Best in Show Magazine Annual 2017

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Publishers Jovana Danilovic Ruth Rauherz Managing Editor Ruth Rauherz editor@bestinshowmagazine.com Art Director Jovana Danilovic jovana@bestinshowmagazine.com Marketing Manager Juraj Sokolic ads@bestinshowmagazine.com Contributin Writers Anne Tureen, Richard Hellman, Juha Kares, Karl Donvil, Lisa Croft-Elliott Jovana Danilovic, Bo Bengtson, Ante Lucin, Viltė Šokaitytė, Mihaela Kosic Contributing Photographers Selene Favretto, Karl Donvil, Lisa Croft-Elliott, Jeffrey Hanlin, Tommaso Urciuolo Jovana Danilovic, Mak Dodan Web Designers Jovana Danilovic Sanja Jukic Printed by GrafoMark d.o.o

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E-mail: ads@bestinshowmagazine.com Web: www.bestinshowmagazine.com While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this publication, the publisher Conaros Sportmanagement AG can not accept liability for any statement or error contained herein. Best In Show Magazine cannot accept responsibility for the claims, goods or services of advertisers. No part of this magazine, inckluding texts, photographs, illustrations, maps or any other graphics may be reproduced in any other way without the prior written consent of Conaros Sportmanagement AG.

Best in Show Magazine

In memory of my grandfather... Thank you for standing next to me every minute of my life and thank you for all the help with the magazine from the beginning.

Jovana Danilovic publisher & art director







Content 144

204

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Euro Dog Show Brussels

80

Hugo Quavedo

102

Montgomery County

130

Marie-Louise Christensen

144

Dan Ericsson

170

Andrew Brace

188

What is exactly our final destination

by Karl Donvil

Inteview with Handler by Jovana Danilovic

Intervie with Junior Handler

About Scotties, Labradors, Judging and life by Anne Tureen

by Ante Lucin

Championship 204 A.K.C. by Jeffrey Hanlin Alexander 228 Will by Mihaela Kosic

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Meet the breed: Bassets & Beagles

Morning Dew Sweepers, Terra dei Templari, Wila Damar, From Elly’s Pack, Dialynne, Daragoj, Di Torrimpietra

300

Requisites for team breeding

310

Lisa Croft-Elliott

326

Reports around the World

362

Dog World in Egypt

378

Shows in Zagreb

by Juha Kares

by Anne Tureen

Yearly reports 2016 by Anna Szabo

by Croatian kennel club



















2016 Euro Dog Show 2016 BRUSSEL, BELGIUM • 26-28 AUGUST th

by Karl Donvil

It promised to be a hot show, in the literal sense of the word. The 5 palaces on the Heizel, for Belgium the most logical place to hold an event like this, date back to 1958. They are not all equipped with the most sophisticated clima systems from now. Temperatures going over 30° would cause extra worries for the organizers. It turned out to be the hardest point of critique on this show, notwithstanding the fact that there was little to do about it but to undergo. In normal temperatures the halls would be more than good enough. In some halls, the refurbished ones, the temperature proved not too bad, but palace 5 where the main ring was located was a disaster. The ventilators were not cooling, but only blowing the warm air around. Fortunately, there were no incidents with dogs in cars. The security was very focused on dogs locked up in cars and did a very good job. The first day started with a big cue at the entrance due to troubles with the scanning system. Fortunately it could be solved relatively quick and was not repeated the next two days. All cars had to park on parking C, across the street . In order to come in one had to take the stairs or the elevator and that was another point of annoyance. With all the stuff that people take along to shows, it was only possible to have a few people at a time. Once finally inside, large rings awaited the exhibitors . There was lots of space, grooming and sitting areas well marked on the floor, (good idea Finland!) and it proves that exhibitors become familiar with these restrictions that are not only practical but can be livesaving!. A 500m long corridor, going from the very 44

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first to the very last hall, was reserved, left and right for the 88 commercial stands. All traffic was forced to pass by before it was possible to find the first rings and dogs. In general, the standholders were happy with it. Some, however, said that there was not enough traffic, but that had to do with the good weather. Indeed, people become lazy in those temperatures and visitors keep or at home or go to the seaside or another place for recreation, other than spending the last days of the holidays inside a closed building. The number of visitors for each day was estimated around 5000. However it was well covered in the national press, radio and television, but that could not withhold people to chose for something more recreational. A pity for the standholders whose success depends on the visitors, not on the exhibitors. But nobody can foresee this. And maybe the terroristic attacks in Belgium this spring, still have affect these large scale gatherings of people. The security was sharper as usual but it was not immediately visible. The opening ceremony was nice but lowbudget compared to The World Show in Moscow. The Belgian breeds were presented by people in costumes of the late 1800s , referring to the first ever show in the world held in Belgium in 1847 followed by the flag ceremony that was a bit unsuccessful as the flag was tossed up unevenly, a small detail maybe, but it was distracting. The concept of the main ring was one of the most perfect till now. The back of the big palace of the main sponsor Royal Canin had a big VIP terrace with its own bar and only accessible to those with a correct wristband. The terrace


was on a higher level boarding a broad space left for the press photographers with seats and storing space for equipment. They were allowed to go around or photograph from the left or right side for a different angle without bothering the view of the VIP’s or public. The main ring was not evenly lit but better than often was the case in the past. Opposite to VIP’s and Press was a huge led screen with live view, sided by the alternating logo’s of the Official partners of the show. The official website offered the same live streaming. During the day there was no animation in the main ring, a deliberate choice of the committee. Another choice was to have no breed specials, except for the European Sighthound Specialty show on Friday. The decoration of the halls was also kept sober but clean, no exaggerations but nice large rings surrounded by boarding panels offered by Royal Canin and with carpet. Besides the main ring , the Royal Canin palace and a few rings, Hall 5 hosted the breed stands, the secretariat and the Press Room. But in that hall was also a typical “Brussels Cafe”, an attraction in itself, however, only accessible to the VIP’s and judges. The most interesting breed club was without any doubt the one of the Matin Belge, the 14th Belgian breed. This breed was once very common and kept to pull the chariots of milk man, and other door-to-door traders in the old days. They were large and strong, reliable and gentle, but their popularity as ideal dogs to pull the heavy mitraillettes during World War I caused the start of their extinction. Fortunately they appear so frequently on war photos that it was possible to reconstruct the breed and they are coming really close now, close enough to take the breed in observation. It will probably not take very long before it will be officially recognized. I hope it will as I’m convinced it will become a lovely, well balanced and reliable family dog, more slender than a Bull Mastiff but smaller than a Great Dane. Alike the show guide of Crufts, it was decided to have one for the visitors in Brussels too, instead of selling them a catalog that is useless to people not familiar with dog shows. But it was clear that the concept was new to the dog people. While all trade stand holders were supposed to find a place for publicity inside, only very few grabbed this opportunity. Breed clubs and the Royal Society

Saint Hubert were also supposed to give information about the breeds, addresses, information about showing and sports with dogs, but nothing about that, a missed opportunity! And where could we find the National breeds or something about the Matin Belge? Norway had a similar publication last year and in here we find all a newcomer should know in a nutshell, including sportsacitivities, how to take care of our dogs, etc. On the cover was a Russian breeder draped with the Belgian tricolor and a Swiss White Shepherd??? That should have been the Chien de St. Hubert, logo of the Belgian Kennel Club or a collage of the Belgian breeds. The only good thing, worth its money (from visitors perspective) is the encyclopedia-like information of every breed, illustrated with a photo. Thanks to this it is a magazine to keep. Another publication was the new brochure about the Belgian Breeds. To be honest, this was a disaster. All breeds were presented by photos in free. Nice maybe, but a breed guide must have “ALWAYS” at least one static photo of a topspecimen from toe to ear and from nose to tail. Not one breed had such a photo. This is not giving a good impression of a breed or how to recognize it. This is another missed opportunity and needs to be done over again. The stares in the main ring were empty for about 1/3rd. The main ring itself was large enough to hold all the groups. Most judges kept perfectly on the imposed way to let the dogs run and on the number of dogs to select, 6 of which only 3 were placed, not four as we recently often see. In order to reach the pre-judging ring, the winners had to make a large tour around, starting via another hall. It was rushing for some owners whose judging ended close to the start of the main ring. Many of them could not find their way to the backstage and almost panicked. There were not enough signs to help them out . In fact, in general people complained about not having enough signs or indications. However, at the entrances of every hall people could find a big overview map, but people are used to look for signs, not maps on walls. On Sunday Prince Laurent and Princess Claire and their children paid an informal visit to the show and followed the finals in the main ring with much interest. The Prince is known to be very dogBest in Show Magazine

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minded but has no dogs for the moment. Maybe his children will help him change his mind again. They were guided around the breed stands and brought to the VIP zone where they stayed untill the very end. The Prince was asked to hand over the BIS Rosette which he accepted with pleasure. With 12.035 entries, this European Dog Show will be remembered as the 3th largest European since it started. That start was also in Brussels, back in 1982. Belgium is famous for its cynological milestones. The first ever dogshow in history was hosted in Tervueren in 1847? The Royal Society Saint Hubert was founded in 1880, one of the oldest Kennel Clubs. Later, in 1911, the FCI was founded and has its seat in Thuin, Belgium. And, although not so generally known, the World Dog Press Association, has also its roots in Belgium. The KMSH/SRSH (Royal Society St.Hubert) was happy with the number of entries. They would refuse to accepts much more dogs as that would involve renting more palaces and reviewing lots of infrastructural items, 12,000 to 12,500 dogs was the goal. France was the country with the highest number of entries, 1780, more than Belgium that had 1422 entries. With 1289 entries Italy was surpassing the Netherlands that only entered 876 dogs and Germany with 635. Russia is always ranking high in numbers. They entered no less than 1181 dogs. It was also expected that the United Kingdom would delegate a lot of participants, and indeed, no less than 423 took a chance to end up high or winning such a prestigious title as the one of European Champion. Ukraine, that took over the flag as the organizers of the next European dog show, had 252 entries here. The USA had 17 entries. The dogs came from 54 different countries, most of them European Countries but there were also entries from as far as Australia, Argentina, China, Iceland, Kazakhstan, the Philippines, South Korea and Tunisia. A small army of judges was invited to look

for the best dogs in Show. The KMSH/SRSH decided to deviate from the usual invitees and give chances to new faces. The result was that a lot of judges ended up with over 100 dogs/day. On Friday, the Swedish Judge Bo Skalin had 132 entries, on Saturday Norman Deschuymere had 134 entries and on Sunday Dimitry van Raamsdonk was the record holder with 125 dogs. The catalogs were complete and informative. The show results were online immediately as were the results of the main ring. Unfortunately these were and still are incomplete until now! On Friday 3400 from 4 groups were on term. In group 1 we found 1310 dogs.Popular were teh Swiss White Shepherds with 92 entries, the Border Collies with 93 entries and the Australian Shepherds with 112 specimen. But I was surprized by the big number of 100 Ceskoslovensky Vlciaks who all came for Mr.Skalin. Rare breeds in this group were the Ca de Bestiar and the Romania breeds, Ciobanesc Romanesc Carpatin and Mioritic. It was surprizing that there were not many entries in some Belgian breeds like there were only two Bouviers des Ardennes. Group 6 had 637 entries. Most popular here were the Rhodesian Ridgebacks with 157 entries, followed byt the 116 Dalmatians, 76 Beagles and 74 Basset Hounds. There was a Dunker and a Briquet Griffon Vendéen, two rare breeds over here in Belgium. Group 7 was good for 572 entries all together. High numbers were to be found in the Irish Setters with 83 entries, Weimaraners Short haired with 86, Magyar Viszla with 68 and surprisingly the Gordon Setters with 64 specimen. A Gammel Dansk Honsehund , a Braque Français type Pyrenées and a Braque de l’Ariège are the rare ones in this group. In Group 8 it is the Deutsche Wachtelhund. Here we have some very popular breeds like the Golden Retrievers who had 175 specimen, the Labradors with 111, the Flat Coated Retrievers with 94, the American Cockers with 71 and the English

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Cocker Spaniels (all colors) with 134 entries. Saturday had 4002 entries in only 3 groups. Group 5 had 1364 dogs to welcome. Here the Akitas and American Akitas were popular with 127 and 119 respectively. Most popular however were the Siberian Huskies with 147 dogs. There were also 94 Samoyeds and 84 Alaskan Malamutes. Rare breeds were the Shikoku, Kishu and Hokkaido and the Taiwan Dog. Group 9 was also on term on Saturday. 2150 Dogs in this group and high numbers in several breeds like the Boston Terries, 109 entries, French Bulldogs, 202, Cavalie King Charles Spaniels, 83, Maltese, 82, Shih Tzus, 96, Chinese Cresteds, 137. Most popular here were the Chihuahuas with 243 entries (long and short hair together). The Belgian Breeds were well represented here with 55 Griffon Bruxellois, 42 Griffon Belges, 46 Petit Brabançons, 22 Papillon Phalène, 77 Papillons and 64 Bichon Frisées. The 10th group, the Sighthounds, had their European Sighthound show on Friday and now the European FCI show. 488 Were entered. High numbers were in the Piccolo Levriero Italiano, with 110 specimen, largely surpassing the 89 Whippets that are usually the most popular in this group. Sunday attracted 4633 dogs for the 3 remaining groups. The biggest group, Group 2, had 2613 entries. High numbers here were in many breeds but 238 Bulldogs, 165 Great Danes, 150 Bernese Mountain Dogs, 142 Cane Corsos, 134 Bull mastiffs and 192 Miniature Schnauzers indicate clearly on what breeds the emphasis lays. Rare breeds here were the Rafaiero Do Alentejo and the Aidi. Another popular group is teh one of the Terriers with 1527 entries. The 203 American Staffordshires span the crown while also the Jack Russell Terriers prove very popular with 161 entries. Good entries too in the Yorkshire Terriers with 103, Scottish with 91 and West Highland White Terriers with 83 specimen. The Staffordshire Bull Terriers had another good score with 91. Last Group on term were the Dachshunds with 493 entries. If we take them as one breed, only differing in size and coats, they are the most popular

breed in fact of this and most other shows. Mr Tammas Jakkel from Hungary was the judge for Best Junior in Show. His 3rd place went to the Old English Sheepdog “Shaggy Blue Bob’s Undercover Girl” , a Finnish entry, owned by Erno Lindahl. The breed was judged by Mrs.Barbara Muller from Switzerland, the group was judged byr Mr.Doedijns from ,Holland. His 2nd place went to the Samojed “Cabaka’s U Are My Sunshine”, bred and owned by Gitte Morel from Denmark. The Breed was judged by Mrs.Vija Klucniece from Latvia, the Group by Mr.Lovenkjaer from Denmark. Best Junior In Show was for the American Cocker Spaniel “Very Vigie Look At Me” , bred by Laurent Pichard and owned by Sanna Vartainen from Finland. It was the choice of Mr.Axel Komorowski who made him BOB and Mrs.Siil from Estland who judged the group. Mr.Hans Van den Bergh was the Best In Show judge. To some a little strange that the KMSH/ SRSH granted this honor to a Dutch judge and not to a Belgian judge. But Hans is very popular over here and maybe by choosing a Dutch judge would prevent a lot of political speculations inside the society. His 3rd BIS place went to the Piccolo Levriero Italiano “Queen Catherine The Great Del Barone Rampante”, a Russian entry. This bitch is 4 years old, bred by Dorella Goldoni and owned by Petr Rodichev. Mrs.Tatjana Urek from Slovenia was the breed judge, Mrs.Urek from Slovenia the Group judge. Res BIS went to the Chow Chow “King of Egypt De Los Perros De Bigo”. This trophy goes to Spain, to Vigo Navajon Nuria, who is owner and breeder of this 3 year old dog. King’s breed judge was Mr.Grunheid nfrom France and his Group judge was Mr.Ionescu from Romania. Best In Show was for the Lakeland Terrier “Aiola Von Den Schonen Bergen”. This bitch was almost 6 years old, bred and owned by Friedrich Wilhelm Schoneberg from Germany. Breed judge was Viva Maria Soleckyj Szpunar from Poland while Mr.Kanas from Slovakia was the group judge.

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FCI GROUP 1

Sheepdogs and Cattledogs JUDGED BY MR. NORMAN DESCHUYMERE (BELGIUM)

1st place

nd 2place

3place rd

MELUSINE DU HAMEAU SAINT BLAISE

Malinois Owned by Dezeure Sébastien

BUBBLETON STJARNA Puli

Owned by Ravn Jesper

ANALOG CC KIND OF BLUE Welsh Corgi Cardigan

Owned by Sonberg Christine



FCI GROUP 2

Pinscher and Schnauzer - Molossoid and Swiss Mountain and Cattledogs JUDGED BY MR. VAN RAAMSDONK (BELGIUM)

1st place

nd 2place

3place rd

VALLEYBULLS QASHQAI

Bulldog Owned by Esteban Conejero Jose

CONCENTO ANIMA KAYZER Dogue de Bordeaux

Owned by Elena Teplaykova

STABLEMASTER’S FAIZ Schnauzer Black

Owned by Joanna Frycze


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FCI GROUP 3

Terriers

JUDGED BY MR. ROBERT KANAS (SLOVAKIA)

1st place

nd 2place

3place rd

AIOLA VD SCHONEN BERGEN Lakeland Terrier Owned by F. W. Schoneberg

AGRIA ZIP CODE Smooth Fox Terrier

Owned by Korozs Papp Judit

HAPPY END DU MOULIN DE MAC GREGOR Scottish Terrier

Owned by Kasinowski Claire



FCI GROUP 4

Dachshunds JUDGED BY MRS. E. GONZALEZ (GIBRALTAR)

1st place

RUDOLFINA MADAMME CHIC VITORAZ Dachshund Wire H. Rabbit Size Owned by Busta Jan

HERZOG DI SILVALLEGRA

nd 2place

Dachshund Miniature Smooth H.

3place rd

Dachshund Standard Long H.

Owned by Frigoli Cristina

ORNBERGETS JUBILEE Owned by Rhodin Elisabeth



FCI GROUP 5

Spitz and primitive types JUDGED BY MR. IONESCU (ROMANIA)

1st place

nd 2place

3place rd

KING OF EGYPT DE LOS PERROS DE BIGO

Chow Chow Owned by Nuria Vigo Navajon

LIBERTIA AMERICANO Alaskan Malamute

Owned by Burnside Perdita

VASKURS JACK SPARROW QONJACSON Pharaon Hound

Owned by Hall Jenny



FCI GROUP 6

Scent hounds and related breeds JUDGED BY MR. LUIS PINTO TEIXEIRA (PORTUGAL)

1st place

nd 2place

FROSTY SNOWMAN Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen

Owned by Huikeshoven Gwen

SHONA OUT OF AFRICA NIEMAN NILO Rhodesian Ridgeback

Owned by Filippo Lasalandra

3place rd

COOKIE CRUNCH VAN TUM-TUM’S VRIENDJES Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen

Owned by Huikeshoven Gwen



FCI GROUP 7

Pointing Dogs JUDGED BY MR. LAURENT PICHARD (SWITZERLAND)

1st place

DOC N’ CAMELOT’S HEAVEN CAN WAIT Weimaraner

Owned by Lenaerts, Finch & Van Der Sichel

nd 2place

3place rd

SOBERS ATTICUS Bracco Italiano

Owned by Bitte Ahrens Primavera & E. Pierluigi Primavera

LATIN LOVE MICHAELA English Setter

Owned by Mocchi Alessio



FCI GROUP 8

Retrievers, Flushing Dogs & Water Dogs JUDGED BY MR. LEENEN (BELGIUM)

1st place

nd 2place

3place rd

PATRIOT’S LIFE IN THE FAST LANE Cao De Agua Portugues

Owned by Griffioen-Van Beek Ilona

VERY VIGIE LOOK AT ME American Cocker Spaniel

Owned by Vartiainen Sanna

CACI´S I´M A PLAYBOY Flat Coated Retriever

Owned by Lundqvist Caroline


21


FCI GROUP 9

Companion and Toy Dogs JUDGED BY MR. IGOR VYGUZOV (MALTA)

1st place

ORLANDINO DI SAN GIMIGNANO Short Haired Chihuahua

Owned by Lehtinen-Cochetti Tuula

nd 2place

3place rd

CINECITTA’ IAN SOMERHALDER Maltese

Owned by Paolantoni-Prosperi Stefano

HUFFISH AMERICAN WOMAN Black Standard Poodle

Owned by Sandell Charlotte


21


FCI GROUP 10

Sighthounds JUDGED BY MRS. TATJANA UREK (SLOVENIA)

1st place

QUEEN CATHERINE THE GREAT DEL BARONE RAMPANTE Piccolo Liviero Italiano

Owned by Rodichev, Petr

nd 2place

HEROIC TRADITION DU MANOIR DE LA GRENOUILLERE Whippet

Owned by Thompson Victoria

3place rd

SOBERS VAGABOND Greyhound

Owned by Lorencova Nowacki Pavlina


21


1st place AIOLA V.D. SCHONEN BERGEN Lakeland Terrier Owned by F.W. Schoneberg


2nd place KING OF EGYPT DE LOS PERROS DE BIGO

Chow Chow Owned by Nuria Vigo Navajon

3rd place QUEEN CATHERINE THE GREAT DEL BARONE RAMPANTE Piccolo Liviero Italiano

Owned by Rodichev, Petr










Hugo Quavedo Professional Dog Handler Interviewed by Anna Szabo

BIS: What is it about the sport that shackled you to it at the beginning? H.Q.: The Dog World has so many sides and some of them are really fascinating. But, I can’t spot any specific situation that captured my attention. I do remember one special experience I had when I was about 6 years old. My parents (they were not involved in breeding or showing), had a good friend who gave them a grown up Collie and I went with them to pick it up. Once we arrived, I was impressed coming into a room all covered with colorful ribbons. At that time I didn’t know what it meant or represented. Several years afterwards, I attended a show as a visitor and the moment I saw the ribbons that picture came into my mind. I guess it was just meant to be. The sense of competition and how fun is to be in the ring with your dog just tugged me into it and the rest is history… BIS: What is your history in the dog world in Peru? H.Q.: Even if I don’t come from a “Dog Family”, I had dogs all my life. I enjoyed just spending time with

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them and being the best dog owner I could. To continue my previous answer, my first approach to the Dog World occurred when I was 18. At that time, I owned a Wire Fox Terrier and attended a show just to watch. I found it captivating so I decided to start going around the ring myself. I was lucky to meet nice people encouraging me to keep at it and it also helped that I got some good results at the shows. It didn’t take much to have me totally involved in the sport and suddenly I was “happily trapped”. Shortly after I finished my studies as an architect I had my first litter of Wire Fox Terriers and I also got a special opportunity to be a board member of the KCP (Kennel Club Peruano). So I combined, at that time, the passion of showing and breeding dogs with the responsibility as a General Secretary, trying to make a difference in the Peruvian dog world. During those years I had the honor to represent my country at the FCI General Assembly in Mexico 1984 and Amsterdam the year after obtaining official recognition of the “Perro Sin Pelo del Peru”


Photo 1 • Multi Ch. Ecco’s Hurricane Harley - “Harley”


“What started as a fun experience turned into a very serious activity participating in shows and also helping others to start their own experience in this incredible and colorful world.” (Peruvian Hairless Dog) as a native breed. I have to mention we also got the huge responsibility of hosting the WDS 1988 in Lima-Peru. During all these years, I had the chance to share time with experienced dog people from whom I gained invaluable knowledge about showing and breeding. I finally decided to take a step aside from the official board affairs and continued having fun in the rings with my dogs. I co-bred Dobermans and Irish Setters under the prefix of “Sinaloa” having a successful litter (Doberman) with 3 BIS winners. One of them turned into the Top Dog All Breeds in the country. I was able to travel abroad with my dogs attending shows and that gave me the confidence to start showing dogs on a professional level and that is what I’ve been doing until now. What started as a fun experience turned into a very serious activity participating in shows and also helping others to start their own experience in this incredible and colorful world. BIS: Even though born and raised in Peru, you’re active in one of the dog world’s leading countries, Norway. How did you end up here? Do you enjoy life in Scandinavia? H.Q.: In 2002, I was a member of the committee for the organization of Las Americas & Caribe Winner Show in my country and at that time I met Marit Sunde from Norway as part of the judging panel and we became good friends. I didn’t show any dogs then, but a couple years later she asked me

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to show one of her Boston Terriers at the WDS in Brazil. Being there I was asked by Christine Sonberg, who was also attending the show, to give a Handling Seminar in Norway. After that first time, I returned several times with the support of my good friend Karl E. Berge. I found a new passion, teaching and helping people to show their own dogs and maximize their chances in the ring. So I decided to start a new chapter in my life by moving there. Norway is my home base as I give seminars and attend shows all over Europe. Starting this “project” in Norway was not easy but after 10 years I can proudly say things are different now and feel I gave people the tools to make themselves better handlers. There is still a lot to do. I do enjoy life in Scandinavia, everything is based on trust and order and I like it. BIS: How would you describe the fancy in your native country and what are the main differences between the South American and European dog communities in your point of view? H.Q.: Peru is a small country in dog terms without any great tradition in the sport. When I started we had just 6 shows a year making it difficult to improve and develop but which, at the same time, pushed people like me to go abroad and try to improve. Recent years have seen sure steps on the right direction but there is still a long way to go.

Photo 2 • Mukti Ch. Isha de Luz y Alegria at the Dachshund National Specialty


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South America (Peru included), has lived under a very strong influence from the US not only in showing but also in breeding. This is a geographical effect since Europe was for many reasons far away. Lately the distances are not so big and we find many breeders trying to get the best out of European bloodlines on different breeds. In the rings of Peru, we see more pro-handlers than in Europe and despite the average dog’s quality (which is better in Europe), I can say over there the dogs are better presented. The show system and scene is similar to Europe and the main difference is the lower number of entries at shows. All over the world … Rings are always rectangular, dogs run around on the same direction and there is someone in the center pointing to the winner. The language might be different but the feelings are always the same. BIS: How did Francesca come into the picture? H.Q.: Francesca Cassin is my life partner and a highly skilled handler & groomer with a long successful career. How we met? …. At a show of course … it was at the Milano Int. Show in 2010. The “excuse” was a dog, a Wire Fox Terrier she was showing at that time. I found myself looking at her getting him ready to be shown and we started talking …. The rest just happened and since then we work together sharing our passion for shows and breeding.

Photo 3 & 4 • WW ‘03 Int multi Ch Inge de Luz y Alegría . Winning BOS of Variety and breed at Knickerboker (specialty the day before Westminster )

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BIS: What is your role within the sport today? H.Q.: The dog world is like a round table and I have had the opportunity of sitting in various places. As a handler, I’ve been running around the ring for the last 40 years always in the same direction and always trying to do the same thing …. Win!!!. Sometimes it worked … many times it didn’t, but it doesn’t matter how hard it was or how many times I have been doing this it always feels like the first time and that is why I keep on trying. As an Instructor, I have the great opportunity of helping people to face the challenge of going in the ring and trying to do it themselves. I receive their trust and I give them back my experience. As a Breeder, I enjoy the mixed feeling of hope and expectation when you plan a litter trying to produce


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quality and give back to the dog world a little bit of what I received. As a Judge (Junior Handling), the responsibility of working with young people as they represent the future of our sport is great indeed. I can’t say which role I enjoy the most as each one of them represents a very important part of what I am and do ….. When you do something with passion you must enjoy it, otherwise, just don’t do it. BIS: You’ve had tremendous success as a handler. Please summarize your career’s highlights. H.Q.: Since my first BIS in 1984 with an Irish Setter, I have to feel lucky and grateful for success in the rings. Here are the ones I consider my highest achievements: • Top Dog All Breeds in Peru on 1993 (Doberman) – 1995 (Weimaraner) • First professional handler winning the Top Dog All Breeds in Norway on 2010 (Standard Wire Dachshund) • 42 World Winner titles • Best in Show (Doberman) and Junior Best in Show (Doberman) at the Las Americas & Caribe Winner Show Peru 1994 • Group 4th Terrier group at Crufts 2012 • Group 2nd Working group a Crufts 2014 • Junior Best in Show (Bouvier Des Flandres) at SICALAM Winner Show Puerto Rico 2005 • Best in Show (Bouvier Des Flandres) at the Swedish Winner 2007 • and over 200 Bests in Show at National, International and Specialty Shows Being a Handler also brought me the great opportunity to receive the responsibility of judging Jr Handling competitions. First Nordic JH Championship in 2006 (Norway), Swedish Winner JH (2008 – 2012), Russia (Eurasia and Golden Collar 2010), Iceland and Denmark. Finally on 2015 I had the huge honor to be the judge for the Junior Handling BIS final at Milano World Dog Show. BIS: I understand Portuguese Water Dogs now highly define your persona as a handler. How would you

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Photo 5 • WW’14 Intrigue Della Bassa Pavese - “Me”

describe the glorious years with ‘Sir Alex’ and his daughter ‘Sarah’? H.Q.: Right, the PWD represent a very important chapter of my handling career, especially during my time in Scandinavia. To be fair I think we can’t leave out of this conversation “Cyan” Isostar’s MissMatch … She is the first PWD I showed and the one who opened the doors for the breed on the international dog scene. World Winner for three years in a row and during the three years I showed her, she lost the breed just 3 times (two of them being BOS). After talking about “My Girl” (that is how I always called her) we can surely talk about “Sir Alex” … for me he is clearly one of the best show dogs I ever had on the leash. Not only a fantastic PWD but mostly a true warrior. No matter how tired he was, he always gave me what I asked of him in the ring. He was an American import and came to Norway for Cyan’s owner (Runi Kristiansen). We fought many battles in the ring and most of the time we hit the


Photo 6 • Multi Ch. Leading Angel’s Esteemed Thornapple - “Travis”

top. Several BIS placements and I think the highest point of his career was the Group 2nd at Crufts 2014. Until this win, he was simply “Alex” and then I came with the symbolic idea of calling him “Sir Alex” after this success on UK soil. He was one of a kind … One in a million … a very special dog. Sarah … coming out of Alex and Cyan for sure couldn’t be less than special too. I think she represents the perfect combination of these two great dogs. Didn’t get to show her as much as her parents but every time I had her on the leash, I could feel the power and grace combined in a wonderful package. At the moment I’m not showing any PWD but there is always a special place in my heart for them as we spent wonderful times turned now into great memories. I have to add, despite the incredible quality of these three dogs. I think the most important achievement for me was turning this breed into a great contender in every country we made people turn their heads

to look at these messy looking but powerful clowns. BIS: What does the future hold for you and Francesca? What dogs are you seriously campaigning now? H.Q.: During the last 6 years we’ve been together we’ve worked hard trying always to give our best. Grateful for having clients trusting us with their dogs and also being able to consider them friends. The dog world is not an easy environment and the future is always a challenge. Right now we combine our activity as handlers with breeding. Having started the adventure with Wire Fox Terriers and Std Wire Dachshunds with some success, there is still a very long way to go, but I think we are on the right path. Being true to what we believe and not taking short cuts is something that keeps us together on the quest for quality. We have now “Salo” – Balboa Saladin, our Wonder Boy and Francesca’s baby. A young Kerry Blue

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“I’m proud to say that I did it by myself. Coming from a country with a limited tradition in the sport as I already mentioned above, I didn’t have at the beginning any model to follow. “ Terrier with some very important wins at All Breed and Specialy shows as BIS placements in Italy and Denmark. We’ve just closed his English Ch title with a Group 1st at LKA (Ladies Kennel Association) Championship Show adding it to the previous Group 1st at the City of Birmingham placing him as Top Kerry Blue Terrier in UK for 2016. There is also “Minnie” – Fransin Minnie Mouse, an incredible Wire Fox Terrier who is two years old and we have big hopes for her as she is our own breeding. There are some other dogs with us like “Victor” – McEudall Victor Victoria & “Fuxia” Giving all My Love for You Della Blenda, both Irish Setters; “Turi” – Stendhal di Casa Giuffrida, Schnauzer P/S; “Zahri” - Danwelsh Diamond Pink Star, Welsh Terrier and “Ella” - Jay’s Joy’s Ella Fitzgerald, Cairn Terrier who just finished her campaign. But at the moment we are on a limited show schedule …. The best is always yet to come. BIS: What is your handling philosophy? H.Q.: It is simple … get the best out of the dog and let him show himself. This is not always possible and it doesn’t alwasys work, but as long as we focus ourselves on that, we have a better chance of success. The dog should enjoy their time in the ring and it is our responsibility to create that atmosphere for them. I learned many years ago that “showing dogs is hard work”. This concept is supported by accurate information, meaning that none of this could be possible without 88

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knowing the breed we have and how it should look and be shown. We have to adapt ourselves to the dog. Be wise and don’t push them over their own limits. We develop a partnership with them based on a “silent communication”, body language is the key of all this … just like dancing. If we move they move, if we stop they stop …. it is simple, but not easy. BIS: So, what breeds stand the closest to your heart and why? H.Q.: I love Wire Fox Terriers, they’ve been always with me and I enjoy the power and determination they have, fearless and funny, wild and sweet when they want to be. Standard and Mini Wire Dachshunds, also share an important part of my life and I learned to understand and enjoy the clown side they have. The Doberman, a fantastic breed, alert, loyal and athletic, with a beautiful outline and a very effective guard dog. The PWD for the reasons already explained above. Finally there is a special place in my heart for the Bouvier Des Flandres, a breed not many know but a dog that turns into your shadow and is always willing to serve and protect. A silent companion and a ferocious guard of you and your property. BIS: Who played an important role on your career and which historical dog figure do you most identify with? H.Q.: I’m proud to say that I did it by myself. Coming from a country with a limited tradition in the sport as I already mentioned above, I didn’t have at the beginning any model to follow. When I had the chance to attend shows abroad, I learned a lot standing ringside watching the “good ones” doing it. Here is a lesson that couldn’t be truer in my case... I learned to SEE, WATCH and PAY ATTENTION. If I have to mention one person, Flavio Werneck from Brasil comes on to my mind; he was a very good friend. For me one of the most complete handlers I ever seen, sadly he died in a car accident returning after a show. As in any other activity, practice makes the master and there is no better experience than being in the ring. The more you get in the ring the better you become.


