Best in Show Magazine USA • June 2021

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WE ARE Best in Show

Here we are, ready for THE show of the year - Westminster.

Everyone will surely miss the show being held at the amazing Madison Square Garden. Many are looking forward to the venue being held at the beautiful and historic Lyndhurst estate, and all are excited to attend. While most of you are packing suitcases and getting ready for New York, we are working hard to bring you the June edition of Best in Show Magazine with plenty of interesting articles and beautifully designed advertisements. In this edition you will be able to read a wealth of informative and entertaining stories, articles, and interviews including an interview with Laura King, handler of many top dogs and currently number one dog all breeds - Striker the Samoyed who is also our beautiful cover model; Two Icons - Chicago International by M. Marshall; Ringside Click of Orange Empire shows; Crowned 100 - JR the Bichon Frise by M. Marshall; Living Legends - James Moses by A. Tureen and M. Marshall; Meet the Breeds: Labrador and Golden Retrievers; Interview with Junior Handler Lily Bennett and for all of you heading to New York - Travel Tips! We wish you and amazing journey! Until our August edition —stay safe and have fun!

JOVANA DANILOVIC Chief Editor

CHRISTIAN RANGEL Marketing Director

BISCREATIVE.COM Art Department

MARY MARSHALL, ANNE TUREEN, LEE GROGAN, CARLA IVANCIC Contributing Writers



LAURA KING

TWO ICONS

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CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL

CROWNED 100

JR the BICHON

A LIVING LEGEND

JAMES MOSES

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INTERVIEW WITH HANDLER

RINGSIDE CLICK

ORANGE EMPIRE

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CONTENT

MEET THE BREED LABRADOR RETRIEVER

DICKENDALL Kendall Herr



GALLIVANT F. Negron & T. Flaherty

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MEET THE BREED LABRADOR RETRIEVER

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CONTENT

MEET THE BREED LABRADOR RETRIEVER

BONAVENTURE Tom & Gail Shearer

MEET THE BREED GOLDEN RETRIEVER

SUMMIT

VERDORO

Michael Faulkner

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MEET THE BREED GOLDEN RETRIEVER

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Beth Johnson

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF

ALLISON ALEXANDER

TRAVEL TIPS

NEW YORK



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I N T E RV I E W W I T H H A N D L E R

LAURA King

Thank you for taking the time to do this interview for Best in Show magazine. Please tell us more about your beginnings in the sport? My mother was a Belgian sheep dog breeder when I was born. I learned to walk by hanging on to her foundation bitch Dora. When I was old enough for my own dog, my parents decided that a Belgian would be too big for me, so they acquired a

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Schipperke for me from Dorris Hearing of Landmark

when she called for the Newfoundland I exclaimed,

Kennel.

“Holy s###!“ While we were taking the photo the judge

Who were your mentors when starting out in the sport of dogs and how do you feel about mentoring newcomers?  Without a doubt my mother had the most influence over me. She taught me basic animal husbandry along with animal structure and movement. I can still hear her

gave me some tongue-in-cheek advice, “Young lady, its best not to swear at a judge who is trying to award your dog” - I was horrified!! What made you decide to become a professional handler? What career other than dogs would you pursue?

voice when I see a dog with great timing and carriage.

I have always known that I wanted to be a handler. As

She would always say “it may be hard to explain, but

a young child I would basically “stalk” the successful

you’ll know it when you see it.“

handlers in our area, watching every move they made

I welcome the chance to mentor newcomers. It is often hard to find time at shows to do it, but I really enjoy it when I get the chance.

both in and out of the rings. My parents were having none of it unless I got a four-year degree. So, I did and even worked part way through my Masters’ degree in Exercise Physiology before quitting to begin handling.

Do you remember your first BIS win, and what was the

I could go back and finish that, but I think I would have

breed and name of the dog?

to start over as I remember very little of it.

My first BIS was under Mrs. Anne Rogers Clark. I was

You had some amazing wins and showed some great top

exhibiting a Newfoundland named Ch. Seabrook’s

dogs through years. Please tell us what do you consider

Headmaster Tabu, nicknamed Bud. I was so shocked

highlights of your career so far?

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I have been very fortunate to be able to show some amazing dogs in a variety of breeds, but I think winning the national specialty is truly the most amazing win. I have been lucky enough to win a number of nationals and each is thrilling. I could not single one out, although the 2017 Siberian Husky National was pretty spectacular. As far as all breed shows go being awarded BIS at the Louisville Kennel Club Show with Ch. Chestnut’s Selling the Drama under Mr. Edd Bivin was among the most exciting. Please name three dogs of the past that you admire that are not owned or shown by you. Ch. Nanuke’s Take No Prisoners, Ch. Torum Scarf Michael, and Ch. Lou Gin Kiss Me Kate. I was very young when I saw her but remember her staring down all the dogs in the Best in Show ring at the International Kennel Club, and thought it was the coolest thing I had ever seen. Are you superstitious? Do you have any special habits you apply with your top dogs?  I am very superstitious. Each dog that we have who becomes a top winner has only one lead. No matter the condition of that lead, it will always be attached to that dog in some fashion. I also use a certain table for our top special along with equipment that is only to be used on that dog. I keep the same rubber bands from week-to-week. If one breaks, I replace it with a band from the group ring table. What is your handling philosophy?  As long as the dog is fit and happy, the rest will fall in to place.

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I NT ERVI EW W I T H HANDLER · LAURA K ING

What part of your job do you like the most and what part

had to go into moving the location for such an enormous

the least?

event under such trying circumstances. I look forward

Working with the dogs is by far my favorite part of the

to it, but also to returning to New York City.

sport. They help to keep me grounded. I think that social

What is your greatest concern regarding the sport? If you

media has created a real problem in not only our sport

could, what would you change in the dog show world?

but society. What used to be a fun venue for sharing has turned into a bully pulpit. Obviously it can still be used for good, but can do much damage when it is not. I could do without having ever been introduced to it. What is the funniest thing you have ever experienced at a dog show?  Having an overzealous Newf puppy get into a tug of war with my skirt while I was in it. The skirt lost. Do you have a favorite show?  I really enjoy the shows in Cambridge, Minnesota— great venue, great club.

I am very bothered by our tendency to eat our own. We need to learn to support one another and not judge without all of the facts. Just because someone coducts themselves or their breeding program in a way that you would not doesn’t mean it is wrong. Is there anything in life that you would like to do other than being involved with dogs?  I really wish that I could sing. What advice would you give to young people who aspire to become professional handlers?  Do the work. Find a handler that you admire and ask

What do you think about Lyndhurst as the new venue for

for a job. Learn the ins and outs of the business, not just

Westminster this year?

how to show a dog. The real work happens outside of

I am thrilled that WKC was able to pull this off. I cannot imagine the amount of work and attention to detail that

the ring. If you learn that correctly the rest will fall into place.









CHICAGO Two icons International Kennel Club of Chicago by Mary Marshall Photo courtesy of Bo Bengtson

Chicago, Illinois, also known as the Windy City, is among the largest and most progressive cities in the U.S. with over 2.81 million inhabitants. Famous for its bold architecture the skyline is punctuated by skyscrapers such as the 1,452-ft tall Willis Tower, the John Hancock Centers, and the neo-Gothic Tribune Tower. Chicago has always been a tourist destination and well known for its world-class museums including the Art Institute of Chicago that holds notable impressionist and post-impressionist works of art. Chicago also boasts eight professional sports teams including the Chicago Bears, Cardinals, Cubs, and the White Sox. Chicago is also home to the prestigious International Kennel Club of Chicago dog show. Chicago, situated on the shores of freshwater Lake Michigan, became incorporated as city in 1837. The settlement was located near a portage between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi watershed, and grew to a large port city by the mid-19th century. The Chicago Fire of 1871 destroyed several square miles of the city and left over

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100,000 inhabitants without homes. The construction boom accelerated population growth, and by 1900, only 29 years after the fire, Chicago became the fifth largest city in the world.is well known as an international hub for culture, commerce, industry, education, technology, telecommunications, and transportation. It is the home of O’Hare International Airport which is ranked among the world’s top six busiest airports based on data from the Airports Council International. Chicago also is home

south by Monroe Street. The diverse culture of “Chi Town” includes a wide array of visual arts, literature, film, theatre, comedy, food, and music with a focus on jazz, blues, soul, hip-hop and gospel. The many colleges in Chicago included the University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Chicago, and Northwestern are considered as high research doctoral universities.

to a wide array of Fortune 500 companies including

One of the largest dog shows in the United States takes

Allstate, Boeing, Caterpillar, Kraft Heinz, McDonalds,

place in Chicago in February—the International Kennel

Mondelez International, United Airline Holdings, US

Club of Chicago Dog Show attracts over 200 breeds of

Foods, and Walgreens.

dogs to the competition. The show, formerly one of the

Conde Nast Traveler has ranked Chicago as the best large city to visit for four years in a row (pre pandemic). Outstanding landmarks to visit include Millennium Park, Navy Pier, the Magnificent Mile, the Art Institute of Chicago, Museum Campus, Willis (Sears) Tower, Grant Park, Lincoln Park Zoo and the Museum of Science and Industry. The Barack Obama Presidential center was built on the south side of Hyde Park. The Bean (a sculpture officially known as Cloud Gate) is quickly on its way to becoming Chicago’s most recognizable icon. It is located on the east side of downtown, bordered on the west by Michigan Avenue, on the east by Columbus Drive, on the north by Randolph Street, and on the

last remaining benched shows in the country, is one of the highlights of the year and draws over 100,000 spectators, dog lovers, breeders, and handlers from all over the country. Not only does the show feature the prestigious all-breed conformation classes but hosts a Purina Canine Pro Plan Performance Team, dancers, agility demonstration and competition, police K9 Unit demonstration, rally, and obedience. There is something for every dog lover to enjoy or participate in or enjoy including over 100 booth exhibitors offering a wide-array of dog-related products from artwork to dog collars and everything in between. “Having a benched show is a wonderful way for


C HI C A GO • TWO ICONS

spectators to find breeds and talk to breeders,” said Lou Auslander, the Club’s former president in an earlier interview prior to his death in 2019. “We view benching as a chance to educate the general public about our wonderful breeds of dogs.”

clusters when dogs and people are tired. Auslander countered this by changing the show’s date from the end of March to the end of February and gradually the weekend began returning as a major highlight of the show circuit. When Auslander and the

Auslander eventually became an all-breed judge and

late Dorothy Donnelly took over the show in 1983. It was

judged best in show events throughout the world,

moved to McCormick Place, located on the lakefront.

including the 1987 BIS at Westminster. He was not only

Auslander said he wanted the show to become more

an advocate for new events and pedigreed dogs, but for

than a beauty contest.

all dogs, and invited shelters to participate in the dog shows including the IKC. The Meet the Breed booth which has been held at the show for several years has offered spectators a chance to become introduced to specific breeds, breeders, and handlers throughout the country. “I had always admired the Brittany Spaniel but had never had my hands on one,” said Margaret Turpin, now a breeder of world-class spaniels. “The Meet the Breed booth at the IKC show was a great introduction that allowed me to connect with a mentor who got me on the right path with my Brittany Spaniels—in the show ring and in the field.” The show is held for three days at McCormick Place convention center, just minutes away from dog friendly hotels and dining in downtown Chicago. The Park Shore Kennel Club show, held on Thursday, and Blackhawk Kennel Club show on Friday

“Let’s face it,” Auslander said “Watching conformation for hours at a time is like watching paint dry. I want the show to be family friendly, fun to be at.” Auslander was among the first to invite participants to a new competition at the IKC show called agility and included Frisbee disc demos to the dog show. In recent years, prior to the pandemic, there have had over 3000 entries at the shows which draws top dogs from across the United States and Canada to compete for many prizes and the coveted Group and Best In Show wins. The IKC has been promoting purebred dogs with world-class competition for over 50 years. The show was previously held at the International Amphitheatre prior to its closure in 1982 when it was eventually moved to the convention center McCormick Place. Chicago may have hosted the nation’s first dog show in 1874 sponsored by the Illinois Sportsmen’s Association

The IKC is a successor to the old Chicago Kennel Club,

that included a wide array of setters and pointers with

which was founded in 1900. It had long been considered

names like Nelly, Frank, Bob, and Joe. The names have

as one of the premier shows in America but became a

changed, the location, dogs, and breeders, but one thing

victim in the 1980’s of the other clubs holding shows

that remains the same in the Windy City is a continued

on the same weekend and falling at the end of major

love for beautiful dogs and dog shows.

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photo 1 • BIS International KC of Chicago 1970, Lakeland Terrier Ch. Special Edition, handled by Peter Green, owned by Mr. & Mrs. James A. Farrell, Jr. photo 2 • BIS International KC of Chicago 1956, Boxer Ch. Barrage of Quality Hill, owned by Mr. & Mrs. Jouett Shouse. photo 3 • The International Amphitheatre, long home to the International Kennel Club of Chicago dog show. It opened in 1934 and demolished in 1999. photo 4 • BIS International KC of Chicago 1967, English Springer Spaniel Ch. Salilyn’s Aristocrat, owned by Mrs. F. H. Gasow. photo 5 • Cover of the 1974 catalogue.




