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2021 ISSUE 2

FA C E S A N D P L A C E S


802 . 764 . 1413 THETAVERNVT.COM


FACES

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Green Mt. Mashers

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Chatting with Joan Goldstein

BY KRISTIE L. SMITH NIKITIN

BY MOLLY RITVO

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Return of the Malt

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Distilling with a Soul

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Meet Jay Wahl

Contents

BY KRISTIE L. SMITH NIKITIN

BY MOLLY RITVO

PLACES

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Best Places for Foam, Food, and Fun in Vermont…

BY MOLLY RITVO

The Women behind Vermont's Brewing Industry

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BY PAM HUNT

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For the Love of Beer

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Legal Superheroes Save Breweries Six Figures

BY KRISTIE L. SMITH NIKITIN

IN EVERY ISSUE

BY KRISTIE L. SMITH NIKITIN

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Brew News

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BrewView To Go . . .

FUN STUFF WE’VE HEARD ABOUT

A COMPREHENSIVE MAP AND KEY OF WHERE TO FIND LOCAL BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, WINERIES, AND CIDERIES

PHOTO THIS PAGE COURTESY OF CALEDONIA SPIRITS


COFFEE TABLE PUBLISHING, LLC 32 Hermit Thrush Lane South Burlington, VT 05403 www.bestofburlingtonvt.com

PUBLISHERS

ROBIN GALES JOHN GALES COPY EDITOR

JENNIFER GOSS DUBY ART DIRECTION/DESIGN

faces and places Welcome to the first online issue of BrewView Vermont! We have a special “theme” if you will—spotlighting faces and places of the craft industry of Vermont. We are extremely proud to spotlight various women and their influences on this less and less male-dominated field. From distribution, brewing, and selling to plant operations and restaurateur. The women of the Vermont craft scene are creative, independent, and take their role in furthering the growth of the Vermont craft industry very seriously. Check out a quick trip through Vermont as we highlight some of our favorite places. With the warm weather, a road trip to Meuleman’s Craft Draughts by Stratton or a trip up to Jeffersonville for some music, food, and brews at Martell’s at the Red Fox is just what the doctor ordered! In case you’ve never had the pleasure of working with or meeting Joan Goldstein, commissioner at Vermont’s Agency of Commerce and Community Development, let us introduce you. Commissioner Goldstein has been on the front lines of upstart breweries, taprooms, distilleries, wineries, and much more. Her department has been instrumental in where we are today as a national leader of the craft scene. There are many more faces to introduce you to. Andrew Peterson of Peterson Quality Malt, The Green Mountain Mashers, and Ryan Christiansen, distiller and president of Caledonia Spirits, to name a few. Happy spring. Enjoy the online issue. Cheers,

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

ROBBIE ALTERIO

ADVERTISING DESIGN

ROBBYCAT DESIGN WEB DESIGN

LOCABLE

ADVERTISING

ROBIN GALES (802) 299-9086 JOHN GALES (802) 558-2719 coffeetablepublishing@comcast.net Keep us posted. BrewView Vermont wants to hear from our readers. Correspondence may be addressed to Letters to the Editor, BrewView Vermont, 32 Hermit Thrush Lane, South Burlington, VT 05403. Advertising inquiries may be made by emailing ctpublishing@comcast.net or coffeetablepublishing@comcast.net. BrewView Vermont is published quarterly by Coffee Table Publishing, LLC, ©2021. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is strictly prohibited. BrewView Vermont accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork, or photographs.


BREW ONLINE

www.brewviewvt.com 20 21

Online Exclusives

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S FA C E

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Two Cafes Making it Work!

Check them out at www.brewviewvt.com and don’t forget to try a Dominican cocktail!

Spotlight on Women in the Industry

SIGN UP TODAY!

We congratulate Eleanor Leger, founder and CEO of Vermont’s Eden Specialty Ciders, for being elected president of the Board of Directors for the American Cider Association. For more information check out www.brewviewvt.com.

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Feel free to drop us a line at brewviewvt@gmail.com, or share your comments on our site or on social media. You might even see your name in our next issue.

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


Green Mountain Manor

661 ripley road, waterbury Gorgeous 4-bedroom, 4-bathroom home with a 871 sq. ft. Trex deck and 200-degree Camel’s Hump to Mt. Mansfield views. Beautiful chef’s kitchen with a Caldera 5-burner gas cooktop and Stanstead Grey granite counters. Large living room featuring white birch hardwood floors and inviting windows and a wall-mounted direct-vent gas fireplace. Spacious dining room and a quiet den are also on the first floor. The second floor has a fantastic primary bedroom suite with views, a 14 ft. x 20 ft. bathroom, with a spacious glass no-step shower, and a large primary closet. There are two other ensuites on this level, each favoring significant views and lots of space. The lower level has a TV room for family gatherings and a new hot tub just outside the door plus an exercise room and another den/library. The large 5+ acre lot is 95 percent open with significant landscaping. Centrally located to restaurants, businesses and recreation. listed by Ken libby | mlS 4839984 | $1,200,000 Stowe AreA reAlty Group At Kw Vermont-Stowe 1056 mountain road, Suite 1, Stowe, Vt 05672 | 802.760.3100 | StoweArearealty.com Contact Ken libby | 802.793.2002 (Cell) or ken@kenlibby.com


BREWNEWS NEW RELEASES WE’VE GOT OUR EYE ON

14TH STAR BREWING COMPANY

Company E New England IPA 7% ABV You’re in good company! They banded together El Dorado, Ella, and Ekuanot hops to create this hazy and well-balanced New England IPA! www.14thstarbrewing.com

BLACK FLANNEL BREWING COMPANY I Know Kung Fu DO YOU KNOW KUNG FU? Back by popular demand, on tap for a limited time—Black Flannel Brewing Company’s Double IPA I Know Kung Fu. Solid malt backbone with ridiculous amounts of some of our favorite hops—Citra, Simcoe, and Galaxy. Bursting with flavors of pineapple, coconut, crushed tangerine, and nuts, this take on the New England Double IPA is an explosion of fresh fruity hop aromas followed by a soft, refreshing palate. We made this beer for the hoppiest of hop heads. So good you’ll start to believe... there is no spoon. www.blackflannel.com

CALEDONIA SPIRITS

Maple Vodka Maple isn’t just for pancakes anymore. Distilled entirely from pure Vermont maple syrup, our limited release Maple Vodka is a bold and decadent balance of flavors. Top notes of butterscotch and caramelized sugars give way to a clean, crisp finish. Great for cocktails and robust enough to sip on its own. So-so on pancakes, but perfect in a Bloody Mary with pancakes. Only available at the distillery in Montpelier. Pick up a bottle today! caledoniaspirits.com

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


ALL NEW

a rugged pack

of 12 ounce cans.

COLD HOLLOW CIDER MILL

featuring your favorite mountain brews and a taste of something new.

City Slacker Turn off your cell phone and commute directly to the fridge. This refreshing semi-dry summer surprise is a crisp rosé-inspired getaway from the hustle and bustle. They relaxed the rules for hard cider and added raspberry and lemon. Because you drove a long way. Hints of citrus and fruit and a pleasing balance on the palate. Happy as a Fourth of July sparkler. It’s enough to make you want to move to Vermont and chill. 5.9% ABV. www.coldhollow.com

get social!

EDEN CIDERS

Orogenies Celebrate the warmer weather with Orogenies! An apple grape Pet Nat made in collaboration with our friends at Iapetus Wines. With notes of white grape, lemon, rose water, and slate, Orogenies is perfect for an evening outside soaking up the sun. www.edenciders.com

www.BrewViewVT.com

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BREWNEWS NEW RELEASES WE’VE GOT OUR EYE ON

LAWSON’S FINEST LIQUIDS

Knockout Blonde Knockout Blonde is a blonde ale that packs a zippy punch of hop aroma! This brew features a flavorful blend of North American malts and is fully loaded with Cascade and Centennial Hops. 5% ABV. www.lawsonsfinest.com

OTTER CREEK BREWING COMPANY

Free Flow IPA in 12 packs Hazy in color, smooth by nature and free flowing by choice. Free Flow IPA is full of Falconer’s Flight, Citra, and Galaxy hop goodness with a hit of oats thrown in the mash to create a smooth, hazy profile. 6% ABV. ottercreekbrewing.com

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


PLACES


Best places for foam,

food, and fun in Vermont…

MIDDLEBURY OTTER CREEK BREWING CO. Otter Creek Brewing was founded in 1991 and has been flourishing ever since. In 2016, they opened a 120-barrel brew house with an accompanying 9,000-square-foot addition to its original space. Due to covid, the brew house is currently closed to the public but their four year-round and two seasonal brews are available in stores throughout the Northeast and mid-Atlantic regions.

Copper Ale, the beloved classic German-style Altbier, is the current limited release celebrating Otter Creek’s 30th anniversary. With notes of sweet caramel, toasted malts, floral, and a hint of citrus, it’s no wonder folks throughout the region are searching out an old favorite.

