Best in Show Magazine Fall 2018

Page 1












Publishers Jovana Danilovic Ruth Rauherz Managing Editor Ruth Rauherz editor@bestinshowmagazine.com Art Director Jovana Danilovic jovana@bestinshowmagazine.com Marketing Manager Juraj Sokolic ads@bestinshowmagazine.com Contributin Writers Milla, Kannine, Anne Tureen, Richard Hellman, Juha Kares, Karl Donvil, Lisa Croft-Elliott Jovana Danilovic, Bo Bengtson, Ante Lucin, Viltė Šokaitytė, Mihaela Kosic Contributing Photographers Selene Favretto, Karl Donvil, Anna Szabo, Lisa Croft-Elliott, Jeffrey Hanlin, Tommaso Urciuolo, Jovana Danilovic Web Designers Jovana Danilovic Sanja Jukic

intro Dear Best in Show readers and followers, After very successfully published 19 editions of Best in Show Magazine, we are proudly presenting you our Fall issue where you will be able to enjoy beautiful photos from shows around the Europe including reports from the World Dog Show Amsterdam by Karl Donvil, 4 Summer Split Shows and Amstaff Major by Boris Glukharev, and many reports from the dog scene worldwide. Besides reports you will be able to read a great number of articles and interviews such as interview with Groomer Santi Sarria, Handler Stefano Schiavo and Junior Handler Aurora de Poli. In This edition you will be able to meet two lovely breeds: Samoyed and Volpino Italiano. I truly hope you will enjoy spending time reading our new edition with a cup of coffee or tea until our next edition which will be Annual 2019. Enjoy!

Printed by GrafoMark d.o.o Questions and feedback: Conaros Sportmanagement AG Landstrasse 58, 9494 Schaan, Liechtenstein

E-mail: ads@bestinshowmagazine.com Web: www.bestinshowmagazine.com While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this publication, the publisher Conaros Sportmanagement AG can not accept liability for any statement or error contained herein. Best In Show Magazine cannot accept responsibility for the claims, goods or services of advertisers. No part of this magazine, inckluding texts, photographs, illustrations, maps or any other graphics may be reproduced in any other way without the prior written consent of Conaros Sportmanagement AG.

Best in Show Magazine

Jovana Danilovic publisher & art director







Content

24 82

110

182

24

World Dog Show

54

History of WDS

82

Stefano Schiavo

90

Aurora de Poli

102

Santi Sarria

110

Amstaff Major

126

Guisachan Retriever Specialty

140

Volpino Italiano

182

Samoyed

218

4 Summer Split Shows

by Karl Donvil by Karl Donvil

Interview with Professional Handler Interview with Junior Handler Interview with Groomer

by V. Mihaljcic & B. Glukharev

by Arianna Rosellini-Briscoe Meet the breed

Interview with Breeders

by Boris Glukharev









2018 World Dog Show 2018 AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS by Karl Donvil

I was rather curious to find out if this was really the biggest World Dog Show ever. I clearly remember Paris, the biggest so far, and Leipzig, the biggest so far but from another point of view. And now I read that Amsterdam had to close the entries earlier as they had reached the maximum that they could welcome. Yes, it was a big show, but no, it wasn’t the biggest World Dog Show ever. There were only 17,652 entries for the World Dog Show, but...it was the biggest concentration ever of dogs being shown under one roof in one weekend. Thursday there was the Benelux Winner with 7712 entries, and during the 3 following days of the World Dog Show there were the Specialties, call it the Club Shows, good for 8294 entries. But we can say that the number of dogs entered on one or all of these shows was slightly more than the number entered for the WDS, as for sure, the dogs that were entered on the Benelux Winner participated most probably on the WDS and the specialties. So, individually we can estimate around 18,000 individual dogs in total. But of course, that is very good and to have the space and the rings for all the World Show and the Specialties the RAI (event halls of Amsterdam) were an excellent choice. However, parking is a problem and very, very expensive. Caravans and Motorhomes had to park about 17km kilometers away and notwithstanding the shuttle that was organized, it was not very convenient if you had to take all your stuff, or big dogs with you. But even with a car it was not easy. The RAI is close to the center and there is hardly any sparking around. All parking is under the halls plus a special parking complexes attached to the halls. You could only enter with a ticket bought in advance and

24

Best in Show Magazine

it was far from cheap. The first day I had to queue more than half an hour in the early morning as it was a working day and a several hundred of cars had to find their way to a parking spot. I had to park very far away and from Hall 1 where I was it took me 25 minutes to go find something in my car that I forgot. The last day I was parked in the parking tower on the 5th floor and it took so long before the lift came up, sometimes still full with people, dogs and crates that I took the stairs finally. Friends, trade stand holders, had to pay 650 EURO for the weekend to have their van parked on the parking outside. Parking came in surplus to the entrance fee for the dogs and catalog that was to be paid an extra 5 EURO/day/ Show. Suppose you entered a dog rather late you had to pay 120 EURO for the WDS, 75 for the Benelux Winner and 55 for the Specialty show, or 265 EURO including catalogs and excluding the parking for 3 days (3x 12,50 EURO) and traveling costs and hotel or camping. There you go! Visitors had to pay 15 EURO (adults) per day but there were special rates for the whole weekend, for children and seniors. Still Sunday morning in the Press Conference was announced that already 35,000 visitors were counted. The Dutch Kennel Club, founded in 1901, has about 200 breed clubs, 70 regional training clubs and about 10 specialty clubs like for training judges etc. Every year they have +/- 6500 litters registered, good for about 36,000 puppies and they estimate that live around 1,5 milj dogs of which 500,000 are purebreds. All this means that cynology is flourishing well. But dark clouds are casting a dark shadow over all this as there is a strong anti -dog-


show and anti-pure-bred-dogs lobby. Holland had the first animal rights party elected in the world and although Animal Rights is good, it must not go into extremes. In Amsterdam they seat in the city council and would have banned the World Dog Show if they could, but all agreements to organize the WDS were made long before they had any power. Anyway, the long term agreement with the RAI, which belongs to the city, will come to an end and the council does not want to prolong it. Fortunately it did not affect the show, although there were no officials to visit this event. The local media were full of comments , articles and interviews and in the end this was a marvelous opportunity for the Dutch Kennel Club to counter the anti lobby and show what they actually stand for. I was told that there was a small protest group announced but I did not see anything. But the Dutch Kennel Club was very afraid that stupid exhibitors or visitors with dogs would let dogs in the car. One such incident would lit the fire again and that would be disastrous for the Kennel Club. Severe measurements were announced in case some dogs were found left in cars. Zero tolerance was the motto. If dogs were found in cars, even in the shade or in the parking, the name of the owner of the car was traced via the license plate that was registered by entering the RAI. If the owner did not show up within maximum 30 minutes , the car was broken open. The owner had to pay a fine of several hundred EURO’s , was excluded from the show, all titles withdrawn and was banned not only from the show but also prohibited to enter any dog in the Netherlands in the future. By the end of the event about 15 cases were found. GOOD JOB ! I hope other countries will follow this example as our hobby is really under fire nowadays. In Luxembourg the Minister of Agriculture has suspended the shows as a result of cases of dogs left in cars with fatal consequences. I think it is only not fair to punish a whole community for the misbehavior of some individuals. But severe measurements like in Amsterdam will surely help to counter the anti lobby and alarm those who don’t really care about the dogs, only about money and prestige. Professional handlers will think twice if they take more dogs than they can manage, because if banned they have no job. The official motto of the show was “Show the world your talent”. With regard to shows to me it sounds

a little weird. What talent is involved in showing a dog? Of course you need to know your dog, be able to handle and present him and pick out the best examples to breed from. But compared to talents of dogs who help disabled people, do search and rescue, scan people for drugs, for cancer, etc. then we speak of a real talent, a skill. A World Dog Show is a beauty contest, no more no less and talent is not the same as being lucky to look nice. A talent is something that is meant to be developed, but the way a dog looks can hardly be changed. Talent counted much more for the dogs who gave demonstrations in Frisbee, Agility, Dog Dancing, Rescue and police work and all other disciplines that were shown in the demonstration ring in Hall 1. There was also a “theater course” , a new discipline where dogs are learned several tricks that could be of use in films and television work. That a World Dog Show requires a massive amount of helpers and people involved is certainly no secret. In order to welcome all those dogs and owners from 74 different nationalities, 450 volunteers were active every day to clean up every evening, prepare the rings, assist as ring steward, cleaning up excrements, collecting results, guide visitors and exhibitors... it is a massive job with lots of volunteers involved, not only from the Netherlands, but also from the neighboring countries and Belgium in the first place as they speak the same language. The breed stand, about 200, were not placed in some kind of village, but next to the ring where the breed was shown. In total there were 60 rings. On the map of the halls I counted 78 rings but probably the 18 extra rings were reserved for the specialties. About 200 judges were invited from 50 different countries and there was a lot of press registered, about 120. And in Hall 1 most of the 150 Trade Stands were located including the two main sponsors, Royal Canin and Eukanuba. Statistics were not to be found in the catalog but at the Press Conference we received an overview of the top ten breeds and the participants. Here we learn that there was a massive representation from Russia, leading for the Benelux Winner and the Specialties and with 1851 entries for the World Dog Show, right after Germany with 3 more entries and the Netherlands who were leading with 1921 entries. France had 1544 entries, Italy 1344. Another impressive number were the British entries; on the

Best in Show Magazine

25


4th place right after Finland with 655 entries, on the 7th place for the WDS with 901 entries and on the second place behind Russia with 717 entries. Let us not forget that England recognizes far fewer breeds than the FCI countries. The Benelux winner was a one day show held on Thursday and it took very long before the Best In Show was chosen, almost 9 in the evening. Not only were all the 10 groups on term but if you do that not only for the adult dogs, but also for the juniors, plus choosing the best Brace, Group, Progeny Group, Junior Handler, Minor Puppy, Puppy, Veteran, Working Class and Dutch breeds.... no need to tell that this program had no climax towards the end, just a longing to go home, sleep and focus on the WDS or Specialties the next days. Fortunately the main ring for the WDS ended at a reasonable hour, between 6 and 7 PM and around 8 on Sunday. The specialties, however, lasted late almost every day. They were held on Friday and Saturday only, not on Sunday. The best In Show went to the Scottish Terrier “Mcvan’s Big Bopper At Beameups” shown by Rebecca Cross from the United States of America. On Friday Groups 1, 3 and 4 were on term, good for 4993 dogs judged by 54 judges. Big numbers in breeds were the American Staffordshire Terrier, 185 in total, Australian Shepherds, 170, Jack Russels , 218 all together, Staffordshire Bull Terriers, 154, 107 Scottish Terriers, 107 Miniature Bull Terrier, 98 Westies, 125 Yorkies and 237 Welsh Corgis, Cardigan and Pembrokes together. The Dachshunds are one group in FCI, Group IV and here we found 751 specimen, all varieties is size and coat. The groupwinning Dachshund was later disqualified. He belonged to a judge, Mr. Jean-François Vanaken from Belgium, who was officiating on this show and that is not allowed by the FCI rules. It is a missed chance for the other winning Dachshunds as they could not compete for BIS in the main ring on Sunday. I think in general that judges should no longer show dogs they own at all on shows, even if they don’t officiate on that show. It gives always a corrupt feeling, certainly if they win, and automatically they win more easily because they know so many judges. It gives other judges also a very discomforting feeling and for sure tend to place their dogs higher than they normally would. On Saturday we found some interest-

26

Best in Show Magazine

ing groups as 6, 7, 8 and 10 were on term. Only 4413 were to be judged also by 54 different judges. Groups 6 and 7 have so many rare breeds that one hardly sees but in the native country or on a World or European dog show. Let me sum up a few: Bleu Gascony Basset and Griffon, Bleu Picardy Spaniel, Ariègois and Ariègois pointing dog, Poitevin, Auvergne Pointer, Briquet Griffon Vendéen, the Istrian hounds, the Polish hounds, the Swiss hounds, the French hounds, Spaniels and Waterdogs, the Segugio’s from Italy, the Great Gascony Blue, the Norwegian hound, the Hamiltonstövare and a I can go on. Several of them can be seen in different coats and most of them had only a few of them present on the show. But it was very interesting that this World Dog Show had one of the most wide spectra in breeds and breed varieties recognized by the FCI. Aspirant All-round judges should grab the opportunity to have a close look at certain breeds they will probably see only a few times in their lives and they should discuss them with specialist judges. Notwithstanding the many rare breeds, these groups contain also some of the most popular breeds. And the big overall winner is the Rhodesian Ridgeback that had 231 examples on this show. The two second most popular breeds were the Labrador and the Golden Retrievers, both with 219 entries. The 4th place was also taken by a breed of group VI, the Beagles, 212 were present. More big numbers are lined up here: 154 Dalmatians, 167 English Cocker Spaniels, 139 Flat Coated Retrievers, 127 Salukis, 171 Weimaraners and 163 Whippets. No specialties on Sunday because there were 8220 entered for the WDS. 94 Judges had to judge them and all 78 rings had to be available in order to finish in time for the start of the finals. It was the day of the groups 2, 5 and 9.Large groups with lots of popular breeds and that counts certainly for the breeds of group 2. Rare breeds were the Dutch Smoushond, a dog rarely to be found out of the Netherlands, only 4 were entered, teh Eeast Siberian Laika, the Asian breeds like the Hokkaido, Kai, Kishu, Korean Jindo dog, the Shikoku, Taiwan dog and Thai Bangkaew dog. The Rafeiro de Alentejo and Jämthund are certainly to be mentioned too., and I was surprised to find such a high number of DanishSwedish Farmdogs, 32 imagine, but that is probably because Denmark borders the Netherlands. I like


this dog as it looks so ordinary like the farmdogs that I used to see a lot when I was young and that were called “farmers fox”. I also need to mention a non recognized Dutch breed, the “Markiesje”, a black spaniel like companion dog, seen often in old Dutch paintings. There were only 9 entered. High numbers were found in the Bernese Mountain dog with 174 entries, the Boston Terriers with 153 entries. The Bulldogs are still very popular, 204 were on this show. Chihuahuas too, 315 were entered, long coats and smooths together. 155 Chinese Cresteds were shown, 236 French Bulldogs, 275 Great Danes, 142 Cane Corso’s and 323 Miniature Schnauzers (all colors together). Pugs keep on being popular, 200 were here and the Pomeranian is coming up a lot with 141. The Siberian too keep well with 174 entries while the Black Russian Terrier is also a rising star with 122 entries! The main ring was large enough with stairs left en right from the podium, the press facing it and upstairs below them the VIP area. The presentation was very well done, in English and Dutch. The carpet was green, not the most wanted colors for the photographers. The press was divided up in those who write and those who took photos for all breed magazines. The first group was seated on the stairs , along with the photographers who only were interested in one or a few breeds. The other photographers had to wear a security vest with PHOTO written on it. The security was very strict and no-one else was allowed in the main ring. That is probably the reason why everything went so fluently and fast. Besides a few flower pots there was not much decoration. The opening ceremony was nothing spectacular starting with a laser show without any message as if one was testing all the buttons available and on the ever used music of “who let the dogs out”. That was followed by a team of acro-dancers depicting most aspects of Holland and their people. That was a nicer treat than the laser show. The light in general was very uneven, especially on the podium where the numbers 1 and 4 were lit totally different compared to 2 and 3. Above the main ring was a big screen where the life streaming was visible. The main ring was well attended each evening and the public stayed until the last moment on Sunday in order to find out who would become the ultimate winner of this

prestigious show and go home with one of the very nice trophies, made by one of the board members of the Dutch Kennel Club, Mr. Hugo Stempher. CEO of the Dutch Kennel Club, Mr Ronny Doedijns, was the chosen one to judge Best In Show. Mr.Doedijns is now 52 and allrounder judge since 2007. He started at 16 with a Finnish Spitz. He had a choice of 9 dogs (winner group IV excluded see above), 3 from Russia, 1 from South Korea (English Bulldog), 1 from Thailand (Pekingese), 1 from teh USA (Airedale Terrier) , 1 from Italy (Italian Pointing Dog), 1 English dog bred in Australia (Afgan Hound), 3 from Russia (Bouvier, American Akita, Golden Retriever) and finally one from the Netherlands, the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen. As there was no final ceremony but a repetition of the dull laser-show-who-let-the-dogs-out performance and the flag ceremony whereby the flag was handed over the Chinese Kennel Club, including a promotional video presentation of what can be expected, the Best In Show judging could start well in time. Unfortunately it started with smoke over the ring and dull light, a nightmare for the photographers. And worse, the light went only a little brighter during judging, but far from good. If you want to use a smoke machine, OK, but once finished have it blown away with a ventilator before you start. The spotlights were probably operated electronically as they could not follow the subject fluently and was far too small, lighting up only parts of the dogs or missing it completely. What a shame to end such a fantastic dog show like this. We Belgians know that contrary to us, Dutchmen are very chauvinistic , and my guess was right, the Dutch dog, the Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen won Best in Show. All group winners are supposed to be top dogs and as only one can win... Frosty Snowman is a 4 year old male entered in Champion Class and was bred by Phil Reid who still co-owns the dog with Gwen Huikenshoven who was the breeder of both parents of this dog. A really nice dog and very good mover too and a happy dog which has probably made this difference when a judge has to split hairs. The only record that can be broken next year in Shangai is that of being the biggest show ever in Asia. Lots of people from Europe will probably chose to go to the European instead and that will probably be a big one, held in Wels in Austria.

Best in Show Magazine

27


FCI GROUP 1

Sheepdogs and Cattledogs JUDGED BY MRS. ILONA ONSTENK-SCHENK (NL)

1st place

2place nd

3place rd

4place th

FAMILY FLIGHT FINE CHANEL Bouvier des Flandres

Owned by Meshcheriakova, Irina

RACKAORZO ZALA Puli

Owned by Ravn, Jesper

SENTIKKI RIX ABSOLUTE VALUE Australian Shepherd Owned by Kronstam, Janne

LAILA OF SKAH DAKOTA White Swiss Shepherd Dog Owned by Scheve, Thorsten



FCI GROUP 2

Pinscher and Schnauzer - Molossoid and Swiss Mountain and Cattledogs JUDGED BY MR. ROBERTO DOUMA (NL)

1st place

2place nd

3place rd

4place th

CAPPELLI BULLSARGENTINA RODO Bulldog

Owned by Lee, Jinwoo

SENNENHUND ROSSII EQUADOR Great Swiss Mountain Dog Owned by Popov, T.

GREAT SOUL DEL PICCOLO JIGO Great Dane, fawn and brindle Owned by Roberto Lo Martire

JADE EAST CATCH YOU ON THE FLIP Shar Pei

Owned by Suarez Diaz, Jose


21


FCI GROUP 3

Terriers

JUDGED BY MR. JO SCJEPERS (NL)

1st place

2place nd

JOVAL ANGEL’S GLORY Airedale Terrier

Owned by Rickard, Valeria

MISHKA GAMMY MARUSYA CHELINES Wire Fox Terrier

Owned by Alberto, Velasco

3place rd

VICTORY IN THE GAME VERTRAGUS West Highland White Terrier

Owned by Przygodzka, Beata

4place th

MERRYMAC ZINNIA OF GOLD AGAIN Irish Terrier

Owned by Hagström, Gertrud


21


FCI GROUP 4

Dachshunds JUDGED BY MR. ANDRAS KOROZS (HU)

2place nd

MINIDOGLAND TAKE AFTER SUN Dachshund Miniature, smooth-haired Owned by Meier, Philippe

3place rd

4place th

PICOLLO TECKEL INFANTA Dachshund Rabbit, smooth-haired Owned by Pikul, Ekaterina

EX SENTIA DEVIL’S ADVOCATE Dachshund Standard, wire-haired Owned by Malecka, Agnieszka


21


FCI GROUP 5

Spitz and primitive types JUDGED BY MR. GREGORY ONISHCHENKO (UA)

1st place

2place nd

3place rd

4place th

LSA SIMONS SPLENDID American Akita

Owned by Hromov, Vladimir

ASSIYA MARINO

Xolotzcuintle, standard Owned by Ostrizhko, Yuliana

YUU-SAIKI V.D EGMATO Shikoku

Owned by Van veghel, Egitte

TOKIE TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE Pomeranian

Owned by Tangkaravakun, Chaiwat


21


FCI GROUP 6

Scent hounds and related breeds JUDGED BY MRS. SULVIE DESSERNE (FR)

1st place

2place nd

3place rd

FROSTY SNOWMAN Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen Owned by Huikeshoven, Gwen

TERRA D`ORFILI ENZO Basset Hound

Owned by Zueva, V.