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BIS: What do you consider the worst quality in a professional handler? H.Q.: I think we better point out what is often very obvious about many of them ….. LACK OF HUMILITY. In this Dog World people forget we are here because and for the dogs. Is a highly competitive activity in which we should never forget … WE GO IN THE RING WITH THE DOG and not that THE DOG IS GOING IN THE RING WITH US. Being fancy and flashy has no meaning if we are not efficient. Being noticeable is not about the way we dress or the colors we choose, is about the quality of our job in and especially out of the ring since what we see inside the ring is just the tip of the iceberg. BIS: What are your favorite breeds and why? H.Q.: If I have to make a choice, I would keep with me the breeds I mentioned before. But when you have a dog on the leash, a real show dog, it doesn’t matter which breed it is. BIS: With whom do you most love to indulge in talking about this sport? H.Q.: The answer is obvious … Francesca is not only my life partner is also my business partner and we share everything. What brought us together is how similar our views are towards this dog world and what we want to achieve in it. Not sure if what we’ve done or what we plan to do will give us a place in the history of the sport, but at least it will bring us peace of mind since we did what we wanted to do and enjoyed doing it. BIS: Where do you normally quench your dog-culture thirst? H.Q.: Perhaps the best way to receive the correct input is to talk with the ones who know the business better and/or have been there longer than I have. We need to know where we come from in order to know where to go. Another source of information is my background as an architect which gives me the chance to visualize the dog as mechanism and as such it needs balance to move efficiently. Here I’m not talking about formulas or complicated calculations nor measure90

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Photo 7 • Ch. Fransin Perhaps The Huntsman

ments. It is just a matter of adapting your own abilities to the information you receive to create good understanding. BIS: What is your greatest concern regarding the sport? H.Q.: The pressure for results, the lack of knowledge and information in the sport brings us to a point where it seems dogs are no longer important. Quality is no longer needed to win and politics are taking over sportsmanship. This is a very sensitive subject as we are all sitting around the same table … handlers, breeders, judges, owners, board members, sponsors, etc. We have to understand what made this sport strong. The ones who started, did it with the vision of a competitive way to honor and enjoy the challenge of breeding better dogs and the shows are


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just the window for the world to see what happens inside. Lets keep these windows clean and clear for the good sake of our sport.

Photo 8 • Multi Ch. Ecco’s Hurricane Harley - “Harley Photo 9 • Multi Ch. Robel Alexander the Great

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BIS: If you could change one thing about the sport and where it’s heading, what would it be? H.Q.: I don’t think we need to change things, we just need to adjust a bit. The dog world has had the same needs and obligations from the very beginning what is going wrong is in the underlying values of the people. The vision of the sport has narrowed to what happens inside the ring and in my opinion that is a big mistake. The sport has a very wide range of different levels and stages and each one of them must be fulfilled in order to make things work properly. Knowledge and education is always a plus in any circumstance and in the dog world it is something we desperately need. It is a fact that every handler starts their career as a newbie we’ve all been there. The practice, dedication and compromise to grow inside this activity turn him/her into a specialist. This is what we have to work on. I think handlers should be qualified and certified in order to raise the level of what we see every day in the ring. I am not only talking about the need of an organization following rules and giving tags or badges. I am talking about a real movement within which handlers will receive support and education. Saying you are a Professional Handler is very easy, being a RESPONSIBLE PROFESSIONAL HANDLER is the challenge we have to face and if we want to change our sport for the better we have to start now. A handler should know how to take care of the dogs before, during and after the show. A handler should also know, accept and follow rules and regulations of animal welfare. I can’t avoid mentioning judges regarding this subject. They all come from the rings … started as exhibitors, breeders or handlers and sometimes (sadly very often) forget how much it takes to get in there, to produce a good dog. Judges receive information and education which they bring inside the ring but what they must also have with them is fairness and being conscious of the responsibility they bear when they point the winners. This moment will influence the


breeding programs since most people want to use the winners. We also need to work with the young people, junior handlers or not, they have to learn the basic concepts of our sport. They have to understand how important is to learn how to handle a dog and not only copy patterns, that takes them nowhere. The future of the dog world like any other activity or discipline relies on the young people and that’s why we need to focus most of our efforts on them. BIS: What do you regard as a drawback of the sport? H.Q.: We all have our own reason to get into the sport. I’m sure we all do this because we like dogs, but sometimes people use this as an excuse to place themselves in front trying to get and/or receive attention. We shouldn’t use the dog world to get social recognition or sometimes we even can say social revenge. Every activity has a dark side because humanity does, and this is also part of the sport we practice. BIS: Which shows or countries do you enjoy visiting or showing in the most and why? H.Q.: Every country has special shows and some of them stand above others. I had the chance to attend many of them and I have my favorites. IN the US … Westminster, is the “Oscar” of the shows. Is not only the show itself but everything around it, it is a real party and celebration of the sport … Montgomery as the ultimate terrier show in the world … Santa Barbara Kennel Club, a classy and glamorous show. In the UK … Crufts, tradition and prestige, a place to go … National Terrier, the top terrier show in the UK the place where terriers come from … Lisboa Winner, a warm and very intimate show … Finland (Helsinki & Finnish Winners), efficiency and order. The best main ring in Europe … Denmark (Danish & Copenhagen Winners), a pleasant and friendly atmosphere … Milano, the most important show in Italy. I do believe shows must always give you a reason to come back and one element that will always draw is a good judging panel. The rest is lights, colors and sometimes glamour … but what makes the difference

Photo 10 • Multi Ch. Fransin Trei Pinheiro Cioccolato - “Tato” Photo 11• Ch. Danskots Spike Jones - “Foppi Fop”

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Photo 11 • U.K. Champion Townvill Tarique 1988E

is what happens inside the ring and who makes it happen. BIS: Please name several dogs of the past and present you admire. H.Q.: During my almost 40 years going around I had the chance to see and enjoy dogs which capture my attention, and why not, my heart …. Irish Setter – Meadowlark Masterpiece, Meadowlark Wyndjammer & Caspian Intrepid / Doberman – Toledobes Serengeti, Brunswig’s Cryptonite, Mariemburg’s Repo Man & Nello’s Lex Luthor / Wire Fox Terrier – Galsul Excellence, Blackdale Carousel & King Arthur van Foliny Home. / Afghan Hound – Kabik’s the Challenger, Coastwind Abraxas & Pahlavi Puttin’on the Ritz / Affenpinscher - Banana Joe V Tani Kazari / Papillon – Loteki Supernatural / PWD – Robel Alexander The Great BIS: Will you make a final comment on breeders/ handlers & other dog people you most admire? H.Q.: As a general practice I used to observe handlers working in the ring and believe me, watching is a very valuable tool to keep on learning. I can mention several of them I respect and consider an incredible source of experience … First I want to mention the ones I have been lucky to 94

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watch and even share the ring with … Peter Green, as the model to follow not only for what he could do in the ring but mostly of all what he represents in the dog sport. Flavio Werneck, a good friend with whom I share the same background (as we both studied architecture), he knew all the sides and corners of this business. Here are some still actively making the circuit … Ernesto Lara who grew up under Peter’s eye. Angela Lloyd whom I consider a dedicated, serious and very talented handler. Gabriel Rangel, a master grooming wire coated breeds. Carlos Puig, a very special and unique character on the dog scene for the way he connects with the dogs. But there are a number of experts out there, and talking to them will help develop knowledge of breed details and of the sport. No matter if it is a handler, breeder or simply a dog person, as long they have experience based on proven practice, they will always have something good to say and we just have to be prepared to listen. My motto? I BELIEVE IN WHAT I DO AND DO MY BEST TO MAKE IT HAPPEN!


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MONTGOMERY County Kennel Club 9th of October 2016 Photo credits: Jovana Danilovic Text by Masa Siroka

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Historical facts of Montgomery: The first show was held in 1929. There were no shows during the years 1942, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47. In 2005 the show changed the location from Ambler to the grounds of Montgomery County Community College in Blue Bell, PA. Handlers that won BIS at Montgomery for more than one time in modern times: Peter Green 10 times Gabriel Rangel 6 times Wood Wornall 3 times Eddie Boyes 2 times Bill McFadden 2 times

Photo 1 • Handler with the most BIS wins is Mr. Peter Green with total of 10. Here on the photo his most recent win, in the year 2014 with his homebred Norfolk terrier GCH. Yarrow Venerie Winning Ticket. Photo 2 • Best in Show winner in 2011 was the Sealyham terrier, Gch. Efbe’s Goodspice Easy Money owned by M.Good, F.Bergeron, S.Middlebrooks, presented by Margery Good and judged by Keith L. Lovell.

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Two women have won more than one BIS at Montgomery: Margery Good has won four times: 1979, 1987, 2008, and 2011 with four different dogs. Three of them where Sealyham’s and one was a Lakeland Terrier. But only my dear friend Margaret – Peggy Browne has won two BIS in a row in 1990 and 1991 with the gorgeous Scottish Terrier bitch Ch Brookhill Morning Edition owned by Marjorie Carpenter. Here I would like to mention the late Dr. Josephine Deubler who was the show chair for Montgomery for 30 years from 1977 till 2006 Dr. M. Josephine Deubler was the first female graduate of the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Veterinary Medicine, receiving her V.M.D. in 1938. She later earned an M.S. and Ph.D. and has been a member of the faculty of the Veterinary School for over 50 years (now Emeritus). For many years she wrote the “Ask Your Doctor” column in Popular Dogs. Her dear friend Patsy Wood who is at 92 years young the oldest member of the Montgomery county Kennel Club commented on how Dr. Josephine Deubler was so sensitive to detail and trying to make everyone happy who was a part of Montgomery County Kennel Club. Patsy attributes the modern day success of Monty to the hard wok of Dr. Deubler.


The Inside Story By Mr. Bruce Schwartz

President of Montgomery County Kennel Club

Photo 3 • Only one time has AMSTAF won Best in Show, it was in year 2010. Ch. Castle Rock’s Sbigstaff Mad About You, owned by G.Brown, R.Simpson, D.Pesenti, presented by Kimberly Rudzik and judged by Peggy Beisel-McIllwaine. Photo 4 • Best in Show winner in 2001, for the second time in row, was the Kerry Blue Terrier, Ch. Torums Scarf Michael owned by M.Hansen, presented by Bill McFadden and judged by A.M. Sommi-Picenardi. Photo 5 • In 2012 Best in Show winner was the Lakeland Terrier, Gch. Iron Van Foliny Home, owned by Victor Malzoni, presented by Gabriel Rangel and judged by Paolo Dondina from Italy.

From 1972-2004, the Montgomery County Kennel Club was held on the grounds of Temple University, Ambler Campus. The show always had a wonderful relationship with the University - and the move to the Montgomery County Community College was only a result of building on campus which no longer allowed for adequate parking. This year was our 8th year at the MCCC and we hope to have this as our forever home. We work closely with the college to be a good tenant as we appreciate this great location for our event. Our show has been affected by financial difficulties our countries have experienced. Our entries are down a few hundred dogs from their highs in the 90’s - but our show always has experienced variances depending on which specialties we were hosting in various years. We have made necessary changes to keep financially sound - without sacrificing the comfort and convenience of the dogs and our exhibitors and spectators. This year we increased the size of our primary tent to provide more ring shade and protection from rain. Next year we are also going to increase the size of the second tent. As times change, exhibitors change and we do what is necessary to keep our specialty clubs coming back to showcase their breed to the largest audience of terrier enthusiasts in the world. Although people may not have the same resources for dog showing, Montgomery County has been able to retain it place of prominence in the terrier world. Many people are involved in the successful operation of any show - but two people stand out at Montgomery County - Carol Carlson, the show Chairperson and Ken Kauffman the grounds chairman. And without the previous dedication of our past president, Walter Goodman and past Show Chairperson, M. Josephine Deubler, Montgomery County would not be where it is today as the preeminent Terrier Show in the world.

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Montgomery County Kennel Club show was held on Sunday, 09th of October. There was 1185 dogs presented in 1857 entries. Best in Show judge was Mr. Dan Ericsson from Sweden. Best of Breed and Best in Show winners are presented in this report.

BEST OF BREED W I N N E R S GCHS DARLING LUCY IN THE SKY WITH DIAMONDS Airedale Terrier

Owned by Emma Darling & Gregory Darling

ALPINE’S LBK LIVING ON THE ROAD American Staffordshire Terrier

Owned by Ed Thomason & Karen Thomason & Lacey Keller



BEST OF BREED W I N N E R S GCH CURIO’S COR BLIMEY

American hairless terrier

Owned by Sue Medhurst

GCHG LAMZ STRIKE A POSE Bedlington Terrier

Owned by Laurie Zembrzuski & Gabrielle Gilbeau

MADCAP JUMP FOR JOY Bull Terrier (White)

Owned by A. Glaser & J. Lindquist & M. Lindquist

CH BAKER ST BLAZING SADDLES OF APPRENTICE Bull Terrier (Coloured)

Owned by S. & A. Ibbitson & T. Rumer



BEST OF BREED W I N N E R S HJOHOO’S LOVE LOOKING AT HJO Cairn Terrier

Owned by E. Theodorsson & M. Hoff

GCH ZLATAPRAHA PANDORA DORNICK Cesky Terrier

Owned by N. Fletcher & D. Fletcher

CH HIGH MTN WARFOX HIGH NOON AT FOXTERITY Smooth Fox Terrier

Owned by C. & R. Snavely & L. Nelson

GCH FOXHAUS SKYFALL AT FOXHOLLOW Wire Fox Terrier

Owned by D. Barish & A. DiGiorgio & W. Voss, White Plains



BEST OF BREED W I N N E R S

GCH ABBERANN TORCAN Glen Of Imal

Owned by Theresa Nesbitt

CH LAKERIDGE CAHAL Irish Terrier

Owned by Tony Barker & Jean Barker

GCHS KRISMA’S XMAN FIRST CLASS Kerry Blue Terrier

Owned by L. &T. Grier & J. Deaton

HI-KEL TERRYDALE TROUBADOUR Lakeland Terrier

Owned by K. McIndoe & M. Wooldridge & J. Stevens



BEST OF BREED W I N N E R S GCH YARROW VENERIE WINNING TICKET Norfolk Terrier

Owned by V. Malzoni Jr & N. Shaw & P. Beale

GCH TALIESIN TWICE AS NICE Norwich Terrier

Owned by Lisa Sons & Kim Sime & Jeffery Sime

GCH BRYWOOD HELUVA RIDE Parson Terrier

Owned by Dana Bryson-Benn & Kiki Courtelis

GCH EVANLEE MAY D’ODDS B’EVR N UR FAVOR RIVER RIDGE Rat Terrier

Owned by S. McWilliams & J. Gardner & R. Fendlason



BEST OF BREED W I N N E R S GCH LYRICAL’S PREACHIN’ TO THE CHOIR Jack Russell Terrier

Owned by Dr A. Hargrave & J. Ferrera

GCH DYNASTY’S BR DONALD ROCKFELLER Scottish Terrier

Owned by Rebecca Cross & Danica Burge

GCH THUNDER ROAD’S LITTLE DEUCE COUPE Sealyham Terrier

Owned by Annette Hall & Taryn Hall

GCHB BLAZE OF GLORY OF WALLACE’S COVEN Skye Terrier

Owned by S. Ahuja & K. Case, Charlotte



BEST OF BREED W I N N E R S GCH BRYR ROSE SYMBOL OF PARIS

Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

Owned by Michele Connor & Jeanne Ferris

GCHS CIERA HOMEBREWED BORN FREE CGC RATI RATN Staffordshire Terrier

Owned by Jodie West & Dion Berry

CH SHAIREAB’S BAYLEIGH DAENERY’S STORMBORN Welsh Terrier

Owned by Sharon Abmeyer & Keith Bailey

GCH LOTRANDO SUNSHINE CELEBRATION West Highland White Terrier

Owned by Zane Smith & Vanessa Skou



Best in Show GCH TALIESIN TWICE AS NICE Norwich Terrier

Owned by Lisa Sons & Kim Sime & Jeffery Sime


r.Best in Show HJOHOO’S LOVE LOOKING AT HJO Cairn Terrier

Owned by E. Theodorsson & M. Hoff


Best in Show 3rd GCHS DARLING LUCY IN THE SKY WITH DIAMONDS Airedale Terrier

Owned by Emma Darling & Gregory Darling


Best in Show 4th GCH BRYWOOD HELUVA RIDE Parson Terrier

Owned by Dana Bryson-Benn & Kiki Courtelis








Marie-Louise Christensen Junior Handler Interviewed by Vilte S okaityte

BIS: Hello, Marie-Louise, and thank you, for giving your time to answer some questions for the next issue. It has been an absolutely great year for you! But could you, first of all, tell us a little bit more about yourself and your life with dogs? Marie-Louise: I am 18 years old and I live in Denmark. I study economics at school. I will graduate next year. I enjoy traveling around the world with my dogs at shows. BIS: How did it happen that you became a dog handler? Are you the only one in your family involved in the world of show dogs? Marie-Louise: I was born into a family full of dogs and dogshows. I was at my first dogshow when I was only 3 months old. I competed in “child and dog” for the first time at the age of 3. In my family we have judges, ringstewards, “showtrainers” and handlers. BIS: So, what kind of dog(s) do you currently have at home? Do you imagine your future with this/these

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breeds too? Marie-Louise: At home I have 5 Tibetan Spaniels aged 10 months to 14 years old. All showdogs. I love the breed, but in the future I see myself owning a larger breed. BIS: Who was the first mentor for you as a handler? Do you still have one today? Marie-Louise: Throughtout my handling career my mom has been my mentor. She supported me in all my competitions worldwide. Also I learned a lot from watching other handlers. At International shows we are a larger group supporting each other, as the best team. BIS: Do you remember your impressions, after your first dog show, competition? Marie-Louise: I was only 3 years old, but slowly I started handling dogs not only in child and dog competition. I’m sure I was nervous before each competition but at the same time enjoying interaction with the dog.


Photo 1 • Multi Ch. Ecco’s Hurricane Harley - “Harley


“Crufts is very special to compete at as a junior handler. It’s all very well organized. We are taken good care of. Every time coming back is special and uniqe.” BIS: Could you mention some of your dogs that made a huge impact for you as a handler and why they are so special? Marie-Louise: I have handled a lot of dogs with special personalities, but the first dog I worked with and who is still very special to handle is my 14 years old tibbie “Lillebror”. He taught me to concentrate, how to connect, when to shine, and most of all always to enjoy what we do. He owns the ring and makes me smile everytime we work together. BIS: Tell us more about junior handling in your country – Denmark. The system, quality, handlers, judges and shows. Marie-Louise: In Denmark we collect points to become junior handler of the year. In every international show we have 2 groups. Minor is from 10-13 years and maxi is 14-17 years. 4 are picked out from each group and meet in the final. Here we place 4 who gets the points. Juniorhandler of the year represents Denmark at Crufts, EDS and WDS. Also we have a Nordic championship for junior handlers. The 4 highest placed of the year goes as a team. In my time as a junior handler the quality was very high and the handlers were very serious. It was a hard competition. BIS: But let’s come to the biggest shows– Crufts, WDS, EDS. We have seen you in all of these exhibitions. First about Crufts – you took part three times in the junior handling final. How would you compare

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Photo 2 • A day off with the dogs. From right: Lillebror, Jensen, Robert and Touché. Photo 3 • Winner at EDS Bruxelles, judge Igor Vyguzov, Russia. Photo 4 • Shortlisted at EDS in Oslo, judge Angela Lloyd, USA


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Photo 5 • Winner at EDS Bruxelles, judge Igor Vyguzov, Russia.

your competitions there? Did you feel more confident coming back for the second or third time? Marie-Louise: Crufts is very special to compete at as a junior handler. It’s all very well organized. We are taken good care of. Every time coming back is special and uniqe. Coming back for the 2nd or 3rd time didn’t mean less nervousness but I was able to focus more on the competition. I knew where to go, who to ask and often also the schedules. BIS: How did you come up with your breed choices? What were the main features for choosing who to compete with? Marie-Louise: I chose the breeds I like. First year at Crufts I chose a Basenji, because it is a breed I like to work with. The second and third year I chose Siberian Husky and Pharaoh hound. These are breeds I knew very well and enjoy showing. BIS: European dog show 2016 in Brussels. I bet you will remember this day forever. Did you ever expect to win such a competition? How did you feel after134

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wards? In your opinion, what made you stand out from the huge group of participants? Marie-Louise: EDS 2016 was a memorable show for me. This was my very last time as a junior handler since I turned 18 the month before. Memorable in many ways. For examble the dog I was supposed to use hurt it’s paw in the morning of the show. So Sunday morning I had NO DOG for the competition. Everybody hearing my story was very kind and helpful. My luck was to meet a Danish couple, who without thinking offered me their young pointer boy “Rubert”. He worked with me from the minute I met him. Think he felt my confusion and we just had so much fun. With that said I would never have thought of winning this particular show. I hoped to do well at my last performance but it was a dream come true. BIS: Tell us more about your other memorable achievements in junior handling over the years. Marie-Louise: I was child and dog/junior handler of the year 11 times and 1 number 2 in our toy dog


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club. Once a year we have a competition called “Gold Cup”. In total I won that 11 times 3 times junior handler of the year in Denmark. 3 times number 2. 6 times in the national team at Nordic championship. 3 times in the top 10. Runner up Nordic champion in 2014. 3 times at Crufts. 1 shortlist in top 10 4th at the WDS in Milano 2015 Winner EDS 2016 In Denmark we have a special show called “Show of Winners”. I won the competition 4 times and was 2nd twice. BIS: As your junior handling career is over, could you say that you reached everything you had ever dreamed of? Marie-Louise: I never dream of achieving what I did I my junior career. All I ever wanted was to enjoy the interaction with the dogs. If it is a dream PLEASE don’t wake me up. Being honest I know I have worked very hard to get here. BIS: And what about the near future? Do you have any plans or new destinations and goals to pursue? Marie-Louise: I know dog shows will always be a big part of my life, but I will stay focused on my interaction with the dog, which for me is the most important thing in this game. I never stop learning. BIS: Would you like to become a judge or a breeder one day? A professional handler or maybe a mentor? Marie-Louise: I am very lucky that a lot of young junior handlers ask for my advice. Also I am pleased, that a lot of people ask me to handle their dogs and trust me to train and show them. I like to keep dog showing as a hobby and a place to relax and have a good time. But no one knows what the future brings. BIS: Finally, what is your life’s credo that helps you to keep moving forward when the time is hard? Marie-Louise: Enjoy, enjoy, enjoy, enjoy and if you don’t enjoy it stop and stay at home.

Photo 6 • Winner at Show Of Winners, judge Frank Kane, Kerstin Nilsson and Joakim Ohlsson. Photo 7 • Runner up at the Nordic Championship in Finland, judge Yiannis Vlachos, Greece.

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Dan Ericsson About Scotties, Labradors, Judging and life Interviewed by Anna Szabo BIS: I understand you were not born into a dog family, yet you felt an intense kinship with animals from a very early age. How did you get yourself and your parents involved in dogs? D.E.: My parents were not animal-minded but for as long as I can remember I wanted a dog of my own and I kept pestering neighbours and various family friends asking to take their dogs for walks. I eventually persuaded my poor parents to let me have a few canary birds, but I was not happy with that and even more so when one of them escaped from its cage! My paternal grandmother was, however, a great dog-lover and had had owned various breeds including Giant Schnauzers and Kerry Blue Terriers and she suggested that a Scottie would probably be a good dog for the dog-loving school-boy and managed to persuade my parents to purchase a black Scottie puppy with an excellent pedigree from a good breeder locally. This little bitch came to be my foundation bitch and also a champion plus a very good producer. I had by then studied everything I could about the breed and well, that was the start of a life-long love affair with dogs and Scottish Terriers in particular

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BIS: What is it about Scottish Terriers that hooked you from the get-go? D.E.: I think I would have loved any breed of dog really, so I suppose it was mere coincidence that my principal breed came to be a Scottie. My grandmother liked the breed a lot and her enthusiasm rubbed off on me and once I started studying the breed and getting to know the people and the dogs closely, there was really no turning back!! BIS: To Scottie enthusiasts, Kennelgarth is a religion, Betty Penn-Bull their messiah and her remarkable The Kennelgarth Scottish Terrier Book a holy piece of history. Could you please summarize her importance in the breed and influence on your becoming a ‘fully realized’ dog person? D.E.: Betty Penn-Bull owned Scotties for more than 70 years and nobody knew more about them than she did. She was a very sharp person with a wonderful memory, an excellent writer and a fascinating personall qualities that I admire tremendously. She managed to breed a distinct type of dog that was easily recognisable and her dogs were almost always very domi-



nant sires producing dogs of quality also when mated to outcross bitches. Betty Penn-Bull never swayed friom what she believed was correct breed type and her dogs ALWAYS had good temperaments which they also passed on. Luckily, her dogs were available at stud throughout her career in dogs and they made a huge contribution to the breed. I would give my right arm to have one of them today! Her various writings were also for the good of the breed and she had a natural authority which made everybody listen to her, and this she never used to minimize others but always for the betterment of the breed. Betty Penn-Bull was involved in every aspect of the breed right up until her death and I miss her more than I can say, not least her unflagging determination and enthusiasm plus some of her quaint eccentricities! She was however not just an eccentric lady, but very sharp-witted and verbal, always updated and a constant source of inspiration – one that can never be replaced BIS: Which individuals of the breed made the greatest impact on you? D.E.: This is a very difficult question as I feel competition (or lack of) at a certain moment of time can make a dog look better or worse and one’s perception of outstanding dogs is also determined by one’s own level of knowledge at the time. However, on reflection, I would like to mention the American brindle dog Ch Dunbar’s Democat of Sandoone (all English breeding though), Gb Ch Kennelgarth Edricj, Gb Chs Brio Once Upon a Time and Brio Jezebel plus the breed record holders for dogs and bitches, Gb Chs Mayson Monopoly and Wildermist Clara-wonderful Scotties who came very close to perfection. BIS: How crucial do you think it is for newcomers to absorb as much as information and knowledge as possible, before taking on the challenging task of breeding? Would you say enough of us have adequate theoretical and practical understanding of what breeding actually is? D.E.: If you are genuinely interested I think you will make a big effort to learn as much as possible about the practicalities of breeding and this I feel most people master quite quickly. To learn about blood-lines and to to study the work of famous kennels, well that seems to become less important, sadly! When I started breeding, it was all about breeding to type and sticking to type and trying to improve on weak points without

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Photo 2 • First Black & White show in Sweden judged by Alan Gill (Gillson Scotties) and Barbara Graham (Lasara Westies) in the early 70’s. Their winners were Dan Ericsson’s UK bred bitch Ch Reanda Ravita (Ch Kennelgarth Knight Errant - Larksgate My Love)-handled here by a youthful owner- and the WHW Ch Tweed Texas Ranger, shown by Ann-Christin Molin and bred by Birgitta Hasselgren. Photo 3 • Ch Doyrinns Chinese Ragh-Lan winning BOB at Stockholm Int Show in 1988, sired by Cherangani Bomber


ground and later influence on your kennel? D.E.: Well, she was my foundation bitch and is still behind most of my dogs. She was not a chance-bred bitch but came from a well-known local breeder who had had success with her dogs and often used imported UK dogs from leading kennels. Terzette was sired by Ch Gaywyn Marquis hailing from one of the top kennels in the UK and he was sired by Westminster BISwinner Ch Bardene Bingo ex Ch Gaywn Viscountess, a daughter of the famous stud-dog Ch Kennelgarth Viking. When I first visited the UK working in kennels I quickly discovered that these bloodlines were behind most of the top-winners and it has ever since been my ambition to combine them in my won dogs. My first really successful litter from Terzette (who was a good whelper and produced big litters) was by another UK import, Ch Gillson Grand Monarch who carried several lines to Bingo and Viking. This produced lovely stock and I have tried to keep to these line up until this very day.

Photo 4 • Raglan Rose Maiden At Bri won Best in Show at the Winsdoor show in the United Kingdom 2003

losing type. This is never easy, but I am still convinced that that is the best and most reliable route to success. Nowadays, the whole world is an open oyster and bloodlines are mixed dramatically resulting in dogs of varying quality and type. This makes it even more difficult for breeders to evaluate the results of their breeding efforts and nobody is an expert in recordtime. In Scotties this new way of determining stud-dogs and also breeding combinations has not been entirely successful. More unbiased study of successful kennels and strains would have helped the breed more, just like we used to do it, rather than diluting the good lines of quality for each generation. There really is no other way than to stick to type and linebreeding and even this method of breeding leads to disappointing results sometimes, but certainly more reliability when it comes to correctness of type-always the most important element in pedigree dogs. BIS: Your life took an unexpected turn when you acquired your first ever Scottish Terrier, Ch Torsloch Terzette. Can you please tell us more about her back-

BIS: And how about your ‘2nd foundation’ bitch, Ch Reanda Ravita? D.E.: I had become very friendly with Mrs Elsa Meyer of the Reanda kennels and she in fact became a lifelong friend. I always used to stay with her when I visited England and she could not have been kinder to me. She produced 36 UK champions, also of a distinct type and they almost always excelled in good fronts and really good dark eyes, not always the case in the breed. Sometimes she would use stud dogs from other kennels and when she decided to use one of her heavily linebred bitches (by Ch Reanda Ringold, another dog sired by Ch Bardene Bingo) to Ch Kennelgarth Knight

“There really is no other way than to stick to type and linebreeding and even this method of breeding leads to disappointing results sometimes” Best in Show Magazine

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Photo 5 • March 7, 2004 GBCH Raglan Rose Maiden At Brio won her 16th CC, became BOB, Best Terrier, and Reserve Best In Show. One of the greatest achievements in Swedish dog sports ever. After Crufts win, Puzzle won 26 CC in the end.

Errant (by Viking ex Bardene Barefoot Contessa), I thought that a puppy could be exciting and yes, she was! She proved somewhat difficult to get in whelp and only produced one puppy in her first litter after having missed several times. The name of this puppy was Ch Raglan Red Rarirty and he became my first really big winner and was Top Terrier in Sweden in 1976. In later litters, Ravita produced bitches enabling me to carry on breeding from her line. Terzette and Ravita were quite different, but both had excellent breed-type and shared a common family background and the combination of these two lines worked well. BIS: Where does the name ‘Raglan’ come from? D.E.: There is really no exciting story connected to this at all and my first choice of prefix was in fact Rockford. This was rejected by the Kennel Club and I liked the sound and look of the word Raglan and thus applied for it. At the time I had of course also become very influenced by Mrs Meyer ‘s Reanda-names, all beginning with the letter ‘R’.

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BIS: What is your breeding philoshophy and how much has it changed from the beginning? Do you breed within a framework of strict principles and base the structure of your pedigrees on strong bitchlines? D.E.: I would like to think that my views on breeding are pretty much the same as when I started, I.e. sticking to type and trying to correct faults in each generation by finding matching sires who in turn must not introduce new faults and yet be of similar type to the bitch. Not easy! If the two components also have a common family background, I am doubly pleased as that reinforces the good points. Good bitches are of great value to all breeders and literally worth their weight in gold. No dog or bitch is better than their type and I never compromise with breed type but can be a little flexible on various points. I am not afraid to use dogs or bitches who are a little overdone providing type is correct. Such dogs often make excellent producers. BIS: Have you ever found yourself at a point in your breeding program which you thought to be a difficult


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or impossible act to follow? D.E.: Yes, I have lately found it difficult to find suitable stud dogs for my bitches. Many of the reliable bloodlines consistently producing good stock are now extinct or have become diluted by blood lines that I do not care for. I have had to take chances on such dogs, but the results have often been somewhat disappointing. However, there now seems to be a nucleus of excellent dogs of correct type again and this has inspired hope! I have also had patches of really bad luck: dead puppies, small litters, bitches missing and oither disasters, but I have learnt to endure such periods of misfortunate and have found that there is almost always light at the end of the tunnel if you do not give up!! Breeding dogs is not for the faint-hearted! BIS: Crufts 2004 is a most historic day for Raglan and the Swedish dog sport… Could you tell us what that weekend meant/means to you and how you lived through it? D.E.: I still find it hard to believe that it actually happened: one of my homebred Scotties won reserve Best in Show at Crufts following a wonderful year where she won Top Terrier – a surreal experience that has meant a lot to me and the breed. It also shows that it is indeed possible to win at the highest level provided you have a really good dog. I would like to record my thanks to Jane Miller who owned and campaigned Rose Maiden to such heights-without her work and dedication it would not have been possible. I was very honoured when Bo Bengtson wrote in one of his columns that Rose Maiden’s Crufts-win must rank as one the greatest wins ever for Swedish dogs-lovely words!