APPALACHIAN GAP DISTILLERY Just off Route 7 in Middlebury sits a distillery obsessed with creating unique and distinctly local spirits. Started in

2010 by friends Lars Hubbard and Chuck Burkins, the Appalachian Gap Distillery is a Middlebury treasure that should not be missed. While you will have to wait to experience a tour of the distillery and enjoy a free tasting due to COVID-19 restrictions, you should not delay in ordering their unique spirits online or by phone and making the trip to collect your liquid treasure curbside. When you make your visit to Appalachian Gap Distillery consider trying the Papilio Agave-Maple Spirit. It www.BrewViewVT.com

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is described by the distillers as tasting of the “smokiness in Vermont’s own dark maple syrup.” If Rye Whiskey is your preference, the Drumlin Champlain Valley Rye is made with rye exclusively grown within 25 miles of the distillery. The distillery focuses on sustainability when producing all eleven of their spirits in their totally solar-powered space. With so many choices, Appalachian Gap is a must try when visiting Middlebury.

LINCOLN PEAK VINEYARD If wine is your jam, then a trip out to the Lincoln Peak Vineyard in nearby New Haven is in order. This local vineyard produces red wine exclusively from grapes grown at the vineyard. Owner and longtime local farmer Chris Granstrom developed his existing tree and strawberry farm into a thriving vineyard growing Marquette and Farnsworth wines. The unique growing conditions of the rocky soil allowed Lincoln Peak Vineyard to create award winning small batch wines. Tastings are not available at this time, but those in the know recommend the vineyard’s wine club as a great value. They are currently running a cellar sale on their older vintages. Prices range from $20 to $45 per bottle and can be picked up in person or ordered online.

WOODCHUCK HARD CIDER The Woodchuck Cider House in Middlebury, founded in 1991, is wellknown throughout the country for their

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


crisp and delicious hard ciders. Their current lineup includes seven core ciders, a 100 Calorie Variety Pack, and the 802 Collection of traditional ciders. The 802 Collection is made with fresh pressed juice from orchards in Vermont. As of March 27, the Cider House is open for visitors. Located on Route 7, the Cidery includes the Tap Room and Cider House. Tours and tastings are open for visitors Wednesday through Sunday. You will not want to miss this stop on the Middlebury Tasting Trail.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN Now that Two Brothers Tavern has returned from the countryside to the heart of town, a stop at this gem of Middlebury is in order. The Two Brothers Tavern space is under construction, but the Notte restaurant and full-service bar remain open. They serve delicious Vermont comfort food loved by locals and visitors alike.

The main attraction when visiting Two Brothers Tavern are the 32 draughts to choose from. Almost as talked about as the rotating variety of brews is the excellent and friendly service of the staff. Boasting the largest selection of craft brews, microbrews, hard ciders, and kombucha— there is definitely something for everyone.

STOWE ALCHEMIST BEER A countryside visit to Alchemist Brewery and Visitor’s Center in Stowe is required for all serious craft brew enthusiasts. Fans of their beers rave about the quality www.BrewViewVT.com

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of the brews and the vibes. Currently the Visitor Center and Tasting Room are closed to the public, but curbside pickup is available. The first brew to try from the Alchemist is the Heady Topper IPA. This unfiltered IPA is full of hoppy goodness and a favorite of Vermont beer lovers. All of the beers canned on the 15-barrel brewery and canning line sport truly incredible artwork. The Alchemist has certainly perfected the cool factor and will be a fun visit when covid restrictions are lifted.

STOWE PUBLIC HOUSE & BOTTLE SHOP The Stowe Public House & Bottle Shop located on Main Street in Stowe is the place to visit if good beer is your passion. They carry a selection of over 700 beers, ciders, meads, and a smaller selection of wine. The folks at Stowe Public House create a welcoming environment for craft beer experts and novices alike. Check out beers from around the world and craft beer favorites from right in Vermont. In addition to their retail bottle shop, Stowe Public House serves Vermont cheese plates, wine, and beer from their tasting menu. If you have the time to do a tasting while visiting you will not regret drawing on the expertise and passion of the staff. The Stowe Public House is a must visit for good beer while in Vermont and the building is lovely as well.

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY If you are searching for great food and beer in an incredible setting then you need to try the Idletyme Brewing Company. With indoor and outdoor seating open and an excellent lineup of beers curated by brewmaster Will Gilson, this brewery and restaurant will become a fast favorite. The folks at Idletyme pride themselves on their historic roots in the community and dedication to fresh, quality Vermont-made ingredients.

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

Many visits to Idletyme Brewery will allow a chance to enjoy the varied settings offered by the brewery. There are multiple dining options, a brewpub, farm table room, porch dining rooms, and a gorgeous backyard to explore. The seasonal patio area is a great place to relax and take in the view. Guests will enjoy the biergarten and Treehouse Bar as well as a large lawn for the entire family to enjoy.

TRES AMIGOS Tres Amigos restaurant offers excellent tequila drinks, Mexicaninspired cuisine, and fantastic live music on their Rusty Nail Stage. Enjoy one of five flights to sample a variety of mezcal and tequilas. Tres Amigos has a substantial drink menu sure to satisfy everyone in your group.


The restaurant has been drawing rave reviews since it’s opening in 2017. It is back in operation with covid restrictions being followed, but open for seating and events on stage. Before you soak in a great show after a long year without live music, eat an excellent meal and unwind with a “flight to Mexico” and choose your favorite tequila.

STOWE CIDER To round out the list of must-visit locations we have Stowe Cider. They are famous for their dry and delicious cider varieties. Stowe Cider is available in stores throughout the region, but why not go directly to the source? Their Taproom is currently open for indoor and outdoor seating while observing proper covid precautions. While visiting the Taproom, there are many options for cider, craft tea, and craft seltzer. The tasting room is right in the production facility, so every visit is its own tour. Drinks in the taproom and live outdoor music should provide plenty of entertainment. Stowe has many great stops for the craft beer and cider enthusiast and Stowe Cider is one that should not be missed.

UPPER VALLEY RIVER ROOST BREWERY The River Roost Brewery is described by visitors as cozy with very friendly service. Located in Hartford in the Connecticut River Valley, this brewery was established in 2016 by founder Mark Babson. The brewery has www.BrewViewVT.com

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a small taproom where patrons can buy and fill growlers with their favorite brew. Tastings are also available to narrow in on your new favorite beer or enjoy exploring new brews. Dedicated followers of River Roost Brewery rave about their IPAs, but don’t underestimate their darker beers as well. Growlers are available for purchase in the taproom as well as a small amount of River Roost merchandise. The Mas Verde IPA is available on tap and in cans as supply allows. This IPA is hugely popular with locals and makes a great start for exploring what River Roost Brewery has to offer.

BIG FATTY’S BBQ AND CROWLER PIT Big Fatty’s BBQ and Crowler Pit, located in White River Junction, has something for the whole family. The BBQ restaurant is a relaxed atmosphere with food and toys to keep the kids entertained. The whole Fatty’s team provides great service and knowledge about their offered beers. The food and beer menus are robust and sure to satisfy every taste. The Crowler pit allows visitors to pick and choose one of ten craft beers on tap to fill their crowler, a 32-ounce can that is filled and sealed then and there. Fatty’s prides itself on stocking hard-to-find craft beers for purchase as well. They even have gluten-free beer options! Enjoy an evening of beer and BBQ at Big Fatty’s and take home your favorite craft beer combinations in your custom crowlers.

NORWICH INN The Norwich Inn is a historic establishment dating back to 1797. One of the best breweries in Vermont, the brewery at the Norwich Inn is under the direction of brewmaster Patrick

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

Darin. The brewery, Jasper Murdock’s Alehouse, opened in 1993. When you make your selection at the bar, the beer is pumped directly from the brewery underground to the tap and into your glass. Talk about fresh! The historic inn is as delightful as the dining and beer options. Visitors will enjoy the delicious food and beer surrounded by a historic atmosphere. Make a weekend out of your visit and enjoy luxury accommodations that harken back to the days when President James Monroe visited the Inn. When you leave, make sure to stop by the brewery and pick up a stock of Vermont craft beer made and bottled onsite. Their brews are sold exclusively at the Norwich Inn, so you won’t want to miss out on bringing your favorites home.

THE PUBLIC HOUSE AT QUECHEE GORGE RESTAURANT The Public House at Quechee Gorge is open once again for dining and drinks at the pub, and it promises to be a good evening out if you stop in. They offer fresh food, craft beer, and live music for the entire family to enjoy. Now that they are back open, it is easier than ever to call and make your reservations ahead of your visit. There are seating options both inside and out as well as bar side. If you are looking to take in their live music while you eat, the outdoor seating is ideal. The owner, Andrew Schain, is known to make the rounds visiting patrons and adding to the welcoming atmosphere. While you are there, order from the knowledgeable bartenders and try a great Vermont craft beer or locally distilled spirit.