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ORANGE EMPIRE DOG CLUB Valley Center, California May 22nd - 23rd, 2021

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O RA NGE EMPIRE DOG CLUB

Satuday • May 22nd, 2021 - BEST IN SHOW WINNER GCH SIMPATICO JOURNEY OF THRILLS Breeder: Jennifer Martin Owner: Bradley Rosenberg and MD & Jo Ann Rosenberg Handler: Keith Pautz - RES. BEST IN SHOW WINNER GCH SABE’S THE SKY’S THE LIMIT Bred by Sharon Saberton and Carla Sanchez Owned by Carla Sanchez and Megan & Sharon Saberton Handled by Susie and Jorge Olivera

Sunday • May 23rd, 2021 - BEST IN SHOW WINNER ALTMARK A SLICE OF HEAVEN Breeder: Robyn Campbell Owner: Sandra Hsieh and Pam Laperruque Handler: Pam Lapperruque - RES. BEST IN SHOW WINNER GCH MEADOWLAKE HIGH TIMES Bred by Karen Fitzpatrick, S. & H. Sorensen Owned by Karen and David Fitzpatrick Handled by Simon Simaan

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O RA NGE EMPIRE DOG CLUB

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Crowned 100

J.R. T H E

B I C H ON

by Mary Marshall

Ch. Special Times Just Right! fondly known as J.R., made Bichon Frise breed history by winning Best in Show at the 125th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on February 12, 2001. The then three-year-old J.R., weighing in at a mere 15 pounds, wowed the crowds and impressed judge Dorothy McDonald with his sparkling charisma, charm and overall perfection to be named the top dog in a ring full of spectacular group champions. It was the crowning glory for a wonderful partnership between J.R. and his handler Scott Sommer after entering the ring as the top ranked dog of breed in the country in 2001.


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C RO W NED 100 · J.R., THE BICHON

standard for temperament which states: ‘’A cheerful attitude is the hallmark of the breed and one should settle for nothing less.” Following the BIS win at Westminster, it was announced that J.R. would be retired. At the time J.R. had accumulated 98 BIS victories. When asked by a New York Times reporter what would be in store for J.R. after retirement Sommer said, “He gets anything he wants. Around the house, we do what J. R. wants to do. We cater to him and he wants to please us any time he can.’’ According to the New York Times Macdonald said that J.R. was ‘’an absolute mirror of his breed’s standard. He When the win was announced the plucky J.R. raced

just epitomized what’s correct in the breed. He was as

merrily in circles and was joyfully scooped into the

close to perfection as you can get. His personality, his

arms of Sommer. J.R. began his signature paw wave to

coat, his head, the very way he moved. I loved all seven

the hordes of photographers and television cameras

dogs. They were excellent. But the other six were all

on hand for the victory which spurred on his gesture

second.”

that forever symbolized a dog’s joy for a job well done.

Among the other “six” were the prior BIS winning

‘’That’s just one of the things he liked to do,’’ Sommer

Kerry Blue Terrier Ch. Torum’s Scarf Michael and the

said. ‘’When he was happy, which was most of the

two-time Toy Group winning Shih Tzu Ch. Charing

time, he would do that. It was just part of his obvious

Cross Ragtime Cowboy.

charm.”

“That was an incredible moment,” said Sommer. “It

J.R. not only made breed history but became one

was a little nerve wracking being up against Mick (Ch.

of the most well-known charismatic ambassadors

Torum’s Scarf Michael) but J.R.’s win was spectacular.”

for purebred dogs and dog shows throughout the country. His comical leap into the winning sterling bowl captivated millions of dog lovers throughout the world. The amazing J.R. broke records and earned a niche in Bichon Frise history for his breeder, owner,

J.R.’s fantastic voyage could have easily been another dog’s tale had it not been for his human family whose contributions played an integral role in his rise to fame.

and handler that captivated a nation and introduced

J.R.’s breeder was Eleanor McDonald, who worked at an

them to the breed. The charming attitude was his

advertising agency in Scarsdale, New York. McDonald

most distinguishing characteristic and fit the breed

acquired her first Bichon in 1992 from breeder Mimi

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C RO W NED 100 · J.R., THE BICHON

Winkler who recalled that she (McDonald), “wanted

of age, and his initial Award of Merit under judge Jane

something else in life. She wanted a dog who could

Forsyth. He captivated judge Frank Sabella and won the

become her child.”

BFCA Nationals in Long Beach, California. By the end of

McDonald began breeding dogs in 1993 and fell in love with the Bichon breed. She had many successful homebred Bichons but decided that she needed a top-drawer male to her kennel. She acquired a male from Brazil named Dream Came True’s Oliver and introduced him to Special Times Temptation (Candy),

2000, J.R. had won 73 BIS, 149 group wins, and a group second at Westminster, and was named the number one dog in the country in 2000 and the top winning non-sporting dog of all time. Within 14 months leading up to his entrance into the ring at Westminster in 2001 the spunky Bichon had accumulated 98 BIS wins.

a bitch that she already owned. The two became

Sommer reflected on the qualities that made J.R. a star

champions and ultimately were bred with great hopes

in and out of the show ring.

for a spectacular litter from this special pairing.

“He had charisma, charm, buoyant energy and was

Candy whelped on November 12, 1997 and to

an over-the-top dog,” said Sommer, reminiscing.

McDonald’s surprise only produced one little whisp of

“He loved everyone, and was so full of happiness,

a Bichon—a singleton who would eventually be named

joy, and exuberance. He was just a great dog in every

Special Times Just Right!. J.R.’s registered name was

way—perfection. J.R. had great eyes, a big black

taken from a children’s charitable organization in

nose, stunning black pigment, a fantastic coat, and

South Carolina called “Happy Days and Special Times.”

just floated around. He was the epitome of what the

The second part of his name was added after McDonald

breed should be in every way. He was physically an

figured he was “just right” after watching him prance

equilateral triangle which is exactly how the breed

around her home as a puppy.

should appear.”

It was obvious from the start that J.R. was something

J.R., like so many celebrated sports stars, got

special. At the tender age of six months of age he

accustomed to winning according to Sommer.

started his show career. Due to the mounting expense of a dog showing campaign, J.R.’s first handler, Flavio Werneck became a part-owner as did Cecilia Ruggles, the owner of High Ridge Kennels in Ridgefield, Connecticut, and had prior experience showing Bichons. However, McDonald enjoyed flying with J.R.

“He would get really wound up with all that tremendous energy,” he said. “He would anticipate winning and start whirling around before the win was even announced. I worked with him in and outside of the ring and taught him how to quiet down.”

to dog shows and had him tucked safely in a traveling

J.R., like every dog, champion or not, pulled certain

bag for the journey.

little tricks that might or might not endear him to the

J.R. was a hit from the moment he stepped into the ring. He won his first national specialty at six months

receiver of the prank. “We were staying in a hotel at a dog show, and I

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12, 2001 with Ms. Dorothy D. Nickles officiating. “That was a show to remember,” said Sommers. “It was the first AKC Kennel Club Show (in Orlando) and J.R.’s 101st Best in Show victory. What a great way to close a great career with 101 BIS awards!” In a sad twist of fate neither McDonald nor Werneck would live to see J.R. win his 101st BIS. McDonald died unexpectedly from a stroke at the age of 66 in October 2001, and his former handler Werneck, was killed in a car accident in Brazil coming home from a dog show. figured J.R. would be just fine loose in the room when I went out for a brief dinner,” said Sommer. “Boy, was I wrong. I came back to the room and discovered that J.R. had chewed up my wallet with all the money in it. I had to call Eleanor and ask her to wire me some money, because every dollar I had was in that gnawed up wallet.”

Following retirement at Sommer’s Houston, Texas, kennel J.R. went on to promote therapy dog programs and the Canine Health Foundation among several charities. He lived a long and charmed life with a bevy of delightful dog companions that included the 2009 Westminster Best in Show winner Ch. Clussexx Three D Grinchy Glee, better known as Stump the Sussex

Following the celebration of his win at Westminster

Spaniel. Stump, like J.R., was the first of his breed to

it was decided that J.R. would retire and live with

win the honor and at 10 years of age the oldest dog to

Sommer as a pampered house dog. Well, that didn’t

ever accomplish the feat.

last long.

“Stump and J.R. were the best of buddies,” said

“We just wanted J.R. to be part of the 100 BIS show

Sommer. “They would race around the house together

club,” said Sommer. “He was such a great dog, and

and hang out on the couch. It was a great friendship.

there was no reason not to go for it.”

In fact, J.R. and Stump died a week apart. Stump died

J.R.’s retirement amounted to a refreshening and off he went to accumulate three more BIS titles on his way

on September 12, 2012 and we lost J.R. on September 19 at the age of 15.”

to collecting a record 101 Best in Show titles. On March

J.R.’s record-setting 101 BIS wins was followed by an

31, 2001 he was awarded BIS at the Brazos Valley

impressive career as the sire of over 20 champions in

Kennel Club by Mr. James Reynolds, on June 30 at the

his first two years at stud. He was named the top Bichon

Shoreline Dog Fancier’s Association by Mrs. Michelle

sire for 2002-03. His progeny eventually included over

Billings, and his final appearance in the ring at the first

60 champions, and a legacy that continues through his

AKC Kennel Club Show (now Royal Canin) on December

enduring contribution to the breed for all time.

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Jim L I V I NG L E GE N D

b y Mary Mar s hal l & A n ne T u re e n

JAMES Moses T

wo things count in a great handler

Shepherd to the position of top dog all

or judge: experience, and an eye for

breeds in Canada. While still too young to

a dog. Mr. James Moses, Jim in the

show dogs in the United States (at the time

dog world, has both in excess. His relaxed

professional handlers had to be 21) Moses,

and transparent manner has occasionally

who traveled with his general contractor

raised some eyebrows, but he speaks with

father from state-to-state, amazed tourists

absolute clarity concerning his priorities in

with his German Shepherds as they

dogs.

responded to his hand signals. He eventually

Moses has been hooked on dogs his entire life. His father bought his first German Shepherd as a gift when he was nine years old, and his mother bred miniature poodles. Moses took the Shepherd to an obedience class at the Air Force base close to his home in Niagara Falls, New York, and within time found himself working as a dog trainer.

gained a foothold in the United States and established himself as a successful handler, traveling with show dogs and showing them in the ring. Over the years he has accrued over 1,000 Bests in Show titles in the U.S. and Canada, including the top win at Westminster. He has led dogs of over 50 breeds to their championship titles, but his own breed is the German Shepherd which he

Moses started handling at the age of 13, and

both breeds and handles. Mr. Moses has been

by the age of 19 he had shown his German

an AKC judge since 2011.


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L I V I N G L E G E N D · JAMES MOSES

The Breed Mr. Moses is there a German Shepherd from your breeding which you can consider your greatest achievement?

The American fancier would never agree to the mandatory training titles needed to place highly in the German system. Many of our better breeders have used German import bloodlines in their breeding program

Ch. Kaleef’s Genuine Risk and her dam, Kaleef’s Valle,

to great advantage. This has increased conformation,

ROM. Genuine Risk is in the 100 BIS club and her dam,

movement, type, and versatility.

Valle, is the top producing dam in the history of the breed.