Photo 6 • English, Swedish & Norwegian Ch Raglan Rose Maiden of Brio, Top Terrier in the UK ‘03 and res BIs Cruft’s ‘04 Photo 7 • Raglan Real Gold, 15 months in the photo Photo 8 • Ch Raglan Royal Prospect winning BIS under Harry O’Donoghue at the Swedish Terrier Club Centenary Show in ‘03

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BIS: Please summarize the rest of the highlights of your homebred Scottish Terriers’ successes. D.E.: The Raglan dogs have over the years won at every level in this country and no less than 7 homebred dogs have won all breed BIS in Sweden, numerous others have won Top Terrier and Ch Raglan Rory is the top-winning terrier of all time and was also crowned Dog of The Year in 2001, all lovely wins, but what delights me the most is that Raglan dogs are behind so many other good Scotties all over the world and I am very thankful for the appreciation they have received from other Scottie experts. Raglan dogs have done particularly well under breed judges, not always easy to please. Raglan dogs continue to do well whenever shown under people who understand the breed


and there is no doubt that they have in fact made a contribution the breed as a whole. BIS: 156 homebred Champions is just one of the extraordinary records on the Raglan account, which without a doubt required a tremendous amount of effort and teamwork with puppy buyers. D.E.: Yes, I have been lucky with most of my puppy buyers and managed to persuade many of them to come for trimming a little more often than otherwise would have been the case. To show a trimmed breed entails a lot of effort, so it is in many ways more difficult to do well in the show ring with a dog of a trimmed breed. I have often paid entry fees for dogs not belonging to me out of my own pocket and also driven long distances to collect and deliver dogs to and from shows, but it has all been worth it. I have also been lucky inasmuch as many other breeders have owned and shown dogs bred by me to success, and some have in fact had numerous dogs from me, I am always very happy for other good breeders to have a Raglan-dog as I find it increasingly difficult to show the dogs due to many judging commitments all over the world BIS: How did Labradors, an entirely different breed from Scottish Terriers, come into the picture? Did you break the Labrador code the same way as in your original breed, and did you learn anything from breeding Labradors that you could make use of in your work with Scotties? D.E.: My interest in dogs has never been limited to Scotties and I have in fact always tried to be updated on other breeds and I have also had friends in many other breeds, mainly perhaps in Labradors- a breed that I had always wanted to own and even more so after getting to know the breed at close quarters. They seemed so easy to keep and yet so adaptable and they required no trimming and there was no shortage on stud dogs! However, Labradors are big dogs and I spent many years longing for a Labrador knowing full well that I did not have room for them at the time, but when life and space permitted owning Labradors, I decided to go ahead- a decision I have never regretted. They share the same sturdiness, compactness, solidity and soundness of mind as Scotties, but require less coat care and are usually easy helpers, but the minus side is more space and exercise, also more health monitoring, so all in all another challenging breed, but with a different focus. Interestingly, I have found that rearing

Photo 9 • Dan with his Labradors Photo 10 • Ch. Raglan Jolson

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Scotties and Labradors is indeed very similar and also that breeders in both breeds seem to share the same views and general outlook in life.

offspring, perhaps most notably through his son Ch So What Excalibur who stayed in the UK for a limited period of time

BIS: The Raglans have certainly made their impact on the Scottish Terrier breed internationally, not least in the UK. How do you think your breeds have profitted from what you have instilled in the gene pool? Are there any kennels that based their foundation on Raglan stock? D.E.: This is one of my greatest delights and one of which I am very proud. In 2014, all new UK champions carried Raglan-lines and most of them had one Raglan-bred parent. The brindle dog Raglan Royal Connection with Brio proved to be the right dog at the time for many UK Scottie bitches and I think he sired 8 UK champions before being retired from stud. His progeny is now winning at every level, also his grandchildren, and I notice that the newly crowned UK Ch Lomondview Signature is doubly bred to him. Another Raglan bitch, Roman Empress, produced several champions for Pam Pagram’s Torcraig kennels and so did Rose Maiden for Jane Miller and her Brios. Ch Raglan Rory never left Sweden and sired very few puppies but his name appears in most pedigrees today, also in the UK where he has made a positive contribution through various

BIS: What is your take on your breeds’ present situation? Are you optimistic about the direction they’re headed? D.E.: There have always been good and bad dogs and this is still the case. I worry about the fact that many judges do not understand breed type properly and that showmanship and that ‘flash and dash’ seem to be become more important than structural correctness. The breed also has many new breeders who work hard but they are sometimes too easily influenced by judges with very little understanding of the breed. Overall, I do however feel that there are some very good dogs around and I just wish that judging would be more consistent and that pretty pictures of sculpted incorrect dogs are not allowed to become more important than correctness of type.

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BIS: What makes breeding so enjoyable for you? What does the future hold for Raglan? D.E.: Breeding is a never-ending challenge- to come as close to perfection as possible and to combine this with soundess. That has always been my ambition, yet unful-


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filled but I shall carry on for as long as I can although I have found it difficult to wind down my breeding activities due to many other commitments, including judging. BIS:‘Foxterriers’ in disguise - your famous expression is. What does it stand for exactly? D.E.: Scotties should be wide, deep and sturdy and correctness of type is closely linked with good body properties. Heads are important and should be long and clean- that is correctness of type for a Scottie. Many present-day Scotties are however built on somewhat racier lines and are overlong in neck and too fine in head. A Scottie should have a muscular neck of moderate length and the head should be long but not fine- hence the expression “Foxterriers in disguise”. These incorrect dogs are often beautifully trimmed but alien to correct breed type BIS: So, how would you describe the ideal Scottish Terrier? Which of your homebred dogs have so far got the closest to this imprint in your head? D.E.: A Scottie is a short backed, strongly made dog with good bone and substance and a deep body with well sprung ribs. He should have a long clean head set on a muscular neck, straight strongly boned front legs, a level short back covered by a hard double coat. His quarters are very muscular and he has a high-set tail. Ears should be small and set high and eyes must be dark of almond shape. He should carry himself with pride and have an air of importance and quality. Of my homebred dogs, I would like to mention Ch Raglan Rory and his daughters Ch Raglan Rose Maiden and Ch Raglan Royal Prospect but also Ch Raglan Royal Commander and his granddaughter Ch Raglan Royal Serenade – all beautiful examples of the breed

Photo 12 • Ch Raglan Jack Frost won 4th in a big Open Class at Crufts 2013. He is pictured here with his breeder and owner/ handler, Thierry Onkelinx from Belgium. Photo 13 • Dan judging Irish Terriers in Sweden Photo 14 • Ch Raglan Rachel Rose with Mia Ejerstad

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BIS: Please name some of the finest Scottish Terriers and Labradors (other than your own breeding) that ever existed, and tell us why you thought they were such exemplary specimens to be noted and remembered. D.E.: I have already mentioned some of my favourite Scotties in a previous question, so will concentrate on the Labradors here. Some of the finest bitches the breed has ever known must surely be the beautiful yellows Gb Sh Chs Sandylands Bliss, Rocheby Polka Dot and Croftspa Hazelnut of Foxrush, but also Covetwood Elouise of Carpenny. They combined substance and quality perfectly with all of the desired breed points


yet retaining quality, difficult individual points to achieve and a real masterclass to combine in the same dog. BIS: Are there any breeders (all breeds) you look up to? D.E.: There are many top class breeders in various breeds worldwide, but my vote goes to those who manage to form and retain a type and who consistently produce good dogs over a long period of time. In Scotties I would like to mention the Lomondview kennels of Carol Annan, the Tamzins of Ray & Ava Platt but also the Kennelgarths, the Reandas and the Gaywyns from the past. In Labradors, the breed’s premier kennel must surely be Marion & David Hopkinson’s Rocheby dogs as well as Erica Jayes’ Sandylands and from a previous period Didi Hepworth’s Poolsteads. I would also like to express my admiration for Bill Shelton’s American Coventry Corgis and Pat Tucker’s famous Vin-Melca Norwegian Elkhounds – wonderful dogs bred for generations by dedicated true breeders. Other breeders that I admire hugely are Zena Thorn-Andrews’ and her Drakesleat Dachshunds and Gladys Dyke with her Hadleigh Pomeranians must surely be one of the best breeders in dogs ever, perhaps matched by Rae Furness of Raycroft Clumber fame and Gordon & Penny Williams whose Bournehouse Setters and Cockers have been hugely successful over a significant period of time BIS: Over the past decades, you have been denominated a world class breeder, respected mentor, Terrier authority, and a hugely popular All-rounder judge. What motivated you to become a dog show judge? What did you want to accomplish by doing so? Have you, from the beginning, planned on judging all breeds? D.E.: It just happened! Dogs and even more dogs have been on my mind every day and moment of my life ever since I was a teenager and I would like to think that some of the patient, clever people of the past installed some knowledge in me and from there things snowballed and I suddenly found myself invited to judge at a Scottie show in 1976, where incidentally the winner was Ch Gaywn Bow Bells, a lovely bitch also by today’s standards. Judging somehow became a natural progression of my commitment to dogs and I was fortunate to receive many invitations and the support of clubs and breeders including my own kennel club which honoured me by licensing me to judge all

Photo 15, 16, 17 • Dan Ericsson judging all around the World

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“The only way to learn about dogs is to talk to good breeders and to see as many dogs as possible of each breed and to be exposed to quality.” breeds, which I have now done for a period of time and I love it! BIS: What was it like to officiate at your first ever appointment - now exactly 40 years ago? Nervous!! D.E.: I was a young boy, full of opinions, some rather doubtful, I must admit, but I got through it and loved the opportunity to go over the dogs properly. I still vividly remember how daunting it was to enter the ring with a packed ringside of breeders and judges of long standing... This was very much the case when I judged the centenary open show of The Scottish Terrier Club of England in 1983.

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finest breeders have very little interest in judging and some of the finest judges have very little interest in breeding.. BIS: Do you have some sort of a ritual of reading through pedigrees and compendiums before judging appointments? D.E.: I always read through the breeds standards prior to judging and if I have any additional information such as books or compendiums, I go through these the week before judging the breeds in question. BIS: What is your judging philosophy? Has it always been the same, or has it slightly changed from the time when you started? D.E.: Yes, I think it has in fact changed. When I first started judging I was probably very technical and made sure I did not miss much. Over the years, I would like to think that I have become more forgiving as long as the overall picture pleases me. I have also learned to distinguish between minor flaws of very little importance to the overall dog and major faults, chief of which is always lack of correct breed type. With added experience I have been more confident in my placings and tend to go more and more on overall balance than absolute correctness in every detail, even if this is the ultimate goal.

BIS: How is the knowledge/experience you gain from breeding reflected in your judging? D.E.: This is a difficult question to answer, but on reflection I think it has added to my respect for breeders who struggle to produce good dogs. Living with dogs of varying ages and breeds also has taught me a lot about how breeds develop and indeed change over a period of time; this insight also goes for showmanship, conditioning and presentation

BIS: Which elements of judging dogs do you take the most pleasure in and when (and why) is it you enjoy it the most? D.E.: I absolutely love a class of top quality dogs which I know will challenge my ability and knowledge and I recognize this feeling immediately when I walk down the line to take a first look at them. This forces me to be at my very best and to recall all I know about the breed in question including all the finer points. To see, handle and place a class of such calibre is a moment of sheer exhilaration!

BIS: Would you say that a clever breeder will no doubt make a great judge as well? D.E.: No, not necessarily, some people seem to focus entirely on their own dogs and lack the ability to see other dogs objectively, others have no luck in planning their own breeding programmes, but are able to see and understand quality in other people’s dogs. In an ideal world, good breeders make good judges but that is not necessarily the case. In fact, some of the

BIS: As opposed to the points you remark above, what can upset you when judging? D.E.: It annoys me when people play silly games, cannot walk their dogs, cannot hold onto the dog’s lead and are upsetting other dogs in the class. I also get annoyed by exhibitors making rude remarks ringside, often meant to put me or fellow exhibitors off – all in very bad taste. Much is said about overweight dogs in the ring, but I am in fact more upset by hugely under-

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weight dogs and I always feel so very sorry for these wondering what sort of home they have. Despite the fact that breeding and judging dogs are extremely interdependent on each other, individuals of these closely related branches of our sport have been drifting further and further away from each other (less so in the UK). BIS: What is your take on how judging and breeding intersect today? D.E.: Some breeds have deteriorated to a degree where it is almost impossible for judges to develop an adequate competence in judging them, as truly quality examples of these breeds are troublesome to find or simply do not exist. BIS: How would you advise student- and well-established judges to build relevant skills for such assignments? D.E.: Not easy, for sure. The only way to learn about dogs is to talk to good breeders and to see as many dogs as possible of each breed and to be exposed to quality. I therefore urge all aspiring judges to travel and go to as many shows as possible, whenever and wherever it is possible plus of course establish contact with reputable breeders. There are however good breeders to be found, and one must therefore be careful not to fall victim of somebody’s misconception of a certain breed! Nothing ever beats experience in the world of dogs. BIS: Which shows do you delight in judging at the most? Any favourite countries you wish to name? D.E.: I have enjoyed judging at most shows all over the world, some I have admired for wonderful layout and organisation, others for outstanding dogs, a show may assemble great dogs in a quaint village hall, so it really is impossible to name a country, place or a specific type of show. The key point is always good dogs and ample space for showing them off in the ring, but a little extra consideration for the comfort of the judge and a good ring steward are welcome ingredients enabling the judge to get on with the job without any hitches. BIS: Please tell us about your Crufts 2016 appointment and what it meant to you that your Group winner West Highland White Terrier went all the way to Best in Show! D.E.: I was of course greatly honoured to be invited to

Photo 18 • Dan judging West Highland Terriers at Crufts 2015

Photo 19 • Dan judging Scottish Terriers at the European Dog Show in Geneve, Switzerland 2013

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BIS: Do you ever, therefore, conference on your judging with experts watching you from ringside? D.E.: I have a group of experienced people, judges and exhibitors, that I admire and in whom I have great confidence. I always look forward to exchanging views with them on the dogs that I have judged. Over the years I have benefitted greatly from this interchange of views and opinions. BIS: Please name the dogs you have judged so far whom gave a real aesthetic sensation. D.E.: This is an impossible question- ceratin dogs hit you and you itch to get your hands on them, but I find it impossible to mention all of these dogs as there have in fact been several including the wonderful Sealyham terrier Ch Efbe’s Hidalgo at Goodspice whom I judged and awarded BIS in the US prior to winning BIS at Crufts and the World Show in Sweden in 2008 Photo 20 • Dan awarding Pomeranian as the Best in Show dog in the USA

judge the group at Crufts this year and was nervous beforehand, but once the dogs started coming into the ring I felt curiously at ease. The little West Highland bitch caught my eye at once and her excellence was confirmed when examined on the table. She is living proof that it is possible to combine balance, and overall quality with correct breed type. The best judges seem have the ability to see this and I was therefore very fortunate that the BIS-judge, Mr Derek Smith, was a widely experienced judge who was able to appreciate her outstanding quality to the fullest. I was of course delighted to say the least and doubly pleased to realise that she was also a very popular winner with many other judges whom I rate highly BIS: Do you ever walk away from an assignment thinking you should have done differently? D.E.: I always leave the ring thinking a little longer about a few decisions. I can usually say why I have placed the dogs in a certain order, but I usually debate a little over a few placings. It is not easy to get it dead right in every class and exhibitors do not always realise that a judge normally only has a few minutes to make up his mind about a dog whereas the owner has usually spent years looking at his – or for that matter, other-dogs!

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BIS: Do you actively take part in recruiting and educating newcomers? What are your ‘teaching’ methods? D.E.: I try to encourage people who are keen and have the right attitude and approach. I always tell them to try and see as many dogs as possible and when I have student judges in my ring I do my best to make them understand breed type and overall correctness, I do also feel that it is important to have a mentor, a person with whom you can air your thoughts and views, somebody who can lead and guide you in the right direction and to whom you can talk openly when you have doubts and queries BIS: What books do you think are a must to read in order to have a thorough understanding of the sport? D.E.: I don’t think there are any “musts”- read as much as you can on dogs generally and dog showing but please include Bo Bengton’s dog showing Bible “Best in Show”, which, for me, captures all the excitement, pleasure and joy I connect with pedigree dogs, as a breeder, exhibitor and a judge BIS: Let us close this interview with some essential wisdom you would like you to share with us. D.E.: In order to gain excellence in dogs you must be prepared to travel, spend money, wake up early at weekends - all to gain experience, which really is the only thing! I am sure that there is no better sport in the world and I am eternally grateful to be part of it!


BIS EUKANUBA WORLD CHALLENGE 2016 RESERVE BEST IN SHOW AT WORLD DOG SHOW 2016 BEST IN SHOW FRENCH CHAMPIONSHIP 2016 - Best IN SHOW IDS DORTMUND 2016 BEST IN SHOW IDS CHINA 2016 - BEST IN SHOW JUNIOR EUROPEAN DOG SHOW 2016

Ver y Vigie l’art d’être unique WORLD WINNER ‘16 VICE WORLD WINNER ’16 JUNIOR WORLD WINNER’16 EUROPEAN WINNER (Male) ‘16 European WINNER (FEMALE) ‘16 JUNIOR EUROPEAN WINNER’16 BOB from JUNIOR CLASS RESERVE BEST OF GROUP and BIS JUNIORAT EDS ‘16 Laurent PICHARD

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The Literary Dog An Eye for a Dog • Review by Andrew Brace Written by Anne Tureen

Though there are a wealth of books that hold interest for people active in the disciplines of showing, breeding, and judging, and there is a vast sea of informative writing, there are very few works which could be described as a ‘fun’ read. Robert W. Cole’s An Eye for a Dog is one of these rare gems. The cover of the book is enough to hook anyone active in dogs, just under the subtitle, Illustrated Guide to Judging Purebred Dogs, two apparently identical drawings of Smooth Fox Terriers challenge us to a test of what most of us believe we know something about: looking at dogs. The 180 pages of this work could be 1,800 and we would still think them too few. The layout of the content with short paragraphs between large clear illustrations (also by Mr. Cole) belies deep challenging concepts exploring the very heart of the fancy. In four sections Mr. Cole cuts straight through the clouds of foam and chalk and diatribe which characterize our sport: 1. Type, Balance, and Proportions, 2. Features, 3. Movement, 4. Faults and Illusions.

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Each concept is presented briefly but completely and followed by an illustration for the reader to evaluate. For example, the author begins his discussion of ‘Type’ with three illustrations of American Staffordshire Bull Terriers. The mettle of the reader is immediately discovered. How many of us will turn to the most obvious excuse: ‘Ah, but that is not my breed’? If the drawings were of an (my breed)..Then I would recognize type!’ Consider how few judges enter the ring exclusively to judge their own breed. Is knowledge of the standard enough to prepare a judge for those critical decisions? Do we not expect a judge to know something about dogs in general? How difficult is that? Well, here is our opportunity to discover just how difficult it is. Open the standard of the Staffie on your phone, and take a look at the three clear drawings set before you. Really look. Even if you have not worked with this breed for the past 20 years of your life, can you identify exactly the differences between these three subjects? They have the same markings and are not even moving so your comparison should be simple compared to the task of the judge in the ring. Shorter neck, longer on leg, higher tail set? This is where the fun begins, there are no tricks, and the explanations follow the challenge; it is very tempting to peek at the answer and then cover up with: ‘Oh I saw that, I just didn’t know how to put it in words…’.

Robert Cole is the friend every person would like to have with them while watching the action in the ring. He invites you to comment on the dogs, he will cite relevant comments from the standard or by authorities in the breed, and finally he will share his opinion with you. He is modest. In

many cases he will load the scales and admit that the balance could go either way, ‘...which would you choose?’. The tone of his writing is lively and inviting, always drawing his reader by simple steps into the thick of a technical discussion. An international all around judge himself, engineer by profession and breeder of Basenji’s and Bull Terriers, Robert ‘Bob’ Cole was the witer of ‘You be the Judge’ a syndicated column in Dogs in Canada which was published for over 20 years. Other major periodicals with which he published included Dog News, and Dog World, moreover he was illustrator of Curtis Brown’s Locomotion and Gait, and author of The Basenji Stacked and Moving. An Eye for a Dog was published posthumously in 2004 by Dogwise, and was much appreciated by his contemporaries. Anne Rodgers Clarke considered it ‘...a must’, and Richard Beachamp agreed it is ‘...a must for everyone who has an eye on the prize’. E.M. Gilbert Jr., author of K9 Structure and Terminology, wrote of this book: ‘You will learn whether you want to or not’. So starting with the Staffie, you will be asked to evaluate the Dachshund, the Dalmatian and a host of other breeds, and along the way you will find new tools to bring to your craft and the ones you had from the beginning will be sharpened. You will also begin to anticipate with excitement the moment when Mr. Cole finally addresses your own breed, which, however, may not occur within the far too few pages of An Eye for a Dog. There are a small handful of breed specific volumes available by the same author at the publisher Dogwise. There are also reprints of some of the individual articles from the column You Be the Judge online at the unlikely source of Canadian Professional Pet Stylists: canpropetstylists.ca. Otherwise you will simply have to open your newly furnished toolbox and apply yourself with diligence, frequently refering to your trusty copy of ‘Eye’ to hear Mr. Cole’s gentle voice reasoning through the guiding principles of looking at dogs. The Literary Dog asked Mr. Andrew H. Brace to comment on some of the concepts and the general approach found in An Eye for Dog, as well as some to offer advice for anyone contemplating further steps in the discipline of judging. Mr. Brace writes for both of the magazines, among others, to which Best in Show Magazine

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Robert Cole contributed, and he has also published his own book on judging. (Please see The Essential Guide to Judging published by Ringpress, 1994.) Mr. Brace is also an international all around judge. He bred Beagles under the kennel name Tragband. He has judged Crufts in several breeds as well as Westminster and other prominent appointments.

BIS: In An Eye for a Dog, Mr. Cole affirms that judging is a part of most activies concerning dogs, the breeder and even the professional handler must be good judges themselves before going into the ring. Have you found this to be true in your various activities? A.B.: No one will succeed as a great breeder unless they have the ability to assess their own dogs with ruthless honesty, and be able to evaulate them in the context of the relevant Breed Standard, recognising virtues and faults. As regards the handler, be it a professional or an owner-handler, the secret of brilliant handling is developing the ability to emphasise virtues and disguise faults in such a way that it makes it difficult for the judge to find them. Great handlers often become great judges because the mental attitude remains the same ... concentrate on rewardng the virtues and see the faults in perspective. “Fault judges” are of no use to the sport ... any idiot can spot a dog’s light eyes, high tailset or whatever but it takes a connoisseur to appreciate its valuable breed characteris-

tics. There will always the the exception but I believe the greatest judges have previously proved themselves by being great breeders or handlers. BIS: Many times Mr. Cole will challenge us to see the difference in proportion of a centimeter in length or height, is real life judging that sharp? A.B.: I loathe the concept of “ruler judging” as to me the essence of a breed is down to balance rather than size. Some breeds have height, girth or weight disqualifications and in those instances then we have to abide by the dictates of the Breed Standard. However I would never penalise a dog that was slightly under or over size (unless it was a matter of disqualification in terms of the Standard) if it was blessed with superb breed type and created a picture that was balanced and typical. Oftentimes a dog can be fractionally longer coupled than the ideal yet will pull itself together and its movement will as a result be extremely impressive. The baby should never be thrown out with the bath water! BIS: Related to the above point, there must be mounting frustration for a judge trying to be accurate during the long morning when sloppy or unprepared handling is contrasted with the super polished professional ‘statue’ presented by professional handlers. Where is the natural dog in the highly artificial setting of the show, and what should we aim for? A.B.: Many exhibitors will tell you that I am not a lover of over-presentation and have often excused dogs (in Shih Tzu and Poodles in particular) if their grooming is unacceptably artificial. Our job as judges is to find the best dog and not the “best” groomed dog. Often I have been faced with a badly groomed and handled dog that is in actual fact far superior to its better groomed and handled competition. Usually this is down to the handler being inexperienced – maybe at their first ever show – and judges should be capable of seeing the cake rather than the icing. Yes of course we would like all the dogs shown under us to be beautifully clean, groomed and trained, but it isn’t always the case. It takes a lot of guts to actually award BOB to a dog whose presentation is poor and whose handling is ineffectual as you know full well that when it apBest in Show Magazine

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pears in the Group your peers will be raising their eyebrows and searching the catalogue to discover who on earth judged THAT breed ... but you should try to do your best in the BREED ring regardless of any subsequent ramifications as it is the breed judging that is actually most important of all (something that many present day handlers seem to forget). BIS: How do you arrange your thoughts while evaluating a larger class of dogs: do you cull for type then move on to movement, outline, head and expression etc. A.B.: I share the thoughts of the late Anne Rogers Clark in that I tend to attempt to get a shortlist of the most typical animals, then work through them in more detail where movement, carriage and character will come into play as well as physical details such as head and expression, coat texture etc. BIS: You have made some passionate comments on grooming. Just to extend that a moment: in a quality lineup, how much would you award grooming and star quality in a dog as compared to structural quality, straightforward breeding stock selection? A.B.: Grooming is not hereditary and let me emphasise that “grooming” and “star quality” are two entirely different things. A great dog can jump in a lake, come out and shake itself and still have star quality, even in its most unkempt state as true star quality comes from an aura that stems from the intensity of breed type coupled with bearing, structure and balance. In the hypothetical case of a line-up of otherwise equal dogs then maybe sophisticated presentation could tip the scales but in reality those hypothetical cases we read of actually never happen! BIS: We had a Swedish judge at our specialty last year, quite an experienced judge, and she was bemoaning the use of chalk and other products on the dogs. ‘After all, we are expert enough to forgive the trifles that people are attempting to mask.’ A contrasting viewpoint can be summed up ‘Would you send a candidate for Miss. America to the contest without her makeup?’ What might your comment be? A.B.: The keynote here is moderation. I have no 174

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problem with a little chalk or hairspray used discretely but the temptation with many handlers these days is they never know when to stop and carry their “glamourising” through to such a degree that the dog becomes a caricature. Using your Miss America analogy, a woman who presents herself with shampooed hair, clean and free of make-up will often be far more beautiful and attractive than someone whose hair is lacquered to such an extent it cannot move and make up applied to an almost clown-like degree. BIS: The final chapter of this book discusses the examination of teeth in various breeds, do you feel there can be an allowance for an otherwise excellent specimen in some genrerally problem free breeds such as a gundog for say a missing P1, and how much irregularity are you prepared to accept in the smaller breeds or the brachycephalous breeds such as the Boxer, the Border Terrier, the Boston Terrier etc especially when you find them in Ch class or the group level? A.B.: Here again common sense should prevail and I have had endless arguments with revered German Shepherd people who openly admit that they would ignore that hypothetically perfect specimen if it had a missing tooth. Dogs have teeth to eat – they are alive so we can assume they are capable of eating. Some breeds were bred to do jobs of work where a particular bite is vital to efficient function. In those breeds the bite must be taken into consideration, but let me stress BITE and if the bite is correct for the breed but an incisor is missing then I would not get hysterical. In the breeds you mention, the bite should be correct for the breed ... an undershot Border Terrier would not figure too highly in my placings, regardless of merits, likewise an overshot Boxer. Apart from the weakening of functionality there would ipso facto be a completely untypical expression as a result. BIS: In the course of his text Mr. Cole discusses some major faults such as a sunken prosternum in sheepdogs, or gundogs, or sickle hocks, especially in Wires, but also in Dachsunds and many other breeds, however these can all be seen occasionally in the group ring. Certainly the burden is on the


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breeders in the first place not to present such dogs, but they also get past judges. Of which major faults do you feel breeders and judges ought to be more critical? A.B.: Breeder-judges have the advantage in that their experience will have taught them which faults are most difficult to eradicate and this is something that all-rounders may be unaware of (unless they are fortunate enough to have good friends in a breed with whom they discuss openly and honestly the most important faults and virtues). Sickle hocks are seen more and more in many breeds and reduce efficient movement drastically – as anyone can see when such afflicted dogs move in profile – yet many judges and handlers seem blind to the condition. Breeders and judges should aim for a dog that is essentially typical but also moves as soundly and typically as possible. Judges will vary in their priorities. Some have a hatred of bad feet, others will never accept straight rears and it is the difference between judges’ priorities that make exhibitors go to shows every week. If every judge’s results were identical exhibitors would probably just go to one show a year! BIS: You mentioned fault judging, could you comment further on that as opposed to merit based appraisal and what sort of approach distinguishes the quality judge? A.B.: Fault judges will never contribute to the sport. Great judges are those who can spot a diamond in the rough, a dog that oozes breed type and character and moves correctly for its breed, regardless of how it is presented or handled. Most of the judges who have my greatest respect have the ability to spot “quality” in any class and would never miss it. Fault judges just end up struggling with mediocrity and will never help take a breed forward as they are too preoccupied with finding obvious (and often minor) faults in otherwise outstanding specimens. BIS: Would you humor us just a moment and play the Fairy Godfather of all judging? What changes would you make, in all countries in all show rings, what requirements, rules, would you set or lift to improve the discipline of judging? A.B.: We have more than enough regulations al176

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ready but not all of them are taken notice of. You cannot legislate integrity or knowledge and these are the vital ingredients so often missing in the centre of the ring. BIS: Apart from Mr. Cole’s book, and your own, what sort of reading or activities would you suggest in order to develop a critical eye for dogs? A.B.: In every breed there is usually at least one book, written by a true breed specialist worthy of the name, that is considered to be the “breed bible”. It astounds me that so often today even exhibitors in a breed may have never read the most important work on their breed. That must be essential reading, but many of the Scandinavian judges will tell you that they self-educated by studying the DOG WORLD Annuals of the past, looking at the many photographs of the great dogs from the legendary kennels and asking themselves what made these dogs so special. BIS: Both yourself and Mr. Cole worked for the publications Dog World and Dogs in Canada, from your experience, and as a consumer, to what degree would you say dog publications, especially periodicals, influence their readers, would you say there is enough stimulating material for breeders, judges, and exhibitors, too much gossip, serious review of important issues, helpful information regularly printed? How do you view online forums? A.B.: I believe that many of the publications remain of great value and still believe that the printed word


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BIS: When did the critical appraisal of the asthetics of dogs begin for you, and how long would you say it took to gain ‘competence’ in this specific area. A.B.: I was fortunate in that I was born into the “golden age” of dogdom and grew up in an area rich in dog matches, Sanction, Limited and Open shows which is where judges learnt their craft. I began judging dog matches in smoky back-rooms of pubs and crowded village halls when I was in my mid-teens and enjoyed the experience of evaluating dogs in so many breeds from an early age. However I felt that I first began really learning when I judged my first Championship show – Pekingese was the breed – in 1977 and I have continued learning ever since. has no substitute when it comes to study and education. The degree of influence they have will depend on the substance of the article and the mindset of the reader. Certainly as far as DOG WORLD – a weekly newspaper – is concerned the content of the paper is virtually 100% fact-based, with, obviously, space given to opinions on important current issues. We do not knowingly include “gossip” in any shape or form. Online forums - like so much online activity - are great in theory but in reality they tend to lose direction and degenerate into slanging matches between non-achievers who are keen to vent their wrath on either judges or fellow breeders and exhibitors. If I had my way they would be banned! BIS: Related to the above subject, I am very thankful to Crufts since that is my yearly opportunity to shop for books and other printed materials related to this sport. While many things are available online, it is helpful to be able to browse and compare prospective purchases. What could other important shows, including the WDS and European Dog Show do to introduce more stands with books and magazines? A.B.: Make their space rental much cheaper!

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BIS: Finally, while much of the pleasure in our sport is based on the comparative evaluation of breeding stock, from the breeder to the bystander, is there a litmus test for determining a future judge? Say for instance, an observer that is generally able to select the same dogs as the judge in the ring, a breeder who generally wins, or a handler who is able to see the ring winner in the pet, is this enough raw material from which a future judge can be formed? What is the ideal course to be undertaken in preparing to become a judge? A.B.: Judges of the future should begin by getting their eye in by studying outstanding examples of the breed/s they wish to judge and doing so whilst absorbing the words of the Breed Standard. They should also avail themselves of the vast knowledge that is still around amongst long established breeders and judges. This I feel is where so many lack today as they seem to think they know more than they do and are reluctant to ask their elders for help. At my judging seminars I advise would-be judges to regularly sit ringside and make their own selections, then write critiques on the dogs who win that day and compare their written assessment with the published judge’s critique. This is a great way to prepare for their debut. Judges can be taught to a certain extent, but only the great ones have that natural eye which enables them to instinctively select the best in any company.