VERMONT SPIRITS DISTILLING CO. Another great stop while you’re visiting the Quechee-White River Junction area is the Vermont Spirits Distilling Company— just look for the large carved moose on Route 4 to know you’re in the right spot! Established in 1999, Vermont Spirits Distilling Company crafts small batch vodka, gin, bourbon, brandy, and liqueurs. They are currently open and welcoming visitors to stop by daily and sample their fine spirits made on location. They use only the finest local ingredients to make spirits worthy of the Vermont tradition. Vermont Gold Vodka is made www.BrewViewVT.com

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from 100 percent Vermont maple sap and their line of Coppers gins are made using organic botanicals and handpicked wild Vermont juniper berries. With so much care and focus on local ingredients, the resulting spirits will become fast favorites.

SMUGGLERS' NOTCH/ JEFFERSONVILLE MARTELL’S AT THE RED FOX When visiting Jeffersonville, a must-see is Martell’s at the Red Fox. The music and food venue is open once again and following current covid guidelines. What better way to relax and unwind after a year without live music! While you are there, soak up the beautiful weather and sunshine in their outdoor seating areas. Visitors to Vermont staying in Smugglers’ Notch say the food at Martell’s at the Red Fox is excellent and the service wonderful. This family-owned and -operated venue is the passion of the Martell family,

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

and you will get a sense of the care and dedication with every delectable option on their menu. As if that wasn’t great enough, they also have a wide and excellent selection of craft beers with a special focus on Vermont brews.

SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH DISTILLERY Experts in their craft, the folks at Smugglers’ Notch Distillery are the recipient of the USA


Families and groups can experience one of the activities available at Arbotrek, or make an entire all-day adventure of your outing. They offer zip line canopy tours, a treetop obstacle course, climbing adventures, and team building activities. The views can’t be beat and what better way to experience the natural beauty of Vermont than from the tree tops.

THE CUPBOARD DELI The Cupboard Deli is a great place to stop before heading out on your adventures in the Smugglers’ Notch area. Treat yourself with a coffee and something from the largest selection of fresh baked goods in the area. If you need to fill up on a bigger breakfast, just add a famous Breakfast Buddy to your order. During warm months, the Creemee Bar is open to meet the ice cream cravings of your group. Folks headed out for a day of hiking or kayaking can gather all they need for packed lunches. The Cupboard Deli also sells a large selection of Vermont wines and craft beers. Locals describe this stop as a hidden treasure, so don’t miss your chance to see why it is so beloved!

RED LEAF GLUTEN-FREE BREWING

Today 10Best Readers’ Choice Awards top ten vodka distilleries in the United States. The distillery was founded in 2006 by father-and-son team Ron and Jeremy Elliott. They produce small batch gin, bourbon, and vodka in the spirit of the original bootleg operations that moved through Smugglers’ Notch in the 1800s. Since prohibition is no longer an issue for current times, visitors should take the opportunity to stop by for a tasting at the distillery. Smugglers’ Notch Distillery is famous not only for their vodka, but for the Vermont Maple Bourbon as well. Tastings are sure

to delight with the smooth offerings and enthusiastic knowledge of the staff.

ARBORTREK CANOPY ADVENTURES Don’t skip out on the adventure when you visit Jeffersonville! The ArboTrek Zip Line Canopy Tour is taking reservations now and reopening in May with updated facilities. Before you relax at one of the many excellent restaurants or breweries, going zipping through the Vermont tree tops. This is an adventure the entire family will want to experience.

If you have always wanted to try a gluten-free beer, Red Leaf GlutenFree Brewing is the place to start. This brewery sources glutenfree grains and locally handpicked berries plus homemade maple syrup for their beers. Folks with and without gluten sensitivities are fans of Red Leaf. It’s just good beer! The tasting room is open and the owners are friendly and ready to talk gluten-free brewing while you sample www.BrewViewVT.com

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their tasty brews. Start with the Woodsmoke Porter now available in cans at the brewery. Sit out on their front porch and sip the summer and sunshine flavors of the Strawberry Hibis-Kiss or Clementine White Ale. Other highlights of a tasting at Red Leaf are the bourbon barrel-aged porter with Vermont maple, the Woodpile Maple Brown Ale, and the Woodsplitter IPA.

SOUTHERN VERMONT

While enjoying the view, sip on one of the Whetstone craft beer offerings and dine on “inspired pub fare” using locally sourced ingredients. Whetstone has a selection of over 50 craft beers, including local and regional favorites. Don’t forget a photo opportunity when you straddle the New Hampshire and Vermont state line running right through the restaurant. Not only will you be drinking really good beer, you can do it in two states at once!

SAXTONS RIVER DISTILLERY Also in Brattleboro is the Saxtons River Distillery, which produces fine Vermont spirits. Founded in 2016, this distillery specializes in small batch handcrafted bourbon, gin, rye, and liqueur. Founder and head distiller Christian Stromberg began distilling spirits near the Saxtons River using recipes passed through the ages from his Lithuanian ancestors. He set out to marry these traditions to the special flavors of Vermont. The result is a distillery worth visiting to explore these quality spirits. Currently the tasting room and indoor areas are closed to the public, but you are encouraged to enjoy a tasting on their outdoor porch area. A visit is absolutely worth your while. Find your new favorite and take a few bottles home with you.

WHETSTONE STATION Take in gorgeous views of the Connecticut River from the riverfront taproom location of the Whetstone Station Restaurant and Brewery in Brattleboro. There are seating options in the firelit indoor dining area or you can take in the cool breezes off the river in the outdoor seating area.

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

VERMONT COUNTRY DELI Customers are raving about the fresh and delicious food at the Vermont Country Deli. This country store has the perfect atmosphere for browsing unique treats and a gourmet marketplace. The deli offers custom pastries, comfort food,


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CHEERS TO BEERS AT BARS & RESTAURANTS! and sandwiches. Many say the baked mac ’n’ cheese is the best they’ve ever had! The Vermont Country Deli opened in 1986 and specializes in local products sourced from around Vermont. In addition to great food and shopping, they have a quality selection of Vermont craft beers and wines. They rotate their selections, but you can expect to find all Vermont beers, ciders, and wines any time you visit.

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Outer Limits Brewing in Proctorsville is open for indoor seating and takeout. However, reservations are required at this time and

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can be made ahead of your visit on their website. The brewery was opened in a historic two-story brick building by the husbandand-wife team of Wesley and Taylor Tice. The dining space is sleek and inviting, creating a relaxed atmosphere for patrons. An interesting note about the brewing process at Outer Limits—their spent grain is used on a local farm which in turn provides meat for their menu. The Sweet Surrender Bakery also takes their spent grain and creates soft pretzels customers claim are the best they have ever tasted. Outer Limits has their great selection of craft beers on tap and available for purchase in 32and 64-ounce growlers. The Ground Control Pale Ale and High Frequency are available in cans for purchase.

MEULEMANS’ CRAFT DRAUGHTS Last but certainly not least is Meulemans’ Craft Draughts in Rawsonville. This is one of the best craft beer stores in the whole state. A small 800-square-foot shop is jam-packed with the best beers and wines Vermont and the surrounding region have to offer. This locally owned shop was founded in 2010 and expanded into their current space in 2013. Not only will you discover rare and hard-to-find craft beers— some on tap that you can’t find bottled anywhere—but they also have a good selection of European beers. The shop has ciders and meads as well. The owners and staff are passionate about craft beer and a great resource for enthusiasts and new lovers of craft beer alike.

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


MIDDLEBURY Otter Creek Brewing Co. 793 Exchange Street Middlebury, VT (802) 388-0727 ottercreekbrewing.com Appalachian Gap Distillery 88 Mainelli Road Middlebury, VT (802) 989-7362 appalachiangap.com Lincoln Peak Vineyard 142 River Road New Haven, VT (802) 388-7368 www.lincolnpeakvineyard.com Woodchuck Hard Cider 1321 Exchange Street Middlebury, VT (802) 385-3656 www.woodchuck.com Two Brothers Tavern 86 Main Street Middlebury, VT (802) 388-0002 www.twobrotherstavern.com STOWE Alchemist Beer 100 Cottage Club Road Stowe, VT (802) 882-8165 alchemistbeer.com Stowe Public House & Bottle Shop 109 Main Street, Stowe, VT (802) 585-5785 www.stowepublichouse.com Idletyme Brewery Company 1859 Mountain Road Stowe, VT (802) 253-4765 idletymebrewing.com Tres Amigos 1190 Mountain Road, #1 Stowe, VT

(802) 253-6245 www.tresamigosvt.com Stowe Cider 17 Town Farm Lane Stowe, VT (802) 253-2065 www.stowecider.com UPPER VALLEY River Roost Brewery 230 South Main Street White River Junction, VT (802) 698-8715 www.riverroostbrewery.com Big Fatty’s BBQ and Crowler Pit 186 South Main Street White River Junction, VT (802) 295-5513 www.bigfattybbq.com Norwich Inn 325 Main Street Norwich, VT (802) 649-1143 www.norwichinn.com The Public House at Quechee Gorge Restaurant 5813 Woodstock Road Quechee, VT (802) 295-8500 www.publichousevt.com Vermont Spirits Distilling Co. 5573 Woodstock Road White River Junction, VT (802) 281-6398 vermontspiritsdistillingco.business.site SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH/JEFFERSONVILLE Martell’s at the Red Fox 87 Edwards Rd Jeffersonville, VT (802) 644-5060 www.martellsredfox.com