ARAGON FROM CHARMING SHADOW Black and Tan Coonhound Owned by Garic, Sanela

4place th

COOKIE CRUNCH VAN TUM-TUM’S VRIENDJES Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen Owned by Huikeshoven, Gwen


21


FCI GROUP 7

Pointing Dogs JUDGED BY MR. HANS VAN DEN BERG (N)

1st place

2place nd

POLCEVERA’S PONENTE Italian Pointing Dog Owned by Segato, Gabriella

SINISUVEN FERNANDO Stabyhoun

Owned by Pehkonen, Elli

SOLIVIA´S WELL WELL WELL

3place rd

4place th

English Pointer

Owned by Maroszczyková, Irena

INDRA ETOILE DE PASSEMARAIS Brittany Spaniel Owned by Lindqvist, Kicki


21


FCI GROUP 8

Retrievers, Flushing Dogs & Water Dogs JUDGED BY MR. JOE DE CUYPER (BE)

1st place

2place nd

3place rd

4place th

LOZUNG ABSOLUTE LEGEND FERNFLOWER Golden Retriever Owned by Mironova, Irina

AMORE AMERICA BIG CITY LIFE English Cocker Spaniel

Owned by Lukacs Czegledi, Nora Attila

SOLIPSE FANTASTICO O.MUTI Romagna Water Dog

Owned by Kadnarova, Jana

ALBA NUADH SOAVE DI STEVIE

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Owned by Van Keesel-van Eijndhoven, Kelly


21


FCI GROUP 9

Companion and Toy Dogs JUDGED BY MR. FRANCESCO COCHETTI (IT)

LIVANDA KASHMIR

1st place

Pekingese Owned by Nagmsiriwong, Suwan

AFTERGLOW ELEKTRA

2place nd

3place rd

4place th

Standard Poodle

Owned by Shaw, John

CANMOY’S BOSTON GLOBETROTTER Boston Terrier

Owned by K. Subasic, Igor Mioc

FALAMANDUS REMASTERED EDITION Tibetan Terrier Owned by Rauhut, Sabine Katja


21


FCI GROUP 10

Sighthounds JUDGED BY MR. VLASTISLAV VOJTEK (SK)

ALAQADAR RIGOLETTO

1st place

Afghan Hound Owned by Douglas, Wayne

BORSCANA EUROCUB

2place nd

Borzoi

Owned by Sellin, Rickard

SOBERS XTRAVAGANZA Greyhound

3place rd

Owned by Ahrens - Primavera, Bitte - Pierluigi

4place th

KARISHMA DELLA BASSA PAVESE

Irish Walfhound Owned by Turini Salamon, Antonia


21


1st place FROSTY SNOWMAN Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen Owned by Huikeshoven, Gwen

2place nd FAMILY FLIGHT FINE CHANEL Bouvier des Flandres Owned by Meshcheriakova, Irina


3rd place CAPPELLI BULLSARGENTINA RODO Bulldog

Owned by Lee, Jinwoo

4place th POLCEVERA’S PONENTE Italian Pointing Dog Owned by Segato, Gabriella






1998 WORLD DOG SHOW Helsinki, Finland

54

Best in Show Magazine


WORLD DOG SHOWS through years by Karl Donvil

The Federation Cynologique International, better known as the FCI, was first established in 1911, a joint union of kennel Clubs of Germany, Austria, Belgium, France and the Netherlands but disappeared due to World War I. In 1921 the Société Centrale Canine de France and the Belgian Royal Society Saint Hubert recreated it . It took until 1968 for the FCI getting legal personality by decree. Since then there was only growth. Almost every country in Europe, except for the UK, Asia and South America are Full member of the FCI, Australia and New Zealand and a few more countries are Associate members. Africa including the Middle East is a white spot except for South Africa and a few countries that are Contract partners now. North America and Canada have their own Kennel Clubs. The FCI is a big organization with seat in Belgium in the city of Thuin. The purpose of the FCI is to set up standards for dogs, international recognition of pedigrees and standardizing all kind of competitions an titles. But in fact every country can still have its own rules, recognize specific breeds and do as they like. Of course it is in their own interest to not deviate too much from the FCI rules as that is a guarantee that other countries will want to recognize them. No need to explain in fact what the benefits are of not being isolated from your neighbors. Of course and as a natural consequence, one day they had the idea of organizing a world show, open to all the countries. In fact

any show is open to all dogs, wherever they come from. But a World Show is different as judges are invited from many different countries and the title of World Champion can be won, and that is of course something every exhibitor wants to have stamped on the pedigree of their dogs. The very first World Dog Show ever held was in 1971 in Budapest but no register is made about the amount of entries. In 72 Brazil was on term with “only 732 entries”. In 73 Dortmund had its first WDS and had a good entry of 4900 dogs. In 81 they were again on term and here we see a more significant number of dogs, 8800. The following year Japan was host to the WDS and had a entry of 1400 dogs. Not much but it was the first and only time a Asian country was guest country. It is no secret that a lot of Asian countries and Japan in the first place, have dogs that are more related in type to the American dogs than to the European. But that is probably not the reason. In 85 Amsterdam had the first WDS with 10.000 entries. A Saluki won BIS, Abrisa vom Felsenkeller, owned by Tim Teilers from Holland. Why do I mention this dog? It was the very first dog to ever win the WDS two times as the following year he won again in Tulln, Austria. In 1987 the show was held in Tel Aviv, Israel . Here it was the Samoyed “Northwind’s Rising Star” that won. Only 1200 dogs in comeptition. A year later when the show was organized in Lima, Peru he won again BIS, but I have no record of the number of entries for this edition. My own first WDS was the one in BrusBest in Show Magazine

55


sels in 1995, good for 14.100 entries. I was very excited. At that time Pedigree Pal was the main sponsor in all the dogs shows and I was used to see their big stands, but what was build for the WDS was beyond my imagination. A real small palace with a second deck for the VIP’s. It was certain that lots of money was involved the more so because there were two Range Rovers to be won, one for the BIS and one for the visitors. In ‘96 the show was split between two countries, Austria and Hungary. It was strange at least. My second WDS was the one of Helsinki in 1998. I remember the beautiful main ring, warm weather and lots of visitors. Finland, alike Norway and Sweden, is known to have a lot of members notwithstanding the low number of inhabitants. Mexico was next on term. With only 4000 entries it was a prestigious show. The opening and final ceremonies were in one word spectacular and beyond any imagination. The opening theme was the Inca time and a temple decor was build and Indians were there to give a spectacle. For the finals, horses were lifted on the second floor where the main ring was and they gave a fantastic performance of cavalry art. The ring stewards were all equipped with a laptop, don’t forget we were still 1999! Unfortunately the halls were too small for this event, not for the dogs, but there were over 300.000 visitors in only 3 days! I took handlers 20 minutes to reach a ring and many carried the dogs on their hands above the people in order to move a little faster. The air-conditioning was unable to cool down, only because of the heath produced by the people. The trophies were massive silver jaguars and statues differing in size but the heaviest several kilograms in weight. Milano, Italy, was the host in 2000. I remember a lot of chaos and even fighting among the press people in the main ring in order to take a proper photo. They had a good entry number of 15200 dogs. Porto was a rather small show with only 7200 entries. It was decided to unite the people of the press and the first action was taken by myself to start the World Dog Press Association in order 56

Best in Show Magazine

to enforce better working conditions for the photographers. I also remember the finals when several Lippizaners entered the main ring and gave a nice performance of classic cavalry art. It was here too that the local breeds were presented by people in local dress. Amsterdam was on term in 2002. 40.000 visitors was a record for Europe. It was here that the World Dog Press was officially baptized already uniting over 65 members worldwide. Dortmund in Germany was host city in 2003. A nice entry of 18.716 dogs was nice but for the rest it was Deutsche Gründlichkeit but little show. That was no difference for Brazil that organized the next World Dog Show, but it started in minor with 11 dogs that died due to the heath. A few died on the tarmac of the airfield where they were kept in the bright sun in their cages without drink or food and brought to the show on the back of a truck. And some died at the show. Little details were given and no public sorry or whatever. It was very hot and a super boring show. Only about 2000 dogs were entered and they came day after day as one day it was the Americas show, the second the Brazilian Championship Show and the third day the World Dog Show. Brazil can be a dangerous country and that was clear from the fact that during the International Junior Handling competition, at a certain moment the main ring was made totally clear to let one boy in, accompanied with two bodyguards beside him. A weird situation for someone not familiar with public danger. On the very last day, when we thought that nothing nice would happen we suddenly heard drums in the background and before we knew there was a group of Brazilian Carnival dancers came in the main ring and before we knew everybody on the stairs, jumped over the fence and went dancing, even the FCI president, Mr.Hans Müller, who was absolutely charmed by the scantily dressed girls with gigantic plumes. It was a strange choice of the FCI to allow the WDS to happen two successive years in South America. The weight of the Americas and


1999 WORLD DOG SHOW Mexico City, Mexico

Best in Show Magazine

57


2000 WORLD DOG SHOW Milano, Italy

58

Best in Show Magazine


Asian section combined is not even half of the weight of the European countries. And that shows in the number of entries. Every year that the WDS is outside of Europe we see a boost in entries for the European Show of that year, simply because the people don’t want to travel that far to take part in a show that is less significant and where the type of dogs is sometimes very different from the European types, thus limiting their chances. Often too they invite a lot of American judges who are not familiar with these types. But in 2005 an exception was made and Argentina was host country. It is said that many judges hope to be invited and as the yearly FCI world meeting takes place in the host country it is a nice excuse to make a very nice travel. Argentina unintentionally entered the FCI history. Two hostile clubs of Dogo Argentina got involved in a fight and knives were used, the judge was threatened and wounded and there was a warning for the next day. While sitting in the Press Room with a colleague, we suddenly saw people running out of a hall and smoke seemed to come out. We ran as fast as we could with our cameras to see what had happened but were forced back as it proved to be a tear gas bomb. There was chaos allover and people even jumped through the window of the hall door to get out. Fortunately there were no victims and only a few people hurt and no casualties among the dogs. On the contrary, after the first reaction people started to run back in to the halls to save the dogs who were benched or still on the grooming tables. A moving wave of solidarity. The incident was even reported on the CNN news. The finals ended with 4 hours of delay. At least the show came close to the European standard with 3187 entries and participants from 50 different countries. They even had dogs entered from Russia, flown in with private jets as the owner was high ranking in the Kremlin. And as it was in the South American wintertime there were no problems with high temperatures. In 2006 Poznan welcomed almost 20.000 dogs for its WDS and it was a well organized show with lots of visitors

although Poznan is not the capital of Poland, but just a big city. They had 57 dogs from the States in competition. The following year Mexico was on term again for the second time and the 3rd time in 4 years on the American Continent. I have no details of this show that I could not attend due to family reasons. The first time the WDS had more than 20.000 entries was in 2008 when the show was held in Stockholm, Sweden. In fact no less than 34.000 dogs were competing in all the club shows and competitions organized during this International event but on a different location. It is of course attractive to not only compete in the WDS but also participating in the Country Championship and Club titles. With some luck you can take your dog home as a club champion, national and international champion and world champion. Sweden has a very big Kennel Club and for the show no less than 1000 people were there helping to organize this show. The WDS itself had 20674 dogs in competition. That results in sometimes high entries in some breeds. For example there were 716 Dachshunds entered! The local and international visitors were treated with folkloristic scenes in the main ring, scenes of daily life of the people and the Sami, an indigenous nomad people of northern Europe, Lapland. The capital of Slovakia is Bratislava and it has big halls and was hosting the show in 2009. However, there must have been double bookings so that not all the halls were available for the show and that only came to light at the last moment. It proved to become a show with lots of problems and improvisation of the last moment. 30.000 dogs were in competition, 21.830 for the WDS, but there was no room for hosting 80.000 visitors. It was difficult to move around and that accumulated with too much entertainment in the main ring. There was acro-gym and folkloristic dancing. Nice, but too much is too much and it took all too long. It was a show that caused lots of mixed feelings. Denmark , guest country in 2010 proved to be a trendsetter. The show was held in Herning and while everybody was somewhat worried if Best in Show Magazine

59


there were enough hotels etc, it proved to be one of the best shows. There was a very nice camping area and excellent parking facilities and the organization never had hoped to welcome 60.000 visitors to see the 19.354 dogs on show. New too was the moving podium. The dogs no longer had to climb a podium but could stay in the middle of the main ring while the podium was moved forward into the ring. The dogs were more relaxed and posed much better for the press. Paris had a lot of dogs, a record, a world record. As there was not only the World Dog Show, there was also the Championnat de France. Breeds on term on one day for the WDS could be entered on the next day for the Championnat de France. So every day, in the very same halls you could go to the Ch. de France or the WDS. Even the main ring program was in two parts. All this went smoothly and resulted in an enormous 38.000 entries, 21.600 for the WDS and the rest for the Ch. de France and other competitions. 60 different nationalities could be found on the floors of these huge halls. However, due to a problem, the cleaning company that was hired did not show up. No way to find a last minute solution for such a big event. Imagine the lawns around the halls after 4 days of show covered with the excrements of 38.000 dogs! Inside the halls on the contrary, there was another team responsible for cleaning and there is was spotless. Notwithstanding the success of the show, I saw many people of the committee weeping out of shame for something they could not help and did not deserve. In 2012 we were invited to Salzburg in Austria. I was very warm but there were no major problems. Salzburg was not so easy to go to but in the end there were 18607 dogs entered from 56 different countries. Only for the record, but FCI WDS have judges coming from all over the world. Here 139 judges were invited representing 34 nationalities. Involvement of the government was casting a big shadow over the 2013 edition of the WDS that was to happen in Budapest , Hun60

Best in Show Magazine

gary. A split in the Kennel Club and take-over by the authorities was subject to lots of troubles as that was opposite to the statutes of the FCI. In the end green light was given and 18.030 dogs participated. The USA entered 57 dogs and was one of the 72 different countries attending this show. High hopes were again for Finland that would host the 2014 edition and they had a nice entry of 21247 dogs. Finland has around 5 million inhabitants but they had 10.838 dogs in competition, imagine! Finland is a dog country but also a trendsetter. In the background one could see immediately the names and results on a big screen and all the results were in realtime online on the internet. The main ring was in one word fantastic, just like the organization. New was the boarding in yellow tape of the grooming areas and the fast lanes. It made a big difference to move around and a big plus for security! Interesting other novelty was a Kennel Club museum on the show. For this show 73 dogs crossed the ocean from the USA to participate and try to win a World Champion title. Nobody expected Milano to be a good edition. There was little communication beforehand and the usual troubles in the organizing Kennel Club’s committee. The show was planned together with the World Expo that happened at the same moment in the same area. Would that be a good plan? It was. Bright new halls, plenty of parking, lots of dogs and, compared to the 2000 version in Milano, this was the opposite, one of the best WDS’s ever! Unfortunately 6 handlers and 16 dogs died in a car crash while travelling to the show. 19927 other dogs managed to come from 68 nations while in total 29.943 were participating that weekend in the main and/or the side shows! The main ring was impressive, large and nice. A Fiat Cinquecento was the big prize for the BIS winner. Indeed, the area around Milano is known for its car industry. On this show 392 breeds were shown, one of the widest spectra covering almost all the recognized breeds. Indeed, Milano is still one of the best WDS so far. We note 2016 when the WDS should take place


2001 WORLD DOG SHOW Porto, Portugal

Best in Show Magazine

61


2002 WORLD DOG SHOW Amsterdam, The Netherlands

62

Best in Show Magazine


in Russia. While we all know that the canine world and the show world in particular counts a very high percentage of gay people and is very tolerant, people were afraid to come over to Moscow, known for its violence against gay people. But in the end this was not at all the case, far from that. In the days prior to the show the police raided the Kennel Club’s office and arrested a few people. With the show coming on in a couple of weeks the FCI was alarmed and with the help of some experienced members from different countries they managed to set up a splendid show as if nothing had happened. It was obvious that lots of money were spend to turn this in to one of the most prestigious World Shows ever. Large rings with tablets for the stewards, large flatscreens for the results and announcements and camera’s in every ring, life streaming any judgment you liked. As if that wasn’t enough, the main ring was huge with the largest LED video wall ever seen and absolutely stunning entertainment on a moving podium, covering folkloric scenes from every part of the world’s largest country, from Russian ballet over Eurosong singing to Asian acrobatic dancing. All this was in the same hands as the organizers of the Olympic winter games in Sotsji. It was a real treat to the audience. The whole show was said to have had 100.000 visitors, a record for Europe. As you see, it was a long time since 2007 in Mexico that the WDS took place outside of Europe. For 2017 Ecuador was scheduled but an earthquake was not on the list. It was impossible to have the WDS take place in Quito and a solution had to be found. Germany offered to take over and the show moved to Leipzig. The European Dog Show of that year took place in Ukraine and due to the political instability and the hostility from Russia it was to be expected that many exhibitors would be very happy to go to Leipzig. The result was that Leipzig ended to be the biggest Dog Show ever held in the world. 24.692 dogs were entered for the World Dog Show and 31.115 dogs were present including all

side competitions. The Leipzig halls were huge and so spacious that one did not have the impression that 90.000 visitors came to see the dogs during the 4 days of the show. And notwithstanding the short time to set up such an event, the show proved to be almost spotless, again Deutsche Gründligkeit, but with very little show aspect and entertainment. But Leipzig has put Crufts in the shadow as the biggest Dog Show ever. This year the show takes place in Amsterdam again for the third time and I will report in depth about this show soon. The World Dog Show can be compared to the Olympic Games. It moves every year to another country and it is decided years before where it will take place in the General Assemble of the FCI. Candidate Kennel Clubs start lobbying years in advance hoping to be nominated. Often anniversaries are used as an excuse. Sometimes the lobbying goes a little far. China gave free 5 star Hotel vouchers to all the members of the assemble and many saw it as corruption. But let’s leave that in the middle. The fact that dogs are still on the menu in China was on the basis of a huge crisis in the FCI. Norway, organizer of the European Dog Show in 2015, was leading a campaign against the FCI decision to have the WDS in China. It almost ended in a split and retreat of the Scandinavian countries and the impact would have been enormous as those countries are financially contribution so much that the future of the FCI was in danger. The quarrel was finally settled and the show will go on in China as planned. It is of course double. How can the FCI support a country where dogs are tortured and slaughtered for consumption, the FCI that stands or should stand for the wellbeing of dogs, purebred dogs in particular. On the other hand, the Chinese Kennel Club is probably one of the best promoters for a better treatment of dogs and showing the people that dogs are a lot more than just food and the political impact can result in significant improvement for the benefit of dogs. Boycotting the Chinese Kennel Club is taking Best in Show Magazine

63


away one of the very few opportunities to show the people that treating the dogs well , keeping them as pets and do sports with them, is a much better alternative than to just eat them. The FCI is still growing and the question is if they will be able to cope with all the international problems, national security issues, religious impact and traditions. All its shows are open to participants from the American and British Kennel Club. But political problems, international hostilities and crises make it often balancing on a tight rope like with Russia and Ukraine. A critique often made is that too often it are the very same judges that officiate at World Dog Shows and European Dog Shows. Of course, as most officials are judges and they need to attend the General Assemble that is normally organized in the days prior or right after the show, it offers the organizers of the show to save lots of money inviting them in the meantime to judge at the show. Another critique is that often the composition of the judges panel consists of local judges and is not international enough. While not always the case I think indeed that there should be a rule that a World Show judging panel should have minimum quota and covering the whole FCI as much as possible. And why not imply that a judge can be invited to judge only once in 3 or 5 years on a world show. That would results in more unpredictable results as one often sees. It is after all a World Dog Show open to all dogs from over the world. If we compare the judges lists of the last 20 years, it is surprising how often we see the same names show up year after year. In certain countries it is easily tolerated but in other countries there is much opposition like in the Scandinavian countries. There is, however, a big difference with the Olympic Games way of working and that is that candidate countries don’t have to prove Financial soundness and minimum requirements. In reality of course it is taken into account in most cases, but it leaves doors open to corruption if there are no strict rules. Things like the show in Brazil would not be possible. Minimum standards 64

Best in Show Magazine

should be made with regard to accommodation, halls with airco, financial stability and open bookkeeping and candidates should make a financial guarantee deposit. It is important that people make a fair chance of winning a title, know in advance what can expected and face a minimum of possible problems. The FCI should have trained officers with lots of experience who can study candidatures and give advice with regard to minimum requirements. There should be an FCI Press Officer that takes care of the Press organization, something that could be a task for the World Dog Press Association that has now around 165 professional members worldwide and that is recognized by the American and British Kennel Club as a reliable partner. Very often we still see big differences in the way the main ring is organized with bad lights, inefficient podia, chaotic presentations without guidance by the ring stewards, changes during the main ring or from day to day, etc. Uniformity based on experiences in the past is the only way to make improvements. Unlike Westminster or Crufts it will always be the first time for an organization. There is no fixed screenplay that can be used year after year with slight improvements here and there. The World Shows and FCI section shows will always face new and unpredictable difficulties, hence the importance of officers who can reduce them by experience. Since air travel is possible at very democratic prizes it can be expected that World Dog Shows will still grow and that international attendance will become more prevalent than ever. Will the FCI be able to overcome all these difficulties? Probably yes, but it will be of utmost importance to listen to all the member countries and brake up the close circle of the ruling few who always seem to be everywhere, enjoying the privileges that some deserve and others don’t, and keep an eye open for the common interest of all the members and put aside the personal ones.