The German Shepherd Association, which is the breed club founded in Germany in 1899 by Max von Stephanitz

While opinion in the USA prefers to remain independent

and his colleague, Arthur Meyer, set the standards of the

of that in the breed’s native country, do you feel there

German Shepherd dog breed. The Germans incorporate

is common ground to be found with the views of the

the SV rating system which can change based on the age

German Shepherd Association (Verein für deutsche

and qualification of the dog, and are received on both

Schäferhunde)?

the local and national level (Sieger show). Awards for beautify are listed before the official name of a dog, and

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A L I VI NG L EGEND · JAMES MOSES

working titles are listed after the dog’s name. What are your favorite attributes of the German Shepherd? I think that the most important part of the German Shepherd, and the thing that I fell in love with as a child, is the fact that they had complete dedication to me and always wanted to please. They’re probably the most biddable dog that I know of. By that I mean they want to do your bidding, no matter what it is you ask of them, they are ready in a second to do that work. So

As a breeder, handler, and judge what is your perception of today’s German Shepherd? Common sense should apply in all instances. We have improved in some areas and have gone too far in others. Many of our dogs have become anatomically nonfunctional for what this breed was developed to do! It seems that many of our exhibitors have an incorrect conception of side gait for the German Shepherd Dog. The last thing our breed was developed for was to look fancy gaiting against the white wall at our national specialties.

once they’ve learned how to do that bidding, they’re

For every inch a dog’s front feet go up in the air, they

willing, anxious and desire to constantly please and so

should be penalized one inch of front reach. At the end of

I think that that’s probably the most important part of

the push from behind the stifle should straighten out and

the German Shepherd. I was born and raised in Western

the hock should follow through. Just because a dog’s rear

New York. As a teenager, we would go hunt pheasant

toes turn up (while his hock is still leaning forward and

and it didn’t take them long to learn to flush him and

his stifle still has a large bend in it ) That is not correct

retrieve the birds.

follow through behind. When and how often have you

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A L I VI NG L EGEND · JAMES MOSES

SPECIALQuotes Jim is an extremely talented show man, one of a kind, with an incredible ability to get into a dog’s head and maximize their performance; even now he is better capable of presenting dogs than most other handlers. I gave him a Dallas son from one of my best girls a few years ago and he finished Chaos himself in straight shows. He is absolutely the BEST at planning a dog’s show career. He has an intuitive grasp of what a judge is looking for and if they have any predictable patterns in their judging. -- Sheree Moses, Kaleef German Shepherds

“Jim Moses is larger than life. His accomplishments in the dog show world make him a living legend. We are so happy that this article is being written to honor his place in the dog world, and not later. Jim is revered by countless people in our sport, meaning loved and with the deepest respect. The first time I ever saw Jim was when he brought Hatter to the shows in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I watched him all day, or should I say, the both. He put Hatter on top of his traveling crate, and on top of that was a garment bag. Hatter was perched on top, never taking his eyes off Jim sitting in the bleachers close by and Jim never took his attention off Hatter. Yes, he was watching judging, but it was evident that his mind was always on what Hatter was doing, constantly looking over to him. Gene met Jim in the early 1980’s, and as he says, ‘I never saw him at the shows until he came into the Best in Show ring.’ Gene has the utmost respect for Jim and we both consider him to be one of the very top people in our sport. His ability to recognize great breed type in any breed, and to verbalize the standard applied to that breed, makes him the most interesting person to sit and watch judging dogs. He is a great judge. The one thing that I would like to say about Jim, that makes him so endearing, is that he really loves dogs. Not just his top winner or top producer, but every dog that he can spend time with, and it does not have to be purebred. We feel very honored to call him our friend, and that the entire dog fancy has been blessed to have Jim Moses in our sport. He has mentored and taught so many people in our sport. We are all so much richer for his wisdom and talents. If you close your eyes and remember him on the green carpet at Madison Square Garden, magic. Pure magic. We wish Jim many more years of continuing to bless the sport of dogs with his greatness, endless knowledge, and love of dogs.” --Eugene Blake and Julie L Mueller

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“I met Jimmy through a German Shepherd called Hanner. I was asked to handle him but turned it down as I felt that I could not do the dog justice in the ring. The owners hired Jim Moses to show the dog. I did not know who Jimmy Moses was at the time and had to go find out. I first saw Jim show a shepherd, and I immediately knew why Hanner’s owners reached out to Jim to handle. Jimmy has a knack of being able to supply judges with the dogs he think will win. Jimmy knows how each dog should look and what he needs to do to get that look, he was also a good marketer. I believe that Jimmy was dedicated much more to the dogs than 95% of the handlers of his time in the ring as a handler. We quickly became friends and over the years I learned a great deal about German Shepherds and the handling of them from Jimmy. Jimmy shared so much of his knowledge from experience and videos of German Shepherds being shown in their native Germany. When discussing dogs over the years we agree 99% of the time. We are in tune with each other and still friends to this day. I really did not like to compete against Jimmy in the ring. I think that many exhibitors, especially younger exhibitors, and those starting out, should attend Jimmy’s seminars. I believe Jimmy’s dedication to the dog show world and the dogs he judges is incredible. Jimmy wants to be a great judge and continues to study. If I had to send someone to buy a dog for me, Jimmy would be one. I would trust him to view a dog and buy it if he felt it was in his opinion a good one. Jimmy is a tough judge to show to. I really admire his honesty when it comes to judging.” --Bruce Schultz


A L I VI NG L EGEND · JAMES MOSES

I have lived through many fads in this breed but we always seem to come back to the correct structure -balanced movers that are suitable for people in all walks of life. Which country do you feel has the deepest quality in the GSD? Germany and America both have incredibly deep quality in the multi-purpose German Shepherd. General questions and the changing scene Looking back, are there some career decisions you would revise? I would have spent more time with family and less time on the road. In the profession as a judge or a handler this is probably significant for many. I have pretty much spent my whole life dedicated to handling, and now judging. I have an intensive background and have seen dogs judged at a fast walk at our nationals? This is a tending breed, not a running breed. Which old world country is your favorite place to judge? I rarely accept judging assignments outside of the

shown probably 50 different breeds to championship levels. Handling has been my whole life and judging is just a continuation of it, and unfortunately it requires constant travel. Once in awhile it’s nice to just take some time off and go fishing.

country. So, I would have to say that judging in the

Which are the moments handling or judging, most

United States is my favorite place to be.

emotionally significant for you?

The German Shepherd standard is an exact and technical

When we won BIS at Westminster in 1987 with Ch. Covy

document, do you feel that new judges coming to the

Tucker Hill’s Manhattan, who became the #1 male show

breed are prepared well in the USA and Europe? Which

dog of all time (#4 overall), with 201 BIS. I also exhibited

country would you say has the best judges for the German

Select Ch. Altana’s Mystique, listed in the Guinness Book

Shepherd?

of World Records as the top-winning show dog of all

Overall I prefer our American judges. Most are very knowledgeable on the standard and have the eye and education to choose the most deserving dog.

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time. Mystique earned 275 all-breed BIS, as well as 30 specialty wins and select ratings at the US National. I also exhibited two more of the top 20 show dogs of all


time, both members of the coveted 100 Club, including

judging, you show to the fancy the knowledge you have

our home-bred Ch. Kaleef’s Genuine Risk. Winning

gained from your time in dogs. The old time, wealthy

BIS at the Garden in 1987 was exciting, BIS at the AKC

breeders are not as dominant as they once were. We

Centennial a real thrill, but winning Westminster was

don’t have as many large kennels as we did 40 years ago.

a relief.

The average, smaller breeder can be competitive today.

Dog breeding and showing usually must answer to one

It used to not be that way. So there is a balance.

of two criticisms; either that it is an elitist activity

Winning and losing- do you see consistent sportsmanlike

viable for the wealthy, or that making a living from dogs

behavior from people regarding their own dog, and are

influences the ability of a person to be objective in selling

we as objective today about our dogs as before? Are we

puppies, handling, or especially, in judging. Where is the

good winners and losers?

equilibrium between the two realities?

Exhibitors are pretty much the same as they always have

The moment a person gets a really good dog, they realize

been. It is awfully hard for an owner to be objective

the game is not as political as they once thought. When

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day. Many exhibitors are particularly good sports,

sportsmanlike conduct is always expected so it should

at least in public. It also depends on what they know

remain that way.

about the breed, the standard and how the dog should move and look like in accordance to the specific breed requirements. When they measure that against their own dog they should be able to see the positive and negative traits in front of them. Whether it makes them objective depends on the individual. I have always been

Interpreting dog shows as a sport seems to contrast with the true objective of judging which is to advise breeders and shape the direction of the breed. Do you feel people are attending shows ‘to win’ or to talk constructively about dogs and seek guidance from an expert judge?

amazed that when an exhibitor finally got a really good

A. Both. There is always a reason to seek out a judge and

dog, how quickly they stopped thinking everything was

talk about the breed, and everyone wants to win. You

so political! We have quite a few judges just looking to

also must be open to opinion and change. Sometimes

find the next really good one.

standards get revised and it is hard to stay current. You

Conduct at shows- would you say showing is a ‘gentlemanly’ sport- should it be?

have to adhere to each breed and its written standard of the ideal dog. There has never been a perfect dog but you look for what closely resembles that ideal dog.

Dog showing is a competitive sport, and you must have

Each year it is always a learning experience for judges,

the drive to stay in the game for the long haul, but

owners, and handlers.

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A L I VI NG L EGEND · JAMES MOSES

With the large number of shows on the roster, and

need to be truly objective in picking the right shows

the close competition for numbers of wins, this sport

and judges for your dog for it to do as well as it should.

has become increasingly intense. Not only do the dogs spend most of their youth confined in crates and on the

What makes a great handler?

grooming table, and people are equally under pressure

First and most important is that they must truly love

and all involved rarely have a day for playing with their

dogs. The very best handlers that I’ve known have a

family. Is this a trend we should reverse? If so, how can

very good understanding of the breed standard for the

that be accomplished?

breeds they were showing. Natural ability is a good

Many dogs finish their championships and then go home. If a dog is going to be shown as a special, most handlers make sure the dog gets enough exercise to stay in fit condition. How many shows a dog competes at is a personal decision depending on finances and desire.

plus, but doesn’t do much good if he or she doesn’t know what they have on the end of the lead. Many of our handlers today can be replaced by any high school track runner. They show their charges scooting around the ring at 100 miles per hour while holding the end of a 20-foot lead. If the dog is not perfectly ring trained with a mommy dependency, those handlers

If you could serve as AKC fairy godfather for one day,

spend half the time untangling the lead and dragging

what changes to the institution and practice would you

the dog back into the ring. They do the down and back

make?

with so much lead hanging that it looks like a figure

I would do away with the limited registration. I feel this has been one of the reasons for a drop in registrations and involvement in AKC shows. What advice would you give to someone new to the sport of showing dogs? Purchase the best dog of your chosen breed that you can and devote the time and effort necessary to keep it in good condition and to have it perform well in the show ring. Learn how to do nails and groom properly. Ask advice from people in the breed that have enjoyed some success. The vast majority will be very happy and willing to share their knowledge and success with you. You will learn from the people that you associate with, so pick them wisely. Evaluate your dog and its performance in the ring, then you and your handler

eight. Many exhibitors complain that we don’t have enough handlers in the breed. You don’t need eight jockeys when there are only three horses in the race. How can we create more interest in showing dogs? I think that we all have to help regional clubs attract and keep new members and then go out of our way to make them feel wanted. Many of the people who purchased dogs from us have been encouraged to join local clubs depending on where they live, only to tell us that no one was friendly and that they felt out of place. I think this is an area to which the parent club should devote much time and effort. Most regional clubs no longer have training classes and no longer have to have sanction matches, two places many of our new members have come from in the past.




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M E E T T H E BR E E D L A BR A D O R R E T R I E V E R

WITH

KENDALL Herr Can you give us some background on yourself? When and how did you start to breed Labrador Retrievers? How old were you and how did it all come about? I got my first Labrador in 1963. Dick wanted a dog to hunt with, so he decided on a

DICKENDALL LABRADOR RETRIEVER

Labrador. Dick was attending the University of Wyoming at the time and we found a dog in the newspaper for $35. I was intending on buying a yellow and came home with a black. I wanted to have puppies because we are just animal people. I didn’t know a thing and bred her to a dog from a local kennel. I knew the puppies were terrible but didn’t know why. I then met Margaret Crothers who lived a few blocks away. I went to go

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MEET T HE B REED · LABRADOR RETRIEVER

see a litter she had advertised in the newspaper. Her

you know everything about them and have personally

dogs didn’t look a thing like mine. She took me to my

seen and lived with many of their relatives so you have

first dog show which opened a whole new world to me

a better idea of what you will get. This isn’t always

and made me want to learn everything I could about the

possible as pedigrees can be too close for me and with

breed.

DNA testing, it is sometimes impossible to do what

What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter? My kennel name is Dickendall, which is just my husband’s

you would have done in the past. This can make going outside your kennel a must. I’ve been fortunate enough to borrow some nice stud dogs that I have felt will add to the quality of my kennel.

name, Dick, and my name, Kendall, put together. I was

Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own

in an obedience class and the instructor said I needed

breeding?

a kennel name to put on the graduation certificate. It was a quick decision as I had never thought of having a kennel name. I bred my first litter in 1969. My first champion was whelped 10/20/1970 – Ch. Dickendall Flip Flop CDX. I remember that because I had to write it so often on entry forms. I have no idea how many litters I’ve had. I don’t breed a lot. I only breed to get something to show and go on with, hopefully. Out of ten puppies I keep and run on for five months to a year, only one may make it to stay. What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other

I really don’t think much about having a line but more about the individual I have and its type or structure. If I have a litter I don’t like, they can all go, rather than keeping the best of a disappointing litter to just keep a line going. What you have today is more important than what you have years ago, and hopefully they are much improved now. Ch. Dickendall Arnold is still in many of my pedigrees. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross?

kennels, have joint ownerships? Do you use stud dogs

I would prefer to outcross. I don’t especially breed

from other kennels, or do you prefer to use your own

from a pedigree, but on what the individual dog needs

dogs?

and on the look of the dog. I look for individuals that

I have done breedings with Faith Hyndman, Buckstone Labradors, for years. She likes bitches and I like dogs, so we’ve shared successfully. I have a few longtime good friends that I also work with.

complement each other--where they may be strong where the other is weak. A dog I find attractive with all the criteria I am looking for is what I want to breed. I’m not that concerned about the pedigree. When I find a dog that I want to breed to, I then look at the

I will use any stud dog I like that I think will compliment

pedigree. Hopefully it isn’t too close, and its DNA testing

my bitch. You can’t stay in your own kennel forever and

compliments each other. If you are considering line

I prefer to outcross. It is great to use your own dogs as

breeding or in-breeding you need to be doubling on

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M EET T HE B REED · LABRADOR RETRIEVER

dogs you personally know (not just famous names on a pedigree) and have seen and know their temperament. You should be also sure when you are line breeding

when you look at a Labrador? Type (head, coat, and tail), balance, and angles.

that you are concentrating on only outstanding

The key factors that make a Labrador typey or unique

representatives of the breed.

from any other breed are the head, coat, and tail. The

What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? Staying in this crazy hobby for so long. ABOUT THE BREED

head, coat, and tail must be hung on a proper frame or structure which creates the outline of the dog. The outline determines the entire look of the dog and is essential to breed type. Balance is essential to making the picture correct and is influenced by length of leg and front and rear angles. Angulation has a great influence

How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that

on the outline making the balance and shape correct.

other breeders have a different point of view as to what

Not only do angles make the picture right but they are

the Labrador should look like, or is there just one correct

essential to proper function.

type?

Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed?

The standard was rewritten in 1994 much to the dissatisfaction of the show enthusiasts. It is negative, wordy, contradicting and very unclear to get a picture of what a Labrador Retriever should be. It is no wonder many new breeders as well as all around judges are confused. It should be redone. The disqualifications are so distracting to new judges and most are things that you would never see in the ring. The old standard was mostly fine. Every breeder puts their own spin on things. You can see kennel type within the breed, but still conforms to the standard. This is to be expected with so many people from so many countries with different ideas of what is correct and not correct. There are also at least three different standards. Every breeder has a little different vision of what they like and what they want to emphasize. What three qualities do you think are the most important

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Poor temperament should not be tolerated. The great temperament and trainability for many activities is what continues to make the Labrador such a popular breed. All dogs have faults and failings, it depends if the virtues are strong enough to carry the faults they have. On the health front there is good work going on to address health problems. Many breeders test their dogs. Is there more work to be done? What health test do you consider necessary to have for mating your Labs? How would you rate health in the breed? The health testing is a great tool to help breeders to breed healthy dogs. I think the dogs are much healthier and in better condition than the dogs in the past --due to testing and better-quality food. I’m not sure the EIC test is correct as there are so many dogs that are tested carriers that we must have been breeding carrier to carrier before testing. There are relatively few Labradors that actually collapse considering the high


number of carriers. There must be a trigger gene or something and the test should have more research done with it to provide a more accurate picture of health. You can test yourself into mediocrity. There are those that only look for an all-clear dog to breed to instead of a good dog that will improve their bitch. This, if done too often, can lead to a downhill slide in overall quality of the breed. The tests are tools to make it possible to build a good dog who is a carrier to a clear of that problem to never get an affected. Hopefully if very lucky, you can breed it out. The DNA tests are just another tool to use and we should always be breeding outstanding individuals. There is no point in breeding a mediocre dog just because it is clear. I require passing hips, elbows, eye clearance within the year, PRA, EIC, HNPK, dilute testing on the gene testing for my boys to be used. Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? I haven’t been to Europe in a while. I think the European dogs may have less substance than the American dogs. This generalization depends on the individual breeders. I think many Europeans (Russia, Poland, Ukraine) are

doing a really good job of breeding currently. What makes them so versatile and popular? Is that a good thing for the breed or a bad thing? Temperament. The Labrador can do anything. They are real people dogs, biddable, anxious to please, sensible, and trainable. After you’ve had one there is no other breed. They are super family dogs and can be trained for many things. I don’t think the popularity is a bad thing. Popularity in a breed is bad when they become popular for not a good reason--as if owned by someone famous, in a movie, or something like that. Because that breed may be difficult to live with or hard to train and then many of these dogs are poorly researched and end up in the shelter. Labs are usually in forever homes and after you’ve had one, you need another. How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say we have evolved for the good or for the worse? Structure and angles have improved greatly. Style comes and goes. In the US, the style seems to be radically short legs. Most people I think realize this is a problem and I think things will swing back to good leg to body balance.

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The key factors that make a Labrador type or unique from any other breed are head, coat, and tail. This head, coat, and tail must be hung on a proper frame or structure, which creates the outline of the dog. The outline determines the entire look of the dog and is essential to breed type. Angulation has a great influence on the outline, making the balance and shape correct. Not only do angles make the picture right, but they are essential for proper function. A well angulated rear is needed for leverage to drive the dog. This requires good length of upper and lower thigh. The longer the bones, the more space there is for muscle attachment. The heavy muscling gives the desired chunky, strong look to the hindquarters. As the rear pushes the dog, most of his weight is supported on the front-end assembly. I think front end assembly is also problem. It is hard to

Ideally, a Labrador should have a well angulated

understand and most don’t. After you do understand it,

scapula and humerus. They work as shock absorbers

it is hard to look at a poor front.

for the joints and front leg that hangs off the end of

Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Labrador? Type - A dog that looks like no other breed. A kind, sweet expression, the unique stuffed animal look obtained by the double coat with a thick undercoat that fills in and rounds out any angular look. They must have a good spring of rib, never slab sided, a deep body and short loin. Good bone that runs right down through the foot with equal bone front and rear.

the humerus to cushion impact on the joints. Many mysterious lameness problems are caused by lack of angulation that creates pounding stress on the joints. The humerus and scapula should be equal in length. When they are of equal length and proper angle, the back of the front leg will drop them under them with placing the front leg well under the withers. A short, straight humerus causes the front leg to come off the front of the body. This creates an atypical Foxhound or terrier type outline. Having a short, straight scapula will

Never light boned or weedy. A pronounced sternum,

give the appearance of a short neck from the head to the

well filled in brisket, front legs set well under the body,

back, and a long underline from the throat to the body.

wide thighs, and well-turned stifles. Enough neck to balance the dog blending gradually into a level topline with the otter tail coming right off the back. They must be a sturdy dog, balanced throughout.

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There are many degrees and variations on bone structure; and this is, of course, an oversimplification of the not-so-simple subject of structure. The angles and the outline they create are as essential as head, coat,


MEET T HE B REED · LABRADOR RETRIEVER

and tail when creating the ideal Labrador and in the end

quite a lot to my breeding program to produce the dogs

are the determining factors when separating the men

of today.

from the boys. Are Labradors becoming separated into “Show” and “Field” type? What is your opinion on that? Should field dogs be to the standard, and should show champions demonstrate field ability?

Which dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? Still working on it. What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? Read everything you can get your hands on about

They have been separated for a long time. Most show

Labradors, structure, health, and other breeds. Visit

dogs can do a good job with field work. But few field

as many kennels as you can, talk dogs, look at their

trial dogs can ever become a show champion due to

dogs. You can learn something from everybody. Ask

their extreme deviation from the standard. The field

questions. Dogs look different in person than in photos.

trials have gotten very extreme and the field trial dogs

Attend as many shows as you can. Obedience train your

are bred to the job without consideration of how they

dog. Get at least a CD. You will learn and bond with

look. Both should work and conform to the standard,

your dog and acquire knowledge to help your puppy

but it’s not going to happen.

buyers about training in the future. Join an all-breed

In order of importance how would you lineup movement, head, coat, substance, and type?

and specialty club. Volunteer to help. you will acquire a world of knowledge through helping. You never stop learning and evolving in this wonderful hobby. You will

All are equally important. Without a combination of

meet great people and go places you never imagined

proper movement, head coat, substance, and type, you

you would visit. Keep an open mind and soak up all the

don’t have a Labrador. As in a recipe, without all the

information you can.

ingredients you don’t have what you are trying to bake. Please name three of your all-time favorite dogs bred by you and three not owned or bred by you. A: Just like children, you can’t have favorites. They are all special in their own way. I’ve owned so many lovely dogs, it is hard to name names. My current favorites are, GCH Ch. Dickendall Buckstone Hou’s He, Ch. Dickendall Churchill, and GCH Ch. FRED CD BN RE SE TKA, the Border Terrier. As for dogs not bred by me, I’ve been lucky to lease many of my favorites for a time and they’ve all added

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WITH

FABIAN Negron

& TOM Flaherty Can you give us some background on yourself?

When and how did you start

breeding Labradors? How old were you and how did it all come about? Fabian: My first Labrador litter was born in

GALLIVANT LABRADOR RETRIEVER

2006 when I was 20 years old. The litter was co-bred with Mary and Michael Wiest of Beechcroft Labradors where I worked as the kennel manager and handler for their dogs. Tom: My first litter was bred in 1993 when I was 23 years old. My first dogs were of Beechcroft lines of Mary and Michael Wiest and Ayr Labradors of the late Nancy Martin, both of those kennels going back to the Ballyduff Kennel.

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What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel

What would you say your greatest achievement as a

name? How many litters have you had so far?

breeder is so far?

Our kennel name is Gallivant because we travel a lot,

We feel that consistently producing dogs who win at

and our travels are most always dog-related, so it

specialty shows as well as in the sporting group is a

seemed very fitting we named our kennel Gallivant.

significant achievement as this does not happen in

Currently we have bred over 20 litters together under

Labradors often.

this prefix.

ABOUT THE BREED

What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, have joint ownerships? Do you use stud dogs from other kennels, or do you prefer to use your own dogs? Health, type, and temperament prioritize our breeding program.

We feel very fortunate to share some

partnerships with good friends who share the same philosophies and goals regarding breeding. Because we typically line breed, we use our own stud dogs

How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different points of view as to what the Labrador should look like, or is there just one type? Because our breed has so much diversity in type, especially between the performance dogs and the conformation dogs, this is a difficult question. We try to breed keeping the standard in mind and keeping in mind the Labrador is a working retriever.

frequently. Occasionally using any outside dog when

What three qualities do you think are the most important

we feel it’s appropriate.

when you look at the Labrador?

Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own

Fabian: Soundness, balance, and temperament.

breeding? MBISS GCH Big Pine’s Faith In Africa. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program, linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing? We usually line breed.

Tom: Balance, soundness, and ability Which faults would you not tolerate in the breed? Fabian: Unsoundness, aggression, shyness. Tom:

Unsoundness,

bad

temperament,

poorly

constructed front assembly, bad tail carriage

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On the health front there is good work going on to address health problems. Many breeders test their dogs. Is there more work to be done? What medical test do you consider necessary to have for mating your Labradors? How would you rate health in the breed? We feel there is a tremendous responsibility as breeders working hard to preserve our breed to utilize the health testing that is available to us. That is not to say we as a kennel breed based solely on health test results. We feel it’s important to remember type and function as well as health when making breeding decisions. We always use OFA scoring for hip and elbow evaluations. We have all MBISS GCHB Lakeside Memoir of Gallivant TKN

our dogs heart function evaluated by a cardiologist and

CGC, Memo, bred by Jared Frasher and owned/

an echocardiogram at a year of age. We test for PRA,

handled by Fabian Negron and Tom Flaherty,

HNPK, CNM, DM, EIC and many other diseases by using

has compiled an enviable record throughout

the genetic test available. All our dogs have an annual

his show career. His most notable wins include:

eye exam by an ophthalmologist as well.

*Best of Breed—2020 Westminster Kennel Club

Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type

*Best of Breed—2019 Potomac Labrador Retriever Club Specialty Show *Open Class—2018 Crufts and Reserve Challenge Certificate over 653 Entries. *Best of Breed—2018 Westminster Kennel Club *Best of Breed—2017 AKC National Dog Show

in Europe and the USA? We feel that yes, there is a difference. American dogs tend to have more angulation, denser coats and more over all strong build. What makes them so versatile and popular? Is that a good thing for the breed or a bad thing? We feel Labradors are the ideal family companion because of their adaptability, excellent temperament, trainability, and low maintenance. How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say we have evolved for the good or the worse? Fabian: As with any change, some things improve, and others decline. Health has improved.


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Tom: Our breed changes in looks quite regularly and

Where in the world would you consider the breed to be at

I believe that is due to the influence of top producing

its best and strongest now?

dogs and bitches having such a strong influence. Sometimes it is a very good thing and other times, not so much. I do agree that overall health has improved

We feel there are very good dogs in many places in the world right now.

greatly thanks to dedicated breeders and the various

Are Labradors becoming separated into “show” and

health organizations who work hard to identify and

“field” types? What is your opinion on that? Should

fund research, allowing breeders the tools needed to

field dogs be to the standard, and should show champions

avoid producing inherited diseases and problems.

demonstrate field ability?

Can you, in your own words describe the ideal Labrador?

Fabian: Yes, I believe there should be two types. Both

Fabian: Yes! It is black! A black athletic dog whose coat wraps tightly around his body, who is the picture of balance moving or standing and is forever willing to please its owner. Tom: A dog who is strong in build, is the essence of style, balance, and strength no matter what he is doing. A dog whose type is so true he can be mistaken for no other, who is kind and biddable and reliable without question, always.