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What is exactly our final destination? Written by Ante Lucin

More than ever in the last few months I have been asking myself where our sport is going, what is happening with it and where does it want to arrive. More and more I am getting depressed by seeing confusing things, reading Facebook comments, watching mediocre dogs winning, and the quality of dogs, judges and handlers going dramatically down. I talk regularly to my friends about it and two things are quite clear to me. When talking to the people who have been in the sport already for 20 or more years they keep on reminiscing about the good old times. When talking to the young generations, I feel there is nothing more that can be done to prove to them that things are not as they see them now. When I was young (or younger) I travelled the world to see dogs. I was not interested in the cities, culture, fancy dinners. I only wanted to watch dogs; to talk to the famous handlers, judges and breeders. To learn. I still remember all the Crufts, Westminster and Collare d’Oro videos, I was dying to receive them. I used to see them over and over again. There were no Facebook, live streams and all the wonders of the modern technology like we have now. But still I knew all the famous dogs and all the famous dog people. Judges, breeders and handlers by their names and by their fame which was exclusively earned by their honest work and knowledge. Today it seems that nobody wants to learn. Nobody is interested in DOGS. Everyone keeps on worrying if he is a friend on Facebook 188

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of the judge who will judge next important show, which handler is good for which judge, which dog is flashy enough for junior handling, which judge is gay and which is straight. Many judges who are judging every weekend are not famous breeders. Some of them have never owned a top quality dog. Some of them never have picked up shit, delivered puppies, bathed dogs or driven all night to hear someone’s opinion. Then of course, many of these judges do not have the respect for the exhibitors and their work. But also there are far too many exhibitors, who think they are the best and they know the best. They happily announce (either verbally to their friends who have also had a bad day, or on Facebook when they get home) that the judges are stupid, all the handlers are corrupt and the only reason why they are not winning is because the whole world is against them because they are so good in everything they do. Nowadays everything is possible. We are not allowed to criticise, to ask or to question the placements. Still I feel the people that are most trashed on Facebook are the honest people. When I was younger judges were famous because of the dogs they had bred and/or shown and because of being honest, kind and ready to share their knowledge with the exhibitors. Breeders were famous for the dogs they bred and showed. Handlers were famous for the quality of the dogs they showed and the conditions in which they were pre-


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sented and the way they were looked after, not the numbers of groups or Bests in Show they had won. So, what is my point? If you read the comments it looks like everyone is disappointed in the current situation in the dog world; the beginners because they think they can’t win because of the famous handlers, some judges because they can’t understand why always the same faces are judging the big shows, experienced exhibitors because they see a lot of corruption and huge decrease in the quality of judging and dogs exhibited. Everyone is disappointed. And no one is ready to do anything because if you start to do something immediately there is a drama. If you have noticed I didn’t write any articles last year for any magazines as I thought that I will not be able to talk about the moon and the stars when I think everything is literally going to hell. I have been following many topics during the year – tragedies in which two handlers lost a big number of dogs, hundreds of videos of exhibitors treating badly the dogs inside and outside of the rings, different videos of judges doing all kind of strange things. There was a drama almost every week. And people have completely lost their minds. There is no culture of conversation, no one wants to talk about arguments, and everyone thinks others should think how they think. I have never felt as disenchanted with the dog world and with dog people as I was last year. I have always been a person who was on the side of justice. I never wanted to be a God or the one who will say what is wrong or right. I think there are always institutions and people who have gone to schools to decide on different matters. I am not the one to say this is correct or this is not. That doesn’t mean I don’t have my opinion. But I can also survive if someone proves me my opinion is wrong. We have lost a lot of important dog people last year. But we still didn’t learn anything. We still don’t understand life is a strange thing. One day you are here, the next you are gone. Now suddenly everyone is a bigger dog lover than the other one, better breeder than the other one, better judge than the other one. People give comments and opinions on everything. They are evil, bad, they want to hurt, they revenge, and they want to destroy other peo190

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ple. I have not been raised like that. I was raised to listen, to exchange opinions, to learn the facts before I speak. I am not crucifying anyone to feel important. I have made mistakes, I am not an angel. I learned that tragedies can happen. I learned to be sorry for lost lives. I learned to be sorry for the pain people are feeling for different reasons. I have never been happy because something bad happened to someone I don’t like or who has caused me pain. I am thinking who are young people who are going to be mentors and legends like some people we lost were to us? I am thinking why people enjoy seeing other people suffering? I can’t understand why the people attack always the ones who are weak, why they never want to learn the facts, support and help. I have read so many comments about the tragedy that happened in Italy last year. I have seen old friends turning their backs on each other because one didn’t unfriend another one on Facebook. I have seen people asking to forbid the summer shows, to forbid the handlers, to punish the judges who are putting up the dogs shown by certain people but in the same time saying it is sad that judges are putting up the dogs only because they are shown by some people. But I have seen only a few trying to understand what happened and really trying to ensure that something like that never happens again. People were writing rules with no sense, speaking badly about all the handlers and judges, show organizers and so on. Why? Why do we always need to be our own worst enemies? I saw a week ago a video of a famous Russian breeder being harsh with her own dog outside of the ring. I don’t know what happened before, I don’t know if the video was true, or was it case of photos and videos being extremely well prepared specifically to crucify someone. I am against everything that can hurt the dogs. But can I find an excuse for the people who without knowing the facts write comments like “ hope she will get cancer” under the video – no, I can’t. The never ending story with the WDS in China was another hot topic, again with people taking sides and being rude without knowing the facts. I am not into politics and I didn’t vote for or against the WDS in China. I am sure there is not ONE dog person in the world who can find an ex-


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cuse for the tradition of killing the dogs in China. I am sure there is not ONE dog person who would not do everything he can to stop this. Some people think they should boycott China until this is solved – fine with me. Some people think they should go to China, show their dogs there and judge and support the Chinese KC in its fight to stop this tradition – fine with me. I have seen some nasty comments on both sides and that just proves how close minded the world is. And when I see all this, than I am not surprised that almost every institution in every country slowly slowly is bringing out the laws that will at the end have only one result – the complete ban on breeding purebred dogs and a ban on dog shows. And I am one of these who is not blaming anyone for this but ourselves – the dog people who pretend to love our dogs and our sport so much but are never prepared to fight for it. Instead it seems that we are only too happy to give ammunition to the animal rights and anti-purebred people with which they can beat us. In general the sad truth is that we are not able to be united even in the most unimportant matters. I just got the Dog World annual and I am reading all the texts about different kinds of new laws for the breeders and exhibitors that are being accepted in different countries. It started with cropping and docking, than they made the list of dangerous breeds, of unhealthy breeds. Than we need to show the dogs on the loose lead, than we cannot use any products, sprays, chalks, driers, table arms, chain collars, double handling, food in the ring… No puppy pens or fences, no changing clothes at the shows, no crackers, no elastics, no this, no that. I am asking myself every weekend when going to the shows the same question – am I a bad handler because I bath and dry my dogs? Am I a bad breeder because I put puppy collars on my puppies? Am I a bad person because I spray the coat of my dogs, because I iron their hair? Am I a torturer of animals because I use table arms and chain collars? Am I the worst criminal in the world when every country is only thinking what else could forbid me to bring to the show my purebred show dog? And I know the answer. No, I am not. I am a dog lover from the bottom of the heart. My dogs live a good life, my dogs are happy, my dogs eat the best food, my dogs are regularly bathed and clean, my 192

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dogs run in the garden all day and play, my dogs are healthy, my puppies have great temperaments and they make their new owners happy. I am proud of who I am, I am proud of my work, I am proud of my dogs, I am proud of my friends. And for once I am sure we need to do something to stop being trashed by other people who don’t understand anything about our sport. Because of the new campaign in which famous people and celebrities are happy to be photographed with puppies from a shelter and state that every purebred dog bought mean one dog is killed in the shelter, people are afraid to buy purebred dogs from respected and dedicated breeders. And it seems that no one is able to explain why this is not true and why any animal loving organizations should be fighting against us! The vast majority of breeders of purebred dogs are firstly dog lovers. People who bring the dogs to the show take better care of them than 90 % of other dog owners. Dogs from serious breeders never end up on the streets or in the shelters; we take care of our puppies since they were born till they die. We do not sell sick puppies; we do not give false pedigrees and fake pet passports. We should be the ones to be thanked and praised, not the ones to be blamed for everything. There is not too much time left. Many things will never be as they were just because we were thinking we need always to keep our heads down; because we thought if we give one thing to the animal rights fanatics they will not ask for another. If we don’t react now it will be too late. Am I one of the few who understand this? I read a few hours ago a very interesting text by Sheila Atter called “The old days – good or bad?” And I would like to end up my article with her sentences: ‘There have always been aspects of the dog game that we should not be very proud about, but it is up to us to make sure that it will still be possible, in another 20 years or so, for someone to rewrite this article. At the moment it sometimes seems that we are very close to pressing the self-destruct button.’


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THE SPORTING GROUP

THE WORKING GROUP

Judge: Pamela Bruce

Judge: Mrs. Kimberly Meredith-Cavanna

1st Place • Clumber Spaniel GCHS CH Clussexx Man Of Steel

1st Place • Boxer GCHP CH Mephisto’s Speak Of The Devil

Breeders: Jeane Haverick, Douglas A. Johnson & Jaime Hubbard Owners: Clussexx Reg J. Hubbard W. & K. Holbrook B. Dowd

2nd Place • Cocker Spaniel ASCOB GCHG CH Silverhall Strike Force Breeders: Wilson S. Pike & Bonnie S. Pike Owners: Regina Beinhauer & Carolee Douglas Agent: Michael Pitts

3rd Place • English Springer Spaniel GCH CH Random Legacy Dylan Du Revention Breeders: David Rand & Jason Douglass Owners: Robert & Sandra Mockoviak & Kellie FitzGerald Agent: Kellie L Fitzgerald

4th Place • German Shorthaired Pointer GCHP CH Vjk-Myst Garbonita’s California Journey

Breeders: Alice Manning, Anita Weiss & Mrs. Valerie Nunes Atkinson Owners: M. & L. Ulrich, V. Atkinson, A. Manning & Y. Hassler Agent: Valerie Nunes-Atkinson

THE HOUND GROUP

Breeders: Michelle Yeadon/Peter Yeadon Jr./Monika Pinsker Owners: Mrs Jack Billhardt & Sergio Tenenbaum Agent: Diego Garcia PHA

2nd Place • Doberman GCHP CH Fidelis Ripcord

Breeders: Colleen Mitchell/Jody Huston Owners: Carolyn Austin & Colleen Mitchell & Jody Huston Agent: Dylan Kipp

3rd Place • Portuguese Water Dog GCHS CH Aviators Lady’s Man De Remis Breeders: Mike Dugan/Cathy Dugan Owners: Remy Smith-Lewis & Julie Conger

4th Place • Mastiff GCHP CH Goldleaf’s Trouble Coming CGC

Breeders: Monica Coyle/Jann Lanz/Mark Lanz/Laura Watson Owners: Laura Watson & Pamela F Winter & Stephanie Taylor Agent: Terry Smith

THE TERRIER GROUP

Judge: Mr. Houston Clark

Judge: Mr. Geir Flyckt-Pedersen

1st Place • Whippet GCHP CH Sporting Fields Shameless

1st Place • Norwich Terrier GCHS CH Taliesin Twice As Nice

Breeders: Dionne Butt & Amanda Giles Owners: Barbara Call, J. Cooney-Waterhouse & D. Butt & A. Gile

Breeders: Lisa Sons, John Sons & Ms. Joan Eckert Owners: Lisa Sons & Jeff and Kim Sime

2nd Place • Greyhound GCHS CH Grandcru Giaconda CGC

2nd Place • Border Terrier GCHG CH Meadowlake Dark Side Of The Moon

Breeders: Melanie S Steele/Rindi Gaudet/Rose Tomlin Owners: Melanie Steele A Phelan R Tomlin and R Gaudet Agent: Rindi A Gaudet

3rd Place • Rhodesian Ridgeback GCHP CH Diablo’s Back Alley Brawler CGC

Breeders: Sandra L. Moore & Karen E. Fitzpatric Owners: K. & D. Fitzpatrick, Courtelis, Richardson & Tack DVM

3rd Place • Norfolk Terrier GCHB CH Yarrow Venerie Winning Ticket

Breeders: Kevin McNary, Shelley McNary & Nancy Faville Owners: Nancy Faville, Helle Rasmussen & Rebecca Boese

Breeders: Pam Beale & Beth Sweigart Owners: Victor Malzoni Jr, Nancy Shaw & Pam Beale Agent: Larry Cornelius PHA

4th Place • Borzoi GCHS CH Belisarius Jp My Sassy Girl

4th Place • Airedale Terrier GCHS CH Brisline’s Baron Basil Of Woodside

Breeder: Kyoko Ozeki Owners: Michele Molnar, Jamie Danburg & Minoru Kato Agent: Valerie Nunes-Atkinson

Breeder: Georgia I. McRae, Carol B. Reynolds, Barbara Fakkema & Helen J. Piperis Owners: Georgia McRae, B. Cooney, M. Beyens & C. Reynolds Agent: Jenny Wornall Rangel



THE TOY GROUP

THE HERDING GROUP

Judge: Mr. Peter J. Green

Judge: Mrs. Barbara Dempsey Alderman

1st Place • Brussels Griffon GCHS CH Somerset Wynzall Hashtag

1st Place • Puli GCHB CH Cordmaker Mister Blue Sky

Breeders: Keith Jacobson & Jo Ann Noffsinger Owners: Keith Jacobson & Jo Ann Noffsinger

Breeder: Sue Huebner Owners: E Charles, J. Beaudoin, L. Pitts, P. Kelly & S. Huebner

2nd Place • Pomeranian GCHB CH Starfire’s Firecracker

2nd Place • Shetland Sheepdog GCHG CH Syringa - Akadia The Corsair

Breeders: Fabian Arienti & Jose Cabrera Owners: Kim Munju, Margo Koga, F. Arienti & J. Cabrera

Breeders: Deborah Sirdofsky & Shannalee Waller-Michalsky Owners: Tyler Crady & Deborah Sirdofsky

3rd Place • Miniature Pinscher GCHS CH Kimro’s Miss Vera Vain

3rd Place • Belgian Sheepdog GCHB CH Sumerwynd’s Amadeus Of Inchallah

Breeders: Kimberly Pastella Calvacca, Robin Greenslade & Salli Moore Kottas Owners: R. Jimmy Cabailo, K. Calvacca, R. Greenslade & H. Schw Agent: Kimberly A. Calvacca

4th Place • Pekingese GCHB CH Pequest Pickwick

Breeder: David Fitzpatrickn Owners: David Fitzpatrick & Nancy H Shapland

THE NON-SPORTING GROUP

Breeders: Cheryl Cocson & Dennette Prawdzik Owner: Heike Wehrle

4th Place • Smooth Collie GCHS CH Wild Wind’s Don’T Stop Believing RN Breeder: Michelle Bergstraser & Laura Bergstraser Owners: Michelle & Laura Bergstraser & Anessa Towell Agent: Laura Bergstraser

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Judge: Mr. Wayne Burton

Judge: Dr. Anthony D DiNardo

1st Place • Bichon Frise GCHP CH Belle Creek’s All I Care About Is Love

1st Place • Puli GCHB CH Cordmaker Mister Blue Sky

Breeders: Lindsay Van Keuren, Glenda Blue, Lorrie L. Carlton & Lawrence A. Letsche D.V.M. Owners: Patrina Odette, L. VanKeur, L. Carlton & L. Letsche Agent: Bill McFadden

2nd Place • Chow Chow GCH CH Eastern Magic Historial Moment Breeder: Chi Kai Fan Owner: Matthew Fan Agent: Michael Brantley PHA

3rd Place • French Bulldog GCHS CH Le Petit Prince De La Bete

Breeders: Peter Photos & Blake Hamman Owners: Alexandra Geremia, Blake Hamman & Peter Photos Agent: Jenny Wornall Rangel

4th Place • Miniature Poodle GCHB CH Splash Mind You Breeder: Doris Backe Owner: Missy Ann Galloway Agent: Christian Manelopoulos

Breeder: Sue Huebner Owners: E Charles, J. Beaudoin, L. Pitts, P. Kelly & S. Huebner

2nd Place • Bichon Frise GCHP CH Belle Creek’s All I Care About Is Love

Breeders: Lindsay Van Keuren, Glenda Blue, Lorrie L. Carlton & Lawrence A. Letsche D.V.M. Owners: Patrina Odette, L. VanKeur, L. Carlton & L. Letsche Agent: Bill McFadden






Will Alexander Professional Dog Handler Interviewed by Mihaela Kosic Main photo: Jeffrey Hanlin



BIS: You have been part of the Dog Show community from a very young age having debuted as a handler at the age of seven. Can you please tell us a little bit more about your beginnings? W.A.: My mother asked for an Irish Setter for her birthday, my father obliged. I have to say that first Irish, though I loved her very much, as a show dog, she really didn’t cut the mustard. The real turn around came when my parents answered an ad in the newspaper. The ad read, a mature Irish Setter male. Half a champion from champion bloodlines. Half a champion meant he had half the points towards his championship. His name was Ch. Windfields Olav Olympia, he went on to win around 15 best in shows. He cost my parents $50. Lol. He was our real start, taking us to all the shows and bringing us success. BIS: Coming from a dog family would you say your parents were your first mentors? Did you have any other mentors? W.A.: I have had many mentors in this sport. In Canada I worked for Garry Macdonald, Garry had natural hands and could handle almost any dog, he taught me two things: that the dogs come first and to never underestimate myself. In America, I worked for Bob Stebbins, Bob taught me to respect the sport, and all those that came before me. They both taught me many fundamentals but I think it was primarily life lessons they tried to teach me, those were the most important things. There were many other people though, Wayne Cavanaugh, easily one of the smartest dog men I have ever met. Always positive, a very difficult thing in this sport. BIS: Have you mentored anyone or are you mentoring anyone at the moment? W.A.: I have had many apprentices, all of whom I am proud of. Adam Bernardin is like a son to me, love watching him show a dog, and through all his success, he still calls me daily sometimes to chat, sometimes for advice. BIS: You were very active and successful in Junior Showmanship, what do you think about today`s Junior Handlers? Are there any differences from when you were a Junior? 230

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Photo 2 • Ch. Fircone Country Cousin • Kevin won the Beagle American National and was Canada’s No. 1 Hound in 1994

W.A.: I love junior showmanship, it gives our young people a place to hone their mechanical skills, it bothers me when I see parents getting too involved, I have seen some actually become their child’s assistant. Grooming the dog, holding it at ringside, questioning judges decisions. It is suppose to be a fun class where kids learn about our sport and the sportsmanship that should go along with it. BIS: Can you please tell our readers about your nick name “Wayne Gretzky of dog shows”? W.A.: I’m from Canada, Canada is hockey, and Wayne Gretzky was a prominent player, some consider him the very best, so I think the nickname, though flattering, is a little off, lol. It was first given to me by a dog show photographer, Garth Gorley, a spectator at a show was asking Garth who I was and he replied “the Wayne Gretzky of dog shows” I’m not sure how it got around. One of my assistants had a characature drawing done of me with that title, I still have it, hanging in my kennel.



the blue English Setter bitch, Keefer the smartest Afghan I have ever met, of course there is P. I hate leaving any out, they all had very special qualities

Photo 3 • BIS, BISS, Am./Can. Ch. Artizoe Colour of My Love Number 1 in the Sporting Group & Number 5 All breed in the ‘97 Number 1 in the Sporting Group & Number 2 All breed in the ‘98

BIS: Do you remember your first BIS win? Your first Champion? What records do you keep of your career? W.A.: I do remember my first best in show, the judge was Lou Derocher, a very prominent Canadian judge of his day. The dog was the Irish Setter Mccamon Impresario who went on to be the number one dog in the country. I’m afraid I do not remember my first champion. As for best in show numbers. I had a webmaster that tried to keep track. Over 700 now I believe. BIS: Having such a successful career with many BIS and multiple Top Dog All Breeds wins what do you consider to be your greatest and personal favorite one? W.A.: No question, Miss P’s Westminster victory. Every handlers dream.

BIS: Miss P - Ch. Tashtins Lookin For Trouble -and you have reached dog immortality by winning the Westminster Kennel Show Best in Show in 2015. Tell us little bit about the moment Hon. David Merriam pointed your way? W.A.: Even when I watch it today, it still seems like a dream. All I can remember was the pride I felt in that little Beagle, she was always so confident, the biggest little dog at the show!! BIS: Judges are the second half of dog shows, what do you appreciate most about the judges you show under? Can you name a few that you admire? W.A.: There are so many, but Mrs Clark, Mrs Billings and the Forsyths were some of my favourites, always looked forward to showing to them and trying to get their approval. I miss them. BIS: What would you say is the hardest part of the dog business? W.A.: The hours, the travel and the gossip lol BIS: If you hadn`t decided to be a handler, do you know what would you be? W.A.: I’d love to say a professional hockey player, but I’m afraid I wasn’t talented enough. Probably something in the theatre world. My mother says I’m still in the theatre!

BIS: After all those big wins do you still have the same feelings, the same rush of adrenaline when you win? W.A.: No question, the rush is always there. I would worry if it was not. BIS: You had many top winning dogs. Can you name some of them? W.A.: Impresario was my first, he will always hold a special place in my memory. So many wonderful dogs, Piper the Irish Setter, he won 100 bests. Adele

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Photo 4 • Miss P and Will winning Best in Show at the Westminster 2015


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BIS: You are a published author, your book “For the Love of Dogs” was published in 2014. Please tell us more about your book? What made you decide to write the book? W.A.: We were driving to shows in Chicago, and the topic about the lack of new youth in our sport arose, that was the moment. I thought I if wrote a story about a young man learning the sport of dogs and if that story helped bring even one new person to our sport, then it would have been worth the effort. BIS: Your Youtube videos Dog Show Tips are well known not only to the beginners. What do you personally want to leave behind as your legacy? W.A.: Someone who respected the sport, did their very best, and passed on what they had learned. BIS: You have two sons. Do you think your children might follow your foot steps? What would be your most important advice to them? W.A.: Neither show much interest, they both love the dogs but as a career? I don’t think so. My adopted son Adam is a very prominent handler in the US. All three make me very proud. BIS: What would you say are the most important skills of a successful dog handler? W.A.: Patience, on all sides, towards the dogs and the people. BIS: Do you have time for any hobbies, if so what are they? W.A.: I love hockey and flea markets. I try to make time for both. BIS: Was the Westminster BIS the highlight of your career? W.A.: I wish that experience was held in a higher regard then it is.

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Morning Dew Sweepers Basset Hounds by Mariano Galán Zancajo Interviewed by Mihaela Kosic BIS: Thank You for taking the time to do this interview and for introducing us to beautiful Basset Hound and your work in the breed! Can you please tell us about your beginnings? M.G.: First of all I would like to thank Best In Show Magazine for this interview and also all the friends who support us and follow our work with the Basset Hound. Thanks also to all the owners who have Basset Hound bred by us around the world. My first important contact with Basset Hounds goes back to 2005, when I bought a puppy as pet (our lovely Obélix, who is still living with us). One day, I went with Obélix to a Dog Show, and he had good results and I enjoyed this new experience, so I started to go with Obélix to some Dog Shows. In 2006 the information about Basset Hounds in Spain was scarce and they were rare, so I made a website named Bassetmania.es, which in a short time became a reference website in Spain for Basset Hounds reaching more than 500.000 users and more than 3.000.000 view pages. Also in 2006 I went to a Basset Hound Specialty organized by the Spanish Basset Hound Club. At this time, the Club was in a difficult moment but I decided become a member of the Club. 244

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A few months later I entered on the Board of the Spanish Basset Hound Club as Secretary of Breeding and Hunting and in 2008 become the president of the Board. I was President of the Board from 2008 to 2014 and with the help of good friends, such as Mr. Ángel Martí, we reorganized the Spanish Basset Hound Club with a view to making it more functional. This year we organized a lot of events with very important judges of our breed, as Mrs. Claudia Orlandi, Mrs. Joan Urban, Mrs. Celeste González, Mrs. Paula Sunebring or Mr. Kresten Scheel. During this year I also starting to learn about our breed and I bought the Basset Hound University published by Basset Hound Club of America, and a number of other volumes about dogs as well as attending seminars about Basset Hounds and other issues directly pertaining to our breed. BIS: Tell us about your beginnings. How did you come up with your Kennel name? And what are your foundation dogs. M.G.: The decision to begin breeding Basset Hounds was a consequence of the passage of the years and the increase of my involvement with the breed.


When my first Basset Hound arrived at home I only was looking for a pet. It took 5 years until I bought my second Basset Hound, so my first litter was 10 years after I starting working with Basset Hounds. Therefore the decision to breed Basset Hounds was taken very slowly. My kennel name (Morning Dew Sweepers) is inspired from a play by William Shakespeare, entitled “A Midsummer Night´s Dream”. In this play there is a paragraph which says: My hounds are bred out of the Spartan kind, So flew’d, so sanded, and their heads are hung With ears that sweep away the morning dew; Crook-knee’d, and dew-lapp’d like Thessalian bulls; Slow in pursuit, but match’d in mouth like bells, Each under each. A cry more tuneable This is considered the first written description of a breed similar to the Basset Hound and for this reason I decided name to my Kennel Morning Dew Sweepers. Regarding my foundation dogs, I have never bred with the my first Basset Hound, because although he obtained some good results in dog shows it is not the kind of Basset Hound that I consider fits the standard. My first foundation bitch was Öreghegyi Vadász Anette (Falbalá) a bitch from Hungary out of World Winner 2006 Woferlow Single Malt and Ch. House Party the Voice of Forest. The problem with Falbalá is that she has very irregular heats, so I have not mated her succesully yet. Our second foundation bitch is Bassjoy Crazy Night (Arielle) a nice bitch form Malta out of Ch. Nhabira Home Run and European Winner 2010 Cora Bassjoy Gloomy Clown. Arielle was a European Winner, BOB and BOG at 2012 Bucharest European Dog Show and she has had lovely puppies which are being shown now in Spain, Mexico, Malta, Portugal, Belgium, and other countries with nice results. From Arielle we have kept some nice puppies, two of them were Best Baby Bitch in Breed and Best Baby Dog in Breed at 2015 Milano World Dog Show and two others were Best Puppy Bitch in Breed and Best Puppy Dog in Breed at 2016 Brussels European Dog Show. In the BIS final of Brussels EDS our puppy was shortlisted between the best 6 puppies in show in the final of groups 1, 6 and 8.

“ In my opinion a true Basset Hound type should be a strong dog, well muscled and capable of have endurance in the field over all types of terrain.” BIS: How many dogs do you have? Do you prefer to keep your dogs with you, or place them in families and co-ownerships? M.G.: I have 8 Basset Hounds at home just now and all of them live with me in a nice place very close to Sierra de Guadarrama National Park and into the UNESCO´s Reserve of Biosphere of Real Sitio de San Ildefonso-El Espinar. I have some dogs bred by me with friends, but a recently approved rule from Royal Society Canine of Spain makes it very difficult to have co-ownership of dogs because it is now required that the legal owner and the owners listed in the register book be the same, so In Spain there is only one legal owner possible. BIS: Do you remember your first Champion? Do you know how many Champions did you have so far? Who is your biggest winner (your own dogs, and your bred dogs)? M.G.: My first Champion was our lovely Arielle (Bassjoy Crazy Night) and she achieved European Winner in 2012 (also she was Best of Breed and Best in Group in Bucarest European Dog Show), RCACIB on Budapest World Dog Show, and several Grand Championships (3), Championships (9) and Junior Championships (8). Our biggest winner was obtained in 2012 Bucharest European Dog Show where Arielle (Bassjoy Crazy Night) was European Winner, Best of Breed and Best in Group, handled by our good friend Marta Flores from Portugal. Recently puppies bred by us have obtained good results in important dog shows. In 2015 Morning Dew Sweepers As You Like Best in Show Magazine

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It and Morning Dew Sweepers All´s Well That Ends Well were Best Minor Puppy Male and Female at 2015 Milano World Dog Show, and Morning Dew Sweepers Crazy Night and Morning Dew Sweepers Call Me Lucky were Best Puppy Female and Best Puppy Male at 2015 Brussels European Dog Show. Lucky also was shorlisted between the best 6 puppies at BIS finals at Brussels EDS. BIS: Do you work with other kennels? Are collaborations between kennels in your opinion necessary for the betterment of the breed? M.G.: Yes, I work with other kennels around the world. I have an special collaboration with Bassjoy Kennel from Malta, but also with other breeders around the world like Pan Clan from Brazil, Terra dei Templari in Italy, Portabales from Colombia, Galopujaca Fufla from Poland, our good friend

“ Ideally the outcross will be between a bitch and a dog who have similar types to obtain a litter as most homogeneous possible.” Rodolfo Farias from Mexico, Bassefied from South Africa or Olea Bull´s, Vallislonga or Bassmoon from Spain, but I have also contact with other European breeders. BIS: Do you prefer linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing? M.G.: First of all, linebreeding and inbreeding are essentially the same, differing only in degree of intensity. Both are tools use to fix some good traits that we want for our bloodlines and outcrossing is good to renew the hybrid vigor in our blood lines. It is very important to highlight two important aspects: first, linebreeding and inbreeding only have viability to the extent of the knowledge of the breeder about basic genetics and second, a linebred pedigree only hasvalue if the breeder has 246

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enough ability and experience to identify the virtues and faults of the dogs it contains. With outcrossing we can say something similar. A good breeder, with a lot of knowledge, experience and familiarity with principles of genetics will make a good use of this breeding tool. I always say that linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing are not intrinsically bad or good. To be honest, I think that I prefer “intype” and I will explain what I mean by it. In my opinion the most important element is the dog itself. We can try to mate a bitch and a dog with pedigrees that are very close, but if both are very different in type, probably the puppies will be very heterogeneous. So this is an ineffective implementaion of linebreeding or inbreeding. Therefore if we are thinking of useing inbreeding or linebreeding in a mating, it is very important that both dogs have similar type and of course both have the good traits that we are trying to fix in our bloodlines. But sometimes we need to renew the hybrid vigor in our bloodlines and in these cases outcrossing is a good tool. Ideally the outcross will be between a bitch and a dog who have similar types to obtain a litter as most homogeneous possible. BIS: How would you describe true breed type in your own words? M.G.: In my opinion a true Basset Hound type should be a strong dog, well muscled and capable of have endurance in the field over all types of terrain. Another significant feature of true Basset Hound type is substance together with good balance and soundness of all the parts. In Basset Hounds it is also very important that the temperament be affectionate, placid and never shy or aggressive. BIS: What are your all time breed legends? Both dogs and breeders? M.G.: It is not an easy question, because there are many fantastic dogs and breeders of Basset Hounds. Regarding breeders my favourite breeders all time are: • Sir Everett Millais and Mr. George Krehl, because both are the “fathers” of Basset Hounds. • Miss Peggy Keevil (Grims Bassets), because probably without her work with Basset Hounds the


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Photo 1 • Morning Dew Sweepers Call Me Lucky

breed would not currently exist. • Mr. Kresten Scheel and Mrs. Birte Scheel, because some of the most beautiful Basset Hounds that I have ever seen are from their kennel. • Mr. José Homem de Mello (Sete Moinhos), because he was the breeder of the only Basset Hound that won BIS in a World Dog Show and also he has the highest number of Basset Hound World Winners and European Winners. It is very unlikely that other Basset Hound breeders could match his records. • Mrs. Claudia Orlandi (Topsfield), because she has a great deal of success in the United States of America and also she is doinga great job teaching to other breeders with her books and seminars. • Mr. Guillermo González (Sierra Lebrera Bassets), because he is a legend in Spain breeding and working every day with Basset Hounds that are fit for their purpose. My favourite Basset Hounds all time are: • Ch. Topsfield Bumper Cars, CD., R.O.M.: It is the 248

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top group winning Basset Hound all time in the United States of America with 250 Group Firsts. Also it was #1 Basset Hound in 200, 2001 and 2002. • DK/AMCH, VV89 Scheel’s First Edition R.O.M.: It was Winner Dog and Best of Winners at the 50th anniversary Basset Hound Club of America Nationals. • MultiCh. WW Come and Get Me dos Sete Moinhos: in my opinion the most successful Basset Hound in Europe. BIS: How do dog shows reflect on the breed? M.G.: Dog Shows have always had a big influence on all the breeds. In fact the original purpose of Dog Shows was the selection of the best specimens to breed like the contests of other species (cows, sheeps, goats,...) are made to choose the best studs and the best breeding females that can transmit the desired traits to their offspring. Dogs are not bred to produce meat or milk. Dogs are used to work or to be pets, so in addition to the physical traits other


traits like health or its temperament are also very important though these are not easily evaluated in the ring of a Dog Show. For this reason, dogs that are successful in Dog Shows are not always the best studs, since they may have very good physical traits, but their health or temperament may not be desirable. Dog Shows are very important for a breeder but it is not the only tool in choosing the best studs. BIS: Do you think the breed changed for better or worse over recent years? M.G.: I think that Basset Hound breeders are doing a good job. Some years ago, the Basset Hound was one of the breeds that appears in a very shocking BBC documentary film named Pedigree Dog Exposed. For this reason the Kennel Club launched the Breed Watch Program whose primary purpose is to enable anyone involved with, but in particular dog show Judges, to find out about any breed specific conformational issues which may lead to health problems. At first, the Basset Hound was included between the category 3 breeds which corresponds with High Profile Breeds (Breeds where some dogs have visible conditions or exaggerations that can cause pain or discomfort). Recently, thanks to the good work done by the English breeders of Basset Hounds it has been moved to category 2 breeds, and therefore the situation is evolving positively. There are still some challenges that need to be overcome, but I think that most of the breeders are doing a good job. BIS: Do show trends change the breed and if so in what way? M.G.: Basset Hounds have a significant presence in Dog Shows, so most of the breeders show their dogs in Dog Shows and follow the winners dogs. For this reason the Basset Hound is a breed that evolves very quickly according to the trends that are observed in the Dog Shows. This situation is not good or bad of itself, but it is very important that a breeder consider this aspect and be sensible enough to follow his breeding plan

without being influenced too much by the trends that are observed in the Dog Shows. BIS: Do you think we have enough Basset breed specialist judges judging at shows in Europe and World Wide? M.G.: The Basset Hound and all the breeds of FCI´s group 6 have the same problem. Usually there is a low number of entries on this group, so the organisation of the show chooses all rounder judges to judge Basset Hounds and the other Hounds. Fortunately, the Basset Hound is a well known breed and most of the judges have enough knowledge to judge them quite rightly. Therefore, although I would like to be judged more often by specialist judges, I am not very upset when my dogs are judged by all around judges, because they usually do a good job judging Basset Hounds. BIS: What qualities do you admire in breed specialist judges? M.G.: In my humble opinion, one common problem with specialist judges is that they give too much importance to some specific defects and minimise other defects that are present in their bloodlines. This means that many times the specialist judges are focused on certain traits and lose the vision of the dog as a whole which is something judges who are not specialists rarely do. However, what I like about specialist judges is that they generally know how to touch dogs very well and look for traits that are important in the breed. For example an important issue in Basset Hound are their ribcages that should be deep, large and well rounded, but is very common find short ribcages, flat ribs or not enough well rounded ribcages. So, a real Basset Hound specialist judge will go over the dog correctly to check for common faults in this breed. BIS: Can “all round” judges change the breed and the breed “trends” when they don’t understand the standard correctly? What can be done to improve judging? M.G.: The Basset Hound is a well known breed for almost all the judges, so usually we receive qualified judgements even though the judge is not connected to Basset Hounds. Best in Show Magazine

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Also it is very important for all breeders keep up the work done by the breeders that precede us and to do all we can to ensure that other breeders continue with the work and bloodlines from a breeder. So I will very pleased if when I leave the breeding of Basset Hounds there are other breeders that continue with my work during this years.Regarding long-term goals in breeding, I would like to be able to raise quality hounds, with good health and with a great ability to work, fit for their function. BIS: What is the thing you would never compromise in your breeding program? M.G.: For me health is very important and they can live for many years in good condition. My dogs live with me after they are retired for breeding of show, so I can see how they evolve as they age. This heightens my concern about some traits in Basset Hounds like haw in the eye or an excessive amount of skin because with age an excessive haw produces some problems in the eyes and excessive skin causes challenges for the dog when the skin loses tone and it hangs too heavily.

