D. Lawler ’60, March 14 William H. Leedy ’50, June 18 C Max R. Simpson ’52, July 12 C Robert E. Steele Jr. ’59, April 19 C

MIT

William L. Peters ’79, Aug. 30 C

Robert E. Donovan ’51, Aug. 8, 2019 C Thomas M. McEvoy Jr. ’45, March 2 C Herbert B. Voelcker Jr. ’51, Jan. 23 C

Mack Yoho Miami ’58 September 14 An original member of the NFL’s Buffalo Bills where he was starting defensive end in his first three seasons, Mack was traded to the Boston Patriots for his final season.

Nick Mourouzis Miami ’59 September 16 A college quarterback, Nick was head football coach at DePauw (1981-2003) and inducted into Miami’s Cradle of Coaches and the Football Hall of Fame at both DePauw and Indiana.

Lehigh

p48-50_Chapter Eternal_fall20.indd 49

North Carolina Samuel L. Blythe ’54, April 29 Thomas W. Jordan Jr. ’71, May 7 Thomas J. Purdie ’77, April 15

North Dakota John N. Black ’58, Sept. 16 C Blaine E. Johner ’62, Feb. 1 Robert V. Kasowan ’68, March 6 Donald W. McKenzie ’68, July 4 C Northwestern Brian E. Baldwin ’54, May 25 Tilden H. Bunge ’91, Jan. 29 John A. Raveret ’57, June 13 F. L. Waples ’50, Jan. 14

Nova Southeastern Robert J. Rand ’10, Feb. 18

Ohio Brent M. Bell ’64, June 27 David M. Briggs ’62, June 13 C William L. Haffner ’54, April 10 Joseph C. Kramer ’81, March 18 John M. Savey ’81, July 30 Gerald B. Smith ’50, Sept. 4 C

Ohio State Robert E. Bardwell Jr. ’74, Dec. 15, 2019 William E. Dickerson ’50, Aug. 24 C Ronald L. Lamb ’71, Feb. 4 Richard L. Springer ’66, Feb. 1 C Wesley H. VanFossen ’58, June 30 C

Ohio Wesleyan Thomas J. Abernathy ’62, March 13 John E. Appel ’56, Feb. 22 C John M. Funderburg ’56, Nov. 29, 2019 Richard W. McClintock ’53, March 31 Walter H. Rohr ’71, May 5 C

Charlie Cunningham Minnesota ’49 July 6 A loyal, humble and generous seven-figure donor of his alma mater, chapter and the General Fraternity, Charlie’s anonymous lead gift endowed Beta’s Peter F. Greiner Leadership College.

John Turner British Columbia ’49 September 19 See pages 42-43 for an extended tribute to the 17th prime minister of Canada. Bob Jin “Aiden” Kim Case Western Reserve ’22 February 20 An international student and former chapter VP of programming, Aiden was kind, loving and enjoyed volleyball. He tragically died by suicide. J. L. “Lang” Hatcher Colgate ’54 September 25 John served as Beta Theta’s chapter president, 10-year chapter counselor and 40-year house corporation board member, including 17 years as president.

49 FALL 2020 | BETA.ORG

Richard D. Boyd ’59, June 25 C David A. Hanson ’71, Sept. 1 John D. Harrison ’65, Jan. 29 Richard T. Petro ’49, March 6, 2019 C Leo W. Stolzer ’57, June 20 C

John R. Feeley III ’94, March 12

John Erickson Beloit ’49 March 18 A former chapter president and accomplished college basketball and tennis player, John was head basketball coach of the Wisconsin Badgers and the first general manager of the NBA’s Milwaukee Bucks.

CHAPTER ETERNAL

John Carroll

McGill

Nebraska William E. Condon ’49, June 13 Douglas J. Cotner ’65, May 17 John H. Lonnquist ’65, July 5 John F. McLeay ’55, June 17 C Richard L. Place ’61, March 17 Joseph L. Rembolt ’67, March 20 Gerard L. Stever ’57, March 18 C Walter W. Switzer ’59, June 19 William E. Thompson ’65, Aug. 2 C

Garret Christino Delaware ’20 August 14 A founding father, chartering president and newly appointed chapter counselor, Garret was killed in a car accident days before beginning law school. Dick Church Oregon ’55 July 24 Since 1976, Dick served Beta in various capacities, including district chief, Beta Rho alumni association member and chairman of two major fundraising campaigns for his chapter.