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should demonstrate natural retrieving ability. Field/ hunt tests have evolved into competitive sports which require speed and physical traits foreign to our breed standard. For these reasons I feel the breed should have the two separate distinctions. Tom: I feel that there are two types, if not two breeds of dog, regarding performance dogs and show dogs in our breed. It has been this way for a long time and always a source of debate and controversy. If you look at a field


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Fabian: Type, movement, head, coat, substance. Tom: Type, coat, substance, movement, head. Please name 3 of your all-time favorite winners bred by you and 3 neither owned or bred by you. Fabian:

Bred by: MBISS RBIS GCHB Gallivant Big

Pine Sarafina On Broadway, MBISS GCH Gallivant Wellington, MBISS MBIS RBIS Am/Can GCH Gallivant Safari

Not bred by:

MBISS MBIS Am/Can GCH

Beechcroft Study’s Top Secret, MBISS GCH Paradocs Bellwether Valley Vista, MBISS Am/ Eng Sh CH Clearcreek Bonaventure Windjammer. Tom: Bred by: MBISS RBIS GCHB Gallivant Big Pine Sarafina On Broadway, Ch. Gallivant Big Pine’s Kenya, MBOSS Ch. Gallivant’s Call Girl. Not bred by: MBISS Tabatha’s Dazzle, WC, MBISS MBIS Am/Can GCH bred or performance bred dog, then look at a dog bred

Beechcroft’s Study’s Top Secret, MBISS CH Epoch’s

for conformation and to the standard, there is little

Brown Baggin’, WC.

resemblance. They basically, in my opinion, are two different breeds. Both should always display natural retrieving ability, let’s not forget the Labrador is first

What advice would you give to a new person in the breed?

and foremost a retriever and a water dog. A “breed” of

Fabian: Don’t overthink things, Analysis paralysis will

dog, horse, cow, chicken or whatever is based on type.

kill your breeding program. Be ethical and be honest

Most performance or field dogs I see do not resemble

with yourself. Learn from your mistakes and always

our breed standard even remotely. In my opinion

educate yourself.

they seriously lack type. For this reason, I believe they should have their own standard. I have high regard for the performance and field dog breeder’s dedication and for their achievements. I would never attempt to change or take that from them, and I expect the same respect in return.

Tom: Never, ever stop learning, never think you know everything and always be willing to listen and take away and apply knowledge. Find a good mentor and at the same time educate yourself and think for yourself. Learn structure, develop your eye for a good dog and be able to know why you think it’s a good example. Be

In order of importance how would you line up movement,

true to yourself, be ethical and above all do right by

head, coat, substance, and type?

your dogs.

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M E E T T H E BR E E D L A BR A D O R R E T R I E V E R

WITH

TOM GAIL Shearer &

Tell our readers about your beginnings and how you got involved with Labrador Retrievers? I grew up on a 300-acre beef and dairy farm in Winchester, Kentucky. Having been around dogs and farm animals from

BONAVENTURE LABRADOR RETRIEVER

a young age I developed a great love of animals and their care. Through 4-H and horse shows I knew that I wanted to be involved in the world of animals. Always wanting a Labrador, that dream became a reality in 1985 with Daisy. She was not exactly the best conformation dog, but she had the heart of a Labrador. The style I most admired was in England. I contacted Janice Pritchard of the Charway

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MEET T HE B REED · LABRADOR RETRIEVER

affix for a puppy. She told me about one of her stud

1998 when we married and began breeding under the

dogs that was recently imported into the U.S. and

BonaVenture kennel name. We had developed the

how to contact his owner, Sally Kelly, Kellygreen

perfect Labrador in our minds and knew that type

Labradors, for a puppy. There was a litter in West

of dog was in England. So, for our wedding present

Virginia with Bonnie Hall, Luger Labradors, and a

in 1998 we imported two dogs from the Rocheby

puppy was brought to Kentucky and became the

Kennel in Styrup, England. The Rocheby line has

beginning of BonaVenture as we know it today. Belle

long been admired for their strong conformation and

is still in BonaVenture pedigrees today.

great temperament. Monty and Dash were brought

Gail had dogs all her life but never was involved with breeding or competition. They were the family pet

to Kentucky and have made a huge impact on the success of our breeding program.

that most of us had growing up. For many years Gail,

We both had mentors in the breed. They became our

originally from Detroit, Michigan, would attend the

best friends and remain so today. The one thing we

Detroit Kennel Club dog show--one of the few benched

have learned about this sport is the group of incredible

shows in the U.S. at that time. It was a good venue to

people in the breed are most willing to share their

be able to meet several breeds all in one place. It was

knowledge. There is a wealth of knowledge to be had

in the Labrador aisle that Gail knew this was the dog

about breeding. Most of our knowledge came from

for her. It would be several years before one came

these friends.

into her life. In 1989 she acquired her first Labrador.

from websites. While most of it is good it is always

She raised her first litter was in 1991 at the age of 38.

a better idea to find out firsthand with someone who

We were both in dogs about the same amount of time

has experienced your issue.

yet on different paths in the beginning.

Now, breeders can get information

Our breeding program together started in 1998. A

We (Gail and I) met at a Labrador specialty in August

lot of people have blended families when they marry.

of 1995. We remained friends and competitors until

We had a blended kennel.

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What is the meaning of your kennel name? BonaVenture loosely translated means ‘good fortune’. We certainly have had that and more. Do you work closely with and co-own with other kennels? A. We work closely with a couple of other kennels. They have several of our dogs and most are co-owned. We keep several stud dogs as our lines tend to produce top males. Over the years there have been outside stud dogs that have had qualities that we wanted to incorporate in our lines and going outside was the right thing to do. The Labrador gene pool is vast and varied. Knowing what a certain dog can produce with your pedigree is key to improving a breeding program. We generally do not place puppies on an open registration unless it is someone we know and want to work with.

sired Windy, BISS BIS AM/CAN/ENG Ch. GCH Clearcreek BonaVenture Windjammer JH and BISS BISSW Clearcreek BonaVenture Cutter WC. Remember the Rocheby bitch imported from England as a wedding present? These were her great grandchildren. It took four generations, but we finally produced what we consider the perfect Labradors, at least in our eyes. Clearcreek Labradors and Elizabeth Martin had gotten several dogs from us and she was one of the very few we trusted with the line we imported from England. Windy and Cutter were co-bred and campaigned with Liz in the U.S. and with Margaret, Andrew, and Mairi Brown of Ramsayville Labradors in Scotland. Cutter was Best in Specialty Show at 17 months of age and then he injured himself and could no longer compete. Windy carried that breeding forward by becoming the first Americanbred Labrador to return to England and become an

Tell our readers about the Labradors that have made a

English show champion. Along the way she was a 15-

lasting impact on your breeding program.

time best in specialty show (AM/CAN/ENG), 5-time best

The strongest line we have goes back to Ch. BonaVentures Clipper. He was line bred on one of the greatest producing Labradors in recent years Ch. Dickendall Arnold JH. Because he was a dominant black, he was not real popular as a stud dog until he

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in all breed shows in Canada and number one Labrador in Canada for 2009, Westminster Kennel Club Best of Breed winner (pulled out in group) in 2012 and Best in Specialty Show winner at the Labrador Retriever Club of the Potomac in 2012 defeating over 1,100 Labradors for that honor. Windy and Cutter have left their mark


M EET T HE B REED · LABRADOR RETRIEVER

on the breed. It was extremely rewarding to have accomplished so much with one breeding and having the opportunity to show them. We crossed Clipper’s line (which was dominant black) to a chocolate line that goes back to our stud dog Epoch’s Edward of BonaVenture. This created Ch. Hightide BonaVenture Cap’n Jack who was a stud fee puppy from one of Clipper’s first litters. CJ was very influential in our breeding program especially with chocolate. He produced the same outline and movement as Clipper, Windy and Cutter but introduced the chocolate gene. One of his first offspring, a beautiful girl produced by Sheabourne Labradors, Sheabourne’s Precious Angel, went BOB at the Florida Labrador Specialty her first time in the ring at six months of age under respected breeder judge Nancy Arbuckle of Hunt Club Labradors.

breeding. You will more than likely produce puppies

Although Cutter, due to his injury, never went on to

with the same issue because it has been doubled up in the

finish his championship title, under the care of Peggy

pedigree. If you have something in your pedigrees that

Parries he recovered and proved himself as a prolific

you want to change, find a pedigree that consistently

stud dog. His son, CAN GCH BonaVenture Black Badger

produces well on whatever you want to fix. It may not

WC was sent to Greg and Susan Trigg in Canada as a four-

happen in one breeding, so patience is key here. First

month-old puppy and has never looked back. Again, the

and foremost, be true to the type and style of Labrador

same physical outline as his ancestors.

you want to breed.

Do prefer linebreeding, inbreeding or outcrossing, and

What are some of the most notable wins by Labradors

why?

that you have bred?

We do believe in linebreeding.

We have had a

tremendous amount of success with this.

A. Dogs bred and owned by us have won Best of

We are

Breed at the Labrador Retriever Club of Potomac,

extremely fortunate to have a line of dogs that are

Reserve Winner’s Bitch at Potomac, Best in Sweeps at

sound on orthopedics, genetics, and temperament.

Potomac, Winner’s Dog at Potomac, and Best of Breed

Without these qualities I would not recommend doing

at Westminster Kennel Club. These were incredible

any tight linebreeding. If you have an Achilles heel in

wins due in part to the size and competition at these

your pedigrees (such as bad bites, low tail sets, high

shows. There are multiple other specialty wins whose

ear set) we would not recommend doing a tight line

memories we will have with us forever.

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and eight puppies from Cap’n Jack. We kept a pair from each. They are still young, but we see the same outline that their sires had. We can only hope this will prove to be a great decision and that lightning strikes twice and maybe even three times! What is your favorite show and why? A. Our favorite show is the Labrador Retriever Club of the Potomac. This specialty show is held each spring in Frederick, Maryland. With an entry over 1,000 Labradors, it was voted the best specialty in the country with the AKC. If Labradors are in your future, it is worthwhile to go and see the most spectacular Labradors on the planet. This show has evolved into a huge international event with many countries represented. Mentoring is available through the parent club at this show and it is Do you compete in field competition with your Labradors? A. Our dogs do work in the field. As we have aged, we

an excellent learning experience. What is your philosophy on the Labrador breed standard?

no longer venture out in this venue but are happy our

The breed standard of the Labrador Retriever is lengthy

dogs and their owners do compete with our pedigrees in

and very extensive in what a Labrador is and is not.

the field. The retriever drive is so important and is still

We respect what the standard says. We understand its

very evident in our puppies. We primarily utilized the

function and generally breed according to its guidelines.

Working Certificate program that is a basic retrieving

Dogs should not be massive and overdone. Nor should

instinct test. One bird on land and two in water.

they be light and weedy. We have somehow evolved

Designed to show the willingness to retrieve. Doing

into two types of Labradors, English, and American

field work with a dog is a great bonding experience for

style, when there should not be a distinction. There is

both owner and dog. It can be extremely rewarding.

only one standard. It is a blueprint for breeders based

Do you have any current young dogs that inspire your future show ring aspirations in Labradors? A. We are so fortunate that we have frozen semen for so many of the mentioned stud dogs. This past year we

on what the parent club deems as correct and is for all Labradors. What are the most important physical qualities for a Labrador Retriever?

were able to use some breedings with Clipper and Cap’n

For many the term ‘head, coat and tail’ is the definition

Jack. We were blessed with five puppies from Clipper

of a Labrador. We happen to agree. These are very

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MEET T HE B REED · LABRADOR RETRIEVER

distinctive traits of the Labrador.

The melting

tell us if the dog is a carrier. But it is the best we have

expressions and kind eyes, the fabulous coat that keeps

right now. Several organizations have been and are

them dry in the coldest of waters and the magnificent

working on developing a genetic marker test for TVD.

otter tail that is the rudder. These make the foundation

It would be a great service to this breed to have this

for a great Labrador along with proper structure and

information.

proportion.

Do you think there are distinct difference between

What are qualities that a Labrador Retriever should not have?

Labradors in the United States and Europe? There is a difference in dogs between here and Europe.