2003 WORLD DOG SHOW Dortmund, Germany

Best in Show Magazine

65


2004 WORLD DOG SHOW Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

66

Best in Show Magazine


2005 WORLD DOG SHOW Buenos Aires, Argentina

Best in Show Magazine

67


2006 WORLD DOG SHOW Poznan, Poland

68

Best in Show Magazine


2008 WORLD DOG SHOW Stockholm, Sweden

Best in Show Magazine

69


2009 WORLD DOG SHOW Bratislava, Slovakia

70

Best in Show Magazine


2010 WORLD DOG SHOW Herning, Denmark

Best in Show Magazine

71


2011 WORLD DOG SHOW Paris, France

72

Best in Show Magazine


2012 WORLD DOG SHOW Salzburg, Austria

Best in Show Magazine

73


2013 WORLD DOG SHOW Budapest, Hungary

74

Best in Show Magazine


2014 WORLD DOG SHOW Helsinki, Finland

Best in Show Magazine

75


2015 WORLD DOG SHOW Milano, Italy

76

Best in Show Magazine


2016 WORLD DOG SHOW Moscow, Russia

Best in Show Magazine

77


2017 WORLD DOG SHOW Leipzig, Germany

78

Best in Show Magazine


2018 WORLD DOG SHOW Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Best in Show Magazine

79


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Stefano Schiavo Interview with Professional Handler Interviewed by J. Danilovic

BIS: Dear Stefano, thank you for taking your time to do interview with us. Please, tell us for the beginning, how did you get involved with dogs? Was it breeding or showing you have started first? S.S.: It was back in 1996, I bought my first Siberian Husky (a breed I had followed and loved for a long time), Margoo del Mitico Click, from a recognized kennel in Rome. I was immediately captured and fascinated by the show world. I’ve been stealing with eyes from the best professionals so I began my journey, breeding and handling at the same time. I figured out I had this special bond with this breed and the rest is history... BIS: Do you remember your first show, which dog did you show? Did you have a mentor in the beginning? S.S.: Of course, Margot was the first dog I’ve ever show, at the international and specialty show of Trieste (IT) where she was junior class winner out of 22 junior females. I “was born” with Richard Hellmann and grew up career wise with Mia Ejerstad, two of the most knowledgeable and professional handlers, so different between each other, but I owe them everything.

BIS: What about your first Best in Show and how did you feel winning your first BIS? S.S.: I don’t remember the actual episode, but i do remember the satisfaction for leading with passion and professionality the dog on the highest step of the podium. BIS: What result do you consider as you’re the biggest and best one? S.S.: It was at the Insubria Winner 2009 where the siberian husky Baby One More Time, daughter of my Margoo, at the age of 10 was BEST IN SHOW VETERAN and ABSOLUTE BEST IN SHOW among 4000 dogs entered, Another episode I remember with pride was at the Enci Winner 2018 where the Basenji Ch. Gunga Itapuca was BEST IN SHOW 3rd at the italian TOP DOG CONTEST and BEST IN SHOW 3rd at the international dog show of Milan, among 6000 dogs entered.

Best in Show Magazine

83


BIS: Do you have favourite show? S.S.: I do. Insubria Winner; for location, organization, services and main ring. BIS: Which dog was your favourite dog that you ever handled, and was this dog also your most successful one? S.S.: I’m not able to choose a favourite dog. Today I am able, thanks to my passion, to bond with the dogs, and I fall in love with every single one of them, and they do it with me. This is my biggest achievement. BIS: What part of your job you do like the least in this business? S.S.: Having to deal with bad organization, not enough for the show they propose. BIS: Tell us something about your breeding? When did you start and how did you chose your breeds? S.S.: 1996 my breeding career started with Siberian Huskies, and from the moment I could organize my life for them they became a part of it. During the years I was passionated about Karelians, then I left that breed aside to start with Golden Retrievers and Amerian Cockers. Nowadays, Basenjies have entered my breeding program thanks to my boyfriend’s passion. BIS: Which win do you consider as your greatest one when we are speaking about breeding? S.S.: Knowing dogs bred by me around the world achieving significan results. BIS: Is there something in the life that you would like to do or to visit, that is your life dream? S.S.: My dream is to be on a sled carried by dogs in snowy woods.

84

Best in Show Magazine


BIS: What do you respect the most in judging skills? S.S.: To be able to dedicate the right amount of time and attention, and being captured by a dog’s presentation. BIS: Please tell us name or two if there someone whose skills you admire when it comes to breeding, showing, grooming or judging? S.S.: First of all, Richard Hellman and Mia Ejerstad, who I deeply respect. Another name could be Alberto Ferrari, well known argentinian handler. BIS: How would you describe a professional handler? What are the most important skills for a handler? S.S.: To begin with, a professional handler must garantee wellbeing of the dogs, passion, professionality and the knowledge of the breeds he shows, either morphology wise and grooming wise. BIS: What about Junior Handling and do you think that Professional Handlers and judges should work more with young people? S.S.: Absolutely I do. For juniors a period of training from a Professional is undoubtedly necessary to achieve a good preparation and knowledge. BIS: If you could, what would you change in dog world? S.S.: I would improve organization wise, and breeding wise every breeder is called to give his 100% to the breed for a common purpose, improving and safeguard the breed we all fell in love with and decide to breed.

Best in Show Magazine

85


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Photo 1 • Winning Monaco JH Final in 2014 with Spencer Scettro d’Argento

Best in Show Magazine


Aurora de Poli Interview with Junior Handler Interviewed by J. Danilovic

BIS: Dear Aurora, please tell us something about your beginnings. When did you get your first dog and how did you get an idea to start going to the shows? A.D.P.: I got my first dog who is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel in 2010 when my brother and I really wanted one and because of this we started looking for a breeder who could give us the most suitable member for our family. When we were looking for the dog we were interested in, the health and character of the puppy was important, whether it was show quality or not, because we didn’t know anything about this world. So it was the breeder who asked my family to try going to dog show at least for one time, and everything started from that request. I completely and immediately fell in love with dog shows where owners were working in full cooperation with their pets and enjoyed doing it, I wanted to do it too! After my first visit to one show I was practicing every day with my dog for the upcoming one where I had to show him in puppy class, needless to say, I was really nervous in the ring but right after we were done in the ring, I was full of satisfaction for the work my dog and I had done together!

BIS: Do you remember your first Junior Handling competition? A.D.P.: I remember it very well, it was during the international dog show in Bergamo in 2010 and there were around 15 junior handlers entered in the younger group and I was there with my 6 months old dog. I didn’t know about Junior Handling rules because at that year there was no clear informations about these competitions in Italy, so I entered in the ring trying to do my best and have fun with Idefix. We ended the competition making the 5th place under Mrs Lorena Merati and I promised myself to do it better the next time. I learned Junior Handling rules and practiced really hard by also watching videos online, and when I attended the competition again in March Idefix and I got the 1st place under Mrs Alenka Pokorn from Slovenia.

Best in Show Magazine

91


BIS: You did some impressive results in showing and in Junior Handling ring. What do you consider your greatest wins in both rings? A.D.P.: This is not an easy question because every win I made gave me lots of emotions. For sure going to Crufts was an unforgettable experience, but entering in the TOP 10 at the Junior Handling Final Competition at the World Dog Show in Milan under Mr Hugo Quevedo was incredible. I was showing an American Cocker Spaniel like at Crufts and it’s a memory that gives me goose bumps every time I’m thinking about it, also because after some months I met the judge at one national dog show in Italy and I wanted to start learning from him and his girlfriend Francesca Cassin. So I spent one year going to them during holidays or right after finishing school on Saturday to Sunday evening to learn as much as I could about dog show and kennel life. Another win that is not the greatest one but the most emotional one for sure was during the Junior Handling Final in Monaco in 2014 where I was showing my Cavalier. I was placed the day before 4th with a Wire Fox Terrier and the day after was the last day to get the qualification for the final. There were lots of Juniors coming from all Europe and I was one of he youngest in the older group. Idefix and I were placed 1st and right after there was the final. It was really hot and to get the qualification for the final we spent lot of time in the ring, so my dog was tired but he put all of himself into that competition. It was probably his very best performance ever. The feeling between us was clear to everyone and I can clearly remember that all the people who were looking at the main ring started clapping and calling my name and when the judge Mr Jean Paul Kerihuel chose us as winners, everyone started screaming for the joy. I immediately started to cry for the emotions I 92

Best in Show Magazine

Photo 2 • Winning for the second year in a row Italian Junior Handling Final in 2013 Photo 3 • Representing Monaco at the International Junior Handling Final at Crufts 2015


was feeling and the first thing I made was hugging my best partner in crime Idefix and this is one of my fondest memories. My greatest win in show ring I think it was this past May at the International Dog Show in Monaco where my own Pharaoh Hound called Bazinga Daenerys On A Dragon Quest went all the way to BIS 3rd at only 14 months of age under Mr Stefan Sinko. It was the first time ever a Pharaoh won the group and got placed during the BIS there and it was a satisfying victory because the dog was in top condition and it was a result of my hard work with her. BIS: Do you have your favorite breed you specially enjoy showing and why? A.D.P.: I enjoy showing all kind of dogs but if I have to choose I really enjoy showing Sighthound and especially Pharaoh Hounds and Salukis for their spirit of independence where you have to find a connection with them to work in the best way and for their elegant but at the same time powerful movement that is a joy share with them in the ring.

Photo 4 • Ch Van Morrison del Whymper delle G. Jorasses during the Gold Cup in 2015 Photo 5 • BISS Multi Ch Oliver Baxter Di Casa Brach Prever in the Main Ring

BIS: Did you or do you have any mentors or people you specially admire? A.D.P.: I have a big sense of respect to all the people are working in this world and I’m always trying to get all the positive things a person can have to improve in the best way my skills For this reason I admire lots of people and it’s really difficult to write all their names, but I can say Hugo Quevedo is one of them. He taught me a lot about how to relate to dogs and work with them in the best way. He was always ready to teach and explain everything and he was and still is really interested in the future of our sport. We spoke a lot about Junior Handling rules and how Junior handlers are being treated by their kennel club and how meaningless competitions have become. How imporBest in Show Magazine

93


Photo 6 • Becoming Vice Italian Champion in 2017 with Spencer Scettro d’Argento

tant it is to give young people the right advices and explaining them the true importance and priorities a handler should have. Richard Hellman is another person who gave me a lot in a really short time since I know him. I had the amazing possibility to live with him and Fran Rupcic for some months and I’ve worked with breeds I never had worked with before. I saw different type of dogs and learned how to relate to them in different ways. Every day there was something new to learn and he was always ready to answer my questions and to give me really good and precious advice. Another person who I really admire is not a professional handler but a breeder, and what a breeder she is! Ludovica Salamon is a person with an amazing knowledge and I could literally spending hours and hours listening to her. She explained to me how a Sighthound should be and why and she was ready to answer all the infinitive questions and doubts I 94

Best in Show Magazine

had. I will always remember our trip together to the Sighthound club show in Donaueschingen where she told me about all the history of her kennel and where I had the unforgettable possibility to read her archives where she had the first photos and information about her breeding program. BIS: You’ve been living with some of the most famous names in Dog world such as Richard Hellman and Gabriela Lovati. What are your experiences living with Professional Handler and big breeder? A.D.P.: I’m feeling really lucky and grateful to have met great people who could help me since my very first beggings. Gabriella Lovati is one of these people and the first time I met her, she gave me advices of how to show in the proper way an Aussie in Junior Handling competition. Before starting working with her she let me understand the impor-


Photo 7 • Multi PBIS, Multi Jr Ch, HR Ch Bazinga Daenerys On A Dragon Quest in the Main Ring

tance of the priority the dogs have in our work and their needs. This should be an obvious thing but how common is it to see dogs staying in the crates for the whole day or being walked for a very short time? Too many. Working with her was always exciting and unforgettable are the memories I have about the Gold Cups we made together. Every year we had lots of dogs to show almost in each class with more dogs entered in from the baby classes all the way to the veteran ones. The work was a lot, but at the end of the weekend the satisfaction was really high and the results were amazing. This summer as I said before I went to Richard Hellman and Fran Rupcic’s kennel to learn more and this experience was unforgettable. I was there with my dear friend Ana Gajzer from Slovenia and we started working at 7.00 am letting dogs out, taking care of them and cleaning the rooms where they were sleeping. After

this we started grooming and training them, and we attended Richard’s lessons where he was working with lots of different breeds and every time a lesson came to an end, we had learned something new. In this world you just know when you will start working but never when you will finish it, so after letting all dogs in, giving them food and tidy the last things we could go to finish the day spending qualitative time with Fran and Richard talking about the day and of course dogs experience. BIS: Many young people consider themselves Handlers even though they are still in Junior Handling. What is your point of view? A.D.P.: This is an interesting point. I’m not a fan at all of junior handlers who are showing lots of dogs every weekend without having any kind of knowledge and experience of what they’re doing. They think that is easy to Best in Show Magazine

95


be a handler because they just have to place the dog and let it run for 3 minutes inside a ring and that’s it. So they never prepare a dog for the ring, they never take the dog out for a walk and they don’t really know how to show the dog they have in their hands in a proper way. They arrive at the show ground with their parents’ car or new brand van bought for them (they’re maybe 15 y.o.) with dogs inside that are not put inside in a safe way… and then the owners are surprised if their dogs were not groomed at all or were presented badly. I never saw one of these juniors going to professional handlers asking them if they can learn or helping them, I only see juniors going to professional handlers asking them for a dog (well trained of course) for the Junior Handling competition. Sometimes I’ve talked with them and they thought I was crazy because I’m used to working during the summer going to kennels or because I’m working as an assistant during the school year, only when my studies allow me to do it. They look at me like I’m an alien because I’m learning and I’m not showing more than five dogs per weekend like them. I think this is a real problem because young people don’t want to learn but they just want to enter in the ring to get placed and have this kind of wrong visibility and become kind of little stars who don’t care at all about improving their skills thanks to the help and experience of Professional Handlers who can become their mentors and follow them step by step. Luckily there are also a few Juniors who want to learn and make new experiences in their free time, but the number is still not high enough. BIS: Lately there are many big handlers searching for assistants. What do you think Handlers are expecting from assistants? A.D.P.: Lots of Professional Handlers are looking for Assistants and I was talking recently with 96

Best in Show Magazine

more Professionals about this argument and how difficult it is to find someone who wants to work. In my point of view Professional Handlers want a person who wants to learn and who’s ready to work really hard to work in the best way possible. To work in the best way an assistant has to be always responsible of what he or she’s doing and has to be trusted by the Handler they are working with. Nothing should be underestimated and working safely is the most important thing because it’s easy to make mistakes and I errors are not allowed to be made. An Assistant has to be organized to not lose precious time and for working in a better and easier place, and everyone knows how important time is in this job. We also have to keep dogs in condition physically and mentally for allowing them to have their best condition every time they’re being showed also in periods of the year where they have to attend shows every weekend. And an Assistant has to have passion for dogs, because it’s not an easy job but if you love what you’re doing nothing will stop you. BIS: Which things are assistants looking to get from Professional Handlers besides knowledge? A.D.P.: Beside knowledge and experience I think assistants want a person who can become their mentor and get from them good advices and answer their infinite questions. When I’m working I expect to be treated with respect from the person I’m working with also in difficult situations that could occur. It’s easier to work also if you can find a person who can give you a calm place to work in so you can work without lots of frustration if you have days full of things to do and you can work in a comfortable environment.


Best in Show Magazine

97


BIS: Even so young, I can personally say that I find you very responsible and organized not only as a Junior Handler but as assistant. In your point of view, what do you think you’ve learned living with Handlers and Breeders? A.D.P.: Working 24/7 with Professional Handlers and Breeders will make sure you learn lots of things and let you also understand this is not an easy job and your life is on function of dogs’ ones. Working with Handlers gave me a sense of responsibility and taught me a lot; the first thing I learned is how to take care of dogs in a perfect way and how to understand their needs and if there’s something wrong how to act. How to handle a kennel however big or small it could be it’s a big responsibility and you have to think really well about how to manage all the situations that can occur. Working with Handlers taught me how to groom and train dogs of course, but taught me how to prepare and maintain them in top condition mentally and physically for the upcoming shows. How to prepare everything perfectly for dog shows, starting with entries, documentation, hotels and statistics to how to load the van in a safe way for dogs. Working with Breeders gave me lots of emotions, from the joy of the birth of a new litter to the sadness of losing a great ambassador for the breed. They explained me lots of things and taught me how important it is for example the choice of the foundation bitch for your breeding program or how to raise a litter in the best way. Talking with breeders is always something I really enjoy to do because you will always learn more and more about how to improve your breeding program.

98

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: What about the future? Do you plan on pursuing a career as a full-time Professional Handler or do you have some other dreams? A.D.P.: I’m now attending my last year of high school and this is a question that I’m always thinking about. In my future I would like to become a Professional Handler and because of this after finishing my studies I will start working as a full time Assistant Handler to learn everything I need to know and to get more and more experience. My parents finally gave up about thinking of me as a future lawyer for example, and I’m really lucky because they’re supporting me in my dreams as they could. Another big interest I have is starting breeding in the future when I will have enough knowledge to do it, and what I would like to breed are dogs that are healthy and are following the standard and not the trend. The future is unpredictable so we will see what will happen, but for sure it will not be boring! BIS:Do you have any advice for young people interested in Dog World? A.D.P.: I really would like to say to young people that if they want to become a Professional Handler or Breeder or whatever they want to do in the future, just to do it. If these young people have a dream, they have to follow it no matter what other people are saying or are thinking, and they have to work really hard to get it. Nobody will give you something for free, so you have to work really hard to archive your goals. Remember to work hard and take things step by step, stay focused and surround yourself with good people, and everything will be great in the end, even if the road is tough!


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Santi Sarria Professional Dog Groomer Interviewed by Milla Kaninen

BIS: Thank you for taking your time to answer our interview. First, please tell us a little bit about you. S.S.: First of all, I wanted to thank the team of Best In Show Magazine for giving me the opportunity to be interviewed in such a great publication, for me it was a great surprise to receive this invitation. At the moment, I own a Grooming Salon called “Samoa Estilistes Canins� together with my wife, in the centre of the city of Barcelona, and I am very concentrated in the circuit of grooming competitions of the European Grooming Association (EGA). I still go to dog shows sometimes, specially to the mandatory points in Spain, but my career is completely focused on grooming competitions right now. BIS: How did you start in the dog world? Did you first start with grooming or with dog shows? S.S.: I started in the dog world in the beginning of 2013, until then I worked as security staff at local night clubs and in February 2013 my mother was diagnosed with cancer and I lost her in April during that same year. While she was losing her life, she told me that I should finally change my life and study what I had always wanted, grooming... And that was the moment I decided I should take her advice and change my life.

102

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: Which was your first dog? What dogs do you have at home? Are they show dogs or are some of them just for grooming, or do you combine both things? S.S.: Since I was a young, we have always had dogs in my family and I have loved dogs since I was born. My first dog ever was a poodle, which is kind of funny since nowadays I compete with poodles in grooming competitions all the time... Who was going to imagine that? At the moment, I have various breeds at home: poodles, American cocker, kerry blue terrier, schnautzer, westie, Brussels griffon, and three mixed breed dogs that were abandoned on the street and they are the leaders at our house. Many of them are also show dogs, but when I use them for grooming also we must plan carefully which shows to attend in each category beforehand.



BIS: When you started in the grooming world, how did you get started? Who helped you to get started and to improve your skills? S.S.: My basic grooming training started in August 2013. I was lucky to start at the academy of Julián Oliva, who is a prestigious breeder of toy poodles and bichon havanese, a handler, an interntional judge of FCI dog shows and also grooming competitions, and he made me feel passionate about both grooming and dog shows at the same time, and helped me resolve all the doubts I had when I was starting. I think if I would have been trained by someone who would not be so involved in the dog shows also, my career would have been completely different since the beginning and I feel very lucky I started with him. Since then, I have always aimed to improve day by day and my wife has always been a great support with all the decisions I have made in order to fulfil my dreams. BIS: Who did you train yourself with? Who would you like to thank for helping you with your career? S.S.: My training has been very complete, since I started as a groomer at the age of 36 years, I had no time to waste and I inverted all my money and time during almost 2 years until I felt that I was trained enough and capable of putting up my own grooming saloon. I have studied with many people: groomers with international success, breeders of various breeds, handlers... For me, there have been four very important people involved in my career: -Julián Oliva, who I started with and I learned from him good basis of everything and a great technique for using scissors.. He also introduced me to both grooming competitions and dog shows as I mentioned above. -Lluisa Royo, who has been by my side since the very beginning, giving me lots of support and helping me to get in touch with the right people in order to progress in my career -Daniel Pérez Guerra and Mónica Méndez, who have been my mentors since the beginning and they have influenced so much in the groomer and I would even say person I am nowadays, I have no words to thank them enough.

104

Best in Show Magazine

-Natalia Tikhonova, who has helped me and inspired me with her essence in the grooming of poodles, one of my favourite breeds.