Photo 2 • Morning Dew Sweepers Crazy Night

It would be great if all rounder judges evaluate properly certain important traits in the Basset Hound. For example in Basset Hound it is very important the next traits: • Head: the muzzle and skull should be almost parallel and stop should be moderate. It is necessary to watch that the eyelids are not too droopy. • Front assembly: the angulation between scapula and humerus should be near of 90 degrees and forearm should wrap around the ribcage. The forefeet should point straight ahead or slightly outward. • Backline: should be at level. • Hindquarters: Should be well muscled, with good angulations and hocks well let down. BIS: What are your long-term goals in breeding? M.G.: I think that all the breeders have the same goal of breeding better dogs that they received when they started. 250

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BIS: Does the breed have specific problems or genetic diseases? Can you tell us little bit about breed problems? M.G.: The Basset Hound is a breed that has no special health problems but it is necessary keep in mind that there are some health issues: • Post Mullerian Duct Syndrome: is an autosomal recessive inherited disease in which males have a uterus besides their normal reproductive organs. This disease has been observed only in Miniature Schnauzers and Basset Hound and it was reported first time in Basset Hound in 1989. • Glaucoma: the good work done by Basset Hound breeders in recent years is reducing the prevalence of this disease in the Basset Hound and today it is very rare to observe, but due to the important negative effects that it can have on health it is necessary to continue taking into account this disease. • Eye diseases: some bloodlines have a considerable incidence of cherry eye, entropion or ectropion. This eye diseases do not have as important effects on vision as glaucoma but they can have some impact on the health of a Basset Hound.


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• Bloat: It is probably the disease that causes the highest mortality in the Basset Hound, but its origin is not entirely known, so the only thing we can do is take certain precautions to prevent bloat. At this moment I would like to highlight the great work done by health committees of the Basset Hound Club of America and The Basset Hound Club which are gathering an extensive amount of information and data about the major diseases affecting the Basset Hound by conducting surveys among breeders and owners. This information has been published and is a great help tool to prioritize efforts, to pay more attention. BIS: Do you health test your dogs? M.G.: Yes, my dogs are examined by my vet to check for eye diseases. BIS: Which in your opinion are the best producers and the most important dogs in your Kennel? M.G.: The best producer until now in Morning Dew Sweepers is Arielle (Bassjoy Crazy Night). She has had only eight puppies in two litters but most of them are having good results in Dog Shows. BIS: Basset Hounds are as the name says hounds. Do you use them as hounds or only as companion show dogs? M.G.: I am not a hunter, so I can not use my Basset Hounds as hounds. Anyway as I live in a place with a great biodiversity and large spaces for walking and running, so every day I go out with my dogs and they can test their condition as hounds. This practice can be a little problem sometimes because in the country the dogs can be damaged with stones, brambles or branches. Fortunately, most judges understand that the Basset Hound is a working breed and they minimize or overlook the wounds they may have on the skin, especially in the ears that is the part of the body of the Basset Hound that recieves the most damage when the Basset Hound is working. BIS: How dominant is their hound side of them? To put it politely, how stubborn or trainable are they? M.G.: Basset Hounds have their origin in French Hounds, so they were selected over the centuries to be trail dogs. When hounds work in the field, 252

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Photo 3 • She is Bassjoy Crazy Night

they are far from their owners and therefore they should take some decisions without the intervention of man, for example if the hounds should follow the trail of a hare or a wild boar they must decide what the best place is to cross a river. For this reason Basset Hounds are not easy to train, because they prefer to decide what they do instead of trying to obey the orders that their owners give to them. Anyway Basset Hounds have a weak point in their stubbornness and they are able to do anything for a little piece of food or for a caress and this is what usually all the handlers use with Basset Hounds to show them in Dog Shows. The training sessions should be very short because the Basset Hounds get bored very quickly. BIS: Last but certainly not the least what advice would you give to new generations, first time owners, one day possible Basset breeders? M.G.: I would like that future generations care with respect the genetic heritage that all the breeders before them have preserrved and transmit this heritage to future generations. But above all I advise to all the people to enjoy their Basset Hounds every day and that they share their lives with them.


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Terra dei Templari Basset Hounds by Federica Vicarini Interviewed by Mihaela Kosic

BIS: Thank You for taking the time to do this interview and for introducing us to the beautiful Basset Hound and your work in the breed! Can you please tell us about your beginnings in the breed? F.V.: Thanks Jovana it is a pleasure and an honor to be with you for Best in Show. My Mother Marina Ansoldi and I have held the ‘Terra dei Templari’ kennel name for 10 years, but our passion started many years before that when our first Basset entered our lives. His sweet eyes and huge heart sent off sparks in our heart and completely conquered us. A Basset is not just a dog, it is a life’s companion. BIS: When and why did you decide to breed Bassets? How did you come up with your Kennel name? And what are your foundation dogs. F.V.: We decided to breed Bassetts about ten years ago, for the love of the breed, we were moved to seek out the best individuals and breed as closely to the standard as possible. Our kennelname comes from the place where we live, San Quirino was called the Land of the Templars since it was an outpost and stop over point. Our foundation dogs are Woferlow Single Malt and Hsissy di Monterosso.

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BIS: How many dogs do you have? Do you prefer to keep your dogs with you, or place them in families and co-ownerships? F.V.: We have about 20 Basset in our home kennel and some are entrusted to families. On the whole we prefer keeping them on and they are part of the family. BIS: Do you remember your first Champion? Do you know how many Champions you have so far? Who is your biggest winner (your own dogs)? F.V.: The first champion was Hsissy di Monteroseo from the great breeder Mariarosa Goi. With this our second Bassett we won quite a lot and he was a great companion. I can’t really say how many champions we have bred since then, but I especially remember Woferlow Single Malt (Rocco) with whom I won my first World Show (Poznan 2006) as BOB, Rocco was a great show dog and producer and wonderful companion, he is the sire of our World Ch (Herning 2010),Wherever You Will Go from Terra dei Templari (Go-Go) with whom we won 75 groups and many BIS. He was also a great producer. I also remember Love who won the World Show at Helsinki 2014 and Top Dog all breeds in Italy as well as many groups and BIS.



not be clumsy or a characature of the breed, it is a hunting dog. BIS: What are your all time breed legends? Both dogs and breeders? F.V.: There are several dogs who have conquered our hearts, one in particulare is Faburn Maverick, a dog with excellent characteristics and a great producer. BIS: In which way do dog shows reflect on the breed? F.V.: Dog shows ought to be a positive influence. One must be objective, and when watching a ring find the virtues and faults of the individual dogs. Shows ought to help us identify new objectives in improving the breed.

BIS: Do you work with other kennels? Are collaborations between kennels in your opinion necessary for the betterment of the breed? F.V.: Yes, I collaborate with many breeders, and I find that the improvement of the breed depends on collaboration, exchanging ideas and experiences between breeders is fundamental. We beginners need to listen to those with more experience. BIS: Do you prefer linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing? F.V.: Dthat depends on the individual and the bloodline. On the whole I prefer to stay within my bloodline. BIS: How would you describe a true breed type in your own words? F.V.: My ideal is a functional dog. He must have esthetic qualities balanced with funtionality. A Basset must move with ease, elegance, and cover ground 258

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BIS: Do you think the breed has evolved in a good or bad way in recent years? F.V.: As far as health goes, there has been progress. We had come to an extremely heavy Bassett, overloaded with pelt, and in some cases to the point where the dog could not move. We must remember that this is a hunting dog, an must go distances with little effort. For this reason the shoulder and rear construction must be built for fluid movement with little effort and maximun resistance. BIS: Do show trends change the breed and if so in what way? F.V.: Direi che non sono state le Expo a cambiare il Basset in questi anni, ma il nuovo standard che ha modificato leggermente alcune caratteristiche. BIS: Do you think we have enough Basset breed specialist judges judging at shows in Europa and World Wide? F.V.: Purtroppo abbiamo pochissimi giudici di razza in Europa ed in particolare in Italia. Il club italiano del Basset Hound negli untimi 3 anni cerca di chiamare per i raduni e le speciali giudici di razza o perlomeno giudici che conoscono la razza. BIS: What qualities do you admire in breed specialist judges? F.V.: Il giudice di razza sa toccare il cane in maniera


corretta, nei punti giusti. In particolare nella nostra razza il torace e la coda, e che sappia riconoscere una buona spalla , un braccio di giusta lunghezza e buone angolazioni posteriori. BIS: Can “all round” judges change the breed and breed “trends” if they don`t understand the Standard correctly? What can be done to improve judging? F.V.: Many times all round judges who do not fully understand the breed are blinded by flashy dogs who are showy rather than fluid which limits ground coverage. BIS: What are your long-term goals in breeding? F.V.: Several objectives are paramount, breeding is a long road. We continue to concentrate on character and construction. BIS: What in your opinion are the best producers and the most important dogs in your Kennel? F.V.: In the past, surely Woferlow Single Malt, and Wherever You Will Go della Terra dei Templari. We imported several bloodlines and an excellent producer was Camblanc Ron con Coca (kennel Camblanc). Another great producer was La Fin du Monde della Terra dei Templari which was the dam of our current champion Tiera del Fuego Cocktail della Terra dei Templari, Bassbarr Silver Cloud who gave us our Go-Go. BIS: Basset Hounds are as the name says hounds. Do you use them as hounds or only as companion show dogs? F.V.: In the past we did work trials but lately we have been concentrating on showing. BIS: Last but certainly not the least what advice would you give to new generations, first time owners, future Basset breeders? F.V.: A good piece of advice would be to listen to experienced breeders because we can learn much. The history of the breed must not be lost. To new owners I would say enjoy the breed, their new friend will bring smiles to their faces every day.

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De Wila Damar Basset Hounds by Daniel Alvarez Ariza Interviewed by Mihaela Kosic

BIS: Thank You for taking the time to do this interview and for introducing us to the beautiful Basset Hound and your work in the breed! Can you please tell us about your beginnings? D.A.: We started with the breed ten years ago. Our first Basset was bought primarily as a pet, and we fell in love with the breed. The breeder encouraged us to attend a dog show with her. That was in 2007 and we have been involved ever since. At the start we didn’t know anything about the dog show world, but we fell for it completely. We searched for information in books and online concerning top breeders, and over time began to plan the direction we wanted to go. BIS: When and why did you decide to breed Bassets? How did you come up with your Kennel name? And what are your foundation dogs. D.A.: There were not many Bassets being shown in Spain when we started, and quality was not as high as in other parts of Europe. The database of the Spanish Kennel Club and the Basset Hound club were great tools for us to gain information about the state of the breed in Spain. There were not many breeders exhibiting outside of the country with good results and we wanted to find a way to be 260

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successful at home and abroad. Our kennel name is comprised of two names; the first word ‘’Willa’’ is the name of our first Basset. It is thanks to her we are still showing today. And ‘’Damar’’ is a combination of both our names (Dani and Marta) so we thought it was perfect for us. BIS: How many dogs do you have? Do you prefer to keep your dogs with you, or place them in families and co-ownerships? D.A.: We have a total of 8 Bassets at home. We don’t breed very often, and only when we want something for ourselves. All of the dogs are part of our family life, and we don’t want to increase the number of dogs in case it disrupts this nice balance. BIS: Do you remember your first Champion? Do you know how many Champions did you have so far? Who is your biggest winner (your own dogs, and your bred dogs)? D.A.: Our first champion was very special because the title was earned in Portugal, not Spain, with Danza da Fraga Enmeigada, or ‘’Willa.’’ In the past ten years our dogs have won 30 champion titles with 7 different dogs, including Jr WW 2011, European JW 2013, Puppy WW 2013 and quite a lot of



BIS at international shows and Basset specialties. The top winning dog in our kennel is Bombay da Willa Damar. He is a special dog because of his temperament as well as his results around Europe. He was BIS at the national in 2014 and 2015, the European Junior Winner 2013 and has had great wins including BIS at Mandatory Point in Bilbao 2015. He was representative for Spain at the Eukanuba World Challenge 2015 in Amsterdam. BIS: Do you work with other kennels? Are collaborations between kennels in your opinion necessary for the betterment of the breed? D.A.: We have been fortunate, we were offered great friendship, help and guidance from top breeder Jose Homem de Mello. His dogs have been a major influence around the world for many years and every dog in our home goes back to his breeding. We recently obtained a new bitch from him which we are starting to show now. We think that collaborations between breeders can be a very positive influence in a breed

“ The Basset should be a sound dog, and typey without excesses of the typical traits. He should be well constructed and with good movement.” BIS: Do you prefer linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing? D.A.: We occasionally use inbreeding to stamp certain traits. We also use outcrosses to renew vitality and incorporate new lines. There is not one exact recipe regarding breeding, everything is trial and error combined with intuition BIS: How would you describe a true breed type in your own words? D.A.: The Basset should be a sound dog, and typey without excesses of the typical traits. He should be well constructed and with good movement. BIS: What are your all time breed legends? Both dogs and breeders? D.A.: There have been a lot of dogs who have made an impact on us. Most importantly was Come and Get Me dos Sete Moinhos. He is the grandsire of Bombay. We had the good fortune to meet him in his old age and were so impressed with his special beauty. Humprey dos Sete Moinhos, Swedesun Flisa, and Swedesun Adam could be considered our favourites in the breed, and the type of Basset we admire and want to keep. We have a good relationship with Jose Homem de Mello (dos Sete Moinhos), and Francoise Schick (Kennel Original Big Bone,) who is the breeder of our second Basset female Dazzler Original Big Bone which was imported from France.

Photo 2 • Marta and Daniel with Bombay

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BIS: Do you think the breed changed and evolved in a good or bad way in the past years? D.A.: Without any doubts in recent years the quality of dogs and the number of entries have improved.


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National breeders have imported new breeding stock from abroad, and we are seeing less dogs with too much skin and poor movement. We still think there are few stud options in Spain so we continue to choose breeding stock from abroad. BIS: Do show trends change the breed and if so in what way? D.A.: In 2011 the FCI made some changes to the breed standard. Excess and overtype in size and skin became more closely monitored. Now you can see a more moderate style dog winning in the show rings. BIS: Do you think we have enough Basset breed specialist judges judging at shows in Europa and World Wide? D.A.: There are several good breed specialist judges across Europe. We have ourselves recently decided to take up the task of judging the breed in our home country of Spain. Breeds in general need specialist judges to confirm the decisions of the exhibitors and breeders and keep a breed heading in the right direction

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BIS: What qualities do you admire in breed specialist judges? D.A.: I appreciate judges who understand the ideal Basset, in every detail both virtue and fault. They have high expectations of the dogs they are judging. It is also important that they are able to explain their decisions clearly. BIS: Can “all round” judges change the breed and the breed “trends” if they don`t understand the Standard correctly? What can be done to improve the judging? D.A.: The standard of a breed can have different interpretations. Some details are more important to some judges than others, and this is reflected in their decisions in judging. BIS: What are your long-term goals in breeding? D.A.: We would hope to maintain the type that we have now, to continue breeding dogs for us to show and enjoy, and try our best to keep away from any major faults


BIS: Do you health test your dogs? D.A.: Our Kennel Club doesn’t require health tests, but we make an annual blood exam and all of our breeding stock are eye tested. BIS: Which in your opinion are the best producers and the most important dogs in your Kennel? D.A.: Bombay da Willa Damar, Birmingham da Willa Damar, and Carlisle da Willa Damar are our most important dogs. BIS: Basset Hounds are as the name says hounds. Do you use them as hounds or only as companion show dogs? D.A.: Bassets have strong hunting instincts still to this day. They enjoy running in a pack, and they continuously trail a scent in the field. Our dogs live as companions, but this does not interfere with their natural abilities.

BIS: What is the one thing you would never compromise in your breeding program? D.A.: We would not breed from dogs with major faults or health issues, as well as temperament problems. Some people think that appearance is the most important thing to consider, but there are other aspects that must be taken into account. Character and movement‌. It is important to see and know the dogs before deciding to use them for a breeding program. BIS: Does the breed have certain problems or any genetic diseases? Can you tell us a little bit about breed problems? D.A.: Like all breeds, Bassets can be affected by genetic diseases. Thankfully the breed is strong overall. The most common illnesses are ocular, such as glaucoma. Occasionally one can find hip dysplasia and allergies relating the skin. It is important that we as breeders work to eradicate them. We wish that there were more facilities for eye testing in our country.

BIS: How dominant is the hound side of them? To put it politely, how stubborn or trainable are they? D.A.: They are kind dogs but quite stubborn. They tend to forget whatever they have been trained. As an owner you need to be one step ahead of them always. Our Bassets get daily walks on the leash. We practice standing and movement, and this helps them perform well in the show ring. BIS: Last but certainly not the least what advice would you give to new generations, first time owners, or possible Basset breeders? D.A.: It is very important that new owners and breeders seek out information from established breeders as a source of help and guidance. Dogs require daily commitment and effort, and this takes time. When we see their happy wagging tails everyday it makes all the work worthwhile

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From Elly`s Pack Beagles by Elly Vervoort Interviewed by Mihaela Kosic

BIS: Thank You for taking the time to do this interview and for introducing us to Beagles and your work in the breed! When did you decide to become a Beagle breeder? What is the story behind your prefix? E.V.: I decided to become a Beagle breeder in 2000, after my first “fun “litter, I liked it so much that I decided to step in the breeder’s world. The story behind my, From Elly’s Pack, affix is very simple, I asked for several kennel names and they all seemed to exist somewhere, so I decided to incorporate my own name in it, to have a bigger chance for an original kennel name. I didn’t have much time because my first “official“ litter was on the way. BIS: How many dogs do you have? Do you prefer to keep your dogs with you, or place them in families and co-ownerships? E.V.: At the moment I have 12 dogs at home, yes, I do place them with friends and familys in co-ownership arrangements. I can’t keep them all at home and give them as much attention as they deserve. BIS: Do you remember your first Champion? Do you know how many Champions you have had so far? Which win do you consider the biggest one (in

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breeding or showing) ? E.V.: My first Dutch Champion was Ike ( Imagine Me Ike From Elly’s Pack ) My best “breeding” bitch so far is Ch. Sheri From Elly’s Pack , Izabelle From Elly’s Pack became World Champion twice! Ayers Rock From Elly’s Pack represented the Netherlands at the Eukanuba Worldchallenge in Orlando USA in 2011. But I was most trilled by winning Best Of Breed at Crufts 2016, being selected in the Houndgroup was like a cherry on the cake. BIS: Do you work with other kennels? Are collaborations between kennels in your opinion necessary for the betterment of the breed? Answer: Not necessary for the betterment of the breed but you can make faster improvements and create more opportunitys, particularly with kennels oversees. BIS: Do you prefer linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing? E.V.: linebreeding with an outcross once in a while BIS: What are your all time breed legends? Both dogs and breeders?


Photo 1 • She is Bassjoy Crazy Night


E.V.: The dogs from Eva Resko from the Daragoj kennel in Finland, she had a great type of dog with style/ elegance and working capacity BIS: In which way do dog shows reflect on the breed? E.V.: I think the breeders have to make their own decisions based on what they like in a dog, on what they need to improve in breeding, have their own opinion on what they like to see in a dog and certainly not on how many titles a dog has. We all know that, unfortunately, often it’s not only the dog that is being judged. BIS: Do you think the breed changed and involved in a good or bad way in recent years? E.V.: Our breed didn’t change much over the past years. BIS: Do show trends change the breed and if so in what way? E.V.: No, not with Beagles. What you see is what you get. BIS: Do you think we have enough Beagle breed specialist judges judging at shows in Europe and World Wide? E.V.: No, we certainly don’t. Unfortunately it’s cheaper for show organizers to ask all rounders, we see that more and more and it’s certainly not in the benefit of the breed. BIS: What qualities do you admire in breed specialist judges? E.V.: I admire them when they judge by the standard, if they know the different types in a breed and to know what they prefer personally. BIS: Can “all round” judges change the breed and the breed “trends” if they don`t understand the Standard correctly? What can be done to improve judging? E.V.: What can be done to improve the judging is more breed specialists. If, for example, “all round“ judges start to like the Beagles with short steps and forget that they have 270

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Photo 2 • Mistique From Elly’s Pack Photo 3 • Sam I Am From Elly’s Pack Best of Breed winner at Crufts 2016

to be able to move in the field all day, it can change the breed. Beginning breeders and handlers see these dogs winning, yes, I think it can change the breed.. A statement of our well-known judge Frank Kane: Help your friend on judging jobs and destroy the breed BIS: What are your long-term goals in breeding? E.V.: To keep my dogs on the same level as we stand now. And to help other breeders to improve their stock. BIS: What is the one thing you would never compromise in your breeding program? E.V.: I would never compromise on health issues.


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Photo 4 • Building Bridges From Elly’s Pack (Bono), out of Kamp. Imagine Me Ike From Elly’s Pack NJK, W07, ESG07, Lux.Ch., Int.Ch., DKCh x Meant To Be From Elly’s Pack

BIS: Does the breed have certain problems or any genetic diseases? Can you tell us a little bit about breed problems in your opinion? E.V.: The Beagle is a very strong and healthy breed. We have a few genetic issues but we have good tests for them and a good world wide program to keep them under control. BIS: Beagles are members of the hound group, and are known for their acute sense of smell. They are used as hounds, detection dogs and therapy dogs. Please tell us little bit more about their temperament? E.V.: A Beagle is a merry little hound, open minded and easy going. Working by following their nose is what they like most.

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BIS: How dominant is their hound side of them? To put it politely, how stubborn or trainable are they? E.V.: They are trainable, they do everything for food, a reward or just to make you happy. However, in the field there is always “the nose “, if they smell a trail, the instinct can be stronger than the desire to please the boss. Yes, sometimes they are gone for a while but at the end they always come back to you. BIS: Last but certainly not the least what advice would you give to new generations, first time owners, one day possible Beagle breeders? E.V.: First time owners: enjoy having a Beagle around, it makes your life so much richer. One day possible Beagle breeders: Make no concessions, only go for the best. Ask the older generation for advice and follow that advice until you are ready to understand enough of the breed to make your very own decisions.


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Dialynne • Beagles by Diana Spavin Interviewed by Mihaela Kosic

BIS: Thank You for taking the time to do this interview and for introducing us to Beagles and your work in the breed! When did you decide to become a Beagle breeder? What is the story behind your prefix? D.S.: My mother Marion Spavin started breeding and showing Beagles in the late 1950’s . She bred Cocker Spaniels along with my Grandfather until having 3 children when trimming became too much, so she decided on the Beagle. Our first Beagle was a good honest bitch and a good foundation brood Derawuda Vanity. I became involved in the mid 1960’s and my name was added to the Prefix. The prefix Dialynne is a combination of my name Dianna and Marilynne my sister. Later Stuart Milner and my daughter Melanie were added to the prefix. Stuart became more associated with the details of dog shows, my judging career started to take off and Melanie became more interested in showing so the dogs and Prefix were handed down to Mel. I still handle but prefer to watch Mel as she is a brilliant handler and gets far more out of the dogs than me. BIS: How many dogs do you have? Do you prefer to keep your dogs with you, or

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place them in families and co-ownerships? D.S.: We keep around 25 to 30 Beagles, we don’t place them in families as we like to keep full control of what we breed and show . All our puppies sold to families as pets are registered with endorsements not to be bred or sold abroad. Keeping them with us also means we can keep them in peak condition with controlled exercise and diet, because our dogs are not on the carpet like a lot of house dogs we never have to trim nails. We have done co- ownerships before but I prefer not to unless the dogs have come over from another country . Partnerships can get messy . We were lucky our partnership with Stuart is still going strong after some 35 years. BIS: Do you remember your first Champion? Do you know how many Champions you have so far? Which win do you consider the biggest one (in breeding or showing) ? D.S.: Our first Champion was from Mrs Clayton , a very prominent breeder at that time Ch Barvae Tamar who produced Ch Dialynne Opal. Our first home bred Champion was Ch Dialynne Huntsman who was the son of a North American import Bar-



vae Benroe Wrinkles. I feel ashamed that I cannot remember how many Champions we have bred , owned or campaigned but it must be near 100 Beagle Champions. We have made up and bred champions in other breeds . I don’t think you can identify your biggest win in breeding, but in the show ring one of our greatest wins was the Hound Group at Crufts 2008 with Ch Dialynne Maximus, he won about 30 Challenge Certificates , four of them at Crufts , the latter two at the tender age of 9 and 10 yrs . Close to it is our youngest Champion Dialynne Peter Piper winning Best in Show at Midland Counties 2016 at just Over 12 months old . BIS: Do you work with other kennels? Are collaborations between kennels in your opinion necessary for the betterment of the breed? D.S.: Most certainly to both parts of the question, you cannot continue breeding litter after litter with your own stud dogs of the same or similar lines for long periods. You have to look at your bitches weaknesses and find a suitable dog which excels in these areas , doubling up on a weakness would be a disaster when trying to better your stock. If there’s a dog you really like it is sometimes better to use his father. Good breeding stock is essential and a dog or bitch that produces better than themselves are good breeding stock . BIS: Do you prefer linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing? D.S.: For some numerically small breeds inbreeding cannot be helped but line breeding in most breeds is essential if you want to establish a type . We like to outcross then come back into our line . We prefer foreign males especially American for their smart clean outline . BIS: What are your all time breed legends? Both dogs and breeders? D.S.: This is a difficult one for me to answer as our own home bred Ch Dialynne Gamble has to be a legend as a sire and is in most dogs pedigree’s. He was born in 1970 and revolutionised the breed, siring 26 champions to all types of bitches from differ276

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ent bloodlines and kennels. He won 25 CC’s even though we retired him at an early age to make way for his son Ch Solomon of Dialynne who like his father sires 26 champions and also won 25 CC’s. An all time legend and Beagle breeder has to be my mother Marion, I have never known a person more dedicated to improving the breed . Mum didn’t have the help and experience that she gave to my daughter and I. Not only was she a good breeder but a good judge and a real character, she would always help up and coming youngsters who were keen to learn. Up until the last few years mum has still kept a keen interest in the kennels but at the tender age of 94 I think she can be excused from kennel duties. BIS: In which way do dog shows reflect on the breed? D.S.: Without dog shows, breeds would suffer both in health and beauty. Because of the Kennel Clubs input on health regulations dogs shown now are much healthier which has to be a good thing especially when breeding . For me dog shows are beauty competitions, so to be successful the dogs have to conform to the breed standard, be in tiptop condition and be sound in movement and temperament. BIS: Do you think the breed changed and involved in good or bad ways in recent years? D.S.: The breed has changed over the years certainly for the better. They have improved on conformation, heads and bone especially. I think better quality dog food has helped give more bone and substance. Because Beagles were bred for hunting they were very hyper and destructive in the house many years ago, so they didn’t make very good pets but in my opinion introducing American blood lines calmed the breed immensely, now they are very domesticated, make excellent pets especially around children and can be trained off a lead. BIS: Do show trends change the breed and if so in what way? D.S.: I don’t think it’s the shows that change the breed but the breeders. At one time we used to have classes for any other color than Tri color be-


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Photo 2 • Stuart Milner , Marion and Dianna spavin , Melanie Spavin holding Ch Dialynne Peter Piper after winning Best in Show at Midland Counties Ch Show 2016

cause tri’s were the most popular and it was difficult for other colors to beat a Tri , now we have nearly as many tan and whites so the classes were dropped. I think trends will always change depending on which stud dog is flavor of the month.

ist judges? D.S.: I admire all honest and knowledgable judges, specialists or all rounders. We cannot get it right all time but as long as it is the judges honest opinion that’s all we can ask for.

BIS: Do you think we have enough Beagle breed specialist judges judging at shows in Europe and World Wide? D.S.: Yes I think so, at least in the UK and the rest of Europe. It’s not healthy to have too many breed specialists. We need all arounders as they look at the dogs differently not just in Beagles but in all breeds, they look at the whole picture whereas some specialists can get hung up on one particular thing even if the dog is excellent in all other departments.

BIS: Can “all around” judges change the breed and the breed “trends” if they don`t understand the Standard correctly? What can be done to improve the judging? D.S.: All around judges cannot change the standard alone but dishonest (face judges) Both in the breed and all arounders can stop good dogs from winning, it happens in all breeds but the majority of judges do a good job. This is only my opinion but I think specialists being passed for CC’s in their own breed should have at least bred or owned a champion in order to appreciate type and quality .

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BIS: What are your long-term goals in breeding? D.S.: I think we have exceeded most of our long term goals but the one thing we would love to do is breed another Gamble . BIS: What is the one thing you would never compromise in your breeding program? D.S.: We would never compromise on anything. Good husbandry is very important in rearing healthy puppies. A strict routine, re; exercise, diet etc is also of the utmost importance. Never use inferior stock especially stud dogs, you need a stallion Hound that can stamp a type. BIS: Does the breed have certain problems or any genetic diseases? Can you tell us little bit about breed problems in your opinion? D.S.: We have genetic problems but the problems are easily rectified unlike cataracts, hips, or slipping patella which affects dogs at different ages the problems we have in the breed are born with it so you can tell almost from birth. We have MLS and NCCD both of these can be eradicated by breeding from 2 clears, their offspring will then be hereditarily clear, I would be very surprised to find any carriers in the show ring now as all registered dogs have to be tested before breeding. BIS: Beagles are members of the hound group, and are known by their acute sense of smell. They are used as hounds, detection dogs and therapy dogs. Please tell us little bit more about their temperament? D.S.: Because Beagles are pack hounds they are quite biddable, there should always be a leader of the pack so in the home environment the leader should always be the human never the dog, this way the dog is happy since he knows his boundaries . They are very intelligent and think things through. Because of their good nature they are great with children and make excellent family pets. BIS: How dominant is their hound side of them? To put it politely, how stubborn or trainable are they? D.S.: 30 or so years ago you would never dream of letting a Beagle off a lead as it would be gone

and never seen again well not for a few hours anyway but with slightly less hunting instincts they are surprisingly easy to keep as pets. My kennel maid has 5 Beagles which she exercises off the lead. We also bred a winner at Crufts for dancing to music freestyle. We have sold quite a few to people wishing to do agility and obedience so they are quite trainable. I have had people ask me are Beagles noisy, do they howl, all I can say is ours are very good they never make a noise after bed time and only bark with excitement when being fed and let out for exercise so my answer is no, they are not noisy or yap. BIS: Last but certainly not least what advice would you give to new generations, first time owners, or possible Beagle breeders? D.S.: If you are serious about breeding and showing please go to a reputable breeder of long standing with a good reputation for breeding good dogs for type and quality, never buy anything on breeding terms as you will never be allowed to keep the best one, the breeder will take the best. Sit by the ring and ask us oldies for advice on what to look for, never be afraid to ask. When you start to breed don’t be kennel blind, don’t keep something for the sake of it, if there’s nothing worth keeping let them all go. If you are just looking for a pet please go to an assured breeder stay clear of puppy farmers.