10/29/20 10:26 AM


Richard W. Standish ’67, July 26 C Chester D. Wright ’56, Aug. 7

Oklahoma Loren V. Baker Jr. ’52, July 20 Steven L. Barghols ’73, July 29 Robert G. Berry Jr. ’61, March 16 Paul G. Brown ’77, Aug. 22 Wayne E. Copeland Jr. ’66, July 1 C Robert T. Dooley ’55, June 12 C Philip J. Lunsford ’51, June 11 C Chandler W. Martin ’12, Feb. 12 Robert N. Naifeh Jr. ’79, March 29 Donald A. Price ’54, April 3 C Paul R. Shunatona ’83, Sept. 6 Charles R. Wright ’85, March 16

Oklahoma State

CHAPTER ETERNAL

50

Jerald W. Ashby ’58, March 8 Donald C. Davis ’62, Jan. 27, 2019 C John C. Donovan ’60, Aug. 10, 2019 Allen K. Grady ’50, March 30, 2019 C Basil A. Hayes Jr. ’50, May 18, 2018 Kris G. Hochderffer ’70, April 8 Robert F. Hufnagel ’85, Dec. 1, 2019 Jerry L. Laughlin ’68, Sept. 23, 2018 Edwin C. Lookabaugh ’57, July 8, 2019 C Joseph L. Meibergen ’53, April 16 C Bruce L. Miller ’64, Dec. 11, 2018 Gene W. Owens ’62, Aug. 20, 2018 Carl E. Shafer ’57, Nov. 10, 2019 Vernon B. VanHorn ’51, July 27, 2019 C Victor L. Weber Jr. ’58, March 14, 2018 C Roger C. Wile ’64, Jan. 5

THE BETA THETA PI

Oregon J. C. Allen ’67, Aug. 24 C Richard F. Church ’55, July 24 C Roger A. Harman ’51, May 22 C Christopher G. McAdams ’96, Feb. 8 Walter V. McKinney Jr. ’51, Oct. 15, 2019 William R. Reed ’46, Jan. 28 C John D. Werschkul ’65, Dec. 2, 2019 C

Oregon State Kevin C. Fuller ’93, March 27 Carl E. Nielsen ’53, May 31, 2019

Penn State Douglas C. Adams ’72, July 19, 2018 Donald E. Frey ’53, Jan. 31, 2019 Thomas M. Imswiler ’57, April 15 C Peter W. Shih ’64, Oct. 22, 2019 Robert S. Sutherland ’74, April 15

Pennsylvania Bruce A. Crocco ’56, June 27

Puget Sound James C. Fredrickson ’70, Feb. 8 George H. Mills Jr. ’68, March 19

Purdue Paul R. Baumgartner ’49, Jan. 17, 2019 Michael J. Cox ’88, June 5 Phillip G. Finney ’56, June 12

p48-50_Chapter Eternal_fall20.indd 50

Glenn C. Maxwell ’48, Sept. 19, 2019 C Thomas M. Popcheff ’73, April 5 Shervin Sadighian ’91, Jan. 22 Charles B. Thompson ’49, May 26, 2019

Rutgers John W. McLoughlin ’57, Jan. 23

Sewanee Stephen L. Barnett ’70, Aug. 13

Mark W. Paulos ’81, June 9 Michael L. Rubin ’72, July 27

Williams

Vanderbilt

Wisconsin

William H. Cammack ’52, Feb. 20 C Jeffery W. Cobb ’82, March 4 Harold A. Deal Jr. ’54, Sept. 12 Robert V. Russell ’59, July 29 C