BIS: Tell us how is a typical day in a life of a groomer like you. S.S.: I must say each day in my life is very intense and tiring... I work in my grooming salon Samoa from 10 to 20 from Monday to Friday, and I have almost no time to breath. A groomer has to be someone who takes his job as a way of life, as it requires so many hours of hard work, patience and dedication. Only we, the groomers, know how hard it can be sometimes and how lowly valued our work is. During the weekends, if I stay at home I groom and try to maintain the coat of my dogs at home, and if I have competitions I will be travelling. BIS: Do you remember your first dog show? Which one was it? S.S.: I remember my first dog show very dearly, it was the Mandatory point show in Madrid in 2014, and my wife Patricia and I went there to show two standard poodle puppies. That was my debut. BIS: How many dog shows do you usually attend per year? S.S.: At the moment, we normally go to just 3 o 4 dog shows per year. These include the Mandatory points in Madrid and Talavera de la Reina, which are the biggest shows in Spain, some shows that are near our home in Barcelona, and if my grooming competition schedule permits, I also try to attend the Spaniel specialty. BIS: And your first grooming competition? S.S.: My first grooming competition was Groomeval in Valencia in December 2013. I did by debut in the beginners’ category, gaining a bronze medal. That is where my passion for grooming really got lit on fire and since that weekend, I have participated in basically all grooming competitions I have been able to. BIS: How many grooming competitions do you usually assist? S.S.: I try to go to all grooming competitions of the Spanish and Italian circuits (Italy for me is like my second country), to the most important ones in France and Belgium, and to special editions such as Oster Trophy, which is each year in a different place. I could say I assist between 8 and 10 per year. Best in Show Magazine

105


BIS: What has been your greatest achievement in the dog world so far? S.S.: I think I have reached various goals and each of them always give me an impulse to continue and make sure that the next one comes sooner than possible... This year, I have gained the Spanish Championship in Valladolid, Best In Show at the European Championship at the Mastershow in Italy with American cocker, and the the Groomeval in Valencia I gained the golden medal with poodle and spaniel in Champion Class, Best National Groomer of 2018 and Best In Show with the American Cocker. I think reaching all these goals in just 7 months of this 2018, means that I am living the most brilliant moment of my career right now. BIS: What do you think as been the key for your success in the grooming world in such a short period of time? S.S.: I have tried to focus on my evolution trying to improve with no decline, on one hand training myself with breeders and real specialists of each breed I have tried to concentrate on so far, and on the other hand, never losing the spirit of a student who wants to learn more and improve. I try to keep 106

Best in Show Magazine

my feet on the ground and never lose my humilty, always sacrificing whatever is necessary to move forward. BIS: What is your next goal? Have you got a dream you want to make true? S.S.: I would love to compete in the USA and Brazil, represent my country in the next World Championship by teams in 2020... I would like to assist Milangroom 2019 with a good level and options of being placed there...And many more goals that are in my head daily. I think dreaming is free and everyone puts their own limits in their minds. The good thing is, my mind does not understand about limits and I think with hard work and sacrifice, eveything is at our reach. BIS: What advice would you give to someone who is thinking of starting in the grooming world? S.S.: I would advice them to look for someone qualified to train them, and day by day they will discover what areas they should concentrate on. Not all of us need to be competitors, or handlers or even show dogs, everyone can make their dreams come true just by listening to their heart and going that way.


BIS: What aspects would you like to change or improve in the grooming competitions? S.S.: I am really happy with the organization, the rules and the way the competitions I have assisted work. I like how the European Grooming Association is organized and I only assist contests of their circuit. BIS: Thank you, Santi, for taking your time. What would you like to say to all the readers? S.S.: For me it has been a great pleasure to tell you a little bit of my life and my story in this world, and thank you to all the people who are supporting me daily to continue working hard to reach my goals, specially thank you to my wife Patricia Miguel, who with my other half and without all her help and support this would not be happening in my life. Hugs to all the readers of Best In Show, and if any of you have any questions that I could answer or solve any of your doubts, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Best in Show Magazine

107


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


AMSTAFF MAJOR

Specialty for American Staffordshire Terriers Written by Vladimir Mihaljcic

AMSTAFF MAJOR is an International Specialty Show for American Staffordshire Terriers. It was created as a need to establish one notable and distinctive Specialty on European continent and it has become a measure of value and quality of AmStaffs. Ever since the first show, we had a great support from the Amstaff fraternity from Europe, and we also had visitors and exhibitors from other continents and countries, such as Argentina, Mexico, USA, Australia etc. The show became popular among Amstaff aficionados, and one of the reasons is probably great atmosphere in and around the ring. Exhibitors and judges have nice memories from these shows, which recommended it to the show organizers in many different countries. Basically, we respond to inquiries of interested Clubs which are willing to organize such a show and willing to use the name of Amstaff Major, in order to attract people involved in this breed to a quality Speciality event. In 2016 we were invited to expand it to another continent, and we organized AMSTAFF MAJOR Latino America in Mexico City. Hopefully, this will become an annual show in Central/South America as it is in Europe.

112

Best in Show Magazine

Our main goal is that AMSTAFF MAJOR should be held each year in a different country, with the best judges available at the moment, guaranteed fun and good times for all participants!

Country Competition

We usually have a Country Competition at Amstaff Major. Groups of 3-5 dogs which form on the day of the Show, based on the country where they were bred, and the judge picks up his favorites. Each country should select one group. All dogs for Country Competition must be entered to the Amstaff Major, and older than 9 months. It is a LOT of fun!


Trophies and Trophy Donations

Winners of each class and title will be properly awarded. Original AMSTAFF MAJOR Trophies are hand made by Alexis Domenech Ochotorena from Spain. In addition to our awards, if you want to become a sponsor of a class or title winner, either personally or as a Club, you may donate a trophy, painting, statue or cup, and your name will be mentioned in the special section of the Show catalogue. You may name a trophy after your kennel or dog!

Amstaff Major 2018 Szilvasvarad, Hu

In 2018 our show took place in hospitable Hungary, in city of Szilvasvarad within the 3*CACIB show weekend. And I’m proud to say that it was absolutely amazing exhibition! Perfectly organized show ground, two honorable American breed specialists and lots of happy smiling faces who came there to share this celebration with us. Even suddenly started rain did not worsen our mood but only intensified the impression of the holiday. Yep, not so easy to break down AmStaff people’ spirit! Amstaff Major’18 was the biggest Specialty show for this breed in Europe so far, and second biggest in the history of the breed, after the National Specialty in Orlando,1998. There were little less then 300 of breed representatives, biggest number in the history of MAJOR. As usual we trying to invite specialists from breed origin country so this year our USA guests were Mrs. Tammy Price and Mr. Jay Richardson. Sure, we feel need to highlight the Winners:

Best of Breed

Pasiro Diamond of the New Generation


Best of Opposite Sex

Vega Alpha Lira A Almaznogo Ostrova

Best Junior

Best Country Competition

In interview after the exhibition, the experts said they were completely delighted with the manner of the show, the atmosphere around the ring and the quality of the presented dogs. They also said that they had never seen a similar level show like this one. Of course, it’s impossible to hold a show on the level without perfect organizational team. And we were lucky enough to have the best of all possible! Huge ‘Thank You!’ to

president of Hungarian Kennel Club and main host of this event Andras Korozs for making it real, to Norbert Tibay and his wonderful wife Beatrix Fabian for all your professionalism, patience and help and to all Am.Staff Major Team for creating this festival! Thank you all for being a part of it, it was a pleasure to see so many people from all over the world as well as their fantastic dogs! See you next year!

LNK’s Rebel and Proud Seven Spanish Angels

114

Best Veteran

Teodora Long Step

Best in Show Magazine

Breeders of Russia


Best in Show Magazine

343


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine





Juha Kares Blog

Best in Show Magazine



128

Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


The year 2018 celebrates the 150th anniversary of the Golden Retriever, a breed relatively young, whose origins are wrapped in a fairy tale mist. For many years it was generally believed that our Goldens were the direct descendants of some Russian circus dogs purchased by Sir Dudley Marjoribanks, the first Lord Tweedmouth. Lord Tweedmouth was fascinated by the intelligence, looks and docility of these cream/golden wavy coated dogs, the story tells he bought the eight dogs and took them to his estate of Guisachan, located in the Scottish Highlands not far from Lochness, where they were used to hunt deers. This magical story was accepted as the origin of the Golden Retriever breed until 1952 when Lord Tweedmouth’s original studbooks were made available by his grand nephew, the sixth Earl of Ilchester. The studbooks indicated that Lord Tweedmouth had purchased an unregistered Yellow Retriever from a cobbler in Brighton in the year 1864, this dog was Nous et he was the only yellow puppy in a litter of black wavy

Retrievers. Nous traveled to Guisachan and few years later Lord Tweedmouth bred Belle, a Tweed Water Spaniel (a now extinct breed from Scotland) with him. The Golden Retriever Breed had just seen its dawn.

128

Best in Show Magazine

The Golden Retriever Club of Scotland has done a terrific work with organizing a fun filled week packed with memorable events, all of them took place around the tiny village of Tomich, whose major attraction seems to be the statue to the Golden Retriever. Guisachan today can be called the Mecca of the Golden Retriever, every breed passionate will visit at least once; many travel

there to spread the ashes of their dogs. During the third week of July 2018 Guisachan was flooded by breed fanciers arrived from literally all over the World – 37 countries - to celebrate the birth of their beloved breed, accommodations throughout the Inverness shire were booked few years in advance and finding a last-minute place to stay was an impossible mission. Celebrations kicked off on July 16 with an evening match show, this was a nice get together to warm up the dogs – and owners – that had arrived already.


One of the highlights of the week was the torchlight procession to the Guisachan estate. The road that leads to the estate is a one mile country road aligned with trees and meadows. The road can feel much longer if you are pested by the dreaded Highlands midges, tiny little vicious bugs that can attack in hundreds and leave you itching for days, or so they say... I let myself be influenced by all the horror stories I heard about the midges, and I passed them onto my husband, who, if there is one mosquito flying around, is the one that always gets bitten. Once we got to the Highlands he couldn’t wait to buy some Jungle Formula, and every evening he religiously sprayed himself to the point of getting intoxicated, but… there were no midges!! Or at least we haven’t seen any. Was Jungle Formula worth every penny it cost, or were the midges just another urban legend? We’ll never know. S o sorry for the digression, I get sidetracked easily by nature, especially when I write/talk about something I am very passionate about. And there is so much to tell about the week! Anyway, back to the procession. Walking that mile in the dimming light of the dusk hours, with likeminded people, and our lovely dogs, it was an experience I will always remeber. At the end of the road there it was, the

beautiful ruin of what used to be the Guisachan estate, engorged by trees, standing proud in the middle of the field, how breath taking! The whole evening had a mystical feeling, a memory we’ll never forget.

Best in Show Magazine

129


The other big highlight of the week was the picnic that took place at the Guisachan field, followed by the biblical event of setting up and taking a photo of all the Golden Retrievers alone – let me repeat it, A L O N E , dogs only – in front of their ancestors birthplace. But first, they all had to be counted! We all proceeded to line up in a semi circle and started this small procession that was ending in front of a committee of volunteer counters: 361 Goldens were counted. I must say that the Goldens were actually 361 + 2, in fact I had to leave two of mine in the car, one was in season and the other was keeping her company.

130

Best in Show Magazine

The evenings were just as pleasant and well organized as the afternoons, and the Golden Retriever Club of Scotland proved to be once again a terrific organizer. The Gala Dinner and the Scottish Night were two exquisite ways to mingle with old friends, and to finally meet in person many other acquaintances otherwise only met thru social networks. Lots of fun was had by all, and surely the good food and the abundance of fluids were the cherries on the cake. On Friday 20 July, the Scottish celebrations ended with the club show and we all were blessed by typical Scottish weather: pouring rain in the morning and sunshine in the afternoon. The judges were very happy with their entries coming from all over Europe – plus one from Canada and one from the US – and each judge ensured that every dog had the undivided attention he deserved. Not an easy task when entries are so high, and the show seems never ending! Lunch break was entertained by the Parade of Champions, what a treat to see in flesh – and not in photo – many lovely representatives of the breed.


Best in Show Magazine

131


DOG CC, BEST VETERAN AND BOB was Multi Ch. Majik Truth or Dare, a Finnish dog that lives in Holland.

BITCH CC AND BOS was Sh Ch. Linirgor Violets are Blue, bred and living in Scotland. Two months have passed by and I am still glowing from the experience. I am sure there will be other gatherings, but they won’t be having the same meaning. The 150thAnniversary marked such a milestone, an unforgettable page in the Golden Retriever book, I am so happy we were there. See you all at the 200th Anniversary!

132

Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Meet the Breed Volpino Italiano The Volpino Italiano shares extremely ancient origins with the other Sptiz varieties. Remains of these useful guard dogs were found all over Europe in archeological sites dating to the Bronze age. Volpinos however were primarily developed in the Italian Peninsula and therefore are cousins to the other Sptiz types but not closely related, like two long branches that stem from the same root base. These little guard dogs had the job of alerting their master to intruders, giving them time to stop what they were doing and prepare welcome or thwart the approaching company. They were useful therefore on homesteads, farms, and on travelling merchant wagons throughout the territory from Sicily to the Mountain passes connecting Italy to central Europe. This dog became especially connected to Rome and Florence starting in the 1500’s, and legend has it that Michelangelo had a beloved Volpino Italiano. One of the most famous representations of this breed is in a painting by Vittore Carpaccio, ‘The Vision of Saint Augustine’. The first official standard was

140

Best in Show Magazine

penned in 1913 and the breed thrived among all social groups until the 1930’s. From approximately the 1940 for about four decades the breed fell in popularity and nearly disappeared. Starting in the 1980’s a concerted effort was made to recover this native breed in Italy. Many breeders and judges in Italy remember these first efforts and the Volpino ring had a variety of sizes and shapes and coats. Careful selection slowly reconstructed the beauty of this rare dog so that today the Volpino Italiano enjoys a fairly stable genetic footing. Occasionally, some less careful parties attempted shortcuts by mixing the closest cousins, the miniature and toy Spitz, to obtain a more ‘show worthy’ appearance. This mix watered down the dna and the Volpino Club of Italy hopes judges and breeders will be very careful to eschew any ‘German Spitz’ tendencies in the Volpino Italiano. To understand the exact differences in these apparently similar breeds, BIS contacted Sonia Pagani, who has been an Italian judge



since 1994, and has recently been invited to judge the Spitz Club Specialty (Torino 2018). ‘You need to see the proportions of the head, especially the muzzle to cranium which are different in the toy and miniature Spitz and altogether different in the Volpino. Notice the shape of the eyes which in the Volpino are rounder compared to the German Spitz. The exact texture of the coat can be different, the Volpino should never have a frizzy quality which unfortunately results when the toy Spitz was used to cross over. The rear feathering is entirely different, the Volpino has Culottes! BIS has prepared the following quick reference chart to help all our readers become experts this rare breed of group 5! VOLPINO ITALIANO Skull described as egg shaped Ratio muzzle to cranium 4/10 Eyes are between oval and round Nose described as large Ears described as ‘length of the ears to measure about half the length of the head’ Dorsal line straight, slightly convex over the loin Croup longer than broad Oval feet Rear legs have ‘trousers, or culottes’ which is long leathering in the upper thigh leaving the point of the hock clean. Clean springy step. Coat forms a collar around the neck Ears covered in fine smooth hair Colors white or rich deer red Height Males 27-30 Females 25-28 MINIATURE SPITZ Ratio muzzle to cranium 2:4 142

Best in Show Magazine

Nose described as black Eyes are described as slanting therefore they have a more pronounced point to the oval Ears are described as small ‘shortest possible straight, firm back’ Croup broad Cat feet Rear legs have fathering almost down to the feet Drive required in movement Coat forma a mane around the neck Velvety ears Colors black brown white orange grey and other colors Height 26 +-3 Both breeds Ratio of height at withers to body length is 1:1 Both tolerate a pincer bite



Ceratium Volpino Italiano by Adrian Acebillo Interviewed by Anne Tureen

BIS: How did you first get to know the Volpino Italiano? A.C.: I’m Adriån Acebillo, from Palma de Mallorca where I work with the kennel name Ceratium. I have been breeding Pointers for 10 years and then I started showing them five years later. Showing my Pointers I was disappointed that the working type was so different from the show type. I decided to find a dog that had only one type, and I wanted something lovely. Looking at the dogs in group 5, I decided to take a look at the standard of the Volpino. I wanted to take a look at the best dogs so I contacted Roberto from Colle degli Ulivi in Italy. My first dog was such a joy that only a few months later I got a second Volpino. Finally, I also got a third dog and since then my dogs have been champions of Spain, Gibraltar, France, Italy, the Netherlands, and have won Specialty and World Winner titles.

144

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: What do you love about this breed? A.C.: The temperament which is so loving and and lively, always wanting to be with me and those around me. BIS: Which aspect/s of the standard do you feel are essential to the breed and which would you allow a bit of interpretation? A.C.: I think the standard of the Volpino Italiano is essential for the ring in every detail. The size, proportions, color, coat, pigmentation, movement, are all qualities that should be exactly as the standard requires. BIS: Does such a specific standard make breeding easier or more difficult? A.C.: All breeds have their complications. We can only do our best with the best dogs we have that do not carry genetically transmitted diseases.



BIS: Which are the principal health issues and how do you manage them? A.C.: I have not had to deal with diseases since I only use clear dogs. BIS: How do structure your breeding program to overcome the narrow genetic base you have to work with? A.C.: I use champions that have been determined to be very near the standard so I only use top quality dogs. BIS: Do you feel that judges generally understand what they are looking at in the Volpino ring? A.C.: As in all breeds, some understand more than others. It is not a very common breed so you need to study more to be prepared. BIS: Is there something you feel the Volpino club could do to support and promote you breed in a new way? A.C.: It would be nice if we had a database with the titles and test results. I would have a registry of all DNA of this breed. BIS: What care does the Volpino require daily and what grooming is necessary to present this breed in the ring? A.C.: I use a natural diet, and of course I clean their space and their coats regularly. I work everyday on my showdogs. BIS: Tell us something about the Volpino temperament. A.C.: Vivacious, happy, capricious, social and sensitive.

146

Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine

343


del Birocciaio Volpino Italiano by Antonio Crepaldi Interviewed by Anne Tureen

Antonio Crepaldi breeds the Volpino Italiano in his kennel “del Birocciaio� since 1987. He is an Fci / Enci (show) judge, he qualified since 1998 for Volpino Italiano and since 2004 also for Neapolitan Mastiff, Fila Brasileiro, Boxer, Bobtail, Siberian Husky, Chow Chow, Cirneco of the Etna, Samoyed, Alaskan Malamute, Akita, Saint Bernard, Cane Corso Italiano, Dogo Argentino, and many other breeds. Has been invited to judge many specialties of the breeds for which he is a qualified judge. Journalist, writer, translator and professional publisher. He began his journalist activities in 1990. He has written for a number of publications and especially for the Italian/ French review Mollossi/Molosses. With coauthor Enrico Franceschetti he wrote the book Il Volpino Italiano, privately published in 2003. He has published a number of books including zootechnical works and studies of the breeds he is qualified to judge. He is co author of the Volpino Italiano standard. He has been a professor at the University of Pisa from 2006 and 2007 in their 148

Best in Show Magazine

course of origins and history of dog breeds. He was chosen for the Doge del Po prize in 2017 awarded for excellence in various disciplines. He has owned Boxers, English Cocker Spaniels and Scottish and Lakeland Terriers. BIS: How did you become involved in writing the updated standard for the Volpino Italiano. A.C.: It was to be rewritten in two languages (English and Italian) because in 2011 the Italian Kennel Club asked the specialized associations of Italian breeds to adapt the standards according to the new scheme presented by the FCI. ATAVI appointed me as coordinator of the internal technical committee, as well as being the only judge specialized in the breed. Once the draft had been adapted, it was first approved by the ATAVI technical committee and then by the ENCI advisory committee of experts (judges) in a meeting at ENCI also in 2011, in which I and the president Fabrizio Bonanno participated representing ATAVI. The approval of the CCE ENCI took place for both the Italian and English versions (the latter sent to the FCI).