Arbotrek Zipline 1239 Edwards Road Jeffersonville, VT (802) 644-9300 arbortrek.com The Cupboard Deli 4837 VT Route 15 Jeffersonville, VT (802) 644-2069 thecupboarddeli.com Red Leaf Gluten-Free Brewery 105 Main Street Jeffersonville, VT (802) 585-1113 www.facebook.com/redleafgf SOUTHERN VERMONT Whetstone Station 36 Bridge Street Brattleboro, VT (802) 490-2354 www.whetstonestation.com Saxtons River Distillery 155 Chickering Drive Brattleboro, VT (802) 246-1128 www.saxtonsdistillery.com Vermont Country Deli 436 Western Avenue Brattleboro, VT (802) 257-9254 www.vermontcountrydeli.com Outer Limits Brewery 60 Village Green Proctorsville, VT (802) 287-6100 Meulemans’ Craft Draughts 8814 Vermont Route 30 Rawsonville, VT (802) 297-9333 www.craftdraughts.com

Smugglers’ Notch Distillery 5087 Vermont Route 15 Jeffersonville, VT (802) 309-3077 www.smugglersnotchdistillery.com www.BrewViewVT.com

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FAC E S

BY KRISTIE L. SMITH NIKITIN

Green Mountain Mashers LEARNING OPPORTUNITY OR SOCIAL SOCIETY?

T

riple-hopped, jalapeño, barrelaged, 12% ABV, sour? Yes, please! Both the beauty and curse of craft and home brews is the complexity and infinite number of combinations possible. Make smooth lawnmower varieties, or rich, creamy sippers that pack a punch. Homebrewing is an excellent way to learn how to make a good beer, and brew clubs are the advisor that every new masher is seeking.

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

ART PLUS SCIENCE

Camaraderie and war stories found here

There is art and science in that kettle. Similarly, the Green Mountain Mashers (GMM) offer equal parts education and entertainment. GMM is the oldest of Vermont’s home brew groups and has more than 60 members. Homebrewing and the craft industry had barely started on the East Coast when those dabbling in homemade beer sought a place for fellowship and the sharing of ideas.


Why invest in a lot of materials, to only use them once a year? Some members don’t brew but join to taste the fruits of someone else’s labor or savor something unique. The more ambitious members like to engineer gadgets for brewing, or want to start their own commercial venture. Jason Stuffle, GMM president, says, “Most members are just [hobbyists], but some have gone pro.” Four Quarters, Queen City, Goodwater, Collaborative, Black Flannel, and Kickback all got their start in the Green Mountain Mashers. Others take full advantage of the Beer Judge Certification Programs (BJCP) and Cicerone training, both of which are nationally associated.

START SIMPLE

Brewmaster Greg Noonan, legend in the industry, encouraged GMM’s inception in 1989 and participated however he could. The going rate for camaraderie and war stories is the very modest price of $20 per year. To encourage sign-ups early in the year, the price goes up to $25 after January. Members enjoy monthly meetings September through May. Special events and outings take

place during the summer months. A one-time fee of $200 buys a lifetime membership—well worth the price considering a charter member would be in for over $600 by now! GMM members have access to resources beyond learning from the trials and tribulations of their cohort. The Mashers have an extensive library and equipment that is available to borrow.

Jason’s advice to new brewers is to start simple. A common question from new members about their own concoctions is, “Why doesn’t it taste right?” Discovering why a beer has quality issues is a common reason people seek out Green Mountain Mashers. “Most of these problems are easily solved with a little dedication and advice from others who have experienced the same problems,” notes Jason. But newbies often fail to ask themselves what each ingredient brings to the beer as a whole. Many times, they fixate on making an intricate flavor profile without understanding the fundamentals. Before jumping into the deep end, Jason asks, “Have you made a SMASH (single malt and single hop) beer?” Layered

GREEN MOUNTAIN MASHERS www.facebook.com /GreenMountainMashers

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nuances are encouraged and a treat for the drinker, but if one hasn’t attempted each layer on its own prior to adding everything together, instead of a recipe for beer they may have a recipe for disaster.

COVID STRIKES AGAIN Thirty-two years later, Green Mountain Mashers are still going strong, though 2020 did put a damper on things by putting a hold in in-person meetings. The Mashers are anticipating that many people began brewing while in lockdown and they are ready to welcome all newcomers with open arms and a beverage. People missed getting together, sharing a pint and a few laughs. In the cold months they were able to hold digital meetings, but according to Jason, “It was in no way a replacement for in-person gatherings.” So, is GMM a learning opportunity or a social society? The answer is a simple but resounding, “Yes!”

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


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www.BrewViewVT.com

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FAC E S BY MOLLY RITVO

Chatting

with

Joan Goldstein

Commissioner of Economic Development Joan Goldstein strives to keep the Vermont craft beverage industry thriving during and after COVID-19

I

t’s been quite a year for many Vermonters. For an industry that relies on gatherings of people to succeed, the Vermont craft beverage industry has certainly taken a hit during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Vermont craft brewing industry is also a vital part of Vermont’s vibrant economy and tourism. Joan Goldstein, Vermont’s commissioner of economic development, understands the importance of preserving Vermont’s craft brewing industry. For the past six years, Goldstein has been leading a team of 20 state employees in efforts to develop and bolster Vermont’s workforce. This past year, of course, was unlike any other year for Goldstein. While the scope of her workload changed, her commitment to supporting local brewers

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

and distillers did not. BrewView had a chance to connect with Goldstein. The interview below has been edited for clarity and space. BrewView: Can you share how your work changed during the pandemic? Joan Goldstein: My work has been completely changed from last March, when we had the unenviable task of closing businesses down. We worked hard to understand how federal programs could help Vermonters. We then had to advocate how to distribute 300 million [dollars]. We have been processing applications for funding and now advocating for those who were left out. And now with the American Rescue Plan in play, it’s going to be a question of what else we need to


brings vibrancy in a village center or in a downtown. The Alchemist started in Waterbury, which at the time wasn’t such a thriving place. Now Waterbury has become this food and beer center, even though the Alchemist has since moved away. Local breweries and distilleries create jobs and help revitalize their local economy. We definitely appreciate and value their investment in Vermont. And their beer is amazing!

do for businesses that might still be struggling to re-open. BV: How do you think the pandemic will change the Vermont brewing economy moving forward? JG: I don’t think we are going to be back to prepandemic levels of normal business activity, but hopefully things will slowly and carefully return to some sense of normalcy. We expect this crisis may have a lingering effect for at least a year in terms of places not being quite where they left off. I think the food and beverage industry will continue with curbside models and will continue to utilize creative delivery and takeout methods. BV: What kinds of programs have you been able to offer to help brewers over these months since the start of the pandemic? JG: More than 330 million [dollars] went to businesses in the form of assistance last year and about 50 percent of it went to the accommodation and food services industry, which includes brewers. Additionally, the Vermont Training Program annually provides funds to businesses and pays up to 50 percent of the wages for a staff member while they are being trained. This is a very handy tool, especially as breweries were looking to recruit or train brewers. BV: Why is the craft brewing industry so important to Vermont’s economy? JG: : In terms of tourism, it’s brilliant! People come to Vermont just to visit breweries and to taste amazing beer! Many breweries also occupy spaces that were otherwise vacant, which

BV: What was your job like in prepandemic times?

People come to Vermont just to visit breweries and to taste amazing beer! Local breweries and distilleries create jobs and help revitalize their local economy. We definitely appreciate and value their investment in Vermont.

JG: No two days were the same and I can hardly remember what it was like. But generally, I would visit businesses and discover how they are operating and what their hurdles are and then I would go about trying to help. It really is an outreach and a business relationship type role and a lot of my time is spent in the legislature advocating for policy improvements or initiatives in order to improve the state's prospects for prosperity now and for future generations to come. BV: What are you most looking forward to once social distancing guidelines are relaxed? JG: Being with friends and family and breaking bread and toasting together with great local beer!

AGENCY OF COMMERCE AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT One National Life Drive Deane C. Davis Building, 6th Floor Montpelier, VT accd.vermont.gov/economic-development

—Joan Goldstein www.BrewViewVT.com

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FAC E S

BY KRISTIE L. SMITH NIKITIN

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


Peterson Quality Malt brings locally produced malt back to Vermont

Return of the

Malt

I

n 2014, professional crafters of adult beverages and homebrewers bought everything Peterson Quality Malt produced…consistently! “It was difficult keeping product available those first years,” says founder Andrew Peterson. This story takes place in a world where local ingredients disappeared, demand was great, and a plague descended, igniting one man’s love of fermented liquids and his quest for a profession.