We do not tolerate a bad temperament under any

Not necessarily bad or good either way. Americans tend

circumstance. The Labrador should never be aggressive.

to breed a stockier dog with sometimes more head than

Shyness is something that should not be tolerated.

what we feel is appropriate. Labradors in England tend

Also, the disqualifications in our breed are specific. Height, thoroughly pink nose, no eye rim pigmentation, no docking of the tail, and no deviation from the colors of black, yellow, and chocolate as described in the standard. Do you think genetic testing has progressed in Labradors, and what are the issues that still need to be addressed in the breed?

to have just a tad more leg, a much better reach of neck, and a very good neck into the shoulder. Recognizing this and utilizing all that is available in the way of reproduction, we can get some of those pedigrees to work nicely with each other. What are your thoughts on Labrador Retrievers as service dogs? Labradors are so intelligent they are sought after for

There are many companies offering genetic health

service work in a big way. To be able to give a blind

testing at competitive, low-cost rates. There is no reason not to test a dog considered for breeding. We do OFA Certifications for hips and elbows, eye certification with

a

board-certified

ophthalmologist,

heart

clearances with a board-certified cardiologist and most of the genetic trait tests that are available (PRA, EIC, HNPK, DM, CM, etc.). These tests are all tools that any breeder should utilize to make good breeding decisions and avoid creating a puppy with an issue. Tricuspid Valve Dysplasia is still an issue in this breed. Performing a heart echo on a dog only determines that the dog being tested is clear. It does not, unfortunately,

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the gift of independent mobility with a service dog is second to none. All the service programs (Diabetes and Epileptic alert, PTSD therapy dog, mobility assistance)

time for Labradors in the sport of dogs. What is your visual perception of the ideal Labrador?

are all great options for a service dog. Whenever an

The ideal Labrador should have a kind and melting

animal can help to improve someone’s life it is a good

expression with correct eye color. Correct eye shape,

thing.

length of muzzle and a broad back skull should all be

How has the breed changed over the years, and do you think it is a positive change?

evident. Correct double coat (harsh to the touch and some wave is acceptable), short coupled with a tail right off the back. Short hocks also give a much prettier

A. The breed has changed immensely starting with the

picture from the side. And, of course, they need to have

last breed standard change in 1994. The disqualification

good movement. The Labrador will never have the

concerning height was the most impactful on the breed.

movement of a setter or a spaniel, but they should move

It has taken many of us several generations to work on

effortlessly both coming and going. And, of course, the

improving the height issue. Fortunately, there is much

correct temperament is paramount.

less use of the wicket being done in the conformation ring than when the new standard was first approved. The key should always be balance and correct type in the Labrador. For the most part the breed has moved

What are your thoughts on two types of Labradors being identified as American field and English type? Do you think they will evolve into two different breeds?

forward, and the dogs being produced today are

A. We are not sure there would ever be a time that the

healthier and better representatives of the breed than

breed would be split. We are more concerned with

25 years ago. There are a lot of good breeders doing

the breeding of dilute Labradors (silver, charcoal, and

really great things right now in Labradors. It is a great

champagne). These ‘designer’ colors are only hurting this breed (and several others). We need to better educate the public, so they understand what’s at risk when there are color mutations. We can see the breed having a special designation for a show champion such as an AKC show championship which would include having a basic field title. This is done in England and several other countries. Retrievers should retrieve. What are the most important attributes of the breed? Type is paramount when looking at a Labrador followed by head, coat, substance, and movement.

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When looking at a dog it is important to look at the whole dog.

What advice would you give to people who are new to the

Who are your three favorite dogs bred by you, and three neither owned nor bred by you? Which dog is your ideal? Bred

by

Our closest to the ideal Labrador would be Windy.

us;

Ch.

BonaVenture’s

Clipper,

breed? If you are new to this breed, get involved. Find a Labrador

Ch.

club near you. There are people there that are always

BonaVenture’s Borowick Mahogany WC and AM/CAN/

willing to share information and help point you in the

ENG Sh. Ch. Clearcreek BonaVenture Windjammer JH.

right direction. Go to shows and trials and decide which

And not owned or bred by us (but wish they were): ENG Sh. Ch. Rocheby Polkadot, three-time BOB winner at Crufts), Ch. Lenche’s Teddy Bear, BOB winner at Westminster, Ch. Lubberline Martingale, also a BOB

style of dog is for you. All of us that have been here for a time want our breed to go forward. Get yourself a good mentor. We had several and they are still our best friends today. And above all, enjoy what you are doing.

winner at Westminster.

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WITH

BETH Johnson Can you please share with our readers about you background in dogs. When and how did you start breeding Goldens? How old were you and how did it all come about and did you have mentors in the breed? I am the only member of my family in the dog game. I was 11 years old when I

SUMMIT

observed a friend of my sister training her

GOLDEN RETRIEVER

me. I loved dogs, all dogs, and at tahat time

Beagle in obedience; this really intrigued we had a farm dog that was a Collie mix and an English Springer Spaniel. Those two dogs learned basic obedience. I then saved my allowance and bought a Golden Retriever puppy from an ad in the local paper. I acquired a CDX obedience title on her. While at the shows, I observed

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the conformation ring and I sought out Ellen Manke

two more times after that and those clearances came

from Amberac Goldens along with Sharon Seeber from

out great.

Klondike kennels. A Klondike bitch was my first show dog and achieved nine single points. I was a sponge observing all the breeders and handlers.

Deborah

Koopman from the Miramichi kennel in Center Point,

What is the meaning behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter?

Iowa became my mentor as I just loved her dogs. Her

Chato’s first litter carried my kennel name, Summit. I

two main stud dogs, Ch. Jayba’s Golden Cadillac, and Ch.

decided on this name for two reasons. The summit is

Beaumaris Miramichi Duran were the dogs I decided

the peak, the top of a mountain, the pinnacle. I always

to work from. I was around 16 years old at the time.

dreamed of living on a mountain or hill overlooking my

I also was awe stricken watching Mary Burke show

Golden Retriever prodigy. I try to breed three litters a

her beautiful Asterling Goldens. They had an instilled

year. In my 20s and 30s I was lucky to have two litters

confidence and carriage about them like no other. The

a year. Now I have been breeding Goldens for 37 years

most notable quality was their impeccable foot timing

and I am closing in on having bred 100 litters. Feeling

and how light they were on their feet. My first breeding

old at the moment--just saying!

was with Chato; Klondike’s Chato de Shamrock. The litter was stunning. I bred to a well-known stud dog and I sent the majority of the litter to show homes on full genetic guarantees. To my dismay it was my biggest disaster ever. I refunded almost the whole litter due to

What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, and does this consist of having dogs in joint ownership? Do you use stud dogs from other kennels or do you prefer to use your own dogs?

mild hip dysplasia. Not an easy thing to endure at 16!

A: I am easy to work with and try to use stud dogs from

It made me learn to study pedigrees and how different

an array of pedigrees. I like to have new blood coming

pedigrees work and combine together. I bred Chato

in, so I don’t get boxed into all the same thing. I co-

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own boys of mine mostly for breeding rights and I like to show in the bred-by exhibitor class. I use my own stud dogs when I am trying to lock in on a certain dog in the pedigree; this is to pull its qualities and genetic coefficient. Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? Miramichi’s Summit Shandine would be my foundation bitch. I started with two totally different pedigrees. When I look at the dogs I have today they all come down from her and only a small percentage come from the other. Due to overall looks, clearances, and longevity I am so happy I did not put all my eggs in one basket. What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross, and why? I am going to answer all of the above. Line breeding is a wise thing to do. I like to line breed on two or three dogs in a certain pedigree to pull their good qualities although some of my most successful breedings have been outcrosses. For example, Paris, Ch. Summit’s Carrera Dom Perignon OD SDHF had a ten-generation coefficient of inbreeding of 5.28% and her half-brother Hobo, Ch. Summits Mr. Bojangles OS SDHF had 4.62%. The breed average is over 8%. Both dogs are multi best in show dogs, multiple specialty best winners, and national specialty winners. I think it is interesting how these two dogs, Ch. Summit’s Mr. Bojangles and Ch. Summits Carrera Dom Perignon, were awarded best of breed and best of opposite sex respectively at two national specialties and they are both an outcross. I am sure it has a lot to do with their mother, Summits Shadow Dancer OD SDHF, and the bitch line strength in the pedigree. The closest I will breed is half-brother to

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MEET T HE B REED · BICHON FRISE

half-sister--to bring in the strength of the grandparent

She has won the bred-by group at Eukanuba and several

I am breeding tight on. This has been successful for me

multiple regional specialties. She owns the most grand

also. I like to line breed a couple times, then outcross,

champion points of any Golden Retriever to date. She

then do another line breeding or inbreeding and so forth.

went BOS at Royal Canin this past year just weeks shy

I never want to get myself cornered into my pedigree

of her twelfth birthday! She also has proven herself as

where I don’t know where to breed. I have seen this

an incredible dam with 17 champions and counting. Her

be a huge flaw for many breeders. I have noticed when

get includes multiple all-breed BIS, BISS, and Golden

a pedigree gets too tight the odds are that you get one

Retriever Club of America SDHF accomplishments. I am

great dog. My observation is that then when you breed

in the best place ever on overall genetic clearances with

that great one using an outcross the genetic clearances

this line. The best thing about Chloe is her incredible

decline. It is all such a fragile balance.

fun-loving silly personality.

What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? There are so many great memories, but I would have to say the answer to this is the sole accomplishments of BIS

I see so much of her

grandfather Hobo, in her. They were best of friends, so I am sure he rubbed off on her. He was a goof into his teenage years also. What is your favorite show to attend and why?

BISS GCHP2 Summits Emery Its In the Bag OD SDHF, aka

I would have to say Eukanuba now the Royal Canin show

Chloe. Chloe was the number one Golden all systems for

held in December in Orlando, Florida is my favorite

two years. She is the top winning specialty best in show

show. Nice big rings, air-conditioned building, and a

winner with 54 specialty wins. She won her most recent

great location for this show. I love seeing people I have

specialty from the 12 and over veteran class! She is in

not seen in ages. There is a plethora of incredible places

the number two spot for all breed best in shows with 34

to wind down and to wine and dine in the evening.

to her name. She has won the national, the top twenty,

Not to mention the weather is normally pleasant and

best of breed at Westminster and the Eukanuba shows.

lodging is close and convenient.

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ABOUT THE BREED How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the Golden should look like, or is there just one correct type?

First and foremost is temperament. Goldens should be sweet and willing to please. Aggression of any sort is a huge no-no! They should not be nervous, anxious or overly busy either. Puppies can be given some forgiveness on the later. Second, I want to see a dog in excellent working condition. I really dislike holes in the

You are always going to have different interpretations

topline or a rolling topline in a dog over a year old. They

of a standard, especially the Golden Retriever standard.

must have a petty face with a more open eye. Squinted,

An English style Golden is way different than the typical

drawn back eyes or loose eye lids are very undesirable.

American Golden. Yet we are supposed to all reflect one standard. In fact, I recently heard my inner voice say

Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed?

“That is a really good English Golden. If I were to judge,

Aggression is intolerable. I think a lighter eye is very

it would not be denied”. I will admit I don’t care for

undesirable; dark brown to almost black is where it is

the light cream-colored coat, but the body, front, and

at. Tail carriage can make or break a dog. I dislike a tail

gorgeous head with pitch black pigment was stunning.

that is carried below three o’clock. The tail is supposed

This dog moved honestly, but not with the more open

to be used as a rudder and it should be thick and strong.

gait that I much prefer. The standard says athletic and

A high flying, flag is just as undesirable; straight off

well-muscled. My interpretation of that is a dog with a

the back at three o’clock up to a two o’clock carriage

hard back and open gait that does not tire easily.

with a little upward swoosh is very pretty. It should be

What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at Golden?

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a smooth flow from the neck to the tip of the tail and reflect a happy dog.


MEET T HE B REED · G OLDEN RETRIEVER

On the health front there is good work going on to address

How has the breed changed over the years since you first

health problems. Many breeders test their dogs, but is

began in the breed? Would you say that the breed has

there more work to be done? What medical test do you

evolved for the better or for the worse?

consider necessary to have before mating your Golden? How would you rate health in the breed overall?

I believe fronts have improved vastly since the eighties. We seldom see fronts with hackney-like movement

There needs to be more studies done on cancer. Yes, it

anymore, crooked front legs, or dogs way down on their

can be environmental, but we are seeing a huge wave

pasterns. Rears have improved on angles as they are

in certain pedigrees getting cancer early in life. When I

more let down and shorter in hock. We are still running

started in this breed 13 was the average life expectancy

into too much rear angle to front ratio. Overall type

and now it is ten which is sad. I think we should have

is starting to lack again. Goldens are retrievers and

hip, elbow, heart, and eye clearances done before we

are meant to be well sprung in rib. There are way too

even think about doing a breeding. We are doing other

many dogs that are tubular which is not a good trait

clearances now also so I go with the flow and do what is

as it affects lung capacity. I believe in the endeavor

required. I hope the trend is not accelerated to a point

to create more leg in our beloved breed, we have lost

of eliminating a dog with desirable qualities due to

ribbing and angles on both ends. We are better in some

people being hypochondriacs about issues that are non-

areas and lacking in others.

disabling. I have seen the breed have its ups and downs with orthopedics, eye issues and heart issues. I think we

Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Golden?

are sitting in a much better place now due to screening

An ideal Golden should have a sparkle to their eye

and not breeding the affected.

showing their enthusiasm and willingness to please. It

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should be in excellent working condition with a level

In order of importance how would you place- movement,

solid top-line. When gaiting I want to see a beautiful

head, coat, substance and type?

footfall with nice reach and drive. This dog should have a good deal of post sternum and return of upper arm. When it sits, the front should protrude making it look like the aristocrat that they are. I like a nice double coat with texture on the outer coat creating a nice tight jacket to the body. Waves are appreciated. Bring on the furnishings; they are like frosting, enhancing a Goldens

This is a difficult question. Type envelopes so much including structure, so it is first. With good structure comes good movement. A Golden is an athletic breed so movement would be second. Third is a pretty face since it is the first thing that you see. Substance and coat would be last for me. I pick puppies in this order as well.

overall appearance with their flowing mane, pants, and

Please name 3 of your all-time favorite winners that have

tail.

been bred by you and three neither owned nor bred by you. My favorite dogs that I bred are Ch. Summits Mystic Rhythms OD SDHF (Mystic), Ch. Summits Mr. Bojangles OS SDHF (Hobo), and GCHP2 Summits Emery Its in the Bag OD SDHF (Chloe). My other favorites are Ch. Twin-BeauD’s Hi Speed Chase OS SDHF (Chase), Am/Can Ch. Jayba’s Golden Cadillac OS SDHF (Turk), and I must mention two girls that are a close tie—Ch. Asterling’s Tahiti Sweetie SDHF (Brooke) and Ch. Krishna Karmiloch Trouble To SDHF (Trouble). These two girls are so opposite of each other but are great in so many ways. What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? A: If you have a set idea in your heart on the ideal Golden Retriever stick with it. It worked for me. I did not switch the type of dog I liked with the changing fads in the breed. Many fellow breeders and handlers have told me this. There is a careful balance with type, temperament, genetic clearances and longevity that play a huge roll in your breeding decisions. This is definitely a delicate balance. You must pick and choose what is most important as you go and sometimes you have to be more lenient in some areas. Breeding can be very rewarding, but it is not for the faint of heart.