In 2013 the FCI standard commission returned to us the new English version in which I found some points reproduced incorrectly, so with ATAVI we corrected the errors and sent the standard once more to the FCI, it is the original version approved by ENCI in 2011. The publication of the new standard in English by the FCI with validation as of January 1, 2016 was done with the correction of the errors mentioned above, but inexplicably other errors appeared much more serious ones because they affect the type of Italian Volpino. By way of example, the coat is described as ‘harsh’ in the recently published standard the correct texture is vitreous, which means with a glassy finish, an entirely different concept. The subsequent translation of the English text into Italian by a translator appointed by the Italian Kennel Club has consequently reproduced the same errors of the English edition upon which it was based. The Italian translator probably tried to remedy the errors, but not being a specialist of the Italian Volpino he misinterpreted some of the information thus there are

new errors in the Italian version. I then listed the errors of the current standard in both languages, which were received by the ATAVI technical committee at the meeting in July 2016 and sent to the Italian Kennel Club for the necessary corrections. To date, however, the corrections have not yet been made, with serious damage to the ethnic description of the Italian Volpino, which can cause serious problems in the future. Fortunately, there is a commented standard which Italian judges can access while we wait for the corrections in the official standard. BIS: How did you determine which part of the former standard needed change? A.C.: The standard was primarily a restructuring of the same technical information already part of the traditional description of the breed, though we did add details where we felt the description was vague. BIS: When Preparing the text, did you have a specific dog in mind as a point of reference? A.C.:No specific dog was in mind because we


maintained the original description prepared by prof. Giuseppe Solaro in 1955. This version, however was inspired by some of the historic champions from the golden age of the breed which was from the 1930’s to the 1950’s. BIS: Which parts do you feel represent essential characteristics of the breed, and which allow for some interpretation by the breeder or judge? A.C.: The standard is complete of all the descriptive details and only those who cannot see a particular in relation to the others can err interpreting it in a subjective and not objective way. The fundamental traits to the essential type logically belong to the head. The typical expression requires above all rounded eyes and ears correctly spaced on the skull which is wider than it is long, all within what should be considered a short head, with a muzzle a little ‘shorter than the skull’. The expression is decisive for distinguishing the Italian Volpino from related breeds. Supreme importance must go to the eyes, in fact, the German Spitz has them as “almond”, while the Japanese Spitz has them as “ginkgo nut” (a middle way between the rounded and the almond shape). BIS: Do you feel there are many dogs that well represent the standard today or do we have some work ahead of us? A.C.: When ATAVI was founded and subsequently recognized in 2010 as a specialized association of the Italian Kennel Club, we provided some indications. (As a judge at four of the annual specials, I made very clear which was the direction of the breed.) So that in a short time the long heads tending to a lack of type disappeared and we began to see various dogs with typical heads, adhering to the original standard. Due to family problems I had been missing from the meetings for the past 150

Best in Show Magazine

two and a half years and at the UMAVI World Meeting in Porto Viro on September 16, 2018 I unfortunately found that the work on the type mentioned above is being lost. I saw a return to many entries with elongated heads with the muzzle longer than the skull. This tendency towards loss of type is quite worrying because it puts at serious risk the future of the breed in terms of adherence to the original standard. I therefore hope that the breeders will realize this and begin to remedy it before the problem spreads too widely and leaves no way out. BIS: Can you tell us in your own words what exactly the standard ought to represent to breeders, judges and owners of the breed? A.C.: The standard (the original one) is the only technical reference point for everyone because it is the objective data that removes the subjectivity of personal opinions that have no value when evaluating stock, especially on the part of the judges. If the breeder and the owners often have personal opinions, the judge should instead use the (original) standard as the only means of comparison.


Best in Show Magazine

351


Dennis Feretti about Volpino Italiano Interviewed by Anne Tureen

BIS: I see you have come to have a look at the Volpini today. D.F.: Yes, I’m here with my daughter since this is her favorite breed, but I am here especially to see the Black Volpini. BIS: Where exactly do the black Volpini come from if they are not a recognized color? D.F.: If you think about it that is the essence of what it means to have a national breed. These dogs have been part of our history and our way of life for centuries. They are supposed to alert the homeowner, or merchant if a stranger is approaching, that gives them just time enough to grab a gun (laughs). So people kept the good guard dogs and bred them but without going to a ring and being judged by anyone. There are plenty of Volpini running around, some that are closer to the standard than others, but there are dogs still doing the same work and still valued by the people for their ability, size and weatherproof coat. I think we can make an analogy. The dogs in the ring are like people speaking school taught Italian, and the dogs on the street are like the dialects. 152

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: Some currents of scientific thought encourage breeders to maintain genetic diversity. Breeders who want to get as close as possible to the standard however would rather try to replicate certain qualities in a predictable way so they would rather create a ‘bloodline’ or a family of related dogs. D.F.: I’m not a breeder , and I don’t work as a scientist, but from over forty years of involvement in these matters I can make an educated guess. I’d say the truth might best be found somewhere in the middle. Clearly, it would be extreme to outcross perhaps to a dog in another country just to find as much genetic variety as possible. However very close breeding is also extreme. The different interpretations of the various breeders guarantees that a variety of specimens will be selected for breeding on the larger scale. No one kennel can hope to represent genetic diversity. Of course extreme genetic diversity can mean the dog no longer belongs to a breed. RsR is an important class, I’m looking forward to seeing the genetic analysis of the black dogs that pass the judge’s exam.


BIS: Will there be a right black and a wrong black? D.F.: All colors have a genetic definition and only one is the correct color for that breed. If you don’t want any surprises in the whelping box, you had better be sure you have the correct color. Most of the dogs here today are white. There are two different genetic types of white, first there is the white background say of the Greyhound, Bull Terrier or Jack Russell Terrier with spots of say liver or black. If those patches are reduced through selection to none, just the white background remains and you have a white dog. The other white color is when you have a red such as in the Cocker Spaniel or Ruby Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and then you select lighter and ligher shades, you get fairly quickly to the golden as in a Labrador, and keep going. Almost white is a champagne color which is admitted in the Volpino Italiano and then you get a milk white which is the correct color, the same as the West Highland or Poodle for example. From a genetic point of view the milk white is correct for a Volpino, but the white from the background of the patch pattern is not. If you see any hint of a patch even very pale, and you see it better when the dog is wet, it means that the dog has been mixed with something genetically incorrect. If you use this dog with a genetically different dog, surprises may emerge in the color of the descendants so you shouldn’t use that dog in breeding the Volpino. However, you may have noticed the standard accepts a very faint ‘biscuit’ color near the ears. When you find that, though it is less desirable than pure white all over, you know you have the genetically correct white for the Volpino, as long as there are no other pale markings anywhere else. The biscuit color sometimes called a pale ‘lemon’ is the exact result of the red being lighter, many red dogs have a darker ear, the Irish Terrier

for example often has that. So the red color of the white Volpino has been diluted all the way down to white but the ear started darker and remains champagne, which we also call biscuit. BIS: Where does the red come from? D.F.: Before coming today I was wondering if I would find that a dog in which the Pomeranian had been used to develop the red variety. However, it is clear that is not the case in the dogs here today. They may not be as showy as the whites, but they are exactly the type of dog that I remember from the 1970’s. They are square in proportions, typical in the shorter muzzle, and a rounded cranium, not a full dome (or God forbid, an apple) and in coat color and texture, they look like the real Volpino Italiano that used to be everywhere. Sooner or later a dog may crop up from some breeder thinking he’s being clever by taking a shortcut to show type by using a Spitz. Then we will see a change in color and also texture. The correct texture of the Volpino coat in the Italian language is ‘sollevato’, which means lifted. It should be full and straight, however not puffy or extremely stand offish definitely not frizzy, textures that can be seen in other Spitz varieties. By the way, the correct Volpino texture is genetically the same coat that used to be seen in the Collie, which according to the standard should still be correct in that breed, but they are getting more and more voluminous. (I would be so relieved to see a correctly coated Collie in the ring) Shortcuts were taken in the recent development of the Cane Corso when people used Boxers or the Mastino Napoletano to quickly get a certain characteristic, then again in the Bolognese they used the Maltese and Poodle to ‘improve’ the breed. The correct red for the Volpino appears different from the red of the Spitz because of selection, but it is genetically the same. It’s the same as the


in through the Spitz or some other black dog, if it is the recessive gene then it came down to us by chance, as amateur breeders bred this dog to that by chance. Today the best example of type among the Black dogs is the bitch who is post-natal so she is out of condition, but she has great type in my opinion. The primitive types are fairly easy to maintain among amateur breeders so it is creditable that a good black Volpino could be found in a family somewhere, good enough to use in the development of this breed.

Ridgeback, Zwergpinscher and many other dogs. Again you have an undesirable trait, the carbon traces in the coat, a full red is preferable, but when you see that carbon, you know you have the genetically correct color! Another telltale sign is that the dog has black whiskers and eyelashes. Now we are coming to the black. I was talking with the breeder who won BOB with the Black Volpino today and she told me she mated the Black winner with a black bitch and also with a white bitch. In the litter from black-black, she got all black puppies. From the Black-White litter she didn’t get a single black puppy. This makes me think we are dealing with a recessive black rather than a dominant black. The DNA test will tell us exactly what we have there. If the black is the dominant allele then it has been brought 154

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: In the famous painting from the 1500’s by Carpaccio, the image of the Volpino is a white one. So the Volpino is generally white? D.F.: Ah ha! The red Volpino used to be the most prevalent color, but the white has a luxurious rare quality that made it the choice of the nobles in old times and of the fashionable set in the 20th century, today it looks stunning in the ring so we have more breeders going with the white Voplino. Red however is the signature color of this breed. I hope breeders don’t start going overboard with the black variety the way they did with the blue French Bulldog. That painting you mentioned is supposed to represent this breed, but don’t forget that ‘breeds’ didn’t exactly exist before the advent of kennel clubs. Any dog was just a sighthound type of dog or a house dog for companionship according to how it looked and above all how well it did a specific job. The Volpino is a rustic dog, close to a ‘normotipo’ or median type. It isn’t so very far from the ‘village dog’, upright ears, weatherproof coat, and not too much of any one quality. If he alerts his master to people coming near then he becomes a valuable animal that is easy to keep, to take on your wagon, and why not, to keep your feet warm at night! This little dog was, and still is so popular among Italians for these reasons.


Best in Show Magazine

355


Faith Whiteley about Volpino Italiano Interviewed by Anne Tureen

BIS: Tell us a little about yourself and how you got to know the Volpino Italiano F.W.: Because the UK Kennel club will not recognize the breed (I believe 82 countries do) I cannot have an official Kennel Name, register my dogs, compete in pedigree shows . I have bred six litters, in all 21 puppies from three bitches and five different males. I have been trying hard to introduce the Italian Volpino to the UK, since 2001 when I imported my first dog, Leo from Roberto Francini. When I realized how rare the breed was (There were, just 500 dogs world -wide), I purchased Nuvola, a bitch in whelp from from Roberto, she had been mated to his Geo, World Champion for several years. My efforts have been hindered by the UK Kennel Club as they refuse to recognize the Italian Volpino as a legitimate breed. This is surprising since Queen Victoria introduced the breed to the UK and used them in the breeding of the modern Pomeranian. She showed and won with her Italian Volpinos at

156

Best in Show Magazine

Crufts and Gena her favorite dog was on her bed when she died. (There are several photos of her in her wheel chair or carriage with her white Volpinos on her lap) The kennel club let the recognition of the breed lapse in 1935. BIS: How do you manage to breed pedigree dogs in a country that does not recognize them? F.W.: My first Volpinos were registered with the Italian kennel Club and all the males I have used subsequently have been registered in their countries Kennel Clubs. In spite of this the UK Kennel club says my dogs are crossbreeds! As I cannot register my puppies I cannot show them, so another strategy has been necessary. I decided to take up Agility with them when I was 69! My dogs are very gifted. With his experienced owner/handler, Lisa Tarry, Gino, achieved Grade 7 in Agility when he was five



BIS: Which aspect/s of the standard do you feel are essential to the breed and which would you allow a bit of interpretation? F.W.: In my mind health is of the utmost importance. My dogs live a sporting life, and if I had patella problems that would be serious. I also want the right muzzle proportions, it must be like a Volpino, which means Fox in English, They need to have the correct Foxy look. BIS: Does such a specific standard make breeding easier or more difficult? F.W.: It is very specific; we have to be careful not to develop too many of the exact same genes in our dogs, that will limit us in the future.

and he is also the first Italian Volpino to do Fly ball, achieving his Second Certificate in Open Classes this year. For the past four years I have competed in Austria, Czechoslovakia and the UK in the UK team for the Para Agility World Cup. In 2016 Dorabella Volpe Bianca came 5th in her second jumping class, gaining 2 points for the UK team, no mean feat with a 76 year old in tow! Fleur Pinot Bianca has competed four times in the UK team, she competes with flair and at speed. BIS: What do you love about this breed? F.W.: They all have lovely temperaments and are delighted to be with children as well as being beautiful, intelligent dogs. I currently have three breeding bitches- five bitches in all, they all compete in agility. The two year old is remarkable, intelligent and fast.

158

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: Which are the principal health issues and how do you manage them? F.W.: We have PLL and Luxating Patella, and my first two dogs were carriers of Pll, though only Nuvola had some trouble with the Patella. Fortunately, I was very lucky in my breeding and since the tests have been developed, I find that I have no more problems with those diseases. BIS: How do structure your breeding program to overcome the narrow genetic base you have to work with? F.W.: I am the only breeder in the UK but I have made considerable efforts to mate my females with beautiful, but unrelated pedigree dogs, so I have used males from Italy, Portugal, Ireland and Denmark and I hope, next time to use a dog from northern Germany. BIS: What care does the Volpino require daily and what grooming is necessary. F.W.: People often comment as we are out walking that my dogs look freshly groomed, but the truth is we never do any of that. I only every


bathe my dogs when they get into something smelly. Their coat has like a tethlon finish and they can get perfectly filthy only to be white as now in an hour’s time. Once I had a big Agility match and I decided to make my Volpino look especially smart so I bathed her and used the blow dryer. Luck would have it that it was pour-

ing rain, then there was soot in the parking lot, and then the match was held in a sandy field. She came out looking awful! I think the prior bathing had taken away that water resistant finish because she didn’t do her self cleaning job as she usually does and I ended up bathing her again. So much for grooming.

Best in Show Magazine

159


Bella Volpino Volpino Italiano by Pia Kristiansen Interviewed by Anne Tureen

BIS: Tell us about yourself and how you first got to know the Volpino Italiano? P.K.: In 2007 I was looking for a small family pet dog, and a colleague of mine showed me a picture of a Volpino on the internet. She was going to get one from from breeder in Sweden, so I had her help get one for me too. I knew absolutely nothing about the breed. I got a male Volpino, who later became the 3rd Volpino in Denmark. I had wanted to try a dogshow, just to see what that was about. Italian judge (don’t remember the name anymore) I went home with a nice judgement, and thought i might try it Again..... So step by step i got more and more in to this “Volpino thing”. I took 2 different dog breeder educations through the Danish Kennel Club and got my Kennel name in 2010. Kennel Bella Volpino. After going to a lot of shows, both international, Club shows and unofficial shows in Denmark, and doing a lot of ring training and Handler courses, I tried to go to a show abroad for the first time in 2010 (Germany... just across

160

Best in Show Magazine

the border, slow start. Now all of Europe was open to me. I could spend 3 weekends every month going to shows all over Europe. Getting a lot of titles, including National Champion Titles and International Champion titles. My first big important show, was the Euro dog show in Geneva in 2013. I only went with 1 Volpino, but she got best junior and Junior European Winner 2013. In 2015 i went to Italy for a show... the World dog show, without any expectations other than meeting the Italian breeders. So I was over the moon for the results I got. My red Male became Italian champion and the White female I entered, got the title UMAVI Champion 2015. (Now in 2018 this title was given to me again, this time it was her daughter, my own homebred girl who won BOS in Porto Viro September 16th.) In 2016 I got the BOB and European Winner in Bruxelles (The junior Winner from 2013). In 2017 the BOB and World Winner 2017 was a Young male breed by me. In 2018 in Amsterdam the BOB and Junior World Winner was my homebred 17 month old boy.


Best in Show Magazine

158


BIS: What do you love about this breed? P.K.: First of all, the temperament. Such a happy dog. Very willing to learn and easy to train! This is important, because they are alarm dogs, but it’s easy to train them not to bark constantly. BIS: Which aspect/s of the standard do you feel are essential to the breed and which would you allow a bit of interpretation? P.K.: The temperament is essential to me, I will not accept aggressive or very shy dogs. An exception could be, if you get a dog from another kennel at adult age, that has not had the same environmental training, as a dog living in a small family. But the you have to put focus on the training of that dog. Black pigmentation, on the nose and eyes is important to me, as I can see that poor pigmentation is passed on to puppies, and this will over time make the pigmentation fade and get weaker. A Little white in the red coat might be ok with me, but only little. I have seen 1 white paw on a mother, then the puppies came out with 3 white legs. So we have to be careful not to use red with too much white, if we want to rebuild the correct red colour. Size is terribly important, but the gene pool is scarce. We see Volpinos that are both too small and too large, but if the proportions are ok – square body, I can accept it, especially if the dog is correct in all other matters and with fabulous coat. Coat – volume and structure has to be correct. And there has to be enough of it đ&#x;˜Š BIS: Does such a specific standard make breeding easier or more difficult? P.K.: With such a rare breed it will always be difficult. Especially if your own demands are very high.

162

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: Which dogs do you think have helped to define the history of this breed? P.K.: I’m so new with only 10 years of breeding. I see some of the best dogs coming from the lines used by Robeto Francini. And them combined with on from Rosanno Oeygangen (combination with male from DELLE SENTINELLE DI CORTE), has given me very nice, close to perfect dogs to work with in my breeding. BIS: Which are the principal health issues and how do you manage them? P.K.: PLL and patella luxation. I DNA test all my dogs for PLL, even if they come from 2 clear parents. I only have clear dogs. I test all my dogs for Patella Luxation when they are 12 months old. I can accept a 0/1 to be used with a 0/0, but no other combinations (of course 0/0 with 0/0).


BIS: Do you feel that judges generally understand what they are looking at in the Volpino ring? P.K.: I have been showing all over Europe, and I have to say NO. I have met many judges for whom my Volpino’s where the first they ever saw. For some it is hard to tell what the difference is between the Japanese Spitz and the Volpino. Or the diffrence between Volpino and Klein/mittle spitz. I have shown very much in Germany, so I can say 5-6 judges now know the Volpino very well there. In Denmark we have good judges who know the breed very well. BIS: Is there something you feel the Volpino club could do to support and promote you breed in a new way? P.K.: That’s hard to say, I think breeders that go to shows all over are the best ambassadors for the breed. Showing and telling people about the breed is the best way to introduce it.

BIS: How do you structure your breeding program to overcome the narrow genetic base you have to work with? P.K.: I use dogs outside of Denmark to mate with. So the gene pool is getting bigger and bigger in Denmark. But in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland I think many breeders use the “dog next door” because it is easier and cheaper. Though they do import new dogs from time to time, I think the same males are used too much. But I can only look at myself and make sure that I do my best to keep looking for new blood.

BIS: What care does the Volpino require daily and what grooming is necessary to present this breed in the ring? P.K.: Clean the eyes every day, so you don’t have bad looking tear stripes and keep the teeth clean. Before a show I wash the dogs in a good shampoo that keeps the coat structured. The coat is easy to keep clean, self rising. So I don’t wash the dogs that much. For example if I have 3 shows in a row, I only wash before the first show. You have to cut the nails and the hair around the paws. BIS: Tell us something about the Volpino temperament. P.K.: The Volpino is a very happy and lovely dog. It builds a very strong bond to it’s owner. They are very eager to work and it’s easy to teach them tricks and different skills Best in Show Magazine

163


Colle degli Ulivi Volpino Italiano by Roberto Francini Interviewed by Anne Tureen

BIS: Tell us about yourself and how you first got to know the Volpino Italiano? R.F.: We saw one walking down the street in our village here in Tuscany and when my eldest daughter overcame a bad influenza we gave her a Volpino puppy to cheer her up, that was Cigno (Swan). Our younger daughter however gave us no peace until she had a Volpino of her own so only a few months later we were looking again, this time we took a little more care finding a new dog, and that was Desy Dell Antica Etruria, who became our foundation bitch. We had no idea what we were getting into at the time! My kennel, Colle degli Ulivi, now has over 24 WDS and EDS titles, and I placed both BOB and BOS at the 100th anniversary Spitz Club show of Switzerland in 2013. I have made history as the first breeder to win groups and BIS with the Volpino Italiano. I also breed and hunt with Weimaraner dogs, and I have had success showing those as well.

164

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: Which aspect/s of the standard do you feel are essential to the breed and which would you allow a bit of interpretation? R.F.: The very first thing to ascertain is that the dog is square. On no account can we consider a rectangular dog as belonging to the breed, no matter what other qualities it may possess. Correct type starts with the proportions. Another essential quality is the proportion of muzzle to cranium. A long muzzle, or a tubular muzzle that is attached to the skull has lost all type in expression. The muzzle must be slightly tapered near the nose yet full and strong, it rapidly widens, with plenty of fill under the eye and a smooth transition into the zygomatic and temporal regions. Coat, of course, is essential. I would be lenient on tail length. The standard states, ‘reaching as near to the neck as possible’ and measuring ‘slightly less than half the length in withers’. If however we are giving priority to a short topline that will give us a square dog (long in back, short in loin) it is quite difficult to get a long tail!


Best in Show Magazine

165


BIS: Does such a specific standard make breeding easier or more difficult? R.F.: This is a very difficult standard to meet. Perhaps people trying to get into this breed need to really have a solid foundation because understanding this standard requires understanding a great deal about construction. BIS: Which are the principal health issues and how do you manage them? R.F.: We have PLL and Patella luxation, and I test all the dogs I use for reproduction. I require these tests if I am looking for a mount.