THE IDEA FERMENTS Not unlike many students in college, Andrew took a liking to the four food

groups—hops, malt, yeast, and water. After graduation he “was determined to be part of the craft beer world.” He wanted to make and sell his own recipes from locally sourced ingredients. The stars were slow to align and when his kegs were finally in a row, there were so many stellar breweries in Vermont that he felt like launching another selfsustaining watering hole would be an uphill climb. Andrew’s a-ha moment was when he noticed what had been a 180-year drought in the Green Mountain state’s malt production. “I would malt and brew

with my own grains,” says Andrew. “I realized pretty quickly that malting was a full-time pursuit, and with all the great beers coming out all around my area, maybe I would be best-served to focus on supplying them.” He started doing research and making sketches in 2011. The journey was not without complications. “There was no roadmap on how to make a craft malt house,” he says. So, he had to build the road first. By August of 2014 his product was on the market. According to Andrew, permits were “the hardest part because nobody at the state knew what a malt house was or how to classify what I was doing.”

PETERSON QUALITY MALT 1211 Ethan Allen Highway Charlotte, VT (802) 989-0014 info@vermontmalts.com

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BUILD IT AND THEY WILL COME Demand for his product rose quickly. Suddenly, the small malt house in the old hay barn next to his family’s living quarters no longer sufficed. Craft adult beverage producers couldn’t get enough of Peterson Quality Malt. He expanded twice in just a few years and sold out in short order. It was time to move the operation. In 2018 the new home of his family business was Nordic Farm, a former dairy operation with plenty of space to build a large-scale malt house from the ground up—with room to grow. Now, the malting happens in a 25,000-square-foot corner of a 42,000-square-foot barn that had previously been instrumental in the harvesting and processing of a bovine-made beverage. It sits on 583 acres of land that were ripe for planting grain.

OPENING IN TIME FOR THE SURPRISE OF THE CENTURY The new digs allow Peterson Quality Malt to produce 30-ton batches or about 1,500 tons of malt, while tending to 350 acres of grain per year. “We commissioned the new malt house the same week that the pandemic shutdown began, so 2020 was a very slow year,” Andrew says. While he didn’t set out to be a farmer, chemist, engineer, artisan, or laborer, that’s exactly what Andrew has become over the years. He also launched a quest as old as the industry of agriculture: to provide local ingredients to brewers, distillers, homebrewers, and even restaurants looking to resurrect some old-world favorites, while single-handedly bringing locally sourced malt back to Vermont. “Hopefully, by the middle of 2021 things will be somewhat back to normal for beer production.”

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


44.9649° N, 72.4602° W

CELEBRATE THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED

VERMONT’S JEEP DEALER | BARRE–MONTPELIER


FAC E S BY MOLLY RITVO

Distilling with a Soul

Spotlight

on

Ryan Christiansen President and head distiller at Caledonia Spirits shares lessons from the past year while looking forward

D

uring an unusually warm spring morning, Ryan Christiansen took a moment to relax outside his home in Plainfield, Vermont. Christiansen has had a busy year. While he had to shut down his tasting rooms, he was able to keep most of his staff employed by shifting to production of mass quantities of hand sanitizer in response to the

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

health crisis. As Christiansen prepares for a hopefully vibrant summer, he chatted with BrewView Vermont. The interview below is edited and condensed for space.

BrewView: What are the duties of a president and head distiller? Ryan Christiansen: I run all the sides of the company operations and thankfully have an incredible team of people helping me. I


try to stay close to the production side because that’s where I came from. I also oversee the blending and barreling side. BV: How did Caledonia Spirits start producing mass amounts of hand sanitizer? RC: We actually ended up producing 800,000 bottles of hand sanitizer! When the hand sanitizer shortage initially started, my team and I realized that we can help our community. It quickly gave us a sense of purpose and a reason to turn on the still. And then quickly we watched the commodity alcohol market dry up. Phyllis, our still, is built to do this. So, together with a few other Vermont companies (including Citizen Cider who lent us a trunk) and a maple company that has an incredible packaging operation, we just all banded together early in the pandemic to help out. BV: How did your team handle the anxiety of producing such an important

product during the early days of the pandemic? RC: It felt like we were such an important part of the fight. It wasn’t just about gin for those few months. It was really about humanity and everybody coming together to fight something that we didn’t know could impact us like it did BV: A large part of your work is working closely with bartenders and crowds of people. How have you been managing that part during social distancing? RC: Covid basically took away the heart and soul of the industry with the restaurants, and so we quickly had to learn how to connect with people. We’re now doing virtual distillery tours and virtual tasting events. While I prefer to give in-person tours, now people from all over the world can come into our space in a virtual way. BV: You started out as an owner of a homebrew supply store. How did you end

up becoming a distiller? RC: I was selling homebrew supplies to many folks who are now Vermont’s brewers. My original plan was to make commercial beer. I then met an incredible beekeeper named Todd Hardie. I was just blown away by his commitment to sustainable agriculture and love for the bees. I slowly realized that I was lacking a deeper understanding of the agricultural process, such as how grains grow and how honey is made and how our fragile ecosystem is affected in the process. As I built my relationship with Tod, it all just

CALEDONIA SPIRITS 116 Gin Lane Montpelier, VT (802) 472-8000 www.caledoniaspirits.com

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35


JOYOUSLY JUICY. HUGELY HAZY. SEDUCTIVELY SMOOTH.

BRIDGEWATER CORNERS, VERMONT

felt like home right away. BV: Do you experience any tension between Vermont’s brewing and distilling industries? RC: (Laughs) I don’t. I sure do love beer. I personally look up to Shaun Hill [of Hill Farmstead Brewery] and Sean Lawson [of Lawson’s Finest Liquids] and all of the folks who have been creating amazing beer. I try to bring that same passion into distilling. BV: What is the process like behind the scenes when it comes to producing Barr Hill gin and vodka? RC: Well, it’s tremendous. We are not an automated operation. We are definitely run by people with real hands doing hard work. We pick up each bottle 13 times before it goes to market and put the wax tip on each bottle as a reminder to all of us that it doesn’t begin with the distillery. It begins at the farm. BV: What do you think distilling will look like post-COVID? RC:I think we’re on the verge of the next roaring twenties. Gin cocktails are going to be at the forefront of everything we do!

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


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And to show our thanks, drop us an email at brewviewvt@gmail.com, with your mailing address and we’ll hook you up with the next 4 issues, delivered to your door. Plus you’ll be registered to win a flight instructor Tee and a $100 gift certificate from Zen Barn in Waterbury Center


FAC E S BY MOLLY RITVO

MEET JAY WAHL,

Executive Director at the Flynn A vision for the arts in Vermont during and after COVID-19

W

hile many local organizations are coming up with innovative ways to survive and possibly pivot during the pandemic, the Flynn has found a way to thrive. In December of 2020, the Flynn board of directors announced the organization’s newest executive director: Jay Wahl, a charismatic and down-toearth arts aficionado who is thrilled to be in Vermont. As he settled into his new home in downtown Burlington fresh from a move from Pennsylvania, BrewView had a chance to connect with him. This interview has been edited for clarity and space. BREWVIEW: What do you love most about the arts? JAY WAHL: The arts have really unique magical powers. It transports the audience and allows us to connect with a part of ourselves we have forgotten, or perhaps a part of ourselves that we overlook. The arts remind us of ways to find acceptance and forgiveness within ourselves and others, and hopefully with strangers in the audiences together. I think that COVID or not, the arts still do that, and still have a responsibility to do that, and still have the power to do that. BV: How has the pandemic changed the

performing arts? What will be different

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

when audiences can gather? JW: I think we’ve all become a little more sensitive and aware that the words of our lives in the past year have been words of restriction. We’ve thought about places we can’t go, or behaviors we can’t do, or things that won’t happen, or quarantines we have to maintain. The arts have often been about ways in which we break through restrictions. I think one of the best gifts that COVID gave us all

I look forward to providing tools for people to have access to emotions that are hard to access. —Jay Wahl is an appreciation for public space and the ways in which the places that we can gather—or even be alone in public space—and how important those places are to us. COVID is showing how the arts

have a way of catalyzing public space to create dialogue. Because we haven’t been having those kinds of dialogue, there’s something missing. And so, we’re sort of searching for that. BV: There has been so much anger and

misunderstanding in our world over the past four years, in addition to COVID. How do the arts help us navigate such uncertainty and unrest? JW: The arts have been my place to learn about other people, to learn about stories that aren’t my story, and to legitimize the experience of other perspectives and other bodies. I watched somebody get on stage and tell their story, and then, the moment that they do that, I cannot deny that they have humanity. And when we stop sharing those stories, due to COVID or whatever other reason, it’s easier to deny other people’s humanity, because we’re caught in our own little bubbles where we don’t really encounter other perspectives and we don’t have to watch another body. I’m not trying to be political in that sense, but it’s not accidental that when governments historically are trying to limit thinking or limit behaviors of populations, one of the first things they do is restrict the arts. BV: What do you think Vermonters need

now, in terms of art? JW: I’ve been thinking a lot about what we need. One of the things we need right now are opportunities for collective mourning, what I’ll call grief rituals. We’re bereft of that at the moment because we can’t gather, we don’t have funerals. The things that we


do as a society, to support each other, many of those tools are sort of missing. The arts have got to find a way to fill that because we need that. We need collective mourning, we need to acknowledge what we’ve lost and who, and how heartbreaking that is. This sounds dark, but I do look forward to providing tools for people to have access to emotions that are hard to access. Also, we need fun! BV: You worked as the artistic director at

the Kimmel Center for Performing Arts for 11 years. Can you share a highlight of your work there? JW: I really thought about ways that we could connect the arts, and people, and community, and stories without fear of restriction. I plan to do the same at the Flynn. A highlight during my tenure at the Kimmel was starting a jazz residency program and helping create the

Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, which was a citywide art festival that brought all sorts of partnerships together. My methodology was always to partner an international artist with a local artist and try to help that mentorship happen with an audience. I brought the Indigo Girls to play with the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra. BV: Public space is important to you. How have you used public space to create art? JW: Art in public space is something I care deeply about. I really am interested in the intersection between art and civic dialogue. I had this real belief around the democracy of arts and how that one of the challenges with concerts often is that some people have good seats, and some people do not, and that really bothers me. So I was able to have a whole band

perform from a crane above the street and 200,000 people saw a concert and all had the same view. BV: Until Vermonters can gather at the Flynn, what is your hope for our readers? JW: I hope many of us have been able to rediscover things they like because that just helps us reconnect to ourselves. The arts have this magical power ability to connect us to ourselves.