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Daragoj • Beagles by Eeva Resko Interviewed by Mihaela Kosic

BIS: Thank You for taking the time to do this interview and for introducing us to Beagles and your work in the breed! When did you decide to become a Beagle breeder? What is the story behind your prefix? E.R.: I already had quite a bit of doggy history behind me before I started with Beagles. Beagles actually came into my life by accident. I had booked a Pekingese puppy from England. She hurt her eye they did not have any other puppy they could send to me. I had Basset Hounds at that time, so I thought Beagles would be well suited with them. I imported my first Beagle in 1975 from England. My prefix was granted to me in 1966 when I was only 18 years old and I had Borzois. I found from a Russian dictionary the word “Daragoj” which means “darling” in English. I thought it was short, easy to remember and to pronounce. BIS: How many dogs do you have? Do you prefer to keep your dogs with you, or place them in families and co-ownerships? E.R.: I have 5 Pugs at home. My last Beagle litter was born in 2012. I gave up my two last Beagles one and a half years ago to live as family pets. When I was actively breeding Beagles I had some

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10-15 adult dogs at home. I have always wanted to keep my show and brood dogs at home, and have during all the time I have bred only had 3 males and 1 bitch in co-ownership living outside of my home. BIS: Do you remember your first Champion? Do you know how many Champions you have had so far? Which win do you consider the biggest one (in breeding or showing)? E.R.: Yes, I remember. My first Champion was a Borzoi bitch which I imported from Switzerland in 1964. She was also the first Int. Ch in her breed in Finland! Champion titles have never been that important for me! If they had been, I would have bred some other breed. To become Finnish Show Champion a Beagle needs to be qualified in a field trial and I definitely do not hunt! I have bred only 3 Finnish Champions which were owned by other people that managed to qualify them in hunting tests. Some of my exports became Champions in South America and Australia. I have bred around 30 American Champions and some Champions in other European countries. My first Beagle Champion is Am Ch Daragoj Double Pleasure. She was from my 3rd litter. Her parents



“ I value honest and respectable judges who judge the dog and not the handler!” were half siblings both out of my foundation bitch Clovergates Pleasure. BIS: Did you work with other kennels? Are collaborations between kennels in your opinion necessary for the betterment of the breed? E.R.: Yes, I did work with some kennels. I believe that when working together, you should share the same ideas in breeding, know each other well, and have mutual trust and respect. I bought and loaned some males from the U.S. and Australia. I never bought any bitches after my first English import Clovergate’s Pleasure in 1975, and she is behind every single Beagle that I have bred. I have a couple of great friends that wanted to give me 2 bitches, which I successfully used in my breeding. I have bought males which I thought would suit my bitches. I think one cannot breed and succeed if not working together with other breeders. I have had a reputation of not easily selling dogs abroad. There have been several reasons for that. For one I have always wanted to sell only the best possible dogs abroad, in Finland there have not been many show Beagle breeders. I wanted to be able to sell dogs to people that would use my dogs very selectively. I don’t believe in so called ‘matador breeding’. Also for me it is very important that my dogs had a good life after their active show and breeding careers, and were not living in large kennels. You could say that I have sold dogs only to serious hobby breeders, that kind of sums up my ideology as a breeder. BIS: Do you prefer linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing? E.R.: My two first litters were outcrosses, third was a half sister/brother mating and then I went out again and later Iinebred and inbred. Linebreeding and in282

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breeding works, but one must know what to in- or linebreed. Champion and Winner titles do really not mean anything. BIS: What are your all time breed legends? Both dogs and breeders? E.R.: I should name in dogs: Black Gold. He was a stunning dog even if he was 11 years of age when I saw him. He was also an excellent stud dog. His younger full brother was Beagler´s Black Gold owned by his breeder Catharina Linde-Forsberg in Sweden. I used him a few times to get the type what I was looking for. I also liked the American male Ch. Navan´s Triple Trouble Rick. I never saw him in the flesh, only in pictures, but I bought his son. I also want to mention CH. Dialynne Gamble, another dog I never saw in the flesh, but he was a very important stud dog in his time in England. In breeders my number one is “Lady in the green hat” = Truda Mawby, Australia, “Madame Clarion”! She bred stunning Beagles. She has an excellent ‘dog eye’, is a great personality and handler. Truda twice a couple of weeks with us in Finland twice, and we have visited her once in Australia. Daragoj Starsong went to her and I got back her son Clarion Crystal Fire. Starsong went all breed BIS in her last show in Finland and she started her show career in Australia being all breed BIS in her two first shows and also won the Australian National Specialty that same year! Another breeder I would like to mention is another Grand Old Lady Marion Spavin from England. Her Dialynne kennels is well known all over the world. Her daughter Diana Spavin and granddaughter Melanie Raymond continue breeding with the Dialynne prefix. BIS: In which way do dog shows reflect on the breed? E.R.: I think shows have affected Beagles like they have affected any other breeds. Too many times they are shown in a way that does not show their true temperament or movement. BIS: Do you think the breed has evolved in a good or bad way in recent years? E.R.: I think every continent has a slightly different type. In America there are 2 varieties and different


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size under 13” and over 13” under 15”. In Australia and America I don´t think the breed has changed so much. But maybe in Europe the breed has improved overall. In Eastern Europe shows Beagles are quite a new “trend”, in Western Europe Beagles used to be big and especially males rather coarse and heavy. Nowadays I think in Europe the type is more even and the quality of dogs better. BIS: Do you think we have enough Beagle breed specialist judges judging at shows in Europe and World Wide? E.R.: My spontaneous answer is we could have more breed specialists judging. I think there are a few in Europe, America and Australia, but I have realized that many countries use the same judges over and over again! There are specialties where the entries are so big that it would be possible to bring a judge that had not been judging the breed too often. Especially in big World or European Winner shows we really should have judges who know the breed, not only those “very important persons” which we so often had during the years I bred. BIS: What qualities do you admire in breed specialist judges? E.R.: I value honest and respectable judges who judge the dog and not the handler! A specialist clearly knows the difference between EXC, VG and G, and also uses the entire scale when judging! Dogs that get VG or G cannot be excellent! A specialist knows what he/she is looking for and you can clearly see what he/she is looking for when looking at the lineups! This, however, should apply to all judges.

Photo 2 • Daragoj Piece Of Gold was born 1987. She won VSS show in Denmark 1989 under Council Barker, USA (150 beagles entered) Photo 3 • Daragoj Double Pleasure • born 1980. 10 months in the picture. Multi Group wins in the USA and BIS winner Photo 4 • Daragoj Desiree • born 2000

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BIS: Can “all round” judges change the breed and the breed “trends” if they don`t understand the Standard correctly? What can be done to improve the judging? E.R.: Yes, they can. The character of dog shows has changed. It is more of a show today. The “show” and very hard competition make people sometimes to do funny things. Many judges are looking for more stylish, glamorous and well handled dogs. I also find it funny that it doesn´t matter what breed one has but people really seem to be running in the ring with


all dogs regardless of the breed! I think the quality of judge’s education varies in different countries and that should be changed. For example here in Scandinavia we have quite good judge´s education. We don´t get anything as a “gift”. It takes a lot of learning and training to obtain the judging rights. Also today there are many judges who expand too quickly to different breeds and groups. BIS: What have been your long-term goals in breeding? E.R.: In all breeds that I have bred, I have always made a lot of research before getting my first dogs. I have wanted to position myself at the best starting point in order to breed top quality dogs. Today it is fairly easy with internet to find information and contact people. 30-40 years ago we had magazines, shows and writing with snail mail. Living in Finland far from everything sure didn’t make it any easier. When I had bred a couple of litters I soon realized I would have to make a tough choice. Would I keep only a couple of dogs at home and have a so called normal life and work outside of home, or would I devote my life to my dogs and make breeding fulltime work. In the end the choice was easy, breeding was always a way of life for me, and it didn’t feel like work in that way. I got my first Beagle in 1975 and bred my first litter in 1977. Altogether I bred 97 litters. My last litter was born in 2012, I no longer breed Beagles. The overall look of a dog is the most important thing for me. Every dog has faults, however some carry their faults better, dogs with natural charisma and carriage. For me the ideal Beagle is wellbalanced with proper proportions. A Beagle has to have good angulations front and rear, a beautifully arched neck, balanced level topline, high tailset and powerful rear with a wide thigh, and a typical head with enough chiseling and stop and the, so typical, soft and sweet expression. Naturally a wellbuilt dog also moves with good reach and drive, parallel both front and rear. I have never bred a bitch or used a dog with a low tailset or a poor topline. Those two things are of key importance for me in addition to balance and carriage. If I had to name the two best dogs and two best bitches that I bred, they would be Daragoj Boomerang (dog),

Daragoj Crystal Rain (dog), Daragoj Piece of Gold (bitch), and Daragoj Lovestory (bitch). I have never bred a litter just to sell puppies, I have always kept most puppies from each litter up to 7-8 months old to see how they develop. You could say I have bred for myself, to get new show dogs and breeding material. BIS: What is the one thing you would never compromise in your breeding program? E.R.: Breed type, anatomy, movement and temperament! I have heard people saying, that nothing is good enough for me. Maybe I am a perfectionist, but I think goals have to be set high enough. That is the only way to breed quality dogs! BIS: Does the breed have certain problems or any genetic diseases? Can you tell us little bit about breed problems in your opinion? E.R.: In my mind Beagles are even today a healthy breed, when you compare them with some other breeds. In my own breeding program I never faced any serious health issues. My dogs normally lived long and healthy lives and had to go to the vet basically only to get their vaccinations. I had one dog with hypothyroid, but that’s really the only one. I believe that I had very healthy lines, as I have made litters with a rather high inbreeding percent, and still got normal healthy dogs. While Beagles are considered to be relatively healthy, there are several diseases and conditions that are breed specific, or shared with a small amount > of other breeds. We are fortunate to have tests available for most of these > conditions, so it is possible to make wiser breeding decisions for future generations. Some things we still do not have the ability to test for so it is important that Breeders are honest about their lines, in order to be able to effectively use pedigree studies as a means of traceing back some of these conditions. The honesty of our Breeders is the key to breeding wisely when tests are not available. The following is a list of conditions that we can test for: Musladin-Leuke Syndrome (MLS), Factor Vll Deficiency (FVll), Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration (NCCD), and Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (IGS). Other conditions common to Beagles: Chondrodystrophy Best in Show Magazine

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– dwarfism, Thyroid Diseases, Steroid Responsive Meningitis (SRM), and epilepsy. BIS: Beagles are members of the hound group, and are known for their acute sense of smell. They are used as hounds, detection dogs and therapy dogs. Please tell us a little bit more about their temperament? E.R.: We say Merry Beagle! Temperament is a big reason to why I love Beagles! They are always happy and wagging their tail. They are always interested in what happens around them. Beagles have a lot of stamina and they need a sporty home to get enough exercise. They love everybody and being pack hounds they like it if they have company of other hounds or dogs. They are easily trained with treats to do different things, but I do not believe they can be top agility or obedience dogs, as they are not that fast and doing same things over and over again is not something they would appreciate. I have sold very few (under 5) to families where the dogs are alone home all the day. I cannot guarantee what happens then! Beagles need people and company, and I prefer that dogs live with people, not in big kennels. BIS: How dominant is their hound side of them? To put it politely, how stubborn or trainable are they? E.R.: There is difference between dogs. For example, I trained my Beagles so that they could run free off leash on the forest roads where we took long walks. I trained them so, that if they tried to jump over the ditch into the forest I called them back and gave them a treat. They learned quickly. Some were more interested in different smells, so I learned very quickly to see from their behavior that a moose or some other animal had been in the area and I put them on the leash. I normally had 5 dogs with me and if one had found a smell they could all be gone! BIS: Last but certainly not the least what advice would you give to new generations, first time owners, one day possible Beagle breeders? E.R.: A Beagle is a working hound, they should be built in a way that they are able to hunt all day if necessary! Learn to understand the interpretation of the breed standard. Buy your brood bitch from 286

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Photo 5 • Daragoj della Duck Photo 6 • Daragoj Thing of My Heart Photo 7 • Daragoj Delilah

lines you like. Do not let titles blind you when you are looking for a male for your bitch, titles are not inherited. I feel that the dog world´s “golden years” have gone. There is a big business and a lot of politics around this lovely sport. Keep it like a hobby, love and respect your dogs. Let dogs be dogs and enjoy their life and bring happiness to your life by just being your best friends.


Photo : Emanule Barbieri - EB PHOTO

Photo : Stefano Cadore

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Di Torrimpietra • Beagles by Rudi Baldi Interviewed by Mihaela Kosic

BIS: Thank You for taking the time to do this interview and for introducing us to Beagles and your work in the breed! When did you decide to become a Beagle breeder? What is the story behind your prefix? R.B.: Since I was a little boy I knew I wanted to become a breeder and my first opportunity came thanks to my first Beagle. My kennel name comes from a castle which can be found in the vicinities of my kennels in Maremma and which is named after Nello Pannocchieschi who married Pia dei Tolomei known as “Di Torrimpietra�. BIS: How many dogs do you have? Do you prefer to keep your dogs with you, or place them in families and co-ownerships? R.B.: I own 18 dogs but only 10 live with me. The others live with other breeders with whom I collaborate or with families. However, I always remain their registered owner, even on the pedigree. BIS: Do you work with other kennels? Are collaborations between kennels in your opinion necessary for the betterment of the breed? R.B.: Yes, I collaborate with other kennels in Italy as well as abroad and I believe that collaborations 288

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between honest and capable kennels is essential for the betterment of the breed. BIS: Do you prefer linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing? R.B.: I prefer linebreeding but not as a rule. I occasionally go for outcrossing but I avoid inbreeding. BIS: What are your all time breed legends? Both dogs and breeders? R.B.: I consider myself to have been inspired by one of the greatest, if not the greatest Beagle breeders of all time, Eeva Resko of Daragoj beagles and for me the most beautiful specimen of the breed is Daragoj Crystal Rain which I have personally met in Finland at Daragoj Kennels before it passed away. BIS: In which way do dog shows reflect on the breed? R.B.: In my opinion dog shows do not reflect the breed in any way. BIS: Do you think the breed has changed for better or worse in recent years? R.B.: I think over the last few years the breed has


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changed and it has evolved, in the sense that the beagle nowadays looks much more beautiful morphologically speaking than in the past. BIS: Do show trends change the breed and if so in what way? R.B.: In current shows, dogs which are more compact, of smaller size and with more correct movement are winning and judges tend to reward more frequently this type of Beagle lately. BIS: Do you think we have enough Beagle breed specialist judges judging at shows in Europe and World Wide? R.B.: Unfortunately, in Europe we do not have enough breed specialist judges whereas for example in the US almost all breeders are specialist judges. BIS: What qualities do you admire in breed specialist judges? R.B.: The qualities I admire in specialist judges are their competence and also their holistic way of judging. BIS: Can “all around” judges change the breed and the breed “trends” if they don`t understand the Standard correctly? What can be done to improve judging? R.B.: I don’t think that all around judges can change the breed or the breed trends. If their judgement is not correct, they might perhaps influence the breeders who still don’t know whether they are on the right track. Only the judges themselves can improve the quality of judging by preparing themselves better beforehand and studying the breed standard meticulously. BIS: What are your long-term goals in breeding? R.B.: My long term goals are to continue producing beautiful specimens as well as helping other young and promising breeders. In my opinion, a good breeder should not produce good dogs just for oneself, keeping them solely for their own use within their own kennels but one should use their males also outside their kennels to help other breeders improve future generations of Beagles. In the long run, after I retire as a sales agent for an Italian dog 290

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and cat food company, I would like to visit other kennels, take part in the Nationals in America and Australia and go to dog shows abroad. In other words, I would like to do what I really enjoy doing but on a full time basis. BIS: What is the one thing you would never compromise R.B.: I would definitely never compromise my relationship with my dogs: I sleep with them, go for walks with them by the sea or in the woods, absolutely never. BIS: Does the breed have certain problems or any genetic diseases? Can you tell us little bit about breed problems in your opinion? R.B.: Beagles are dogs with very few health problems. Certain disorders such as the Cherry Eyes which involves the weakening, stretching or detachment of the anchoring tissue of the third eyelid, can be solved by means of a surgical repositioning of the gland. One should also perform tests for certain genetic diseases such as Malignant Hyperthermia (MA), Degenerative Myelopathy (DM), Hyperuricosuria (SLC), Musladin-Leuke Syndrome (MLS), Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), Factor VII Deficiency, Pyruvatkinase Deficiency (PK) and Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration (NCCD). BIS: Beagles are members of the hound group, and are known by their acute sense of smell. They are used as hounds, detection dogs and therapy dogs. Please tell us little bit more about their temperament? R.B.: Their proverbial sense of smell is so heightened that it neutralizes all the other senses when they want to concentrate solely on a scent. They don’t see anymore, they don’t hear anymore as they follow a scent with their nose to the ground. In Australia, Beagles are used to detect contraband food items in airports. A Beagle is always merry, never aggressive, fun loving, attentive and curious, very active and never lethargic. They are full of energy and they get along very well with people as well as dog breeds of any kind.

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BIS: How dominant is their hound side of them? To put it politely, how stubborn or trainable are they? R.B.: Beagles are highly intelligent and always ready to discover new things, therefore they can be easily trained. They are also very driven by food and with a treat in your hand, you can make them do whatever you want. BIS: Last but certainly not the least what advice would you give to new generations, first time owners, one day possible Beagle breeders? R.B.: My advice to families would be to get a Beagle as it is a great life companion. As to upcoming breeders, I would advise them to be patient: buy a quality Beagle, study the bloodlines, get to know experienced breeders, talk to them, learn from them, work with your dogs and wait to see the results of your hard work as sooner or later they will start coming in. Do not buy dogs only for their name or because they are currently doing well in the ring. Think about what you want to accomplish and work hard to establish your own line. This is what I would advise those who wish to embark on this beautiful adventure.


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Requisites for Team Breeding by Juha Kares

Dog breeding is getting more and more like a team sport than an individual hobby. At least in Northern Europe the era of big kennels is over. It is almost imposible to keep a large number of dogs in one place. The law and the requirements contribute to make traditional breeding difficult for an individual. Therefore more and more breeders are choosing a fruitful coperative approach with their puppy buyers. The very best and most co-operative homes can become part of an enlarged breedership which works as a team. This change affects the role of the modern breeder who acts more asa coache or team leader. Therefore traditional qualites such as self reliance, and determination take a back seat to other abilities. Foremost among these are good social skills, necessary to cultivate established connections and to build up a co-operative network with new families. Modern breeders who choose a team approach need social skills more

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than traditional breeders who work alone since people become major ingredients in the success of the breedership. People will now be a necessary gateway to breeding quality dogs. Modern and future breeding is about team work in my view. So I chose to adopt a team breedership approach several decades ago. Currently I have some 40 people around me helping to breed and show dogs, And at this point, I could not breed and show dogs in this scale without these great talented friends. Based on my experience, I would say the first principal in creating a successful team breedership is that all relationships must be open and fair. It is about give and take, both sides must gain something, otherwise the story will be short. Part of the challenge is thinking about how to find great people and how to keep them. Thus at all stages of this sort of breedership, social skills are much needed. The breeder the person who



will provide both information and inspiration, the only way to build up a great team. If you are a team breeder you will be the primary resource in dealing with problems which will arise sooner or later. You sold a puppy and things did not work out as planned. Easch problem will require a creative solution, for example: how to deal with friction between you and one of your families. This is among the most trying challenges. My best advice is to listen, respect and be cool headed. What ever the specific issue may be, maintain control of the situation. Be a professional and do the right thing. Problems must be solved so that all the parties are more or less happy with the result. This is only possible if you do your home work well from the beginning. Dog breeding is becoming increasingly International. Team breeders need good networks around the globe. Thanks to social media this is one of the easiest parts of developing a team. However to be able to build up truly co-operative and tustworthy relationships you must meet the people in person though several counties may be involved. On this level as well, good social skills are much needed to reach out the right people and to make them part of your network. Respect is probaly the main ingredient in forging good working relationships with the team which includes neighbors, kennel clubs, breed clubs, vets and other breeders. Breeders must understand

“Respect is probaly the main ingredient in forging good working relationships with the team which includes neighbors, kennel clubs, breed clubs, vets and other breeders. ”

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how important these organizations and ‘outside’ people are to one’s own breeding program. It is an advantage if breeders also have the opportunity to work in breed clubs and create a positive connection with other breeders. Part of achieving this relationship with colleagues is to let other breeders do their job. Above all, do not participate in gossip, and keep your private opinions just that – private! It is easy really. This will foster a mutual feeling of respect. There is far too much gossiping and negativity in the dog World, do not be part of it. Be a fair player and always polite. People will find out who you are by your behavior. If you have good social skills and good manners you will be respected. If not take a mirror and have a look.


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THE MANY HATS of Lisa Croft-Elliott Written by Anne Tureen How many ways are there to be actively involved in dogs on a professional level? If we set aside professional handling, Lisa Croft-Elliott is a leader in most of these roles. Her training is as a graphic designer, and she blazed the trail with many of the ‘classic’ layouts we find paging through dog magazines today. First and foremost however, she is a photographer, after her first shoot at Crufts for the periodical Rare Insight she was hooked and has served as Staff Photographer to the greatest institutions of dogdom: The Kennel Club for Crufts, Westminister Kennel Club, The Canine Chronicle, The American Kennel Club, and Eukanuba. She is a prizewinning writer (Howell Book House Award and multiple Maxwell Awards) and reporter. She has been showing and breeding since 1969 when she showed her family’s Kerry Blue, and since then has won most of the highest accolades awarded, multiple times at Crufts, the World Dog Show, European Winner Show and Eukanuba she has broken breed records with her homebred English Toy Terrier in several countries. In her volunteer work Ms. Croft-Elliot has served on the Board for the Canine Alliance and as Secretary to the Cardigan Corgi Club. Best in Show magazine was able to catch up with her for a quick chat as she was driving across The Netherlands. BIS: Where to start Ms. Croft-Elliott, you have so many hats, you are an artist, administrator, sportswoman, activist and you are constantly travelling around the world. 310

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L.C.E.: That’s true, Sometimes I wake up on a plane ride and ask myself, am I coming or going to the event? No really, I don’t know how I do it, organization is not my strong point, but between online services and my phone, I manage just about everything. PHOTOGRAPHY BIS: The Nobel candidate Robertson Davies once said, anyone owning a pen has the idea they could write, I immagine this is a bit the same with photography? L.C.E.: Indeed, Art is one thing, luck is another. BIS: When I saw your 2002 Crufts photo, with the Poodle and the judge walking away, I was floored. It is a photo that could win any prize even outside the fancy. L.C.E.: And it did, it has won prizes all over the world, even Japan. When I first saw it among my negatives I was astonished, I cried, I just couldn’t believe what I had done. That photo says everything about dog shows. BIS: You have showcased a black and white foto of Phoebie the Scottish Terrier on your site, this foto seems to me a miracle of photography, one can see even the finest details. What are the challenges of photgraphing black dogs?


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L.C.E.: I have no problem with black, white is a challenge for me. My method is straighforward, in fact my epiteth will probably be ‘Insert dog here!’- I see the picture in my head, it is just waiting for the dog, and we shoot it. I don’t do much after that as far as touching up the photo. You could do almost everything in photoshop today, but the art of photography is something different. I took a photo once of a miniature Poodle and people asked me if I’d done it in a sculpure garden, but in reality it was a building site, and the forms behind the dog are rubble! Setting is nothing, light is everything. BIS: Among the takes you have which will be the one you select? L.C.E.: I just pick the one I like. During the shoot I torture the handlers I work with, I want every hair in place, and between shots it has to be made perfect every time. I have two or three people on a shoot, I use a baiter and a handler, once I needed a third to keep the tail in position with fishing line. In portraits I focus on orchestrating a shot that is as near perfect as possible. I suppose that arises from all of my years before the advent of digital photos when we used real film, and each shot was an expense; each shot counted. That’s how I still feel. BIS: Photographing dog after dog, especially in the visually sterile arena background, where do you find inspiration? L.C.E.: The dog himself is my inspiration each time, for each photo I follow the rhythm of the dog. I don’t just set the camera on super fast speed and click away like a video machine gun hoping to get something. I watch the dog and take my picture, like shooting skeets, you don’t point the bird, you point just ahead of it. I can tell when he is about to look my way or hit his long reach walking. ADVERTISING/GRAPHIC BIS: How does creativity mesh with deadlines, when the work has to be got out and time is pressing, how do you find the mental space to think up yet another idea? 312

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L.C.E.: If I think in those terms, I’m not even going to start on a project. I have to just go, run with it, dig into it, dream about it while I’m doing it, and make, lots of coffee. BIS: I love it that you changed career midlife, now you have really ‘found your bliss’ as Joseph Campbell would say? L.C.E.: On the whole yes, I got a bit sidetracked for awhile with the graphics, which I enjoy, but my heart is most of all in the photoraphy, I like telling the story, more than framing it. I like living the story too, travelling, showing. BIS: In speaking to people in the USA, one of the factors that cripples many a promising team is the cost of photos and advertising. How do you view the needs on the part of magazines, graphic designers and photographers to meet costs with the reality that this becomes a sport for the wealthy? L.C.E.: I was fortunate enough to be among the pioneers of advertizing dogs. I helped develop what is becoming the industry of photos and graphics that showcase the beauty of an individual dog. Yet it saddens me that it works so well, I can absolutely say that in a number of cases, judges are influenced by advertizing. I am also against crunching numbers in this sport,


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with the numbers of wins and dogs beaten etc. calculated to represent the quality of a dog. That is simply not the spirit of this sport, it definitely should not be a question of funds available. WRITING BIS: The recent long piece you’ve written for the Chronicle reviewing the Transylvania shows is a lesson on how to weave the good points and the bad into a truthful yet not critical review. L.C.E.: Some shows have year round comittees to make them black tie events running like clockwork. There are other sides to the sport. I did a piece on Montgomery one year which we called ‘Mudgomery’, but what is the point of bashing that event? I prefer to look at the comical side. In fact I lost four pair of shoes that weekend, literally sucked down into the mud and gone forever. The truth is that we are there for the dogs, and what happens in the ring is what makes it a great show. BIS: As a reader, I enjoy the personal detail of some of your articles, for example of adventures that occur on the trip to the show, or the jaunts out on the town in the evening. I feel it brings back some of the glamor and fun that seemed more prominent in past eras. Do you feel trends in showing and show writing are getting more into the ‘business as usual’ mindset? L.C.E.: I don’t know about other writers, but there is so much more to a dog show than the routine. If an article consits of a list of winners where is the writing? The opportunities for a story along the way are part of it, and I like to bring that into my pieces. Don’t forget that part of our events is the family and friends who accompany us, and the event should be inclusive, so should the writing. ADMINISTRATOR AND ACTIVIST BIS: How long did you serve as an official for the Corgi Club? L.C.E.: I became part of the Club almost by chance. They were going through a difficult period, and I 314

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felt I could offer some skills, so they took me on as Secretary. I did manage to help out with some burocratic issues, some ruffled feathers, and that was extremely satisfying. After a short period as Vice President I moved on from that as well, I am more of a loner than a pack animal. BIS: After it’s explosive start following the Crufts 2012 vet checks, how are things coming along with the Canine Alliance? L.C.E.: I whole heartedly agree with the ideas of the Canine Alliance which is why I became a part of it. But I am a one woman show, and group situations are not my meleè so I bail out as soon as I feel I’ve been useful. Nonetheless, I hope I will always be truly an activist where dogs are concerned. SPORTSWOMAN BIS: You find something to admire in each dog you photograph, and have owned a number of breeds ranging from the Akita to the Chinese Crested, how do you choose your next dog? L.C.E.: I have a number of breeds that I love. I watch them over the years, I get to know the people, do plenty of research, look at the dogs generation after generation. Then one day I see a dog and go ‘Bingo!’ It is usually the issue of dogs I have known and loved watching in the past, and I know that this one is mine. I’ve bred a bit too with the prefix Argoel. I had a suggestion from a top breeder to use his line for my English Toy Terrier bitch Am CH Poricias Timeout by Saint Lazar. I was thrilled, so when the time came I gave him a call, but he had changed his mind and the answer was ‘No’. I didn’t sleep for three days looking up pedigrees and studying until I happened upon an excellent match. The dog was getting on though, ought to have been 12 years old at that point, so I made a cold call to the owner and presented myself. I asked if her dog was still alive? -Yes. Is he intact? - Yes. Is he still viable? -Yes, he has a litter on the ground now. I have a bitch from the States and I was hoping I 316

Best in Show Magazine

could use your male? -I know her very well and I would be honored. It was that combination which gave me my record breaking English Toy Terrier Argoel Poricias Stoli Boli (RO CH, O GCH, UK CH, Int CH, NL, Bel, It, HR, Lux, Benelux Ch, BE JCH, NJK CH, CZ JCH JWW’14, EurJW ‘14). I love putting dogs together in my mind, having known the parents and grand parents I try to imagine what the issue would be. With my lifestyle I could never aspire to being considered a breeder, maybe in another lifetime! BIS: Do you think an art background is useful for the appreciation of purebred dogs? L.C.E.: There are two backgrounds that help in the dog world, one is art and the other is horses. The reason is that balance is everything, the sum of the parts. This applies across all breeds from Carpathians down to Chihuahuas. It has to all fit together beautifully. BIS: And which hat will you reach for next? L.C.E.: I’d say I’ll be wearing my activist hat for a while. I’m working hard to get a handler’s association on it’s feet and recognized by the FCI for all of it’s member countries. I’ll also doff the photographer’s cap for a new project coming up, a sort of visual blog- Catch me if you can!


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


GRAZ 5th and 6th of March At the International show in Graz 5th and 6th of March, Best in Show Winner was American Akita - El Gaucho de Gabritho, owned by Gabriela Thoma. Reserve Best in Show was Medium Poodle Black - Dream Catcher Starring Monrovia, owned by Jana Vavrouskova and 3rd placed was Beagle - Fonteposca’s Face To Face, owned by Michaela Maurer.

SALZBURG 9th of April At the International show in Salzburg 9th of April, Best of Day Winner was Greyhound - Neva Dell’Attimo Fuggente, owned by Petra Zonova. Reserve Best of Day was Welsh Terrier - Legenda od Guvernera, owned by Lucie Lieblova and 3rd placed was Rhodesian Ridgeback - Wa Kishujaa Dakari, owned by Markus Winkler.

SALZBURG 10th of April At the International show in Salzburg 10th of April, Best of Day Winner was Leonberger - Dakar Vom Roten Schpf. Reserve Best of Day was Bauvier des Flandres - Hardey From The Dogfarm and 3rd placed was Medium Poodle Black - Attila-Laki Black Joktan.

KLAGENFURT 18th of June At the International show in Klagenfurth 18th of June, Best in Show winner under Mr. Stefan Sinko was Clumber Spaniel - Big Booms Jocker Donkey, owned by Lana Levai. Reserve Best in Show was Wels Corgie - Andvol Pinkerton, owned by Margarita Erman and 3rd placed was Leonberger - Nero, owned by Andrea Vankova.


KLAGENFURT 19th of June At the International show in Klagenfurth 19th of June, Best in Show winner under Mr. Igor Selimovic was Newfoundland - Ursinus Velutus Zesty Guy, owned by Zoltán Bartus & Oton Fantur.

TULLN 1st of October At the International show in Tulln 1st of October, Best in Show winner under Mr. Cristian Stefanescu was Standard Poodle Black - Saxon American Dragon, owned by Lenka Flasarova.

INNSBRUCK 13th of August At the International show in Innsbruck 13th of August, Best in Show winner under Mr. Kari Jarvinen was Yorkshire Terrier - Qoccle’s Welcome Emira, owned by Nicoletta Pollini. Reserve Best in Show was Weimaraner - H’Asics The Wittelsbach Von Silberwiss Jager, owned by David Baillyand 3rd placed was Australian Shepherd - Risingstar’s Little Guy For Chalet De Fanny, owned by Francoise Lamarche.

TULLN 2nd of October At the International show in Tulln 2nd of October, Best in Show winner under Mr. Michael Forte was English Cocker Spaniel - Gallinagos Cause Nothing Compares, owned by Dusko Piljevic.

INNSBRUCK 14th of August At the International show in Innsbruck 14th of August, Best in Show winner under Mrs. Barbara Muller was Newfoundland - Littlebears One I Think I’m The Special One, owned by Giuliano Gadaldi.

WELS 10th of December At the International show in Wels 10th of December, Best in Show winner under Mr. Otto Schimpf was Pointer - Zensu Mousetrap Heart, owned by Dorottya Zahonyi.


TURNHOUT 2016 REPLACES HOOGSTRATEN There is no greater horror for a committee than cancelling a show only a few weeks prior to the show itself. . Only, a couples of weeks prior to the show the owners of the halls decided that the show could no longer take place in the auction halls. The committee was suddenly facing a big problem. The entry number dropped from 2377 to 1526! Best In Show judge was Mrs.Rita Reyniers. Best In Show was a gallant whippet bitch, owner of a most romantic name “Ch. La Belle Hélène Da Roseira Brava” and indeed she was a fragile beauty coming from Portugal, by Paulo Coelho, and co-owned and living with Bart Scheerens and Leona Dams from Belgium. The 2017 edition will happen in military hangars near Turnhout and will probably stay there for years.