166

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: How do you structure your breeding program to overcome the narrow genetic base you have to work with? R.F.: I have about 30 dogs here, it’s a game of checkers, not easy, but the outside dogs I can use are so few. I have spent all these years travelling across Europe looking at dogs, trying to find good ones, but there are very few. However, occasionally I am able to make a nearly complete outcross. BIS Which dogs do you think have helped to define the history of this breed? RF When the breed was rising again in the


1980’s there was so much diversity in type. Billy del Antica Etruria was one of the first real definers of type in my opinion, and Desy which we obtained from that kennel was another great example. Geo del Colle degli Ulivi was from that line in our kennel and was 4 times world champion as well as reproducer champion. BIS: Do you feel that judges generally understand what they are looking at in the Volpino ring? R.F.: Unfortunately, I think most judges have limited experience in this breed, Italian judges have the most experience. Fortunately, many of these are also sincerely interested in the breed. When our standard was updated, I received telephone calls from some of the Italian judges who wanted to discuss the changes with me. The fact that they took the time to contact a breeder and listen to thoughts from the point of view of whelping box, so to say, shows true interest in the breed. BIS: Is there something you feel the Volpino club could do to support and promote you breed in a new way? R.F.: I think one of the best thing the Italian breeders can do is to attend shows abroad. I have even suggested we all get in a van together and go! Italian judges have much more experience than others, but if other countries rarely even see a Volpino, how can they develop an eye for the breed? It is up to us to bring our breed to them. Having said that, the Scandinavian countries are right behind the Italian judges, very well qualified.

the coat is a hard one, the abundant guard hairs have a glassy finish, in the sun it appears covered with tiny diamonds. Dirt just brushes right out. A week before shows I wash the dog, the day before I mist the dog with water and then sprinkle them with potato flour and I leave that in all night to absorb oils and in the morning I brush it out. This I daresay is an old-fashioned method, but I don’t like using any chemicals or spray. You have to go very lightly with the scissors, just the feet, anything obviously long, but just a few hairs, because you need to feel the pointed tips when judging the coat. BIS: Tell us something about the Volpino temperament. R.F.: This dog is everything you would not expect from it’s appearance. Rustic, with a lively personality, a real trooper! The breed is meant to alert the arrival of strangers so it ought to show no fear. When the stranger however has been welcomed, the dog is social, capering around and ready for cuddles from everybody. We have a saying about this breed, it is referred to as ‘The joy of life’, and they really are that. When you come home from a hard day, they do their best to lighten you heart.

BIS: What care does the Volpino require daily and what grooming is necessary to present this breed in the ring? R.F.: This is a rustic breed, not at all high maintenance, especially the white variety. You see, Best in Show Magazine

167


Rienon Volpino Italiano by Siiri Seesvaara Interviewed by Anna Tureen

BIS: Firstly, can you please give us some background on yourself? How old were you and how did it all come about? S.M.: My name Svetlana Mironenko, 47 year old and I’m living in Moscow, Russia. I have been living with dogs since my childhood so dogs were always in our family. I had my first show dog when I was 10 and it was Collie, then I have been breeding Shar Peis but 2005 I got my first Pomeranian and since then I fall in love with this breed. BIS: Why did you choose Pomeranians as your own breed? What made you fall in love with them? S.M.: I fall in love with Pomeranians 2005 when I have been visiting Thailand. Friend of mine had beautiful bitch and I immediately decided I want to have girl like she was. After my Princess I knew Pomeranians will be my love forever. And why I fall in love with them... well because they are smart, funny, foxy and showy.

168

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: When was your kennel founded? When did you breed your first litter? And how many litters have you bred so far? S.M.: I had my first littler 2007 and since then I had around 300 litters. BIS: Do you prefer keeping your stud dogs for your own breeding program or do you also give them for outside service? S.M.: I prefer keep my stud dogs with me and my spesial owner of my dogs. I didn’t breed my stud dogs to outside service. My kennel close for another kennel, only for my friends. BIS: What are your thoughts about breeding? Do you prefer inbreeding, linebreeding or outcrossing? S.M.: In my kennel I prefer line breeding, I don’t like to use close inbreeding, and sometimes I use outcrossing, but it’s so difficult in our breed.


Even I don’t have a big team, I do believe in team work. Our Thai Silk team has 5-6 members at dog shows but I do also have a lot of people around world who are owners of Thai Silk dogs and I would say they are members of our team as well. BIS: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the Pomeranians should look like, or is there just one correct type? S.M.: . Standard is standard and it is very important to follow it. It doesn’t metter what is fashionable or popular, we all have to follow standard. It’s keeping our breed safe from many problems we could have in breeding. I believe many people are thinking differently but I am sure breeders like that will never have success in breeding. BIS: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at a Pomeranians? S.M.: . First what I do is check the pedigree, than look to type of dog, his silhouette, movement and dog head. BIS: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? S.M.: I would not tolerate absence of silhouette and dog without movement. BIS: Is the Black Skin Disease common in Pomeranian breeders? S.M.: Maybe some breeder have BSD problem, but it never happened in my breeding. BIS: What is the main difference between AKC and FCI Pomeranian Standard? S.M.: Nothing is really different between this

standards and neither of them say that dog can be dissable. BIS: How do you think the breed has changed over the years? Are the changes positive or negative? How has your own breeding changed? S.M.: Breed is almost changing during the life and I think those changes are positive. I hope my breeding is one of the proofs. This is important thing for me and my breeding. BIS: How important do you think dog shows are for Pomeranian breeders? Do you attend more or less shows as the years go by? S.M.: Dog shows are very important for dogs and for kennels. I would say that show dogs are born to be show dogs. I have a feeling that I am attending more shows each year, even I think from time to time to reduce showing but feelings on shows are pushing me to attend them more each time. BIS: What is the importance of health testing in your breed? Do you do health tests on all the dogs you use for breeding? S.M.: Some tests are really important, but some in my opinion we do not need to do. You easy can see in your kennel who is healthy and who is not. I do test my dogs when I see and feel something can be wrong. BIS: What has been your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? S.M.: There are many things my dogs have accomplished through years such as : World and European Champions, Juniors World and European Champions, Champions of America without any American Handlers, Champions Of Thailand, A lot of Best in Show winners around the world the world.

Best in Show Magazine

169


At the moment I am showing my little girl and she is making me proud winning Best in Shows in countries all over the Europe such as Italy, Belgium, Luxemburg, Russia, and her biggest win in World show -2017 Germany, Leipzig. where she won Best of Breed, Best in Group and she was short cut in the Junior Best in Show as well, and she is only 1 year old. BIS: Please name 3 of your all time favorite winners bred by you and 3 not owned nor bred by you? S.M.: My favourite dogs bred by me are: Thai Silk Unique Perspective, Thai Silk Code of Success, Thai Silk Zone Of Perfect. My favourite dogs not bred or owned by me

170

Best in Show Magazine

are: Chriscendo Conqustador, Unbeaten Premiera, Fon’s First Of June. BIS: Which dog from the past would you like to use for breeding if possible? S.M.: I would use Thai Silk Always and Forever. BIS: What advice would you give to someone passionate who is starting in the breed now? S.M.: Before you buy a dog try to study about the breed and give more attention to pedigree and type of the dog.


Best in Show Magazine

385


Terralea Collins about Volpino Italiano Interviewed by Anna Tureen

BIS: How did you first get to know the Volpino Italiano? Tell us something about you and your kennel and how you got into Volpini. T.C.: Growing up I heard my dad talk about the little white dog he had when he was about 10 in the 1930’s. The dog got Rabies bit him so he had to go through the series of shots. I saw a photo of it but not sure where that photo is. I think my aging aunt has it, she’s 93 so I did talk to her about the dog. They called it a big Spitz/Pom., more of the size of a big 10-pound Pom but it was not a Pom. When they were young they grew up with Italian friends and they didn’t call Volpino’s, Volpino’s at that time. Then as I grew I also grew up with Italians and there were many little red and black and white dogs that ran around our neighborhood. In the 1990’s I decided I wanted a little white scruffy dog but didn’t know what kind. I went to our local dog shelter and all the dogs were big. At the end of the row was a little white and cream spotted dog. They said he was a Volpino/ Pom but they didn’t know what a Volpino was. I took him home and had him for 8 years, he was

172

Best in Show Magazine

6 when I got him. I learned he didn’t have much time to live so I began researching the internet for Volpino breeders in America. There was one person who had a couple litters but the last litter was sick so they didn’t breed any more. I began looking for who is the Champion in Italy. I found out who it was. They didn’t speak English so it took me about 2 years of emailing back and forth until I got 4 Volpino’s from them. 2 males and 2 females, by that time I was living on a ranch in TN (Tennessee) so it was perfect. BIS: What do you love about this breed? T.C.: I love the white color, I love the fact they are so easy to groom, they don’t need baths once a week, just brush them now and then. They are a healthy breed don’t get sick easily. Loyal and very loving, small so they sit on my lap. I can take them on the airplane. Most of all they are a watch dogs. We lived on a ranch and they were my alarm if someone was driving up.


BIS: Which aspect/s of the standard do you feel are essential to the breed and which would you allow a bit of interpretation? T.C.: I’m not quite sure what you mean by this. A Volpino has a Standard size and requirement, every litter we have had has met those requirements. I think a few breeders in Italy has mixed some other breeds into them because the noses are showing a lot of pink now and noses are getting pug like short, in Italy, not sure what to call it but too short which is not healthy. Eyes are required to be round not slanted but

because some are round, it causes eyes to tear. One with a little slant barely noticed does not tear. So, I guess one might say the color of the nose and shape of the eyes are important to me. Italy wants long tails, I think that makes a Volpino look more like an American Eskimo but it doesn’t matter. I look at the fur and stance, legs. I’m very happy they are bringing back the red and black and cream colors. People in America actually love the colors more than white.

Best in Show Magazine

173


BIS: Does such a specific standard make breeding easier or more difficult? T.C.: I find it very easy to meet the Standard requirements. I have had about 150 puppies and they are all with in the Standard. I have seen about 3 different sizes though. Our smallest was Elizabetta, born 1 ounce normal is 3 ounces but we have had some born as much as 6 ounces, when born. So there becomes 3 sizes when fully grown but all within the standard. 33cn or less in height. I like to breed a smaller male with a larger female, that is my preference to keep size Standard. The Geo blood line was bigger. I have a new female now that has Geo 4th GGF she is a little bigger than what I like but within the Standard. None of my other blood lines are like that. So this new blood line will be beautiful with my Pelu’ from Italy. BIS: Which are the principal health issues and how do you manage them? T.C.: I have never had any health issues other than to be sure to clean their teeth. As long as they are fed properly, no junk food from China, home made treats not store bought like, carrot, broccoli, sweet potato, yam, peas, string beans. Those are good treats, not bully sticks, or greenies etc…. Blood test once a year check for autoimmune or any other thing that could be wrong. BIS: How do you structure your breeding program to overcome the narrow genetic base you have to work with? T.C.: I started with 4 blood lines. Then others bought Volpino’s from Italy, I bought a male from them when they had puppies, then bred them to my second or third generation. I used a calculator system from Australia. Never breeding Father to Daughter or Mother to Son. Only cousins, or Aunt to nephew or uncle to niece.

174

Best in Show Magazine

Then 2 years ago, I bought a 5th Volpino from Italy a totally different blood line. So, we used 12 original different blood lines that came from Italy but they were all related to the original Genzianella Italian Volpino’s 3 to 6 generations back into the 60’s. BIS: Do you feel that judges generally understand what they are looking at in the Volpino ring? T.C.: First, we can only Register and show with the UKC because of what the breeders have done with the American Eskimo the AKC will not recognize Volpino’s but they do admit they have Volpino mixed into the American Eskimo, politics too, we don’t have any money, AKC wants money. So No, not in America the judges are confused not knowing the history of the Volpino vs the American Eskimo. American Eskimo Breeders went to Italy bought Volpino’s then brought them back to America, changed their name to American Eskimo then began mixing them into the Standard American Eskimo breed to make them smaller. When they saw they didn’t look so pretty anymore and they didn’t resemble a Standard American Eskimo, they had their own look the big breeders stopped. It made them a little smaller called a Mini. Then, after a time they bought more Volpino couples, brought them back to America changed their name to American Eskimo and said, their Standard American Eskimo’s had runts and they began calling them Toy and Mini Eskis. So now in the ring the Toy and Mini do not win over a Standard American Eskimo. But we found that when one of our Volpino’s showed against a Toy or Mini Volpino it would always win as the Judges did some homework asked questions, call into headquarters and learned about Volpino’s. The Eski show people are not nice at all, very jealous.


BIS: Is there something you feel the Volpino club could do to support and promote you breed in a new way? T.C.: We do our best to have Reunions once a year, we have our website, promote on Facebook and Instagram. No one shows anymore, I’m too old and disabled. If AKC would allow Volpino’s in then I think it would go crazy as this breed is healthier than an Eski’s and so much more beautiful. BIS: What care does the Volpino require daily and what grooming is necessary to present this breed in the ring? T.C.: Food and water, lots of love daily. Brush maybe once a week but I keep a brush next to where I sit so everytime one jumps on my lap, I brush it, bathe only when dirty. Never brush the undercoat out, never shave them. They don’t smell and there is something in the fur that allows dirt to fall off. I may bath them each week a few weeks before a show then again night before show. Never use that white spray to make them look white, it’s bad for their eyes and breathing. Italians say bathing is bad for their skin but I have not found that to be.

BIS: Which dogs do you think have helped to define the history of this breed? T.C.: The Volpino’s in the 60’s is very difficult to recreate, In the past we see old paintings that show the true look of the Volpino, which is a little different from today. It’s a beginning and it’s OK, a lot of work has to be done when starting over. Then when Geo dell Colle Degli Ulivi, started showing, he set the Standard look that I personally wanted. I never got one of his puppies but after rescuing 8 Volpino’s they were Geo’s great-grand-children. Other kennels, had eye problems and sparse of fur to leggy or too short of legs, too big of ears. As for which Volpino helped define the breed History, I feel the old Italian master paintings have defined the breed. They prove how far back Volpino heritage goes compared to American Eskimo, German Spitz, Japanese Spitz and the Greek Melitan. as they migrated north.

BIS: Tell us something about the Volpino temperament. T.C.: They are a watch dog. They have very good hearing and smell which also makes them good hunters, so they will hear a voice approaching and let you know by barking. They never bark for no reason, only if they hear something or someone/animal approaching. They are giddy happy loving dogs for all ages. Super smart but head strong if they fear something is near, you won’t be able to stop them from barking unless you pick them up.

Best in Show Magazine

175


Mosjons Volpino Italiano by Suzanne Lindskog Interviewed by Anna Tureen BIS: Tell us a little about yourself and how you got to know the Volpino Italiano S.L.: Our kenel name is Mosjöns Kennel, we live in Sweden, near Gothenburg We got our first Volpino Italiano in 2002. At the moment we have 6 Volpino, 3 white Kleinspitz and a German Hunting terrier. We travel a lot with our dogs, in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Europe, it’s the best way to meet new people and new breeders. Our absolutely best memory is when we got the World Winner Trophy BOS (for our breed) in Austria, Salzburg 2012 with our beautiful male Gastone Del Collle Degli Ulivi, he also got the Europen Dog Show trophy in 2011 in the Netherlands, Leuverden. In 2013 we got another European Dog Show trophy with our male Lapo Del Colle Degli Ulivi, that was in Switzerland. We have 2 very nice females from Gastone and 1 one from Lapo and she (Mosjöns Majken) got Junior World Winner trophy in Germany, Leipzig 2017. This year in the Netherlands, Amsterdam we went Best of Breed Puppy with a grand daughter (Mosjöns Olivi) out of Gastone – and our own Mosöns Jiennie. We also have 3 white Kleinspitz, they are a little bit smaller than the Volpino, we have only had one litter from them so far. BIS: What do you love about this breed? S.L.: They are always happy, kind, nice to each other and to other dogs. It’s an easy dog to have. I love that smile they have – happy face.

176

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: Which aspect/s of the standard do you feel are essential to the breed and which would you allow a bit of interpretation? S.L.: I think it’s important to be careful of the size and the coat then also good proportions, good movement, and good pigmentation. BIS: Which are the principal health issues and how do you manage them? S.L.: In Sweden we are very aware of health and make a lot of veterinary checks such as DNA-test, checks on the eyes and patella. We even have the privilege to make a mental test for the disposition called BPH specially designed for smaller dogs BIS: How do you structure your breeding program to overcome the narrow genetic base you have to work with? S.L.: To get beautiful Volpinos we have imported some very good dogs from Italy and we are thankful for their trust and their faith that we will breed Volpinos to the Italian standard. In Sweden it’s difficult to get new blood so we have to import new male now and then to our own females. BIS: What care does the Volpino require daily and what grooming is necessary. S.L.: I think the teeth need the most work, to maintain good teeth I brush them 3 times a week also I brush the coat at least once a week, cut nails and look over the dogs. A walk every day and free run in the woods once a week is good both for me and the dogs.


Best in Show Magazine


UMAVI WORLD CUP Volpino Italiano Written by Anna Tureen

The Volpino Italiano is represented in it’s country of origin by the breed club ATAVI (Associazione Technica Amatori Volpino Italiano). This same group opened an even larger umbrella in September 2011 called the UMAVI (Unione mondiale Associazioni Volpino Italiano) to include sister clubs from other nations which promote the breed. On the 15th and 16th of Settember UMAVI held a two day event in Porto Viro, Venice consisting in a day of breed conferences followed by the third competition for the UMAVI world cup. This event is considered by the entire Volpino community to be of historical importance since it is the first official event with an RSR category for the black variety of Volpino. Roger 178

Best in Show Magazine

Barenne was invited from France to judge all classes and Antonio Crepaldi, author of the most recent breed standard, was assigned to handle the delicate task of sorting the RSR exhibits.

The President Fabrizio Bonanno Mr. Bonanno starded out as a breeder of Reisenschnauzer about 50 years ago. He qualified as a judge of defence and utility work. He and his wife began to work with Bolognese along the way, and then turned their attention to the red variety of Volpino.


BIS: ATAVI was founded quite recently, just over 10 years ago, where was the Volpino before the existence of a breed club? F.B.: We were part of a club along with the Bolognese, the Maltese, but ENCI broke up the club for technical reasons linked to the statutes. Twelve of us got together and decided to see if we could gather all the necessary technical requirements to establish our own club, and we managed to do that! BIS: How does UMAVI work? F.B.: There are 17 associated countries, though not all of them have a Volpino club, In some countries a representative is assigned from a larger club which represents the Volpino along with other Spitz type breeds. Each of the foreign nation representatives is a junior president, and the Italian representative which is the breed’s native country is the President. We do not ask anyone to pay dues or contribute financially, but the country hosting the Umavi cup pays for the show. Our world cup in an honorary title which we decided to introduce to our breed specialty, though FCI CAC are also awarded today. Our cup represents a great deal among Volpino breeders. It is not only the dog who is deemed the best representative of the day, it is also a symbol of quality breeding since all member associations adhere to our list of practices such a PLA testing. Our objective is both health and beauty. BIS Since the Volpino Italiano is such a rare breed, especially abroad, it must have been difficult to find a judge ou felt qualified to judge your world cup specialty. FB Naturally the decision was addressed by all of the 17 representatives, but since the show was being held in Italy this year, the final choice was left to me. Since an Italian judge had been chosen both at the shows in Poland and the WDS where the cup was awarded in 2015, I felt the time had come to call in another nation. I had presented one of my own dogs to Mr. Barenne in a French show. It was the first time he had the opportunity to judge a Vol-

pino and I was impressed by his care and precision. He judged Volpino’s at a later show, and we felt he did a good job so we felt we could trust him today. BIS: You have Mr. Crepaldi judging the RSR class in today’s show… F.B.: Yes, these are extremely delicate points. The Volpino white is not exactly white, it is milk white. The red coat is not at all an orange like the Spitz, it is a richer red Rosso Cervo in Italian (Deer red). The balck color which exists among amateur breeders in Italy is helpful genetically in maintaining the red because they are actually carriers. A red Volpino mated with a Black will produce some red pups and some black, the same way it works with the Groenendael breed. Our club had an interview with the Central Technical Committee of ENCI which gave us the green light to construct a project with the Scientific Committee. That project starts today, we have our first official ‘viewing’ of the black Volpino. We filled out cards for each dog with comments concerning type, and these will be passed on to the Scientific Department of ENCI where the DNA of these dogs will be assessed. We will begin a database with the results and if one of these dogs comes to a future specialty the judge can award a Certificate of Type conformation. That dog would then become the foundation of a new line, and after three generations they can apply for a pedigree. Both the White and Red varieties have gone through similar processes since this breed had all but disappeared from the kennel club.

The Judge Roger Barenne Mr Barenne is an all around judge, and a breeder of the German Spitz. He was president of theFrench, German and Italian Spitz clubs from 1992 to 2007.