FLYNN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 153 Main Street Burlington, VT (802) 863-5966 www.flynnvt.org

www.BrewViewVT.com

39


FAC E S BY PAM HUNT

The

Women behind

Vermont’s Brewing Industry

PHOTO BY KAREN PIKE

Gretchen Langfeldt, Plant Engineer SWITCHBACK BREWING COMPANY When Gretchen Langfeldt graduated from the University of Notre Dame with a degree in mechanical engineering, she took a part-time job at Switchback

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

Brewing Company to make some money and “maybe get some free beer,” she admits. Now, 16 years later, Gretchen is an integral part of one of Vermont’s longest-running breweries. “I had the opportunity to do a little bit of everything as we grew from a three-person crew to a now 30-plus

employee-owned company,” she says. Over her years at the company, she has grown from a keg scrubber to helping to plan the packaging line and the brewery’s expansion. “My days look a little different now, but the satisfaction of starting with a bunch of raw ingredients and two weeks later having a finished beer in a keg, bottle, or can head out the


door for someone to enjoy will never get old,” she says. Gretchen sees a bright future for Vermont brewers. “Vermont has built a solid reputation as a brewing mecca over the last few decades and based on the sheer volume of breweries and tourists coming up to visit, that status doesn’t seem to be dwindling,” she says. Gretchen’s beer of choice: “Anything smoky! I love smoked beers and really enjoy seeing what other brewers are doing with them.”

Samantha Sawyer, Head Brewer and Owner HOGBACK MOUNTAIN BREWERY Samantha Sawyer and her husband Jamie were working as pharmacists and homebrewed in their spare time. The pair shared the desire to support local businesses and agriculture and, after seeing the success of a nearby hop yard, decided to take the leap into professional brewing.

“The first time Jamie said the words, ‘Let’s open a brewery!’” Samantha shares, “I thought for sure he was crazy.” After talking through the process, however, they realized it was doable. Samantha graduated from the American Brewers Guild Intensive Brewing Science and Engineering Brewery in Planning program 2017, and the couple set out to plan their next steps. They had initially envisioned starting a brand-new brewing operation, but serendipitously, they befriended Kevin Hanson, the founder of Hogback Mountain Brewing in Bristol. Hanson was interested in an exit strategy from his business, and the Sawyers realized that taking over and expanding an existing brewery might be their best option. The couple purchased the brewery and moved it to its currently location on Rockydale Road in early 2019. The brewery has grown, but the Sawyers haven’t lost sight of their mission. “We continue to strive to source as many ingredients as locally as possible, with the majority of our brews being crafted with 100 percent locally grown ingredients,” Samantha says. She sees “local supporting local” as a growing theme among Vermont brewers. “I see a greater interest in more breweries crafting all-Vermont brews of late,” she says. Samantha’s beer of choice: “I love Fiddlehead’s Betty Nelson—a tart, fruited wheat beer with raspberries, lemongrass, and dehydrated lemon.”

www.BrewViewVT.com

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bution system to maintain the freshness of each beer. In her role as “Heart of Operations,” Indy takes care of the people in the company. “I am focused on integrating all aspects of our business and cultivating a work atmosphere that is empowering and supportive for our employees,” she says. “Beer tourism in Vermont is a growing industry and I think this will continue to support growth in Vermont beer manufacturing,” Indy says. As for styles of beer that she sees as thriving, she notes, “IPAs will remain the most sought after and craft lagers will continue to expand market share.” Indy’s beer of choice: “My personal favorite Vermont-made beers are Lawsons’s Finest Liquids Chinookered IPA and Four Quarters Brewing Dolla Dolla Pilsner.”

Indy Ewald, Co-owner, Head Shepherdess VERMONT BEER SHEPHERD Indy Ewald fell in love with craft beer in 1987 when she moved to Chico, California, home of Sierra Nevada Brewing Company. It was at the brewery’s bar where she fell in love again, this time to her now husband, Mark, while drinking Sierra Nevada’s first IPA. Indy learned more about beer from Mark, an avid homebrewer, and for 25 years, the pair traveled around the United States, seeking the best craft brews from each region.

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

In 2015, after seeing that the large beer distributors weren’t a good fit for smaller breweries, they decided to start their own company. To support their mission of caring for the beer to “ensure safe passage from brewer to beer lover,” Vermont Beer Shepherd invested in a cold chain distri-

Jen Kimmich, Co-Owner and CEO THE ALCHEMIST Jen Kimmich found her passion for beer and the service industry—as well as her husband John—while working at Vermont Pub and Brewery, first as a


waiter and as she moved up to manager. She and John had a dream: “To open our own brewpub. That was it. All we wanted was a community pub, someplace where John could make beer and I could run a restaurant and make ends meet and live happily ever after.” For the first part of their life together, they worked on their business plan, developed beer recipes, and saved money. Their dream came true in 2003, when they opened the doors of The Alchemist Pub and Brewery in Waterbury with “a lot of salvaged equipment, lots of elbow grease, a $100,000 loan, and a bunch of maxed-out credit cards,” Jen says. The Alchemist thrived as a popular restaurant and bar for many years, and in early 2011, the couple opened the Alchemist Cannery, a 15-barrel brewery and canning line, for the production of Heady Topper. After Tropical Storm Irene damaged the pub’s building, the Kimmiches regrouped and rebuilt a larger brewery up the road in Stowe, where they continue to offer their sought-after beers. Jen sees quality as a hallmark of Vermont beers. “While lots of breweries around the country are trying to make the most outrageous beers possible—milkshake beers, beers brewed with chicken and waffles!—I am confident that we will collectively continue to shine a light on the great flavors that malt and hops produce. That’s why we all got into this business: a love for the raw ingredients and what they can magically do when they are together.” Jen’s beer of choice: “I would be lying if I said anything other than Focal Banger, but I also frequently enjoy Allagash White—they’re a fellow B Corp brewery that I admire.” www.BrewViewVT.com

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WANT MORE INFORMATION ON ANY OF THESE LOCATIONS? SWITCHBACK BREWING COMPANY (802) 651-4114 www.switchbackvt.com

HOGBACK MOUNTAIN BREWERY (802) 643-2304 www.hogbackbrew.com

VERMONT BEER SHEPHERD (802) 595-3217 www.vtbeershepherd.com

THE ALCHEMIST (802) 882-8165 alchemistbeer.com

14TH STAR BREWING COMPANY (802) 528-5988 www.14thstarbrewing.com

FARRELL DISTRIBUTING (802) 775-2391 www.farrelldistributing.com

SHELBURNE TAP HOUSE (802) 985-4040 www.shelburnetaphouse.com

Anna Kinzly FARRELL DISTRIBUTING Before working for Farrell Distributing, Anna Kinzly spent nearly two decades in the bar and restaurant business, where she developed a love for the hospitality industry. “Being able to learn so much about different Vermont breweries, and then showcase them, was incredibly rewarding,” she says. She points to the evident importance of the brewing industry to Vermont during the COVID-19 shutdown. “I was pleased both that Vermont beer was deemed essential during the pandemic, and that it proved itself worthy as such,” she explains. “Beer is such a great part of the community and also the Vermont experience.” She’s excited to be a woman in this industry, though

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BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


she’d love to see more women join her. “Whether through homebrewing, rising through the ranks at established breweries, or starting their own, I am looking forward to the beer industry welcoming more women as leaders in production, distribution, and ownership.” Anna’s beer of choice: She loves her double IPAs: “My favorite beers from Vermont are B-72 from 14th Star, Madonna from Zero Gravity, and Tropical Illusion from Goodwater.”