MOUSCRON 2016 Mouscron is a very popular show and every year lots of French dogs are entered as Mouscron is a border town to France, 673 this time. Mouscron is very near to the Chunnel, ideal for British Dogs, 53 crossed the sea. The Royal Society of St.Hubertus decided to limit the number of entries for Mouscron to 2000 and we see that 1994 dogs were entered. Mrs. Ekaterina Senashenko from Russia was granted the honor to judge Best In Show. She pointed to the Bichon Frisée ‘I want it all des Portes de Hanau”, a two year old male bred and owned by Erb Cindy from France.

GENT 2016 For the second time in the history Gent held its show over two days. There was only a very slight increase of entries, 1966, to be exact. The committee dreams of crossing that border of 2000 again. There was no demonstration ring. A pity maybe, and something to reconsider for the future. It always adds value for the visitors and space is not a problem here. 82 Dogs crossed the channel and I start to recognize more and more as regular participants with familiar faces. Best in Show judge was Mr. Leif Wilberg from Norway. The Best In Show dog was again “Bearded Connections Kenji”. Owner Otto Rinus. Maybe in the future (2017?) Gent will have a CAC show each alternative year to its two yearly CACIB-show.


GENK LKV SHOW 2016 1989 Dogs were entered for this Crufts qualifying show. That is a very good number of entries considering the fact that this show was exactly at the very same date as Crufts itself. Many good dogs were in England and many judges missed the show, but that could not spoil this show, although the organizers were very worried. Best In Show Judge was Mrs. Ramune Kazlauskaite. Best in Show went to the Phalène “MAGIC SUNRISE GREAT GENTLEMAN” from Ilze Fraimane from Rigas Raj (Latvia). (Photos Jan de Landseer )

AMBIORIX TROFEE 2016 For the second time in a month Genk was host city of a Dog Show. This time it was the 18th edition of the Ambiorix Trofee. Notwithstanding “only” a CAC this year, the club had a nice entry of 1465 dogs coming from 13 different countries. 13 British dogs were entered. The club invited 15 judges from 7 different countries. Judge for Best In Show was MR. Svend Lovenkjaer from Denmark. Ultimate winner and Best In Show was the Newfoundlander “Cypress Bay’s The One That I Want For Bear N Mind”. This very dog was 3 weeks earlier placed 3rd in the Working Group at Crufts. He is co-owned by Mrs and Mr Bogaerts and Dwight Gorsuch. He is American bred by Debra.

BRABO 2016 Last year the euphoria about the unequaled success of the Brabo show turned this year in a big frustration. There was a loss of 30% and no direct reason was to be found. The number of entries dropped from 2439 to only 1688. The podium was rearranged for the better, less distracting disorder behind the new podia made a big change. For the first time there was Live streaming video of the main ring, seen from 4 different angles that could be chosen. The judges were representing only 10 nationalities, notwithstanding 27 were invited and that might have affected the entries. People want change and challenge. People know their chances with most Belgian judges. They have entered their dogs probably before or seen who won on other shows. Mrs.Mariette Van Herle , vice president of the Club, was granted the honor to judge Best In Show. The title went once more to “Beardie Connections Kenji” from Otto Rinus from Holland. This dog is proudly bred by Mrs. Hectors, judge and wife of Brabo’s president. They were undoubtedly very pleased with this home match victory.

WIEZE 2016 This is already the 37th edition of this small show. The committee has found a new dynamism and gets it done to set up a nice and smoothly running show. Inside the halls it was large enough to hold all 1293 dogs comfortably, plus a big main ring that was not in use during the day. The club is dreaming of having another CACIB in the future. Mr.August De Wilde, Belgium’s oldest all rounder, was appointed BIS judge. His choice was again Beardie Connections Kenji .


LOMMEL 2016 It’s never easy for small shows to score well when within reasonable distance there are a few big shows going on. The very same weekend there was the Championnat de France in Metz in the Nord East of France, probably the most important show in France. In the Netherlands, very near to Lommel, was the CACIB show of Tilburg, Fortunately, there were still 1067 exhibitors who preferred to take their chance in Lommel, 113 less than last year. Mr.Van Raamsdonk was not only the best scoring judge but he was also honored with his first BIS judging. Mrs. Nancy Daponte won this show with her American Akita “American Triumph OMG It’s Him”. There are high expectations for next edition as that will be a holiday weekend and without other shows .

LIÈGE 2016 A NEW RECORD! 3 Days before the closing date of the show, there were not even 1000 dogs entered. It looked like a nightmare. Within the 3 last days the entries rose to a new record of 2275! Liège is always a small festival! Liège has its classics on offer, his Golden Groomer trophy, its Golden Leash, its “dogs in art” expo, and every two years its Gala Show the “Masters Trophy”, as was now the case. The winners this year are: the Hovawart, CH. GOTHAM DES ILES DU LAGON BLEU, owned by GARDES Benoit from France, Reserve was for the Leonberger, AMICUS OPTIMUS VITALIS, owned by MIKHOLEVA Anna from Russia. 50 UK dogs were in competition, plus some handlers for the Golden Leash. There were also 3 Irish entries. For the first time in Belgium and probably any other country outside France a Cursinu was entered. The Cursinu, seems to be an old breed from Corsica that was almost extinct. Best In Show judge was vice president Jean François Vanaken. He did send Mr.Eric Bernard’s Yorkshire Terrier “HUNDERWOOD IDOL” to the podium. MECHELEN 2016 BRITAIN TAKES THE CUP! At first the show was planned for December due to the European of Brussels end of august, but at last they had to take the risk and set it back to summer like they were used too , only two weeks prior to the European. There was only a small decrease from 1568 to 1496 entries . Best In Show judge was Mr.Jos de Cuyper from Belgium. 6 Tchiorny Terriers were entered and one of them became Best In Show, the two year old male “Sibirski Medved Vesely Rodzher”. This dog is living in the United Kingdom and is owned by Antonina Chichvarkina and bred by I.Zaytseva from the UK.


BRUSSELS 2016 EUROPEAN DOG SHOW It promised to be a hot show, in the literal sense of the word. Temperatures going over 30° would cause extra worries for the organizers. It turned out to be the hardest point of critique on this show, notwithstanding the fact that there was little to do about it but to undergo. Alike the show guide of Crufts, it was decided to have one for the visitors in Brussels too, instead of selling them a catalog that is useless to people not familiar with dog shows. On Sunday Prince Laurent and Princess Claire and their children paid an informal visit to the show and followed the finals in the main ring with much interest until the very end. With 12.035 entries, this European Dog Show will be remembered as the 3th largest European since it started. The KMSH/SRSH (Royal Society St.Hubert) was happy with the number of entries as it matched her goal. The dogs came from 54 different countries. France was the country with the highest number of entries. Russia is entered no less than 1181 dogs. It was also expected that the United Kingdom would delegate a lot of participants, and indeed, no less than 423 took a chance . Mr Tammas Jakkel from Hungary was the judge for Best Junior in Show.This title was for the American Cocker Spaniel “Very Vigie Look At Me” , bred by Laurent Pichard and owned by Sanna Vartainen from Finland. Mr.Hans Van den Bergh was the Best In Show judge. To some a little strange that the KMSH/SRSH granted this honor to a Dutch judge and not to a Belgian judge. But Hans is very popular over here and maybe by choosing a Dutch judge would prevent a lot of political speculations inside the society. His 3rd BIS place went to the Piccolo Levriero Italiano “Queen Catherine The Great Del Barone Rampante”, a Russian entry. This bitch is 4 years old, bred by Dorella Goldoni and owned by Petr Rodichev. Mrs.Tatjana Urek from Slovenia was the breed judge, Mrs.Urek from Slovenia the Group judge. Res BIS went to the Chow Chow “King of Egypt De Los Perros De Bigo”. This trophy goes to Spain, to Vigo Navajon Nuria, who is owner and breeder of this 3 year old dog. King’s breed judge was Mr.Grunheid nfrom France and his Group judge was Mr.Ionescu from Romania. Best In Show was for the Lakeland Terrier “Aiola Von Den Schonen Bergen”. This bitch was almost 6 years old, bred and owned by Friedrich Wilhelm Schoneberg from Germany. Breed judge was Viva Maria Soleckyj Szpunar from Poland while Mr.Kanas from Slovakia was the group judge.

CHARLEROI 2016 Charleroi is working hard on its new élan and the results start showing. This year there was an increase again till 1603 entries and say that they had to refuse about 200 entries that where unpaid! . The 5th place was taken by the United Kingdom with 41 dogs. We can more and more fully consider the UK as one of our neighboring countries. The best in Show judge came from Macedonia, Mr. Mile Aleksoski. His winner was the Black Standard Poodle “Huffish Almerican Ganster With Atastar”. Philip Langdon is his master and they both live in the United Kingdom. This male Champion was bred in 2013 by Mrs. Charlotte Sandell.


RIJEKA 6th of February At the International show in Rijeka 20th of February, Best in Show Winner was Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen - Black Majesty Gives U Goose Bumps, owned by Iva Raic and Marko Ljutic. Reserve Best in Show was Scottish Terrier - Allison At Melscot Vittscott, owned by Ante Lucin & Javier Gonzalez Mendikote and 3rd placed was Afghan Hound Way Up James Bond, owned by Agnese della Rocca.

RIJEKA 7th of February 2016 At the International show in Rijeka 21st of February, Best in Show Winner was Scottish Terrier - Allison At Melscot Vittscott, owned by Ante Lucin & Javier Gonzalez Mendikote. Reserve Best in Show was Newfoundland - AMidnight Lady’s Top Of The Line At Cayug, owned by Riccardo Quartiglia and 3rd placed was Dachshund Standard Smooth Haired - Ebonheart’s Neon Lights, owned by Marino Muzica.

ZADAR 28th of April At the first International show in Zadar 28 of April, Best in Show Winner was Maltese - Cinecitta Ian Somerhalder, owned by Franco Prosperi. Reserve Best in Show was English Setter - Blue Baltic’s Lawrence of Arabia and 3rd Old English Sheepdog - Bottom Shaker Shaker Zephyr Dream, owned by Jozsef Koroknai.

ZADAR 29th of April At the second International show in Zadar 29 of April, Best in Show Winner was Old English Sheepdog - Bottom Shaker Shaker Zephyr Dream, owned by Jozsef Koroknai. Reserve Best in Show was English Setter - Blue Baltic’s Lawrence of Arabia and 3rd Whippet - Absolute Mann Betty Boop, owned by Fabrizio Manni.


ZADAR 30th of April At the third International show in Zadar 30 of April, Best in Show Winner was Dalmatian Dog - Melissa Iz Terletskoy Dubravy, owned by Petrakova I. and Chernova V.. Reserve Best in Show was Jack Russell Terrier - Touchstar Gossip Maker, owned by Francesca Scorza and 3rd Tervueren - Flammeus Should Know Me, owned by Ilda Rinne.

ZADAR 1st of May At the fourth International show in Zadar 1st of May, Best in Show Winner was American Akita - Estava Rain Catch The Wind, owned by Katja Sabine Rauhut. Reserve Best in Show was Jack Russell Terrier - Touchstar Gossip Maker, owned by Francesca Scorza and 3rd Black Terrier - Fenja Alexandra Vom Zarenhof, owned by Arnd and Heidi Friedrich.

VARAZDIN 28th of May At the International show in Varazdin 28th of May, Best in Show Winner was American Akita - Nekmar Game On, owned by Marin Nekic and Marko Krznaric. Reserve Best in Show was Petitt Basset Griffon Vendeen - Black Majesty’s Roller Coaster della Godegli, owned by Iva Raic and 3rd Standard Poodle - Leanka’s Evangeline, owned by Regina Schmeisser.

UMAG 4th of June At the International show in Umag 4th of June, Best in Show Winner was Wolfspitz - Blessed To Dare From Lavendermist Meadow, owned by Del Monte Dragnone kennel. Reserve Best in Show was Newfoundland - Casper Little Bears Black Koralle, owned by Michaela Santi and 3rd Bearded Collie - Silesian Diamonds Moris Prime, owned by Monika Dlociok.

UMAG 5th of June At the International show in Umag 5th of June, Best in Show Winner was Welsh Springer Spaniel - Northernstar The Red Dragon, owned by Michele Tiani. Reserve Best in Show was Wolfspitz - Blessed To Dare From Lavendermist Meadow, owned by Del Monte Dragnone kennel and 3rd Whippet - Whiprose Queen of My Heart, owned by To Whiprose di M. Rosati kennel.

VARAZDIN 28th of May At the International show in Varazdin 28th of May, Best in Show Winner was American Akita - Nekmar Game On, owned by Marin Nekic and Marko Krznaric. Reserve Best in Show was Petitt Basset Griffon Vendeen - Black Majesty’s Roller Coaster della Godegli, owned by Iva Raic and 3rd Standard Poodle - Leanka’s Evangeline, owned by Regina Schmeisser.


SPLIT 28th of July At the National show in Split 28th of July, Best in Show Winner was Lakeland Terrier - Aiola vd Schonen Bergen, owned by F. W. Schoneberg. Reserve Best in Show was Weimaraner - Doc N’Camelot’s Heaven Can Wait, owned by E. Lenaerts and Finch Tonie and Van der Sichel Linda and 3rd placed was Puli Hungary White Puli Doki, owned by Rusz Bodil.

SPLIT 28th of July At the International show in Split 29th of July, Best in Show Winner was American Cocker Spaniel - Very Vigie I Don’t Know, owned by Leonard-Nolle Mathilde. Reserve Best in Show was Bichon Havanais - Bellezza’s Keep It Hot, owned by Miia Lauronen and 3rd placed was Afghan Hound - Shaira Bint Benasid Von Haussman, owned by Erika Heilmann.

SPLIT 30th of July At the first National show in Split 30th of July, Best in Show Winner was Lakeland Terrier - Aiola vd Schonen Bergen, owned by F. W. Schoneberg. Reserve Best in Show was Dachshund Kaninchen Smooth Haired - Picollo Teckel Infanta, owned by E. S. Pikul and 3rd Chihuahua Short Coated - Orlandino Di San Gimignano, owned by Tuula Lehtinen-Cochetti.

SPLIT 31st of July At the second International show in Zadar 29 of April, Best in Show Winner was Bichon Havanais - Bellezza’s Keep It Hot, owned by Miia Lauronen. Reserve Best in Show was Yorkshire Terrier - Sunachates Dancing With Desire, owned by O. Begena and 3rd Shetland Sheepdog Japaro Eye Of The Storm, owned by Helge Olsen Finn.



Best In Show at the International Dog Show of the Greek KC, on 7 of May, under judge Mr. Jorgen Hindse from Denmark, was the German Shepherd Dog, Geneva Clever Canin, owned by Kostas Ioannidis, 2nd the Chihuahua Long Coated, Mystic Legion Drago, owned by Apostolis Raptakis & George Papadopoulos, 3rd was Rottweiler, Phoenix Vom Entferntland, owned by Eugenia Tsetsi and 4th Afghan Hound, Karakush The Meow Factor, owned by Alkis Papodopoulos & Thiseas Kokkinos.

Best In Show at the International Dog Show of the Greek KC, on 1st of July, under judge Mr. Rony Doedijns from the Netherlands, was the Maltese, Cinecitta’s Ian Somerhalder, owned by Stefano Paolantoni and Franco Prosperi, 2nd the Akita, Kanji Go, owned by Karina Radzminkaya, 3rd Old English Sheepdog, Air Zeppeline Calypso, owned by Matteo Autolitano and 4th Epagneul Breton, Loqo Del DnD Serbia, owned by Thanos Theocharis & Giannis Fraggidis.

Best In Show at the International Dog Show of the Greek KC, on 8 of May, under judge Mrs. Paula Heikkinen-Lehkonen, was the Chihuahua Long Coated, Mystic Legion Drago, owned by Apostolis Raptakis & George Papadopoulos, 2nd the Scottish Terrier, Version in Black Terra Alice, owned by Sotiris Stroumpinis & Michael Premtsis, 3rd Afghan Hound, Karakush The Meow Factor, owned by Alkis Papodopoulos & Thiseas Kokkinos and 4th Labrador Retriever, Daisy Okeanas Elite, owned by Margarita Weber.

Best In Show at the International Dog Show of the Greek KC, on 2nd of July, under judge Mr. Damir Skok from Croatia, was Epagneul Breton, Loqo Del DnD Serbia, owned by Thanos Theocharis & Giannis Fraggidis, 2nd the Maltese, Cinecitta’s Ian Somerhalder, owned by Stefano Paolantoni and Franco Prosperi, 3rd Karakush The Meow Factor, owned by Alkis Papodopoulos & Thiseas Kokkinos and 4th Miniature Schnauzer, Fixus Final Call, owned by Anne & Jannica Wallin.


Best In Show at the International Dog Show of the Greek KC, on 3rd of July, under judge Mr. Stefan Sinko from Slovenia, was the Maltese, Cinecitta’s Ian Somerhalder, owned by Stefano Paolantoni and Franco Prosperi, 2nd Old English Sheepdog, Air Zeppeline Calypso, owned by Matteo Autolitano, 3rd Epagneul Breton, Loqo Del DnD Serbia, owned by Thanos Theocharis & Giannis Fraggidis and 4th Miniature Schnauzer, Fixus Final Call, owned by Anne & Jannica Wallin.

Best In Show at the International Dog Show of the Greek KC, on 16th of October, under judge Mr. Tamas Jakkel from Hungary, was Standard Poodle, Da Maya Huffish Trademark, owned by Vijay Prabhakaren, 2nd the Whippet, Absolute Mann Sea World, owned by Francesca Pavesi, 3rd Scottish Terrier, Version In Black Terra Alice, owned by Sotiris Stroumpinis and 4th Rottweiller, Lenon Vom Kanellos Wappen, owned by Elias Kanellos.

Best In Show at the International Dog Show of the Greek KC, on 14th of October, under judge Mr. Antonio di Lorenzo from Norway, was the German Shepherd, Geneva Clever Canin, owned by Kostas Ioannidis, 2nd Labrador retriever, Pierre Land Di Casa Picca, owned by Franco Picca, 3rd Rottweiler, Hellastar Titan, owned by Petros Karagiannis and 4th Greek Hound, Team Illiadis Simon, owned by Elias Illadis.

Best In Show at the International Dog Show of the Greek KC, on 15th of October, under judge Mr. Hans Van Den Berg from the Netherlands, was the Afghan Hound, Karakush The Meow Factor, owned by Alkis Papadopoulos & Thiseas Kokkinos, 2nd the Pug, Iron Man Of Smiling Farm, owned by Soulis Vythoulkas, 3rd Scottish Terrier, Version In Black Terra Alice, owned by Sotiris Stroumpinis and 4th Labrador Retriever, Daisy Okeanas Elite, owned by Margarita Weber.

Best In Show at the International Dog Show of the Greek KC, on 13th of November, under judge Mr. Peter Harsanyi from Hungary, was German Shepherd, Geneva Clever Canin, owned by Kostas Ioannidis, 2nd the Caucasian Shepherd, Giouri Greek Dogcenter, owned by Argyrios Gerou, 3rd the Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Staff Diamonds Flash, owned by A. Soutzoglou and K. Tsoulou and 4th Chihuahua Long Coated, Mystic Legion Drago, owned by Apostolis Raptakis and George Papadopoulos.




CHAMPION OF CHAMPIONS Among the 426 dogs at the Champion of Champion 9th of January , first place took Ch Doux of Ice Wine – Berger Blanc Suisse, owned by Magyar Katalin. Second placed was Ch. Absolute Mann Betty Boop – Whippet, owned by Fabrizio Manni and third placed was Ch. Tripitaka Bite the Bullet – Tibetan Terrier, owned by Sean and Cathy Lydon. Champion of Champions have been judged by Damir Skok, Miroslav Vaclavik, Gitty Schwab, Pero Bozhinovski, Serghei Volinets, Laurent Pichard and Carsten Birk.

PRESIDENT CUP At the President Cup 10th of January , Best in Show Winner was Miniature Schnauzer Black – Steadlyn ZenSation, owned by Ante Lucin and Javier Gonzalez Mendikote, reserve was Whippet - Ch. Absolute Mann Betty Boop, owned by Fabrizio Manni and third placed was Old English Sheepdog Bottom Shaker Zéphyr Dream, owned by Koroknai Jozsef.

FEHOVA WINTER DOG SHOW 1. DAY At the FeHoVa Winter Dog Show 18th of February Best in Show was Old English Sheepdog - Bottom Shaker Zéphyr Dream, owned by Koroknai Jozsef. Second placed was Wire Haired Miniature Dachshund - Gudwil’s Jano Just Like Daddy, owned by N. Firsova and third placed was Pointer - Zensu Mousetrap Heart, owned by Bruno Pozzebon.

FEHOVA WINTER DOG SHOW 2. DAY At the FeHoVa Winter Dog Show 19th of February Best in Show was Great Dane - Euro Power Future Lord, owned by Shulgin Oleg. Second placed was Berger Blanc Suisse - Doux of Ice Wine, owned by Magyar Katalin and third placed was Yorkshire Terrier - Classic of New Deal, owned by Záhonyi-Ábel Dorottya.


SZILVÁSVÁRAD CACIB 1. DAY At the International Dog Show in Szilvasvarad 14th of May among 1737 entries, Best in Show Winner was Jack Russell Terrier - Lovely-Orange Jackpot, owned by Olga Serova. Reserve was Whippet Absolute Mann Betty Boop, owned by Fabrizio Manni and 3rd placed was Maltese - Cinecitta’ Ian Somerhalder, owned by Stefano Paolantoni and Franco Prosperi.

FEHOVA WINTER DOG SHOW 3. DAY At the FeHoVa Winter Dog Show 20th of February Best in Show was Berger Blanc Suisse - Doux of Ice Wine, owned by Magyar Katalin. Second placed was Siberian Husky - Avaks, owned by Chaplina E. and third placed was Medium Black Poodle - Magic Shmarock Gucci by Gucci, owned by Lorenzo Lazzeri, Forgács Gábor . SZILVÁSVÁRAD CACIB 2. DAY At the International Dog Show in Szilvasvarad 15th of May among 1839 entries, Best in Show Winner was Lakeland Terrier - Aiola v.d. Schönen Bergen, owned by F.W. Schöneberg. Reserve was Maltese - Cinecitta’ Ian Somerhalder, owned by Stefano Paolantoni and Franco Prosperi and 3rd placed was Whippet Absolute Mann Betty Boop, owned by Fabrizio Manni.

FEHOVA WINTER DOG SHOW 4. DAY At the FeHoVa Winter Dog Show 21st of February Best in Show was Black Giant Schnauzer - Gently Born King of Kings, owned by Anna Vlasova. Second placed was West Highland Terrier - Aston Martin Rokoko, owned by Dmitriy Kitaev. and third placed was Berger Blanc Suisse - Doux of Ice Wine, owned by Magyar Katalin.

SZILVÁSVÁRAD CACIB 3. DAY At the International Dog Show in Szilvasvarad 16th of May among 1542 entries, Best in Show Winner was Whippet Absolute Mann Betty Boop, owned by Fabrizio Manni. Reserve was Lakeland Terrier - Aiola v.d. Schönen Bergen, owned by F.W. Schöneberg and 3rd was Maltese - Cinecitta’ Ian Somerhalder, owned by Stefano Paolantoni and Franco.


GRAND PRIX CACIB 1.DAY At the Grand Prix 3rd of June Best in Show winner among 868 entries, was Shikoku Yuu-Saiki Van De Egmato, owned by Egitte Van Veghel, judged by Luis Pinto Texeira from Portugal.

GRAND PRIX CACIB 2.DAY At the Grand Prix 5th of June Best in Show winner among 818 entries, was Lhasa Apso - Shut Up And Kiss Me Dell’ Albertico, owned Stefano Paolantoni, judged by . Jakkel Tamás from Hungary.

GRAND PRIX CACIB 2.DAY At the Grand Prix 4th of June Best in Show winner among 929 entries, was Newfoundland - Skipper’s Colour Of The Night, owned Kovács László, judged by Lisbeth Mach from Switzerland.

KOMAROM 1. DAY At the International Dog Show in Komarom 7th of October among 1723 entries, Best in Show winner was Pekingese - Sunrise Dragon Iz Love And Desire, owned by N. Romanyuk. Reserve was Rhodesian Ridgeback - Mahalin Maktaja Auksinis Feniksas, owned by Aleksandras Keiras. Third placed was Scottish Terrier - Filisite Brash Zephyr In Chocolate, owned by Popova Valentina.

KOMAROM 2. DAY At the International Dog Show in Komarom 8th of October among 2109 entries, Best in Show winner was Beagle - Varinhouse Ras Algethi, owned by T. Tsaregorodseva. Reserve was Papillon - Best Bendzamin Night Dr, owned by Signe Rancane. Third placed was Kerry Blue Terrier - Dinnyésvárosi Nevermore, owned by Tajtiné Burovicz Katalin.

KOMAROM 3. DAY At the International Dog Show in Komarom 9th of October among 2019 entries, Best in Show winner was Pekingese - Sunrise Dragon Iz Love And Desire, owned by : N. Romanyuk. Reserve was English Cocker Spaniel - Amore America Big City Life, owned by Lukács Nóra and Czeglédi Attila. Third placed was Hungarian Viszla - Berek Adu Ász, owned by Urbán Adrienn.



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INDONESIA Photo credits: Ferdinal Chandra

On the 18th of March, Best in Show winner at the first FCI Asia Pacific Show, was Pomeranian Pomhaven Oh Behave, 2nd was Golden Retriever and 3rd Samoyed.

On the 18th of March, Best in Show winner at the second FCI Asia Pacific Show, was Samoyed Icepaw’s I B Cruz’N, 2nd place Scottish Terrier and 3rd the Pekingese.


On the 19th of March, Best in Show winner at the fourth FCI Asia Pacific Show, was Black Poodle Medium.

On the 20th of March, Best in Show winner at the fifth FCI Asia Pacific Show, was Siberian Husky Unicornhill Final Destination.

On the 20th of March, Best in Show winner at the sixth FCI Asia Pacific Show, was Golden Retriever Hocus Pocus Gold Legend.

On the 19th of March, Best in Show winner at the third FCI Asia Pacific Show, was Doberman Konan Von Frankenburg and 2nd was Golden Retriver. Best Young in Show was Jack Russell Terrier and 2nd was Shih Tzu.


SEDRIANO 9th of January At the National show in Sedriano 9th of January, Best in Show winner was English Cocker Spaniel - Day By Day, owned by Cristian Marcellino. Reserve Best in Show was Toy Poodle Black - Giusy Ferrero Deigini, owned by Deigini kennel and 3rd placed was Whippet - Sobers Mimosa, owned by Sobers kennel.

MILANO 10th of January At the International show in Sedriano 9th of January, Best in Show winner was Great Dane - You Are Not Alone Del Piccolo Jigo, owned by Del Piccolo Jigo kennel. Reserve Best in Show was Norwich Terrier - Star Pride Couldn’t Do Better, owned by Alfred D’Angieri Nunzio and 3rd placed was Whippet - Sobersalto XXX, owned by Enrico De Gasperi.

REGGIO EMILIA 20th of March At the International show in Reggio Emilia 20th of March, Best in Show winner was Whippet - Sobersalto XXX, owned by Enrico De Gasperi.

CUNEO 1st of July At the International show in Cuneo 1st of July, Best in Show winner was Italian Greyhound - Rosalia Gaetana Del Barone Rampante, owned by Gaetano Calderone. Reserve Best in Show was Giant Schnauzer - Gently Born Chilli Pepper, owned by Dario Pancaldiand 3rd placed was Kerry Blue Terrier - Balboa Saladin, owned by Francesca Cassin.


IVREA 2nd of July At the National show in Ivrea 2nd of July, Best in Show winner was Giant Schnauzer - Gently Born Chilli Pepper, owned by Dario Pancaldiand. Reserve Best in Show was Maltese - Cinecitta’ Oliver Hardy, owned by Stefano Paolantoni and 3rd placed was Pointer - Franzini Polo, owned by Gianbattista Guffanti.

TREVISO 3rd and 4th of September At the International show in Treviso 3rd and 4th of September, Best in Show winner was Bloodhound. Reserve Best in Show Italian Greyhound - Rosalia Gaetana Del Barone Rampante, owned by Gaetano Calderone and 3rd placed was English Cocker Spaniel - Day By Day, owned by Cristian Marcellino.

TORINO 3rd of July At the International show in Torino 3rd of July, Best in Show winner was Giant Schnauzer - Gently Born Chilli Pepper, owned by Dario Pancaldiand.

ROME 17th of December At the International show in Rome 17th of December, Best in Show winner was Standard Poodle Black - Samarcanda Italian Lover, owned by Samarcanda kennel.

GRADISCA D’ISONZO 14th of August At the International show in Gradisca D’Isonzo 14th of August, Best in Show winner was Chihuahua Long Coated - Toro Loco Di Rio Galeria, owned by Simonetta Stampigi. Reserve Best in Show was Bracco Italiano - Bolo, owned by Maurizio Turci and 3rd placed was Newfoundland The Wave’s Sons Nefoundlands Knickerbockers, owned by Elisa Corna.

ROME 18th of December At the International show in Rome 18th of December, Best in Show winner was American Staffordshire Terrier - TNT Power Commander, owned by Monica Scognamiglio. Reserve Best in Show was Giant Schnauzer - Gently Born Ciao Caro, owned by Raffaele Napoletano and 3rd placed was Samoyed - Cabaka’s Happy Go Lucky, owned by Donato Gennaro.






After an extremely busy weekend in the FCI International dog show in Osaka, I am writing this article and looking back on the dogshow scene in Japan in 2016. The biggest news of the year is that the Japan Kennel Club has elected a the new JKC President. Mr. Satoshi Bessho. Bessho has been a professional handler and breeder of show dogs for many years, and now he is well known as an international dog show judge all over the world. After the interview of Mr.Bessho, His objectives for a “New JKC” is to open to the world and the policy of “Exhibitor first”. It can take time to change many things but he aims to make JKC the best it can be. So we, the Japanese dog people are delighted to have the new JKC President Mr. Bessho and looking forward to seeing the future JKC! Concerning the FCI International dogshow in Osaka which is one of the largest FCI shows in Japan. You can check the group winners listed below and see that many of them are group winners bred in Japan even though a good number of imported dogs from all over the world attended the show. Facebook is a contributing factor, helping Japanese breeders identify good dogs to stregnthen their breeding programs . • Best King Line up • Group 1: Shetland Sheepdog (Bred in Japan) Group 2: Bulldog (Bred in Spain) Group 3: Norwich Terrier (Bred in U.K) Group 4: Long haired Miniature Dachshund (Bred in Japan) Group 5: Pomeranian (Bred in China) Group 6: Beagle (Bred in Japan) Group 7: Irish Setter (Bred in Japan) Group 8: Golden Retrever (Bred in USA) Group 9: Shih Tzu (Bred in Japan) Group 10: Borzoi (Bred in Japan)


• Best Queen Line up • Group 1: Rough Collie (Bred in Japan) Group 2: Boxer (Bred in Japan) Group 3: Jack Russell Terrier (Bred in Japan) Group 4: Long Haired Miniature Dachshund (Bred in Japan) Group 5: Siberian Husky (Bred in Japan) Group 6: Beagle (Bred in Japan) Group 7: Short haired Hungarian Viszla (Bred in Japan) Group 8: Cocker Spaniel (Bred in Denmark) Group 9: French Bulldog (Bred in Japan) Group 10: Borzoi (Bred in Japan) Moreover several of the Japanese bred group winners have also won shows outside of Japan. The Siberian Husky won Best in Show under Ed Bivenand Best of winners at the Siberian Husky club of America National specialty. The Borzoi also won several big shows in the USA. In 2016, Many Japanese breeders were successful in the dogshow scene all over the world. They strengthened their breeding program and worked hard to be successful in their own breeding although we still have a very strict quarantine rule when we import dogs from overseas. We hope this quarantine rule will change in near future so that we can work mpre closely with foreign breeders, importing dogs, surely the JKC will support these serious breeders. With our new JKC leader Mr. Satoshi Bessho, the Japanese dog show scene will have a bright future.




LUXEMBOURG SPRING 2016

LUXEMBOURG AUTUMN 2016

Is Luxembourg over it’s top? Since a few years growth stopped and started to go down from 5487 in its record year 2009 to 4568 this year. Of course 4568 is far from bad, but compared to last year when the show still had 5288 entries...The terrorist attacks at Brussels airport cannot be the reason as the dogs were entered before. It also seems that they had relatively little impact on the flights of the 41 judges who were all well in time at the show. 31 Countries were represented. 69 Came all over from Britain. The main ring had a brand new carpet and there was live streaming on internet. Mr. Giovanni Battista Tabe from Italy was the chosen to judge Best In Show. The BIS Trophy went to Russia. Mrs. E.Gaynulina can be proud of her Miniature Spitz Orange “Thai Silk Unique Perspective”.