Best in Show Magazine

179


BIS: What was the quality like today? R.B.: In general the quality was very high, I found beautiful dogs today that were in good type, and well constructed. Open male was inferior to intermediate male. All around there was good dentition, Only one dog was missing teeth (incisors), that unfortunately is a disqualifying fault. The coats were very good, excellent colors, some were not as long as I would like, but understandable in this season. A few dogs today had a timid personality, I saw some fear. BIS: Is timidness a severe fault in the Volpino? R.B.: It is a question of socialization, and well being, dogs cannot be kept at home in the kennel all day then brought out just for the show. BIS: How were the eyes? R.B.: Just a few had eyes that were too big, but many had trouble with the tear ducts. This is a problem in many breeds. There are operations that can 180

Best in Show Magazine

help but sooner or later the problem returns even after that, so you simply need to select the dogs with good eye construction for breeding. I would not breed from a dog who had tear duct trouble, you are just going to continue getting that for generations, and there is really no remedy. BIS: Where do we find the best Volpini today in your opinion? R.B.: In Italy, definitely, however the northern countries, Denmark today is a good example, are also strong. BIS: How did you select your winners today? R.B.: The Female was love at first sight. She had a beautiful head with a stunning expression. The male however carried the day with BOB due to his brilliance in movement around the ring. He had great distinction and that air of bravado that stole the show


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


De Villaodon Samoyeds Carmen Navarro & Rafael Garcia Interviewd by Milla Kanninen

Q: Firstly can You give us some background on yourself? When and how did You start to breed the Samoyeds? How old were you and how did it all come about? A: We got our first Sammy in 1986, although when I was only 12 years old in 1970 and saw a Samoyed for the first time at Circo de Gredos natural park, I hugged him and told my father: “Daddy, when I grow up, I want to have one of these dogs” (Rafael). Q: What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you bred your first litter? A: Our kennel name “De Villaodon” comes from the name of the town where we lived in 1987 when we applied for the kennel name from the F.C.I., which is called Villaviciosa de Odón, situated in Madrid, and our first litters under this kennel name were born during the second part of the 1980s. We started with the breed during mid 1980s and we can say that ever since we started, we have placed our future goals in different time scales, understanding that achieving some of them will take much more time than others. We have tried to improve our initial lines trying to pursue and obtain Samoyeds with correct type, good health, balanced temperament, noticeable “glamour”, good show attitude and good movers with correct wide moves. 184

Best in Show Magazine

Q: Where did your original stock came from? From where/whom did you obtain your first dog/s ? A: We started with various dogs we got from Jesús Garcibravo and Fernando Sánchez, whose dogs basically come from English lines from Snowland and Fairvilla kennels. Also during our beginning, we bought some females in Spain from Antonio Choya, whose dogs came from Novaskaya lines. This means that we started with completely English bloodlines, but although we saw that they all had nice heads, a lovely coat and were nice dogs in general, we were aware since the very beginning that we were missing something and we wanted to improve specifically their movement and their attitude in the ring, and we started to realize that in order to improve that we needed to work on improving their structure and aim for more height in legs and more correct angulations. Q: What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels have joint ownerships or rent dogs in or from other kennels? Or do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? A: Sometimes we cooperate with some breeders from USA, Canada and Europe, and we might exchange some good reproducers, but basically we have based our breeding plan in the selection of our females and then try to find the correct stud


Best in Show Magazine


dogs for them that we think can help us to improve and achieve our goals in the breed. We would like to point out that at the moment all the females that live with us are between sixth and eighth generation of our breeding on their dam’s side. Q: Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? A: Multi Champion & Multi BIS & BISS Bogart de Villaodon “Bogart” (1990-2003) was an essential and fundamental dog in our breeding plan in all aspects. His temperament and specially his show attitude was unique and very special. We can proudly say without doubt, that almost all Sammys bred by us since then that live in our home, and a huge majority of the Champions we have bred, proudly have Bogart somewhere in their pedigree. Q: What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross? A: In our breeding we use basically linebreeding, working with some consanguinity, with some dogs in common in second or third generations, although we have also done inbreeding sometimes when we have tried to emphasize some very desirable qualities in our dogs, trying to strengthen the genetic heritage of the dogs of our kennel. In some occasions, we have also used outbreeding to refresh our bloodlines, adding a stud without any close relatives in common (in three or four generations), trying to add some qualities our bloodlines lack. Out of these litters, we then try to select the puppies that show those qualities on top of the typical characteristics of our dogs, and add them to our breeding plan. Q: What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? A: We must say there are many of them and all are so important for us. For example, we would like to point out that in 1993, our Multi Ch & Multi BIS & BISS Bogart de Villaodon “Bogart” won the Purina Trophy for the Best Dog of the Year of All Breeds in Spain, apart from 186

Best in Show Magazine


being the only dog by the date that has won Best in Show at the Nordic Breeds and Akita Club Specialty Show in Spain twice. We would also like to point out that dogs of our breeding have won by the date over 300 official Champion titles in over 60 different countries, and we keep on working and putting all our love, effort and hard work in order to grow these numbers even more. Q: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the Samoyed should look like, or is there just one correct type? A: The standard has only been written in one way, but we humans make it possible to be interpreted in so many different ways, and for us this is part of “the magic� of breeding and what makes that the breed lives and constantly evolves. For us all criteria is valid, as long as we maintain and respect the basic qualities of functionality and type of our breed. Q: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at Samoyed? A: We aim for Samoyeds with balanced structure, and work specially on the correct height of legs and correct movement, two things we consider that are essential and basic for any functional dog. Q: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? A: Bad temperaments, dogs with incorrect length of legs, bad pigmentation, light or round eyes and incorrect texture in coat. Q: Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? What is the difference in AKC and FCI Standards? A: If we compare the Standards of the FCI and AKC, we can hardly find any differences worth mentioning, for us at the moment in this globalized and well communicated world that we are lucky to live in, the big difference is in the Standard of the Kennel Club of England, in reference to the size. The FCI Standard states that the perfect height of a Samoyed is 57 cm, and allows 3 cm more or less, while the KC Standard states that a male should be between 50 Best in Show Magazine

187


and 56 cm. So in England a male of 50 cm would fit the Standard, while in Europe, America and Canada he would be way below the desired height in our Standard, and the same applies to females. Q: How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say we have involved for the good or for the worst? A: Of course the breed has changed during the years, you just have to look at photos of the dogs from past decades and the beginning of 1900s and compare them to our present dogs to see the change, we believe that all breeds and alive and in constant evolution, and depending of the moment that evolution can be for either better or worse, depending on the periods that we compare. 188

Best in Show Magazine

Q: Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Samoyed? A: The most important is a balanced type, with a lovely expression of a typical Samoyed and balanced in all aspects. Q: In order of importance how would you lineup movement, head, coat, substance and type? A: TYPE, movement, head, coat, substance, but overall balance between all of these five points. Q: Please name 3 your all time favourite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. A: OURS: Multi.Ch. Bogart de Villaodon “BOGART”, Multi-Ch. De Villaodon Beefeater “IKER” and MultiCh. De Villaodon Aston Martin “ASTON”.


OTHERS: Ch. Kiskas Karaholme Cherokee “PAINTER” , Ch. Ice Way´s Ice Breaker “BREAKER” and Ch. White Magic´s Rock Star “JASPER”.

sult of hundreds of hours of studying genetics and pedigrees, and investigating temperament, health, structure and movement.

Q: What bred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? A: Multi Ch. De Villaodon Aston Martin “ASTON”.

Q: What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? A: LOTS OF INFORMATION, LOTS OF ILLUSION AND LOTS OF PATIENCE!

Q: What would you say is the secrete to continued success? A. All the dogs (males and females) that we have incorporated into our breeding plan, have been first studied and then minutely selected thinking of the following: genetic health, type and structure, always in this order. Each puppy born at our home is a reBest in Show Magazine

189


Samspring Samoyeds Dariia Chorna da Silva and Pedro Silva Interviewd by Milla Kanninen

Q: Firstly can you give us some background on yourself? When and how did you start to breed the Samoyeds? How old were you and how did it all come about? A: My first litter was born in May 2007. It was a very important moment for me, as I made the litter of my dreams with the two most expected dogs of my life Midas (Roybridge King Midas) and Cilla (Zamoyski Lucky Priscilla). They gave to me 5 gorgeous puppies and I kept one at my home. Her name is Arti (Samspring Artemis). Q: How did it start and why the Samoyed? A: Once I was walking down the street and saw a white dog that I liked a lot. I was searching everywhere to find out which breed it was and I found that is was a Samoyed. I fell in love with beauty of this breed and began my research to find the right dog for myself. In 1997, my first Samoyed entered in my life and since that time we have always been together. I was 24 years old, still young and ambitious. White was the name of my first boy. He was just a part of my family and I didn’t know nothing yet about dog shows. My true adventure with shows began with Midas. He was real showman. He made me fall in love with this style of life and until now I keep enjoying it.

190

Best in Show Magazine

Q: What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter? A: My kennel name Samspring has a very simple story. When I was thinking about how to name my kennel I had also another dog, an English Springer Spaniel, which came from a very famous American kennel. I was thinking to work with these two breeds, so I just put names of breeds together: “Sam” – Samoyed and “Spring” – Springer. This is how we got our kennel name Samspring. Later I decided just to keep Samoyeds as they are closer to my heart. I don’t do many litters as all our dogs we have at home are part of our family and only the special puppies stay at home with us. We love to spend time with all our dogs and give enough of attention to each of them. Since May 2007, I have had 20 litters, which is two litters per year approximately. Q: Where did your original stock came from? From where/whom did you obtain your first dog/s ? A: My first dogs, which were foundation of my kennel, came from two very strong and old English kennels that had dogs holding records in the breed, such as Roybridge and Zamoyski. I started to work with the English type of Samoyeds. I was very happy with result I have gotten. Few years later, I


Best in Show Magazine


wanted to do something different and was searching for another type of dog which I could use with lines I have had already at home. When I found Val (Cabaka’s Valiant of Gucci), he was just the opposite to all the dogs I used to have, but he was a brilliant addition, and gave to me in combination with my English dogs very interesting results. He came from the Danish kennel Cabaka and in his pedigree he has very strong line of famous Canadian kennel Vanderbilt. Together with him I brought Ulli (Cabaka’s Miss Ulli of Playhard), which has similar pedigree and type of course. Those dogs helped me to build something very special. Something what I name now Samspring. Q: What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels have joint ownerships or rent dogs in or from other kennels? Or do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? A: As I have a small kennel and can’t use only my dogs, I’m happy to work together with other breeders and kennels. I think it’s a key of success when we can share the result of our breeding with each other and work together to improve our breed. For my stud males, I accept only females that have an interesting pedigree for me and I think together they can produce something nice. Q: Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? A: As I work together with two different lines (English and American type), I can consider two dogs as the foundation of my breeding. Cilla, which helped me to bring old English type in my lines, and Val, as I used him with all my girls and I kept for my future breeding puppies for myself and in co-ownership. Q: What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross? A: I prefer to work with inbreeding as I like the results more. Of course it can not be a constant choice as sometimes we need to put “a drop“of fresh blood to change the things we want to improve in our breeding.

192

Best in Show Magazine


Q: What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? A: I would say my greatest achievement as a breeder is to be proud of the dogs I have bred, to be happy when I look at them and I like what I see as they look close to what the ideal Samoyed should look like for me. This is the most important thing. If we speak about shows, I have many champions of different countries all around the world, and many International Champions. These dogs live either in my house or with my puppy owners. I have been awarded prizes for Top Puppy, Top Junior of the year all breeds, Top dog of group 5 during many many years in my country. I’m not the type of breeder who only cares about dogs that are bred by myself. Every dog at our house has the same rights. We are happy to work with and show every one of them. Q: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the Samoyed should look like, or is there just one correct type? A: The standard gives us a basic idea of how the Samoyed should look like, but each person has his own view and priorities. That is why we have in our breed so many types and I think this is fine. I always give a lot of importance to the head of a dog. A Samoyed must have its typical smile as it is a “visit card” of the breed. With my own preferences, I have tried to build my own type of Samoyed, with a beautiful movement, body, coat, head. Q: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at Samoyed? A: Very simple for me: first is head, movement - second, body - third. These 3 qualities make my perfect Samoyed. Q: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? A: If a Samoyed doesn’t smile, I do not accept it. Too light eyes, not good texture of coat, tiny bone, too soft pasterns and paws (with open fingers), aggressive and shy temperament are things I do not tolerate at all. Best in Show Magazine

193


Q: Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? What is the difference in AKC and FCI Standards? A: I would say that there is a huge difference in type between the dogs from the USA and England. In some cases, they even look like two different breeds. The difference is just in everything: body structure, head and expression, type of movement, coat, temperament. With European dogs, I can’t say that, as nowadays we have already very mixed pedigrees with American lines here in Europe. Anyway, even within Europe we have a lot of different types, which make dogs look very different. In their standards, the AKC and the FCI are not so different. Just in the size of females. In the FCI standard, females are 50 - 56 cm, while in the AKC 194

Best in Show Magazine

standard they are smaller, 19-21 inches (48 -53 cm). Also, the FCI standard speaks more about faults. Q: How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say we have involved for the good or for the worst? A: I think Samoyeds have changed a lot over the years like any other breed. This is a normal process as a lot of factors are involved, political as one of the most important. Good or worse? I would say both. We can see some very interesting examples of the breed as a result of the good work of some breeders, but also wrong types with serious problems due to the modifications.


Q: What bred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? A: Any dog is a perfect dog. And from the dogs I bred I can’t choose one to say it’s closest to my ideal! As I’m a very critical person and always demand for better results, usually I’m less satisfied than I probably should be. As to the type of dog I’m searching for now, I can say I’m very happy to see my young generation as they have many qualities I want to keep, but still something to work with. For example, Samspring Washington Is the most beautiful male in type I have bred. His head is to die for. These eyes and smile just make you look at him and admire. Samspring Carry on My Secret with Joy probably is the best balanced and moving bitch I have got from my latest breedings. She is the bitch which you want to enter in ring all time as she is pure joy to work with! Samspring Toffee Crispy is beautiful in type. Her head and attitude is what makes me love to work with these lines more and more.

Q: Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Samoyed? A: An ideal Samoyed to me has a beautiful smiling head with sweet expression, small ears and a short muzzle. A very proud top line and well-developed body. Strong bone, feet and paws. A beautiful coat, which shows the shape of a dog and well-coated legs. Moving proudly with drive and good reach. Q: In order of importance how would you lineup movement, head, coat, substance and type? A: Type, head, movement, substance, coat Q: Please name 3 your all time favourite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. A: Samspring Sir Lancelot ( Quest), Samspring Carry on My Secret with Joy ( Joy) and Samspring Toffee Crispy ( Toffee). Zamoyski Lucky Casanova at Roybridge, Rexann’s Ringmaster, Pilgrimage Snow Ball.

Q: What would you say is the secret to continued success? A: Hard work is a key to success! Sitting and dreaming about something big will never make it come true! You need to be a fair person first of all and not blind. You need to know what you want and work on it without changing your direction all the time like a wind. And don’t follow the “fashion” as it’s changing all the time. Q: What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? A: Oh, it’s difficult to give advices to new people in the breed as everything comes with experience. Each person will go through different experiences to find out what they want. You always need to be smart and never follow the results of dog shows to understand what is the “right Samoyed”, as results sometimes depend on the judges and politics, you will never find your truth there. You need to find the type you like and follow your instincts! If you are right or wrong time will show and your experience will always help you to choose the way.

Best in Show Magazine

195


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Snowball Samoyeds Kristiine Uspenski Interviewd by Milla Kanninen

BIS: Firstly can You give us some background on yourself? When and how did You start to breed the Samoyeds? How old were you and how did it all come about? K.U.: As long as I know, I have always been surrounded by the animals. Dealing with them has attracted me since I was very young. Even though we lived in the city, we always had some animals – guinea pig, hamster, dogs. When I was 13 I started horse riding, mainly show jumping. I was actively involved with horses for 13 years, 7 years of it as a coach for children and horse trainer. At one point, I realized that riding actively and competing with the horses is not so easy when you have family and only have free time for riding on Sundays – this was not enough for me. Life without animals seems impossible for me. In 2002, I got my first purebred dog – a 2 years old French bulldog. Such a great breed! In 2005, I saw cute and irresistible Samoyed puppy and the emotional decision was made – we will have a Samoyed in our family! We had great success since our first puppy shows and my interest for the dog show world and breeding was growing daily. I decided to register my own kennel Smiling Snowball in 2006 and then it all started! Today I am Estonian Kennel Union judge for all breeds from 5th and 8th groups. Continuing as dog show judge was a natural “next step” for me, as the interest of seeing dogs closer also inside the ring was just growing bigger and bigger. 200

Best in Show Magazine

BIS: What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you breed your first litter? K.U.: We still consider our kennel pretty young. Within 10 years of breeding, we have had 23 litters, all together 111 puppies. Our first litter was born in 2008. The story about the kennel name is not so original – it came from my first Samoyed´s name. BIS: Where did your original stock came from? From where/whom did you obtain your first dog/s ? K.U.: My first ever Samoyed came to us on 2005 from Estonia, it all started because of her. Despite of being a fantastic show dog, she also proved herself as a wonderful brood bitch. Then in 2006 and 2007, I imported 2 male dogs from Slovakia and Canada. Where as the first Samoyed puppy was more as unplanned and emotional, the 2 next dogs were the results of thorough searching and going through the pedigrees, seeing the available photos and videos. Those 3 dogs are the starting points of my kennel and also today I can say I have been very lucky to be able to start breeding exactly with these dogs. My first Samoyed is from Estonian kennel Pilgrimage and she is just the world’s best for me. When I was looking for the males, my intention was to find from the Canada (Vanderbilt’s) a great mover and from Slovakia (Yoshi And Us) the beautiful smiling expression. My wishes were fulfilled for 100%. The starting position was perfect for me!


Best in Show Magazine

195


BIS: What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels have joint ownerships or rent dogs in or from other kennels? Or do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? K.U.: How my kennel would work was clear to me quite quickly. I knew I would never want to keep a big kennel at home. I have one rule, as I like to walk my dogs in the forest and fields – I can have as many dogs as I can fit to my car – maximum 5 adult dogs! I keep 1-2 female puppies almost from every litter, but I place them in families keeping the breeding rights. It’s a good option to keep the kennel running and not to keep all the dogs for yourself. If they grow up as I like, the health tests are OK and I decide to use the female in my breeding, she comes to me to have puppies and raise the litter. I’ve been fortunate to meet great people in my life to co-operate in my breeding and share the dogs! BIS: Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? K.U.: Pilgrimage Snow Ball “Yeti”, my first “emotional buy” was the reason why I am the breeder today and she is the base of my breeding. BIS: What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross? K.U.: Linebreeding and outcross. BIS: What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? K.U.: I think this question is expecting an answer of the greatest show results. I like go to the shows and being successful. I am so happy and proud when my breeding is awarded the best results - who wouldn’t like that? It’s a wonderful feeling to get the best results from the big shows, but more important and heartwarming for me is when I hear that Smiling Snowball Samoyeds can be recognized by their similar type and they are so easy and intelligent to live with every day. I really hope I can be proud also in future about those things.

202

Best in Show Magazine


BIS: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the Samoyed should look like, or is there just one correct type? K.U.: Like in all breeds, also samoyeds have different types in the breed. I think it comes down to how you interpret the standard. I’ve noticed that the type a kennel breeds, with the positive and less positive features, is usually similar to their base female. I started the breeding from an excellent breed specimen and I feel, on one hand, that I had an advantageous situation, and on the other hand, a complicated situation – it has been a hard job to breed better dog than my base female. Different types are not a problem for me as long as they fit into standard. It’s a pity when breeders think about more of the dog being effective and not fit to function. When breeding, you should follow more the standard and make your choices according to that. BIS: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at Samoyed? K.U.: Type, movement, expression. And for the fourth I would certainly add the – character/temperament. BIS: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? K.U.: The movement not recognizable for this breed, wrong expression and proportions. BIS: Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? What is the difference in AKC and FCI Standards? K.U.: Samoyeds have 3 standards – UK, AKC and FCI. When you compare those standards – you get the impression of pretty much the same dog, which is normal. But when you see the dogs in different countries, the impression is not “of the same dog”. Samoyeds corresponding to FCI standard for me are the most balanced and less forced to some direction – it doesn’t highlight proud but not the typical movement for the breed, or the typical head and sweet expression and huge coat. If I have to choose which standard is the easiest to interpret and readable for me – it would be the US standard. Best in Show Magazine

203


American dogs are quite different of European dogs even though the standards are not so different. Very often there is mentioned great movement of American type dogs. I don’t know if it has changed in recently, or do I understand Samoyed movement differently. Surely you can’t make generalizations, but what I have mainly seen is too flashy, erratic movement that doesn’t seem durable. The height measurements are the same in US and FCI standards, but you often see very high dogs is US, huge bones, long hocks, unbalanced angulations and unbalanced not durable movement. Sometimes they remind me more of American Akitas than of Arctic Spitz. Also, often their expressions are different from “smiling expression”. At the same time, European samoyeds are quite often with too light bones, short steps with no reach and drive and too much coat which also makes the use of the breed complicated. I’ve visited Australia and it was interesting to see their dogs. They use the UK standard there. I saw many beautiful dogs, whose type is similar to European Samoyeds, but they have more substance, excellent fronts, balanced angulation, and a typical ground covering and correct neck position move204

Best in Show Magazine

ment. I also saw some dogs being too heavy and too low on legs. BIS: How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say we have involved for the good or for the worst? K.U.: I’d say the quality has not been improving lately. In last years, I have found it almost impossible to find a males with “new blood”. When I started, I was looking for an excellent breed specimen with super temperament and health results. Today, I would be happy to find a correct healthy dog with good health tests and temperament. Why the quality of the dogs has been going down? I think there are many reasons and we would need much another magazine to write it all down. All breeds suffer these times when their general quality declines, but they will be followed by better times for sure. I think long time breeders are experiencing this also in their breeding job – there are times you have to think more of the so called pedigree matings, so you can later do the linebreedings to keep the type. But I think a reason for the decline in quality is that people are using the same popular dogs for their breeding. They are getting popular because of the


great handling and preparations, but the substance of the dog might not be so good comparing the dog who has never been showed and never being used, because he is not popular. I would like to find those “best home dogs” to see and use them. BIS: Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Samoyed? K.U.: Substance, beautiful silhouette that comes from being compact, the right proportions, beautiful arches (proud neck and beautifully curled tail) and balanced angulation. The expression of the Samoyed has to be smiling, but not too sweet. To give me the ideal expression, every detail (the head, ears, stop, eyes, muzzle) has to be of the right size and in the right place. Dark eyes and black pigmentations is must. As to their construction, it is every breeder’s dream to have the excellent width and angulated front and rear. I don’t look for the exaggerated angulation but balanced, moderate angulation in our breed. The body has to be strong but not too heavy, for sure not too long. Straight legs covered with dense coat, strong wrists. The coat should have a dense undercoat covered with slightly longer top coat. Their movement should be parallel, from the side ground covering with long front steps and powerful rear movement (back legs should move equally under the body and stretching out). The head should be almost level with the topline. Why this type of movement? The breed should move effectively and be durable also for long distances. Any small deviation will make the movement less effective and durable for long distance. The temperament should be normally active, motivated, balanced and self confident. BIS: In order of importance how would you lineup movement, head, coat, substance and type? K.U.: First is type, second is movement and head (I can’t say, which is more important), third is substance and last one is coat.