Taylor Radke, Brewery Sales 14TH STAR BREWING CO. Taylor Radke got an introduction to Vermont beers as a server at several Burlington restaurants while a student at UVM. After spending some time in Costa Rica after graduation, she returned to the Green Mountain State and joined the team at Zero Gravity’s South End taproom, where she learned more about craft beer under the tutelage of brewmaster Paul Saylor. She currently works as a Vermont sales representative for 14th Star Brewing. “I am constantly amazed at the incredible sense of community within the craft beer scene here in Vermont and am looking forward to seeing the industry grow,” she says. Taylor is proud that 14th Star takes

part in the Collaboration Brew Day run by the Pink Boots Society, a nonprofit organization that supports women working in the brewing profession. “Each year, Yakima Chief Hops provides a specific hop blend that the participating breweries receive to create a special Pink Boots batch of beer at the hands of all the ladies involved,” she says. After a year off due to the pandemic, the female staff at the brewery gathered recently to

brew this year’s batch: an India pale lager with lemon and hibiscus. Taylor attributes the success of Vermont’s breweries to their sense of community. “Vermont is a special place in regard to the craft beer movement. It seems as though our brave little state helped cultivate a widespread demand for craft beer within the New England region and beyond. This speaks not just to the quality of the liquid that Vermont

LOOK FOR IT WHERE YOU GET YOUR

FAVORITE BREW

Your guide to

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45


is putting out, but the folks behind the tanks, so to speak.” Taylor’s beer of choice: “It goes without saying that the 14th Star Citranade is my favorite beer of all time. I am also a big fan of Zero Gravity’s Bretthead as well as Stange, a Kölsch-style ale from Goodwater Brewery.”

Barbara Cote, Owner SHELBURNE TAP HOUSE Barbara Cote has been active in Vermont’s restaurant world for two decades, first as a chef and now as the owner of the Shelburne Tap House. “Owning a bar and restaurant allows you to become a fabric in the community,” she says. Looking forward to postpandemic times, she notes, “I love nothing more than hearing the laughter

and chatter mixed in with background music on a busy night!” The gastropub certainly draws diners for its cuisine, but it’s also known for its 12 seasonally rotating taps of local and regional beers. For Barbara, the state’s craft beer and spirits community represents what Vermont is all about—“Hard work and

craftsmanship.” She sees the industry “continuing to grow and impress, with no slowdown in sight.” The only downside for her: “I only wish I had more taps to showcase more!” Barbara’s “brew” of choice: Citizen Cider's bRosé. "It's crisp, refreshing, and never disappointing!”

Creative Marketing Studio

PROFESSIONAL DOODLER

LETS CHAT! HIT ME UPMadison Lamothe madisonxlamothe@gmail.com www.hazelmooncreative.com 46

BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2


President and head distiller at Caledonia Spirits shares lessons from the past year while looking forward

FAC E S

BY KRISTIE L SMITH NIKITIN

learned so much about this craft in the five years I have been in this role.” She continued, “There are so many different styles to experience, history to absorb, and recipe variations that produce an ever-changing, alwaysinspiring experience. So yes, I love beer.” But, mostly, she says, “I love

Melissa is in the business of supporting the brewmasters across the state by whatever means possible. the people that create the experience I have when I drink their beer.” If that quote doesn’t scream passion for the fermented, brewed, malty goodness thirst quencher, nothing does.

MUST LOVE BEER

FOR THE

LOVE OF

D

BEER

o you like beer? It’s asked in any number of social settings— parties, blind dates. If one is really lucky, they answer this question

in a job interview. When asked if she likes beer, Melissa Corbin, executive director of the Vermont Brewers Association (VBA), replied “I have

Melissa is in the business of supporting the brewmasters across the state by whatever means possible. Prior to joining VBA, she had quite an extensive career in the nonprofit arena, and she recently published her first novel—but she always has time for members. It’s her appreciation of all things hoppy that guides her through www.BrewViewVT.com

47


ranks to become a V.I.B. or Vermont Influential Beer-lover. For five dollars per month, participants receive early and exclusive access to events, upto-date news and information about the industry in Vermont, and more. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, Melissa and her team are rethinking the original concept for this membership option. This spring they will unveil new members-only events and benefits. Melissa and the Vermont Brewers Association continue Noonan’s legacy through their work providing support and resources for brewing operations across the state. All of the guild’s time and effort is returned to them in kind by the flood of assistance from the beer-loving community. “The outpouring of support for our members has been humbling during this pandemic and we are so very grateful to everyone who has shown their love for our industry this past year,” says Melissa.

running the state’s consortium of craft brew makers. Melissa is the belle of brand visibility, maximizer of memberships, and optimizer of opportunities to build craft beer-focused tourism in the Green Mountain State. Wildly effective, the VBA offers its 66 member-breweries everything from the tedious to the fun. The benefits of membership include lobbying services; money-saving allied partnerships; networking, technical, and educational events; marketing, communications, and social media promotion; and access to all of the National Brewers Association’s resources.

KNOWN ON THE NATIONAL STAGE Founded in 1995 to promote and strengthen the culture of craft brewing through marketing, education, and advocacy for Vermont-made beer, the VBA is one of the many legacies of the late Greg Noonan. While almost every state has a brewers association, the VBA is known throughout the country as one of the most highly functioning and mature guilds. The strong financial reserves they keep have helped them weather the current economic storm caused by the pandemic.

48

BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

PASSPORT TO PERKS While offering benefits and camaraderie for the craft industry, VBA also trades in tourism with its passport and beer trail programs and has a sort of “fan-base” too. In an effort to augment operating expenses, the VBA has invited those who are craft beer aficionados into their

VERMONT BREWERS ASSOCIATION

PO Box 985 Burlington, VT (802) 310-6942 www.vermontbrewers.com


Legal SuperHeroes

FAC E S

BY KRISTIE L. SMITH NIKITIN

Save Breweries Six

Figures

New blog arms purveyors of craft consumables with knowledge

W

ho needs to know food and beverage law? Anyone who produces edibles and drinkables, that’s who. Super heroes in the craft beverage arena Walter Judge, Jr. and Peter Kunin prevent those who concoct and sell commodities from making costly mistakes. Working for the law firm of Downs Rachlin Martin, they have

recently started a food and beverage law blog at DRM.com. Now they protect and serve in the ever-growing Vermont brewing community. Keeping track of legislation like the Vermont Origin Rule or California’s Proposition 65 is a full-time job. Purveyors of craft consumables are bombarded with regulations at every turn. Before

mortgaging the house or selling the kids, vintners, brewers, and distillers may want to read the Downs Rachlin Martin food and beverage blog.

DUE DILIGENCE SAVES TIME AND MONEY Walter defends businesses being sued by other companies or individuals. Peter www.BrewViewVT.com

49


SHARING A WEALTH OF KNOWLEDGE

focuses on intellectual property, that is, trademarks and naming. With the everexpanding Vermont brewing industry, it is becoming increasingly more difficult to name your next stout or amber ale without unintentionally co-opting an existing name. While most are wellintentioned, that won’t stop a company from vehemently defending what is lawfully theirs.

WHAT’S IN A NAME? Trying to name a brewing company? Good luck! There are more than 65 breweries in Vermont alone. Not to mention more than 8,000 craft breweries nationwide. That’s a list of names that would give Santa Claus trouble. Research is important and even big companies can bungle it. One of Peter’s clients, a national food company, had a close call shortly before the launch of a new brand name. Someone had failed to do their due diligence and it cost the company six figures to get the trademark in question, because another business already owned it.

50

BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

The blog’s purpose is to publicize unforeseen legal issues to those who need to know. Both Walter and Peter enjoy what they do and they like to share their knowledge. Since the blog’s launch in February, Walter has been the primary author but they hope to involve the rest of the firm in future posts. To generate content, Walter harvests cautionary tales of local and national news and receives a daily feed about newly filed suits, both frivolous and with merit. The two hope that their blog will help Vermont artisans avoid spending a fortune defending themselves in situations that can be avoided. State and federal labeling rules are also covered. When companies want to sell regionally or nationally, they must know regulations for each state in which they want to market, not just what Vermont dictates. Case in point is California’s Proposition 65. Prop 65 declares that if businesses are going to sell products in the Golden State, they must disclose any “chemicals of concern.” California keeps an ongoing and expanding list of chemicals that may cause harm to its citizens. Adhering to Prop 65 has spawned an industry, and there are now food labs whose sole purpose is to test for compliance.

Justice may be blind, but business is too costly to forge ahead blindfolded. It’s no fun having to do research when all you want to do is create the perfect pale ale, but it is prudent in the long haul. Make room in the marketing, advertising, and branding budget to at least consult with a lawyer, if not retain one. If that budget is already too thin, consider doing the research personally. The Internet, public libraries, and the DRM food and beverage blog are great places to start.