The European Dog Show in Brussels, only about 200km away, has the same public and was very expensive. People make choices then and most of them go for the European title. We probably don’t need to look further for the entries dropping from 4244 in 2014 to (only) 3386 this time. Dogs were entered from as much as 27 different countries, the United Kingdom had a good number of 66. It becomes also a habit to introduce novelties every time. This time it was a big screen for live view. And not only the dogs in the main ring are shown, but beneath is the dog’s entry number and breed. Perfect, that is the way it should always be! Visitors pay for a catalog to find out at the end that they are more confused instead of wiser. Now they can find the breed, the name and a whole new world opens. Mr. Norman Deschuymere, allround judge from Belgium, was the judge of honor. The Bracco Italiano, a two year old dog called “Dante”, was made BIS. Dante went back to France with his owner Pierre Badia.



BELGRADE At the International show in Belgrade 6 of March, Best in Show Winner was Wire Fox Terrier - Travella Strike The Deal, owned by Minjon Milovanovic. Reserve Best in Show was Medium Black Poodle Jasenak Back To The Future, owned by Dragana and Ivan Vasiljevic and 3rd placed was German Shepherd Zafira Vom Haus Milesevac, owned by Sasa Spasojevic and Adrien and Peter Firic.

SUBOTICA At the International show in Belgrade 22 of May, Best in Show Winner was American Staffordshire Terrier - Return To My American Dream, owned by Iwona Dabek. Reserve Best in Show was Toy Poodle - Pinocchio Party of Abra Lee Charm, Gordana Petrovic Cetkovic and 3rd placed was Doberman - Irukandji Shadow of The Darkne, “Shadow of The Darkness�.

POZAREVAC At the International show in Pozarevac 10 of September, Best in Show Winner was Rhodesian Ridgeback - Jelany Red Itongo, owned by Elena Kamle. Reserve Best in Show was Shih Tzu - Peter Pan of Mondoshawan and 3rd placed was Doberman - Giddy Blossom Fela.

NOVI SAD At the International show in Novi Sad 25 of September, Best in Show Winner was Keeshond - Hamesha Star Benefis Armstronga Evlora, owned by E. Sablina. Reserve Best in Show was Black Medium Poodle - Jasenak Back to the Future, owned by Dragana and Ivan Vasiljevic.



Best In Show at the National Show in Valladolid, on 27 of February, under judge Mrs. Cate Elisabeth Cartledge from UK, was Maltese Cinecitta Ian Somerhalder, owned by Stefano Paolantoni and Franco Prosperi, 2nd the Rough Collie Blue Jasmine de Jorbat Y’Anna and 3rd placed was Black Giant Schnauzer Jack Johnson de Lordships. Best In Show at the International Show in Valladolid, on 28 of February, under judge Mr. Andrew Brace from UK, was Maltese Cinecitta Ian Somerhalder, owned by Stefano Paolantoni and Franco Prosperi, 2nd the Rough Collie Blue Jasmine de Jorbat Y’Anna and 3rd placed was Spanish Waterdog Rayaragua Billabond. Best In Show at the National Show in Oviedo, on 9 of April, under judge Mrs. Linda Volarikova from Slovakia, was English Bulldog Vulcansbull Did It My Way, 2nd was Maltese Cinecitta Ian Somerhalder and 3rd was Afghan Hound Tuu-Jhuu’s Bela Lugosi. Best In Show at the International Show in Oviedo, on 10 of April, under judge Mr. Gerard Cox from UK, was Siberian Husky Alioth dos Abuneiros, 2nd was Maltese Cinecitta Ian Somerhalder and 3rd was American Staffordshire Srcky’s Last Man Standing. Best In Show at the International Show in Madrid, on 2021 of May, under judge Mr. Carlos Renau, was Maltese Cinecitta Ian Somerhalder, 2nd was Afghan Hound, Goldragon Angerfirst and 3rd was Lakeland Terrier Chelines in Excelsis.

Best In Show at the International Show in Leon, on 25 of September, under judge Mr. Andri Hudono from India, was Pug, Ios Chatos del Norte Let Me Be a Superstar, 2nd was Spanish Waterdog Rayaragua Billabong and 3rd was Doberman Pride of Russia Sever. Best In Show at the International Show in Talavera, on 8-9 of October, under judge Mrs. Christine Rossierwas, was Akita Taikou Go Shun’You Kensha, 2nd was German Shorthaired Pointer Dexter de Valcreole and 3rd was Lakeland Terrier Chelines in Extremis. Best In Show at the National Show in Santiago, on 29 of October, under judge Mrs. Markku Kipinas, was Kerry Blue Terrier Volzhskiy Arkos Legolas, 2nd was English Bulldog Vulcansbull Did It My Way and 3rd was Toy Poodle Sotto Voce Sweet Calimero. Best In Show at the International Show in Santiago, on 30 of October, under judge Mr. Rafael Malo Alcrudo, was Kerry Blue Terrier Volzhskiy Arkos Legolas, 2nd was Pomeranian Thai Silk Dream Maker and 3rd was Doberman Teraline Orietta.



DOG WORLD in Egypt Written by Anna Szabo

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Traveling with dogs have never been possible in as many countries as it is now, with travel costsslightly more affordable and airlines’ growing consciousness of passengers’ needs to travel with their pets. Certain countries, however, have very strict regulations for crossing their borders with animals - such is the case with Egypt. I well remember how much effort it took me to arrange the paperwork of the glowing black Greyhound female I showed in Egypt two years ago (we won Best in Show at the Red Sea Winner Show in 2015 under Kari Jarvinen from Finland and Chris Zeniou from Cyprus. Upon arrival at our hotel, we were greeted with highly raised eyebrows, and moments later the whole hotel staff surrounded us, taking pictures and asking countless questions about ‘Mina’, as if she was a revived Dinosaur of some sort. She was given the nickname ‘Anubis’ due to her looks that indeed resemble the iconic Egyptian god (usually depicted as a jackal or a man with a canine head).

In ancient Egypt, many animals were associated with gods. Respect and veneration for animals was fundamental in all their traditions. Bastet was the cat-goddess, who was an infinite source of power throughout the ancient Egyptian religion: she was the protector of home, and the goddess of fertility and fire. Cats were pets, hunting partners and sacred animals (in fact, the punishment for killing or hurting a cat was death!). The aforementioned Anubis was the patron of lost souls and funeral rites, and weighed the heart of the dead for Osiris; any dog owner today will tell you that dogs can see the true soul of a person. Dogs were highly valued in Egypt as part of the family and as symbols of gods. They served as hunting companions and watchdogs and they were often mummified and buried next to their owners, or sometimes in their own coffins.


Best in Show at the 2015 Red Sea Winner International was Int.Nord.Eg.Ch. Jet’s Take It Or Leave It, representing ninth consecutive generation of Best In Show-winning FCI international champion bitches of the Jet’s bitchline. She is pictured by Anna Szabo in front of the pyramids in Giza.

Recently, an incredible mass grave of eight million dogs and puppies dating back to ancient Egypt has been unearthed. The catacomb (estimated to be built some 2500 years ago) next to the Temple of Anubis in North Saqqara was discovered in the 19th century but was not fully recovered until recently. Paintings from different periods of ancient Egypt portrayed dogs with a greyhound-like appearance and other times looking more like a mastiff. An interesting fact is that officially, neither the FCI, nor the KC or the AKC classify any breeds as originating in Egypt. Based on DNA analysis, the Pharaoh Hound has no link with Ancient Egypt. However, a popular myth holds that the breed is descended from the Tesem, one of the ancient Egyptian hunting dogs. Some believe that there are similarities between the breed and images of dogs found on the walls of ancient Egyptian tombs. This myth proposes that the Pharaoh Hound was brought by the Phoenicians to Malta, where it has existed for over 2,000 years. (“About the Breed”. Pharaoh Hound Club of America. 2013) Unfortunately, this is in sharp contrast to the role of dogs in present Egypt’s culture. To understand the reasons, we must first observe that roughly 88% of Egypt’s population are Muslim. Even though Islam teaches its followers to be merciful to all creatures, and that all form of animal cruelty is forbidden, many Muslim jurists consider dogs to be ritually unclean. Also, according to a Sunni narration, black dogs are a manifestation of evil in animal form. On the other hand, there are also stories in Islamic tradition that tell of people

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who were forgiven their sins through the kindness they showed towards a dog, and they indeed are admired as family members in many Egyptian households. Understanding the development and changes in dogs’ roles in Egyptian society and culture throughout history is crucial in order for us to be able to conceptualize their present situation in the country. It is very controversial. Hopefully, the newly formed Egyptian Kennel Federation (EKF), founded in 2012, will be able to guide more and more Egyptians to a more illuminated path of pet-keeping, simmilar to that of the West. In merely a few years, the EKF has managed to gain control of purebred dog breeding throughout the country, has become a Contract Partner of FCI (not yet a fully recognized member, but it is granted the right to hold International CACIB Shows and its National Ch title is acknowledged in all FCI countries) and has arrived to a point where its dog shows attract exhibitors from Europe and the United States as well. The club often organizes handling seminars to help exhibitors improve their skills and embraces breed clubs of the most thriving breeds of the country. The heart and soul of all this are EKF President, Mohamed El Azhary and his handful but ever dedicated team. The key to Mohamed’s success has been his grasp of the big picture: his appreciation of the Western dog sport and its culture together with recognition of the importance of overall knowledge of dogdom. This is supported by strong foreign relations allowing the Egyptian Kennel Federation to build on a solid base and to gain international acknowledgment. Mohamed is a frequent visitor at major FCI events and has done a remarkable job promoting his club with stands at FCI World and European Shows. Last year, for the first time, Egypt sent its representative to the Split4Summer Show to win the right to compete at the Eukanuba World Challenge at Crufts this year. The Red Sea Winner Shows (Golf City Club, Heliopolis, Cairo) were undoubtedly a highlight of the country’s show scene. An International and a National AllBreed Show were held the same day. People’s curiosity towards dogs is fascinating, if sometimes imprudent, though. Anyone who thinks true dog lovers of this country cannot come out of this cultural revolution victorious doesn’t appreciate how utterly they’ve already changed things thus far. “It’s like driving a car at night - you never see further than your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way” - writes American novelist E. L. Doctorow.


CAC show • Best in Show Baby, judged by Mr. Espen Engh from Norway

CACIB show • Best in Show Baby, judged by Mrs. Lisbeth Mach from Switzerland

CAC show • Best in Show Puppy, judged by Mr. Espen Engh from Norway

CACIB show • Best in Show Puppy, judged by Mrs. Lisbeth Mach from Switzerland


CAC show • Junior Best in Show, judged by Mrs. Lisbeth Mach from Switzerland

CACIB show • Best in Show Junior, judged by Mr. Espen Engh from Norway

Best in Show under Espen Engh (Jet’s) from Norway at the Red Sea Winner International was the Central Asian Shepherd Dog, Assad, bred and owned by Ahmed Hassib Mohamed in Egypt. Previously, ‘Assad’ was successfully shown at the World Dog Show in Moscow last year and won Supreme Best in Show at the Red Sea Winner Shows.

Best in Show under Lisbeth Mach from Switzerland at the Red Sea Winner National Show was the White Swiss Shepherd male, Ch Hallo Devil Junior Du Domine De La Patte Blanche, owned and bred by Aemmer Yves & Laurence in France.



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2016 in the UK Text & photos by Anna Szabo As one year ends, and a new one begins, we look back over the past 12 months to bring you some of the highlights of British dogdom, honouring the individuals and events that deserve wider recognition and attention for their outstanding achievements and their importance in 2016. In February, the Kennel Club (London) announced that it would grant CC’s in all breeds to an

additional six championship shows, starting in 2019 for a three-year-long trial period. The existing championship show societies were invited to apply for ‘allbreed status’ and the following six were given CC’s to all eligible breeds: Manchester, Bath, Windsor, Leeds, Darlington and the Ladies’ Kennel Association, adding around 260 extra sets of CC’s to the total of 3500 sets of CC’s across the 163 breeds that

The Standard Poodle, BIS BISS Am.Uk.Ch. Afterglow Tyrone Power, owned by John Shaw from Hong Kong and Maud Nilsson from Norway and bred by Michael Gadsby, Jason Lynn and Sara & John Stone has had a fantastic craeer in the show ring, piloted to his wins by his immaculate handler and co-breeder Jason Lynn. ‘Jason’ won Best in Show at Welsh Kennel Club championship show under Swedish judge Göran Bodegård and Reserve Best in Show at City of Birmingham under Andrew Brace. He is pictured here by Anna Szabo after his Utility Group win at South Wales championship show.

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the Kennel Club acknowledges as breeds eligible for tickets. Breed club show CC’s have not been affected. Whereas Open shows struggle to keep their entries up, championship show entries have dropped yet again, although, not significantly and the average entry at a UK championship show still remains the highest in the world. KC chairman Simone Luxmoore also announced that they were planning to introduce a new training system for judges in 2017. It is not yet decided yet, though, what changes they will adopt in order to improve the training scheme. For the first time, Jack Russell Terriers had classes at a UK championship show. Liz Cartledge had the honour of sorting through an incredible entry of 47 exhibits at National Terrier. The BOB winner came from Italy, whereas BOS was a female from Sweden.

The highlight of the year for the Kennel Club was most certainly moving to its new headquarters at Clarges Street 10, just a stone’s throw from Buckingham Palace. It was Princess Anne, representing the Club’s Patron, Her Majesty The Queen, who officially opened the KC’s new offices. Later in the year, Chairman of the Eukanuba World Challenge, Jose Luis Ibanez made an announcement that the 10th edition of the EWC was going to be held at Crufts 2017. The opening ceremony and semi-finals will take place in the Arena on the Hound day (Thursday) at 17:30, before the terrier and hound groups. Then, the final will take place the same place and time on the Friday, before the utility and toy groups - leaving me in doubts as to just how fair it is to expose the representatives belonging to these four group to such overly tight schedule: should

The UK’s Top Dog All Breeds is the Whippet female, Ch Nothing Compares to you at Crosscop, owned by Leigh Morris, George Waddell and Charley Donaldson of the Crosscop kennel and is handled by Charley who is believed to be the youngest handler of an all-breed Top Dog and handler of a BIS placer at Crufts (19 in March last year). A remarkable achievement, considering the extremely high competition a Whippet has to face on breed level. Hazel’s career kicked off with her Reserve Best in Show win at Crufts, followed by a Best in Show win at the Hound Association of Scotland and at WELKS.

Barely after his arrival in the UK, the Australian-bred English Springer Spaniel, Aus.Sup.Ch. Sandicam The Look of Love finished his English champion title at South Wales championship show and sweetened his win by going all the way to Best in Show under Robin Newhouse. He is handled by the very capable, Ed Casey, who also owns him together with his breeder, Cam Cavallo from Australia, where he had previously won 10 all-breed best in show awards. He is Top English Springer of the UK 2016. Photo Anna Szabo

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Best in Show at Ladies’ Kennel Association and Blackpool championship shows was the Papillon male, Ch Rozamie Dream Lover owned by Joe Magri and Kevin Arrowsmith. He is pictured here winning BIS at LKA under the Netherlands’ Hans van den Berg, from an entry well over 10000 dogs.

At National Gundog, Frank Kane awarded Best in Show to the hugely successful Pointer bitch, Sh Ch Sharnphilly Juici Cuture, owned by Sam and Sharron Dyer. She is the breed’s CC record holder and was Top Gundog of the UK in 2015. Photo Anna Szabo

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their owners want to show them in the breed judging on their respective day, they will barely make it to the EWC in the Arena. Never mind representatives who might even win their breeds - right after the Challenge , they will have to go back again into the Arena to compete in the group. Sounds quite chaotic and not well-thought through to me! 2016 was a memorable year for the younger generation of the sport: several young individuals accomplished an incredible feat of winning in the show ring and continue to do so. Charley Donaldson, owner/handler of the hugely successful Whippet bitch, the UK’s TOP DOG ALL BREEDS 2016, Ch Nothing Compares to You at Crosscop, is probably the youngest handler ever to place in Crufts Best in Show. She was 19 last year when she and ‘Hazel’ won Reserve Best in Show at Crufts. In tight race till the end with the Bulldog, Ch Sealaville He’s Tyler, owned by Paul and Hayley Seal, as to who was to win the Top Dog trophy was all down to their winnings at the LKA, the last championship show of the year. I feel truly grateful for having been able to witness Charley and Hazel receiving that all-deciding CC… The ringside was fully packed with curious spectators, the atmosphere pervaded with excitement, and as the breed judge handed the CC card over to Charley, she broke out in tears. It was such touching moment that they made some of us sitting ringside cry as well - including myself. The owner-handler of a full sister of Hazel, April Showers at Crosscop is even younger than Charley. 15-year-old James Winkley-Balmer has piloted ‘April’ to numerous wins, including two CCs and Best in Show at Southern Counties championship show. Since the war, it happened only once that two full sisters won all-breeds championship best in show awards. ‘Hazel’ did so at WELKS.


A truly historical win: the Bracco Italiano, bred in Italy and owned by Orsolya Nagy-Kovencz in Hungary, Uk.Rom.Serb.Ch. Polcavera’s Ercole won the breed’s first Best in Show at a UK championship show. ‘Peti’ has been living in the UK since last year January with his handler Nicola Maddox and won his Best in Show at Bournemouth under Espen Engh from Norway. He quickly added a Reserve Best in Show at Welsh Kennel Club under Swedish judge Göran Bodegård. Photo Anna Szabo

Best in Show at Southern Counties championship show was the elder of sister of the UK’s Top Dog All Breeds 2016, April Showers at Crosscop, currently on two CCs, owned and handled by the 15-year-old James Winkley-Balmer, who is a nominee for the Pawscars Junior Handler of the Year 2017. The judge was Karina Le Mare. Photo Anna Szabo

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FCI 1, JUDGED BY MARION CAMPBELL (IRL) SHAGGY BLUE BOBS UMBERTA @BLUE ZOTTELS Old English Sheepdog, Ow. A. Semmelroth

VENUS DALIDO Briard, Ow. D. Kellovska

GALAK DIDGERIDINGO Australian Cattle Dog, Ow. Gemma Zuccato

FCI 2, JUDGED BY JORGEN HINDSE (DEN) URSINUS VELUTUS ZESTY GUY Newfoundland, Ow. Oton Fantur

DAMMI UN DADO DEL SACRO FIUME Bernese Mountain Dog, Ow. Valeria Sozzi

URAGAN BOSS-TOR Tornjak, Ow. Darko Kelemenic

FCI 3, JUDGED BY LISBETH CAMPBELL (NOR) STAFF EDITION ANUK Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Ow. Marcel Brehme

AMOR VOM JAUNGRABER Lakeland Terrier, Ow. Schoneberg & Horky

TUSCAN RED FONTALLORO Irish Terrier, Ow. Anne Tureen


FCI 4, JUDGED BY KARL ERIK JOHANSON (SWE) NO MARIO NO DI TURBOLAND Dachshund Standard Size Smooth H., Ow. C. Cecconi

LUX DEL PALATINO OCEAN DEEP Dachshund Standard Wire H., Ow. A. Saletti

KINGLORD EAGER BOY Dachshund Miniature Wire H., Ow. V. Barcella

FCI 5, JUDGED BY ORIETA ZILLI (IT) SWEEPER DEL BIAGIO Alaskian Malamute, Ow. G. Biagiotti

THAI SILK MISTER LOUIS VUITTON Pomeranian, Ow. E. Holtappels & Baerts

YUU-SAIKI V.D EGMATO Shikoku, Ow. G. Hesselmans

FCI 6, JUDGED BY REFET HADZIC (BIH) BLACK MAJESTY HOLLYWOOD PBGV, Ow. I. Raic, Wallis & Marshall

DALMINO VOODOO VISION Dalmatian, Ow. Halper Drazic Z. & M.

FONTEPOSCAS DOWN UNDER Beagle, Ow. Michaela Maurer


FCI 7, JUDGED BY JANA JANEK (SK) WEIMPOINT NO STRINGS ATTACHED

English Pointer, Ow. Kristina Pilatus

GARDEN STARS IRISH UNIQUE Irish Red Setter, Ow. Tatjana Schulz

FAIRRAY UNOBTAINABLE UTOPIA English Setter, Ow. Hans Sleegers

FCI 8, JUDGED BY UMIT ÖZKANAL (TUR) VERY VIGIE HULUBERLULU American Cocker Spaniel, Ow. Vartiainen S.

SNOOPYS GANG ELEMENT OF SURPRISE Labrador Retriever, Ow. Kaca Kacian

BIG BOOMS JOKER DONKEY Clumber Spaniel, Ow. Lana Levai

FCI 9, JUDGED BY CHRISTIAN JOUANCHICOT (FRA) DILEMMA CAVALLI JUST CAVALLI Lhasa Apso, Ow. B. Kamps & N. Smolic

MICROSCHIHUAS IMPERATOR Chihuahua Long Coated, Ow. D. Paunovic

ROYAL CURAZH TINKER BELL Bichon Frise, Ow. Ida Meresse


FCI 10, JUDGED BY GRZEGORZ WERON (POL) CH WHITE INFNITY’S DOLL ME UP Afghan Hound, Ow. Bakos Csilla

TOMMY DEI MANGIALUPI Irish Wolfhound, Ow. Alex Riva

NOVATICA EIRWEN OF EDEN Italian Greyhound, Ow. Monika Nowak

JUNIOR BEST IN SHOW, JUDGED BY IUZA BERADZE ( CZE) TUSCAN RED FONTALLORO Irish Terrier, Ow. Anne Tureen

HIGHLANDER’S HUNGARIAN CHRISTMAS Siberian Husky, Ow. Gabriella Hollo

CHERRY BOMB OF WOLF POINT American Akita, Ow. Zsolt Urban

BEST IN SHOW, JUDGED BY ORIETTA ZILLI (ITA) DILEMMA CAVALLI JUST CAVALLI Lhasa Apso, Ow. B. Kamps & N. Smolic

SWEEPER DEL BIAGIO Alaskian Malamute, Ow. G. Biagiotti

NO MARIO NO DI TURBOLAND Dachshund Standard Size Smooth H., Ow. C. Cecconi


FCI 1, JUDGED BY DAVOR JAVOR (HR) BUBBLETON FEEL THE SPIRIT Puli, Ow. Jesper Ravn

BOTTOM SHAKER ZEPHYR DREAM Bobtail, Ow. Jozef Koroknai

AIRPLANE’S LET ME CRY FOR YOU LANCE Australian Shepherd Dog, Ow. Jerca Pokorn

FCI 2, JUDGED BY IGOR MIOC (HR) TAJINASTES PERLA NEGRA Min. Schnauzer Black, Ow. Osvaldo Piuzzi

MATTIA DE DON ELOY Dogo Argentino, Ow.. Albino Bagnoli

ANGEL’S PHOENIX THE DEVIL’S ADVOCATE Bullmastiff, Ow. Francesca Pavesi

FCI 3, JUDGED BY AUGUSTIN IONESCU (ROM) AMOR VOM JAUNGRABER Lakeland Terrier, Ow. Schoeneberg/Horky-Hass

MONALINE LORI LEE Welsh Terrier, Ow. Vladimir Bilobrk

PATON KING OF RINGS American Staff. Terrier, Ow. Tibay Norbert


FCI 4, JUDGED BY LISBETH CAMPBELL (NOR) MY PASCAL MARSELIO KOMPANIJA Dachund Standard Smooth, Ow. K. Kazlauskaite

KINGLORD EAGER BOY Dachshund Miniature Wire, Ow. V. Barcell

MALEFICENT DEGLI ARISTOBASSI Dachshund Miniature Smooth H., Ow. A. Belli

FCI 5, JUDGED BY IUZDA BERADZE (CZE) YUU-SAIKI V.D EGMATO Shikoku, Ow. Gianne Hesselmans

STARLIGHT EXPRESS DEL BIAGIO Alaskan Malamute, Ow. Giuseppe Biagiotti

MINDA QUANTUM THE RANSOM OF REDCHIEF Am. Akita, Ow. Hellman/Hamblet/Walker/Francee

FCI 6, JUDGED BY MARIJAN CIZMESIJA (HR) LACRIMA CHRISTI CREME DE LA CREME Dalmatian, Ow. Anita & Zeljko Radic

RAYRIDGE DAYO CAMARIYA Rhodesian Ridgeback, Ow. Valeria Iurtaeva

NANI OD MALINSKIH VINKOVICA Istrian Short Haired Hound, Ow. Zrinko Balder


FCI 7, JUDGED BY RUI OLIVEIRA (POR) LOVEFINDER LOGAN RAVANDLIL English Setter, Ow. Pavol Bocskoras

WEIMPOINT NO STRINGS ATTACHED English Pointer, Ow. Kristina Pilatus

GARDEN STARS IRISH UNIQUE Irish Red Setter, Ow. Tatjana Schulz

FCI 8, JUDGED BY GRZEGORZ WERON (POL) BIG BOOMS BANDITOS DEX Clumber Spaniel, Ow. Levai L.

CANINA AQUA BORN AS A STAR Spanish Waterdog, Ow. Marta Mrduljas

SOULCHARISMA TRULY BLESSED Golden Retriver, Ow. Toni Gligor

FCI 9, JUDGED BY INGA SILL (EST) ARCHIMEDE DELLE MURACHE Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Ow. L. Favaron

MICROSCHIHUAS IMPERATOR Chihuahua, Long Haired, Ow. Dusan Paunovic

JASENAK BACK TO THE FUTURE, Medium Poodle Black, Ow. Dragana Vasiljevic


FCI 10, JUDGED BY LUDMILA FINTOROVA (SVK) BARAKAH ZAIM MIN SZITAR AL-FIDDA Afghan Hound, Ow. Emanuel Pop

SOBERS POMELIA Whippet, Ow. Deborah Einberger

LILY ROSE RAZ DEGAN Saluki, Ow. Anna Giavaldi

JUNIOR BEST IN SHOW, JUDGED BY GUNTER EHRENREICH (AUT) Y’ GRECQUE-N DI MONTE GENTILE Miniature Schnauzer Black, Ow. O. Piuzzi

GENTLE STAR ABOUT A DREAM Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Ow. B. Cukic

PATRIOT IZ RUSSKOI DINASTII Black Russian Terrier, Ow. Pavol Bocskoras

BEST IN SHOW, JUDGED BY RUI OLIVEIRA (POR) BUBBLETON FEEL THE SPIRIT Puli, Ow. Jesper Ravn

AMOR VOM JAUNGRABER Lakeland Terrier, Ow. Schoeneberg/Horky-Hass

YUU-SAIKI V.D EGMATO Shikoku, Ow. Gianne Hesselmans
















Golden Collar Russian Dog Show Scene Written by Dog Review Magazine

Russian pop and movie stars came to congratulate Best of the best, Champions of international dog shows and sport competitions on last Saturday of the outgoing year. For the first time in more than 10-year history of the GOLDEN COLLAR Show of Champions, Event format became a symbiosis of dog shows and a show with pop, film and television star performances. This year, show format significantly changed. Not all dogs who become the best representatives of their breed entered the main ring. They had to go through another qualifying round in their groups, leaving only 30 dogs, 3 best representatives from each group. Guests followed the program of the main ring, which, in addition to traditional dog activities included presentations by the finalists of musical projects such as The Voice Russia, and A Factor and Big Stage of past years: Angelina Frolova, Alexander Bykov, Uliana Sineckoj and Samvel Vardanyan, accompanied the “Russian Style� Orchestra under Dmitry Kalinin.

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The main heroes of the ring were of course dogs and their owners. Opening the program were performances by three lovely young ladies, winners of Junior Handling competition: Elizaveta Pestova, 15 years, Kirov (bronze winner); Anastasia Dedkova, 15 years old (silver prize); Anna Goriounova, 12 years old (winner); who received praise not only from main ring host Kirill Nabutov, but also from the judge of the Young handlers contest Ina Begma and Alexander Inshakov, President of RKF. Next, were the participant of the costume contest that included children and adults with pure and mixed breed partners. Contestants were united by their love of creativity, taste and style. Competition was evaluated by a whole panel of judges, headed by renowned fashion photographer Olga Zinovskaya with help from designers Alisa Tolkacheva and Natalia Dushegreja, as well as actresses Irina Lachina, Julia Romashina and ballerina Anna Tikhomirova.


The judges had to deliberate a long time before they called the winners: 3rd place winner -”Pirate Party”, presented by French Bulldog NICOLET FROM KURGAN CASTLE and owner Tatyana Matrunich. 2nd place winner -”Aphrodite and the Golden Fleece”, presented by longhair Collie DALE DREAM MY PRESENT FOR NEW NAMES and owner Elena Kazeeva. 1st place winner-”Queen of Chess”, presented by а Yorkshire Terrier GLAMOUR TOY TERESSA and owner Margaret Koznjasheva. Winners received prizes and gifts from contest sponsor, AFINA. The jury, however, decided to award 2 more costumes, honorable mentions went to: “Rudolph and the Christmas tree” by German Boxer ARDANTES IMPERIAL and owner Natalia Beznosikova and “Snowflake” by Yorkshire Terrier FENYA with young owner Ekaterina Moroz. After completion of exterior rings, a second drawing was held. As a result, the rings were divided for the quarterfinals, as well as the judges, who were to carry out the selection of the finalists, which proved daunting, picking three dogs from each group of

champions. The hardest was the second group, which had so many dogs that they had to be split into several subgroups. Finally, all 30 finalists were named to go to the main ring. But before starting the final round, the main hosted the award ceremony for the most titled dogs - winners of “Top Dog” and “Top breeder.” This year, it was decided to recognize not only 2016 winners but also 2015. The audience greeted them with thunderous applause. Final task of the main ring was the choice of Best in Show. Three runners instead of the usual two complicated the work of judges, but made a last tour even more exciting. Six finalists of Golden Collar-2016: Bearded Collie, Welsh Corgi, Bracco Italiano , Italian Greyhound, Black Toy Poodle, and Miniature Pinscher were closely examined by the judges left their booths to get acquainted with the dogs. Each judge then cast their vote by writing the breed of the dog that they believed to be the winner of the show and dropped their votes into the ballot box. For the final vote count, judges invited two spectators. Another surprise was waiting for the guests, a performance by Larisa Dolina. After a short concert, presenters showed audience top awards: gold and silver medallions and jewelry awards “People’s Choice Award” and “Award of the President of RKF” provided by DiJewellery. By the way, for the first time the audience was given the opportunity to vote for their favorite dog. The sympathies of the majority went to one of the finalists in the “Top Dog” 2016 - Leonberger AMICUS OPTIMUS VITALIS, ow. Anna Mikhalev (St. Petersburg). In turn, Alexander Ivanovich gave his prize to an Italian Greyhound , ow. Peter Rodichev (St. Petersburg). However, majority of judges voted for Toy Poodle EVAK’S WATERMARK, ow. Anna Stepkina and Natalia Mankova. In addition to the title of “Best Dog 2016”, the winner got golden decoration, and his owners received a car, Lada Largus, provided by the Champions show sponsor, ProPlan. Reserve winner and recipient of silver decoration was the Bracco italiano RUS DE’VIARO BLANCA, ow. Irina Tikhomirova.

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THE WINNERS OF THE COSTUME CONTEST: 1st place winner -”Queen of Chess”, presented by Yorkshire Terrier GLAMOUR TOY TERESSA and owner Margaret Koznjasheva. 2nd place winner -”Aphrodite and the Golden Fleece”, presented by longhair Collie DALE DREAM MY PRESENT FOR NEW NAMES and owner Elena Kazeeva. 3rd place winner -”Pirate Party”, presented by French Bulldog NICOLET IZ KURGAN GRADA and owner Tatyana Matrunich. The jury, however, decided to award 2 more costumes, honorable mentions went to: “Rudolph and the Christmas tree” by German Boxer ARDANTES IMPERIAL and owner Natalia Beznosikova and “Snowflake” by Yorkshire Terrier FENYA with young owner Ekaterina Moroz.

TOP BREEDER OF THE YEAR 2016 #1 DREAMKISS, Miniature Schnauzers Owned by Tatiana Kaptsova #2 FORMULA USPEHA, Dachshunds Owned by Irina Khapaeva #3 GOLDINALENA, Dogo Argentinos Owned by Yelena Goldina #4 L’END SHOW, Bedlington Terriers Owned by Elena Pyhtar

PEOPLE CHOICE AWARD #1 AMICUS OPTIMUS VITALIS, Leonberger Owned by Anna Mikhalev

JUNIOR HANDLING WINNERS: 1st place: Anna Goryunova 2nd place: Anastasia Dedkova 3rd place: Elizaveta Pestova

TOP DOG OF THE YEAR 2016 #1 GOLDINALENA LEYLAND, Dogo Argentino Owned by Kirill Drozdov

PRIZE OF THE RKF PRESIDENT #1 Italian Greyhound Owned by Peter Rodichev

SILVER COLLAR #1 RUS DE’VIARO BLANCA, Bracco Italiano Owned by Irina Tikhomirova

#2 RUS DE`VIARO BLANCA, Bracco Italiano Owned by Irina Tikhomirova #3 AMAL SALANG COEUR D`COEURS, Afghah HoundOwned by Kirill Drozdov, Moscow

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GOLDEN COLLAR #1 EVAK’S WATERMARK, Toy Poodle Black Owned by Anna and Natalia Stepkina Mankova


Best in Show Magazine