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WITH

MICHAEL Faulkner Please share with our readers about your background in dogs. When and how did you start breeding Golden Retrievers? How old were you, how did it all come about, and did you have mentors in the breed? I have been active in breeding and showing

VERDORO GOLDEN RETRIEVER

dogs most of my life. My parents were active in breeding Golden Retrievers and Field Spaniels under the Jeran prefix, and it was a natural transition. My involvement in the breed started in 1969. My mentors within the sport have been many.

Peggy Grayson, although not

a Golden Retriever breeder, was the individual who had the greatest impact on my understanding of the sport including

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breeding and judging. I owe a great deal of gratitude to Golden Retriever breeders Ron Bradbury (Nortonwood) and Joan Gill & Daphne Philpott (Wesley) who graciously offered wisdom, insight, pedigrees and dogs to a young American lad who craved knowledge. Also, a special acknowledgement to Peggy Owen (Westrose) for years of friendship and for allowing me to own several of her beautifully bred dogs. What is the meaning behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter? Over the past 51 years I have been associated with several kennel names. Jeran (a combination of my

our criteria both in genotype and phenotype. There

parents’ names – Jerry & Joan), Woodspoint (the name

are a few well established kennels that we have a long

of a street in Lexington, Kentucky and the kennel

established history of breeding back and forth with.

name established with my first partner, the late David

Ann is a successful canine reproduction specialist, so we

E. White). David and I bred Golden Retrievers, Field

have the ability to store semen and successful produce

Spaniels, and Springer Spaniels under this prefix. Also,

a family of healthy Golden Retrievers from several

during this time span I co-bred Golden Retrievers with

sources, including semen from several of our top sires

a dear friend, the late Patricia “Pat” Vogel – Devoe.

over almost 40 years.

After both David and Pat died, I combined forces with Dr. Ann Greenbank (Verdoro Golden Retrievers). Ann and I had known each other for decades, and having

Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding?

co-owned dogs and shared a mutual understanding of

There are too many to mention – a few include: Can. Ch.

what a Golden Retriever should look like, we joined our

Golden Jenny OTCH, Am. Can. Ch. Verdoro’s Georgia On

breeding programs, retaining the Verdoro prefix which

My Mind, Am. Can. Ch. Verdoro’s Tellise Arrow Smith,

is a hybrid French/Spanish meaning “towards gold”.

Ch. Westrose Happy Fellah, Ch. Devoe Woodspoint

What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels, and does this consist of having dogs in joint

Feline Fine, Ch. Woodspoint’s Lillihammer, Ch. Pekay’s Jesse James, Ch. Roshar Chimere.

ownership? Do you use stud dogs from other kennels or

What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding

do you prefer to use your own dogs?

program line breeding, inbreeding or out cross, and why?

Ann and I most definitely work with other kennels.

For me/us linebreeding on a strong bitch line is

We are constantly looking for young dogs that meet

essential.

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What would you say was your greatest achievement as a

Provided it falls within in the framework of the standard

breeder so far?

and individual interpretation various styles can be

Personally, my/our greatest achievement is to

acceptable.

consistently breed dogs that are typical, sound and a joy

What three qualities do you think are the most important

to live with. We have bred numerous champions, best

when you look at a Golden?

in show winners, national specialty winners, and at the end of the day the greatest achievement is do they make you smile when you look at them. What is your favorite show to attend and why. A: From a breed perspective my favorite show to attend in the USA is the Golden Retriever Club of America National Specialty. This week-long show allows both Ann and myself an opportunity to look potential

1. Balance / proportions – both on the move and standing. 2. Head properties 3. Coat and temperament. (I can’t just choose three). Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? Faults that drive me crazy are: Bad temperament, improper heads, open / soft coats, long and low in proportion and incorrect tails.

young males for breeding and to have meaningful

On the health front there is good work going on to address

conversations with respected breeders. All-breed shows

health problems. Many breeders test their dogs, but is

would include Westminster and Crufts, for the obvious

there more work to be done? What medical test do you

reasons.

consider necessary to have before mating your Golden?

ABOUT THE BREED How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the Golden should look like, or is there just one correct type?

How would you rate health in the breed overall? As you already know my partner in breeding is a veterinarian. We are vigilant in testing for everything that we can, in hopes of reducing the chance of perpetuating many of genetic problems plaguing the breed. We currently test for the following before

That’s a loaded question that has and will continue

breeding: hips, eyes, hearts, elbows, DNA for ichthyosis

to get me in trouble. There is only one type-period!

(skin), PRA 1, PRA 2, PRCD-PRA, NCL (neurological). We

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utilize the Embark DNA Golden Retriever panel test. How has the breed changed over the years since you first began in the breed? Would you say that the breed has evolved for the better or for the worse? The breed, at least in the US, has evolved from a

Moderate with good reach and drive. I always say to new judges “You are going to see a lot of sheep in the ring, go for the cow!” In order of importance how would you place movement, head, coat, substance, and type?

gentleman’s gundog to a flashy, glamourized show

Type is defined by movement, head, coat, substance. All

machine. Long, low specimens with open / fluff coats

are important.

have become the norm at all-breed shows with the correct dogs only being exhibited to breeder judges and specialty shows. Mediocrity has become the norm. Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Golden?

Please name 3 of your all-time favorite winners that have been bred or owned by you and three not owned nor bred by you. Three of my all-time favorites are: Ch. Roshar Chimere,

A medium sized, well-built gundog with a gold-colored

Ch. Westrose Happy Fellah and Ch. Verdoro’s Boom or

coat and proportions of length to height of 12:11 – length

Bust. Three or more that were not owned or bred by

in the rib and a short broad loin. Primarily a gundog,

me: Ch. Davern Figaro, Ch. Lorinford Harlequin, Ch.

proper coat texture, level back, tail carried level and a

Lorinford Lancelot, Ch. Nortonwood Checkmate, and

head that has the strength to perform while exuding a

Ch. Cal-Vo’s Happy Ambassador.

kind, gentle nature. Exaggerations should never be part of the equation in defining the ideal Golden. Easy going,

What advice would you give to a new person in the breed?

coordinated movement with four legs underneath the

Listen, watch and absorb as much information as

body, level topline and a tail that is carried off the back.

possible – the magic is in the pedigree.

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The wonderful world of

Allison

Believing that you should always do what you love, Allison Foley became a professional handler in 1987. She has been presenting Canada’s (and the world’s) top dogs ever since. With more than 550 All-Breed Best in Shows, she was proud to have been highly awarded at such prestigious shows as Crufts, the World Dog Show, Westminster Kennel Club, and the AKC Invitational. She has also had top dog all breeds in Canada on three separate occasions. All three dogs are still record holders. In addition to her wins as an all-breed handler, Allison has spent more than thirty years perfecting the art of presenting one of the dog world’s most difficult breeds to master--the Poodle. Today, she is internationally recognized as one of the world’s most talented and experienced Poodle handlers. Allison has presented seminars on grooming Poodles all over the world. She is also the creative educational advisor and specialist for Chris Christensen Systems. Allison has proven that hard work, dedication, and passion can take you everywhere in this wonderful sport. In 2017, she launched Leading Edge Dog Show Academy, the world’s first online dog show training school. Her mission is to help mentor a new generation of dog show enthusiasts through innovative video-based grooming and handling lessons. LEDSA has won the award for best online education each year since it’s inception. Allison looks forward to working with enthusiastic students as they perfect their skills on the way to the winner’s circle.


The new normal Better Than Ever by Allison Alexander

By now most of you know that I live in Canada.

go to our friend’s house and socialize a puppy. Even the

Canada spans roughly 10,000,000 square kilometers

veterinarian was a curbside pick-up. All of this for the

(approximately 6,200,000 square miles) and has a

better part of last year and where I live it continues into

population of less than 38 million people. This translates

the summer months.

to Canada has one of the lowest population densities in the world. As much as there are many memes and cartoons of Canadians hidden in their igloos don’t let that fool you. More than 80% of us Canucks live in cities, with more than 1/3 of us living in just three cities Vancouver, Montreal, and Toronto.

As a result of no dog shows for a year many people are asking do we even need dog shows? Do we need to gather humans and dogs from all over the world and bring them together with the risk of getting sick? Well, we are a resilient bunch. More importantly to me when we do all get together real human energy abounds! To

It was cities where the effects of COVID-19 were

me that is so inspiring. Knowledge of Poodles gone

most acutely felt, especially during the early days of

past, of pedigrees and people just coagulates together

lockdown. Once vibrant bustling cities were basically

in crazy little places like the Poodle Club of America,

shut down all over the world. No one was going to the

Westminster Kennel Club, Crufts, and many more.

office, you couldn’t go shopping, there was and still is zero nightlife. Take into consideration as well theatres, concert halls, museums. Absolutely no sporting events. No dog shows. Life, and cities went very, very dark.

Do I miss the events? The winning? The losing? The excitement? Of course, but what I miss more, what we cannot live without are the connections. After the hairspray has been bathed out, the last dog has sighed

Many said maybe we shouldn’t have cities. We should all

and curled up to sleep what means the most is the wine,

move out of them-that is how we are going to survive.

the friendship, and most of all the stories. Old or new.

Live in little pockets all around the world and no more

Raunchy or completely PG, all about the dogs and their

urbanization.

humans. That is what I miss. That is why dog shows

As well as a world-wide stoppage of dog shows and all

have to come back.

dog sports there were no handling classes, no puppy

Luckily for us dog shows are not going to become

classes, no agility, nose work, hunting trials. We couldn’t

extinct. Why? Because we need to thrive. We need to

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have that crazy energy that only spraying up 14 Poodles of three different varieties in a couple of hours at Crufts can bring.

to love it, and so have our dogs. We have also made the most of those small windows of time when we were allowed to socialize. and we’ve

My question for you to ponder now is can our dog world

learned that socializing from six feet away even with

actually be better than ever after the pandemic?

our dogs is not such a bad thing. Our dogs have learned

If the early days of dog showing in the United States is any indication, then the number of entries will get larger and the competition fiercer. For many years now

to love being at home with us and not always having to go to a dog show. Being able to curl up on the couch and watch Netflix and chill is heavenly.

all the experts have agreed that having too many dog

We have learned to spray up a Poodle and trim it not for

shows made for diluted entries both in quantity and in

the dog show, but for the pure indulgence of how our

quality.

gorgeous Poodles look.

My favorite class at PCA to compete in or watch

When we all get to travel, I think it will be easier. The

is Standard Poodles Open Females. It is always so

commute to the dog show is not going to be as congested.

competitive. You know that any of those dogs in the

Airports will be easier to navigate. There is going to be

final cut could and usually do go onto win a Best in

more resiliency and compassion among us all.

Show. I cannot wait for this year. Imagine a PCA with not just one year’s crop of open bitches but two years of them! That is worth the price of admission right there.

The pandemic has taught us to learn from each other. In an industry and hobby where not everyone is very tech savvy we have taught each other how to get on a

Some advantages we have had is the time to see our

Zoom or Skype call. How to face time our way through

young dogs grow up without the stress and pressure of

a grooming project. Those things we can carry with us,

entering them at a dog show. Even if we want to “hold

expand upon, and use as life and travel opens. They also

them back” or “wait for PCA” we often enter a local

have the added benefit of bringing the world together

show. Maybe it is a show we think we need to support.

in a different, interesting and much needed way.

We have all had some more time to look at what we have at home, perfect some training, perfect some grooming techniques and really take stock without outside influences.

In many places around the world people are still suffering from the pandemic or the effects from it. Vaccines are controversial, slow to roll out in some countries and abundant in others. We have survived.

We are learning to appreciate that we can train and

We will continue to not only survive but thrive. I truly

socialize our dogs by ourselves. That we can do a lot

believe that as we come out on the other side of this

more things outside with our dogs than we previously

pandemic that one of the things that will emerge is

did. We started those extra walks and training sessions

the second renaissance of the modern dog show era. I

in the cold mostly out of necessity, but we have learned

cannot wait.