Virginia

Robert L. Coburn ’68, Nov. 18, 2019

Richard L. Barrick ’85, July 11 Alexander P. Smith ’56, July 20 C Keith H. Wood ’57, Feb. 7 C

South Dakota

Wabash

SMU

Ordell W. Braase ’54, March 26, 2019 Robert E. Hall ’58, June 4 Paul J. Kern ’58, Nov. 16, 2018 Dan H. Kirkham ’58, Feb. 7 Leroy D. Mohrman Jr. ’64, May 7, 2018

Dwight G. Brainard ’54, Feb. 18 Donald B. Miller ’53, May 26 C

Washington Thomas R. Brooks ’63, July 19 C

Southern California

Washington & Jefferson

Nelson E. Mills ’58, June 19

William R. Frey ’57, Feb. 12 C James S. Griffin II ’65, July 3 C George E. Lantz ’53, Feb. 8 C

Stanford Thomas E. Lagerquist ’61, July 10 C

Stevens

Washington and Lee

Richard E. Kronauer ’49, Oct. 18, 2019

John K. Boardman Jr. ’51, July 8 C James F. Surface Jr. ’60, July 17

Texas

Washington in St. Louis

Daniel J. Bates ’81, May 2 Sidney S. Jarnagin ’63, April 13 Hal W. Johnson ’52, July 19 C R. L. Jordan ’65, Sept. 16 C Thomas M. Kyger ’65, March 1 Kenneth H. Pape ’58, Oct. 8, 2019

Arthur H. Harter Jr. ’49, Feb. 20 C Frederick J. Sudekum Jr. ’47, Jan. 17

Washington State Howard G. Hallgarth ’49, June 3, 2019 William E. Yenter ’54, Nov. 25, 2019 C

Texas A&M

Wesleyan

Branch L. Ward ’89, Aug. 21, 2019

John K. Easton Jr. ’58, April 17 Vincent J. LePore Jr. ’49, Sept. 21, 2018 Jeffrey T. Winston ’67, July 23

Texas Tech Blake A. Justice ’20, Oct. 4

Toronto David R. McCuaig ’58, May 31

Tulane Dabney M. Ewin ’51, June 24 C David R. Normann ’49, Oct. 13, 2018

UC Berkeley Craig W. Brandt ’57, Jan. 13 C Kermit A. Seefeld ’67, June 5 C

UCLA Raymond E. Hammeras ’49, March 26 C Albert Su ’05, May 9, 2018 Terrence A. Waldron ’01, Dec. 26, 2018

Union Daniel M. Paine ’63, Feb. 13 C

Utah Frederick L. Anderson ’60, June 8 Michael Brinton ’85, July 20 David M. Creer ’70, April 22 Frank Fuller ’83, May 31

West Virginia Robert L. Hamilton ’49, March 4 C Richard L. Howard ’64, July 28 C Robert H. Martin ’55, July 18, 2019 Herbert G. Underwood ’51, July 7 C

Western Reserve Edward J. Benedict ’61, June 9 C Alfred M. Cheselka ’52, Sept. 15 C Wayne L. Clevenger ’65, March 21 C John F. DiStefano Jr. ’70, July 13 C

Westminster Giles M. Fowler ’55, Nov. 3, 2018 William L. Hartford ’61, Sept. 9 C Thomas H. May ’58, March 31 C Robert S. Stoltz III ’63, March 27 C

Wichita State Robert A. Deardorff ’63, Feb. 21 Michael R. Stucky ’64, June 27

Willamette Herbert C. Peschel ’68, April 16 C Robert M. Waibel ’87, March 26

Denys R. Slater Jr. ’52, May 30

Benjamin N. Belzer ’18, July 22 Gordon F. Rohn ’62, June 11, 2019 C Paul E. Tausche ’48, April 24 C

Wittenberg John W. Sixt ’64, July 9 Donald R. Ward ’51, March 7 C Trell H. Yocum ’70, Feb. 8