WALTER E. JUDGE, JR. DIRECTOR, LITIGATION GROUP DOWNS RACHLIN MARTIN PLLC 199 Main Street, PO Box 190 Burlington, VT (802) 846-8326 wjudge@drm.com www.drm.com


AD INDEX

WINTER 2021

14th Star Brewing Co. ...........................................................................18 Beverage Warehouse ..........................................................................45 Big Tree Brewing Co. .............................................................................. 3 Black Flannel Brewing & Distilling Co. .............................................22 Caledonia Spirits ...................................................................................15 Cold Hollow Cider Mill........................................................................27 CW Print + Design ................................................................................51 Edelweiss Mountain Deli ....................................................................27 Fable Farm Fermentology ..................................................................... 8 Farrell Distributing ...............................................................................36 Fringe Salon and Lash Bar .................................................................43 Hazel Moon Creative ......................................................................... 46 Lawson's Finest Liquids ...................................... Outside Back Cover Long Trail Brewing Co. .........................................................................36 Meulemans' Craft Draughts ................................................................ 8 Midstate Dodge.................................................................................... 33 Otter Creek Brewery.............................................................................15 Outdoor Gear Exchange ....................................................................... 9 Red Leaf Gluten-Free Brewing ...........................................................26 Shelburne Tap House ...........................................................................17 Smugglers' Notch Distillery ...............................................................26 Stowe Area Realty .................................................................................. 5 Stowe Public House .............................................................................32 Switchback Brewing Co. ......................................................................21 The Essex Vermont's Culinary Resort & Spa..... Inside Front Cover The Public House at Quechee Gorge ................................................18 The Shed Brewery .................................................................................. 7 Vermont Country Deli ........................................................................... 7 www.BrewViewVT.com

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BREW

KEY

BREWERIES

1. Kingdom Brewing .....................................................Newport 2. Next Trick Brewing .............................................. West Burke 3. Hill Farmstead Brewery .......................................Greensboro 4. Ten Bends Beer...................................................... Hyde Park 5. Brewster River Pub and Brewery .......................Jeffersonville 6. Farm Road Brewing .............................................Bennington 7. 14th Star Brewing Co. ............................................ St. Albans 8. Mill River Brewing BBQ & Smokehouse .............. St. Albans 9. Kickback Brewery ..................................................... Westford 10. Red Barn Brewing ......................................................Danville 11. Foam Brewers........................................................Burlington 12. House of Fermentology ..........................................Charlotte 13. Outer Limits Brewing .........................................Proctorsville 14. Queen City Brewery ...............................................Burlington 15. Simple Roots Brewing ...........................................Burlington 16. Switchback Brewing ..............................................Burlington 17. Vermont Pub and Brewery ....................................Burlington 18. Zero Gravity Craft Brewery ....................................Burlington 19. Halyard Brewing Company ........................South Burlington 20. Good Water Brewery ............................................... Williston 21. Burlington Beer Company....................................... Williston 22. Four Quarters Brewing............................................Winooski 23. 1st Republic Brewing Co ................................ Essex Junction 24. Stone Corral Brewery............................................. Richmond 25. Frost Beer Works ...................................................Hinesburg 26. Fiddlehead Brewing Company .............................. Shelburne 27. Rock Art Brewery .................................................. Morrisville 28. Lost Nation Brewing ............................................ Morrisville 29. Alchemist Beer ............................................................. Stowe 30. Idletyme Brewing Copmany ......................................... Stowe 31. Red Leaf Gluten-Free Brewing ..........................Jeffersonville 32. Saint J Brewery.................................................. St. Johnsbury 33. Prohibition Pig....................................................... Waterbury 34. Bent Hill Brewery..................................................... Braintree 35. Brocklebank Craft Brewing .....................................Tunbridge 36. Foley Brothers Brewing Company ...........................Brandon 37. Cousins Brewing .................................................... Waitsfield 38. Lawson’s Finest Liquids......................................... Waitsfield 39. Good Measure Brewing Co. .................................. Northfield 40. Norwich Inn.............................................................. Norwich 41. River Roost Brewery ......................................White River Jct. 42. Bobcat Brewery and Café ............................................ Bristol 43. Hogback Mountain Brewing ....................................... Bristol 44. Drop In Brewing Company ................................. Middlebury 45. Otter Creek Brewing ............................................ Middlebury 46. Killington Beer Company ....................................... Killington 47. Rutland Beer Works................................................... Rutland 48. Harpoon Brewery ..................................................... Windsor 49. Vermont Beer Makers .......................................... Springfield 50. Backacre Beermakers .................................................Weston 51. Madison Brewing ................................................Bennington 52. Harvest Brewing ..................................................Bennington 53. Beer Naked Brewery ................................................Marlboro 54. Hermit Thrush Brewery....................................... Brattleboro 55. McNeill’s Brewery ............................................... Brattleboro 56. Whetstone Station............................................... Brattleboro 57. Collaborative Brewing ............................................ Waitsfield 58. Hired Hand Brewery .............................................Vergennes 59. Red Clover Ale ..........................................................Brandon 60. Long Trail Brewing................................ Bridgewater Corners 61. Upper Pass Beer Company ...........................South Royalton 62. Weird Window Brewing ..............................South Burlington

52

BREWVIEW Vermont 2021 Issue 2

63. Freak Folk Bier .......................................................Burlington 64. Black Flannel Brewing & Distilling Co. .........................Essex 65. Whirligig Brewing ............................................. St. Johnsbury 66. Kraemer and Kin..................................................North Hero

DISTILLERIES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Elm Brook Farm................................................. East Fairfield Smugglers’ Notch Distillery ..............................Jeffersonville Green Mountain Distillery ..................................Morristown Caledonia Spirits ..................................................Montpelier St. Johnsbury Distillery ..................................... St. Johnsbury Wild Heart Distillery .............................................. Shelburne Old Route Two Distillery ............................................... Barre Hooker Mountain Farm and Distillery ................ Marshfield Vermont Spirits Distillery ..............................White River Jct. Applachian Gap Distillery ................................... Middlebury Black Flannel Brewing & Distilling Co ..........................Essex WhistlePig.............................................................. Shoreham Silo Distillery ............................................................ Windsor Spirits of Old Bennington Distillery ........North Bennington Vermont Distillers ...................................................Marlboro Saxtons River Distillery ....................................... Brattleboro Mad River Distillery ................................................ Waitsfield

WINERIES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Boyden Valley Winery ........................................... Cambridge Snow Farm Vineyard & Winery ...........................South Hero Hillis Sugarbush Farm & Vineyard .......................Colchester Shelburne Vineyard ............................................... Shelburne Charlotte Village Winery..........................................Charlotte North Branch Vineyards.......................................Montpelier Montpelier Vineyards ...........................................Montpelier Neddo Family Vineyards ............................................... Barre Fresh Tracks Winery ..................................................... Berlin La Garagista Winery .....................................................Bethel Neshobe River Winery..............................................Brandon Lincoln Peak Vineyard .........................................New Haven Whaleback Winery ................................................... Poultney Putney Mountain Winery ............................................Putney Honora Winery & Vineyard .................................Jacksonville Fable Farm Fermentory..............................................Barnard

CIDERIES

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

Eden Specialty Ciders ...............................................Newport Stowe Cider .................................................................. Stowe Hall Home Place .............................................. Isle La Motte Citizen Cider ..........................................................Burlington Groennfell Meadery............................................... St. Albans Chapin Orchard .............................................. Essex Junction Boyer’s Orchard ......................................................Monkton Shacksbury Cider ...................................................Vergennes Lawson’s Finest Liquids......................................... Waitsfield Flag Hill Farm ............................................................Vershire Champlain Orchards ............................................. Shoreham Vermont Hard Cider ............................................ Middlebury Woodchuck Cider ................................................ Middlebury Windfall Orchard ......................................................Cornwall Mountain Cider Company......................... North Chittenden Wood’s Cider Mill ................................................. Springfield Whetstone Ciderworks ............................................Marlboro Fable Farm Fermentory .............................................Barnard Shelburne Orchards .............................................. Shelburne


BREWVIEW TO GO

Everywhere you want to be at a glance Newport 3 66

15 19

12 16 20

13 17 21

63

3

4

4

22

33 57 37 38 17

8 42 43 12

45 12 14

13

9

Middlebury

Montpelier

6

4

7 39

93

8

91

35

34

11

65

8

60

7

9

32

5

2

25 24

7

St. Johnsbury 10

2 29 30

7

58

3

28

2

91

Stowe

89 26

5

6

27

23

19 6

3

5

9

18

Burlington 4

62

2 31

64

100

1

14 18

1

St. Albans

89

2

1

1

8

7

2 11

7

5

44 10 11

11 12

61

100

89

59

10

15 10

16

36 46

4

Rutland 13

41

Woodstock

4

60

47

40

18

13

7

48

91 Springfield

50

16

9

White River Jct.

Breweries Wineries

49

Cideries Manchester

Distilleries

7

14

100

30

14 6

51

52

9

Bennington

9

15

53 17

16 15

54 55 56

Brattleboro 91

www.BrewViewVT.com

53


Profile for Best of Burlington Magazine

BrewView Vermont - Spring 2021  

Read about The Women behind Vermont’s Brewing Industry, Vermont Brewers Association, our chat with Commissioner of Economic Development Joan...

BrewView Vermont - Spring 2021  

Read about The Women behind Vermont’s Brewing Industry, Vermont Brewers Association, our chat with Commissioner of Economic Development Joan...

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