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I N T E RV I E W W I T H J U N IO R H A N D L E R

LILY Bennett Hello Lily. Thank you for accepting our invitation and taking your time to participate in this interview with Best in Show magazine. I am sure many people around your country know you as a very successful junior handler. To begin with, please tell us some facts about you and your beginnings. I have always had a big part in raising awareness and funds for children’s charities starting from a young age. I still take most of the month of March to help three children’s charities that are supported by the Portland Roadster Show. Angels On Wheels toy drive that helps the Randall Legacy Children’s Hospital, Wagon Angels-where wooden wagons are painted custom for children with cancer, and the High School Challenge where we give scholarships to high school youth to help them follow their dreams of learning about cars. When we were helping at the county fair fine arts booth, I noticed the 4-H dog project and became intrigued. I was introduced to junior showmanship completely by accident through 4-H in 2015. My leader suggested I go to a handling class after doing so well at a fun match.

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After a lot of practice, I went to my first AKC show with

several people to explain to me what just happened, and

my Miniature American Shepherd Ginger. While I was

it took me a while to get over the embarrassment. In

successful in 4-H in different areas of competition, I

fact, I did not come out of the lady’s restroom for over

decided to acquire a more competitive dog to start

ten minutes.

the training with myself. I was told about Dr. Cheryl McDermott DVM who had a Cirneco Dell’ Etna. We had no idea what this breed was. We drove to Ethel, Washington, a small town north of us, on Thanksgiving weekend and met Cheryl. She brought Deagan in, who was just six months old. He promptly came up to me and

I didn’t have a mentor when I started out. I was lucky enough to find several people to help me learn about AKC dog shows. Currently, I have several handlers, breeders, and owners that are willing to share their knowledge with me.

put his head in my chest as his way of loving me. He

Who do you consider your biggest supporter along the

went home with us that night. When my father came

way?

home from working out of town, we had a new dog! I then started to learn about larger dogs with German Shorthaired Pointers.

A: My biggest supporters have been my parents! My mother is always willing to go the extra distance to drive me to the best shows, help me find clothes when I hit a

What was your first experience at a dog show? Did you

huge growth spurt, plan my schedules, find hotels, and

have a mentor as soon as you started?

eat what I like while out on the road. My father always

My first experience at an AKC dog show was interesting, to say the least. The first time I walked into the ring with my frightened Cirneco, his puppy brain thought it would be a good idea to suck up one of his testicles and get us excused. I was ten at the time and was quite confused why I was asked to leave the ring. It took

considers me to be the best junior handler, win, lose or draw. He is a patient when I forget to call him while out on the road and does not make me return a new dog that I bring home. My father even supported my crazy idea to compete at the 2019 Crufts Dog Show, with over 22,000 dogs entered. I was one of 25 who entered from

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Wirehaired Pointing Griffon (Goose). At the Placerville, California shows in May 2019, my Standard Manchester Terrier mentor allowed me to show her group winning dog in best in show. To my surprise, we were awarded BIS over some of the top dogs in the country. Everyone was surprised and delighted when we repeated the BIS win the following day. I am very honored to have won back-to-back BIS at the age of 14. What breed do you consider is the best to compete within the JH and why? I believe it depends more on the individual dog than the breed. It can be very stressful being in juniors for the handler and the dog because you must maintain focus the U.S. It was an amazing experience winning the Good

for such long periods of time. However, the relationship

Citizen Dog Scheme Class and then placing third in a

and rapport can be life changing.

breed class with over 26 Cirnechi! My Mimi has always been a huge part of my life and is always there for me and holds down the fort while we are gone. My mentors

Do you think it is better to be consistent and show one breed in JH or to change breeds and dogs more often?

help me by always seeming to have a good time at the

I personally love showing different breeds of dogs in

shows even though we don’t always win, teaching me

juniors. I enjoy learning the different breed standards

how to exhibit my breeds to the best of my ability, new

and learning how to handle the different dogs’

grooming techniques, and cheering me on even though

individual style and aspects of their breed. Within the

some of them are across the country and around the

eight different groups of dogs, I have found that each

world.

breed is unique with their own quirks and foibles. This

What is a highlight in your junior handling career so far? While all my wins have been exciting, the ones that stand out are being name the best junior handler of

is what makes learning so exciting and fun. What are the sides of dog shows you like, what do you dislike?

California with my Cirneco Dell Etna, Deagan in 2019

One of the unique things I like about the dog shows is

and making it to the semi-finals at Royal Canin in

the ability to try different food from different areas

December of 2020. As for breed wins as a junior handler

of the country. I like most of it, but not all of it. I like

with my Deagan, I was able to represent the breed on

the people. I love being able to see my friends from

the red carpet at the Orlando Nationals. I have also

different parts of the country. We talk about different

won two back-to-back NOHS best in shows with my

hobbies or different sports, K-POP, and Anime. Who has

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been to the most current Comic-Con? What are their plans for the summer? I get to see breeds that are not as common in my area. I love to see the different handlers and how they each have their own style of grooming. I don’t like that it can be so political and can have such poor sportsmanship. What do you like doing more: showing dogs or grooming and preparing them? I like doing all the above. I really enjoy grooming as it is quite therapeutic, presenting the dog you have groomed gives you an adrenaline rush. I am excited to take a new puppy and train him for the show ring. Taking a puppy on the journey from not knowing anything to being successful in the ring gives me the warm fuzzies. Do you think it is important for young people to work and be around professionals? It honestly depends on the professional and what their outlook is on junior showmanship. Handlers can have different attitudes about competing with juniors. The handlers can see it as “That junior is serious competition” or “That junior is great! I hope they are very successful”.

Have you ever considered becoming a breeder or judge one day? My Boston Terrier mentors have allowed me to cobreed a few litters and we are now Breeders of Merit. My first Cirneco Dell’ Etna litter will be my Deagan (GCHS Ch. Kr’Msun Nero D’ Avola RN TKI ACT2 CGC CGCA CGCU VHM FDC ATT) bred to Ch. Kr’Msun Declaration of Independence. The owner of GCHS Ch. Colisto’s Bella, the only best in show Cirnechi in the breed, has allowed me to co-breed a litter with Deagan as the sire. I would

Would you like to become a professional one day and do

love to judge all breeds and juniors so I can travel the

this job for a living or do you have other plans?

world and be able to interact with the best dogs and

I’d love to keep this as a hobby rather than a living

junior handlers.

mainly because I feel that it would take the fun out of

Have you attended or watched any shows outside of the

it for myself and the dogs. I have plans to go to college

USA besides Crufts? If not, do you wish to visit some of

to major in animal science with a minor in business,

them? What in your opinion is different than the shows

with the goal of becoming a microbiologist. No matter

in America?

what I am doing in life, I will always give back to my community and help with children’s charities.

I was lucky enough to show at Crufts in breed in March of 2019. We were one of 26 Cirnechi, this being the

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largest entry we have ever competed with. A dream is

the west coast has not been as quick to open as the

to be able to show at the World Show in Spain in 2022,

rest of the country this has impacted the ability of the

in both breed and juniors. The difference between the

juniors on the west coast to be competitive for national

two venues is Crufts in Europe did not have any ring

rankings and Westminster / AKC National qualifying

stanchions, the chairs defined the ring. The catalogs,

wins. Covid also made maintaining my friendships

procedures and class names are different. The European

complicated, because of the shutdown of the dog shows.

show attire is more casual.

Thankfully with technology, we have been able to stay

How do you manage your school activities with all your hobbies? For me, it is quite difficult because of late nights and

in touch. Do you have any suggestions for young people just entering the dog show world? What should they be aware of?

early mornings to prepare the dogs for that day’s show,

For junior handlers just starting out, remember that the

somehow wedging in schoolwork at the same time. But

best dog is the one going home with you. It is important

my online teachers and principal at Peak Prep Academy

to keep a sense of humor and every time you go in the

are great and very supportive about my weird schedule.

ring it is a learning experience.

I am even able to write reports on the places and museums I have visited for extra credit.

Thank you once again for taking your time and letting our readers get to know you a bit better. We hope you’ll

How has Covid-19 influenced your life and activities? Did

continue following your dreams and we wish you a lot of

it change a lot, or did you continue with life normally?

success in the upcoming competitions and life.

Covid has really impacted my life with dog shows being

Thank you for the opportunity to tell the fancy about

shut down and opening mostly on the east coast. Since

myself!

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TRAVEL Tips

NEW YORK POPULAR AND SECRET PLACES IN NEW YORK

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T RA VEL TIPS · NEW YORK

We are back in New York and it is almost summer, so the

Artichoke Basille’s Pizza This is definitely a great place

feeling might be different. No packing coats this time!

to eat to tantalize the tastebuds. We recommend the

New York City has a wide variety of places to see, eat

artichoke pizza. The taste is amazing, and it is not like

and visit, so we are presenting you some of the many

a regular pizza. They also offer the option to purchase

places to go that we enjoy in the city. Enjoy your trip!

by the slice, this way you get served quick and get to try

TIME TO EAT!

different pizzas. A great value for money. It’s a must!

BEST OF BREED MEAL Baz Beagle and Restaurant Very small, cozy and friendly place. Their menu has a lot of variety and food is delicious! The staff is very nice and helpful. The restaurant is small and always packed, so we recommend making reservations and you will be seated right away!

GROUP 1 MEAL Piccola Cucina This is a must go to restaurant for true Sicilian food. Most of the staff and patrons are Italian, and the restaurant is small and cozy. The food is sensational. The pasta alla Norma is a staple dish and worth every calorie. A true experience. Caracas Arepa Bar Great little spot with authentic arepas. The flavors are fresh and authentic, the prices are very reasonable and the atmosphere is lively. It is small and can get crowded, but it’s worth stopping in during the day for a snack or full meal.


T RA VEL T I P S · NEW YORK

K. Rico Steakhouse was created by Tommy Greco and Christian Tanno. Having traveled extensively throughout different parts of Latin America, they became enamored with the diverse cuisines, cultures, and flavors of many lands, and wanted to offer an authentic experience based on these culinary and cultural adventures. At K. Rico, the butchering and dry aging of the steaks is done in-house, and the cuts are displayed at the table before guests place their orders, resulting in a unique and memorable New York City dining experience.

BEST IN SHOW MEAL Per Se Opened in 2004, Per Se is Thomas Keller’s acclaimed New York interpretation of The French Laundry in the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle. Designed by Adam D. Tihany, Per Se features a serene and intimate environment with spectacular views of Central Park and Columbus Circle. The restaurant is Chef Keller’s second three-Michelin-starred property featuring his daily nine-course tasting menu and a ninecourse vegetable tasting menu using classic French technique and the finest quality ingredients available. Per Se is a member of the French-based associations Relais & Chateaux, Relais Gourmands, and Traditions & Qualite organizations, which are recognized for their dedication to maintaining the highest international standards for hospitality and culinary excellence.

Buenos Aires This restaurant offers a huge selection of tasty Argentine steaks. Great portions, great vibes, great service. You must try the creamed spinach for the side dish! Don’t forget to get dessert--panqueque dulce de leche. It was amazing!


T RA VEL TIPS · NEW YORK

Momofuku Ko Great experience from start to finish. You

questions you might have about New York’s long and

will love each dish and the beverage pairings -- nice

storied history. And don’t leave without stopping by the

variety of red, white, sparkling, beer and sake. Service

One Mix bar for a glass of celebratory prosecco and one

was outstanding, and if you are dining solo, the counter

last look toward the horizon.

is a fantastic place to watch all the kitchen action with never a dull moment.

Central Park For more than 150 years, visitors have TIME TO HAVE FUN

flocked to Central Park’s 843 green acres in the heart of Manhattan. Since 1980, the park has been managed by

New York is popular for so many places to see, here are

the Central Park Conservancy, in partnership with the

some of the spots we think you should not miss! Have a

public. Central Park is open from 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. daily.

blast!ambiance, it’s all you need.

Central Park Is an icon of the city and you can’t miss to

One world observatory There are a million things to

see its grandeur.

experience in New York City, but there is only one way to see them all at once. You can start by hopping a Sky Pod to the top of the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. There, 102 stories up, find yourself faceto-face with New York’s iconic skyline. Step onto the Sky Portal and stroll high above the crowded streets. Take an interactive guided tour of the city with the help of our Skyline Concierges, available to answer any

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T RA VEL T I P S · NEW YORK

Statue of Liberty The Statue of Liberty enlightening

The

the world was a gift of friendship from France to the

commemoration,

people of the United States and is a universal symbol

programs, the National 9/11 Memorial & Museum, a

of freedom and democracy. The Statue of Liberty was

nonprofit in New York City, remembers and honors

dedicated on October 28, 1886 and designated as a

the 2,983 people killed in the horrific attacks of

national monument in 1924. It was restored for her

September 11, 2001, and February 26, 1993, as well

centennial on July 4, 1986

as those who risked their lives to save others and all

National

9/11

Memorial&Museum Through

exhibitions,

and

educational

who demonstrated extraordinary compassion in the aftermath of the attacks.

New York Public Library Two marble lions mark the THE FINE ARTS

entrance to this Beaux Arts masterpiece, a national historic landmark containing more than six million

The Metropolitan Museum of Art At New York City’s most

books. This is truly a remarkable building with history

visited museum and attraction, you will experience

that you can’t miss visiting.

over 5,000 years of art from around the world. The Met is for anyone as a source of inspiration, insight and understanding. You can learn, escape, play, dream, discover, and connect with art to inspire.


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