VWW15, Multi Winner, Multi CH, 10X Speciality Winner, Crufts winner 08 +BOG 2, Multi BIS winner PILGRIMAGE SNOW BALL And now the answer: CIB, Multi winner, WW16 Smiling Snowball Moon Walk; CH, CIB, EuW16, WW17 Smiling Snowball Luminous Phobos and CIB WW13 Smiling Snowball I´m Your Illusion Not bred by me: Finnish dogs Tuulian Vuononvaltias and Vogas Arancione, Australian dog Kalaska Aussie Idol BIS: What bred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? K.U.: It’s a very hard question. As we know the ideal dog is not bred yet. There are some different ideal qualities in different dogs. I would mention CIB, WW16 Smiling Snowball Moon Walk, one of my homebred dogs, who is an excellent specimen of the breed with his stronger and weaker sides. BIS: What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? K.U.: Luck, dedication, self-criticism and teamwork are the words for success. For the new people in breed, I would advise them all to find the mentor who has been in this breed for longer time, has long time experience in breeding and excellent show results in different countries. That’s it! Finding this kind of person, the beginner with the “dog-eye” will reach their desired results quicker, and the person with less “dog-eye” will find the right way quicker, because you can avoid many many mistakes. “Dogeye” – what does it mean? My explanation – it’s something some people are born with, that makes you able to see proportions, paying attention to the details and to feel the balance.

BIS: Please name 3 your all time favourite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. K.U.: As the question is set up the way that I can’t name the only one absolute favorite, then I will just mention her here to begin with: CIB, WW08, Best in Show Magazine

205


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Vanderbilt Samoyeds Judi Elford Interviewd by Milla Kanninen

BIS: Firstly can You give us some background on yourself? When and how did You start to breed the Samoyeds? How old were you and how did it all come about? J.E.: I obtained my first Samoyed in 1977 when I was still a teenager. He became a group winning Champion and CDX obedience title holder. I was attracted to the Samoyed from a World chart of dog breeds I saw in our family’s encyclodedia. So while that picture told me nothing of the character or other traits of the Sammy, it stood out to me as the most beautiful of them all. Luckily for me the breed was mostly quite healthy, as well as being of charming temperament suited for children, seniors and everyone in between seeking a loyal and loving pet.

BIS: Where did your original stock came from? From where/whom did you obtain your first dog/s ? J.E.: Our first dogs came from a couple of sources first the Canadian Shebaska kennel (Frank & Helga Gruber) and were down from the old English Snowland as well as American Oakwood Farms (Joan Lueck) lines. We also purchased a bitch from a Canadian breeder Bert Pye who descended primarily from English Kobe lines. Later we were to import genes from the American Wolf River kennel, as well as beginning to work with other US kennels such as Polar Mist, White Magic and Echo. Our main alliance now however is with the Danish Cabaka kennel and we actively work back and forth with the Canadian, American and Danish lines we have developed.

BIS: What is the story behind your kennel and your kennel name? How many litters have you had so far? When did you bred your first litter? J.E.: No one really starts out planning a kennel I don’t think but it happens over time as your involvement deepens. My husband Blair and I jumped in head first and immediately began doing everything possible with our Samoyeds – conformation, obedience, sledding, tracking, etc. We started breeding Samoyeds about 8 or 9 years after getting our first 2 dogs. I’m not sure of the exact number of litters but we have been actively breeding since the mid 80’s.

BIS: What is your breeding policy? Do you work with other kennels have joint ownerships or rent dogs in or from other kennels? Or do you prefer to have your stud dogs for yourself? J.E.: We work closely with a few kennels and with these the dogs can go back and forth to help in all of our breedings. I do have quite a few of my own stud dogs but still regularly breed to outside outstanding males when I find them. I judge internationally so get a great view of the breed that way, as well as traveling to attend, compete and/or observe major shows like WDS, Crufts, etc.

208

Best in Show Magazine


BIS: Which dog do you consider the foundation of your own breeding? J.E.: The most important one behind our foundation is probably the bitch CH Wolf River’s Vanderbilt Mesa, “Mesa” has given us fantastic quality. Another bitch CAN CH Shebaska’s Vanderbilt Kipmetna, “Chloe” added a distinct flavour to our ‘look’ in combination with the Wolf River. Though we have added many other dogs and lines since those original girls, we still see the type from the original cross of those lines which produced dogs such as Multi BIS CAN AM CH Vanderbilt’s Secretariat, “Ajax” and CAN AM CH Vanderbilt’s Neon Nightingale, “Neon”. BIS: What kind of selection do you prefer in your breeding program linebreeding, inbreeding or outcross? J.E.: In so much as it is even possible to outcross in a breed descended from 13 individuals I do it – but mostly I linebreed loosely and based on phenotype, and what I know about the producing ability of the ancestors. I occasionally do a tight linebreeding, and extremely rarely an inbreeding. Succcessful breeding requires an ‘instinct’ in a way. Not just copy cat breeding of what other kennels are doing. BIS: What would you say was your greatest achievement as a breeder so far? J.E.: That may be a question for history to answer. I try to breed standard sized dogs with eye arresting breed type, exceptional movement and strong temperament. I sell a lot of really beautiful puppies as cherished family pets as I mostly limit access to my breeding to those that I trust, however the Vanderbilt dogs are in the pedigrees of many kennels world wide now. BIS: How do you interpret the standard? Do you accept that other breeders have different point of views as to what the Samoyed should look like, or is there just one correct type? J.E.: I definitely accept that other breeders have different points of view, and I like to study our breederjudges at major shows to see where their emphasis lies, and looking at their own breeding as well of course. Many of our top breeders are not judges,

and I love to learn from them where I can. All genetic traits occur in a range on a bell curve. There is a range of acceptable breed type of course. There are also many extremes. In Samoyeds we see many including the Pomeranian, Chow Chow, and Wolf types. Of course none of these are correct Samoyed type. The standard is actually pretty clear. A few of the more important points are: 55% leg length, just off square proportions, more bone than expected in a dog of this size, and of course the “Sammy Smile”. BIS: What three qualities do you think are the most important when you look at Samoyed? J.E.: In no particular order: 55% leg length, just off square proportions, more bone than expected in a dog of this size, and of course the “Sammy Smile”. But let’s not forget the typical happy Sammy temperament. The smile can draw you in, but the temperament will keep you there! BIS: Which faults would you not tolerate in your breed? J.E.: Bad (aggressive, too hyper or too shy) temperament. Untypical dogs – incorrect flat, long or droopy coats, collie heads, light bone, extreme tail sets, unsound movement to name a few. Unfortunately these things are still seen in abundance globally. Best in Show Magazine

209


BIS: Would you say there is a difference in dogs and dog type in Europe and USA? What is the difference in AKC and FCI Standards? J.E.: Top winning dogs in Europe can generally do great in the USA and Canada (and vice versa) which speaks well to many breeders efforts at producing global breed type – however there are remarkably different types found within Europe itself. There are differences in the various breed standards for the breed globally, and to discuss them would be a full article in and of itself. One major difference is the FCI calling for a limit on the amount of biscuit coloration, whilst other standards wholeheartedly embrace the colour with no limitation on the amount. BIS: How has the breed changed over the years? Would you say we have involved for the good or for the worst? J.E.: The breed has definitely improved. Health and temperament in general are much better, and thanks to some remarkable breeders worldwide who stay strict to the standard (and are gifted in its interpretation) and are willing to travel the world to combine the best dogs, the type and soundness is exceptional in some areas. BIS: Can you, in your own words describe an ideal Samoyed? J.E.: A medium sized Spitz dog, with just off square proportions, 55% leg length, more bone than expected, well angulated, strong neck, good legs, hare feet, very sound endurance trotter movement, Sammy smile, friendly but conservative temperament, standoff double coat of white, cream or biscuit in an eye-arresting package! Some say that the Samoyed is the breed that “carries the spirit of Christmas in their face and heart the whole year through”. There are many more fine details but I think that can suffice as a summary! BIS: In order of importance how would you lineup movement, head, coat, substance and type? J.E.: Type is a combination of the other points, including movement. I personally cannot abide a poor

210

Best in Show Magazine


moving Samoyed and place great emphasis upon it in my breeding and judging, but the dog must grab me from a static perspective as well – fitting into that outline in my mind, tail balancing neck, with a gorgeous head, correct dark, oblique almond shaped eyes. BIS: Please name 3 your all time favourite winners bred by you and 3 not owner nor bred by you. J.E.: Bred by me: CH Vanderbilt’s Break The Seal, “Fizz”, CH Vanderbilt’s Warpaint, “Heero”, CH Vanderbilt’s Playin’ It Cool, “Fonzie”. Not bred by me: AM CH Winterfrost’s Gyrfalcon, AM CH Wolf River’s Terra, AM DK CH Cabaka’s Gabe Of Rock Star BIS: What bred dog of yours comes closest to your ideal? J.E.: Probably AM CAN GCH Vanderbilt’s Top Gun, “Maverick”. He had huge appeal and was a very big winner while he was being shown. BIS: What advice would you give to a new person in the breed? J.E.: Don’t collect “kennel names” and think you can become a famous breeder this way. Yes you need the right pedigrees but you also need the brains of the people that engineered them in order to know how to combine them correctly. So often I see people who do not develop a relationship with the right breeders, and think that they can resell their pedigrees as “brands”. This can work a little bit but for long standing success you need the right dogs AND the right mentor. Package deal. Otherwise it will take you much longer and you will always be a B or C breeder – not an A. Developing your breeders ‘instinct’ is best done at the knee of a master breeder. Do not betray these breeders!! For if you do you will find yourself cut off from the supply of the best genes. Honesty and loyalty is very important.

Best in Show Magazine

211


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine


Best in Show Magazine




GROUP

W I N N E R S GROUP 1 SHALOVLIVAJA IGRUSHKA HARISON FORD SHIPPERKE

OWNED BY MCLACHLAN LINDSEY JUDGED BY HORST KLIEBENSTEIN (DE)

GROUP 2 ATLANTIC EUROPICA VARIETAS RUSSKIY TCHIORNY TERRIER

OWNED BY BOCSKORAS PAVOL JUDGED BY MILE ALESOSKI (MK)

GROUP 3 ZICAN’S HAVE TO HAVE MUDCAKE AMERICAN STAFFORDSHIRE TERRIER

OWNED BY FRANCESCA SCORZA (I) JUDGED BY NOREEN HARRIS (AU)

GROUP 4 BARTHA VOM HOUSE YOKO DACHSHUND MINIATURE SMOOTH

OWNED BY PÁLOCSKA HENRIETT JUDGED BY NIKSA LEMO (HR)



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 5 SHOWLINE MELIN’S EMILIA CARESS SILK THAI RIDGEBACK

OWNED BY ROGOZINA ALEXANDRA & MELNIKOVA SOFIA JUDGED BY HIROSHI KAMISATO (JP)

GROUP 6 BLUMINGSDAIL WORLDS FINEST COMIC DALMATIAN

OWNED BY DEVIC NENAD JUDGED BY FOZAN BELKIS (TR)

GROUP 7 IRISH SHERRY DO TO ME IRISH RED SETTER

OWNED BY AINARA OTEGUI JUDGED BY EDD BIVIN (US)

GROUP 8 VERY VIGIE LATE NIGHT SHOW AMERICAN COCKER SPANIEL

OWNED BY ALLEVAMENTO DEIGINI JUDGED BY VARTIAINEN SANNA



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 9 SHUTTLE DELL’ALBERICO LHASA APSO

OWNED BY STEFANO PAOLANTONI JUDGED BY SYLVIE DESSERNE (FR)

GROUP 10 ADIXATZ MY FUTURE SOUNDS LIKE A FAIRY TALE MAGYAR AGAR

OWNED BY FOURTICQ FLORENT JUDGED BY JOAO VASCO POCAS (PT)

BEST IN SHOW W I N N E R ATLANTIC EUROPICA VARIETAS RUSSKIY TCHIORNY TERRIER

OWNED BY BOCSKORAS PAVOL JUDGED BY SUE E BOWNDS (AU)



162



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 1 SHALOVLIVAJA IGRUSHKA HARISON FORD SHIPPERKE

OWNED BY MCLACHLAN LINDSEY & JOANNE JUDGED BY VOJISLAV AL-DAGHISTANI (RS)

GROUP 2 URSINUS VELUTUS ZESTY GUY NEWFOUNDLAND

OWNED BY BARTUS ZOLTAN & OTON FANTUR JUDGED BY NIKŠA LEMO (HR)

GROUP 3 EDBRIOS UNITED COLORS KERRY BLUE TERRIER

OWNED BY AGEEVA LARISA JUDGED BY SUZANA VERSTOVŠEK (HR)

GROUP 4 LUDWIG VAN B.DU REVE SIX COEURS

DACHSHUND STANDARD LONG HAIRED

OWNED BY HARDY RENZE JUDGED BY HORST KLIEBENSTEIN (DE)



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 5 KING OF EGYPT DE LOS PERROS DE BIGO CHOW CHOW

OWNED BY VIGO NAVAJON NURIA JUDGED BY NEDIM ŠUTA (BA)

GROUP 6 BLACK MAJESTY’S ROLLERCOASTER DEL LAGO DEGLI ORSI PETIT BASSET GRIFFON VENDEEN

OWNED BY RAIC IVA JUDGED BY SUE E BOWNDS (AU)

GROUP 7 NEVER SAY NEVER SIRIUS NOVA WEIMARANER

OWNED BY LUKESOVA LUCIE JUDGED BY SYLVIE DESSERNE (FR)

GROUP 8 VERY VIGIE LATE NIGHT SHOW AMERICAN COCKER SPANIEL

OWNED BY VARTIAINEN SANNA JUDGED BY HIROSHI KAMISATO (JP)



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 9 A LA PROHIBIDA DE MALKANORAH

CHIHUAHUA LONG COATED

OWNED BY SANTIAGO PIER JOSE LUIS JUDGED BY OZAN BELKIS (TR)

GROUP 10 CELIAN CELTIC ALANDA IRISH WOLFHOUND

OWNED BY AMLING ASTRID JUDGED BY CRISTIAN STEFANESCU (RO)

BEST IN SHOW W I N N E R KING OF EGYPT DE LOS PERROS DE BIGO CHOW CHOW

OWNED BY VIGO NAVAJON NURIA JUDGED BY EDD BIVIN (US)



162



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 1 DOUX OF ICE WINE WHITE SWISS SHEPHERD

OWNED BY MAGYAR KATALIN JUDGED BY CRISTIAN STEFANESCU (RO)

GROUP 2 URSINUS VELUTUS ZESTY GUY NEWFOUNDLAND

OWNED BY BARTUS ZOLTAN & OTON FANTUR JUDGED BY SYLVIE DESSERNE (FR)

GROUP 3 CRAGSMOOR GOOD FELLOW SKYE TERRIER

OWNED BY KITTI CARINA JUDGED BY SUE E BOWNDS (AU)

GROUP 4 AIN’T MISBEHAVIN’ VOM SCHWARENBERG

DACHSHUND STANDARD MINIATURE WIRE

OWNED BY PHILIPPA JORDAN SCHLOSSER ATTILA JUDGED BY NEDIM ŠUTA (BIH)



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 5 ESTAVA RAIN REBEL HEART AMERICAN AKITA

OWNED BY GOROZHANKINA ELENA JUDGED BY EDD BIVIN (US)

GROUP 6 SPONTANICZNA WHISKI PRZYJAZNE GENY PETIT BASSET GRIFFON VENDEEN

OWNED BY ZADERENKO TATIANA JUDGED BY VOJISLAV AL-DAGHISTANI (RS)

GROUP 7 BRACCORIONS JUNO WHAT BRACCO ITALIANO, WHITE-ORANGE O WNED BY PEARSON STUART

JUDGED BY NOREEN HARRIS (AU)

GROUP 8 GALLINAGOS CAUSE NOTHING COMPARES ENGLISH COCKER SPANIEL

OWNED BY PILJEVIC DUSKO JUDGED BY MILE ALEKSOSKI (MK)



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 9 APLAUSE FOR DIAMELLA WHITEMANTRA BICHON FRISE

OWNED BY GIERKENA INGRIDA JUDGED BY SUZANA VERSTOVÅ EK (HR)

GROUP 10 LILAC WIND MOGADIR - TO CELTIC ALANDA DEERHOUND

OWNED BY AMLING ASTRID JUDGED BY HIROSHI KAMISATO (JP)

BEST IN SHOW W I N N E R DOUX OF ICE WINE WHITE SWISS SHEPHERD

OWNED BY MAGYAR KATALIN JUDGED BY HORST KLIEBENSTEIN (DE)



162



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 1 SHALOVLIVAJA IGRUSHKA HARISON FORD SHIPPERKE

OWNED BY MCLACHLAN LINDSEY & JOANNE JUDGED BY SUE E BOWNDS (AU)

GROUP 2 CASA ALTO CRISTELO STORM GUARDIANI WINDSOR BULLMASTIFF

OWNED BY SILVA RICARDO JUDGED BY JOAO VASCO POCAS (PT)

GROUP 3 ALZBETA BATHORY BLACK ROSE STAFF

STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER

OWNED BY SOROKO EKATERINA JUDGED BY SYLVIE DESSERNE (FR)

GROUP 4 ENERGY ELEGANCE PACKARD DACHSHUND MINIATURE WIRE HAIRED

OWNED BY JORDAN PHILIPPA JUDGED BY SUZANA VERSTOVÅ EK (HR)



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 5 CONFETTI PREMIERA POLAND POMERANIAN

OWNED BY MIRONENKO SVETLANA JUDGED BY NOREEN HARRIS (AU)

GROUP 6 BLACK MAJESTY SECRET OF LEGOLAND PETIT BASSET GRIFFON VENDEEN

OWNED BY ZADERENKO TATIANA JUDGED BY HORST KLIEBENSTEIN

GROUP 7 FAIRRAY GIVE ME FIVE ENGLISH SETTER

OWNED BY PÁLOCSKA HENRIETT JUDGED BY CRISTIAN STEFANESCU (RO)

GROUP 8 VERY VIGIE LATE NIGHT SHOW AMERICAN COCKER SPANIEL

OWNED BY VARTIAINEN SANNA JUDGED BY OZAN BELKIS (TR)



GROUP W I N N E R S GROUP 9 A LA PROHIBIDA DE MALKANORAH

CHIHUAHUA LONG COATED

OWNED BY SANTIAGO PIER JOSE LUIS JUDGED BY EDD BIVIN (US)

GROUP 10 FONEZEL NEOBYKNOVENNAYA KARINA BORZOI

OWNED BY GRISANTI IRENE JUDGED BY NIKÅ A LEMO (HR)

BEST IN SHOW W I N N E R A LA PROHIBIDA DE MALKANORAH

CHIHUAHUA LONG COATED

OWNED BY SANTIAGO PIER JOSE LUIS JUDGED BY HIROSHI KAMISATO (JP)



Supreme BIS Baby & Puppy J U D G E D B Y S Y LV I E D E S S E R N E ( F R )

CANMOY`S BOSTON CELEBRATION BOSTON TERRIER OWNED BY ORGUSAAR KLARISSA


Supreme Junior Best in Show J U D G E D B Y C R I S T I A N S T E FA N E S C U ( R O )

SANPARTI´S COCKTAIL VIGIE PLEASE AMERICAN COCKER SPANIEL OWNED BY VARTIAINEN SANNA


Supreme Veteran Best in Show J U D G E D B Y VO J I S L A V A L - D A G H I S T A N I ( R S )

DALMINO VOODOO VISION DALMATIAN OWNED BY HALPER DRAZIC ZELJKA


Supreme Best in Show

J U D G E D B Y P AU L S T A N T O N ( S E )

ATLANTIC EUROPICA VARIETAS BLACK RUSSIAN TERRIER OWNED BY BOCSKORAS PAVOL