Yale Richard A. Feder ’58, July 17 C Charles R. Hoogland ’52, June 25 C

George Mills Puget Sound ’68 March 19 Retiring last fall from his role as associate vice president for university relations at Puget Sound, George devoted his entire career to his alma mater. Blake Justice Texas Tech ’20 October 4 Described by his chapter brothers as “always ready to welcome anyone with open arms,” the former chapter president and vice president of recruitment tragically died by suicide. Jack Easton Wesleyan ’58 April 17 A former General Treasurer, Jack also served on the Beta Foundation Board of Directors and was honored in 2011 with the Francis W. Shepardson Award for his lifetime of service to the General Fraternity. Ben Belzer Wisconsin ’18 July 22 Personal assistant to Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers, who described him as “simply incomparable” and “remarkably talented,” the former chapter recruitment chairman drowned in a tubing accident.

10/26/20 2:01 PM


THE BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION 2020 ANNUAL REPORT JUNE 1, 2019 – MAY 31, 2020

SO SAY W E A L L O F U S WORKING TOGETHER TO KEEP BETAS CONNECTED

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WELCOME

BETA BROTHERS AND FRIENDS OF BETA:

ANNUAL REPORT

HIGHLIGHTS BY THE NUMBERS

pg. 4

JOHN REILY KNOX CLUB

pg. 9

NAMED ENDOWMENT FUNDS pg. 11 BRIDGE BUILDER SOCIETY

pg. 13

GIVING DAY CHALLENGE

pg. 15

AUTO-KAI CLUB

pg. 17

SONS OF THE DRAGON CLUB

pg. 19

MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS

pg. 21

On behalf of the Beta Theta Pi Foundation, thank you for your generous support. This year’s Annual Report highlights the Beta Foundation’s 2019-20 year, which includes the largest Beta Leadership Fund results in the history of the Fraternity! Because of you, 10,000 students, 140,000+ alumni and 1,000 volunteers will continue to receive the resources needed to honor the mission of our Fraternity: “To develop men of principle for a principled life.” This year, when the global pandemic forced Betas across North America to complete their school term from home and stay connected in new ways, the Fraternity quickly adapted to meet the moment and support undergraduates financially impacted through COVID-19 relief scholarships. As our chapters navigate this new environment, the Beta Foundation aims to continue to meet their needs by doubling the Men of Principle Scholarship grants and delivering an expanded field of online educational tools to undergraduates and volunteers. This year's recordbreaking support of the Beta Leadership Fund made these endeavors possible. Thank you again, brothers and friends, for your resiliency and dedication to our Great and Good Fraternity. Onward! — Mike Feinstein, MIT ’82 Foundation Chairman

$2,738,566 FOUNDATION PURPOSE

To advance the educational mission and goals of Beta Theta Pi toward the vision of the Fraternity.

TOTAL EDUCATIONAL DOLLARS GRANTED IN FY20

SUPPORTING FRATERNITY INITIATIVES including . . . MORE THAN

200

Foundation Responsibilities Cultivate lifelong friendships Solicit Betas and friends Provide gift stewardship Fund leadership and educational grants • Empower Foundation volunteers • Oversee investment strategies • Recognize Betas, parents and Friends of Beta

2x

• • • •

$185,000

IN TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS

MEN OF PRINCIPLE GRANTS TO AID CHAPTERS IN RECRUITMENT

ONLINE TRAINING MODULES FOR UNDERGRADUATES AND VOLUNTEERS

$300,000

FOR BETA BROTHERHOOD ASSESSMENT AND SON OF THE STARS MEMBER ORIENTATION

$70,000 IN COVID-19 RELIEF SCHOLARSHIPS

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |2| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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I think it’s important for undergraduate Betas like me to reflect on all of the opportunities that being a part of Beta affords all of us. This fraternity has given me so much that it would be selfish not to give back.”

— Grant Gagaza, Pacific ‘21 Sons of the Dragon Club Council Member

CHAPTER PRESIDENT GRANT GAGAZA, PACIFIC ‘21 (SECOND FROM LEFT)

TESTIMONIALS

HONORARY PARENT CHAIRS

Rick and Lea Hetherington, Parents of Will Hetherington, Mississippi ’21 “Beta has given our son a sense of family. We have seen Will’s confidence grow through his Beta experience. We support the Beta Foundation because we know the Fraternity is investing in and building up the next generation of leaders."

HONORARY IRA CHAIRMAN

Kent Mergler, Cincinnati '63 "Being a Beta is a life enhancing experience! I support Beta because our core values continue to be taught to our undergraduate men through the Men of Principle leadership training, preparing them to take on the challenges of the future.”

FRIEND OF BETA CHAIRMAN

Billy Boulden, Assistant Dean of Students at Iowa State “One of the most remarkable things about Beta is that the organization is exactly what they say they are. Beta truly invests in its members by providing them the tools, resources and skills to impact the world around them.”

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |3| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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BY THE NUMBERS

FALL 2019 NEW MEMBERS GATHER OUTSIDE THE NEWLY BUILT CHAPTER HOUSE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

$3,809,179 2019-2020 TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE BETA FOUNDATION:

3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500

DONOR PARTICIPATION

2,517 Alumni Donors 987 Undergraduate Donors 451 Parents and Friends of Beta Donors 101 Corporate and Matching Gifts

0

GIFTS RECEIVED

(JUNE 1, 2019 – MAY 31, 2020)

 Beta Leadership Fund

 Tuition Scholarship Funds

 Leadership and Programmatic Funds

 DEA* and Chapter Funds

$30,398

$1,082,372

$1,884,573

$235,333

 Operating Funds

*The Designated Educational Area Grant Program allows the Beta Foundation to accept gifts earmarked for funding educational spaces or projects of chapter houses. Visit beta.org/dea to learn more.

$400,000

 Founders Fund Endowment $175,903

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |4| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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FRATERNITY SNAPSHOT

A LOOK AT THE FRATERNITY TODAY COMPARED TO 1997, WHICH MARKED THE INCEPTION OF THE MEN OF PRINCIPLE INITIATIVE.

139 Chapters and Colonies

Average chapter membership size is up 64% from 1997

10,119 Undergraduates Up from 6,842 in 1997

1,012 Chapter Advisors Up from 280 in 1997

94¢

OF EVERY DOLLAR SPENT directly benefited young Betas through leadership programs – well above the non-profit industry benchmark of 65¢.

3.2 Beta's All-Chapter GPA Up from 2.82 in 1997

2019-20 LEADERSHIP PROGRAM PARTICIPATION 1,782 STUDENTS GRADUATED FROM BETA'S AWARD-WINNING LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS THANKS TO YOUR SUPPORT!

60% Keystone Regional Leadership Conference 18% Wooden Institute for Men of Principle Leadership College 14% 8% Presidents Academy

(1,079 Undergraduates)

(329 Undergraduates)

(242 Undergraduates)

(132 Chapter Presidents)

BETA LEADERSHIP FUND DOLLARS RAISED $1,200,000

$1,082,372 LARGEST BLF TOTAL ON RECORD!

$1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000

$551,391

$400,000 $200,000 $0

2005

2020

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |5| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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OUR SUPPORTERS

BETA BROTHERS FROM GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY (2019)

BETA FOUNDATION RECOGNITION ANNUAL, LIFETIME, AND CONSECUTIVE GIVING

The following list contains all donors (grouped alphabetically by school) who made gifts to the Beta Foundation from June 1, 2019 through May 31, 2020. Lifetime Giving Societies, consecutive years giving and Auto-Kai Club members are highlighted throughout the list using club names, various symbols and colors defined by the legend. Friends of Beta (including parents), Beta organizations and General Fraternity initiates can be found on pages 22-23.

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |6| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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DONOR LEGEND June 1, 2019 – May 31, 2020

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |7| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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DONOR LEGEND June 1, 2019 – May 31, 2020

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |8| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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JOHN REILY KNOX CLUB THE PREMIER ANNUAL GIVING CLUB

Beginning June 1, 2020, gifts of $1,839 or more to the BLF in a single year will qualify for membership. Furthermore, Betas within 10 years of graduation can join the club by making a $500 BLF gift. John Reily Knox Club members receive exclusive opportunities, including a special invitation to Beta's annual recognition dinner. CLUB MEMBERS CONTRIBUTED

325

$595,244

CLUB MEMBERS JOINED IN 2019-20.

TO THE BETA LEADERSHIP FUND THIS YEAR.

JRK CLUB MEMBER TESTIMONIAL

Amar Budarapu, Lawrence '87 “When I reflect on my career and personal life, I know that my Beta experience continues to be a critical factor. Beta’s impact has lasted a lifetime. I want as many of our younger brothers as possible to gain from this experience like I have."

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |9| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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DONOR LEGEND June 1, 2019 – May 31, 2020

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |10| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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NAMED ENDOWMENT FUNDS DEVELOPING MEN OF PRINCIPLE FOREVER

Named Endowment Funds allow the Foundation to impact the Beta generations of today and tomorrow. These funds are subject to a 4% annual distribution policy. Generous donors have contributed to the growth of the Beta Foundation’s overall endowment, detailed in the chart below. A full list of Named Endowment Funds can be found at beta.org/namedfunds. BETA FOUNDATION ENDOWMENT $25,000,000 $20,000,000 $15,000,000 $10,000,000 $5,000,000 0

2001

THANKS TO THE GENEROSITY OF OUR NAMED FUND DONORS . . .

2010

2020

552

BETAS WERE ABLE TO ATTEND A LEADERSHIP PROGRAM

70

AND BETAS RECEIVED MEN OF PRINCIPLE SCHOLARSHIPS.

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |11| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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DONOR LEGEND June 1, 2019 – May 31, 2020

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |12| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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BRIDGE BUILDER SOCIETY

LEAVING A LEGACY FOR THOSE WHO FOLLOW The Bridge Builder Society recognizes those who have chosen to leave a legacy for Beta Theta Pi through their will or estate plans. A full list of the 242 Betas and friends currently in the Bridge Builder Society can be viewed at beta.org/bbs.

$110,000

ESTATE GIFT Jim Bartels, Kansas State ’43, and his Beta Sweetheart Patricia first notified the Beta Foundation of their estate plans in 2005. This year their BBS gift was received to the tune of $110,000 to support today’s student leaders and the future of Beta Theta Pi. As Jim said in a 2011 interview, “Beta is a fantastic organization that deserves our support.”

TOP

3 WAYS TO JOIN

THE BRIDGE BUILDER SOCIETY

Give a charitable bequest in your will or living trust to the Beta Foundation. Name the Beta Foundation as a beneficiary of your 401k or other retirement plans. Open a life insurance policy with the Beta Foundation as the policy owner and make annual premiums to the BLF.

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |13| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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DONOR LEGEND June 1, 2019 – May 31, 2020

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |14| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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ETA B ETA T H

PI

ENGE

Y CHALL A D G N I GIV

GIVING DAY CHALLENGE ONE DAY. ONE BROTHERHOOD.

Beta's inaugural Giving Day Challenge raised more than $250,000 from nearly 2,000 individual donors, the largest single fundraising day in the history of the Beta Leadership Fund! In the spirit of friendly competition, chapters not only vied for bragging rights, but for recognition prizes – their name engraved on a new plaque and their school flag flying over Beta’s Administrative Office.

$285,039

RAISED BY 1,966 DONORS!

NUMBER OF DONORS ARKANSAS 126 Donors

WINNING CHAPTERS

DOLLARS RAISED

MIAMI $13,377

THANKS TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED.

DETAILS FOR THE 2021 GIVING DAY CHALLENGE WILL BE ANNOUNCED SOON! BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |15| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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DONOR LEGEND June 1, 2019 – May 31, 2020

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |16| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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AUTO-KAI CLUB

RECURRING ELECTRONIC GIFTS TO THE BLF

MAKING IT AUTOMATIC

The Auto-Kai Club recognizes Betas and friends who establish recurring electronic gifts to the Beta Leadership Fund in monthly, quarterly or yearly installments. The Auto-Kai Club helps maximize BLF impact through simple, secure and ongoing charitable giving.

AUTO-KAI CLUB PARTICIPATION The Auto-Kai Club has experienced rapid growth since its creation in 2015.

2021 2020 2019 2018

365+

2017

CLUB MEMBERS ALREADY COMMITTED FOR 2020-21.

2016 2015

26 0,0 $11 3 ,60 $99 9 ,28 $90 ,144 $66 5 ,66 $48 3 ,39 $43

337

$9,

0

JOIN TODAY AT BETA.ORG/AUTOKAI BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |17| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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DONOR LEGEND June 1, 2019 – May 31, 2020

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |18| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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SONS OF THE DRAGON CLUB LEAVE YOUR MARK...FOR THE KAI

The Sons of the Dragon Club is the annual giving club for undergraduates designed to highlight the purpose of the Beta Foundation and begin young Betas on their path of annual giving to the Beta Leadership Fund. This year, students joined with a gift of $18.39 and received a Beta STUDENTS MADE polo. Learn more and view A BLF GIFT the full list of club members IN 2020. at beta.org/dragons.

987

CHAPTER PARTICIPATION THE FOLLOWING CHAPTERS REACHED 100% PARTICIPATION OR 76+ CLUB MEMBERS

Arkansas

Bethany

Bowling Green Cornell

Denver

Kettering A Oregon

Southern Illinois

Toledo

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |19| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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DONOR LEGEND June 1, 2019 – May 31, 2020

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |20| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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MERIT SCHOLARSHIP

EXEMPLIFYING BETA’S DEVOTION TO THE CULTIVATION OF THE INTELLECT Each year tuition scholarships are awarded to Betas and children of Betas pursuing their undergraduate or graduate 96 degrees. The full list of SCHOLARSHIPS WERE Merit Scholarship AWARDED TOTALING winners is available at $116,000. beta.org/scholarships.

FOUNDERS SCHOLARSHIPS Endowed by an estate gift of Robert C. Lafferty, Ohio Wesleyan ’28, each recipient received $2,250.

JOHN REILY KNOX

Luke A. McGeown, Johns Hopkins '21

SAMUEL TAYLOR MARSHALL John A. Furla, Mississippi '22

DAVID LINTON

Fran Leskovar, Puget Sound '21

JAMES GEORGE SMITH

Tommi A. Redl, British Columbia '21

CHARLES HENRY HARDIN Andrew C. Prince, Virginia '20

JOHN HOLT DUNCAN

Benjamin C. Shappard, Georgia Tech '20

MICHAEL CLARKSON RYAN Jacob M. Kelber, DePauw '21

THOMAS BOSTON GORDON Thomas J. Nardicchio, Indiana '22

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |21| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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DONOR LEGEND June 1, 2019 – May 31, 2020

Others Gordon C. Davidson '50 William M. Folberth III '66 GENERAL FRATERNITY ROLLS $1,500-$2,499 Joel Huxley &  $250-$499 Dwight H. Johnson '01% Others Gary L. Anderson '05% Keith S. Barber '04Y Roger D. Cox '05% Eugene A. Fernandez '07% John A. Rundle '03% FRIENDS OF BETA $50,000+ Ann Brennan G $5,000-$9,999 M. Neal Moore& Miss Morgan Z Irene Zand Y $2,500-$4,999 Bernidene Merrill& Jamie Yatest $1,500-$2,499 Anne Emmerth & Mike Barta Michael and Anne ChildressY Susan KayZ Edward Kirklin &  Jan ThietjeZ $1,000-$1,499 Charles and Diane Barr % Helen B. Davis Y Brian Grimm % Rick and Lea Hetherington % Frank and Tammy Minear % Morton Family Foundation &  Sandra Northrop % Peggy Sisson % $500-$999 Gordon and Sharon Betts % Molly Bullard Jenise Conway % David and Amy Dahler Daniel and Lisa Duzyk % John and Jennifer Furla Rodney Hill % Lynn Huynh % Erin M. McHale % Luke Morgan and Lou Anna Red Corn % Maurice Negrin % Mark and Elisabeth Kuhlman % Alfonso Pelaez % Michael and Wendy Popke James and Andrea Robinson Peter J. Roupas Zachary Shirley % Calvert and Sally Simmons % Brian and Lisa Stewart Robert Tigner Y Aleks and Sandra Zlatic $250-$499 William Hill and Joyce Currie % Leni Moore % Ben and Deneen Zimmerman % David Finlay Vansh Sharma Amber and Lonnie Brannin Jack Briggs Laura Childs Hilary Cooper

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |22| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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THANK YOU!

TO ALL BETAS, FRIENDS OF BETA AND FAMILY MEMBERS WHO SUPPORT OUR GREAT AND GOOD FRATERNITY!

BETA THETA PI FOUNDATION |23| 2020 ANNUAL REPORT

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THE BETA WALKWAY CURRENTLY INCLUDES

8,895

PERSONALIZED BRICKS. DONATE

$350+

TO ADD YOURS TODAY.

BETA WALKWAY DONOR

Rodrigo Rivera-Reyes, Oklahoma ’15 “Having a brick in the Beta Walkway in Oxford is a way to display the joy and pride I still feel to be a Beta. It is so important to give back and help our Fraternity continue to build Men of Principle. For me, this was a celebratory way I could accomplish that.”

TOP 5 WAYS TO GIVE

LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE AND OTHER WAYS TO MAXIMIZE YOUR IMPACT AT BETA.ORG/GUIDE

1

#

GIVE ONLINE

Donate online for a quick and secure way to support the Beta Foundation. If you join the Auto-Kai Club by establishing a recurring gift, you can divide a larger contribution into manageable payments and reduce costs to the Beta Foundation.

JOIN

THE 2020-21 BETA LEADERSHIP FUND BY MAKING YOUR GIFT AT BETA.ORG/GIVE

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2

#

APPRECIATED STOCK

3

#

Choose a charitable gift of stock, bonds or mutual funds. And, if you were born before 1950 you may also realize a significant tax savings by making a qualified charitable distribution directly from your individual retirement account (IRA “rollover”).

MATCHING GIFTS Many employers offer a gift matching program to incentivize your charitable giving. Your contribution to the Beta Foundation may be doubled or even tripled, so ask your employer if they participate or visit our website for a list of known companies affiliated with the Beta Foundation.

4

#

NAMED ENDOWMENT FUNDS

5

#

Establish a special Named Endowment Fund to make an impact in perpetuity. A pledge of $10,000 or more is required, and the Beta Foundation can work with you to ensure your named gift meets your intentions.

THE BETA WALKWAY

Many Betas and friends have secured their personalized brick in the Beta Walkway at the Administrative Office. The Beta Foundation anticipates a rate increase to this premium beginning in 2021, so now is the perfect time to lock-in your brick with a gift of $350 or more to the BLF.

DE V E LO P I NG M E N OF P R I NC I P L E FOR A P RIN CIP L ED L IFE

8/14/20 3:26 PM


N

ow, more than ever, young men need the brotherhood, personal growth and sense of home that only Beta Theta Pi can provide. Help a young man begin his journey at beta.org/recommend.

NEWSWORTHY 75 Winter 2017

Photo: Kyle Miller, James Madison ’21

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“WOW. THE CLEAR WINNER IN A STRONG FIELD.”

— Alex Baker, Fraternity Communications Association President, announcing The Beta Theta Pi magazine’s second consecutive* win as the fraternity and sorority magazine of the year in 2020. *Previously awarded in 2016; rules require three years pass before a winning organization is eligible to receive the award again.

BEYOND THE BOARDROOM Not all Beta legends are Fortune 500 executives.

Despite being entitled to a lifelong subscription, only 39% of Betas receive The Beta Theta Pi magazine due to outdated contact information or an inactive subscription. Manage your subscription at beta.org/update and help bring your chapter brothers back into the loop at beta.org/lost.

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Profile for Beta Theta Pi

The Beta Theta Pi - Fall 2020  

The Beta Theta Pi - Fall 2020  

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